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Sample records for concrete slab track

  1. Fatigue of concrete beams and slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, Jeffrey Raphael

    Traditionally, simply supported concrete beam (SSB) fatigue results have been used to characterize the fatigue resistance of fully supported concrete slabs (FSS). SSB concrete fatigue tests have been assumed to be equivalent to the fatigue resistance of concrete slabs in the field. The effect specimen size, boundary conditions, and loading configurations have on the fatigue of concrete beams and slabs have not been considered in the design of concrete pavements against fatigue. A laboratory study was undertaken to determine if the fatigue behavior of FSS and SSB were similar. A fully supported beam (FSB) was also tested under repeated loading, since it represented an intermediate specimen size and testing configuration between SSB and FSS. The best way to present fatigue results for all specimens was a stress ratio (S) to number of cycles to failure (N) curve (S-N curve). SSB fatigue behavior was similar to results obtained from the literature. FSB had similar fatigue behavior to SSB. The fatigue curve derived from repeated loading of FSS was 30 percent higher than the SSB fatigue curve. This suggested for a given number of cycles to failure, FSS could take a 30 percent higher bending stress as compared to SSB and FSB. The concrete modulus of rupture from a FSS test configuration was 30 percent greater than the concrete modulus of rupture from a SSB test setup. If the concrete modulus of rupture from a FSS test configuration was used in the slab's stress ratio, the slab's fatigue curve was the same as the SSB and FSB. This meant concrete behaved the same under fatigue loading, irrespective of specimen size and test configuration, as long as the correct concrete modulus of rupture was used in the stress ratio. Strain gages, attached to all specimens tested, indicated cracking in concrete occurred in a narrow band. Regions of high plastic strain were found in the plane of cracking, while adjacent areas experienced decreases in strain levels with cracking. Strain

  2. Vibration characteristics of floating slab track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chen-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yi

    2008-11-01

    Coupled equilibrium equations of suspended wheels and floating slab track system were solved with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to obtain the deflections, vibration velocities, and wheel-rail contact forces. The program was validated through several aspects. Cases with various vehicle speed, slab mass, and stiffness of slab bearing were analyzed to reveal the effects of slab bearing on track responses. The correlation between wheel-rail resonance and train speed was also discussed. It was found that rail deflections increase significantly as train speed increases. Although large slab mass may lower tuning frequency, it could also result in higher wheel-rail contact force and rail deflections. The floating slab track is effective in isolating loading above 10 Hz, which might present in some railway sections with irregularities. Adopting floating slab track for vibration control for environment along the railway may cause concerns about ride quality and track damages.

  3. 31. VIEW OF CONCRETE SLAB AT WEST ENTRANCE OF WALKWAY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF CONCRETE SLAB AT WEST ENTRANCE OF WALKWAY. '1944 JOE LANDETA' SCRATCHED INTO FRESH CONCRETE. March 1987 - Verde River Sheep Bridge, Spanning Verde River (Tonto National Forest), Cave Creek, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. DETAIL OF NORTH GUARDRAIL AND EXPANSION JOINT IN CONCRETE SLAB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF NORTH GUARDRAIL AND EXPANSION JOINT IN CONCRETE SLAB, SHOWING DAMAGED SECTION OF GUARDRAIL AND ALUMINUM REPLACEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Hassayampa Bridge, Spanning Hassayampa River at old U.S. Highway 80, Arlington, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEASTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEASTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS AT LEFT AND RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. 12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEASTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEASTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. 13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHWESTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHWESTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 9. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  14. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT FAR CENTER RIGHT. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  16. 12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 8. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, ACCESS RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, ACCESS RAMP IN FOREGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  18. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Quality of Slab Track Construction - Track Alignment Design and Track Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šestáková, Janka

    2015-05-01

    The slab track superstructure design (without ballast) is a perspective construction especially for building tunnels and bridges in the modernized sections of railway tracks in Slovakia. Monitoring of the structure described in this article is focused on the transition areas between standard structure with ballast and slab track construction.

  20. 49. VIEW OF WOOD FRAME STUCCO STRUCTURES ON CONCRETE SLABS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. VIEW OF WOOD FRAME STUCCO STRUCTURES ON CONCRETE SLABS, REPUTED HOUSES FOR PROSTITUTES, LOOKING NORTH. NOTICE SIMILAR RUIN IN BACKGROUND RIGHT. THREE OR FOUR SIMILAR RUINS ALONG RIVER ROAD NORTH OF MINE WORKINGS. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  1. 18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH BLOCKS AND PULLEYS OVERHEAD LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  2. 8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER DRAINAGE AREA IN THE DISTANCE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. DETAIL OF STEEL PLATE SET INTO THE CONCRETE SLAB OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF STEEL PLATE SET INTO THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE NORTH END OF THE ABOVE-GROUND PORTION. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE SOUTH END OF THE ABOVE-GROUND PORTION. NOTE STEP DOWN TO THE STEEL PLATE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. 6. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, CONNECTING TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, CONNECTING TUNNEL VISIBLE AT CENTER RIGHT AND FAR RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE WESTERN EDGE, ACCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE WESTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS AT LEFT AND RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. Monitoring fatigue life in concrete bridge deck slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhook, J.; Limaye, V.

    2007-04-01

    Concrete bridge deck slabs are the most common form of bridge deck construction in short and medium span bridge structures in North America. Understanding and monitoring the condition of these bridge decks is an important component of a bridge management strategy. Progressive deterioration due to fatigue occurs in concrete decks due to the large number of cycles of heavy wheels loads and normally manifests itself as the progressive growth of cracks in the top and underside of the deck slab. While some laboratory fatigue testing programs have been reported in the literature, there is very little information on proposed techniques to monitor this phenomenon. This paper discusses the issue of how fatigue monitoring may be included as part of a structural health monitoring system for bridges. The paper draws upon previously published experimental results to identify the main characteristics of fatigue damage and structural response for concrete bridge deck slabs. Several means of monitoring this response are then evaluated and monitoring methods are proposed. A specific field structure monitoring program is used to illustrate the application of the concept. The cases study examines several sensor systems and discusses the various limitations and needs in this area. The results are of interest to both the general area of structural health monitoring as well as fatigue monitoring specifically.

  8. Analytical and experimental study of sleeper SAT S 312 in slab track Sateba system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guigou-Carter, C.; Villot, M.; Guillerme, B.; Petit, C.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a simple prediction tool based on a two-dimensional model is developed for a slab track system composed of two rails with rail pads, sleepers with sleeper pads, and a concrete base slab. The track and the slab are considered as infinite beams with bending stiffness, loss factor and mass per unit length. The track system is represented by its impedance per unit length of track and the ground by its line input impedance calculated using a two-dimensional elastic half-space ground model based on the wave approach. Damping of each track component is modelled as hysteretic damping and is taken into account by using a complex stiffness. The unsprung mass of the vehicle is considered as a concentrated mass at the excitation point on the rail head. The effect of the dynamic stiffness of the sleeper pads on the vibration isolation is studied in detail, the vibration isolation provided by the track system being quantified by an insertion gain in dB per one-third octave band. The second part of this paper presents an experimental test rig used to measure the dynamic stiffness of the sleeper pads on a full width section of the track (two rails). The experimental set-up is submitted to vertical as well as horizontal static loads (via hydraulic jacks) and an electrodynamic shaker is used for dynamic excitation of the system. The determination of the dynamic stiffness of the sleeper pads is based on the approach called the "direct method". The limitations of the experimental set-up are discussed. The measurement results for one type of sleeper pad are presented.

  9. Degradation and mechanism of the mechanics and durability of reinforced concrete slab in a marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng-xing; Liu, Guan-guo; Bian, Han-bing; Lv, Wei-bo; Jiang, Jian-hua

    2016-04-01

    An experimental research was conducted to determine the corrosion and bearing capacity of a reinforced concrete (RC) slab at different ages in a marine environment. Results show that the development of corrosion-induced cracks on a slab in a marine environment can be divided into three stages according to crack morphology at the bottom of the slab. In the first stage, cracks appear. In the second stage, cracks develop from the edges to the middle of the slab. In the third stage, longitudinal and transverse corrosion-induced cracks coexist. The corrosion ratio of reinforcements nonlinearly increases with the age, and the relationship between the corrosion ratio of the reinforcements and the corrosion-induced crack width of the concrete is established. The flexural capacity of the corroded RC slab nonlinearly decreases with the age, and the model for the bearing capacity factor of the corroded RC slab is established. The mid-span deflection of the corroded RC slab that corresponds to the yield of the reinforcements linearly increases with the increase in corrosion ratio. Finally, the mechanisms of corrosion morphology and the degradation of the mechanical properties of an RC slab in a marine environment are discussed on the basis of the basic theories of steel corrosion in concrete and concrete structure design.

  10. Investigation of compressive membrane action in ultra high performance concrete slab strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Bradley Wade

    Reinforced concrete slabs are found in very common structural systems in both civilian and military applications. The boundary conditions that support the slab play an important role in the response to a particular load. Specifically, the amount of lateral and rotational restraint dictates how a slab responds to a particular load. Compressive membrane (i.e., in-plane) forces are present in slabs when the boundaries are sufficiently stiff, therefore restricting the slab from both lateral translations and rotations. Advancements have been made to account for the additional capacity due to compressive membrane forces in conventional strength concrete. In today's world, concrete performance is improving because of increasing compressive strengths and additional ductility present in concrete members. As a result of this current improvement, there is an urgent need to investigate compressive membrane theory in ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) slabs to better understand their behavior. Existing compressive membrane theory should be revisited to determine if current theory is applicable, or if it is not, what modifications should be made. This study will provide insight into the validity of existing theory that is currently used to predict the ultimate capacity in conventional-strength concrete slabs and attempt to modify the existing equations to account for high-strength concrete materials. A matrix of 14 normal-strength concrete (NSC) and 13 UHPC slabs was tested both statically and dynamically to better understand the behavior of each material set and the effects that boundary conditions have on slab response. The results from these experiments were then compared to response calculations made from existing theory as well as finite element analyses. Valuable data sets on rigidly restrained UHPC slab response were obtained through an experimental research program. The experiments helped to validate the associated numerical analysis that was performed. It was

  11. Analysis and design of on-grade reinforced concrete track support structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, F. G.; Williams, R. D.; Greening, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    For the improvement of rail service, the Department of Transportation, Federal Rail Administration, is sponsoring a test track on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway. The test track will contain nine separate rail support structures, including one conventional section for control and three reinforced concrete structures on grade, one slab and two beam sections. The analysis and design of these latter structures was accomplished by means of the finite element method, NASTRAN, and is presented.

  12. NORTH SIDE FACING TRACK, SHOWING ELECTRICAL BOX AND CONCRETE VAULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH SIDE FACING TRACK, SHOWING ELECTRICAL BOX AND CONCRETE VAULT - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Electrical Distribution Station, South side of Sled Track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF CRACK AND STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF RC SLAB IN STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE GIRDER UNDER NEGATIVE BENDING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Junichi; Nakajima, Akinori; Suzuki, Yasuo

    The sophisticated numerical analysis method is required to simulate the strain behavior of the reinforcement and the crack width of the RC slab, although many researches are conducted on the cracking behavior of the RC slab in the composite girder under the negative bending. In this paper, the numerical analysis method is constructed to evaluate the strain behavior of the reinforcement and the crack width of the RC slab in the steel-concrete composite girder subjected to the negative bending. The analysis method using the rigid body spring model takes into account the imperfect composite action between the steel girder and the RC slab, the bond between the reinforcement and the concrete, and the shrinkage of the concrete. As a result, it is confirmed that the analysis method can simulate the crack and the strain behavior of RC slab quantitatively in the steel-concrete composite girder under the negative bending.

  14. Influence of slab thickness on responses of concrete walls under fire

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.L.D.; Ahmed, G.N. )

    1991-01-01

    Of considerable concern in safety assessments of high-temperature nuclear reactors and of tall buildings is the ability to determine the concrete response, and, in turn, its structural integrity after exposure, to a severe thermal environment. Under hostile environmental conditions, the concrete structure could be exposed to extremely high temperatures. The induced gradients of temperature, pressure, and moisture content in concrete provoke internal stresses that may cause microcracks, macrocracks, and explosive spalling of concrete. Thus the integrity of concrete may be questionable, and the prediction of coupled heat and mass transport in concrete under high temperature (fire, for instance) is becoming more and more important. For the purpose of fire safety, concrete walls with different thicknesses exposed to the fire course described by ASTM E119 and the following decay stage specified in ISO 834 standard are considered. A mathematical model, simulating the coupled heat and mass transfer in concrete walls under time-dependent boundary conditions, has been developed and numerically solved. The results predict the pore pressure, temperature, and moisture histories for different concrete wall thicknesses at various depth thickness ratios. The results show that, under fire, thinner slabs are more vulnerable to damages and ruptures than thicker ones.

  15. Numerical Modelling of Reinforced Concrete Slabs under Blast Loads of Close-in Detonations Using the Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, M.; Daoud, O.

    2015-07-01

    This paper includes an investigation for the deformations, including deflections and damage modes, which occur in reinforced concrete (RC) slabs when subjected to blast loads of explosions. The slab considered for the investigation is a one-way square RC slab with the dimensions of 1000 x 1000 x 40 mm, fixed supported at two opposite sides. It was subjected to close-in detonations of three different charge weights for a constant standoff distance. For the study, the slab was analysed using the numerical method by means of nonlinear finite element analysis. The slab was modelled as 3-D structural continuum using LS-DYNA software. For concrete modelling, two constitutive models were selected, namely the KCC and Winfrith concrete models. Blast loads were applied to the slab through the Lagrangian approach, and the blast command available in the software, namely LOAD_BLAST_ENHANCED, was selected for the application. The deflections and damage modes results obtained were compared to those from a previously published experiment. From the study, both the KCC and Winfrith concrete models effectively and satisfactorily estimated the actual slab maximum deflection. For damage modes, the KCC model appeared to be capable to capture satisfactorily the general damage mode including flexural cracks. However, the model could not capture the local shear mode at the middle of slab (spallation) because the Lagrangian approach does not simulate the interaction between the ambient air and the solid slab.

  16. AREA FACTOR DETERMINATIONS FOR AN INDUSTRIAL WORKER EXPOSED TO A CONCRETE SLAB END-STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, T; Patricia Lee, P; Eduardo Farfan, E; Jesse Roach, J

    2007-02-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) is decommissioning many of its excess facilities through removal of the facility structures leaving only the concrete-slab foundations in place. Site-specific, risk-based derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for radionuclides have been determined for a future industrial worker potentially exposed to residual contamination on these concrete slabs as described in Jannik [1]. These risk-based DCGLs were estimated for an exposure area of 100 m{sup 2}. During deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) operations at SRS, the need for area factors for larger and smaller contaminated areas arose. This paper compares the area factors determined for an industrial worker exposed to a concrete slab end-state for several radionuclides of concern at SRS with (1) the illustrative area factors provided in MARSSIM [2], (2) the area correction factors provided in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Soil Screening Guidance [3], and (3) the hot spot criterion for field application provided in the RESRAD User's Manual [4].

  17. A Study of Concrete Slab Damage Detection Based on the Electromechanical Impedance Method

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianyan; Zhu, Hongping; Wang, Dansheng

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is being gradually applied into practice as a new intelligent material for structural health monitoring. In order to study the damage detection properties of PZT on concrete slabs, simply supported reinforced concrete slabs with piezoelectric patches attached to their surfaces were chosen as the research objects and the Electromechanical Impedance method (EMI) was adopted for research. Five kinds of damage condition were designed to test the impedance values at different frequency bands. Consistent rules are found by calculation and analysis. Both the root mean square deviation (RMSD) and the correlation coefficient deviation (CCD) damage indices are capable of detecting the structural damage. The newly proposed damage index Ry/Rx can also predict the changes well. The numerical and experimental studies verify that the Electromechanical Impedance method can accurately predict changes in the amount of damage in reinforced concrete slabs. The damage index changes regularly with the distance of damages to the sensor. This relationship can be used to determine the damage location. The newly proposed damage index Ry/Rx is accurate in determining the damage location. PMID:25341438

  18. 75 FR 52490 - Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... amendments to 49 U.S.C. 20106. 63 FR 34029, June 22, 1998; Sec. 1710(c), Public Law 107- 296, 116 Stat. 2319... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 213 RIN 2130-AC01 Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties... promote the safety of railroad operations over track constructed with concrete crossties. In...

  19. Façade Greening: High-rise apartment building in Milan using pre-stressed concrete slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenning; Li, Mingxin; Han, Yinong; Wang, Moqi; Ansourian, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this project, one single level of the Façade Greening was designed and modelled using finite element method in Strand7. A static analysis was performed in order to understand the deflection and the stress due to the extra loads imposed by the soil and plants. The results produced by the linear static solver are compared with the strength of the materials and the European limitations. The maximum tension stress which exceeds the tensile strength in concrete is found in the root of the cantilever balcony. An alternative design of the cantilevered balcony with pre-stressed concrete slab is modelled separately for the balcony. Decrease is found in the tension stress and the significant improvement of deflection of the balcony with pre-stressed concrete slab. The dynamic loads such as wind and earthquake did not suggest significant effect on the pre-stressed concrete slab.

  20. Failure mechanisms of concrete slab-soil double-layer structure subjected to underground explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Zhang, W.; Cho, C.; Han, X.

    2014-09-01

    The failure mechanism of a concrete slab-soil double-layer structure subjected to an underground explosion was investigated by experimental and numerical methods in this paper. Two underground explosion depths of 150 and 350 mm were tested. The typical failure modes such as the conoid spall of concrete, the bulge of the concrete slab and the cavity in the soil were obtained experimentally. Numerical simulations of the experiments were performed using a hydrodynamic code to analyze the effects of both the stress wave and the expansion of the blast products. Based on the experimental and numerical results, the effects of explosive depth, blast wave front and expansion of the blast products on the failure modes and failure mechanisms were discussed. The underground explosion process at different explosion depths was also analyzed. The results show that attenuation of the stress wave in the soil is significant. The blast wave front and the expansion of the blast products play different roles at different explosion depths. At the explosion depth of 150 mm, the failure mode is mainly caused by a point load induced by the blast wave front, whereas at the depth of 350 mm a sphere-shaped load resulting from the expansion of the blast products is a key factor for failure.

  1. Impact resistance performance of green construction material using light weight oil palm shells reinforced bamboo concrete slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muda, Z. C.; Usman, F.; Beddu, S.; Alam, M. A.; Thiruchelvam, S.; Sidek, L. M.; Basri, H.; Saadi, S.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigate the performance of lightweight oil palm shells (OPS) concrete with varied bamboo reinforcement content for the concrete slab of 300mm x 300mm size reinforced with different thickness subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.2 kg drop at 1 m height has been used in this research work. The main variables for the study is to find the relationship of the impact resistance against the amount of bamboo reinforcement and slab thickness. A linear relationship has been established between first and ultimate crack resistance against bamboo diameters and slab thickness by the experiment. The linear relationship has also been established between the service (first) crack and ultimate crack resistance against the bamboo reinforcement diameter for a constant spacing for various slab thickness using 0.45 OPS and 0.6 OPS bamboo reinforced concrete. The increment in bamboo diameter has more effect on the first crack resistance than the ultimate crack resistance. The linear relationship has also been established between the service (first) crack and ultimate crack resistance against the various slab thickness. Increment in slab thickness of the slab has more effect on the crack resistance as compare to the increment in the diameter of the bamboo reinforcement.

  2. A numerical model for calculating vibration due to a harmonic moving load on a floating-slab track with discontinuous slabs in an underground railway tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. F. M.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for modelling floating-slab tracks with discontinuous slabs in underground railway tunnels. The track is subjected to a harmonic load moving with a constant velocity. The model consists of two sub-models. The first is an infinite track with periodic double-beam unit formulated as a periodic infinite structure. The second is modelled with a new version of the Pipe-in-Pipe (PiP) model that accounts for a tunnel wall embedded in a half-space. The two sub-models are coupled by writing the force transmitted from the track to the tunnel as a continuous function using Fourier series representation and satisfying the compatibility condition. The displacements at the free surface are calculated for a track with discontinuous slab and compared with those of a track with continuous slab. The results show that the far-field vibration can be significantly increased due to resonance frequencies of slabs for tracks with discontinuous slabs.

  3. 5. Launch closure, close up of track and concrete apron, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Launch closure, close up of track and concrete apron, view towards north - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  4. 76 FR 18073 - Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... agency's promulgation of concrete crosstie regulations per the mandate of the RSIA. See 75 FR 52490. This... post-1998 amendments to 49 U.S.C. 20106. 63 FR 34029, June 22, 1998; Sec. 1710(c), Public Law 107-296... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 213 RIN 2130-AC01 Track Safety Standards; Concrete...

  5. 76 FR 34890 - Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... constructed with concrete crossties. See 76 FR 18073. The effective date of this final rule was to be July 1..., 2011. DATES: The effective date for the final rule published April 1, 2011, at 76 FR 18073, effective... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 213 RIN 2130-AC01 Track Safety Standards; Concrete...

  6. A theoretical investigation on influences of slab tracks on vertical dynamic responses of railway viaducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li; Cai, Yuanqiang; Wang, Peng; Sun, Honglei

    2016-07-01

    A railway viaduct model consisting of infinite spans of elastically-supported girders carrying a slab track of infinite length is established to investigate the influence of the slabs on the vertical dynamic response of the viaduct, when a moving harmonic point load or a moving sprung wheel is applied. The infinite rail, the discontinuous slabs and girders of identical span lengths are idealized as Euler-Bernoulli beams. The rail fasteners, the cushion layer beneath the slab and the elastic bearings at the girder supports are represented by discretely distributed springs of hysteretic damping. Due to the repetitive nature of the girders, the model can be divided into periodic three-beam units by the span length of the girder, and then solved analytically in the frequency domain using the property of periodic structure. Besides the first natural frequency of the girder with elastic bearings, it is found that the resonance frequency of the slab on the cushion layer has a significant influence on the dynamic response of the track and the girder. Parametric excitations due to the moving wheel periodically passing the discontinuous slabs contribute significantly to the wheel/rail interactions.

  7. DESIGN OF A CONCRETE SLAB FOR STORAGE OF SNF AND HLW CASKS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bisset

    2005-02-14

    This calculation documents the design of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and High-Level Waste (HLW) Cask storage slab for the Aging Area. The design is based on the weights of casks that may be stored on the slab, the weights of vehicles that may be used to move the casks, and the layout shown on the sketch for a 1000 Metric Ton of Heavy Metal (MTHM) storage pad on Attachment 2, Sht.1 of the calculation 170-C0C-C000-00100-000-00A (BSC 2004a). The analytical model used herein is based on the storage area for 8 vertical casks. To simplify the model, the storage area of the horizontal concrete modules and their related shield walls is not included. The heavy weights of the vertical storage casks and the tensile forces due to pullout at the anchorages will produce design moments and shear forces that will envelope those that would occur in the storage area of the horizontal modules. The design loadings will also include snow and live loads. In addition, the design will also reflect pertinent geotechnical data. This calculation will document the preliminary thickness and general reinforcing steel requirements for the slab. This calculation also documents the initial design of the cask anchorage. Other slab details are not developed in this calculation. They will be developed during the final design process. The calculation also does not include the evaluation of the effects of cask drop loads. These will be evaluated in this or another calculation when the exact cask geometry is known.

  8. Ultimate capacity evaluation of reinforced concrete slabs using yield line analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Yield line theory offers a simplified nonlinear analytical method that can determine the ultimate bending capacity of flat reinforced concrete planes subject to distributed and concentrated loads. Alternately, yield line theory, combined with hinge rotation limits can determine the energy absorption capacity of plates subject to impulsive and impact loads. This method is especially useful in evaluating existing structures that cannot be qualified using conservative simplifying analytical assumptions. Typical components analyzed by yield line theory are basements, floor and roof slabs subject to vertical loads along with walls subject to out of plant wall loads. One limitation of yield line theory is that it is difficult to evaluate some mechanisms; this is aggravated by the complex geometry and reinforcing layouts commonly found in practice. A yield line evaluation methodology is proposed to solve computationally tedious yield line mechanisms. This methodology is implemented in a small PC based computer program that allows the engineer to quickly evaluate multiple yield line mechanisms.

  9. Experiment on the concrete slab for floor vibration evaluation of deteriorated building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S. U.; Na, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, Y. T.

    2014-08-01

    Damages from noise and vibration are increasing every year, and most of which are noises between floors in deteriorated building caused by floor impact sound. In this study, the floor vibration of the deteriorated buildings constructed with the concrete slabs of thickness no more than 150 mm was evaluated by the vibration impact sound. This highly reliable study was conducted to assess floor vibration according with the serviceability evaluation standard of Reiher / Meister and Koch and vibration evaluation standard of ISO and AIJ. Designed pressure for the concrete slab sample of floor vibration assessment was 24MPa, and the sample was manufactured pursuant to KS F 2865 and JIS A 1440-2 with size of 3200 mm × 3200 mm × 140 mm. Tests were conducted twice with accelerometers, and Fast Fourier Transform was performed for comparative analysis by the vibration assessment criteria. The peak displacement from Test 1 was in the range of 0.00869 - 0.02540 mm; the value of peak frequency ranged from 18 to 27 Hz, and the average value was 22Hz. The peak acceleration value from Test 2 was in the range of 0.47 - 1.07 % g; the value of peak frequency was 18.5 - 22.57 Hz, and the average was 21Hz. The vibration was apparently recognizable in most cases according to the Reiher/Meister standard. In case of Koch graph for the damage assessment of the structure, the vibration was at the medium level and causes no damage to the building structure. The measured vibration results did not exceed the damage limit or serviceability limit of building according to the vibration assessment criteria of ISO and residential assessment guidelines provided by Architectural Institute of Japan (AIJ).

  10. 49 CFR 213.234 - Automated inspection of track constructed with concrete crossties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... concrete crossties. 213.234 Section 213.234 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 213.234 Automated inspection of track constructed with concrete crossties. Link to an amendment... track inspection required under § 213.233, for Class 3 main track constructed with concrete...

  11. Displacement monitoring of switch track and its slab on a bridge of high speed railway by FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weilai; Li, He; Cheng, Jian; Huang, Xiaomei; Pan, Jianjun; Zhou, Ciming; Yang, Minghong

    2011-05-01

    In a 350km/h high speed railway line, there is a seamless switch with ballastless slabs built on a bridge. 54 Fiber Bragg Grating detecting cells are employed to monitor the displacement of track and slab. The cell is of extending function of measurement range, up to 50mm displacement, and is of good linearity. Protecting methods for cells and fiber are adopted to keep them surviving from the harsh conditions. The results show that in 75 days, the displacement of the track and sleeper slab was 8-9mm, and the displacement is of high correlation with daily environmental temperature change.

  12. Seismic joint analysis for non-destructive testing of asphalt and concrete slabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryden, N.; Park, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    A seismic approach is used to estimate the thickness and elastic stiffness constants of asphalt or concrete slabs. The overall concept of the approach utilizes the robustness of the multichannel seismic method. A multichannel-equivalent data set is compiled from multiple time series recorded from multiple hammer impacts at progressively different offsets from a fixed receiver. This multichannel simulation with one receiver (MSOR) replaces the true multichannel recording in a cost-effective and convenient manner. A recorded data set is first processed to evaluate the shear wave velocity through a wave field transformation, normally used in the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method, followed by a Lambwave inversion. Then, the same data set is used to evaluate compression wave velocity from a combined processing of the first-arrival picking and a linear regression. Finally, the amplitude spectra of the time series are used to evaluate the thickness by following the concepts utilized in the Impact Echo (IE) method. Due to the powerful signal extraction capabilities ensured by the multichannel processing schemes used, the entire procedure for all three evaluations can be fully automated and results can be obtained directly in the field. A field data set is used to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  13. Structural damage detection based on the reconstructed phase space for reinforced concrete slab: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Zhenhua; Hao, Hong; Ma, Hongwei

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a parameter based on geometry changes of the reconstructed multidimensional phase space of the measured vibration signals for structural damage identification is proposed. The choice of the proper delay time steps and embedding dimensions for phase space reconstruction of linear systems is discussed. Using the determined delay time and embedding dimensions, an index Changes of Phase Space Topology (CPST) with multiple embedding dimensions is calculated and then used to identify the structural damage. To demonstrate the reliability of the proposed method, vibration test data corresponding to different damage states of a continuous reinforced concrete slab is used to calculate the CPST value for damage identification. The results indicate that except the measurement points at structural supports, the CPST values at all the measurement points on the structure increase with structural damage level irrespective of the damage location, indicating that using a single or a minimum number of measurement points and their CPST value can effectively identify damage existence in the structure. The traditional modal-based indices are also calculated using the same vibration data for comparison. It is found that the proposed method with CPST is the most sensitive to structural damage than any modal-based index. The results demonstrate that the proposed method with CPST value is very effective in identifying damage existence in the structure. Although it cannot quantify the damage, it can be a good candidate for continuous structural health monitoring because it needs only a few sensors to detect damage existence in the entire structure.

  14. Effects of vibration characteristics on the walking discomfort of floating floors on concrete slabs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Ho; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the vibration characteristics of floating floor systems and the discomfort in walking upon them have been studied in concrete slab structures through mock-up floors experiments. Seven types of floor systems, with panels of various sizes and supporting beams with different joist spacings, were constructed based on actual conditions. For the vibration measurement, an ISO rubber ball dropped from a height of 20 cm was used as an impact source to reproduce human walking. The vibration characteristics were evaluated by calculating the vibration acceleration values and the autocorrelation function parameters for the floor structures. Finally, a human walking experiment was conducted to investigate subjective responses to the vibration characteristics of floating floors. From the results, it was found that the vibration acceleration values and walking discomfort varied with the supporting conditions of the floors and that these were highly correlated with each other. It was also found that more than 75% of subjects accepted the floors when the vibration value of the floor in terms of vibration does value (VDV) is below 4.8 ms(-1.75). In addition, a practical regression of the VDV was obtained and design guidelines for floating floors were suggested. PMID:25324073

  15. Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Trains as Data Mules to Monitor Slab Track Infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Cañete, Eduardo; Chen, Jaime; Díaz, Manuel; Llopis, Luis; Reyna, Ana; Rubio, Bartolomé

    2015-01-01

    Recently, slab track systems have arisen as a safer and more sustainable option for high speed railway infrastructures, compared to traditional ballasted tracks. Integrating Wireless Sensor Networks within these infrastructures can provide structural health related data that can be used to evaluate their degradation and to not only detect failures but also to predict them. The design of such systems has to deal with a scenario of large areas with inaccessible zones, where neither Internet coverage nor electricity supply is guaranteed. In this paper we propose a monitoring system for slab track systems that measures vibrations and displacements in the track. Collected data is transmitted to passing trains, which are used as data mules to upload the information to a remote control center. On arrival at the station, the data is stored in a database, which is queried by an application in order to detect and predict failures. In this paper, different communication architectures are designed and tested to select the most suitable system meeting such requirements as efficiency, low cost and data accuracy. In addition, to ensure communication between the sensing devices and the train, the communication system must take into account parameters such as train speed, antenna coverage, band and frequency. PMID:26131668

  16. Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Trains as Data Mules to Monitor Slab Track Infrastructures

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Eduardo; Chen, Jaime; Díaz, Manuel; Llopis, Luis; Reyna, Ana; Rubio, Bartolomé

    2015-01-01

    Recently, slab track systems have arisen as a safer and more sustainable option for high speed railway infrastructures, compared to traditional ballasted tracks. Integrating Wireless Sensor Networks within these infrastructures can provide structural health related data that can be used to evaluate their degradation and to not only detect failures but also to predict them. The design of such systems has to deal with a scenario of large areas with inaccessible zones, where neither Internet coverage nor electricity supply is guaranteed. In this paper we propose a monitoring system for slab track systems that measures vibrations and displacements in the track. Collected data is transmitted to passing trains, which are used as data mules to upload the information to a remote control center. On arrival at the station, the data is stored in a database, which is queried by an application in order to detect and predict failures. In this paper, different communication architectures are designed and tested to select the most suitable system meeting such requirements as efficiency, low cost and data accuracy. In addition, to ensure communication between the sensing devices and the train, the communication system must take into account parameters such as train speed, antenna coverage, band and frequency. PMID:26131668

  17. Low-frequency vibration control of floating slab tracks using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengyang; Yang, Jizhong; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Longqing; Cai, Chengbiao

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to effectively and robustly suppress the low-frequency vibrations of floating slab tracks (FSTs) using dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). First, the optimal locations where the DVAs are attached are determined by modal analysis with a finite element model of the FST. Further, by identifying the equivalent mass of the concerned modes, the optimal stiffness and damping coefficient of each DVA are obtained to minimise the resonant vibration amplitudes based on fixed-point theory. Finally, a three-dimensional coupled dynamic model of a metro vehicle and the FST with the DVAs is developed based on the nonlinear Hertzian contact theory and the modified Kalker linear creep theory. The track irregularities are included and generated by means of a time-frequency transformation technique. The effect of the DVAs on the vibration absorption of the FST subjected to the vehicle dynamic loads is evaluated with the help of the insertion loss in one-third octave frequency bands. The sensitivities of the mass ratio of DVAs and the damping ratio of steel-springs under the floating slab are discussed as well, which provided engineers with the DVA's adjustable room for vibration mitigation. The numerical results show that the proposed DVAs could effectively suppress low-frequency vibrations of the FST when tuned correctly and attached properly. The insertion loss due to the attachment of DVAs increases as the mass ratio increases, whereas it decreases with the increase in the damping ratio of steel-springs.

  18. Craters in concrete slabs due to detonation - drawbacks of material models with a Mohr-Coulomb yield surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed with a commercial distributed explicit FE-solver and the results have been compared with experiments. High explosive was placed in front of different concrete slabs with the dimension 100 × 100 × 16 cm. Some of the results of the simulations, in particular the profile of the craters, are not in agreement with the test results. Therefore the key characteristics of the constitutive equation based on Mohr-Coulomb yield surfaces and a damage evolution linked to the plastic strain has been reviewed.

  19. Temperature and pore pressure distribution in a concrete slab during the microwave decontamination process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Ebadian, M.A.; White, T.L.; Grubb, R.G.; Foster, D. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    As an application of microwave engineering, the new technology of concrete decontamination and decommissioning using microwave energy has been recently developed. The temperature and pore pressure within the concrete are studied theoretically in this paper. The heat and mass transfer within the porous concrete, coupled with temperature dependent dielectric property are investigated. The effects of microwave frequency (f), microwave power intensity (Q{sub 0,ave}), concrete porosity ({phi}) on the temperature and pore pressure distributions and their variations are fully discussed. The effects of the variation of complex dielectric permittivity ({epsilon}) and presentation of different steel reinforcements are also illustrated.

  20. 49 CFR 213.234 - Automated inspection of track constructed with concrete crossties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... concrete crossties. 213.234 Section 213.234 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 213.234 Automated inspection of track constructed with concrete crossties. (a) General. Except for... constructed with concrete crossties over which regularly scheduled passenger service trains operate, and...

  1. 49 CFR 213.234 - Automated inspection of track constructed with concrete crossties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... concrete crossties. 213.234 Section 213.234 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 213.234 Automated inspection of track constructed with concrete crossties. (a) General. Except for... constructed with concrete crossties over which regularly scheduled passenger service trains operate, and...

  2. 49 CFR 213.234 - Automated inspection of track constructed with concrete crossties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... concrete crossties. 213.234 Section 213.234 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 213.234 Automated inspection of track constructed with concrete crossties. (a) General. Except for... constructed with concrete crossties over which regularly scheduled passenger service trains operate, and...

  3. Numerical simulation on slabs dislocation of Zipingpu concrete faced rockfill dam during the Wenchuan earthquake based on a generalized plasticity model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhou, Yang; Zou, Degao

    2014-01-01

    After the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, the Zipingpu concrete faced rockfill dam (CFRD) was found slabs dislocation between different stages slabs and the maximum value reached 17 cm. This is a new damage pattern and did not occur in previous seismic damage investigation. Slabs dislocation will affect the seepage control system of the CFRD gravely and even the safety of the dam. Therefore, investigations of the slabs dislocation's mechanism and development might be meaningful to the engineering design of the CFRD. In this study, based on the previous studies by the authors, the slabs dislocation phenomenon of the Zipingpu CFRD was investigated. The procedure and constitutive model of materials used for finite element analysis are consistent. The water elevation, the angel, and the strength of the construction joints were among major variables of investigation. The results indicated that the finite element procedure based on a modified generalized plasticity model and a perfect elastoplastic interface model can be used to evaluate the dislocation damage of face slabs of concrete faced rockfill dam during earthquake. The effects of the water elevation, the angel, and the strength of the construction joints are issues of major design concern under seismic loading. PMID:25013857

  4. Numerical Simulation on Slabs Dislocation of Zipingpu Concrete Faced Rockfill Dam during the Wenchuan Earthquake Based on a Generalized Plasticity Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Zou, Degao

    2014-01-01

    After the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, the Zipingpu concrete faced rockfill dam (CFRD) was found slabs dislocation between different stages slabs and the maximum value reached 17 cm. This is a new damage pattern and did not occur in previous seismic damage investigation. Slabs dislocation will affect the seepage control system of the CFRD gravely and even the safety of the dam. Therefore, investigations of the slabs dislocation's mechanism and development might be meaningful to the engineering design of the CFRD. In this study, based on the previous studies by the authors, the slabs dislocation phenomenon of the Zipingpu CFRD was investigated. The procedure and constitutive model of materials used for finite element analysis are consistent. The water elevation, the angel, and the strength of the construction joints were among major variables of investigation. The results indicated that the finite element procedure based on a modified generalized plasticity model and a perfect elastoplastic interface model can be used to evaluate the dislocation damage of face slabs of concrete faced rockfill dam during earthquake. The effects of the water elevation, the angel, and the strength of the construction joints are issues of major design concern under seismic loading. PMID:25013857

  5. Random vibration analysis of train-bridge under track irregularities and traveling seismic waves using train-slab track-bridge interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Yan-Gang; Xu, Wen-Tao; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Chen, Ling-Kun; Lou, Ping

    2015-04-01

    The frequent use of bridges in high-speed railway lines greatly increases the probability that trains are running on bridges when earthquakes occur. This paper investigates the random vibrations of a high-speed train traversing a slab track on a continuous girder bridge subjected to track irregularities and traveling seismic waves by the pseudo-excitation method (PEM). To derive the equations of motion of the train-slab track-bridge interaction system, the multibody dynamics and finite element method models are used for the train and the track and bridge, respectively. By assuming track irregularities to be fully coherent random excitations with time lags between different wheels and seismic accelerations to be uniformly modulated, non-stationary random excitations with time lags between different foundations, the random load vectors of the equations of motion are transformed into a series of deterministic pseudo-excitations based on PEM and the wheel-rail contact relationship. A computer code is developed to obtain the time-dependent random responses of the entire system. As a case study, the random vibration characteristics of an ICE-3 high-speed train traversing a seven-span continuous girder bridge simultaneously excited by track irregularities and traveling seismic waves are analyzed. The influence of train speed and seismic wave propagation velocity on the random vibration characteristics of the bridge and train are discussed.

  6. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements. Part 3: Prestressed hollow-core slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper deals with the shear strength of prestressed hollow-core slabs determined by the theory of plasticity. Two failure mechanisms are considered in order to derive the solutions. In the case of sliding failure in a diagonal crack, the shear strength is determined by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin-Ping Zhang. The model takes into account the resistance against the formation of cracks due to prestressing as well as the variation of the prestressing force in the transfer zone. Due to the fact that the anchorage of the reinforcement takes place by bond, a rotation failure, which is indeed by a crack formed at the support with subsequent slip of the reinforcement, is also considered. This failure mode is likely to occur in cases with a high prestressing force combined with a short shear span. The theoretical calculations are compared with test results form the literature. A good agreement has been found.

  7. 7. 'Tunnel No 14, Concrete Lining,' Southern Pacific Standard SingleTrack ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. 'Tunnel No 14, Concrete Lining,' Southern Pacific Standard Single-Track Tunnel, ca. 1909. Under current numbering, this is now Tunnel 29 (HAER No. CA-205). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. Damage assessed by wavelet scale bands and b-value in dynamical tests of a reinforced concrete slab monitored with acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitto, Miguel E.; Piotrkowski, Rosa; Gallego, Antolino; Sagasta, Francisco; Benavent-Climent, Amadeo

    2015-08-01

    The complex Morlet Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) was applied to acoustic emission (AE) signals from dynamic tests conducted on a reinforced concrete slab with a shaking table. The steel reinforcement bars did not yield during the tests, but a severe loss of bond between reinforcement bars and surrounding concrete was detected. Comparison of the evolution of the scale position of maximum values of CWT coefficients and the histories of response acceleration obtained in different seismic simulations allowed us to identify the (45-64 kHz) frequency band corresponding to the fracture of concrete. The Cumulative Acoustic Emission Energy (CAE) obtained by reconstructing the AE signals in this scale (frequency) band was compared with the Cumulative Dissipated Energy (CDE) of the tested structure. The CDE is accepted as a good parameter for characterizing the mechanical damage in structures. A reasonably good agreement was found between the normalized histories of CAE and CDE. This made it possible to categorize the cracking of concrete as the main source of damage in the reinforced concrete slab. Conversely, the differences between the CAE and CDE curves observed for high levels of peak acceleration applied to the shaking table can be attributed to the deformation of the steel that formed the columns. The AE coming from the plastic deformation of the steel is not detected by CAE due to the threshold amplitude (45 dB) used in the AE monitoring, but the strain energy dissipated by the steel through plastic deformations is included in the CDE. Further, a study of the evolution of the b-value in the successive seismic simulations revealed that the b-value can capture the inception of severe cracking in the concrete, which the tests described in this study attributed mainly to the loss of bond between reinforcing steel and surrounding concrete.

  9. 76 FR 55819 - Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... concrete crossties. See 76 FR 18,073. FRA received two petitions for reconsideration in response to the... 403(d), of the Rail Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (Pub. L. 110-432, Division A) (RSIA). See 75 FR 52..., FRA delayed the effective date of the final rule until October 1, 2011. See 76 FR 34,890 (June...

  10. 4. Launch closure, concrete apron and tracks at left, transporter/erector ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Launch closure, concrete apron and tracks at left, transporter/erector horizontal at right, view towards northwest - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  11. 6. 'Tunnel No. 6, Concrete Lining,' Southern Pacific Standard SingleTrack ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. 'Tunnel No. 6, Concrete Lining,' Southern Pacific Standard Single-Track Tunnel, ca. 1909. Compare to photos in documentation set for Tunnel 27 (HAER No. CA-203). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  12. An Eye-Tracking Study of Learning from Science Text with Concrete and Abstract Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lucia; Pluchino, Patrik; Tornatora, Maria Caterina; Ariasi, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the online process of reading and the offline learning from an illustrated science text. The authors examined the effects of using a concrete or abstract picture to illustrate a text and adopted eye-tracking methodology to trace text and picture processing. They randomly assigned 59 eleventh-grade students to 3 reading…

  13. Cracking in Concrete near Joints in Steelconcrete Composite Slab / Zarysowanie Płyty Żelbetowej W Strefie Przywęzłowej Stropu Zespolonego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedośpiał, Marcin; Knauff, Michał; Barcewicz, Wioleta

    2015-03-01

    In this paper results of the experimental tests of four full-scale composite steel-concrete elements are reported. In the steel-concrete composite elements, a steel beam was connected with a slab cast on profiled sheeting, by shear studs. The end-plates were (the thickness of 8 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm) thinner than in ordinary design. Joints between the column and the beams have been designed as semi-rigid, i.e. the deformations of endplates affect the distribution of forces in the adjacent parts of the slab. The paper presents the theory of cracking in reinforced concrete and steel-concrete composite members (according to the codes), view of crack pattern on the surface of the slabs and a comparison of the tests results and the code calculations. It was observed, that some factors influencing on crack widths are not taken in Eurocode 4 (which is based on Eurocode 2 with taking into account the phenomenon called "tension stiffening"). W artykule przedstawiono wyniki badań czterech elementów zespolonych. Kształtownik stalowy połączony był z betonowym stropem wykonanym na blasze fałdowej. W modelu zastosowano cienkie blachy czołowe (o grubości 8 mm, 10 mm i 12 mm), cieńsze niż zwykle przyjmowane w praktyce projektowej. Połączenie to zaprojektowano jako podatne tzn. takie, w którym odkształcenia blach czołowych mają istotny wpływ na rozkład sił w połączeniu. Przedstawiono normową teorię dotyczącą zarysowania elementów żelbetowych i zespolonych, obraz zarysowania stropu oraz porównano otrzymane wyniki z obliczeniami wykonanymi wg aktualnych norm. Zauważono, iż nie wszystkie czynniki obliczania szerokości rys w konstrukcjach zespolonych są zdefiniowane w normie projektowania konstrukcji zespolonych (która w tej kwestii odwołuje się do normy projektowania konstrukcji żelbetowych z uwzględnieniem zjawiska "tension stiffening").

  14. Effect on vehicle and track interaction of installation faults in the concrete bearing surface of a direct-fixation track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. C.; Kim, E.

    2012-01-01

    Various installation faults can occur in fasteners in the construction of a direct-fixation track using the top-down method. In extreme cases, these faults may cause excessive interaction between the train and track, compromise the running safety of the train, and cause damage to the track components. Therefore, these faults need to be kept within the allowable level through an investigation of their effects on the interactions between the train and track. In this study, the vertical dynamic stiffness of fasteners in installation faults was measured based on a dynamic stiffness test by means of an experimental apparatus that was devised to feasibly reproduce installation faults with an arbitrary shape. This study proposes an effective analytical model for a train-track interaction system in which most elements, except the nonlinear wheel-rail contact and some components that behave bilinearly, exhibit linear behavior. To investigate the effect of the behavior of fasteners in installation faults in a direct-fixation track on the vehicle and track, vehicle-track interaction analyses were carried out, targeting key review parameters such as the wheel load reduction factor, vertical rail displacement, wheel load, and mean stress of the elastomer. From the results, it was noted that it is more important for the installation faults in the concrete bearing surface of a direct-fixation track to be limited for the sake of the long-term durability of the elastomer rather than for the running safety of the train or the structural safety of the track.

  15. Pulses of earthquake activity in the mantle wedge track the route of slab fluid ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Lloyd; Rawlinson, Nicholas; Lister, Gordon; Tanner, Dominique; Macpherson, Colin; Morgan, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes typically record the brittle failure of part of the Earth at a point in space and time. These almost invariably occur within the crust or where the upper surface of subducting lithosphere interacts with the overriding mantle. However, there are also reports of rare, enigmatic earthquakes beneath rifts, above mantle plumes or very deep in the mantle. Here we report another type of mantle earthquake and present three locations where earthquake clusters occur in the mantle wedge overlying active subduction zones. These earthquake clusters define broadly circular to ellipsoidal columns that are 50 km or greater in diameter from depths between ~150 km and the surface. We interpret these rare pulses of earthquakes as evidence of near vertical transport of fluids (and associated flux-melts) from the subducted lithosphere through the mantle wedge. Detailed temporal analysis shows that most of these earthquakes occur over two-year periods, with the majority of events occurring in discrete month-long flurries of activity. As the time and location of each earthquake is recorded, pulses of seismic activity may provide information about the rate of magma ascent from the dehydrated subducted slab to sub-arc/backarc crust. This work indicates that fluids are not transported through the mantle wedge by diapirism, but through sub-vertical pathways facilitated by fracture networks and dykes on monthly to yearly time scales. These rare features move us toward solving what has until now represented a missing component of the subduction factory.

  16. Investigation of rail irregularity effects on wheel/rail dynamic force in slab track: Comparison of two and three dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Javad; Khajehdezfuly, Amin; Esmaeili, Morteza; Poorveis, Davood

    2016-07-01

    Rail irregularity is one of the most significant load amplification factors in railway track systems. In this paper, the capability and effectiveness of the two main railway slab tracks modeling techniques in prediction of the influences of rail irregularities on the Wheel/Rail Dynamic Force (WRDF) were investigated. For this purpose, two 2D and 3D numerical models of vehicle/discontinuous slab track interaction were developed. The validation of the numerical models was made by comparing the results of the models with those obtained from comprehensive field tests carried out in this research. The effects of the harmonic and non-harmonic rail irregularities on the WRDF obtained from 3D and 2D models were investigated. The results indicate that the difference between WRDF obtained from 2D and 3D models is negligible when the irregularities on the right and left rails are the same. However, as the difference between irregularities of the right and left rails increases, the results obtained from 2D and 3D models are considerably different. The results indicate that 2D models have limitations in prediction of WRDF; that is, a 3D modeling technique is required to predict WRDF when there is uneven or non-harmonic irregularity with large amplitudes. The size and extent of the influences of rail irregularities on the wheel/rail forces were discussed leading to provide a better understanding of the rail-wheel contact behavior and the required techniques for predicting WRDF.

  17. Biaxial Behavior of Ultra-High Performance Concrete and Untreated UHPC Waffle Slab Bridge Deck Design and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Kacie Caple

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) was evaluated as a potential material for future bridge deck designs. Material characterization tests took place to identify potential challenges in mixing, placing, and curing UHPC. Biaxial testing was performed to evaluate behavior of UHPC in combined tension and compression stress states. A UHPC bridge deck was designed to perform similarly to a conventional concrete bridge deck, and a single unit bridge deck section was tested to evaluate the design methods used for untreated UHPC. Material tests identified challenges with placing UHPC. A specified compressive strength was determined for structural design using untreated UHPC, which was identified as a cost-effective alternative to steam treated UHPC. UHPC was tested in biaxial tension-compression stress states. A biaxial test method was developed for UHPC to directly apply tension and compression. The influence of both curing method and fiber orientation were evaluated. The failure envelope developed for untreated UHPC with random fiber orientation was suggested as a conservative estimate for future analysis of UHPC. Digital image correlation was also evaluated as a means to estimate surface strains of UHPC, and recommendations are provided to improve consistency in future tests using DIC methods. A preliminary bridge deck design was completed for untreated UHPC and using established material models. Prestressing steel was used as primary reinforcement in the transverse direction. Preliminary testing was used to evaluate three different placement scenarios, and results showed that fiber settling was a potential placement problem resulting in reduced tensile strength. The UHPC bridge deck was redesigned to incorporate preliminary test results, and two single unit bridge deck sections were tested to evaluate the incorporated design methods for both upside down and right-side up placement techniques. Test results showed that the applied design methods would be conservative

  18. Numerical simulation of tests for the evaluation of the performance of the reinforced concrete slabs strengthening by FRCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anania, Laura; Badalá, Antonio; D'Agata, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In this work the attention is focused to the numerical simulation of the experimental bending tests carried out on a total of six reinforced concrete r.c. plates the latter aimed to provide a basic understanding of the its performance when strengthened by Fiber Reinforced Cementitius Matrix (FRCM) Composites. Three of those were used as control specimens. The numerical simulation was carried out by LUSAS software. A good correlation between the FE results and data obtained from the test, both in the load-deformation behavior and the failure load was highlighted. This permits to prove that applied strengthening system gives back an enhancement 2.5 times greater in respect of the unreinforced case. A greater energy dissipation ability and a residual load-bearing capacity makes the proposed system very useful in the retrofitting as well as in the case of strengthening of bridge structures. Based on the validation of the FE results in bending, the numerical analysis was also extended to characterize the behavior of this strengthening system in tensile.

  19. Tracking traces of transition metals present in concrete mixtures by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry studies.

    PubMed

    Bassioni, Ghada; Pillay, Alvin E; El Kadi, Mirella; Fegali, Fadi; Fok, Sai Cheong; Stephen, Sasi

    2010-01-01

    Transition metals can have a significant impact in research related to the dosage optimization of superplasticizers. It is known that the presence of transition metals can influence such doses, and the application of a contemporary instrumental method to obtain the profiles of subsisting transition elements in concrete mixtures would be useful. In this work, inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is investigated as a possible tool to track traces of transition metals in concrete mixtures. Depth profiling using ICP-MS on proofed and unproofed concrete shows the presence of Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at trace intensities in the bulk of the samples under investigation. The study demonstrates that the transition metals present in the concrete sample are largely a part of the cement composition and, to a minor degree, a result of exposure to the seawater after curing. The coated concrete samples have a metal distribution pattern similar to the uncoated samples, but slight differences in intensity bear testimony to the very low levels that originate from the exposure to seawater. While X-ray diffraction fails to detect these traces of metals, ICP-MS is successful in detecting ultra-trace intensities to parts per trillion. This method is not only a useful application to track traces of transition metals in concrete, but also provides information to estimate the pore size distribution in a given sample by very simple means. PMID:21173466

  20. Concrete Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wilby, C.B.

    1991-12-31

    Concrete Materials and Structures provides one of the most comprehensive treatments on the topic of concrete engineering. The author covers a gamut of concrete subjects ranging from concrete mix design, basic reinforced concrete theory, prestressed concrete, shell roofs, and two-way slabs-including a through presentation of Hillerborg`s strip method. Prior to Wilby`s book, the scope of these topics would require at least four separate books to cover. With this new book he has succeeded, quite remarkably, in condensing a fairly complete knowledge of concrete engineering into one single easy-to-carry volume.

  1. Cracking behavior of structural slab bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baah, Prince

    Bridge deck cracking is a common problem throughout the United States, and it affects the durability and service life of concrete bridges. Several departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States prefer using continuous three-span solid structural slab bridges without stringers over typical four-lane highways. Recent inspections of such bridges in Ohio revealed cracks as wide as 0.125 in. These measured crack widths are more than ten times the maximum limit recommended in ACI 224R-01 for bridge decks exposed to de-icing salts. Measurements using digital image correlation revealed that the cracks widened under truck loading, and in some cases, the cracks did not fully close after unloading. This dissertation includes details of an experimental investigation of the cracking behavior of structural concrete. Prism tests revealed that the concrete with epoxy-coated bars (ECB) develops the first crack at smaller loads, and develops larger crack widths compared to the corresponding specimens with uncoated (black) bars. Slab tests revealed that the slabs with longitudinal ECB developed first crack at smaller loads, exhibited wider cracks and a larger number of cracks, and failed at smaller ultimate loads compared to the corresponding test slabs with black bars. To develop a preventive measure, slabs with basalt and polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete were also included in the test program. These test slabs exhibited higher cracking loads, smaller crack widths, and higher ultimate loads at failure compared to the corresponding slab specimens without fibers. Merely satisfying the reinforcement spacing requirements given in AASHTO or ACI 318-11 is not adequate to limit cracking below the ACI 224R-01 recommended maximum limit, even though all the relevant design requirements are otherwise met. Addition of fiber to concrete without changing any steel reinforcing details is expected to reduce the severity and extent of cracking in reinforced concrete bridge decks.

  2. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  3. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  4. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  5. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. PMID:26218450

  6. Methodology for Assessing the Probability of Corrosion in Concrete Structures on the Basis of Half-Cell Potential and Concrete Resistivity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the corrosion of steel reinforcement has become a major problem in the construction industry. Therefore, much attention has been given to developing methods of predicting the service life of reinforced concrete structures. The progress of corrosion cannot be visually assessed until a crack or a delamination appears. The corrosion process can be tracked using several electrochemical techniques. Most commonly the half-cell potential measurement technique is used for this purpose. However, it is generally accepted that it should be supplemented with other techniques. Hence, a methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete slabs by means of a combination of two methods, that is, the half-cell potential method and the concrete resistivity method, is proposed. An assessment of the probability of corrosion in reinforced concrete structures carried out using the proposed methodology is presented. 200 mm thick 750 mm  ×  750 mm reinforced concrete slab specimens were investigated. Potential Ecorr and concrete resistivity ρ in each point of the applied grid were measured. The experimental results indicate that the proposed methodology can be successfully used to assess the probability of corrosion in concrete structures. PMID:23766706

  7. Progress on slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, G. F.; Eggleston, J. M.; Petr, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    After a brief overview of slab geometry work published to date, zig-zag optical path slab laser development toward a 100-Hz slab YAG system ('Centurion') and a 10-Hz dual slab glass system ('Gemini') is described. Some of the major diagnostic work performed and in the process is also described to illustrate the major mechanisms responsible for beam distortion observed in these types of slab lasers.

  8. Instrumentation by accelerometers and distributed optical fiber sensors of a real ballastless track structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Cailliau, Joël; Gueguen, Ivan; Dumoulin, Jean

    2015-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. Firstly, they are built quickly since the slabs can be cast in place in an automated fashion by a slipform paver. Secondly, with its service life of at least 60 years, they requires little maintenance and hence they offers great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. In the framework of a FUI project (n° 072906053), a new ballastless track structure based on concrete slabs was designed and its thermal-mechanical behavior in fatigue under selected mechanical and thermal conditions was tested on a real scale mockup in our laboratory [1,2]. By applying to the slabs both together mechanical stresses and thermal gradients, finite elements simulation and experimental results show that the weather conditions influence significantly the concrete slabs curvatures and by the way, the contact conditions with the underlaying layers. So it is absolutely necessary to take into account this effect in the design of the ballastless track structures in order to guarantee a long target life of at least of 50 years. After design and experimental tests in laboratory, a real ballastless track structure of 1km was built in France at the beginning of year 2013. This structure has 2 tracks on which several trains circulate every day since the beginning of year 2014. Before the construction, it was decided to monitor this structure to verify that the mechanical behavior is conform to the simulations. One part of the instrumentation is dedicated to monitor quasi-continuously the evolution of the curvature of a concrete slab. For this, 2 accelerometers were fixed on the slab under the track. One was placed on the edge and the other in the middle of the slab. The acquisition of the signals by a

  9. Estimation of Structure-Borne Noise Reduction Effect of Steel Railway Bridge Equipped with Floating Ladder Track and Floating Reinforced-Concrete Deck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Sogabe, Masamichi; Asanuma, Kiyoshi; Wakui, Hajime

    A number of steel railway bridges have been constructed in Japan. Thin steel members used for the bridges easily tend to vibrate and generate structure-borne noise. Accordingly, the number of constructions of steel railway bridges tends to decrease in the urban areas from a viewpoint of environmental preservation. Then, as a countermeasure against structure-borne noise generated from steel railway bridges, we have developed a new type of the steel railway bridge equipped with a floating-ladder track and a floating reinforced-concrete (RC) deck. As a result of train-running experiment, it became apparent that the new steel railway bridge installed by double floating system has reduced a vibration velocity level by 10.5 dB(A) at main girder web as compared with a steel railway bridge installed by directly fastened track. This reduction effect was achieved by the ladder track and RC deck supported by resilient materials.

  10. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT IN AGED CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of radon generation and transport in Florida concretes sampled from 12- to 45-year-old residential slabs. It also compares measurements from old concrete samples to previous measurements on newly poured Florida residential concretes....

  11. 16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing detail of floor beam at central pier, half section of cantilever slab at end of bridge, floor beam end panels, slab reinforcing, plan of slab reinforcing, diagram of slab bars, typical floor girder. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  12. Deepest hypocentral distributions associated with stagnant slabs and penetrated slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Y.; Obayashi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We constructed a new P-wave tomographic model of the mantle, GAP_P4, using more than ten millions of travel time data, including waveform-based differential travel times from ocean bottoms, to all of which the finite frequency kernels were applied in the inversion. Based on this model, we made a systematic survey for subducted slab images around the Circum Pacific. This survey revealed a progressive lateral variation of slab configuration along arc(s), where a subducted slab is in general in one or two of the following four stages: I. slab stagnant above the 660, II. slab penetrating the 660, III. slab trapped in the uppermost lower mantle (660 to ˜1000 km in depth), and IV. slab descending well into the deep lower mantle. The majority of the slab images are either at stage I or III. We interpret I to IV as the successive stages of slab subduction through the transition region with the 660 at the middle. There is a remarkable correlation of the slab configuration with the deepest shock hypocentral distribution. Subhorizontal distributions of deepest shocks are associated with stagnant slabs in the transition zone (slabs at stage I). Their focal depths are limited to shallower than ˜620 km. Steeply dipping deepest shock distributions are associated with penetrating slabs across the 660-km discontinuity or trapped slabs below it (slabs at stages II and III). Their focal depths extend well beyond ˜620 km. There are no cases of association of either a stagnant slab (at stage I) with subvertical distribution of deepest shocks or a trapped slab (at stage II or III) with their subhorizontal distribution. Only steeply dipping slabs appear to penetrate the 660 to be trapped in the uppermost lower mantle. The along-arc variations of stagnant-slab configuration and deepest shock distribution beneath the Bonin arc indicate a process of how the slab begins to penetrate the 660-km discontinuity after the slab stagnation. Those beneath the Java arc and Kermadec arc commonly

  13. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  14. Cordilleran slab windows

    SciTech Connect

    Thorkelson, D.J.; Taylor, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The geometry and geologic implications of subducted spreading ridges are topics that have bedeviled earth scientists ever since the recognition of plate tectonics. As a consequence of subduction of the Kula-Farallon and East Pacific rises, slab windows formed and migrated beneath the North American Cordillera. The probable shape and extent of these windows, which represent the asthenosphere-filled gaps between two separating, subducting oceanic plates, are depicted from the Late Cretaceous to the present. Possible effects of the existence and migration of slab windows on the Cordillera at various times include cessation of arc volcanism and replacement by rift or plate-edge volcanism; lithospheric uplift, attenuation, and extension; and increased intensity of compressional tectonism. Eocene extensional tectonism and alkaline magmatism in southern British Columbia and the northwestern United States were facilitated by slab-window development.

  15. Slab Leaf Bowls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suitor, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    In science class, fourth graders investigate the structure of plants and leaves from trees and how the process of photosynthesis turns sunlight into sugar proteins. In this article, the author fuses art and science for a creative and successful clay slab project in her elementary art classroom. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  16. The Role of Subducting Ridges in the Formation of Flat Slabs: Insights from the Peruvian Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja; Wagner, Lara; Kumar, Abhash; Beck, Susan; Long, Maureen; Zandt, George; Eakin, Caroline M.

    2015-04-01

    Flattening of the subducting plate is often used to explain various geological features removed far from the subducting margins, including basement-cored uplifts, the cessation of arc volcanism, ignimbrite flare-ups, and the formation of high plateaus and ore deposits [Humphreys et al., 2003; Gutscher et al., 2000; Rosenbaum et al., 2005, Kay and Mpodozis, 2001]. Today, flat slab subduction is observed in central Chile and Peru, representing the modern analogues to the immense paleo-flat slab that subducted beneath the North American continent during the Laramide orogeny (80-55 Ma) [English et al., 2003]. However, how flat slabs form and what controls their inboard and along-strike extent is still poorly understood. To better understand modern and paleo-flat slabs, we focus on the Peruvian flat slab, where the Nazca plate starts to bend at ~90 km depth and travels horizontally for several hundred kilometers beneath the South American plate. Earlier studies propose a correlation between the flat slab and the subducting Nazca Ridge that has been migrating to the south over the past 11 ~Ma [Hampel et al., 2004, Gutscher et al., 2003]. Combining 3D shear wave velocity structure and Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy between ~10° and 18° S, we find that the flat slab has the greatest inboard extent along the track of the subducting Nazca Ridge. North of the ridge track, where the flat slab was initially formed, the flat slab starts to sag, tear and re-initiate steep slab subduction, allowing inflow of warm asthenosphere. Based on our new constraints on the geometry of the subducted plate, we find that the subduction of buoyant oceanic features with overthickened oceanic crust plays a vital role in the formation of flat slabs. We further develop a model of temporal evolution of the Peruvian flab slab that forms as a result of the combined effects of the subducting ridge, trench retreat, and suction forces. Once the buoyant ridge subducts to ~90 km depth, it will fail to

  17. Shear Resistance between Concrete-Concrete Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačovic, Marek

    2013-12-01

    The application of precast beams and cast-in-situ structural members cast at different times has been typical of bridges and buildings for many years. A load-bearing frame consists of a set of prestressed precast beams supported by columns and diaphragms joined with an additionally cast slab deck. This article is focused on the theoretical and experimental analyses of the shear resistance at an interface. The first part of the paper deals with the state-of-art knowledge of the composite behaviour of concrete-concrete structures and a comparison of the numerical methods introduced in the relevant standards. In the experimental part, a set of specimens with different interface treatments was tested until failure in order to predict the composite behaviour of coupled beams. The experimental part was compared to the numerical analysis performed by means of FEM basis nonlinear software.

  18. Carbon dioxide slab laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tulip, J.

    1988-01-12

    A gas slab laser is described comprising: first and second elongated electrodes each including a planar light reflecting surface disposed so as to form a light guide only in a plane perpendicular to the planar surface and to define a gas discharge gap therebetween; a laser gas disposed in the gap; and means for applying a radio frequency current between the first and second electrodes to establish a laser-exciting discharge in the laser gas.

  19. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek concrete scabbling system consists of the MOOSE{reg_sign} scabbler, the SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers, and VAC-PAC. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 3/8 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  20. WORKERS FABRICATE ROOF SLABS FOR MTR BUILDING AT THE CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKERS FABRICATE ROOF SLABS FOR MTR BUILDING AT THE CONSTRUCTION SITE. FORMS WERE MADE OF STEEL. AFTER AN INCH OF CONCRETE HAD BEEN POURED IN THE FORM, A MAT OF REINFORCING STEEL WAS PLACED ON IT. THE REMAINDER OF THE FORM WAS FILLED, AND THE CONCRETE WAS VIBRATED, STRUCK, AND TROWELED. GROOVES AT CORNER WILL HAVE 1/4 INCH RODS WELDED INTO THE EYE OF THE STEEL MAT FOR GROUNDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 578. Unknown Photographer, 9/1/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Workmen and Crawler Crane pouring roof slab and parapet wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Workmen and Crawler Crane pouring roof slab and parapet wall of building - looking northwest. Taken Nov. 15, 1929. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 7165 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. SUB-SLAB PROBE INSTALLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sub-slab sampling has become an integral part of vapor intrusion investigations. It is now recommended in guidance documents developed by EPA and most states. A method for sub-slab probe installation was devised in 2002, presented at conferences through 2005, and finally docume...

  3. Experimental and numerical investigation of slabs on ground subjected to concentrated loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øverli, Jan

    2014-09-01

    An experimental program is presented where a slab on ground is subjected to concentrated loading at the centre, the edges and at the corners. Analytical solutions for the ultimate load capacity fit well with the results obtained in the tests. The non-linear behaviour of the slab is captured by performing nonlinear finite element analyses. The soil is modelled as a no-tension bedding and a smeared crack approach is employed for the concrete. Through a parametric study, the finite element model has been used to assess the influence of subgrade stiffness and shrinkage. The results indicate that drying shrinkage can cause severe cracking in slabs on grade.

  4. Structural Aspects of Railway Truss Bridges Affecting Transverse Shear Forces in Steel-Concrete Composite Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siekierski, Wojciech

    2015-03-01

    At the steel-concrete interface, the horizontal shear forces that are transverse to cross beams occur due to joint action of the steel-concrete composite deck and the truss girders. Numerical analysis showed that values of the forces are big in comparison to the longitudinal shear forces. In both cases extreme force values occur near side edges of a slab. The paper studies possibilities of reduction of these shear forces by structural alterations of the following: rigidity of a concrete slab, arrangement of a wind bracing, arrangement of concrete slab expansion joints. An existing railway truss bridge span has been analysed. Numerical analysis shows that it is possible to reduce the values of shear forces transverse to cross beams. It may reach 20% near the side edges of slabs and 23% in the centre of slab width.

  5. [Thermoluminescence Slab Dosimeter].

    PubMed

    Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Koba, Yusuke; Tamatsu, Satoshi; Sakurai, Noboru; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Fukuda, Kazusige

    2013-01-01

    In 1953 F. Daniels et al. used the property of thermoluminescence in dosimetry for the first time. Since then, numerous TLD have been developed. 2D TLD was investigated for the first time in 1972 by P Broadhead. However, due to excessive fading, difficulties with handling and the time required for measurements, development stalled. At the current time, the majority of TLD are used in small scale, localized dosimetry with a wide dynamic range and personal dosimeters for exposure management. Urushiyama et. al. have taken advantage of the commoditization of CCD cameras in recent years--making large area, high resolution imaging easier--to introduce and develop a 2D TLD. It is expected that these developments will give rise to a new generation of applications for 2D TL dosimetry. This paper introduces the "TL Slab Dosimeter" developed jointly by Urushiyama et. al. and our team, its measurement system and several typical usage scenarios. PMID:24893451

  6. View of Flume Tunnel #5 showing an example of concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Flume Tunnel #5 showing an example of concrete flume covered with concrete slabs as it enters a tunnel under the road (FS 502). Looking southwest - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Flume Tunnel No. 5, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  7. New evidence about the subduction of the Copiapó ridge beneath South America, and its connection with the Chilean-Pampean flat slab, tracked by satellite GOCE and EGM2008 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Orlando; Gimenez, Mario; Folguera, Andres; Spagnotto, Silvana; Bustos, Emilce; Baez, Walter; Braitenberg, Carla

    2015-11-01

    Satellite-only gravity measurements and those integrated with terrestrial observations provide global gravity field models of unprecedented precision and spatial resolution, allowing the analysis of the lithospheric structure. We used the model EGM2008 (Earth Gravitational Model) to calculate the gravity anomaly and the vertical gravity gradient in the South Central Andes region, correcting these quantities by the topographic effect. Both quantities show a spatial relationship between the projected subduction of the Copiapó aseismic ridge (located at about 27°-30° S), its potential deformational effects in the overriding plate, and the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament. This volcanic lineament constitutes a projection of the volcanic arc toward the retroarc zone, whose origin and development were not clearly understood. The analysis of the gravity anomalies, at the extrapolated zone of the Copiapó ridge beneath the continent, shows a change in the general NNE-trend of the Andean structures to an ENE-direction coincident with the area of the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament. This anomalous pattern over the upper plate is interpreted to be linked with the subduction of the Copiapó ridge. We explore the relation between deformational effects and volcanism at the northern Chilean-Pampean flat slab and the collision of the Copiapó ridge, on the basis of the Moho geometry and elastic thicknesses calculated from the new satellite GOCE data. Neotectonic deformations interpreted in previous works associated with volcanic eruptions along the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament is interpreted as caused by crustal doming, imprinted by the subduction of the Copiapó ridge, evidenced by crustal thickening at the sites of ridge inception along the trench. Finally, we propose that the Copiapó ridge could have controlled the northern edge of the Chilean-Pampean flat slab, due to higher buoyancy, similarly to the control

  8. Thermal insulated building slab

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, J. H.

    1985-06-25

    A thermally insulated building foundation structure comprising a monolithic poured concrete foundation extending about the perimeter of a building site and having a plurality of elongate straight sides with flat, vertical outside surfaces with lower portions below the surface of the ground and upper portions above the surface of the ground and having flat, horizontal top surfaces, a thermal insulating girdle about the perimeter of the upper portion of the foundation comprised of a plurality of elongate straight horizontal channel sections in end to end relationship and having vertical outside walls defining the outside surface of said upper portion of the foundation, horizontal top walls defining the outer portion of said top surface of the foundation, horizontal bottom walls and upper and lower flanges on inner edges of the top and bottom walls and cores of thermal insulating material filling the channel sections; and a plurality of anchor units spaced about the girdle and having inner deadman portions set in the concrete and outer portions in secure engagement with the flanges of the channel sections.

  9. Failure of underground concrete structures subjected to blast loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, C. A.; Nash, P. T.; Griner, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    The response and failure of two edges of free reinforced concrete slabs subjected to intermediate blast loadings are examined. The failure of the reinforced concrete structures is defined as a condition where actual separation or fracture of the reinforcing elements has occurred. Approximate theoretical methods using stationary and moving plastic hinge mechanisms with linearly varying and time dependent loadings are developed. Equations developed to predict deflection and failure of reinforced concrete beams are presented and compared with the experimental results.

  10. The Effect of Thickness and Mesh Spacing on the Impact Resistance of Ferrocement Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Ashraful Alam, Md; Syamsir, Agusril; Sulleman, Sorefan; Beddu, Salmia; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Ismail, Firas B.; Usman, Fathoni; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of the thickness and mesh spacing on the impact of ferrocement for the concrete slab of 300mm x 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at height of 150 mm, 350mm, and 500mm has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance of ferrocement against slab thickness and mesh reinforcement spacing. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistance of ferrocement against slab thickness and its mesh spacing. The first and ultimate crack impact resistance for 40 mm slab are 2.00 times and 1.84 times respectively against the 20 mm slab with the same mesh spacing. The first and ultimate crack impact resistance for 40 mm slab with 20 mm mesh spacing are 2.24 times and 3.70 times respectively against 50 mm mesh spacing with the same slab thickness. The mesh with higher content of reinforcement provides more contribution to the slab resistance as compare with the thickness.

  11. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.; Thorsness, C.; Suratwala, T.; Steele, R.; Rogowski, G.

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  12. Delamination detection in reinforced concrete using thermal inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N K; Durbin, P F

    1998-11-30

    We investigated the feasibility of thermal inertia mapping for bridge deck inspections. Using pulsed thermal imaging, we heat-stimulated surrogate delaminations in reinforced concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Using a dual-band infrared camera system, we measured thermal inertia responses of Styrofoam implants under 5 cm of asphalt, 5 cm of concrete, and 10 cm of asphalt and concrete. We compared thermal maps from solar-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs with thermal inertia maps from flash-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Thermal inertia mapping is a tool for visualizing and quantifying subsurface defects. Physically, thermal inertia is a measure of the resistance of the bridge deck to temperature change. Experimentally, it is determined from the inverse slope of the surface temperature versus the inverse square root of time. Mathematically, thermal inertia is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity. Thermal inertia mapping distinguishes delaminated decks which have below-average thermal inertias from normal or shaded decks. Key Words: Pulsed Thermal Imaging, Thermal Inertia, Detection Of Concrete Bridgedeck Delaminations

  13. Moisture dependence of radon transport in concrete: measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Cozmuta, I; van der Graaf, E R; de Meijer, R J

    2003-10-01

    The moisture dependence of the radon-release rate of concrete was measured under well controlled conditions. It was found that the radon-release rate almost linearly increases up to moisture contents of 50 to 60%. At 70 to 80% a maximum was found and for higher moisture contents the radon-release rate decreases very steeply. It is demonstrated that this dependence can be successfully modeled on basis of the multi-phase radon-transport equation in which values for various input parameters (porosity, diffusion coefficient, emanation factor, etc.) were obtained from independent measurements. Furthermore, a concrete structure development model was used to predict at any moment in time the values of input parameters that depend on the evolution of the concrete microstructure. Information on the concrete manufacturing recipe and curing conditions (temperature, relative humidity) was used as input for the concrete structure model. The combined radon transport and concrete structure model supplied sufficient information to assess the influence of relative humidity on the radon source and barrier aspects of concrete. More specifically, the model has been applied to estimate the relative contributions to the radon exhalation rate of a 20-cm-thick concrete slab of radon produced in the concrete slab itself and due to diffusive transport through the slab of radon from soil gas. PMID:13678285

  14. Instrumentation by distributed optical fiber sensors of a new ballastless track structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Gueguen, Ivan; Cailliau, Joël

    2013-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. With its service life of at least 60 years, they require little maintenance and hence they offer great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. A new ballastless track structure has been designed to be circulated up to 300km/h, with a target life of 100 years. It is an interoperable way on concrete slabs that are cast-in-place and slip formed. This structure has been built and tested at the scale one in our laboratory. Indeed, ten millions cyclic loads were applied at 2.5Hz to evaluate the fatigue behaviour under selected mechanical and thermal conditions. To monitor the thermo-mechanical behavior of this new structure and to verify the numerical simulations used for its design, a lot of sensors have been embedded. In particularly, we have tested an optical fiber as distributed sensors to measure strain distribution in the railway model. This sensor can also be used to detect, localize and monitor cracks in concrete slabs. The optical fiber sensing technique ("Rayleigh technique") used in this experimentation has a centimetric spatial resolution which allows to measure complex strain profiles unlike electrical strain gauges which only give local information. Firstly, optical cables used as sensors have been successfully embedded and attached to the reinforcing steel bars in the structure. We have noted that they are resistant enough to resist concrete pouring and working activities. Secondly, strains measured by conventional strain gauges has confirmed the quality of the strain profiles measurements obtained by optical fiber sensors. Moreover, we have found a good agreement between experimental profiles measurements and those obtained by numerical simulations. Early

  15. Impact performance of FRC slabs under various strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horska, Alena; Jiricek, Pavel; Foglar, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Impact resistance of plain concrete and FRC composites gains high importance in the present days. This paper presents outcomes of the experiments focused on performance of FRC slabs subjected to impact loading of various strain rates. The FRC slabs, thickness 30, 60 and 120 mm were subjected to various drop-weight impacts. The different drop-hammer weights provided different loading speeds and strain rates. The performance of the slabs was recorded with the use of high speed cameras. The cameras were used for impact speed control and specimen deflection measurement. With the use of the recordings, the force-time response of the slabs could be plotted. The plots correspond to the mechanical behaviour obtained by static load tests (loading speed 0.2 mm/min) but several differences can be found. Several types of FRC (varying fiber material, fiber content, etc.) were tested and evaluated. The experimental program is supplemented by numerical modelling which provides good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for lift-slab construction operations. 1926.705 Section 1926.705 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for lift-slab construction operations. 1926.705 Section 1926.705 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements for lift-slab construction operations. 1926.705 Section 1926.705 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for lift-slab construction operations. 1926.705 Section 1926.705 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.705 - Requirements for lift-slab construction operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for lift-slab construction operations. 1926.705 Section 1926.705 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete...

  1. Delamination detection in reinforced concrete using thermal inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelGrande, Nancy; Durbin, Philip F.

    1999-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of thermal inertia mapping for bridge deck inspections. Using pulsed thermal imaging, we heat-stimulated surrogate delaminations in reinforced concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Using a dual-band infrared camera system, we measured thermal inertia responses of Styrofoam implants under 5 cm of asphalt, 5 cm of concrete, and 10 cm of asphalt and concrete. We compared thermal maps from solar-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs with thermal inertia maps from flash-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Thermal inertia mapping is a tool for visualizing and quantifying subsurface defects. Physically, thermal inertia is a measure of the resistance of the bridge deck to temperature change. Experimentally, it is determined from the inverse slope of the surface temperature versus the inverse square root of time. Mathematically, thermal inertia is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity. Thermal inertia mapping distinguishes delaminated decks which have below-average thermal inertias from normal or shaded decks.

  2. Quantification of vapor intrusion pathways into a slab-on-ground building under varying environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Bradley M; Davis, Greg B

    2009-02-01

    Potential hydrocarbon-vapor intrusion pathways into a building through a concrete slab-on-ground were investigated and quantified under a variety of environmental conditions to elucidate the potential mechanisms for indoor air contamination. Vapor discharge from the uncovered open ground soil adjacent to the building and subsequent advection into the building was unlikely due to the low soil-gas concentrations at the edge of the building as a result of aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbon vapors. When the building's interior was under ambient pressure, a flux of vapors into the building due to molecular diffusion of vapors through the building's concrete slab (cyclohexane 11 and methylcyclohexane 31 mg m(-2) concrete slab day(-1)) and short-term (up to 8 h) cyclical pressure-driven advection of vapors through an artificial crack (cyclohexane 4.2 x 10(3) and methylcyclohexane 1.2 x 10(4) mg m(-2) cracks day(-1)) was observed. The average subslab vapor concentration under the center of the building was 25,000 microg L(-1). Based on the measured building's interiorvapor concentrations and the building's air exchange rate of 0.66 h(-1), diffusion of vapors through the concrete slab was the dominantvapor intrusion pathway and cyclical pressure exchanges resulted in a near zero advective flux. When the building's interior was under a reduced pressure (-12 Pa), advective transport through cracks or gaps in the concrete slab (cyclohexane 340 and methylcyclohexane 1100 mg m(-2) cracks day(-1)) was the dominant vapor intrusion pathway. PMID:19244997

  3. The Effect of Mortar Grade and Thickness on the Impact Resistance of Ferrocement Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Syamsir, Agusril; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Sulleman, Sorefan; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Ismail, Firas B.; Usman, Fathoni; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and mesh spacing on the impact of ferrocement for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at height of 150 mm, 350mm, and 500mm has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance of ferrocement against the mortar grade and slab thickness. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistance of ferrocement against the mortar grade and the thickness of ferrocement slab. The first and ultimate crack impact resistance of mortar grade 43 (for 40 mm thick slab with mesh reinforcement) are 1.60 times and 1.53 times respectively against the mortar grade 17 slab (of same thickness with mesh reinforcement). The first and ultimate crack impact resistance for 40 mm thick slab (mortar grade 43 with mesh reinforcement) are 3.55 times and 4.49 times respectively against the 20 mm thick slab (of same mortar grade with mesh reinforcement).

  4. Phase conjugated slab laser designator

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Paul, J.L.

    1989-06-06

    A laser designator is described comprising a laser pump means; a high power phase conjugated slab laser amplifier formed of GSGG:Cr:Nd as a lasing material on one side of the pump means; a low power rod shaped laser oscillator on the opposite side of the pump means; and a first plurality of optical reflecting and refracting means for directing and shaping a laser beam which surrounds the pump means and passes through the rod and slab; and a telescope means coupled to the beam to direct it to a distant target.

  5. A wrinkly phononic crystal slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Alireza; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-03-01

    The buckling induced surface instability is employed to propose a tunable phononic crystal slab composed of a stiff thin film bonded on a soft elastomer. Wrinkles formation is used to generate one-dimensional periodic scatterers at the surface of a finitely thick slab. Wrinkles' pattern change and corresponding stress is employed to control wave propagation triggered by a compressive strain. Simulation results show that the periodic wrinkly structure can be used as a transformative phononic crystal which can switch band diagram of the structure in a reversible behavior. Results of this study provide opportunities for the smart design of tunable switch and elastic wave filters at ultrasonic and hypersonic frequency ranges.

  6. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening: Insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models that have been conducted to improve our understanding of the influence of slab window opening on subduction dynamics, mantle flow and associated dynamic topography over geological time scales. The adopted setup consists of a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the subduction of a fixed plate of silicone (lithosphere) under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We found that the opening of a slab window does not produce consistent changes of the geometry and the kinematics of the slab. On the contrary, slab-induced mantle circulation, quantified both in the vertical and horizontal sections using the Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified. In particular, rollback subduction and the opening of the slab window generate a complex mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of poloidal and toroidal components, with the importance of each evolving according to kinematic stages. Mantle coming from the oceanic domain floods through the slab window, indenting the supra-slab mantle zone and producing its deformation without any mixing between mantle portions. The opening of the slab window and the upwelling of sub-slab mantle produce a regional-scale non-isostatic topographic uplift of the overriding plate that would correspond to values ranging between ca. 1 and 5 km in nature. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compared them to the tectonics and volcanism of the Patagonian subduction zone. We found that the anomalous backarc volcanism that has been developing since the middle Miocene could result from the lateral flow of sub-slab

  7. Development of a Leave-in-Place Slab Edge Insulating Form System

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Hoeschele; Eric Lee

    2009-08-31

    Concrete slabs represent the primary foundation type in residential buildings in the fast-growing markets throughout the southern and southwestern United States. Nearly 75% of the 2005 U.S. population growth occurred in these southern tier states. Virtually all of these homes have uninsulated slab perimeters that transfer a small, but steady, flow of heat from conditioned space to outdoors during the heating season. It is estimated that new home foundations constructed each year add 0.016 quads annually to U.S. national energy consumption; we project that roughly one quarter of this amount can be attributed to heat loss through the slab edge and the remaining three quarters to deep ground transfers, depending upon climate. With rising concern over national energy use and the impact of greenhouse gas emissions, it is becoming increasingly imperative that all cost-effective efforts to improve building energy efficiency be implemented. Unlike other building envelope components that have experienced efficiency improvements over the years, slab edge heat loss has largely been overlooked. From our vantage point, a marketable slab edge insulation system would offer significant benefits to homeowners, builders, and the society as a whole. Conventional slab forming involves the process of digging foundation trenches and setting forms prior to the concrete pour. Conventional wood form boards (usually 2 x 10's) are supported by vertical stakes on the outer form board surface, and by supporting 'kickers' driven diagonally from the top of the form board into soil outside the trench. Typically, 2 x 10's can be used only twice before they become waste material, contributing to an additional 400 pounds of construction waste per house. Removal of the form boards and stakes also requires a follow-up trip to the jobsite by the concrete subcontractor and handling (storage/disposal) of the used boards. In the rare cases where the slab is insulated (typically custom homes with radiant

  8. Marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book examines how the chemical and physical properties of the oceans affect the durability, fatigue, and corrosion of structures. Structure types addressed include oil platforms, arctic structures, and sea walls. Reviews qualities of plain, reinforced, prestressed, and floating concrete. Discusses the inspection, maintenance, and repair of concrete structures.

  9. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-01

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction. PMID:12364804

  10. Emplacement of the Kodiak batholith and slab-window migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farris, David W.; Haeussler, P.; Friedman, R.; Paterson, S.R.; Saltus, R.W.; Ayuso, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Kodiak batholith is one of the largest, most elongate intrusive bodies in the forearc Sanak-Baranof plutonic belt located in southern Alaska. This belt is interpreted to have formed during the subduction of an oceanic spreading center and the associated migration of a slab window. Individual plutons of the Kodiak batholith track the location and evolution of the underlying slab window. Six U/Pb zircon ages from the axis of the batholith exhibit a northeastward-decreasing age progression of 59.2 ?? 0.2 Ma at the southwest end to 58.4 ?? 0.2 Ma at the northeast tip. The trench-parallel rate of age progression is within error of the average slab-window migration rate for the entire Sanak-Baranof belt (???19 cm/yr). Structural relationships, U/Pb ages, and a model of new gravity data indicate that magma from the Kodiak batholith ascended 5-10 km as a northeastward-younging series of 1-8-km-diameter viscoelastic diapirs. Individual plutons ascended by multiple emplacement mechanisms including downward flow, collapse of wall rock, stoping, and diking. Stokes flow xenolith calculations suggest ascent rates of 5-100 m/yr and an effective magmatic viscosity of ???107-108 Pa s. Pre-existing structural or lithologic heterogeneities did not dominantly control the location of the main batholith. Instead, its location was determined by migration of the slab window at depth. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  11. Phase 2 microwave concrete decontamination results

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Foster, D. Jr.; Wilson, C.T.; Schaich, C.R.

    1995-04-01

    The authors report on the results of the second phase of a four-phase program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. The microwave energy is directed at the concrete surface through the use of an optimized wave guide antenna, or applicator, and this energy rapidly heats the free water present in the interstitial spaces of the concrete matrix. The resulting steam pressure causes the surface to burst in much the same way popcorn pops in a home microwave oven. Each steam explosion removes several square centimeters of concrete surface that are collected by a highly integrated wave guide and vacuum system. The authors call this process the microwave concrete decontamination, or MCD, process. In the first phase of the program the principle of microwaves concrete removal concrete surfaces was demonstrated. In these experiments, concrete slabs were placed on a translator and moved beneath a stationary microwave system. The second phase demonstrated the ability to mobilize the technology to remove the surfaces from concrete floors. Area and volume concrete removal rates of 10.4 cm{sup 2}/s and 4.9 cm{sup 3}/S, respectively, at 18 GHz were demonstrated. These rates are more than double those obtained in Phase 1 of the program. Deeper contamination can be removed by using a longer residence time under the applicator to create multiple explosions in the same area or by taking multiple passes over previously removed areas. Both techniques have been successfully demonstrated. Small test sections of painted and oil-soaked concrete have also been removed in a single pass. Concrete with embedded metal anchors on the surface has also been removed, although with some increased variability of removal depth. Microwave leakage should not pose any operational hazard to personnel, since the observed leakage was much less than the regulatory standard.

  12. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek scabbling technology was tested at Florida International University (FIU) and is being evaluated as a baseline technology. This report evaluates it for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek concrete scabbling system consisted of the MOOSE{reg_sign}, SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I, and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross-section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 318 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  13. Modified creep and shrinkage prediction model B3 for serviceability limit state analysis of composite slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Relatively little research has been reported on the time-dependent in-service behavior of composite concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork and little guidance is available for calculating long-term deflections. The drying shrinkage profile through the thickness of a composite slab is greatly affected by the impermeable steel deck at the slab soffit, and this has only recently been quantified. This paper presents the results of long-term laboratory tests on composite slabs subjected to both drying shrinkage and sustained loads. Based on laboratory measurements, a design model for the shrinkage strain profile through the thickness of a slab is proposed. The design model is based on some modifications to an existing creep and shrinkage prediction model B3. In addition, an analytical model is developed to calculate the time-dependent deflection of composite slabs taking into account the time-dependent effects of creep and shrinkage. The calculated deflections are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  14. Evidence for a coherent southeastern edge of the Farallon slab window from USArray tomography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, Alexander

    Before the San Andreas Fault developed, subduction of the ancient Farallon plate dominated North America's west coast. As the Pacific-Farallon ridge reached the continent and Farallon subduction became restricted to separate regions, an area with no slab formed under southwestern North America. The northern boundary of this "slab window" is well-defined in recent high-resolution tomography models derived from USArray data, but the geometry of the southeastern edge of the slab window has received less attention. I will show that this eastern edge exists as a coherent boundary separating the subducted Cocos plate from the slab window. I adapt stage pole data for the Cocos plate into a single surface slab model designed to track the motion of the plate through time. This model of the Cocos plate geometry is consistent with recently published tomography models derived from combinations of USArray and global seismic data. The tomography results suggest the subducted slab remains intact along the southeastern edge of the Farallon slab window.

  15. Experimental constraints on the impact of slab dip, gaps and rollback on mantle wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, J. G.; Szwaja, S.; Kincaid, C. R.; Fischer, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted fluids experiments to better understand how subduction zone mantle flow and seismic anisotropy relate to slab dip variations, slab gaps, and retrograde trench motion. Subducting lithosphere was modeled with two rubber-reinforced continuous belts that pass around rollers at the trench and at the equivalent of 670 km depth; the advecting mantle was represented by an isoviscous glucose fluid. Each belt had a variable dip and speed, and trench rollback was modeled using translation of the belt system. Neutral density rotation markers ("whiskers") as well as beads and bubbles were used to track flow patterns; whiskers were also used as proxies for finite strain and were assumed to reflect the evolution of olivine fabrics and anisotropy. The dips of the two slab segments were systematically varied from 30° to 80° at subduction rates equivalent to 4 and 8 cm/yr, and in select cases trench rollback equivalent to 3 cm/yr was imposed. Reference cases with identical parameters for the two slab belts produced mantle wedge flow that reflected simple entrainment by the slab, with flow lines that were roughly trench-normal in much of the wedge, except for toroidal flow around the lateral edges of the slab. Dip variations between the slab segments deflected mantle wedge flow lines towards trench-parallel in the direction of the shallower slab, in agreement with prior numerical modeling studies. The degree of along-arc deflection increased as the slab dip difference grew. Deflection also increased as the absolute dip of the shallower-dipping segment decreased, as predicted by analytical estimates of trench-parallel pressure gradients (Hall et al., 2000). Whisker alignments showed the greatest evidence for extension and alignment of olivine a-axes that are sub-parallel to the trench in the mantle wedge close to the change in slab dip, consistent with the numerical models of Kneller and Van Keken (2007). The addition of trench rollback to a given set of experimental

  16. Preface: Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig R.; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to publish this special issue of the journal Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors entitled "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics". This issue is an outgrowth of the international symposium "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics", which was held on February 25-27, 2009, in Kyoto, Japan. This symposium was organized by the "Stagnant Slab Project" (SSP) research group to present the results of the 5-year project and to facilitate intensive discussion with well-known international researchers in related fields. The SSP and the symposium were supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (16075101) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government. In the symposium, key issues discussed by participants included: transportation of water into the deep mantle and its role in slab-related dynamics; observational and experimental constraints on deep slab properties and the slab environment; modeling of slab stagnation to constrain its mechanisms in comparison with observational and experimental data; observational, experimental and modeling constraints on the fate of stagnant slabs; eventual accumulation of stagnant slabs on the core-mantle boundary and its geodynamic implications. This special issue is a collection of papers presented in the symposium and other papers related to the subject of the symposium. The collected papers provide an overview of the wide range of multidisciplinary studies of mantle dynamics, particularly in the context of subduction, stagnation, and the fate of deep slabs.

  17. Influence of Elevated Temperatures on Pet-Concrete Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, C.; Camacho, N.; Hernández, M.; Matheus, A.; Gutiérrez, A.

    2008-08-01

    Lightweight aggregate is an important material in reducing the unit weight of concrete complying with special concrete structures of large high-rise buildings. Besides, the use of recycled PET bottles as lightweight aggregate in concrete is an effective contribution for environment preservation. So, the objective of the present work was to study experimentally the flexural strength of the PET -concrete blends and the thermal degradation of the PET in the concrete, when the blends with 10 and 20% in volume of PET were exposed to different temperatures (200, 400, 600 °C). The flexural strength of concrete-PET exposed to a heat source is strongly dependent on the temperature, water/cement ratio, as well as the content and particle size of PET. However, the activation energy is affected by the temperature, location of the PET particles on the slabs and the water/cement ratio. Higher water content originates thermal and hydrolytic degradation on the PET, while on the concrete, a higher vapor pressure which causes an increase in crack formation. The values of the activation energy are higher on the center of the slabs than on the surface, since concrete is a poor heat conductor.

  18. Down-dip and Along-strike Stress in Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, P.; Carminati, E.; Basili, R.; Doglioni, C.

    2014-12-01

    The reconstructed stress fields for intermediate depths in slabs (between 100 and 300 km) remain enigmatic. Slab pull should enhance downdip tension, but downdip compression is often observed.Based on hotspot tracks (indicating a relative motion between the lithosphere and the mantle) several researchers proposed a westward drift of the lithosphere with debated velocities (2-13 cm/yr). Available data indicates that dominant down-dip tension occurs along E-directed subductions (e.g., Chile) sustained by the eastward relative mantle flow and down-dip compression along W-directed subductions (e.g., Tonga) encroached by the mantle motion. In this perspective, 3D viscoelastic models (FEM) were performed to investigate the origin of stress in slabs at intermediate depths. Geometries inspired to real subduction zones, were used to analyze the effect of the principal geodynamic forces (slab pull, mantle flow, plate convergence), the correlation between subduction polarity (i.e., how the mantle flow approaches the slab) and geometry, the nature of down-dip and along-strike stresses (poorly investigated in the literature).We conclude that, although the stress in slabs is controlled by several geodynamic processes, down-dip compression is favored by mantle flow opposing the slab, whereas down-dip tension is enhanced by mantle flow sustaining the slab. These predictions are in agreement with available geophysical observations.Substantial along-strike deformation affects intermediate and deeper regions of the slab when mantle flow is enhanced. Down-dip and along-strike axes form couples that tend to rotate approaching the slab sides. The larger the lateral extent of the plate the most this effect is evident. According to these findings, along-strike tension or compression comes out in response to the flexure (forward or backward) of the lithosphere depending on the slab longitudinal curvature. Along-strike tension occurs in case of slabs curved towards the mantle flow direction

  19. 80. Laurel Fork Creek Bridge #2. Example of a concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. Laurel Fork Creek Bridge #2. Example of a concrete slab bridge with T beams. It was built in 1937 and the wing walls were faced with stone to blend with its surroundings. Looking northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  20. 129. Julian Price Memorial Park. Price Lake Dam. A concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    129. Julian Price Memorial Park. Price Lake Dam. A concrete slab bridge crosses the top of the dam impounding a forty-seven acre lake. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  1. Monitoring Stress Changes in a Concrete Bridge with Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähler, S.; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Niederleithinger, E.; Pirskawetz, S.

    2009-12-01

    The sensitivity of coda waves for material changes has been demonstrated in various environments ranging form laboratory scale to regional seismology. Here we present a test for monitoring stress induced velocity variations in a concrete construction. The construction is a bridge made of reinforced concrete in Germany that is build in incremental launching method (Taktschiebe-Mode). This means that construction takes place at one end of the bridge from which the bridge is successively pushed over the pillars as the constructions continues. During the movement of the construction over the pillars the stress in the girder and the deck slab undergoes changes between 0 and 14 MPa in horizontal direction. We used seismic equipment to induce elastic waves in the deck slab of the bridge at different position of the array relative to the supporting pillars. Comparing reverberating waves in slab recorded at different stress states we can infer changes in the propagation velocity. The observed velocity change is compared to modeled stress variations in the slab. Comparison is difficult due to imprecise positioning of the array and the spatially periodic stress variations. But we can show that the observed velocity variation is in agreement with the predictions from the stress model. Samples of the concrete used in the bridge are tested under different loads in the laboratory to infer the stress-velocity relation. The experiments show that the acousto-elastic effect in the specific concrete can account for the observed velocity variations.

  2. Numerical Models of Subduction and Slab Detachment: Placing a Lower Bound on the Strength of Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; Andrews, E.

    2007-12-01

    Subduction provides the main driving force for the motion of tectonic plates at the Earth's surface through slab- pull and sinking-induced flow in the surrounding mantle. The ability of the slab to directly transmit slab-pull forces to the tectonic plate at the surface depends on the minimum strength and rheology (e.g., viscous, plastic) of the slab. Previous models have shown that observations including the state of stress in slabs, dynamic topography and the geoid above slabs, the evolution of slab and the kinematic history of subduction can be well-matched by a variety of models with either low viscosity (i.e., 100-1,000 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) or high viscosity slabs (i.e., more than 10,000 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle). However, in many of the models in which a good match to observations is found for low viscosity slabs, the maximum slab viscosity is imposed as a cut-off value, which forces the entire slab to have a more or less uniform viscosity independent of strain-rate or stress magnitude, rather than a plastic yielding-type rheology. We present numerical models demonstrating that when the non-Newtonian viscosity of the upper mantle and plastic yielding behavior of slabs are taken into account, the minimum yield strength that allows for continuous subduction is approximately 300- 500 MPa, which leads to high viscosity slabs with some localized lower viscosity regions. A yield stress of 10-100 MPa is required to form uniformly low viscosity slabs, but these slabs detach from the subducting plate, due to localized weakening, when the slab reaches a length of 200-300 km, even when subduction is facilitated by a low viscosity shear zone and kinematically-imposed surface velocities. In contrast, detachment of higher strength slabs in fully-dynamic models only occurs when the shear zone is removed and prevents further subduction.

  3. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H2O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  4. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism.

    PubMed

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-05-17

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H(2)O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  5. Noise reduction in urban LRT networks by combining track based solutions.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Vanhonacker, Patrick

    2016-10-15

    The overall objective of the Quiet-Track project is to provide step-changing track based noise mitigation and maintenance schemes for railway rolling noise in LRT (Light Rail Transit) networks. WP 4 in particular focuses on the combination of existing track based solutions to yield a global performance of at least 6dB(A). The validation was carried out using a track section in the network of Athens Metro Line 1 with an existing outside concrete slab track (RHEDA track) where high airborne rolling noise was observed. The procedure for the selection of mitigation measures is based on numerical simulations, combining WRNOISE and IMMI software tools for noise prediction with experimental determination of the required track and vehicle parameters (e.g., rail and wheel roughness). The availability of a detailed rolling noise calculation procedure allows for detailed designing of measures and of ranking individual measures. It achieves this by including the modelling of the wheel/rail source intensity and of the noise propagation with the ability to evaluate the effect of modifications at source level (e.g., grinding, rail dampers, wheel dampers, change in resiliency of wheels and/or rail fixation) and of modifications in the propagation path (absorption at the track base, noise barriers, screening). A relevant combination of existing solutions was selected in the function of the simulation results. Three distinct existing solutions were designed in detail aiming at a high rolling noise attenuation and not affecting the normal operation of the metro system: Action 1: implementation of sound absorbing precast elements (panel type) on the track bed, Action 2: implementation of an absorbing noise barrier with a height of 1.10-1.20m above rail level, and Action 3: installation of rail dampers. The selected solutions were implemented on site and the global performance was measured step by step for comparison with simulations. PMID:26028336

  6. Dynamic uplift during slab flattening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávila, Federico M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-09-01

    Subduction exerts a strong control on surface topography and is the main cause of large vertical motions in continents, including past events of large-scale marine flooding and tilting. The mechanism is dynamic deflection: the sinking of dense subducted lithosphere gives rise to stresses that directly pull down the surface. Here we show that subduction does not always lead to downward deflections of the Earth's surface. Subduction of young lithosphere at shallow angles (flat subduction) leaves it neutrally or even positively buoyant with respect to underlying mantle because the lithosphere is relatively warm compared with older lithosphere, and because the thickened and hence drier oceanic crust does not undergo the transformation of basalt to denser eclogite. Accounting for neutrally buoyant flat segments along with large variations in slab morphology in the South American subduction zone explains along-strike and temporal changes in dynamic topography observed in the geologic record since the beginning of the Cenozoic. Our results show that the transition from normal subduction to slab flattening generates dynamic uplift, preventing back-arc marine flooding.

  7. Application of headed studs in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composite slab of steel beam-column connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cui; Nakashima, Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) is a promising material with high strength in both compression and tension compared with normal concrete. The ductility is also greatly improved because of 6% volume portion of straight steel fibers. A steel beam-column connection with Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) slab diaphragms is proposed to overcome the damage caused by the weld. The push-out test results suggested that the application of SFRCC promises larger shear forces transferred through headed studs allocated in a small area in the slab. Finite element models were developed to simulate the behavior of headed studs. The failure mechanism of the grouped arrangement is further discussed based on a series of parametric analysis. In the proposed connection, the SFRCC slab is designed as an exterior diaphragm to transfer the beam flange load to the column face. The headed studs are densely arranged on the beam flange to connect the SFRCC slab diaphragms and steel beams. The seismic performance and failure mechanism of the SFRCC slab diaphragm beam-column connection were investigated based on the cyclic loading test. Beam hinge mechanism was achieved at the end of the SFRCC slab diaphragm by using sufficient studs and appropriate rebars in the SFRCC slab.

  8. An evaluation of controlled permeability formwork for long-term durability of structural concrete elements

    SciTech Connect

    Suryavanshi, A.K.; Swamy, R.N.

    1997-07-01

    The long-term performance of a concrete slab (CPF slab) exposed to chloride ingress and atmospheric carbonation from the surface generated by controlled permeability formwork (CPF) is investigated. The results are compared with a similar slab exposed to long-term chloride ingress and atmospheric carbonation from the cast face (Control slab). Techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analyses (DTA) were employed to determine the resistance against carbonation while, mercury porosimetry was used for investigating the pore size distribution at the surface of the slabs. Amount of acid soluble chlorides was determined by using Volhard`s method. The CPF employed at the bottom of the mould was not fully effective in its intended purpose of generating a permanent and dense impermeable concrete layer adjacent to it when the design water-cement (w/c) ration of the concrete mix was 0.60. This resulted in an almost similar extent of carbonation at the surface for both CPF and control slabs as shown by XRD and DTA studies. Similarly, there were no significant differences in the amount of chlorides and their depths of penetration for both CPF and control slabs, although the former was marginally superior in chloride penetration resistance at the surface.

  9. Subducting Slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, C.; Braun, J.; Husson, L.; Le Carlier de Veslud, C.; Thieulot, C.; Yamato, P.; Grujic, D.

    2010-12-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  10. Subducting slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, Christelle; Braun, Jean; Husson, Laurent; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Thieulot, Cedric; Yamato, Philippe; Grujic, Djordje

    2010-08-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  11. Elastic Wave Propagation in Concrete and Continuous Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Gi, Yu-Fung; Pan, Chi-Ling; Cheng, Chia-Chi

    2005-04-01

    Elastic wave methods, such as the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the impact echo, are often subject to multiple reflections at the boundaries of various constituents of concrete. Current study aims to improve the feature identification of elastic wave propagation due to buried objects in concrete slabs and cylinders. Embedded steel reinforcement, steel and PVC tubes, wooden disks, and rubber spheres are tested. The received signals are analyzed using continuous wavelet transform. As a result, signals are decomposed into distinctive frequency bands with transient information preserved. The interpretation of multiple reflections at different boundary conditions thus becomes more straightforward. Features related to reflections from steel bar, PVC tube, and steel tube can be readily identified in the magnitude plot of wavelet coefficients. Vibration modes of the concrete slab corresponding to different buried objects can also be separated based on corresponding time duration.

  12. Elastic Wave Propagation in Concrete and Continuous Wavelet Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.-H.; Gi, Y.-F.; Pan, C.-L.; Cheng, C.-C.

    2005-04-09

    Elastic wave methods, such as the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the impact echo, are often subject to multiple reflections at the boundaries of various constituents of concrete. Current study aims to improve the feature identification of elastic wave propagation due to buried objects in concrete slabs and cylinders. Embedded steel reinforcement, steel and PVC tubes, wooden disks, and rubber spheres are tested. The received signals are analyzed using continuous wavelet transform. As a result, signals are decomposed into distinctive frequency bands with transient information preserved. The interpretation of multiple reflections at different boundary conditions thus becomes more straightforward. Features related to reflections from steel bar, PVC tube, and steel tube can be readily identified in the magnitude plot of wavelet coefficients. Vibration modes of the concrete slab corresponding to different buried objects can also be separated based on corresponding time duration.

  13. The slab geometry laser. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Kane, T. J.; Kuhn, K.; Byer, R. L.; Unternahrer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Slab geometry solid-state lasers offer significant performance improvements over conventional rod-geometry lasers. A detailed theoretical description of the thermal, stress, and beam-propagation characteristics of a slab laser is presented. The analysis includes consideration of the effects of the zig-zag optical path, which eliminates thermal and stress focusing and reduces residual birefringence.

  14. Methods for ultimate load analysis of concrete containments

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, R.S.; Rashid, Y.R.; Yuan, K.A.; Lu, Y.M.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of the research project described in this interim report is to develop a qualified methodology for the ultimate load analysis of concrete containment structures. The EPRI-sponsored nonlinear finite element code ABAQUS-EPGEN, which has recently been modified to incorporate a constitutive model for plain concrete and modeling capabilities for reinforced and prestressed concrete containments, is utilized as the structural analysis tool in this development. The ABAQUS-EPGEN concrete modeling and analysis capabilities are first evaluated by comparing measured data with code predictions for full-scale reinforced concrete slab specimens tested under uniaxial and biaxial tension. These specimen tests simulate the behavior of the cylindrical wall of a typical concrete containment structure under internal pressure. The calculated and measured strain comparisons are used to improve the constitutive model and to qualify the code for concrete containment analysis. The second part of this effort deals with the ultimate load analysis of reinforced and prestressed containments to determine bounds on the global overpressure capacities of typical concrete containment structures. The third part of this effort further examines such local effects through a substructural analysis of the liner-concrete interaction at major concrete cracks.

  15. Looking east inside of the 44" slab mill building at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east inside of the 44" slab mill building at the red hot slabs being conveyed to the hot beds. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, 44" Slab Mill, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  16. A cryogenic slab CO laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kozlov, A Yu; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2009-03-31

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 {yields} V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 {mu}m. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of {approx}12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved {approx}14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at {approx} 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 {mu}m with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 {yields} V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 {mu}m. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than {+-}10 %) was stable for more than an hour. (lasers)

  17. On the Viability of Slab Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.; Magni, V.; Maunder, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Melting subducted mafic crust is commonly assumed to be the main process leading to silicic melts with an adakitic signature, which may form Archaean granitoids and generate early continental crust. Alternatively, melting of the overriding lower mafic crust and near-Moho depth fractional crystallisation of mantle melts can form differentiated magmas with an adakitic signature. Previous work shows how only very young slabs melt through dehydration melting, or depict melting of dry eclogites via water addition from deeper slab dehydration. Alternatively, underplated subducted material via delamination and diapirism may be important in the generation of felsic continental crust. We quantify subduction dehydration and melting reactions in a warm subduction system using a thermo-mechanical subduction model with a thermodynamic database. We find that even young (hot) slabs dehydrate before reaching their solidus, which suppresses any slab dehydration melting and creates significant amounts of mantle wedge melting irrespective of slab age. Significant slab crust melting is only achieved in young slabs via water present melting if metamorphic fluids from the subducted mantle flux through the dry eclogites. These slab melts, however, interfere with massive mantle wedge melting and unlikely to participate in the overriding plate felsic magmatism, unlike the shallower, primitive mantle wedge melts. We also explore the conditions for delaminating the mafic subducted crust. For a wide range of ages, the uppermost part of the subducted slab might delaminate to form compositionally buoyant plumes that rise through the mantle wedge. Thick crust on young slabs (as perhaps representative for a hotter, early Earth) may delaminate entirely and reside in the mantle wedge. Under such conditions, this ponded crust might melts subsequently, forming "adakitic" felsic melts contributing to a significant amount of the overriding plate crustal volumes.

  18. Slab stagnation and detachment under northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Results of tomography models around the Japanese Islands show the existence of a gap between the horizontally lying (stagnant) slab extending under northeastern China and the fast seismic velocity anomaly in the lower mantle. A simple conversion from the fast velocity anomaly to the low-temperature anomaly shows a similar feature. This feature appears to be inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations on the interaction between the slab and phase transitions with temperature-dependent viscosity. Such numerical models predict a continuous slab throughout the mantle. I extend previous analyses of the tomography model and model calculations to infer the origins of the gap beneath northeastern China. Results of numerical simulations that take the geologic history of the subduction zone into account suggest two possible origins for the gap: (1) the opening of the Japan Sea led to a breaking off of the otherwise continuous subducting slab, or (2) the western edge of the stagnant slab is the previous subducted ridge, which was the plate boundary between the extinct Izanagi and the Pacific plates. Origin (2) suggesting the present horizontally lying slab has accumulated since the ridge subduction, is preferable for explaining the present length of the horizontally lying slab in the upper mantle. Numerical models of origin (1) predict a stagnant slab in the upper mantle that is too short, and a narrow or non-existent gap. Preferred models require rather stronger flow resistance of the 660-km phase change than expected from current estimates of the phase transition property. Future detailed estimates of the amount of the subducted Izanagi plate and the present stagnant slab would be useful to constrain models. A systematic along-arc variation of the slab morphology from the northeast Japan to Kurile arcs is also recognized, and its understanding may constrain the 3D mantle flow there.

  19. Geopolymer concrete for structural use: Recent findings and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruddin, M. F.; Malkawi, A. B.; Fauzi, A.; Mohammed, B. S.; Almattarneh, H. M.

    2016-06-01

    Geopolymer binders offer a possible solution for several problems that facing the current cement industry. These binders exhibit similar or better engineering properties compared to cement and can utilize several types of waste materials. This paper presents the recent research progress regarding the structural behaviour of reinforced geopolymer concrete members including beams, columns and slabs. The reported results showed that the structural behaviour of the reinforced geopolymer concrete members is similar to the known behaviour of the ordinary reinforced concrete members. In addition, the currently available standards have been conservatively used for analysis and designing of reinforced geopolymer concrete structures. On the other hand, the main hurdles facing the spread of geopolymer concrete was the absence of standards and the concerns about the long-term properties. Other issues included the safety, cost and liability.

  20. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  1. Impact Resistance Performance of Kenaf Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Syamsir, Agusril; Sheng, Chiam Yung; Beddu, Salmia; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Usman, Fathoni; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the performance of kenaf fibre mesh reinforced concrete (KFMRC) with varied kenaf fibre mesh reinforcement content for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced with different mesh diameter at constant spacing with varied slab thickness subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.40 m height has been used in this research work. The main variables for the study is to find the relationship of the impact resistance against the amount of mesh reinforcement and slab thickness. A linear relationship has been established between first and ultimate crack resistance against kenaf fiber diameters by the experiment. The linear relationship has also been established between the service (first) crack and ultimate crack resistance against the slab thickness. The threshold (highest) values for service crack and ultimate crack is 47.9 N/mm2 and 130.58 N/mm2 respectively observed and computed for 50 mm slab with 7 mm diameter mesh.

  2. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  3. INVESTIGATION ON THE RESPONSE OF SEGMENTED CONCRETE TARGETS TO PROJECTILE IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, Paul M.; Cargile, James D.; Kistler, Bruce L.; La Saponara, Valeria

    2009-07-19

    The study of penetrator performance without free-surface effects can require prohibitively large monolithic targets. One alternative to monolithic targets is to use segmented targets made by stacking multiple concrete slabs in series. This paper presents an experimental investigation on the performance of segmented concrete targets. Six experiments were carried out on available small scale segmented and monolithic targets using instrumented projectiles. In all but one experiment using stacked slabs, the gap between slabs remained open. In the final experiment design, grout was inserted between the slabs, and this modification produced a target response that more closely represents that of the monolithic target. The results from this study suggest that further research on segmented targets is justified, to explore in more detail the response of segmented targets and the results of large scale tests when using segmented targets versus monolithic targets.

  4. 4. AN IMAGE, LOOKING NORTH WEST, OF THE TRACK, BALLAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AN IMAGE, LOOKING NORTH WEST, OF THE TRACK, BALLAST AND CONCRETE BALUSTRADES, SHOWING HOW THE BRIDGE WAS DESIGNED TO TAKE TWO SETS OF TRACK. - Vandalia Railroad Bridge, Spanning U.S. Route 40, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  5. Sausage oscillations of coronal plasma slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsey, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Fludra, A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Sausage oscillations are observed in plasma non-uniformities of the solar corona as axisymmetric perturbations of the non-uniformity. Often, these non-uniformities can be modelled as field-aligned slabs of the density enhancement. Aims: We perform parametric studies of sausage oscillations of plasma slabs, aiming to determine the dependence of the oscillation period on its parameters, and the onset of leaky and trapped regimes of the oscillations. Methods: Slabs with smooth transverse profiles of the density of a zero-beta plasma are perturbed by an impulsive localised perturbation of the sausage symmetry. In particular, the slab can contain an infinitely thin current sheet in its centre. The initial value problem is then solved numerically. The numerical results are subject to spectral analysis. The results are compared with analytical solutions for a slab with a step-function profile and also with sausage oscillations of a plasma cylinder. Results: We established that sausage oscillations in slabs generally have the same properties as in plasma cylinders. In the trapped regime, the sausage oscillation period increases with the increase in the longitudinal wavelength. In the leaky regime, the dependence of the period on the wavelength experiences saturation, and the period becomes independent of the wavelength in the long-wavelength limit. In the leaky regime the period is always longer than in the trapped regime. The sausage oscillation period in a slab is always longer than in a cylinder with the same transverse profile. In slabs with steeper transverse profiles, sausage oscillations have longer periods. The leaky regime occurs at shorter wavelengths in slabs with smoother profiles.

  6. Detecting slab structure beneath the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Sun, Daoyuan; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    The presence of subducted slabs in the Mediterranean has been well documented with seismic tomography, however, these images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, underestimate the sharpness of the structures. The position and extent of the slabs and the presence possible tears or gaps in the subducted lithosphere are still debated, yet the shape and location these structures are important for kinematic reconstructions and evolution of the entire subduction zone system. Extensive distribution of broadband seismic instrumentation in the Mediterranean (Italian National Seismic Network in Italy and the NSF-PICASSO project in Spain and Morocco) has allowed us to use alternative methodologies to detect the position of the slabs and slab tears beneath the Central and Western Mediterranean. Using S receiver functions we are able to identify S-to-p conversions from the bottom of the subducted slab and a lack of these signals where there are gaps or tears in the slab. We also analyze broadband waveforms for changes in P wave coda from deep (> 300 km depth) local earthquakes. The waveform records for stations in southern Italy and around the Betic-Rif show large amplitude, high frequency (f > 5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after relatively low-frequency onset. High frequency arrivals are the strongest from events whose raypaths travel within the slab to the stations where they are recorded allowing for mapping of where the subducted material is located within the upper mantle. These two methods, along with inferring the slab position from fast P-wave velocity perturbations in tomography and intermediate depth seismicity, provide additional geophysical evidence to aid in interpretation of the complex, segmented slab structure beneath the Mediterranean.

  7. Andean flat subduction maintained by slab tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, Gerben; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Kosters, Martha; Boschman, Lydian; McQuarrie, Nadine; Spakman, Wim

    2016-04-01

    In two segments below the Andean mountain belt, the Nazca Plate is currently subducting sub-horizontally below South America over a distance of 200-300 km before the plate bends into the mantle. Such flat slab segments have pronounced effects on orogenesis and magmatism and are widely believed to be caused by the downgoing plate resisting subduction due to its local positive buoyancy. In contrast, here we show that flat slabs primarily result from a local resistance against rollback rather than against subduction. From a kinematic reconstruction of the Andean fold-thrust belt we determine up to ~390 km of shortening since ~50 Ma. During this time the South American Plate moved ~1400 km westward relative to the mantle, thus forcing ~1000 km of trench retreat. Importantly, since the 11-12 Ma onset of flat slab formation, ~1000 km of Nazca Plate subduction occurred, much more than the flat slab lengths, which leads to our main finding that the flat slabs, while being initiated by arrival of buoyant material at the trench, are primarily maintained by locally impeded rollback. We suggest that dynamic support of flat subduction comes from the formation of slab tunnels below segments with the most buoyant material. These tunnels trap mantle material until tearing of the tunnel wall provides an escape route. Fast subduction of this tear is followed by a continuous slab and the process can recur during ongoing rollback of the 7000 km wide Nazca slab at segments with the most buoyant subducting material, explaining the regional and transient character of flat slabs. Our study highlights the importance of studying subduction dynamics in absolute plate motion context.

  8. Structural vulnerability assessment using reliability of slabs in avalanche area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Philomène; Bertrand, David; Eckert, Nicolas; Naaim, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    Improvement of risk assessment or hazard zoning requires a better understanding of the physical vulnerability of structures. To consider natural hazard issue such as snow avalanches, once the flow is characterized, highlight on the mechanical behaviour of the structure is a decisive step. A challenging approach is to quantify the physical vulnerability of impacted structures according to various avalanche loadings. The main objective of this presentation is to introduce methodology and outcomes regarding the assessment of vulnerability of reinforced concrete buildings using reliability methods. Reinforced concrete has been chosen as it is one of the usual material used to build structures exposed to potential avalanche loadings. In avalanche blue zones, structures have to resist to a pressure up to 30kPa. Thus, by providing systematic fragility relations linked to the global failure of the structure, this method may serve the avalanche risk assessment. To do so, a slab was numerically designed. It represented the avalanche facing wall of a house. Different configuration cases of the element in stake have been treated to quantify numerical aspects of the problem, such as the boundary conditions or the mechanical behaviour of the structure. The structure is analysed according to four different limit states, semi-local and global failures are considered to describe the slab behaviour. The first state is attained when cracks appear in the tensile zone, then the two next states are described consistent with the Eurocode, the final state is the total collapse of the structure characterized by the yield line theory. Failure probability is estimated in accordance to the reliability framework. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to quantify the fragility to different loadings. Sensitivity of models in terms of input distributions were defined with statistical tools such as confidence intervals and Sobol's indexes. Conclusion and discussion of this work are established to

  9. Constraints of subducted slab geometries on trench migration and subduction velocities: flat slabs and slab curtains in the mantle under Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Lin, C.; Kanda, R. V.

    2013-12-01

    The past locations, shapes and polarity of subduction trenches provide first-order constraints for plate tectonic reconstructions. Analogue and numerical models of subduction zones suggest that relative subducting (Vs) and overriding (Vor) plate velocities may strongly influence final subducted slab geometries. Here we have mapped the 3D geometries of subducted slabs in the upper and lower mantle of Asia from global seismic tomography. We have incorporated these slabs into plate tectonic models, which allows us to infer the subducting and overriding plate velocities. We describe two distinct slab geometry styles, ';flat slabs' and ';slab curtains', and show their implications for paleo-trench positions and subduction geometries in plate tectonic reconstructions. When compared to analogue and numerical models, the mapped slab styles show similarities to modeled slabs that occupy very different locations within Vs:Vor parameter space. ';Flat slabs' include large swaths of sub-horizontal slabs in the lower mantle that underlie the well-known northward paths of India and Australia from Eastern Gondwana, viewed in a moving hotspot reference. At India the flat slabs account for a significant proportion of the predicted lost Ceno-Tethys Ocean since ~100 Ma, whereas at Australia they record the existence of a major 8000km by 2500-3000km ocean that existed at ~43 Ma between East Asia, the Pacific and Australia. Plate reconstructions incorporating the slab constraints imply these flat slab geometries were generated when continent overran oceanic lithosphere to produce rapid trench retreat, or in other words, when subducting and overriding velocities were equal (i.e. Vs ~ Vor). ';Slab curtains' include subvertical Pacific slabs near the Izu-Bonin and Marianas trenches that extend from the surface down to 1500 km in the lower mantle and are 400 to 500 km thick. Reconstructed slab lengths were assessed from tomographic volumes calculated at serial cross-sections. The ';slab

  10. Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic porcelain stoneware slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, M.; Guarini, G.; Zanelli, C.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.; Dondi, M.

    2011-10-01

    Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic industrial porcelain stoneware large slabs were realized by deposition of nanostructured TiO2 coatings. Different surface finishing and experimental conditions were considered in order to assess the industrial feasibility. Photocatalytic and wetting behaviour of functionalized slabs mainly depends on surface phase composition in terms of anatase/rutile ratio, this involving - as a key issue - the deposition of TiO2 on industrially sintered products with an additional annealing step to strengthen coatings' performances and durability.

  11. General view of concrete foundation rail for Pintle Crane at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of concrete foundation rail for Pintle Crane at marine railway, completed. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 4640 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Three-dimensional necking during viscous slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscharner, M.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Duretz, T.

    2014-06-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3-D) deformation during detachment of a lithospheric slab with simple numerical models using the finite element method. An initially vertical layer of power law viscous fluid mimics the slab and is surrounded by a linear or power law viscous fluid representing asthenospheric mantle. We quantify the impact of slab size and shape (symmetric/asymmetric) on slab detachment and identify two processes that control the lateral (i.e., along-trench) slab deformation: (1) the horizontal deflection of the lateral, vertical slab sides (> 100 km with velocities up to 16 mm/yr) and (2) the propagation of localized thinning (necking) inside the slab (with velocities >9 cm/yr). The lateral propagation velocity is approximately constant during slab detachment. Larger slabs (here wider than approximately 300 km) detach with rates similar to those predicted by 2-D models, whereas smaller slabs detach slower. Implications for geodynamic processes and interpretations of seismic tomography are discussed.

  13. ORNL Soils Remediation and Slabs Removal The Bridge from D&D to Redevelopment

    SciTech Connect

    Conger, M Malinda; Schneider, Ken R

    2012-01-01

    The landscape of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has dramatically changed over the past 2 years with demolition of aging facilities in the Central Campus. Removal of these infrastructure legacies was possible due to an influx of DOE-Environmental Management funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). Facility D&D traditionally removes everything down to the building slab, and the Soils and Sediments Program is responsible for slabs, below-grade footers, abandoned waste utilities, and soils contaminated above certain risk levels that must be removed before the site can be considered for redevelopment. , DOE-EM has used a combination of base and ARRA funding to facilitate the clean-up process in ORNL s 2000 Area. Demolition of 13 buildings in the area was funded by the ARRA. Characterization of the remaining slabs, underground pipelines and soils was funded by DOE-EM base funding. Additional ARRA funding was provided for the removal of the slabs, pipelines and contaminated soils. Removal work is in progress and consists of removing and disposing of approximately 10,000 cubic yards (CY) of concrete, 2,500 CY of debris, and 500 CY of contaminated soil. The completion of this work will allow the site to be available for redevelopment and site reuse efforts at ORNL.

  14. Damage Assessment of Two-Way Bending RC Slabs Subjected to Blast Loadings

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haokai; Wu, Guiying

    2014-01-01

    Terrorist attacks on vulnerable structures and their individual structural members may cause considerable damage and loss of life. However, the research work on response and damage analysis of single structural components, for example, a slab to blast loadings, is limited in the literature and this is necessary for assessing its vulnerability. This study investigates the blast response and damage assessment of a two-way bending reinforced concrete (RC) slab subjected to blast loadings. Numerical modeling and analysis are carried out using the commercial finite element code LS-DYNA 971. A damage assessment criterion for the two-way bending RC slab is defined based on the original and residual uniformly distributed load-carrying capacity. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the effects of explosive weight and explosive position on the damage mode of the two-way RC slab. Some design parameters, such as the boundary conditions and the negative reinforcement steel bar length, are also discussed. The illustrated results show that the proposed criterion can apply to all failure modes. The damage assessment results are more accurate than the ones due to the conventional deformation criterion. PMID:25121134

  15. Damage assessment of two-way bending RC slabs subjected to blast loadings.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haokai; Yu, Ling; Wu, Guiying

    2014-01-01

    Terrorist attacks on vulnerable structures and their individual structural members may cause considerable damage and loss of life. However, the research work on response and damage analysis of single structural components, for example, a slab to blast loadings, is limited in the literature and this is necessary for assessing its vulnerability. This study investigates the blast response and damage assessment of a two-way bending reinforced concrete (RC) slab subjected to blast loadings. Numerical modeling and analysis are carried out using the commercial finite element code LS-DYNA 971. A damage assessment criterion for the two-way bending RC slab is defined based on the original and residual uniformly distributed load-carrying capacity. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the effects of explosive weight and explosive position on the damage mode of the two-way RC slab. Some design parameters, such as the boundary conditions and the negative reinforcement steel bar length, are also discussed. The illustrated results show that the proposed criterion can apply to all failure modes. The damage assessment results are more accurate than the ones due to the conventional deformation criterion. PMID:25121134

  16. Measuring snow properties relevant to slab avalanche release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Benjamin; Proksch, Martin; Löwe, Henning; van Herwijnen, Alec; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    The release of a slab avalanche is preceded by a sequence of fractures. The main material properties relevant for the fracture processes are the specific fracture energy of the weak layer, as also the elastic modulus and the density of the overlying slab layers. The snow micro-penetrometer (SMP) is the method of choice for snow stratigraphy measurements in the field with high resolution. Recent advances in signal processing allow us to derive the most needed material properties to model the fracture behaviour of snow. On a smaller scale, the three dimensional structure of snow samples is obtained from snow micro-tomography (CT) providing snow density directly. By modelling the mechanical behaviour of the ice matrix the elastic properties of the snow sample can be calculated. At the macro-scale, fracture mechanical field tests with particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) allow observing the in-situ fracture behaviour. Specific fracture energy and slab stiffness are derived from PTV measurement by fitting an analytical beam equation to the observed deformation field. Over the past years we were able to generate two datasets of overlapping SMP and CT as well as SMP and PTV measurements. SMP measurements and micro-tomography of snow samples show that snow density is well reproduced with current SMP signal processing algorithms. Also the specific fracture energy as derived from the SMP signal is in agreement with PTV results. The effective modulus, however, being the most sensitive parameter in fracture covers three orders of magnitude depending on measurement method. The present work discusses observed similarities and differences arising from measurement methods, theoretical assumptions and process scales. Reliable methods to determine the parameters describing the fracture process are key to snow instability modelling based on either snow cover simulations or field measurements. Preliminary modelling results from ongoing spatial variability studies illustrate the

  17. Mantle seismic structure beneath USArray: slab segmentation and deep roots of the Yellowstone hotspot (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Yellowstone hotspot track is a dramatic example of how EarthScope data are helping to reveal systematic connectivity between deep Earth convection, plate tectonics, and surface geologic activity in the plate interior. Two types of seismic constraints provide evidence for buoyant ascent of a lower mantle thermal plume beneath Yellowstone. First, teleseismic body-wave tomography images of smooth 3-D velocity structure show a vertically elongated and irregular low-velocity volume extending to about 1000 km depth. Second, upward deflection of the endothermic postspinel phase transition that represents the boundary between the lower and upper mantle specifically indicates local upwelling of hot lower mantle. Beyond establishing the present day existence of the Yellowstone plume, recent seismic images afford further insight into hotspot initiation in a region where subducted slabs might be expected to block ascent of a lower mantle plume. Several body-wave tomography using EarthScope data reveal a dissected distribution of high-velocity slabs beneath the western U.S., thus providing potential pathways for plume ascent and origins for the plume's vertical irregularity. The possibility of plume ascent through such a slab gap has recently been substantiated by other workers' numerical forward modeling of Farallon subduction constrained by a global plate tectonic model, which predicts a trench-normal slab segmentation event that is spatially consistent with present day tomography and temporally consistent with Miocene initiation of the Yellowstone hotspot track near the edge of Precambrian North America lithosphere.

  18. Was there a Laramide "flat slab"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Slab-continent interactions drive most non-collisional orogenies; this has led us to usually anticipate that temporal changes or spatial variations in orogenic style are related to changes in the slab, most especially in the slab's dip. This is most dramatically evident for orogenies in the foreland, well away from the trench, such as the Laramide orogeny. However, the physical means of connecting slab geometry to crustal deformation remain obscure. Dickinson and Snyder (1978) and Bird (1984) laid out a conceptually elegant means of creating foreland deformation from shear between a slab and overriding continental lithosphere, but such strong shear removed all of the continental lithosphere in the western U.S. when included in a numerical simulation of flat slab subduction (Bird, 1988), a removal in conflict with observations of volcanic rocks and xenoliths in many locations. Relying on an increase in edge normal stresses results, for the Laramide, in requiring the little-deformed Colorado Plateau to either be unusually strong or to have risen rapidly enough and high enough to balance edge stresses with body forces. Early deformation in the Plateau rules out unusual strength, and the accumulation and preservation of Late Cretaceous near-sea level sedimentary rocks makes profound uplift unlikely (though not impossible). Relying on comparisons with the Sierras Pampeanas is also fraught with problems: the Sierras are not separated from the Andean fold-and-thrust belt by several hundred kilometers of little-deformed crust, nor were they buried under kilometers of marine muds as were large parts of the Laramide foreland. We have instead suggested that some unusual interactions of an obliquely subducting plate with a thick Archean continental root might provide a better explanation than a truly flat slab (Jones et al., 2011). From this, and given that several flat-slab segments today are not associated with foreland orogenesis and noting that direct evidence for truly

  19. Refractory concretes

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3, Sm.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3, NH.sub.4 Cl, YCl.sub.3 and Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden.

  20. Water in the Slab: a Trilogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, M.; Burlini, L.; Gerya, T.; Mancktelow, N.

    2012-12-01

    In this presentation we summarize the results of a project started in 2007 from a brilliant intuition of Luigi Burlini that suggested an additional anisotropy source for the interpretation of seismic anisotropy patterns observed at subduction zones. Such an anisotropic body located in the upper part of the slab would result from the hydration of the oceanic plate at the trench outer-rise. The natural continuation of the project was to understand the mechanical processes behind slab hydration and the fluid flow patterns established during slab dehydration. In both cases, we found that tectonic pressure gradients due to the bending and unbending of the subducting oceanic plate are fundamental in driving fluid flow. This last part of the project led to the other two chapters of the final trilogy about the long route of water in the slab. This trilogy is here described in detail and a chronologically ordered series of events presented below. The first episode is related to slab hydration occurring during bending at the trench-outer rise. Here, fluids are driven downward along active normal faults by bending-related, sub-hydrostatic pressure gradients. Water can percolate down to 15-20 km below the seafloor, triggering hydrothermal reactions and the formation of hydrous minerals. This results in an elongated pattern of mostly trench-dipping hydrated faults with a strike parallel to the trench and whose orientation below the forearc becomes sub-vertical. The second episode is related to the geophysical implications of a hydrated slab below the forearc. Indeed, both the subvertical layering of closely spaced hydrated and dry levels (SPO) and the syn-deformational, fault-parallel alignment of highly anisotropic minerals (CPO) such as serpentine and talc may contribute to the SKS splitting patterns observed in the forearc. We suggest that the upper part of the slab may have a strong seismic anisotropy that can be approximated by a transverse isotropic body with a sub

  1. Blast impact behaviour of concrete with different fibre reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdlová, Martina; Čechmánek, René; Řídký, Radek

    2015-09-01

    The paper summarizes the results of the development of special concrete intended for the explosion resistance applications, with the emphasis on minimal secondary fragments formation at the explosion. The fine-grained concrete matrix has been reinforced by various types of short dispersed fibers (metallic, mineral and polymer) of different sizes and by their combination and the effect of the fibre reinforcement on the physico-mechanical properties and blast resistance was observed. The concrete prism specimens have been subjected to the determination of mechanical parameters (compressive and flexural strength at quasi-static load). The blast tests were conducted on the slab specimens prepared from selected mixtures. The material characteristics and explosion test data have been used for numerical investigation, which defined the optimal wall composition and dimensions of the concrete element which should resist the explosion defined by type, size, weight and placement of the blast. In the next step the test elements resistance was verified by real explosion test.

  2. Contribution of Elasticity in Slab Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourel, L.; Goes, S. D. B.; Morra, G.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that plate rheology exerts a dominant control on the shape and velocity of subducting plates. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of the, often disregarded, role of elasticity in slab bending at the trench, using simple, yet fully dynamic, set of 2.5D models where an elastic, visco-elastic or visco-elasto-plastic plate subducts freely into a purely viscous mantle. We derive a scaling relationship between the bending radius of visco-elastic slabs and the Deborah number, De, which is the ratio of Maxwell time over deformation time. We show that De controls the ratio of elastically stored energy over viscously dissipated energy and find that at De exceeding 10-2, it requires substantially less energy to bend a visco-elastic slab to the same shape as a purely viscous slab with the same viscosity (90% less for De=0.1). Elastically stored energy at higher De facilitates slab unbending and hence favours retreating modes of subduction, while trench advance only occurs for some cases with De<10-2. We use our scaling relation to estimate apparent Deborah numbers, Deapp, from a global compilation of subduction-zone parameters. Values range from 10-3 to >1, where most zones have low Deapp<10-2, but a few young plates have Deapp>0.1. Slabs with Deapp ≤ 10-2 either have very low viscosities, ≤10 times mantle viscosity, or they may be yielding, in which case our apparent Deborah number may underestimate actual De by up to an order of magnitude. If a significant portion of the low Deapp slabs yield, then elastically stored energy may actually be important in quite a large number of subduction zones. Interestingly, increasing Deapp correlates with increasing proportion of larger seismic events (b-value) in both instrumental and historic catalogues, indicating that increased contribution of elasticity may facilitate rupture in larger, less frequent earthquakes.

  3. History vs. snapshot: how slab morphology relates to slab age evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, Fanny; Goes, Saskia; Davies, Rhodri; Davies, Huw; Lallemand, Serge; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2016-04-01

    The age of the subducting plate at the trench ("slab age") spans a wide range, from less than 10 Myr in Central and South America to 150 Myr in the Marianas. The morphology of subducting slab in the upper mantle is also very variable, from slabs stagnating at the top of the lower mantle to slabs penetrating well beyond 1000 km depth. People have looked rather unsucessfully for correlations between slab morphology and subduction parameters, including age at the trench, on the basic assumption that old (thick) plates are likely to generate a large slab pull force that would influence slab dip. Thermo-mechanical models reveal complex feedbacks between temperature, strain rate and rheology, and are able to reproduce the evolution of plate ages as a function of time, subducting plate velocity and trench velocity. In particular, we show how initially young subducting plates can rapidly age at the surface because of a slow sinking velocity. As a consequence, different slab morphologies can exhibit similar ages at the trench provided that subduction history is different. We illustrate how models provide insights into Earth subduction zones for which we have to consider their history (evolution of trench velocity, relative plate ages at time of initiation) in order to unravel their present-day geometry.

  4. Test of LOX compatibility for asphalt and concrete runway materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyers, C. V.; Bryan, C. J.; Lockhart, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A literature survey and a telephone canvass of producers and users of LOX is reported which yielded one report of an accident resulting from a LOX spill on asphalt, one discussion of hazardous conditions, and an unreferenced mention of an incident. Laboratory tests using standard LOX impact apparatus yielded reactions with both old and new alphalt, but none with concrete. In the final test, using a larger sample of asphalt, the reaction caused extensive damage to equipment. Initial field experiments using 2-meter square asphalt slabs covered with LOX, conducted during rainy weather, achieved no reaction with plummets, and limited reaction with a blasting cap as a reaction initiator. In a final plummet-initiated test on a dry slab, a violent reaction, which appeared to have propagated over the entire slab surface, destroyed the plummet fixture and threw fragments as far as 48 meters.

  5. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  6. Cracking assessment in concrete structures by distributed optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Gerardo; Casas, Joan R.; Villaba, Sergi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a method to obtain crack initiation, location and width in concrete structures subjected to bending and instrumented with an optical backscattered reflectometer (OBR) system is proposed. Continuous strain data with high spatial resolution and accuracy are the main advantages of the OBR system. These characteristics make this structural health monitoring technique a useful tool in early damage detection in important structural problems. In the specific case of reinforced concrete structures, which exhibit cracks even in-service loading, the possibility to obtain strain data with high spatial resolution is a main issue. In this way, this information is of paramount importance concerning the durability and long performance and management of concrete structures. The proposed method is based on the results of a test up to failure carried out on a reinforced concrete slab. Using test data and different crack modeling criteria in concrete structures, simple nonlinear finite element models were elaborated to validate its use in the localization and appraisal of the crack width in the testing slab.

  7. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs.

    PubMed

    Rudelli, Bruno Alves; Silva, Marcelo Valerio Alabarce da; Akkari, Miguel; Santili, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%). Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%), and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%). In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places. PMID:23903263

  8. Polymer concrete patching manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. J.; Bartholomew, J.

    1982-06-01

    The practicality of using polymer concrete to repair deteriorated portland cement concrete bridge decks and pavements was demonstrated. This manual outlines the procedures for using polymer concrete as a rapid patching material to repair deteriorated concrete. The process technology, materials, equipment, and safety provisions used in manufacturing and placing polymer concrete are discussed. Potential users are informed of the various steps necessary to insure successful field applications of the material.

  9. Humectant use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Collins, W.K.; Bennett, J.E.; Laylor, H.M.

    2000-11-01

    Use of humectants to improve the thermal-sprayed zinc anode performance during the cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete was examined. A humectant is a hygroscopic material. It is applied onto the surface of the zinc anode to keep the concrete-anode interface moist and a good conductor. The thermodynamics of humectants are discussed. Laboratory results are presented on the effects of using lithium bromide (LiBr) and lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}) as humectants in galvanic cathodic protection (GCP) and impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems, in high and low relative humidities, and on new and previously electrochemically aged CP systems. LiNO{sub 3} and LiBr promoted more effective CP performance. Both improved the performance of aged slabs, suggesting that application of humectants onto existing CP systems would be of benefit. Microscopy showed that humectant-treated slabs develop the same cement-reaction zone, zinc anode structures as untreated slabs. Microscopy of LiBr-treated slabs revealed that the highest concentration of bromide was in the reaction zone. In GCP tests, LiBr was more effective than LiNO{sub 3}. In accelerated ICCP tests, LiNO{sub 3} was more effective than LiBr. It was surmised that bromide could be oxidized in the high-voltage accelerated ICCP tests. At the lower impressed currents of most installed ICCP systems, LiBr may perform as well as or better than LiNO{sub 3}.

  10. Humectant use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Russell, J.H.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.; Collins, W.K.; Bennett, J.E.; H.M. Laylor

    2000-03-01

    The use of humectants to improve the thermal-sprayed zinc anode performance during the cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete is examined. A humectant is a hygroscopic material. It is applied onto the surface of the zinc anode to keep the concrete-anode interface moist and a good conductor. The thermodynamics of humectants are discussed. Laboratory results are presented on the effects of using LiBr and LiNO{sub 3} as humectants in galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) systems, in high and low relative humidities, and on new and previously electrochemically aged CP systems. LiNO{sub 3} and LiBr promoted more effective CP performance. Both improved the performance of aged slabs, suggesting that application of humectants onto existing CP systems would be of benefit. Microscopy showed that humectant-treated slabs develop the same cement-reaction zone-zinc anode structures as untreated slabs. Microscopy of LiBr-treated slabs revealed that the highest concentration of bromide was in the reaction zone. In GCP tests, LiBr was more effective than LiNO{sub 3}. In accelerated ICCP tests, LiNO{sub 3} was more effective than LiBr. It was surmised that bromide could be oxidized in the high-voltage accelerated ICCP tests. At the lower impressed currents of most installed ICCP systems, LiBr may perform as well as or better than LiNO{sub 3}.

  11. Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate; Southwestern Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-07-01

    This document provides content for three areas of the Building America Solution Center. First, "Insulating Closed Crawlspace Walls and Band Joist Area" describes how to install rigid foam insulation on the interior perimeter walls and band joist area in closed crawlspace foundations of homes. Second, "Removing Construction Debris from Flexible Ducts" describes how to clean flexible ducts after construction or major renovation of a home to remove debris resulting from building materials, particularly airborne dust and particulates. Third, images, CAD drawings, and a case study illustrate right and wrong ways to apply polyethylene sheeting over aggregate. Similarly, a CAD drawing is included that illustrates the use of a concrete slab over polyethylene.

  12. Fluorescence losses from Yb:YAG slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Rapaport, Alexandra; Chung, Te-yuan; Chen, Bin; Bass, Michael

    2003-12-20

    We report on the distribution of fluorescence that can be emitted through the surfaces of a ytterbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Yb:YAG) slab-shaped high-power solid-state laser. Slab shapes considered include parallel or antiparallel Brewster endfaced slabs and rectangular parallelepiped slabs. We treat cases in which all the faces of these slabs are in air, or with water or another coating on the largest faces. The fraction of the fluorescence emitted through each face, its distribution over that face, and the directions in which it travels are shown to be important to the design of high-power slab lasers. PMID:14717292

  13. Crushed cement concrete substitution for construction aggregates; a materials flow analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the substitution of crushed cement concrete for natural construction aggregates is performed by using a materials flow diagram that tracks all material flows into and out of the cement concrete portion of the products made with cement concrete: highways, roads, and buildings. Crushed cement concrete is only one of the materials flowing into these products, and the amount of crushed cement concrete substituted influences the amount of other materials in the flow. Factors such as availability and transportation costs, as well as physical properties, that can affect stability and finishability, influence whether crushed cement concrete or construction aggregates should be used or predominate for a particular end use.

  14. Using emissivity-corrected thermal maps to locate deep structural defects in concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelGrande, Nancy; Durbin, Philip F.

    1995-05-01

    Dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging is a promising, noncontact, nondestructive evaluation tool to evaluate the amount of deteriorated concrete on asphalt-covered bridge decks. We conducted proof-of-principle demonstrations to characterize defects in concrete structures which could be detected with DBIR thermal imaging. We constructed two identical concrete slabs with synthetic delaminations, e.g., 1.8-in. thick styrofoam squares, implanted just above the 2-in. deep steel reinforcement bars. We covered one of the slabs with a 2-in. layer of asphalt. We mounted the DBIR cameras on a tower platform, to simulate the optics needed to conduct bridge-deck inspections from a moving vehicle. We detected 4-in. implants embedded in concrete and 9-in. implants embedded in asphalt-cevered concrete. The midday (above ambient) and predawn (below ambient) delamination-site temperatures correlated with the implant sizes. Using DBIR image ratios, we enhanced thermal-constrast and removed emissivity-noise, e.g., from concrete compositional variations and clutter. Using the LLNL/VIEW code, we removed the asphalt thermal-gradient mask to depict the 4-in. deep, 9- in. square, concrete implant site. We plan to image bridge deck defects from a moving vehicle for accurate estimations of the amount of deteriorated concrete impairing the deck integrity. Potential longterm benefits are affordable and reliable rehabilitation for asphalt-covered decks.

  15. Using emissivity-corrected thermal maps to locate deep structural defects in concrete bridge decks

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.

    1995-04-05

    Dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging is a promising, non-contact, nondestructive evaluation tool to evaluate the amount of deteriorated concrete on asphalt-covered bridge decks. We conducted proof-of-principle demonstrations to characterize defects in concrete structures which could be detected with DBIR thermal imaging. We constructed two identical concrete slabs with synthetic delaminations, e.g., 1/8-in. thick styrofoam squares, implanted just above the 2-in.-deep steel reinforcement bars. We covered one of the slabs with a 2-in. layer of asphalt. We mounted the DBIR cameras on a tower platform, to simulate the optics needed to conduct bridge-deck inspections from a moving vehicle. We detected 4-in. implants embedded in concrete and 9-in. implants embedded in asphalt-covered concrete. The midday (above-ambient) and predawn (below-ambient) delamination-site temperatures correlated with the implant sizes. Using DBIR image ratios, we enhanced thermal-contrast and removed emissivity-noise, e.g., from concrete compositional variations and clutter. Using the LLNL/VIEW code, we removed the asphalt thermal-gradient mask, to depict the 4-in. deep, 9-in. square, concrete implant size. We plan to image bridge deck defects, from a moving vehicle, for accurate estimations of the amount of deteriorated concrete impairing the deck integrity. Potential longterm benefits are affordable and reliable rehabilitation for asphalt-covered decks.

  16. Behavior of adhesively bonded concrete-graphite/epoxy composite bridge girders

    SciTech Connect

    Gordaninejad, F.; Saiidi, M.S.; Wehbe, N. )

    1994-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the behavior of composite bridge girders constructed from carbon fiber reinforced plastic sections and concrete slabs. The study examined four-point bending of three beams, one bare, I-type, graphite/epoxy beam, and two constructed from concrete slab and graphite/epoxy sections. The concrete slab and graphite/epoxy section were adhesively bonded and no shear connectors were used. All three beams are approximately one-eighth scale models of bridge girders. The sections are geometrically symmetric and have the same symmetric lamination schemes. Theoretical and experimental studies were performed on the bare I-sections to develop basic understanding of the bending behavior. The analyses and tests were then extended to the composite girders. The theoretical and experimental results for the failure loads were in close agreement. It was found that the slip at the interface of the concrete slab and the graphite/epoxy beam had minor effects on the failure load, but it significantly reduced the stiffness of the composite sections. 8 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  18. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one. PMID:11838241

  19. Structural design of concrete storage pads for spent-fuel casks

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Y.R.; Nickell, R.E.; James, R.J. )

    1993-04-01

    The loading experienced by spent fuel dry storage casks and storage pads due to potential drop or tip-over accidents is evaluated using state-of-the-art concrete structural analysis methodology. The purpose of this analysis is to provide simple design charts and formulas so that design adequacy of storage pads and dry storage casks can be demonstrated. The analysis covers a wide range of slab-design parameters, e.g., reinforcement ratio, slab thickness, concrete compressive strength, and sub-base soil compaction, as well as variations in drop orientation and drop height. The results are presented in the form of curves, giving the force on the cask as a function of storage pad hardness for various drop heights. In addition, force-displacement curves, deformed shapes, crack patterns, stresses and strains are given for various slab-design conditions and drop events. The utility of the results in design are illustrated through examples.

  20. Effect of Thickness and Fibre Volume Fraction on Impact Resistance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete (SFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Usman, Fathoni; Syamsir, Agusril; Shao Yang, Chen; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and fibre volume fraction (VF) on the impact performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.57 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance SFRC against slab thickness and volume fraction. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistances of SFRC against slab thickness. However the impact resistance of SFRC against percentage of volume fraction exhibit a non-linear relationship.

  1. Slab flattening, dynamic topography and normal faulting in the Cordillera Blanca region (northern Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margirier, A.; Robert, X.; Laurence, A.; Gautheron, C.; Bernet, M.; Simon-Labric, T.; Hall, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Processes driving surface uplift in the Andes are still debated and the role of subduction processes as slab flattening on surface uplift and relief building in the Andes is not well understood. Some of the highest Andean summits, the Cordillera Blanca (6768 m) and the Cordillera Negra (5187 m), are located above a present flat subduction zone (3-15°S), in northern Peru. In this area, both the geometry and timing of the flattening of the slab are well constrained (Gutscher et al., 1999; Rosenbaum et al., 2005). This region is thus a perfect target to explore the effect of slab flattening on the Andean topography and uplift. We obtained new apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track ages from three vertical profiles located in the Cordillera Blanca and the Cordillera Negra. Time-temperature paths obtained from inverse modeling of the thermochronological data indicates a Middle Miocene cooling for both Cordillera Negra profiles. We interpret it as regional exhumation in the Cordillera Occidental starting in Middle Miocene, synchronous with the onset of the subduction of the Nazca ridge (Rosenbaum et al., 2005). We propose that the Nazca ridge subduction at 15 Ma and onset of slab flattening in northern Peru drove regional positive dynamic topography and thus enhanced exhumation in the Cordillera Occidental. This study provides new evidence of the impact subduction processes and associated dynamic topography on paleogeography and surface uplift in the Andes.

  2. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND SLAB BEING PROCESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND SLAB BEING PROCESSED THROUGH PRESS/STECKLER (RIGHT). HEATED SLABS MAKE SEVERAL PASSES THROUGH THE STECKLER WITH THICKNESS OF THE SLAB DECREASED UNTIL REQUIRED GAGE IS REACHED. - Central Iron Foundry, Hot Strip Mill Building, 1700 Holt Road, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  3. Necessity of the Ridge for the Flat Slab Subduction: Insights from the Peruvian Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Long, M. D.; Zandt, G.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    Flattening of the subducting plate has been linked to the formation of various geological features, including basement-cored uplifts, the cessation of arc volcanism, ignimbrite flare-ups, and the formation of high plateaus and ore deposits [Humphreys et al., 2003; Gutscher et al., 2000; Rosenbaum et al., 2005]. However, the mechanism responsible for the slab flattening is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the Peruvian flat slab, where the Nazca plate starts to bend at ~80 km depth and travels horizontally for several hundred kilometers, at which point steep subduction resumes. Based on a 1500 km long volcanic gap and intermediate depth seismicity patterns, the Peruvian flat slab appears to have the greatest along-strike extent and, therefore, has been suggested as a modern analogue to the putative flat slab during the Laramide orogeny in the western United States (~80-55 Ma). Combining 3D shear wave velocity structure and Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy between ~10° and 18° S, we find that the subducting Nazca plate is not uniformly flat along the entire region, but fails to the north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Our results show that, in combination with trench retreat, rapid overriding plate motion, and/or presence of a thick cratonic root, the subduction of buoyant overthickened oceanic crust, such as the Nazca Ridge, is necessary for the formation and sustainability of flat slabs. This finding has important implications for the formation of flat slabs both past and present.

  4. Debris velocity of concrete structures subjected to explosive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Lu, Yong

    2006-08-01

    When designing above-ground ammunition storage facilities, one has to take into account the debris hazard resulting from accidental explosions. The purpose of this paper is to develop a predictive method for debris dispersion around an ammunition storage site in case of an accidental detonation in a reinforced concrete storage structure. The concrete slabs/walls break up into debris when it is overloaded by the internal blast. The debris velocity is one of the important parameters to describe the debris dispersion. The parameters that affect the debris velocity are complex. This study adopts the energy approach to simplify the formulation. The failure process in a relatively thin concrete slab/wall is treated using the concept of expansion. Based on energy conservation, a general formula is derived for the debris launch velocity in a cubicle structure subjected to internal blast loading. The dynamic strength of concrete and reinforcement are considered in the fracture process. The analytical results are found to be consistent with the relevant experimental results.

  5. Lunar concrete for construction

    SciTech Connect

    Cullingford, H.S.; Keller, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  7. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1992-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar base construction was discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the Moon are provided in this paper, along with specific conclusions from the existing database.

  8. Mantle Response to a Slab Gap and Three-dimensional Slab Interaction in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Seismically constrained global slab geometries suggest the Middle America-South American subduction system contains a gap on the order of 500 km separating the east-dipping Cocos and Nazca slabs at depth (Gudmundsson and Sambridge, 1998; Syracuse and Abers, 2006; Hayes et al., 2012). The location of the gap correlates with tectonic features impinging on the Pacific side of the Middle America trench, in particular the incoming young buoyant oceanic lithosphere and oceanic ridges associated with the Galapagos hotspot and Cocos-Nazca spreading center (Protti et al., 1994; Mann et al., 2007; Muller et al., 2008). Moreover, geochemical studies focusing on the arc chemistry in the Central American volcanic front argue for a slab window of some kind in this region (Johnston and Thorkelson, 1997; Abratis and Worner, 2001; Hoernle et al., 2008). We use high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) geodynamic modeling of the Middle America-South American subduction system to investigate the role of the incoming young oceanic lithosphere and a gap between the Cocos and Nazca slabs in controlling mantle flow velocity and geochemical signatures beneath Central America. The geodynamic models are geographically referenced with the geometry and thermal structure for the overriding and subducting plates based on geological and geophysical observables and constructed with the multi-plate subduction generator code, SlabGenerator (Jadamec and Billen, 2010; Jadamec et al., 2012; Jadamec and Billen, 2012). The viscous flow simulations are solved using the mantle convection finite-element code, CitcomCU (Zhong, 2006), modified by Jadamec and Billen (2010) to take into account the experimentally derived flow law for olivine and allow for variable 3D plate interface geometries and magnitudes of inter-plate coupling. The 3D numerical models indicate the gap between the Cocos and Nazca slabs serves as a conduit for Pacific-Cocos mantle to pass into the Caribbean, with toroidal flow around the

  9. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work. PMID:26164853

  10. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Analyses of Track-Embankment-Ground System Subjected to High Speed Train Loads

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model was developed to investigate dynamic response of track-embankment-ground system subjected to moving loads caused by high speed trains. The track-embankment-ground systems such as the sleepers, the ballast, the embankment, and the ground are represented by 8-noded solid elements. The infinite elements are used to represent the infinite boundary condition to absorb vibration waves induced by the passing of train load at the boundary. The loads were applied on the rails directly to simulate the real moving loads of trains. The effects of train speed on dynamic response of the system are considered. The effect of material parameters, especially the modulus changes of ballast and embankment, is taken into account to demonstrate the effectiveness of strengthening the ballast, embankment, and ground for mitigating system vibration in detail. The numerical results show that the model is reliable for predicting the amplitude of vibrations produced in the track-embankment-ground system by high-speed trains. Stiffening of fill under the embankment can reduce the vibration level, on the other hand, it can be realized by installing a concrete slab under the embankment. The influence of axle load on the vibration of the system is obviously lower than that of train speed. PMID:24723838

  11. Slab edge insulating form system and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Brain E.; Barsun, Stephan K.; Bourne, Richard C.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Springer, David A.

    2009-10-06

    A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

  12. Three year tests on cathodic prevention of reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, L.; Bolzoni, F.; Pedeferri, P.; Pastore, T.

    1997-12-01

    The effectiveness of cathodic protection applied to new reinforced or prestressed concrete structures exposed to chloride environments for preventing pitting corrosion has been studied. The operating conditions have been evaluated with long term tests on reinforced concrete slabs polarized with current densities ranging from 0.5 to 20 mA/m{sup 2} and subjected to chloride ponding. Laboratory tests were carried out to estimate the pitting potential versus the chloride content and to evaluate the effect of low cathodic currents on the chloride migration in the concrete cover. The results show that cathodic prevention may be effective in preventing pitting corrosion initiation by increasing the critical chloride content and that this technique can be safely applied also to new prestressed structures. The effect of current densities up to 2 mA/m{sup 2} on chloride migration was negligible during the first three years of test.

  13. Dual-band infrared imaging for concrete bridge deck inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, P.; Del Grande, N.

    1994-02-01

    Dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging methods and unique image-correction algorithms used successfully for underground and obscured object imaging and detection (of buried mines, archaeological structures, geothermal aquifers and airframe defects) are adapted for inspection of concrete highways and bridge decks to provide early warnings of subsurface defects. To this end, we prepared small concrete test slabs with defects (embedded plastic layers). We used selective DBIR (3--5 {mu}m and 8--12 {mu}m) image ratios to depict the defect sites and remove the effects of surface clutter. We distinguish true temperature-difference signals (at surrogate delamination sites) from emissivity noise (at sites with oil stains, sand, gravel, metal parts and roughness differences) towards improved concrete bridge deck inspections.

  14. Construction of a large span concrete roof over a vitrification building canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, I.K.; Alexandrou, C.D.; Tom, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    An innovative shoring system for a 1.22 m (4-foot) thick concrete roof spanning 71 feet is discussed. At a height of 22.3 m (73 ft) from the canyon floor, conventional shoring using scaffolding was not cost-effective and would have interrupted construction in the canyon. High shoring would have also been a safety hazard. The shoring method utilized consists of roof trusses spanning the canyon with the concrete bottom formwork made from stiffened plates supported on the bottom chord of the trusses. After the roof slab was placed on the stiffened plates and the concrete achieved the design strength, the members of the trusses exposed above the slab were flame-cut in a calculated sequence. This unique method shortened the construction schedule by at least 6 months. 8 figs.

  15. Effect of Mesh Distribution on Impact Resistance Performance of Kenaf Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Syamsir, Agusril; Sheng, Chiam Yung; Beddu, Salmia; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Usman, Fathoni; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the mesh distribution on the impact performance of kenaf fibre mesh reinforced concrete (KFMRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced with varied thickness and mesh diameter subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.40 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the effect of the mesh distribution on the impact resistance kenaf fibre mesh concrete for various slab thickness and mesh diameter. 2-layers one Top and one Bottom mesh distribution kenaf mesh is the most efficient in the ability to control crack formation and propagation against impact energy followed by 1-layer Middle mesh distribution and lastly the 1-layer Top mesh distribution is the least effective.

  16. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  17. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  18. Effects of Thermodynamic Properties on Slab Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; King, S. D.; Caddick, M. J.; Ross, N.

    2012-12-01

    We perform a series of numerical experiments to investigate the effects of thermodynamic properties on the geometrical evolution of subducting slabs. We calculate density (ρ), thermal expansivity (α), and heat capacity (cp) of mantle mineral assemblages of a harzburgite composition over a range of pressure and temperature conditions applicable to the Earth's mantle, using the thermodynamic database of Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni [2011] and the thermodynamic calculation code Perple_X [Connolly, 2009]. Following Nakagawa et al. [2009], we assume that thermal diffusivity (κ) follows a power-law relationship with density (κ=κ0(ρ/ρ0)3, where κ0 and ρ0 are reference diffusivity and density, respectively). The calculations show that ρ, α, and κ change significantly along mantle geotherms; the ranges of their values are 3300-5100 km/m3, 1.5-3.5 10-5/K, and 3-17 W/m K, respectively. The change in cp is small (< 5%). We incorporate the pressure and temperature (PT) dependence of these thermodynamic properties into a 2-D finite element code with compressible convection formulations under the truncated anelastic liquid approximation [Lee and King, 2009] and develop a dynamic subduction model with kinematic boundary conditions. In the model, we use a composite mantle rheology that accounts for both diffusion and dislocation creep with flow law parameterization of wet olivine [Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003]. Following Billen and Hirth [2007] and Lee and King [2011], we adjust the flow law parameter values for the lower mantle to test the effects of viscosity contrast between the upper and lower mantle on slab evolution. We use a reference model with a constant ρ, κ α, and cp, which is equivalent to using the incompressible extended Bousisnesq approximation. Preliminary results show that incorporating PT-dependent ρ enhances the vigor of the buoyancy driven flow compared to the reference model. Further, lithostatic pressure at a given depth is higher than in the

  19. The effect of metastable pyroxene on the slab dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, Roberto; Hunen, Jeroen; Goes, Saskia

    2014-12-01

    Seismic studies show that some subducting slabs penetrate straight into the lower mantle, whereas others seem to flatten near the base of the mantle transition zone. Slab stagnation is often attributed to an increase in viscosity and phase transformations in the olivine system. However, recent mineral physics studies showed that due to extremely low transformational diffusion rates, low-density metastable pyroxene may persist into the transition zone in cool slabs. Here we use a dynamically fully self-consistent subduction model to investigate the influence of metastable pyroxene on the dynamics of subducting oceanic lithosphere. Our results show that metastable pyroxene affects slab buoyancy at least as much as olivine metastability. However, unlike metastable olivine, which can inhibit slab penetration in the lower mantle only for cold, old, and fast slabs, metastable pyroxene is likely to also affect sinking of relatively young and slow slabs.

  20. The Effect of Subducting Slabs in Global Shear Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-03-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave travel time dataset for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the travel time anomalies produced by the 3D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw travel time anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88%. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs - potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41%. We tested two source relocation procedures - an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitude of artifact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5% S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large scale lower mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the starting models in global

  1. The effect of subducting slabs in global shear wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave traveltime data set for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the traveltime anomalies produced by the 3-D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw traveltime anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88 per cent. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs-potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41 per cent. We tested two source relocation procedures-an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitudes of artefact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5 per cent S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large-scale lower-mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the

  2. Fast Waves in Smooth Coronal Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of transverse density structuring in coronal slab-like waveguides on the properties of fast waves. We generalized previous results obtained for the exponential and Epstein profiles to the case of an arbitrary transverse density distribution. The criteria are given to determine the possible (trapped or leaky) wave regime, depending on the type of density profile function. In particular, there are plasma slabs with transverse density structuring that support pure trapped fast waves for all wavelengths. Their phase speed is nearly equal to the external Alfvén speed for the typical parameters of coronal loops. Our findings are obtained on the basis of Kneser’s oscillation theorem. To confirm the results, we analytically solved the wave equation evaluated at the cutoff point and the original wave equation for particular cases of transverse density distribution. We also used the WKB method and obtained approximate solutions of the wave equation at the cutoff point for an arbitrary transverse density profile. The analytic results were supplemented by numerical solutions of the obtained dispersion relations. The observed high-quality quasi-periodic pulsations of flaring loops are interpreted in terms of the trapped fundamental fast-sausage mode in a slab-like coronal waveguide.

  3. Implementing slab solar water heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveendran, S. K.; Shen, C. Q.

    2015-08-01

    Water heating contributes a significant part of energy consumption in typical household. One of the most employed technologies today that helps in reducing the energy consumption of water heating would be conventional solar water heating system. However, this system is expensive and less affordable by most family. The main objective of this project is to design and implement an alternative type of solar water heating system that utilize only passive solar energy which is known as slab solar water heating system. Slab solar water heating system is a system that heat up cold water using the solar radiance from the sun. The unique part of this system is that it does not require any form of electricity in order to operate. Solar radiance is converted into heat energy through convection method and cold water will be heated up by using conduction method [1]. The design of this system is governed by the criteria of low implementation cost and energy saving. Selection of material in the construction of a slab solar water heating system is important as it will directly affect the efficiency and performance of the system. A prototype has been built to realize the idea and it had been proven that this system was able to provide sufficient hot water supply for typical household usage at any given time.

  4. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  5. Modelling Gravitational Instabilities: Slab Break-off and Rayleigh-Taylor Diapirism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, Sergio; Fernández, Manel; Díez, Pedro; Vergés, Jaume

    2008-08-01

    A non-standard new code to solve multiphase viscous thermo-mechanical problems applied to geophysics is presented. Two numerical methodologies employed in the code are described: A level set technique to track the position of the materials and an enrichment of the solution to allow the strain rate to be discontinuous across the interface. These techniques have low computational cost and can be used in standard desktop PCs. Examples of phase tracking with level set are presented in two and three dimensions to study slab detachment in subduction processes and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, respectively. The modelling of slab detachment processes includes realistic rheology with viscosity depending on temperature, pressure and strain rate; shear and adiabatic heating mechanisms; density including mineral phase changes and varying thermal conductivity. Detachment models show a first prolonged period of thermal diffusion until a fast necking of the subducting slab results in the break-off. The influence of several numerical and physical parameters on the detachment process is analyzed: The shear heating exerts a major influence accelerating the detachment process, reducing the onset time to one half and lubricating the sinking of the detached slab. The adiabatic heating term acts as a thermal stabilizer. If the mantle temperature follows an adiabatic gradient, neglecting this heating term must be included, otherwise all temperature contrasts are overestimated. As expected, the phase change at 410 km depth (olivine-spinel transition) facilitates the detachment process due to the increase in negative buoyancy. Finally, simple plume simulations are used to show how the presented numerical methodologies can be extended to three dimensions.

  6. Lunar concrete: Prospects and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitab, Anwar; Anwar, Waqas; Mehmood, Imran; Kazmi, Syed Minhaj Saleem; Munir, Muhammad Junaid

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of using concrete as a construction material at the Moon surface is considered. Dissimilarities between the Earth and the Moon and their possible effects on concrete are also emphasized. Availability of constituent materials for concrete at lunar surface is addressed. An emphasis is given to two types of materials, namely, hydraulic concrete and sulfur concrete. Hydraulic concrete necessitates the use of water and sulfur concrete makes use of molten sulfur in lieu of cement and water.

  7. A two- and three-dimensional numerical comparison study of slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric; Buiter, Susanne; Brune, Sascha; Davies, Rhodri; Duretz, Thibault; Gerbault, Muriel; Glerum, Anne; Quinteros, Javier; Schmalholz, Stefan; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    Subduction is likely to be the most studied phenomenon in Numerical Geodynamics. Over the past 20 years, hundreds of publications have focused on its various aspects (influence of the rheology and thermal state of the plates, slab-mantle coupling, roll-back, mantle wedge evolution, buoyancy changes due to phase change, ...) and results were obtained with a variety of codes. Slab detachment has recently received some attention but remains a field worth exploring due to its profound influence on dynamic topography, mantle flow and subsequent stress state of the plates, and is believed to have occured in the Zagros, Carpathians and beneath eastern Anatolia, to name only a few regions. Following the work of Schmalholz (2011), we propose a two- and three-dimensional numerical benchmark of slab detachment. The geometry is simple: a power-law T-shaped plate including an already subducted slab overlies the mantle whose viscosity is either linear or power-law. Boundary conditions are free-slip on the top and the bottom of the domain, and no-slip on the sides. When the system evolves in time, the slab stretches out vertically and shows buoyancy-driven necking, until it finally detaches. The benchmark is subdivided into several sub-experiments with gradually increase in complexity (free surface, coupling of the rheology with temperature, ...). An array of objective measurements is recorded throughout the simulation such as the width of the necked slab over time and the exact time of detachment. The experiments will be run in two-dimensions and repeated in three-dimensional, the latter case being designed so as to allow both poloidal and toroidal flow. We show results obtained with a multitude of Finite Element and Finite Difference codes, using either compositional fields, level sets or tracers to track the compositions. A good agreement is found for most of the measurements in the two-dimensional case, and preliminary three-dimensional measurements will be shown. Schmalholz

  8. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ ‑h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  9. Dynamic buckling of subducting slabs reconciles geological and geophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changyeol; King, Scott D.

    2011-12-01

    Ever since the early days of the development of plate tectonic theory, subduction zones have been engrained in geological thinking as the place where steady, linear slabs descend into the mantle at a constant, uniform dip angle beneath volcanic arcs. However, growing evidence from geological and geophysical observations as well as analog and numerical modeling indicates that subducting slabs buckle in a time-dependent manner, in contrast to the steady-state, linear cartoons that dominate the literature. To evaluate the implication of time-dependent slab buckling of geological events, we conduct a series of 2-D numerical dynamic/kinematic subduction experiments by varying the viscosity increase across the 660 km discontinuity and the strength of the subducting slab. Our results show that slab buckling is a universal figure in all the experiments when rate of the trench migration ( Vtrench) is relatively slow ( Vtrench| < 2 cm/a) and viscosity increases across the 660 km discontinuity are greater than a factor of 30. Slab buckling is expressed as alternate shallowing and steepening dip of the subducting slab (from ~ 40 to ~ 100°) which is correlated with increasing and decreasing convergent rate of the incoming oceanic plate toward the trench. Further, the slab buckling in our experiments is consistent with the previously developed scaling laws for slab buckling; using reasonable parameters from subducted slabs the buckling amplitude and period are ~ 400 km and ~ 25 Myr, respectively. The slab buckling behavior in our experiments explains a variety of puzzling geological and geophysical observations. First, the period of slab buckling is consistent with short periodic variations (~ 25 Myr) in the motions of the oceanic plates that are anchored by subduction zones. Second, the scattered distributions of slab dips (from ~ 20 to ~ 90°) in the upper mantle are snapshots of time-dependent slab dip. Third, the current compressional and extensional stress environments in

  10. Along-strike translation of a fossil slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikser, Jacob E.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Hirth, Greg

    2012-05-01

    The Isabella anomaly is a high seismic velocity anomaly beneath the southern Central Valley of California that has previously been interpreted to represent a lithospheric drip or delaminated Sierra Nevada root. However, recent work suggests that the anomaly is a remnant slab, left over from Cenozoic subduction, attached to the Pacific plate underneath the edge of the North American plate. This hypothesis requires the slab to translate hundreds of kilometers along-strike while remaining intact and attached to the Pacific plate despite drag from the surrounding asthenosphere and overriding lithosphere. We use 3-D finite element models to simulate this scenario, and calculate the viscosity ratio between the slab and the surrounding asthenosphere required for the slab to translate undeformed. The required viscosity ratio increases with increasing downdip extent of the slab, and decreases with increasing slab dip; for geometries approximating that of our proposed slab, the required ratio ranges from 102 to 104. Given the thermal and petrologic history of the slab, mantle flow laws predict viscosity contrasts greater than or equal to these requirements. As such, we conclude that along-strike translation of a remnant slab is feasible, and serves as a possible explanation of the Isabella anomaly. The significance of this finding extends beyond our general understanding of subduction dynamics, in that the presence of such a slab could have implications for the water budget of the San Andreas Fault and its role in aseismic slip.

  11. Buoyancy, bending, and seismic visibility in deep slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, Craig R.; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Suetsugu, D.; Bina, C.; Inoue, T.; Wiens, D.; Jellinek, M.

    2010-11-01

    The petrological consequences of deep subhorizontal deflection ("stagnation") of subducting slabs should affect both apparent seismic velocity structures and slab morphology. We construct kinematic thermal models of stagnant slabs and perform thermodynamic modeling of the consequent perturbation of high-pressure phase transitions in mantle minerals, focusing upon Japan as our study area. We calculate associated thermo-petrological buoyancy forces and bending moments which (along with other factors such as viscosity variations and rollback dynamics) may contribute to slab deformation. We consider effects of variations in depth of stagnation, post-stagnation dip angle, phase transition sharpness, transition triplication due to multiple intersection of geotherms with phase boundaries, and potential persistence of metastable phases due to kinetic hindrance. We also estimate seismic velocity anomalies, as might be imaged by seismic tomography, and corresponding seismic velocity gradients, as might be imaged by receiver-function analysis. We find that buoyant bending moment gradients of petrological origin at the base of the transition zone may contribute to slab stagnation. Such buoyancy forces vary with the depth at which stagnation occurs, so that slabs may seek an equilibrium slab stagnation depth. Metastable phase bending moment gradients further enhance slab stagnation, but they thermally decay after ∱/4600•700 km of horizontal travel, potentially allowing stagnant slabs to descend into the lower mantle. Stagnant slabs superimpose zones of negative velocity gradient onto a depressed 660-km seismic discontinuity, affecting the seismological visibility of such features. Seismologically resolvable details should depend upon both stagnation depth and the nature of the imaging technique (travel-time tomography vs. boundary-interaction phases). While seismic tomography appears to yield images of stagnant slabs, discontinuity topography beneath Japan resolved by

  12. Evolution and diversity of subduction zones controlled by slab width.

    PubMed

    Schellart, W P; Freeman, J; Stegman, D R; Moresi, L; May, D

    2007-03-15

    Subducting slabs provide the main driving force for plate motion and flow in the Earth's mantle, and geodynamic, seismic and geochemical studies offer insight into slab dynamics and subduction-induced flow. Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones as either infinite in trench-parallel extent (that is, two-dimensional) or finite in width but fixed in space. Subduction zones and their associated slabs are, however, limited in lateral extent (250-7,400 km) and their three-dimensional geometry evolves over time. Here we show that slab width controls two first-order features of plate tectonics-the curvature of subduction zones and their tendency to retreat backwards with time. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations of free subduction, we show that trench migration rate is inversely related to slab width and depends on proximity to a lateral slab edge. These results are consistent with retreat velocities observed globally, with maximum velocities (6-16 cm yr(-1)) only observed close to slab edges (<1,200 km), whereas far from edges (>2,000 km) retreat velocities are always slow (<2.0 cm yr(-1)). Models with narrow slabs (< or =1,500 km) retreat fast and develop a curved geometry, concave towards the mantle wedge side. Models with slabs intermediate in width ( approximately 2,000-3,000 km) are sublinear and retreat more slowly. Models with wide slabs (> or =4,000 km) are nearly stationary in the centre and develop a convex geometry, whereas trench retreat increases towards concave-shaped edges. Additionally, we identify periods (5-10 Myr) of slow trench advance at the centre of wide slabs. Such wide-slab behaviour may explain mountain building in the central Andes, as being a consequence of its tectonic setting, far from slab edges. PMID:17361181

  13. Tectonic controls on earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate: slab buoyancy and slab bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are clear variations in maximum earthquake magnitude among Earth's subduction zones. These variations have been studied extensively and attributed to differences in tectonic properties in subduction zones, such as relative plate velocity and subducting plate age [Ruff and Kanamori, 1980]. In addition to maximum earthquake magnitude, the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes also differs among subduction zones, such as the b-value (i.e., the slope of the earthquake size distribution) and the frequency of seismic events. However, the casual relationship between the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes and subduction zone tectonics has been unclear. Here we divide Earth's subduction zones into over 100 study regions following Ide [2013] and estimate b-values and the background seismicity rate—the frequency of seismic events excluding aftershocks—for subduction zones worldwide using the maximum likelihood method [Utsu, 1965; Aki, 1965] and the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model [Ogata, 1988]. We demonstrate that the b-value varies as a function of subducting plate age and trench depth, and that the background seismicity rate is related to the degree of slab bending at the trench. Large earthquakes tend to occur relatively frequently (lower b-values) in shallower subduction zones with younger slabs, and more earthquakes occur in subduction zones with deeper trench and steeper dip angle. These results suggest that slab buoyancy, which depends on subducting plate age, controls the earthquake size distribution, and that intra-slab faults due to slab bending, which increase with the steepness of the slab dip angle, have influence on the frequency of seismic events, because they produce heterogeneity in plate coupling and efficiently inject fluid to elevate pore fluid pressure on the plate interface. This study reveals tectonic factors that control earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate, and these relationships between seismicity and

  14. Impact Resistance Behaviour of Light Weight Rice Husk Concrete with Bamboo Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Beddu, Salmia; Syamsir, Agusril; Sigar Ating, Joshua; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Usman, Fathoni; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the performance of lightweight rice husk concrete (LWRHC) with varied bamboo reinforcement content for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced with varied slab thickness subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.65 m height has been used in this research work. The main variables for the study is to find the relationship of the impact resistance against the amount of bamboo reinforcement and slab thickness. A linear relationship has been established between first and ultimate crack resistance against bamboo diameters and slab thickness by the experiment. The linear relationship has also been established between the service (first) crack and ultimate crack resistance against the bamboo reinforcement diameter and slab thickness. 5% RH content exhibit better first and ultimate crack resistance up to 1.80 times and up to 1.72 times respectively against 10% RH content.

  15. Friction evaluation of concrete paver blocks for airport pavement applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    The development and use of concrete paver blocks is reviewed and some general specifications for application of this type of pavement surface at airport facilities are given. Two different shapes of interlocking concrete paver blocks installed in the track surface at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) are described. Preliminary cornering performance results from testing of 40 x 14 radial-belted and bias-ply aircraft tires are reviewed. These tire tests are part of a larger, ongoing joint NASA/FAA/Industry Surface Traction and Radial Tire (START) Program involving several different tire sizes. Both dry and wet surface conditions were evaluated on the two concrete paver block test surfaces and a conventional, nongrooved Portland cement concrete surface. Future test plans involving evaluation of other concrete paver block designs at the ALDF are indicated.

  16. Roadmap 2030: The U.S. Concrete Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-12-01

    Roadmap 2030: The U.S. Concrete Industry Technology Roadmap tracks the eight goals published in the American Concrete Institute Strategic Development Council's Vision 2030: A Vision for the U.S. Concrete Industry. Roadmap 2030 highlights existing state-of-the-art technologies and emerging scientific advances that promise high potential for innovation, and predicts future technological needs. It defines enabling research opportunities and proposes areas where governmental-industrial-academic partnerships can accelerate the pace of development. Roadmap 2030 is a living document designed to continually address technical, institutional, and market changes.

  17. Smart acoustic emission system for wireless monitoring of concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Jin; Kim, Young-Gil; Kim, Chi-Yeop; Seo, Dae-Cheol

    2008-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this technique or this kind of principle, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures. Concrete is one of the most widely used materials for constructing civil structures. In the nondestructive evaluation point of view, a lot of AE signals are generated in concrete structures under loading whether the crack development is active or not. Also, it was required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. Therefore we have done a practical study in this work to fabricate compact wireless AE sensor and to develop diagnosis system. First, this study aims to identify the differences of AE event patterns caused by both real damage sources and the other normal sources. Secondly, it was focused to develop acoustic emission diagnosis system for assessing the deterioration of concrete structures such as a bridge, dame, building slab, tunnel etc. Thirdly, the wireless acoustic emission system was developed for the application of monitoring concrete structures. From the previous laboratory study such as AE event patterns analysis under various loading conditions, we confirmed that AE analysis provided a promising approach for estimating the condition of damage and distress in concrete structures. In this work, the algorithm for determining the damage status of concrete structures was developed and typical criteria for decision making was also suggested. For the future application of wireless monitoring, a low energy consumable, compact, and robust wireless acoustic emission sensor module was developed and applied to the concrete beam for performance test. Finally, based on the self-developed diagnosis algorithm and compact wireless AE sensor, new AE system for practical

  18. Applications for concrete offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The report collects and summarizes the various proposals for development offshore which have in common the use of concrete as the main structural material, and where possible, indicates their relative feasibility. A study encompassing such diverse schemes as offshore windmills, concrete LNG carriers, hydrocarbon production platforms and floating airports cannot be completely exhaustive on each subject, so references to sources of further information have been given wherever possible. Details of individual projects and proposals are included for Power plants, Hydrocarbon production platforms, Concrete ships, Storage systems and industrial plants, Subsea systems, Offshore islands, Coastal works and Other concrete structures.

  19. 24. REAR ELEVATION, HULETT ORE UNLOADERS. TRACKS CARRYING THE FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. REAR ELEVATION, HULETT ORE UNLOADERS. TRACKS CARRYING THE FRONT END AND REAR LEGS OF THE HULETT UNLOADERS ARE LAID ON THE DOCK AND REAR WALLS, RESPECTIVELY; BOTH WALLS ARE MADE OF REINFORCED CONCRETE SUPPORTED ON CONCRETE PILES. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Analysis of concrete targets with different kinds of reinforcements subjected to blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oña, M.; Morales-Alonso, G.; Gálvez, F.; Sánchez-Gálvez, V.; Cendón, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental campaign carried out to study and analyse the behaviour of concrete slabs when subjected to blast loading. Four different types of concrete have been tested: normal strength concrete with steel rebar, normal strength concrete with steel rebar retrofitted with Kevlar coating, steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) and polypropylene fibre reinforced concrete (PFRC). The major asset of the experimental setup used is that it allows to subject up to four specimens to the same blast load what, besides being cost effective, makes possible to have a measure of the experimental scatter. The results of SFRC and PFRC concretes have been analysed by using a previously developed material model for the numerical simulation of concrete elements subjected to blast. The experimental campaign and preliminary results of this numerical analysis show how the high strain rates, in spite of improving the mechanical properties of these kinds of fibre reinforced concretes, lead to an embrittlement of the material, which may be dangerous from the point of view of the structural behaviour.

  1. Numerical quadrature for slab geometry transport algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hennart, J.P.; Valle, E. del

    1995-12-31

    In recent papers, a generalized nodal finite element formalism has been presented for virtually all known linear finite difference approximations to the discrete ordinates equations in slab geometry. For a particular angular directions {mu}, the neutron flux {Phi} is approximated by a piecewise function Oh, which over each space interval can be polynomial or quasipolynomial. Here we shall restrict ourselves to the polynomial case. Over each space interval, {Phi} is a polynomial of degree k, interpolating parameters given by in the continuous and discontinuous cases, respectively. The angular flux at the left and right ends and the k`th Legendre moment of {Phi} over the cell considered are represented as.

  2. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Peter Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  3. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes.

  4. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOEpatents

    Martin, R.J.

    1985-12-24

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes. 5 figs.

  5. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, Joseph W.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Davidson, James C.; Koo, Jackson C.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  6. Slab coupled optical fiber sensor calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, B.; Noren, J.; Chadderdon, S.; Wang, W.; Forber, R.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a method for calibrating slab coupled optical fiber sensors (SCOS). An automated system is presented for selecting the optimal laser wavelength for use in SCOS interrogation. The wavelength calibration technique uses a computer sound card for both the creation of the applied electric field and the signal detection. The method used to determine the ratio between the measured SCOS signal and the applied electric field is also described along with a demonstration of the calibrated SCOS involving measuring the dielectric breakdown of air.

  7. Observation of the Early Transition from Slab to mixed Slab-Toroidal ETG Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbaky, Abed; Sokolov, Vladimir; Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-10-01

    Parametric studies of the transition between the slab branch of electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode and the mixed slab-toroidal branch of the ETG mode in CLM are reported. CLM was operated in a mirror machine configuration with a cell length of 50--100 cm, and a mirror ratio of 1--2. For typical CLM parameters and a mode localized at r = 2 cm this provides a range for inverse radius of curvature Rc - 1 between 0 and .006 cm-1. Under normal conditions theory predicts transition between slab and toroidal modes would occur when the parameter k| |Rc / 2k⊥ ρ ~ 1. Recent experiments have obtained an experimental scaling of mode amplitude and frequency as a function of Rc - 1. They indicate that even for much more modest levels of k| |Rc / 2k⊥ ρ ~ . 1 , there are substantial increases in saturated mode, up to 5 times larger than the pure slab mode. Changes in real frequency in the mode are generally small, on the order of <5%. This research was supported by the Department of Electrical Engineering of Columbia University.

  8. Thermally induced birefringence in Nd:YAG slab lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ostermeyer, Martin; Mudge, Damien; Veitch, Peter J.; Munch, Jesper

    2006-07-20

    We study thermally induced birefringence in crystalline Nd:YAG zigzag slab lasers and the associated depolarization losses. The optimum crystallographic orientation of the zigzag slab within the Nd:YAG boule and photoelastic effects in crystalline Nd:YAG slabs are briefly discussed. The depolarization is evaluated using the temperature and stress distributions, calculated using a finite element model, for realistically pumped and cooled slabs of finite dimensions. Jones matrices are then used to calculate the depolarization of the zigzag laser mode. We compare the predictions with measurements of depolarization, and suggest useful criteria for the design of the gain media for such lasers.

  9. MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE RUN OUT INCLUDES THE TRAVELING TORCH WHICH CUTS SLABS TO DESIRED LENGTH, AN IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TO INDICATE HEAT NUMBER AND TRACE IDENTITY OF EVERY SLAB, AND A DEBURRING DEVICE TO SMOOTH SLABS. AT LEFT OF ROLLS IS THE DUMMY BAR. DUMMY BAR IS INSERTED UP THROUGH CONTAINMENT SECTION INTO MOLD PRIOR TO START OF CAST. WHEN STEEL IS INTRODUCED INTO MOLD IT CONNECTS WITH BAR AS CAST BEGINS, AT RUN OUT DUMMY BAR DISCONNECTS AND IS STORED - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  10. MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE RUN OUT INCLUDES THE TRAVELING TORCH WHICH CUTS SLABS TO DESIRED LENGTH, AN IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TO INDICATE HEAT NUMBER AND TRACE IDENTITY OF EVERY SLAB, AND A DEBURRING DEVICE TO SMOOTH SLABS. AT LEFT OF ROLLS IS THE DUMMY BAR. DUMMY BAR IS INSERTED UP THROUGH CONTAINMENT SECTION INTO MOLD PRIOR TO START OF CAST. WHEN STEEL IS INTRODUCED INTO MOLD IT CONNECTS WITH BAR AS CAST BEGINS, AT RUN OUT DUMMY BAR DISCONNECTS AND IS STORED. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL