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Sample records for concreto estrutural leve

  1. Geophysical applications for levee assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlaib, Hussein Khalefa

    Levees are important engineering structures that build along the rivers to protect the human lives and shield the communities as well as agriculture lands from the high water level events. Animal burrows, subsurface cavities, and low density (high permeability) zones are weakness features within the levee body that increase its risk of failure. To prevent such failure, continuous monitoring of the structure integrity and early detection of the weakness features must be conducted. Application of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Capacitively Coupled Resistivity (CCR) methods were found to be very effective in assessing the levees and detect zones of weakness within the levee body. GPR was implemented using multi-frequency antennas (200, 400, and 900 MHz) with survey cart/wheel and survey vehicle. The (CCR) method was applied by using a single transmitter and three receivers. Studying the capability and the effectiveness of these methods in levee monitoring, subsurface weakness feature detection, and studying the structure integrity of levees were the main tasks of this dissertation. A set of laboratory experiments was conducted at the Geophysics Laboratory of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) to analyze the polarity change in GPR signals in the presence of subsurface voids and water-filled cavities. Also three full scale field expeditions at the Big Dam Bridge (BDB) Levee, Lollie Levee, and Helena Levee in Arkansas were conducted using the GPR technique. This technique was effective in detecting empty, water, and clay filled cavities as well as small scale animal burrows (small rodents). The geophysical work at BDB and Lollie Levees expressed intensive subsurface anomalies which might decrease their integrity while the Helena Levee shows less subsurface anomalies. The compaction of levee material is a key factor affecting piping phenomenon. The structural integrity of the levee partially depends on the density/compaction of the soil layers. A

  2. Raising the bar for levees.

    PubMed

    Lougheed, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Engineers have worked for millennia to control natural flooding through dams and levees. While the fundamental principles and challenges of holding back water have not changed, the tools brought to the task continue to evolve. Among other tools being tested and implemented today are elaborate sensors to detect stresses and strains within structures, and impermeable lining materials known as geomembranes, which are laid underneath the structure before it is built to prevent water seepage. PMID:16393647

  3. Using geophysics to characterize levee stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Laura M.

    Shallow slough slides have occurred along the river side slope of Mississippi River Levees for over sixty years. Shallow slough slides also occur along smaller levees that protect tributaries of the Mississippi River. This investigation takes place along a section of the Coldwater River Levee, a tributary levee of the Mississippi River. Field observation, soil samples, and geophysical data were collected at two field sites located on the border of Tate and Tunica County, MS. The first site consists of a developed shallow slough slide that had occurred that has not yet been repaired and the second site is a potential slide area. Electromagnetic induction and electrical resistivity tomography were the geophysical methods used to define subsurface conditions that make a levee vulnerable to failure. These electrical methods are sensitive to the electrical conductivity of the soil and therefore depend upon: soil moisture, clay content, pore size distribution as well as larger scale structures at depth such as cracks and fissures. These same physical properties of the soil are also important to assessing the vulnerability of a levee to slough slides. Soil tests and field observations were also implemented in this investigation to describe and classify the soil composition of the levee material. The problem of slough slide occurrence can potentially be reduced if vulnerabilities are located with the help of geophysical techniques.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Study of Levee Breach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elalfy, E. Y.; LaRocque, L.; Riahi-Nezhad, C. K.; Chaudhry, H.

    2014-12-01

    Levees are constructed along rivers and channels for flood protection. Failure of these levees can cause loss of life and property damage. A better understanding of the flow field from a levee breach allows the decision maker to assess risks and to prepare emergency plans. For this purpose, a two-dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate the levee breach. The model solves the shallow-water equations using the MacCormack explicit, finite- difference two-step, predictor-corrector scheme. The scheme is second-order accurate in time and space. The artificial viscosity technique is used to smooth the high-frequency oscillations in the computed results. The numerical results compare satisfactorily with the experimental results. A parametric study is carried-out to investigate the effect of main channel width, breach width on the computed flow field.

  5. Levee Scour Protection for Storm Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E.; Sustainable; Resiliency in Levee Scour Protection

    2011-12-01

    Earnest Johnson, Firat Y. Testik *, Nadarajah Ravichandran Civil Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA * Contact author ftestik@clemson.edu Levee failure due to scouring has been a prominent occurrence among intense storm surges and waves, giving rise to the implementation of various scour protection measures over the years. This study is to investigate the levee scour and to compare different scour protection measures on a model-levee system in a laboratory wave tank. The protection measures that are tested and compared for their effectiveness in this study include turf reinforcement mats, woven geotextiles, and core-locs. This is an ongoing research effort and experiments are currently being conducted with model levees constructed based upon the United States Army Corps of Engineers' levee design and construction guidelines under various simulated storm conditions. Parameters such as wave elevations, deformation time history of the floodwall, and the scour depth are measured in each test. The finding of this research will be translated to provide effective scour protection measures for robust levee designs.

  6. Risk-based planning analysis for a single levee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Rui; Jachens, Elizabeth; Lund, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Traditional risk-based analysis for levee planning focuses primarily on overtopping failure. Although many levees fail before overtopping, few planning studies explicitly include intermediate geotechnical failures in flood risk analysis. This study develops a risk-based model for two simplified levee failure modes: overtopping failure and overall intermediate geotechnical failure from through-seepage, determined by the levee cross section represented by levee height and crown width. Overtopping failure is based only on water level and levee height, while through-seepage failure depends on many geotechnical factors as well, mathematically represented here as a function of levee crown width using levee fragility curves developed from professional judgment or analysis. These levee planning decisions are optimized to minimize the annual expected total cost, which sums expected (residual) annual flood damage and annualized construction costs. Applicability of this optimization approach to planning new levees or upgrading existing levees is demonstrated preliminarily for a levee on a small river protecting agricultural land, and a major levee on a large river protecting a more valuable urban area. Optimized results show higher likelihood of intermediate geotechnical failure than overtopping failure. The effects of uncertainty in levee fragility curves, economic damage potential, construction costs, and hydrology (changing climate) are explored. Optimal levee crown width is more sensitive to these uncertainties than height, while the derived general principles and guidelines for risk-based optimal levee planning remain the same.

  7. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Levee owner's manual. 203.51... Program § 203.51 Levee owner's manual. (a) Authority. In accordance with section 202(f) of Public Law...

  8. Toward a model for leveed lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Many lava flows have two distinct volumetric components during emplacement. First, there is a component actively flowing in accordance with Newtonian or other constitutive relations. Second, there may be an inactive, stationary component that is no longer participating in the forward movement of the flow. Such passive components may take the form of flow-confining levees, solidified lateral margins, overspilling, plating, small ponds and sidestreams, or a lava tube. To describe the conservation of flow volume for the active component, governing equations are given and discussed.

  9. Climate and floods still govern California levee breaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Florsheim, J.L.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Even in heavily engineered river systems, climate still governs flood variability and thus still drives many levee breaks and geomorphic changes. We assemble a 155-year record of levee breaks for a major California river system to find that breaks occurred in 25% of years during the 20th Century. A relation between levee breaks and river discharge is present that sets a discharge threshold above which most levee breaks occurred. That threshold corresponds to small floods with recurrence intervals of ???2-3 years. Statistical analysis illustrates that levee breaks and peak discharges cycle (broadly) on a 12-15 year time scale, in time with warm-wet storm patterns in California, but more slowly or more quickly than ENSO and PDO climate phenomena, respectively. Notably, these variations and thresholds persist through the 20th Century, suggesting that historical flood-control effects have not reduced the occurrence or frequency of levee breaks. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Channel Levees Built by Turbidity Currents in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrig, D.; Straub, K. M.; Buttles, J.; Pirmez, C.

    2005-12-01

    A laboratory experiment resolves, at a reduced scale, many of the interactions between turbidity currents and bottom topography that lead to construction of channel-bounding levees. Analysis of the experimental data focuses on establishing the connections between levee thickness, levee taper and composition (grain size). These levee characteristics are in turn related to the following physical properties of the depositing currents: 1) current thickness relative to the local depth of the channel; and 2) vertical profiles of suspended-sediment concentration and grain size within the interiors of currents. Change in local depth confined more or less current within the channel and determined the fraction of current present at and above the levee-crest elevation where it could act as a sediment source for bank construction. A relatively thick, steep and coarse-grained levee was constructed at locations along the channel where the currents were significantly thicker than the channel was deep and a relatively thin, weakly tapered and fine-grained levee formed where the channel was deeper. Levee deposition rate varied as a function of both the absolute concentration and size of the particles suspended in the depositing current at the elevation of the local levee crest. Likewise, the laterally varying deposition rates that produced the levee taper were controlled by the vertical gradients in suspended-sediment concentration and grain size for only that fraction of the current moving out onto the bank of the channel. Trends reported here were measured in a straight channel and not affected by any cross-channel variation associated with channel bends. Variability in levee form and composition induced by irregularity in channel plan-form complicates the connection between properties of the depositing flows and the levees they construct, increasing the number of measurements necessary to resolve any systematic change in levee properties through space or time. The experimental

  11. Multiscale numerical modeling of levee breach processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M. W.; Akkerman, I.; Bazilevs, Y.

    2010-12-01

    One of the dominant failure modes of levees during flood and storm surge events is erosion-based breach formation due to high velocity flow over the back (land-side) slope. Modeling the breaching process numerically is challenging due to both physical and geometric complexity that develops and evolves during the overtopping event. The surface water flows are aerated and sediment-laden mixtures in the supercritical and turbulent regimes. The air/water free surface may undergo perturbations on the same order as the depth or even topological change (breaking). Likewise the soil/fluid interface is characterized by evolving headcuts, which are essentially moving discontinuities in the soil surface elevation. The most widely used models of levee breaching are nevertheless based on depth-integrated models of flow, sediment transport, and bed morphology. In this work our objective is to explore models with less restrictive modeling assumptions, which have become computationally tractable due to advances in both numerical methods and high-performance computing hardware. In particular, we present formulations of fully three-dimensional flow, transport, and morphological evolution for overtopping and breaching processes and apply recently developed finite element and level set methods to solve the governing equations for relevant test problems.

  12. National Levee Database: monitoring, vulnerability assessment and management in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbetta, Silvia; Camici, Stefania; Maccioni, Pamela; Moramarco, Tommaso

    2015-04-01

    A properly designed and constructed levees system can often be an effective device for repelling floodwaters and provide barriers against inundation to protect urbanized and industrial areas. However, the delineation of flooding-prone areas and the related hydraulic hazard mapping taking account of uncertainty (Apel et al., 2008) are usually developed with a scarce consideration of the possible occurrence of levee failures along river channels (Mazzoleni et al., 2014). Indeed, it is well known that flooding is frequently the result of levee failures that can be triggered by several factors, as: (1) overtopping, (2) scouring of the foundation, (3) seepage/piping of levee body/foundation, and (4) sliding of the foundation. Among these failure mechanisms that are influenced by the levee's geometrical configuration, hydraulic conditions (e.g. river level and seepage), and material properties (e.g. permeability, cohesion, porosity, compaction), the piping caused by seepage (ICOLD, http://www.icold-cigb.org) is considered one of the most dominant levee failure mechanisms (Colleselli F., 1994; Wallingford H. R., 2003). The difficulty of estimating the hydraulic parameters to properly describe the seepage line within the body and foundation of the levee implies that the study of the critical flood wave routing is typically carried out by assuming that the levee system is undamaged during the flood event. In this context, implementing and making operational a National Levee Database (NLD), effectively structured and continuously updated, becomes fundamental to have a searchable inventory of information about levees available as a key resource supporting decisions and actions affecting levee safety. The ItaliaN LEvee Database (INLED) has been recently developed by the Research Institute for Geo-Hydrological Protection (IRPI) for the Civil Protection Department of the Presidency of Council of Ministers. INLED has the main focus of collecting comprehensive information about

  13. Woody Vegetation on Levees? - Research Experiences and Design Suggestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, Walter

    2013-04-01

    Recent flood events in Austria have reawakened practical and scientific interest in the stability of levees. One focus amongst others has been taken on the relationship between vegetation and levee stability with special reference to the role of woody plants. The effects of woody plants are undoubtedly manifold: On the one hand they can potentially have a negative influence and endanger levees, which is why many guidelines ban woody vegetation to preserve stability, visual inspection and unhindered flood-fight access. On the other hand woody vegetation can have several positive impacts on soil stability and which effects prevail depends largely on types and characteristics of plants. This shows how controversially woody plants on levees can be discussed and the strong need for further research in this field. In order to obtain new insights and widen horizons for this controversial issue, a research project carried out by the Institute of Soil Bioengineering and Landscape Construction - at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna - was launched. This project deals with several aspects of effects of woody plants have on levees and focuses particularly on shrubby woody plants. The examined vegetation type is a dense stand of willows - Purple-Willows (Salix purpurea L.) - commonly used for stabilization of river embankments. The proposed contribution discusses the gained results with reference to levee stability and existing levee vegetation guidelines and gives design suggestions for compatible woody vegetation on levees.

  14. Optimized Radar Remote Sensing for Levee Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.

    2013-01-01

    Radar remote sensing offers great potential for high resolution monitoring of ground surface changes over large areas at one time to detect movement on and near levees and for location of seepage through levees. Our NASA-funded projects to monitor levees in the Sacramento Delta and the Mississippi River have developed and demonstrated methods to use radar remote sensing to measure quantities relevant to levee health and of great value to emergency response. The DHS-funded project will enable us is to define how to optimally monitor levees in this new way and set the stage for transition to using satellite SAR (synthetic aperture radar) imaging for better temporal and spatial coverage at lower cost to the end users.

  15. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  16. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  17. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  18. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  19. Overtopping breaching of river levees constructed with cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hongyan; Yu, Minghui; Wang, Dangwei; Li, Yitian

    2016-07-01

    Experiments were conducted in a bend flume to study the overtopping breaching process and the corresponding overflow rates of river levees constructed with cohesive sediments. The river and land regions were separated by the constructed levee in the bend flume. Results showed that the levee breaching process can be subdivided into a slope erosion stage, a headcut retreat stage and a breach widening stage. Mechanisms such as flow shear erosion, impinging jet erosion, side slope erosion and cantilever collapse were discovered in the breaching process. The erosion characteristics were determined by both flow and soil properties. Finally, a depth-averaged 2-D flow model was used to simulate the levee breaching flow rates, which is well expressed by the broad-crested weir flow formula. The deduced discharge coefficient was smaller than that of common broad-crested rectangular weirs because of the shape and roughness of the breach.

  20. Cibola High Levee Pond Annual Report 2003. Interim Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, G.A.; Carpenter, J.; Marsh, P.C.; Minckley, C.O.

    2003-01-01

    Bonytail and razorback sucker have once again spawned and produced swim-up larvae in Cibola High Levee Pond (CHLP). CHLP continues to support annual recruitment of bonytail while recent razorback sucker recruitment remains elusive. Thus far, razorbacks have experienced intermittent years of spawning success. Both native species were observed spawning on, or near, the riprap on the river levee. Razorbacks spawned from late January until mid-March over gravel and large cobble along the levee toe (2-3 m depth) and bonytail spawned along the levee shoreline during mid-April. Razorback suckers rapidly fin during the reproductive act, which flushes fines from the substrate and leaves gravel relatively clean. Bonytail on the other hand, appear to spawn over or on substrate that has been disturbed by beaver activity. Substrate scour or disturbance appears to be an important factor in spawning site selectiona?|

  1. Game Theory and Risk-Based Levee System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.; Madani, K.

    2014-12-01

    Risk-based analysis has been developed for optimal levee design for economic efficiency. Along many rivers, two levees on opposite riverbanks act as a simple levee system. Being rational and self-interested, land owners on each river bank would tend to independently optimize their levees with risk-based analysis, resulting in a Pareto-inefficient levee system design from the social planner's perspective. Game theory is applied in this study to analyze decision making process in a simple levee system in which the land owners on each river bank develop their design strategies using risk-based economic optimization. For each land owner, the annual expected total cost includes expected annual damage cost and annualized construction cost. The non-cooperative Nash equilibrium is identified and compared to the social planner's optimal distribution of flood risk and damage cost throughout the system which results in the minimum total flood cost for the system. The social planner's optimal solution is not feasible without appropriate level of compensation for the transferred flood risk to guarantee and improve conditions for all parties. Therefore, cooperative game theory is then employed to develop an economically optimal design that can be implemented in practice. By examining the game in the reversible and irreversible decision making modes, the cost of decision making myopia is calculated to underline the significance of considering the externalities and evolution path of dynamic water resource problems for optimal decision making.

  2. Estimation of Discharge from Breached Earthfill Levee with Elapsed Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yang, Jiro; Song, Chang Geun; Lee, Seung Oh

    2014-05-01

    Lack of the freeboard of levee has been occurred due to abnormally peaked flood events. Thus, the risk from overtopping of earthfill levee has been remarkably increased. When overflow on levee starts to occur, the breaching gap suddenly grows up at initial stage. As the breach width is extended, the discharge from breached section is also nonlinearly increased. Moreover, if the levee is located through multiple cities, the related damage cannot be predictable. However, researches about the breach mechanism have been focused on the breached shape of levee on the equilibrium state and the study on the development of levee breach is not enough to utilize the prediction of damage itself and select its countermeasure. In this study, the formula for breach discharge was presented to be able to predict that based on hydraulic experimental results. All experiments have been conducted with the movable levee which was the crown width of 0.3 m, the height of 0.3 m, the landside slope of 2:1 (H:V). Breach was induced by the lateral overflow for Froude numbers in main channel from 0.15 to 0.35 with the increment of 0.05. Based on the dimensional analysis with significant parameters such as main channel depth, breach width and discharge coefficient, temporal variation of each parameter was estimated with 25 experimental cases. Finally, the formula for prediction of breach flow due to overtopping failure of levee was presented considering the elapsed time for each Froude number after combing all significant parameters. When Froude number was less than 0.3, the breach discharge occurred to increase with Froude number while it became decreased with Froude number exceeding 0.3, which means the maximum breach discharge was occurred at Froude number = 0.3. It would be explained with the flow diversion caused by the collision of breach flow on the breached section downstream, which decreased the breach discharge into landside for higher Froude number of 0.3. As a future works, when the

  3. Characterizing Levees using Polarimetric and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbiru, L.; Aanstoos, J. V.; Mahrooghy, M.; Gokaraju, B.; Nobrega, R. A.; Younan, N. H.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring the physical condition of levees is vital in order to protect them from flooding. The dynamics of subsurface water events can cause damage on levee structures which could lead to slough slides, sand boils or through seepage. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice to identify such problem areas so that they can be treated to avoid possible catastrophic failure. The radar polarimetric and interferometric data is capable of identifying variations in soil properties of the areas which might cause levee failure. The study area encompasses portion of levees of the lower Mississippi river in the United States. The methodology of this research is mainly categorized into two streams: 1) polarimetric data analysis and classification, and 2) interferometric analysis. Two sources of SAR imagery are used: a) quad-polarized, L-band data from Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) for polarimetric classification, and b) high resolution dual-polarized Terrasar-X data for interferometric analysis. NASA's UAVSAR imagery acquired between 2009 and 2011 are used for the analysis. The polarimetric classification is performed based on the decomposition parameters: entropy (H), anisotropy (A) and alpha (α) and the results detected slough slides on the levees and potential future slides. In the interferometric approach, the Terrasar-X SAR images acquired at different times in the year 2011 are combined into pairs to exploit the phase difference of the signals. The interferometric information is used to find evidence of potential small-scale deformations which could be pre-cursors to levee failure.

  4. Mapping levees for river basin management using LiDAR data and multispectral aerial orthoimages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choung, Yun Jae

    Mapping levees is important to assessing levee stability, identifying flood risks for the areas protected by levee systems, etc. Historically, mapping levees has been carried out using ground surveying methods or only one type of remote sensing data set. This dissertation aims at mapping the levees by using airborne topographic LiDAR data and multispectral orthoimages taken in the river basins of the Nakdong River. In this dissertation, three issues with mapping levees are illustrated. The first issue is developing new methods for mapping levee surfaces by using geometric and spectral information. Levee surfaces consist of multiple objects having different geometric and spectral patterns. This dissertation proposes multiple methods for identifying the major objects and eroded areas on the levee surfaces. Multiple geometric analysis approaches such as the slope difference analysis and the elevation and area analysis are used to identify the levee top, berm, slope plates and the eroded area having different geometric patterns. Next, the spectral analysis approach, such as clustering algorithms, is used to identify major objects having different spectral patterns on the plates identified. Finally, multiple components, including the major objects and eroded areas on the levee surfaces, are identified. The second issue is developing new methods for mapping levee lines by using the geometric and spectral information. In general, the levee lines are determined on levee surfaces by considering the geometric pattern, the types of major objects, etc. This dissertation proposes multiple methods for mapping the levee lines located on various levee surfaces. First, the three baselines (the edges extracted from the images, the cluster boundaries extracted from the identified clusters and the plate boundaries extracted from the LiDAR data) are extracted separately from different sources. Next, the judgment test is performed in order to select one baseline as the levee line

  5. Bayesian estimation of levee breach progression in natural rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, M.; D'Oria, M.; Mignosa, P.

    2013-12-01

    During severe flood events, sometime, levee breaches occur in a river reach causing the flooding of the surrounding area. Most levee failures are not instantaneous but they gradually evolve over a period of time: the initial breach progressively increases its depth and enlarges its width. After the failure takes place, even if its location can be known, the breach progression is hard to be recovered. However, if one or more sites monitored with level gauges are located downstream the failure site, the breach time evolution leaves an imprint in these water levels. The knowledge of the breach progression can be useful to better understand the effective dynamics of the failure and to evaluate the breach flood wave in order to simulate the flooding process for forensic purposes among others. In this work an inverse methodology to estimate the progression of an occurred levee breach in a natural river using water level data available at monitored stations downstream the failure is presented. The methodology is based on a Bayesian approach to the inverse problem coupled with geostatistical models to describe the structure of the unknown breach time evolution. The methodology requires a forward hydraulic model of the considered river reach able to accurately reproduce not only the flow routing processes but also the levee breach in terms of progression and outflow discharge. In this work, a 1D forward model (USACE HEC-RAS river analysis system) that solves the unsteady flow De Saint Venant equations has been used. A simplified description of both the depth and the width time evolution of the levee breach has been considered. The methodology has been tested by means of synthetic examples of several levee breaches considering different stressing flood waves and different locations of the observed water levels used as input for the inverse procedure. The results highlight the reliability of the procedure in estimating the progression of the levee breach and consequently the

  6. Evaluation of levee setbacks for flood-loss reduction, Middle Mississippi River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierauer, Jennifer; Pinter, Nicholas; Remo, Jonathan W. F.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryOne-dimensional hydraulic modeling and flood-loss modeling were used to test the effectiveness of levee setbacks for flood-loss reduction along the Middle Mississippi River (MMR). Four levee scenarios were assessed: (1) the present-day levee configuration, (2) a 1000 m levee setback, (3) a 1500 m levee setback, and (4) an optimized setback configuration. Flood losses were estimated using FEMA's Hazus-MH (Hazards US Multi-Hazard) loss-estimation software on a structure-by-structure basis for a range of floods from the 2- to the 500-year events. These flood-loss estimates were combined with a levee-reliability model to calculate probability-weighted damage estimates. In the simplest case, the levee setback scenarios tested here reduced flood losses compared to current conditions for large, infrequent flooding events but increased flood losses for smaller, more frequent flood events. These increases occurred because levee protection was removed for some of the existing structures. When combined with buyouts of unprotected structures, levee setbacks reduced flood losses for all recurrence intervals. The "optimized" levee setback scenario, involving a levee configuration manually planned to protect existing high-value infrastructure, reduced damages with or without buyouts. This research shows that levee setbacks in combination with buyouts are an economically viable approach for flood-risk reduction along the study reach and likely elsewhere where levees are widely employed for flood control. Designing a levee setback around existing high-value infrastructure can maximize the benefit of the setback while simultaneously minimizing the costs. The optimized levee setback scenario analyzed here produced payback periods (costs divided by benefits) of less than 12 years. With many aging levees failing current inspections across the US, and flood losses spiraling up over time, levee setbacks are a viable solution for reducing flood exposure and flood levels.

  7. Levee Breach Experiment by Overflow at the Full Scale Experimental Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, T.; Yokoyama, H.

    2010-12-01

    The increased occurrence of storm disasters caused by typhoons and local downpours in recent years has given rise to concerns over the possibility of large-scale floods resulting from river overflow. Levee breaches cause particularly severe damage, and in Japan, more than 80% of such accidents in the past have been attributed to overflow. Studies on levee breach by overflow have been conducted from various viewpoints using diverse methods. However, the mechanism of three-dimensional levee breach by overflow has not been clarified in past studies. Elucidation of this mechanism is very important for disaster prevention as well as for the future progress of studies on levee breach by overflow. Levees (levee crown width; 3m, levee height; 3m, levee length; 80m) were built in the Chiyoda Experimental Channel (full-scale experimental channel; width is 30m, length is 1,300m, maximum discharge is 170t/s) in Hokkaido Japan in 2010, and a three-dimensional experiment on levee breach by overflow. The findings of the experiment are as follows: After the beginning of overflow, levee breach widening did not begin until after most of the levee section had collapsed. It was also considered that, even if overflow occurred, extremely serious damage (e.g., sudden increase in levee breach width and overflow discharge) was unlikely unless the majority of the levee section collapsed.

  8. Earthflow yield strength constrained by lateral levee morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nereson, A. L.; Finnegan, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Slow-moving landslides, or earthflows, are characterized by persistent, flow-like motion that is commonly modeled using various viscous and viscoplastic rheologies. One of the manifestations of viscoplastic flow down a slope is the emergence of stationary bodies of fluid at the margins of the flow (i.e. lateral levees). These levees are common signatures of earthflow morphology and, while they are frequently used to outline boundaries for mapping purposes, they have received little attention for what they may indicate about the history and properties of the flow itself. In contrast, lateral levees along lava flows have long been used by physical volcanologists as tools to learn about their non-Newtonian rheologies and chemical compositions. Hulme (1974) was the first to note that, for a given slope, levee width may be characteristic of a fluids's yield strength and his methodology has been subsequently used to infer properties of lavas on the Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Using these lavas as analogies, we apply Hulme's approach to earthflows in a variety of settings globally. We find that calculated yield strengths for individual earthflows fall within a relatively narrow range between 101-102 kPa. In addition, individual earthflow complexes often preserve multiple generations of levees, which in some cases may record apparent reductions in yield strength over time for a given flow, possibly from weakening of previously failed material. Knowledge of earthflow yield strength permits the calculation of a critical earthflow thickness below which there will be no downslope motion for a given slope angle. Thicknesses calculated in this manner could thus be used to estimate the flux of landslide material for earthflows without direct depth constraints, provided that surface velocity measurements are obtained by other methods (e.g. InSAR, GPS, manual feature tracking).

  9. 76 FR 6809 - Rehabilitation Assistance for Levees and other Flood Control Works, DAP 9524.3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Rehabilitation Assistance for Levees and other Flood Control... Rehabilitation Assistance for Levees and other Flood Control Works. DATES: Comments must be received by March 10... certain levees and other flood control works under the provisions of the Robert T. Stafford...

  10. Game theory and risk-based leveed river system planning with noncooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Rui; Lund, Jay R.; Madani, Kaveh

    2016-01-01

    Optimal risk-based levee designs are usually developed for economic efficiency. However, in river systems with multiple levees, the planning and maintenance of different levees are controlled by different agencies or groups. For example, along many rivers, levees on opposite riverbanks constitute a simple leveed river system with each levee designed and controlled separately. Collaborative planning of the two levees can be economically optimal for the whole system. Independent and self-interested landholders on opposite riversides often are willing to separately determine their individual optimal levee plans, resulting in a less efficient leveed river system from an overall society-wide perspective (the tragedy of commons). We apply game theory to simple leveed river system planning where landholders on each riverside independently determine their optimal risk-based levee plans. Outcomes from noncooperative games are analyzed and compared with the overall economically optimal outcome, which minimizes net flood cost system-wide. The system-wide economically optimal solution generally transfers residual flood risk to the lower-valued side of the river, but is often impractical without compensating for flood risk transfer to improve outcomes for all individuals involved. Such compensation can be determined and implemented with landholders' agreements on collaboration to develop an economically optimal plan. By examining iterative multiple-shot noncooperative games with reversible and irreversible decisions, the costs of myopia for the future in making levee planning decisions show the significance of considering the externalities and evolution path of dynamic water resource problems to improve decision-making.

  11. Floodplain restoration with flood control: fish habitat value of levee borrow pits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Earthen flood control levees are often built using soil excavated from borrow pits lying parallel to and riverward of the finished levee. After construction, these pits can provide valuable floodplain habitats, and their value is well established along corridors of larger rivers. However, levee bo...

  12. Miller City levee break and incipient meander cutoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.A.; Jacobson, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    On July 15, 1993, the flooding Mississippi River broke through a levee near Miller City, Ill., at the head of the Mississippi Embayment, approximately 55 km upstream from Cairo, Ill. Flow through the break crossed a high-amplitude meander bend and reentered the main channel approximately 24 km upstream from Cairo, bypassing 31 km of the river channel. The incipient meander cutoff is one of the more dramatic examples of geomorphic change accompanying the 1993 flood. Discharge and bathymetry data were collected in the incipient cutoff channel every other day during the 2 weeks before and after the flood peak. During the peak on August 7, as much as 8,100 m3/s, or approximately 25 percent of the Mississippi flood discharge, was bypassing the meander bend. The flow excavated an irregular channel in the flood plain up to 25 m deep. This irregular channel extends as far as 2 km downstream from the levee break. By August 25, as much as 2,900 m3/s was still flowing through the levee break; with recession of the flood, extensive sand deposits were exposed on the margins and downstream from the scoured areas. Preliminary data indicate that local relief, such as relict channels and preexisting county roads, affected the extent of new channel formation.

  13. Processing of laser radar data for the extraction of an along-the-levee-crown elevation profile for levee remediation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Michael J.; McGill, Thomas E.; Taylor, Stacy R.

    2004-09-01

    Using LiDAR data collected on the levees along the Rio Grande River in New Mexico and Texas, an algorithm has been developed to automatically extract longitudinal elevation profiles. This algorithm consists of a series of filters, interpretation of geophysical properties, and digitized levee centerlines. The series of filters, in order of operation, include an alignment buffer filter, bare-earth filter, sampling filter and a maximum value filter. The result of the filter configuration is a 3-D polyline that models the levee crest. This algorithm allows for efficient identification of portions of levee that are lower than original design specifications. A comparison between the LiDAR levee crown extraction filter and a least-cost-path technique are offered.

  14. Levee breaches and uncertainty in flood risk mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranzi, Roberto; Barontini, Stefano; Ferri, Michele; Bacchi, Baldassare

    2010-05-01

    Due to the dense anthropization, to the agricultural and industrial exploitation and to its treasures of art and history, northern Italy floodplain, which is a result of the action of the rivers draining into the northern Adriatic sea, is a land where the mitigation of the flooding risk rises at crucial importance. Most of the major rivers flowing in this area have a long and complex history of training in order to protect the plain and the cities and it is difficult to predict the position where levee breaches can occur and the width and depth of the breaches. In view of an investigation on the uncertainties in flood risk mapping, with the aim of developing a methodology based on a stocastic approach to model the position, length and depth of the breach coupled with a simplified method to determine the flooded area, we collected information on major floods and statistics of levees breaches occurred in the Po, Adige, Brenta, Piave and Tagliamento rivers. We provide the statistics of 225 historical breaches occurred in the 1801-2000 time windows in the floodplain course of the Po river, which is 324 km long (from upstream to downstream, 80 km are meandering, 100 km are braided and the others are sinuous-straight). The first two stretches are characterised also by lateral inflow, while the last stretch is mainly characterised by routing and floodplain inundation processes. Three dominant levee collapse mechanisms (overtopping, erosion, piping) were considered. The highest number of breaches was registered in the meandering course, with overtopping strongly (78%) as the most frequent dominant mechanism. Three different samples of historical floods were considered, separated by two important floods (1857 and 1879). A significant decrease in the total number of breaches (per year and per kilometer) was observed since the second half of the 19th century, as a consequence of flood directives issued in that period and to the levees restoration after the floods. A decrease

  15. Process of Levee Breach by Overflow at the Full Scale Chiyoda Experimental Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, T.; Yokoyama, H.

    2011-12-01

    The increased occurrence of storm disasters caused by typhoons and local downpours in recent years has given rise to concerns over the possibility of large-scale floods resulting from river overflow. Levee breaches cause particularly severe damage, and in Japan, more than 80% of such accidents in the past have been attributed to overflow. Previous studies on overflow-induced levee breaches have not revealed the mechanisms of these issues on a full-scale 3D basis (i.e., side-overflow taking river flow on the riverside land into consideration). It is important to clarify these mechanisms in terms of disaster prevention and for the purpose of bringing progress in future studies on overflow-induced failure. Levees (levee crown width is 3m in 2010 and 6m in 2011, levee height is 3m, levee length is 80m) were built in the Chiyoda Experimental Channel (full-scale experimental channel; width is 30m, length is 1,300m, maximum discharge is 170t/s) in Hokkaido Japan, and a three-dimensional experiment on levee breach by overflow. The findings of the experiment are as follows: After the beginning of overflow, levee breach widening did not begin until after most of the levee section had collapsed. And in case of 6m of the levee crown width, that time in becomes long. It was also considered that, even if overflow occurred, extremely serious damage (e.g., sudden increase in levee breach width and overflow discharge) was unlikely unless the majority of the levee section collapsed.

  16. Evidence of an emerging levee failure mechanism causing disastrous floods in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, Stefano; Moretti, Giovanni; Albertson, John D.

    2015-10-01

    A levee failure occurred along the Secchia River, Northern Italy, on 19 January 2014, resulting in flood damage in excess of $500 million. In response to this failure, immediate surveillance of other levees in the region led to the identification of a second breach developing on the neighboring Panaro River, where rapid mitigation efforts were successful in averting a full levee failure. The paired breach events that occurred along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers provided an excellent window on an emerging levee failure mechanism. In the Secchia River, by combining the information content of photographs taken from helicopters in the early stage of breach development and 10 cm resolution aerial photographs taken in 2010 and 2012, animal burrows were found to exist in the precise levee location where the breach originated. In the Panaro River, internal erosion was observed to occur at a location where a crested porcupine den was known to exist and this erosion led to the collapse of the levee top. This paper uses detailed numerical modeling of rainfall, river flow, and variably saturated flow in the levee to explore the hydraulic and geotechnical mechanisms that were triggered along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers by activities of burrowing animals leading to levee failures. As habitats become more fragmented and constrained along river corridors, it is possible that this failure mechanism could become more prevalent and, therefore, will demand greater attention in both the design and maintenance of earthen hydraulic structures as well as in wildlife management.

  17. An assessment of two methods for identifying undocumented levees using remotely sensed data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Christiana R.; Williams, Byron K.; Westman, Jack; LeClaire, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Many undocumented and commonly unmaintained levees exist in the landscape complicating flood forecasting, risk management, and emergency response. This report describes a pilot study completed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assess two methods to identify undocumented levees by using remotely sensed, high-resolution topographic data. For the first method, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers examined hillshades computed from a digital elevation model that was derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) to visually identify potential levees and then used detailed site visits to assess the validity of the identifications. For the second method, the U.S. Geological Survey applied a wavelet transform to a lidar-derived digital elevation model to identify potential levees. The hillshade method was applied to Delano, Minnesota, and the wavelet-transform method was applied to Delano and Springfield, Minnesota. Both methods were successful in identifying levees but also identified other features that required interpretation to differentiate from levees such as constructed barriers, high banks, and bluffs. Both methods are complementary to each other, and a potential conjunctive method for testing in the future includes (1) use of the wavelet-transform method to rapidly identify slope-break features in high-resolution topographic data, (2) further examination of topographic data using hillshades and aerial photographs to classify features and map potential levees, and (3) a verification check of each identified potential levee with local officials and field visits.

  18. Documenting Tragedy and Resilience: The Importance of Spike Lee's "When the Levees Broke"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Kevin Michael; Blakes, Tifani; McKay, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Spike Lee's documentary, "When the Levees Broke," provides an informative, enduring, and alternative presentation surrounding the human and man-made debacle associated with Hurricane Katrina. Levees centers the voices of survivors and others involved in the weeks during and after the hurricane, historicizes residents' understandings and reactions,…

  19. 77 FR 9637 - Process for Requesting a Variance From Vegetation Standards for Levees and Floodwalls; Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    .... If the prism is not smaller than the existing levee cross section, it is unlikely that a variance... dimension the levee prism (see Figure 1). The prism is the minimum analytical cross section that, given site... require a larger prism. The prism must also satisfy the requirements of any other applicable standard....

  20. A Model for Variable Levee Formation Rates in an Active Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Crisp, J.

    2004-01-01

    Channelized lava flows on Mars and the Earth often feature levees and collateral margins that change in volume along the path of the flow. Consistent with field observations of terrestrial flows, this suggests that the rate of levee formation varies with distance and other factors. Previous models have assumed a constant rate of levee growth, specified by a single parameter, lambda. The rate of levee formation for lava flows is a good indicator of the mass eruption rate and rheology of the flow. Insight into levee formation will help us better understand whether or not the effusion rate was constant during an eruption, and once local topography is considered, allows us to look at cooling and/or rheology changes downslope. Here we present a more realistic extension of the levee formation model that treats the rate of levee growth as a function of distance along the flow path. We show how this model can be used with a terrestrial flow and a long lava flow on Mars. The key statement of the new formulation is the rate of transfer from the active component to the levees (or other passive components) through an element dx along the path of the flow. This volumetric transfer equation is presented.

  1. Radar remote sensing for levee health assessment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Jones, C. E.; Dudas, J.; Bawden, G. W.; Deverel, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Levees and dikes form extensive flood protection infrastructure that often also serve critical water conveyance functions. We have studied the use of radar remote sensing for providing health assessment of levees, focusing on California's levee system. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, which lies directly east of San Francisco Bay, is an area comprised of tidal marshland and reclaimed land in the form of ~60 islands surrounded by 1700 km of levees. Improved knowledge of subsidence across the region is needed to maintain the integrity of the Delta levee system, which protects the integrity and quality of the state's primary water supply. The western Delta is particularly critical because levee failure in this area would rapidly draw water of high salinity content into the channels conveying the fresh water supply. Here we report on a study that uses radar interferometry to measure the spatially and temporally varied levee movement and subsidence in the area, focusing particularly on Sherman Island, the westernmost island of the Delta. We use data from NASA's L-band (23.79 cm) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) collected at 6-week average interval from July 2009 through the current day. We show preliminary results for localized movement on and near the levees and for island-scale subsidence and discuss the techniques used for these measurements and how they could contribute to emergency response.

  2. Balancing Play, Meaning and Reality: The Design Philosophy of LEVEE PATROLLER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harteveld, Casper; Guimaraes, Rui; Mayer, Igor S.; Bidarra, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Most serious games have been developed without a proper and comprehensive design theory. To contribute to the development of such a theory, this article presents the underlying design philosophy of LEVEE PATROLLER, a game to train levee patrollers in the Netherlands. This philosophy stipulates that the design of a digital serious game is a…

  3. Regional Similarity of Leveed Lava Flows on the Mars Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Steve M.; Glaze, Lori, S.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of lava flow movement are controlled by the fluid interior. Crust, solids, and nondeformable material can only retard the advance or spreading of a lava flow. Figure 1 shows a typical large, channelized lava flow found on the Mars plains. It has been suggested in [I] that such large leveed flows on the Mars plains were emplaced by a balance between the formation and shedding of crust as the flow advances. For the prototypical flow north of Pavonis Mons (Fig. I), such a balance leads to a flow morphology that approximately self-replicates at all locations along the flow path [2,3]. Moreover, most quantitative characteristics of emplacement (e.g., viscosity, volumetric flow rate) of the prototype flow at Pavonis Mons resembled those of large channelized lava flows on Earth. The exception was the relatively long, sustained supply of lava, on the order of a year as opposed to hours or days for terrestrial analogs.

  4. Study of Movement and Seepage Along Levees Using DINSAR and the Airborne UAVSAR Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; Bawden, Gerald; Deverel, Steven; Dudas, Joel; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the utility of high resolution SAR (synthetic aperture radar) for levee monitoring using UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) data collected along the dikes and levees in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and along the lower Mississippi River. Our study has focused on detecting and tracking changes that are indicative of potential problem spots, namely deformation of the levees, subsidence along the levee toe, and seepage through the levees, making use of polarimetric and interferometric SAR techniques. Here was present some results of those studies, which show that high resolution, low noise SAR imaging could supplement more traditional ground-based monitoring methods by providing early indicators of seepage and deformation.

  5. SIMULATION REAL SCALE EXPERIMENT ON LEVEE BREACH USING 2D SHALLOW FLOW MODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenno, Hiroki; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Ichiro

    Flood in rivers is a common disaster all over the world. If a levee breach happens, it sometimes causes a fatal disaster. In addition, many buildings, urban facilities, lifelines, etc. are seriously damaged. Detailed mechanism of a levee breach has not been clarified yet. Therefore, it is important to predict the collapsing process of riverbank and behavior of overtop flow for reducing damage. We applied a two-dimensional shallow flow computational model to levee breach phenomena caused by overflow and the performance of the model was elucidated. A calibration of the numerical model is made through the comparison with field experimental data. Recently, a real-scale experiment on a levee breach was carried out at the Chiyoda Experimental Channel in Hokkaido, Japan. We performed the computation under the same conditions in the experiment. The computational results showed the excellent performance for simulating levee breach phenomena.

  6. Evidence of an Emerging Disturbance of Earthen Levees Causing Disastrous Floods in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, S.; Moretti, G.; Albertson, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    A levee failure occurred along the Secchia River, Northern Italy, on January 19, 2014, resulting in flood damage in excess of $500 Million (Figure). In response to this failure, immediate surveillance of other levees in the region led to the identification of a second breach developing on the neighboring Panaro River, where rapid mitigation efforts were successful in averting a full levee failure. The paired breach events that occurred along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers provided an excellent window on an emerging disturbance of levees and related failure mechanism. In the Secchia River, by combining the information content of photographs taken from helicopters in the early stage of breach development and 10-cm resolution aerial photographs taken in 2010 and 2012, animal burrows were found to exist in the precise levee location where the breach originated. In the Panaro River, internal erosion was observed to occur at a location where a crested porcupine den was known to exist and this erosion led to the collapse of the levee top. Evidence collected suggested that it is quite likely that the levee failure of the Secchia River was of a similar mechanism as the observed failure of the Panaro River. Detailed numerical modeling of rainfall, river flow, and variably saturated flow occurring in disturbed levees in response to complex hydroclimatic forcing indicated that the levee failure of the Secchia River may have been triggered by direct river inflow into the den system or collapse of a hypothetical den separated by a 1-m earthen wall from the levee riverside, which saturated during the hydroclimatic event. It is important to bring these processes to the attention of hydrologists and geotechnical engineers as well as to trigger an interdisciplinary discussion on habitat fragmentation and wildlife shifts due to development and climate pressures. These disturbances come together with changes in extreme events to inform the broader concern of risk analysis due to floods.

  7. EXPERIMENT FOR THE DESTRUCTIVE MECHANISM OF THE OVERFLOW LEVEE AND FLOODING AREA AT THE CHIYODA EXPERIMENTAL CHANNEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Hirai, Yasuyuki; Miyake, Hiroshi

    The mechanism of three-dimensional levee breach by overflow (i.e., lateral overflow with consideration of river flow riverside land) has not been clarified in past studies. Elucidation of this mechanism is very important for disaster prevention as well as for the future progress of studies on levee breach by overflow. We conducted experiments of levee breach in three-dimensions by overflow using the Chiyoda Experimental Channel. The results of the experiment are as follows: Until the beginning of levee breach, phenomena near overflow area was similar to one by front overflow. It means that we can apply knowledge from anamnestic levee breach experiment involving front overflow to until the beginning of levee breach. After the beginning of levee breach, it related to unit width discharge and levee breach speed.

  8. Levee crest elevation profiles derived from airborne lidar-based high resolution digital elevation models in south Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Barras, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the feasibility of using airborne lidar surveys to derive high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and develop an automated procedure to extract levee longitudinal elevation profiles for both federal levees in Atchafalaya Basin and local levees in Lafourche Parish. Generally, the use of traditional manual surveying methods to map levees is a costly and time consuming process that typically produces cross-levee profiles every few hundred meters, at best. The purpose of our paper is to describe and test methods for extracting levee crest elevations in an efficient, comprehensive manner using high resolution lidar generated DEMs. In addition, the vertical uncertainty in the elevation data and its effect on the resultant estimate of levee crest heights is addressed in an assessment of whether the federal levees in our study meet the USACE minimum height design criteria.

  9. A statistical method to estimate outflow volume in case of levee breach due to overtopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandimarte, Luigia; Martina, Mario; Dottori, Francesco; Mazzoleni, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to propose a statistical method to assess the outflowing water volume through a levee breach, due to overtopping, in case of three different types of grass cover quality. The first step in the proposed methodology is the definition of the reliability function, a the relation between loading and resistance conditions on the levee system, in case of overtopping. Secondly, the fragility curve, which relates the probability of failure with loading condition over the levee system, is estimated having defined the stochastic variables in the reliability function. Thus, different fragility curves are assessed in case of different scenarios of grass cover quality. Then, a levee breach model is implemented and combined with a 1D hydrodynamic model in order to assess the outflow hydrograph given the water level in the main channel and stochastic values of the breach width. Finally, the water volume is estimated as a combination of the probability density function of the breach width and levee failure. The case study is located in the in 98km-braided reach of Po River, Italy, between the cross-sections of Cremona and Borgoforte. The analysis showed how different counter measures, different grass cover quality in this case, can reduce the probability of failure of the levee system. In particular, for a given values of breach width good levee cover qualities can significantly reduce the outflowing water volume, compared to bad cover qualities, inducing a consequent lower flood risk within the flood-prone area.

  10. Terrestrial Lidar Datasets of New Orleans, Louisiana, Levee Failures from Hurricane Katrina, August 29, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Brian D.; Kayen, Robert; Minasian, Diane L.; Reiss, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall with the northern Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, as one of the strongest hurricanes on record. The storm damage incurred in Louisiana included a number of levee failures that led to the inundation of approximately 85 percent of the metropolitan New Orleans area. Whereas extreme levels of storm damage were expected from such an event, the catastrophic failure of the New Orleans levees prompted a quick mobilization of engineering experts to assess why and how particular levees failed. As part of this mobilization, civil engineering members of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) performed terrestrial lidar topographic surveys at major levee failures in the New Orleans area. The focus of the terrestrial lidar effort was to obtain precise measurements of the ground surface to map soil displacements at each levee site, the nonuniformity of levee height freeboard, depth of erosion where scour occurred, and distress in structures at incipient failure. In total, we investigated eight sites in the New Orleans region, including both earth and concrete floodwall levee breaks. The datasets extend from the 17th Street Canal in the Orleans East Bank area to the intersection of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) with the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) in the New Orleans East area. The lidar scan data consists of electronic files containing millions of surveyed points. These points characterize the topography of each levee's postfailure or incipient condition and are available for download through online hyperlinks. The data serve as a permanent archive of the catastrophic damage of Hurricane Katrina on the levee systems of New Orleans. Complete details of the data collection, processing, and georeferencing methodologies are provided in this report to assist in the visualization and analysis of the data by future users.

  11. Application of High Resolution Multispectral Imagery for Levee Slide Detection and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hossain, A. K. M. Azad; Easson, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to develop methods to detect and monitor levee slides using commercially available high resolution multispectral imagery. High resolution multispectral imagery like IKONOS and QuickBird are suitable for detecting and monitoring levee slides. IKONOS is suitable for visual inspection, image classification and Tasseled Cap transform based slide detection. Tasseled Cap based model was found to be the best method for slide detection. QuickBird was suitable for visual inspection and image classification.

  12. Mitigation Experiment of Levee Breach by Concrete Block Foot Protection in Chiyoda Experimental Flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobita, D.; Kakinuma, T.; Yokoyama, H.; Takeda, A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent years have seen a considerably increased incidence of typhoons, torrential rainstorms and other extreme meteorological phenomena due to climate change, thereby raising the risk of large-scale disasters caused by riverine floods. The flood damage is particularly severe when levee breaches occur, so estimating the flood magnitude and providing hazard maps are crucial for risk management. In previous studies, the mechanisum of levee breach was examined and measures to reinforce levee and restrict the overflow rates of protection forest were investigated. However, no appropriate techniques for the implementation of such measures hasn't been established yet. The purpose of this study is to evaluate countermeasures of mitigating levee breach progress and reducing overflow rate. The concept of the countermeasure is to utilize 2 ton of concrete blocks installed on the levee ahead of breaching and expect these blocks to be collapsed and protect the edge of the breached levee. Upon considering this concept, we referred to the findings of previous side-overflow breach experiments performed in the Chiyoda experiment flume, where the levee breach process with state-of-the-art observation devices under highly precise hydraulic conditions. Therefore we performed levee breach experiments in the Chiyoda Experimental Flume. (Large scale experimental flume; width is 30m, length is 1,300m, bed slope is approximately 1/500.) The experimental results highlighted the behavior of the collapsed blocks, effectiveness for mitigating the breach progress, and hydraulic characteristics around blocks. Considerations such as the number of blocks to be used were also clarified.

  13. Possible Weakening Processes Imposed on California's Earthen Levees under Protracted Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J. D.; Vahedifard, F.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2015-12-01

    California is currently suffering from a multiyear extreme drought and the impacts of the drought are anticipated to worsen in a warming climate. The resilience of critical infrastructure under extreme drought conditions is a major concern which has not been well understood. Thus, there is a crucial need to improve our understanding about the potential threats of drought on infrastructure and take subsequent actions in a timely manner to mitigate these threats and adopt our infrastructure for forthcoming extreme events. The need is more pronounced for earthen levees, since their functionality to protect limited water resources and dryland is more critical during drought. A significant amount of California's levee systems are currently operating under a high risk condition. Protracted drought can further threaten the structural competency of these already at-risk levee systems through several thermo-hydro mechanical weakening processes that undermine their stability. Viable information on the implications of these weakening processes, particularly on California's earthen levees, is relatively incomplete. This article discusses, from a geotechnical engineering perspective, how California's protracted drought might threaten the integrity of levee systems through the imposition of several thermo-hydro mechanical weakening processes. Pertinent facts and statistics regarding the drought in California are presented and discussed. Catastrophic levee failures and major damages resulting from drought-induce weakening processes such as shear strength reduction, desiccation cracking, land subsidence and surface erosion, fissuring and soil softening, and soil carbon oxidation are discussed to illustrate the devastating impacts that the California drought might impose on existing earthen levees. This article calls for further research in light of these potential drought-inducing weakening mechanisms to support mitigation strategies for reducing future catastrophic levee failures.

  14. Levee reliability analyses for various flood return periods - a case study in southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.-C.; Yu, H.-W.; Weng, M.-C.

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, heavy rainfall conditions have caused disasters around the world. To prevent losses by floods, levees have often been constructed in inundation-prone areas. This study performed reliability analyses for the Chiuliao First Levee in southern Taiwan. The failure-related parameters were the water level, the scouring depth, and the in situ friction angle. Three major failure mechanisms were considered: the slope sliding failure of the levee and the sliding and overturning failures of the retaining wall. When the variability of the in situ friction angle and the scouring depth are considered for various flood return periods, the variations of the factor of safety for the different failure mechanisms show that the retaining wall sliding and overturning failures are more sensitive to the change of the friction angle. When the flood return period is greater than 2 years, the levee could fail with slope sliding for all values of the water level difference. The results of levee stability analysis considering the variability of different parameters could aid engineers in designing the levee cross sections, especially with potential failure mechanisms in mind.

  15. Levee reliability analyses for various flood return periods - a case study in Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.-C.; Yu, H.-W.; Weng, M.-C.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, heavy rainfall conditions have caused damages around the world. To prevent damages by floods, levees have often been constructed in prone-to-inundation areas. This study performed reliability analyses for the Chiuliao 1st Levee located in southern Taiwan. The failure-related parameters were the water level, the scouring depth, and the in-situ friction angle. Three major failure mechanisms were considered, including the slope sliding failure of the levee, and the sliding and overturning failures of the retaining wall. When the variabilities of the in-situ friction angle and the scouring depth are considered for various flood return periods, the variations of the factor of safety (FS) for the different failure mechanisms show that the retaining wall sliding and overturning failures are more sensitive to the variability of the friction angle. When the flood return period is greater than 2 years, the levee can undergo slope sliding failure for all values of the water level difference. The results for levee stability analysis considering the variability of different parameters could assist engineers in designing the levee cross sections, especially with potential failure mechanisms in mind.

  16. Time-lapse seismic study of levees in southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Stimac, N.; Ballard, R.F., Jr.; Dunbar, J. Joseph; Smullen, S. Steve

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this work was to measure changes in compressional- (Vp) and shear-wave (Vs) velocities in an earthen levee during a ponding experiment designed to simulate flood conditions on the Rio Grande in south New Mexico. Although similar to such experiment, performed an year earlier on the Rio Grande in south Texas, the levee seismic response results are different. This work was similar to previous Preliminary testing at three levee sites, all within a 1 km radius and each with unique physical, EM, and core characteristics, was completed and a single low-conductivity, highly fractured site was selected for investigation. Several different types of seismic data were recorded. Seismic data analysis techniques appraised included P-refraction tomography and Rayleigh surface-wave analysis using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). P-wave velocity change (decrease) was rapid and isolated to one section within the pool confines, which already had anomalously high velocity most likely related to burrowing animals modification of the levee structure. S-wave velocity change was gradual and could be observed along the whole width of the pond within and below the levee. The results within the levee sand core were consistent with the observations of sand S-wave velocity changed due to saturation. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  17. Numerical simulation of levee breach by overtopping in a flume with 180° bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.-T.; Wang, D.-W.; Yu, M.-H.; Liang, Y.-J.

    2013-08-01

    Floods caused by levee breaching pose disastrous risks to the lower reaches and the flood flow zones of rivers. Thus, a comprehensive assessment of flow and sediment transport during floods must be performed to mitigate flood disasters. Given that the flow state becomes relatively more complex and the range of the submerged area becomes more extensive after a levee breach, this paper established a flow and sediment model by using two-dimensional shallow water equations (SWEs) to explore the break development process and the flow and sediment transport in a curved bed after a levee breach due to overtopping. A three-element weighted essentially non-oscillatory-Roe scheme was adopted for the discretization of SWEs. In addition, a non-equilibrium total-load sediment transport model was established to simulate the scour depth development process of the break. A stable equilibrium of the break was established based on flow shear force and soil shear strength. The lateral widening of the break was simulated by the scouring-collapse lateral widening mode. These simulations, together with the levee breach experiment conducted in the laboratory, demonstrate the validity of the flow and sediment transport process established in this paper. The effects of water-head in and out of the watercourse, the rate of flow, the levee sediment grading, and other variables during levee breaching were also analyzed. The mathematical model calculation provided a number of physical quantities, such as rate of flow and flow state at the break, that are difficult to measure by using the current laboratory facilities. The results of this research provide fundamental data for developing measures that can reduce casualties and asset loss due to floods caused by levee breaching.

  18. Root Development of Salix purpurea L. on Heavily Compacted Levee Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, W.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of woody vegetation on levee stability is discussed controversially. On the one hand woody plants improve slope stability, prevent erosion failures and may aid in levee stability. On the other hand it is believed that woody vegetation has negative impacts which are largely related to the rooting system. Hence, root penetration can facilitate water movement - seepage or piping - as well as living and decaying roots can lead to voids and threaten the structural integrity of levees. In general root architecture is known for many plant species, but specific root characteristics and their interaction with soils are influenced by many factors, and therefore poorly understood. Consequently the current research investigates the rooting performance of woody vegetation by singling out a special type of vegetation which is often used within soil bioengineering techniques at river embankments. This vegetation type is a dense stand of shrubby willows (Salix purpurea L.), implemented with brush mattresses. The data is collected from a test site constructed in 2007, 5 km northeast of Vienna, Austria. Part of the test site is a research levee built true to natural scale. The fill material of the levee is a mineral silt-sand-gravel compound classified as silty sand, which was compacted to a dry density of 1.86 g/cm3. The planting of vegetation was applied directly to the compacted levee body using only a thin layer (2-4 cm) of humus topsoil. In 2009 the studies were supplemented with a lysimeter-like setup consisting of a total of 20 containers. The lysimeters were filled homogenously with the same soil as the levees and were consolidated to the same degree of compaction. They were planted similar to the research levees. Within the investigations a comprehensive annual vegetation monitoring program was carried out. Measured aboveground parameters were shoot diameter, shoot length, biomass and leaf area index (LAI). Monitored rooting parameters - examined by excavation

  19. Advanced Unsupervised Classification Methods to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Polarimetric SAR Imagery.

    PubMed

    Marapareddy, Ramakalavathi; Aanstoos, James V; Younan, Nicolas H

    2016-01-01

    Fully polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR) data analysis has wide applications for terrain and ground cover classification. The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We used L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to screen levees for anomalies. SAR technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice for identifying problematic areas on earthen levees. Using the parameters entropy (H), anisotropy (A), alpha (α), and eigenvalues (λ, λ₁, λ₂, and λ₃), we implemented several unsupervised classification algorithms for the identification of anomalies on the levee. The classification techniques applied are H/α, H/A, A/α, Wishart H/α, Wishart H/A/α, and H/α/λ classification algorithms. In this work, the effectiveness of the algorithms was demonstrated using quad-polarimetric L-band SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the Southern USA, where earthen flood control levees are maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers. PMID:27322270

  20. Advanced Unsupervised Classification Methods to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Polarimetric SAR Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Marapareddy, Ramakalavathi; Aanstoos, James V.; Younan, Nicolas H.

    2016-01-01

    Fully polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR) data analysis has wide applications for terrain and ground cover classification. The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We used L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to screen levees for anomalies. SAR technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice for identifying problematic areas on earthen levees. Using the parameters entropy (H), anisotropy (A), alpha (α), and eigenvalues (λ, λ1, λ2, and λ3), we implemented several unsupervised classification algorithms for the identification of anomalies on the levee. The classification techniques applied are H/α, H/A, A/α, Wishart H/α, Wishart H/A/α, and H/α/λ classification algorithms. In this work, the effectiveness of the algorithms was demonstrated using quad-polarimetric L-band SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL’s) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the Southern USA, where earthen flood control levees are maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers. PMID:27322270

  1. Geophysical characterization of the Lollie Levee near Conway, Arkansas, using capacitively coupled resistivity, coring, and direct push logging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillip, Jonathan A.; Payne, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    A geophysical characterization of Lollie Levee near Conway, Arkansas, was conducted in February 2011. A capacitively coupled resistivity survey (using Geometric's OhmMapper) was completed along the top and toe of the 6.7-mile levee. Two-dimensional inversions were conducted on the geophysical data. As a quality-control measure, cores and direct push logs were taken at approximately 1-mile intervals along the levee. The capacitively coupled resistivity survey, the coring, and the direct push logs were used to characterize the geologic materials. Comparison of the cores and the direct push log data, along with published resistivity values, indicates that resistivity values of 200 Ohm-meters or greater represent relatively clean sand, with decreasing resistivity values occurring with increasing silt and clay content. The cores indicated that the levee is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of sand, silt, and clay. The capacitively coupled resistivity sections confirm that the levee is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of high and low resistivity materials and show that the composition of the levee varies spatially. The geologic materials underlying the levee vary spatially as a result of the geologic processes that deposited them. In general, the naturally deposited geologic materials underlying the levee contain a greater amount of low resistivity materials in the southern extent of the levee.

  2. Use of geophysical methods to map subsurface features at levee seepage locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackett, Thomas C.

    The Great Flood of 2011 caused moderate to severe seepage and piping along the Mississippi River levees in Northwest Mississippi. The aim of this thesis was to implement geophysical techniques at two seepage locations in order to give a better understanding of the causes of underseepage and information on how to mitigate the problem. Sites near Rena Lara in Coahoma County and near Francis in Bolivar County were chosen to conduct this survey. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Electromagnetic Induction (EM) surveys were conducted on and adjacent to levees to identify seepage pathways and any dominant geological features at the sites. Results from geophysical surveys revealed that Francis and Rena Laura each had a prominent geomorphologic feature that was attributing to underseepage. Seepage at Francis was the result of a sand filled channel capped by a clay overburden. Permeable materials at the base of the channel served as a conduit for transporting river water beneath the levee. The seepage surfaced as sand boils where the overlying clay overburden was thin or non-existent. Investigations at the Rena Lara site revealed a large, clay-filled swale extending beneath the levee. The clay within the swale has relatively low horizontal permeability, and concentrated the seepage flow towards more permeable zones on the flanks of the swale. This resulted in the formation of sand boils at the base of the levee. Both geomorphic features at Francis and Rena Lara were identified as surface drainages using remote sensing data. With the assistance of borehole and elevation data, geophysics was successfully used to characterize the features at each site. Properties such as permeability and clay content were derived from responses in electrical conductivity and used to build seepage models at each site. These models will hopefully be considered when determining seepage conditions and mitigation techniques at other sites along the levee.

  3. California Levee Risk, Now and in the Future:Identifying Research and Tool Development Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R L; Hanemann, M; Farber, D

    2006-11-28

    The Center for Catastrophic Risk Management (CCRM) and the California Center for Environmental Law and Policy (CCELP) at UC Berkeley and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) joined together to cosponsor a workshop to define research requirements to mitigate the hazards facing the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Levee system. The Workshop was intended to provide a forum to (1) Report assessments of current vulnerabilities facing the levees, such as structural failure, seismic loading, flooding, terrorism; (2) Consider longer term challenges such as climate change, sea level rise; and (3) Define research requirements to fill gaps in knowledge and reduce uncertainties in hazard assessments.

  4. Counter measures applied on levee system: Effects on flood map and probability of failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekle, Shewandagn; Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Dottori, Francesco; Brandimarte, Luigia

    2014-05-01

    Historical records have shown that people living in the flood plain areas surrounded by levees are increased over the time around the world.. However, the effectiveness of different counter measures on increasing levee efficiency, and their environmental and economical consequences on the urbanized flood prone area, are not yet well exploited. The present research proposes a methodology to investigate the effects of two different counter measures on the estimation of the probability of levee failure due to overtopping and the consequent flood extent. The case study was performed in 98km-braided reach of Po River, Italy, between the cross-sections of Cremona and Borgoforte. The adopted methodology was divided into four core categories. Firstly, reliability analysis, expressed in terms of fragility curve, of the levee system in case of overtopping was performed using the geotechnical and geometrical data of the levee considering the grass cover quality as a stochastic variable to account the uncertainties associated to it. In order to estimate the fragility curves for all sections, a Monte Carlo framework was introduced. Secondly, 1D hydrodynamic model was implemented to estimate the water level in the river in case of a synthetic flood event of 200year return period. The information of the water level was used as hydraulic load into the previous fragility curves. Then, a levee breach modeli was introduced to address the uncertainties related to the location, size and development of the breaches. Finally, a 2D hydrodynamic model CA2D_S,based on the cellular automata approach in semi-inertial formulation for flux computation, was implementd. CA2D - SCENARI (CA2D_S) is a version of the CA2D model specifically designed to simulate levee breach scenarios in low land areas. The previous methodological steps were repeated for each countermeasure scenario and the results from CA2D, expressed in terms of flood extent, were compared and analyzed. The analysis showed that

  5. The impact of different soil bioengineering techniques on the surface erosion of levees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, W.; Meixner, H.; Florineth, F.

    2009-04-01

    The recent flood events have once more drawn attention to the stability and maintenance of river levees. Subsequently, the attention has also been focused on the prevention of erosion by hydraulic forces in case of flooding or overtopping. Vegetation can limit the soil detaching capacity of flowing water, by their retarding effects on runoff and velocity as well as the physical protection of the levee surface. At low discharge intensity vegetation stands rigid and unsubmerged, reducing velocity below required for soil particle entrainment (Coppin and Richards, 1990). At higher discharge capacities flexible vegetation tend to lay down, dissipating energy and providing resistance to scour (Henderson and Shields, 1984). Roots increase the shear strength of the soil (Schiechtl, 1980) and can create a fibrous mat that resists detachment of the surrounding soil matrix (Henderson and Shields, 1984). The erosive capacity of surface water flow is dependant to type and pattern of vegetation. The denser the vegetation, the better the soil surface is protected against erosion. Sets of regulations regard compact turf to be the best vegetation cover for river levees. A contentious issue are woody plants, and many guidelines (DIN 19712, 1997; FEMA, 2005; USACE, 2000) ban woody vegetation from levees for several reasons. So, the planting of woody plants is not an accepted policy by any agency. Within the frame of a research project carried out by the Institute of Soil Bioengineering and Landscape Construction (University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna), focusing on woody plants on levees, the effects of small to medium growing woody (shrubby) plants on erosion while hydraulic forces (overtopping) are tested. Data are drawn from two natural-scaled research levees. The homogenous levees consist of a mineral silt-sand-gravel and have a fill height of 2.7 m and a slope inclination of 2:3. The tests investigate erosion resistance with respect to four different

  6. Development of Floating Wave Barriers for Cost Effective Protection of Irrigation Pond Levees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The earth levees commonly used for irrigation reservoirs are subjected to significant embankment erosion due to wind-generated waves. Large seasonal fluctuations in water level make vegetative bank protection impractical, and other stabilization methods, such as the use of stone or discarded tires, ...

  7. 76 FR 78015 - Revised Analysis and Mapping Procedures for Non-Accredited Levees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Revised Analysis and Mapping Procedures for Non-Accredited... Management Agency (FEMA) is accepting comments on the proposed solution for Revised Analysis and Mapping Procedures for Non-Accredited Levees. This document proposes a revised procedure for the analysis and...

  8. The use of seismic tomograms for the identification of internal problems with earthen dams and levees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to the National Inventory of dams (NID, 2009), out of the 84,134 dams in the US, more than 87% (73,423) are earthen dams. The majority of these earthen dams are past or approaching their design life expectancy of 50 years. According to the National committee on Levee Safety (NCLS, 2009),...

  9. Level-I Trauma Center Effects on Return-to-Work Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prada, Sergio I.; Salkever, David; MacKenzie, Ellen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Injury is the leading cause of death for persons aged 1-44 years in the United States. Injuries have a substantial economic cost. For that reason, regional systems of trauma care in which the more acutely injured patients are transported to Level-I (L-I) trauma centers (TCs) has been widely advocated. However, the cost of TC care is…

  10. 44 CFR 65.10 - Mapping of areas protected by levee systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mapping of areas protected by levee systems. 65.10 Section 65.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL...

  11. 44 CFR 65.10 - Mapping of areas protected by levee systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Mapping of areas protected by levee systems. 65.10 Section 65.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL...

  12. 44 CFR 65.10 - Mapping of areas protected by levee systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mapping of areas protected by levee systems. 65.10 Section 65.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL...

  13. 44 CFR 65.10 - Mapping of areas protected by levee systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mapping of areas protected by levee systems. 65.10 Section 65.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL...

  14. Grain-size segregation and levee formation in geophysical mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.G.; Kokelaar, B.P.; Iverson, R.M.; Logan, M.; LaHusen, R.G.; Gray, J.M.N.T.

    2012-01-01

    Data from large-scale debris-flow experiments are combined with modeling of particle-size segregation to explain the formation of lateral levees enriched in coarse grains. The experimental flows consisted of 10 m3 of water-saturated sand and gravel, which traveled ~80 m down a steeply inclined flume before forming an elongated leveed deposit 10 m long on a nearly horizontal runout surface. We measured the surface velocity field and observed the sequence of deposition by seeding tracers onto the flow surface and tracking them in video footage. Levees formed by progressive downslope accretion approximately 3.5 m behind the flow front, which advanced steadily at ~2 m s-1 during most of the runout. Segregation was measured by placing ~600 coarse tracer pebbles on the bed, which, when entrained into the flow, segregated upwards at ~6–7.5 cm s-1. When excavated from the deposit these were distributed in a horseshoe-shaped pattern that became increasingly elevated closer to the deposit termination. Although there was clear evidence for inverse grading during the flow, transect sampling revealed that the resulting leveed deposit was strongly graded laterally, with only weak vertical grading. We construct an empirical, three-dimensional velocity field resembling the experimental observations, and use this with a particle-size segregation model to predict the segregation and transport of material through the flow. We infer that coarse material segregates to the flow surface and is transported to the flow front by shear. Within the flow head, coarse material is overridden, then recirculates in spiral trajectories due to size-segregation, before being advected to the flow edges and deposited to form coarse-particle-enriched levees.

  15. Shallow (0-10) seismic investigation of a distressed earthen levee, New Orleans, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Hicks, J.; Vera, E. E.

    2009-12-01

    Both deep- and near-surface hydrogeologic processes can contribute to the structural failure of artificial earthen levees. Recently, seismic geophysical methods have attempted to develop a proxy for engineering shear strength, by mapping changes in the transmission velocity of shear waves. High fluid content may indicate both weak, under-compacted materials and/or organic-rich sediments. In the absence of electromagnetic methods, Vp/Vs ratios can be used as good indicators of variations in the fluid (water, and air or gas) saturation. Cone penetration borehole tests measure the resistance of soils to penetration of the cone tip and its frictional sliding that can be correlated to sediment types and their physical properties. A distressed section of an artificial earthen levee, suitable for seismic investigation, lies ~15 km S of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Open curvilinear fissures, 10 cm wide, 30 cm deep, and up to 100 m in length, exist along the crest at two sites. Between September 2007 and February 2008 we collect horizontally (SH) polarized shear and compressional wave (P) data in pseudo-walkaway tests for the upper 100 m of the subsurface along the protected (west) side of the earthen levee, within 30 m of its crest. One profile lies parallel and adjacent to the damaged levee crest and, for reference, two profiles lie nearby adjacent to undamaged portions of the artificial earthen levee. In the first ~30 m of sediment below the lower delta plain of the Greater New Orleans area, a complex and dynamic interaction of freshwater and marine sedimentary environments juxtaposes a diverse set of facies. We combine of Vp and Vs velocity maps, sedimentary environment interpretations, and cone-penetration-derived sediment/soil and laboratory-derived physical properties to locate possible zones of high fluid concentration, (and perhaps seepage), weak engineering materials, and natural foundation soil shear strength. Under the distressed portion of the

  16. An Inverse Methodology to Estimate the Flow Released from a Levee Breach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oria, M.; Mignosa, P.; Tanda, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    When a levee breach occurs a remarkable volume of water is released causing the inundation of an extended area. To accurately reproduce the flooding resulting from the failure, the discharge over time leaving the river must be known. This flow rate is conditioned by many factors such as: 1. the river water levels in proximity of the failure; 2. the geometry of the breach and its evolution in time; 3. the water level of the flooded area that can produce backwater effects and thus reduce the leaving flow rate or in some case reverse the flow; and 4. the provisional works aimed at fixing the failure. However, from a practical point of view, many of the previous data are hardly known and usually the only available information is the position and the finally geometry of the breach and sometimes its opening time. But, if gauging stations are located in proximity of the failure, the water levels observed upstream and mainly downstream the levee breach are affected by the discharge leaving or eventually re-entering the river. In this work, a Bayesian inverse methodology to estimate the discharge time series leaving a levee breach based on the water levels recorded downstream and/or upstream the failure site is proposed. Prior information, in forms of geostatistical functions, regularizes the solution. The required simulation of the forward problem, able to reproduce the river flow routing and the discharge leaving the breach, has been accomplished by means of the 1D HEC-RAS model. The Uniform Later Flow boundary condition of HEC-RAS has been used to simulate the flow leaving/entering the river across the breach. Synthetic examples with and without the above mentioned back water effects and provisional works has been used to test the procedure. Different levee breaches modeled by means of a lateral weir with movable gates has been simulated to collect the synthetic level data then used in the inverse procedure. The methodology was able to accurately reproduce the flow

  17. Ground-water flow beneath levee 35A from conservation area 2B, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    Conservation Area 2B is an area of recharge for the surficial aquifer system in Broward County. Water stored in the conservation area provides the hydraulic potential for downward flow to the high permeability zone of the Biscayne aquifer. A 5.64 ft head differential (average for the period of record) between water levels in Conservation Area 2B and water levels in the adjacent levee 35A borrow canal causes water to leak into the canal at an average rate of about 0.0022 cu ft per sec per lineal foot of canal and accounts for a loss of 0.013 foot per day of surface water from Conservation Area 2B. Amounts of canal leakage and underflow are constantly changing and are dependent upon the head differential between Conservation Area 2B and the levee 35A borrow canal. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Relationship between canal and levee density and coastal land loss in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    Nearly 1% of Louisiana's coastal land becomes water each year. This land loss affects everything from wildlife, fisheries, and recreation to the economy and culture. A part of this loss results from natural, unmanageable factors, but manageable factors are also responsible. This report discusses one of the manageable factors: canals and their dredged-material levees. In coastal Louisiana wetlands, canals are constructed primarily to facilitate navigation and oil and gas recovery. The density of canals in this region is now about equal to the natural network of bayous and creeks. The primary effect of these canals and associated levees is to alter the process of flooding and drainage. The influence of canals and their levees on coastal Louisiana erosion rates are modified by local geologic, hydrologic, and biologic interactions. The empirical relationship between canals and erosion is, however, clear; land loss is directly related to canal density. Comparisons with mosquito ditches, which are smaller analogues of canals, reveal similar patterns of wetland changes and suggest management options.

  19. Origin and architecture of deep-water levee deposits: Insight from the ancient rock record and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Zishann

    Although levee deposits make up a significant part of modern and ancient deep-marine slope systems, details of their internal lithological composition and stratal architecture remain poorly documented. At the Castle Creek study area, strata of the Neoproterozoic Isaac Formation (Windermere Supergroup) crop out superbly in a kilometre-scale section through a sinuous deep-water channel-levee system (ICC3). Levee deposits near the outer bend of the channel consist of sandstone-rich (sandstone-to-mudstone ratio of 68:42), medium- to thick-bedded turbidites interstratified with thinly-bedded turbidites. Structureless sandstone (T a), planar laminated sandstone (Tb), non-climbing ripple cross-stratified sandstone (Tc) and massive and laminated siltstone (Td) are common. Thick beds generally thicken and then thin and fine laterally over about 300 m. Thin-bedded strata, in contrast, thin and fine negligibly over similar distances. In the distal part of the outer-bend levee (up to 700 m laterally away from the channel) strata consist predominantly of thin-bedded Tcd turbidites with a much lower sandstone-to-mudstone ratio (35:65). On the opposite side of the channel, inner-bend levee deposits are mudstone-rich, locally as low as 15:85, and consist mostly of thin-bedded, Tcd turbidites, although thicker-bedded, Ta-d turbidites are more common in the lower part of the section. Lateral thinning and fining of beds is more rapid than their outer-bend counterpart. Levee deposits of ICC3 comprise three stacked decametre-scale upward-thinning and -fining successions. Each is interpreted to record a depositional history consisting of lateral channel migration, levee deposition, channel filling, and distal levee deposition. During the early stage of increasing levee relief it is proposed that the termini of individual beds progressively backstep towards the channel margin resulting in an overall lateral thinning of the stratal profile. This interpretation notably contrasts the common

  20. Effects of river reach discretization on the estimation of the probability of levee failure owing to piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Brandimarte, Luigia; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Over the centuries many societies have preferred to settle down nearby floodplains area and take advantage of the favorable environmental conditions. Due to changing hydro-meteorological conditions, over time, levee systems along rivers have been raised to protect urbanized area and reduce the impact of floods. As expressed by the so called "levee paradox", many societies might to tend to trust these levee protection systems due to an induced sense of safety and, as a consequence, invest even more in urban developing in levee protected flood prone areas. As a result, considering also the increasing number of population around the world, people living in floodplains is growing. However, human settlements in floodplains are not totally safe and have been continuously endangered by the risk of flooding. In fact, failures of levee system in case of flood event have also produced the most devastating disasters of the last two centuries due to the exposure of the developed floodprone areas to risk. In those cases, property damage is certain, but loss of life can vary dramatically with the extent of the inundation area, the size of the population at risk, and the amount of warning time available. The aim of this study is to propose an innovative methodology to estimate the reliability of a general river levee system in case of piping, considering different sources of uncertainty, and analyze the influence of different discretization of the river reach in sub-reaches in the evaluation of the probability of failure. The reliability analysis, expressed in terms of fragility curve, was performed evaluating the probability of failure, conditioned by a given hydraulic load in case of a certain levee failure mechanism, using a Monte Carlo and First Order Reliability Method. Knowing the information about fragility curve for each discrete levee reach, different fragility indexes were introduced. Using the previous information was then possible to classify the river into sub

  1. Modeling and analysis of the vertical roots distribution in levees - a case study of the third Rhone correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianetta, Ivan; Schwarz, Massimiliano; Glenz, Christian; Lammeranner, Walter

    2013-04-01

    In recent years the effects of roots on river banks and levees have been the subject of major discussions. The main issue about the presence of woody vegetation on levees is related to the possibility that roots increase internal erosion processes and the superimposed load of large trees compromise the integrity of these structures. However, ecologists and landscape managers argue that eliminating the natural vegetation from the riverbanks also means eliminating biotopes, strengthening anthropisation of the landscape, as well as limiting recreations areas. In the context of the third correction of the Rhone in Switzerland, the discussion on new levee geometries and the implementation of woody vegetation on them, lead to a detailed analysis of this issue for this specific case. The objective of this study was to describe quantitatively the processes and factors that influence the root distribution on levees and test modeling approaches for the simulation of vertical root distribution with laboratory and field data. An extension of an eco-hydrological analytic model that considers climatic and pedological condition for the quantification of vertical root distribution was validated with data provided by the University of Vienna (BOKU) of willows' roots (Salix purpurea) grown under controlled conditions. Furthermore, root distribution data of four transversal sections of a levee near Visp (canton Wallis, Switzerland) was used to validate the model. The positions of the levee's sections were chosen based on the species and dimensions of the woody vegetation. The dominant species present in the sections were birch (Betula pendula) and poplar (Populus nigra). For each section a grid of 50x50 cm was created to count and measure the roots. The results show that vertical distribution of root density under controlled growing conditions has an exponential form, decreasing with increasing soil depth, and can be well described by the eco-hydrological model. Vice versa, field

  2. Numerical modeling of the lateral widening of levee breach by overtopping in a flume with 180° bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.-T.; Wang, D.-W.; Yu, M.-H.; Liang, Y.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Floods caused by levee breaching pose disastrous risks to the lower reaches and the flood flow zones of rivers. Thus, a comprehensive assessment of flow and sediment transport during floods must be performed to mitigate flood disasters. Given that the flow state becomes relatively more complex and the range of the submerged area becomes more extensive after a levee breach, this paper established a flow and sediment model by using two-dimensional shallow water equations (SWEs) to explore the breach development process and the flow and sediment transport in a curved bed after a levee breach due to overtopping. A three-element weighted essentially non-oscillatory Roe scheme was adopted for the discretization of SWEs. In addition, a non-equilibrium total-load sediment transport model was established to simulate the scour depth development process of the breach. A stable equilibrium of the breach was established based on flow shear force and soil shear strength. The lateral widening of the breach was simulated by the scouring-collapse lateral widening mode. These simulations, together with the levee breach experiment conducted in the laboratory, demonstrate the validity of the flow and sediment transport process established in this paper. The effects of water head in and out of the watercourse, the flow rate, the levee sediment grading, and other variables during levee breaching were also analyzed. The mathematical model calculation provided a number of physical quantities, such as flow rate and flow state at the breach, that are difficult to measure by using the current laboratory facilities. The results of this research provide fundamental data for developing measures that can reduce casualties and asset loss due to floods caused by levee breaching.

  3. An inverse method to estimate the flow through a levee breach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oria, Marco; Mignosa, Paolo; Tanda, Maria Giovanna

    2015-08-01

    We propose a procedure to estimate the flow through a levee breach based on water levels recorded in river stations downstream and/or upstream of the failure site. The inverse problem is solved using a Bayesian approach and requires the execution of several forward unsteady flow simulations. For this purpose, we have used the well-known 1-D HEC-RAS model, but any unsteady flow model could be adopted in the same way. The procedure has been tested using four synthetic examples. Levee breaches with different characteristics (free flow, flow with tailwater effects, etc.) have been simulated to collect the synthetic level data used at a later stage in the inverse procedure. The method was able to accurately reproduce the flow through the breach in all cases. The practicability of the procedure was then confirmed applying it to the inundation of the Polesine Region (Northern Italy) which occurred in 1951 and was caused by three contiguous and almost simultaneous breaches on the left embankment of the Po River.

  4. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  5. Topographic effect on Radio-Magnetotelluric and Slingram signals: application to a levee along the Loire river, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Rodolphe; Fauchard, Cyrille; Antoine, Raphael

    2014-05-01

    We study the influence of the topography of a levee on the electric and magnetic signals obtained with the Radio-Magnetotelluric method (RMT) and the Slingram method, respectively. For the RMT method, field measurements have been modelled with a finite element commercial software (AC/DC and Radio-Frequency modules of Comsol Multiphysics). A levee situated in Orléans (France) along the Loire river has been considered in order to design a model taking into account the skin depth and the incident wavelength. The effect of the incident electromagnetic field direction has been assessed with two different incident wave directions: BBC 5 from Salford (UK) and France-Inter from Allouis (France). The simulations highlight the tri-dimensional effects of the topography in the apparent resistivity, observed on the crest of the levee, depending on the incident field direction and topography. For the Slingram method, the magnetic field has been simulated using the AC/DC module of Comsol. The ratio of the primary magnetic field on the secondary one, received in a loop is determined above a straight levee. The study aims to show the various responses obtained in function of both vertical and horizontal coil configurations. We show that the signal also depends on the topography and the right configuration of the coils alignment with respect to the levee stretch direction. In this study, a buried gas pipe is also characterized by the two methods. Numerical modelling of 3D electromagnetic effects on geophysical signals helps to interpret the field measurements and offers to the stakeholder an optimized methodology for geophysical surveys on levees.

  6. The influence of woody plants on the seepage of flood protection levees: Experiences from a test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, W.; Meixner, H.; Florineth, F.

    2009-04-01

    The past flood events have once more drawn the attention to the stability and maintenance of flood protection levees. The attention has also been focused on the relationship between vegetation and the structural integrity of dikes. Current standards regard dense turf to be safest vegetation cover for dikes. Many guidelines ban woody vegetation from dikes and levees to provide structural integrity, visual inspection and unhindered flood-fight access. The refusal of woody plants is mainly based on the argument that root penetration of woody plants facilitates water movement along their path. Within the frame of a research project carried out by the Institute of Soil Bioengineering and Landscape Construction (University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna), focusing on woody plants on levees, the effects of small to medium growing woody (shrubby) plants on the seepage are tested. Data are drawn from two natural-scaled research levees. The homogenous levees consist of a mineral silt-sand-gravel and have a fill height of 2.7 m and a slope inclination of 2:3. The tests investigate the impact of woody plants (living brush mattress - transversal) in comparison to compact turf (jute netting mulch seeding). Measured plant parameters, characterising the vegetation structures were shoot lengths, shoot diameters, and above ground biomass. Root growth is investigated in an extra plot area allowing excavation of the plants. Percolation is monitored using seepage monitoring pipes, soil moisture sensors and soil temperature probes, which were build into the embankment during construction. The proposed contribution discusses the effects of woody plants (shrubs) on seepage of flood protection levees. Methodology of research and results after three initial seepage tests are presented.

  7. Geomorphic Response to Global Warming in the Anthropocene: Levee Breaches in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsheim, J. L.; Dettinger, M.; Malamud-Roam, F.; Ingram, B.; Mount, J.

    2006-12-01

    Geomorphic processes in rivers are likely to be influenced by global warming through alterations of flood, erosion, and sedimentation processes and rates. In California's Sierra Nevada, warming scenarios imply future increases in magnitudes and durations (and changes in timing) of floods as snow packs diminish and rainfall runoff increasingly dominates flow into the Central Valley fluvial system. Geomorphic processes are likely to differ from processes that dominated during the Holocene due to the influence both of projected global warming and land use alterations including levee construction that narrows and separates Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers and tributaries from floodplains and flow regulation downstream of numerous large dams. Whereas Holocene floods induced overbank flow and avulsion processes that led to vertical floodplain accretion and variability of stages in aggrading multiple-channel systems, modern floods largely transport flow and sediment within incised channels confined by levees. Because the scenarios of warming are developed at coarse scales, only an understanding of the relations between large-scale hydrology and climate on the one hand, and the incidence of levee breaches on the other, will make it possible to project likely geomorphic responses to future warming and flooding. A historical record of catastrophic levee breaks on the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers has been developed to allow analyses of these connections. In the current work, we develop statistical relations between historical levee break events and flow discharge, as well as with climatic phenomena such as El Nino and La Nina phases of the ENSO cycle, positive and negative phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and seasonal propensities towards "pineapple-express" storms. Preliminary results suggest strong relations between levee breaches and discharge, but poor relations to ENSO. Further investigation of these data will provide insight to help inform models and river

  8. Geophysical Characterization of the American River Levees, Sacramento, California, using Electromagnetics, Capacitively Coupled Resistivity, and DC Resistivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asch, Theodore H.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Burton, Bethany L.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2008-01-01

    A geophysical characterization of a portion of American River levees in Sacramento, California was conducted in May, 2007. Targets of interest included the distribution and thickness of sand lenses that underlie the levees and the depth to a clay unit that underlies the sand. The concern is that the erosion of these sand lenses can lead to levee failure in highly populated areas of Sacramento. DC resistivity (Geometric?s OhmMapper and Advanced Geosciences, Inc.?s SuperSting R8 systems) and electromagnetic surveys (Geophex?s GEM-2) were conducted over a 6 mile length of the levee on roads and bicycle and horse trails. 2-D inversions were conducted on all the geophysical data. The OhmMapper and SuperSting surveys produced consistent inversion results that delineated potential sand and clay units. GEM-2 apparent resistivity data were consistent with the DC inversion results. However, the GEM-2 data could not be inverted due to low electromagnetic response levels, high ambient electromagnetic noise, and large system drifts. While this would not be as large a problem in conductive terrains, it is a problem for a small induction number electromagnetic profiling system such as the GEM-2 in a resistive terrain (the sand lenses). An integrated interpretation of the geophysical data acquired in this investigation is presented in this report that includes delineation of those areas consisting of predominantly sand and those areas consisting predominantly of clay. In general, along most of this part of the American River levee system, sand lenses are located closest to the river and clay deposits are located further away from the river. The interpreted thicknesses of the detected sand deposits are variable and range from 10 ft up to 60 ft. Thus, despite issues with the GEM-2 inversion, this geophysical investigation successfully delineated sand lenses and clay deposits along the American River levee system and the approximate depths to underlying clay zones. The results of

  9. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Sicily Island, Louisiana (Sicily Island area levee project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demcheck, Dennis K.; Dupuy, Alton J.

    1980-01-01

    Samples consisting of composited core material were collected from five areas by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide data on the impact of proposed channel excavation and levee construction in the Sicily Island area, Louisiana. Samples of receiving water from the five areas, selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed dredged material of the levee fill material, also were collected. Chemical and physical analyses were performed on samples of core material and native water and on elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water mixtures. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (USGS)

  10. Capacitively coupled resistivity survey of the levee surrounding the Omaha Public Power District Nebraska City Power Plant, June 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Bethany L.; Cannia, James C.

    2011-01-01

    This report is a release of digital data from a capacitively coupled resistivity survey conducted on June 13, 2011, on the flood-protection levees surrounding the Omaha Public Power District Nebraska City power plant. The U.S. Geological Survey Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center and the Nebraska Water Science Center performed the survey in response to a flood on the Missouri River. A single line of resistivity profiling was completed along the center line of the section of levee 573 that surrounds the power plant.

  11. Characterizing land surface change and levee stability in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using UAVSAR radar imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, C.; Bawden, G.; Deverel, S.; Dudas, J.; Hensley, S.

    2011-01-01

    The islands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have been subject to subsidence since they were first reclaimed from the estuary marshlands starting over 100 years ago, with most of the land currently lying below mean sea level. This area, which is the primary water resource of the state of California, is under constant threat of inundation from levee failure. Since July 2009, we have been imaging the area using the quad-polarimetric UAVSAR L-band radar, with eighteen data sets collected as of April 2011. Here we report results of our polarimetric and differential interferometric analysis of the data for levee deformation and land surface change. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  12. Utilizing Radar Remote Sensing to Assess the Water Extent along River Levees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laygo, K.; Madson, A.; O'Connell, K.; Jones, C. E.; Holt, B.

    2012-12-01

    Every spring, precipitation and snowmelt in the central U.S. leads to high water levels in the Mississippi River and its tributaries, with concurrent flooding and levee damage a near-yearly event. In the spring of 2011, historic water levels led to extensive flooding from Mississippi County, Missouri, to southern Louisiana, necessitating the opening of three major spillways, including the Morganza Spillway north of New Orleans, which diverts water from the Mississippi River through the Atchafalaya Basin of central Louisiana and had not been used since 1973. There is value to NOAA, the agency responsible for flood prediction, and the Army Corp. of Engineers, the agency responsible for flood control, in the application of remote sensing to flood mapping and soil moisture mapping, both along the main rivers and levee systems. We plan to use high resolution radar (NASA UAVSAR - Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), with a particular focus on increased soil moisture mapping in order to determine how quickly and accurately areas of increased soil moisture content associated with levee seepage and sandboils can be delineated. We have several UAVSAR data sets collected along the Mississippi River during June 2009, April and June 2011, which we have analyzed for soil moisture detection algorithm development during the Spring 2012 term. Our goal for part 2 of the study is to develop an algorithm to detect areas of increased soil moisture, and to finalize flood map end products for decision makers based on an easily applied algorithm that utilizes a standard analysis package for water extent measurement along waterways, which will be usable by non-experts with widely available software.River Gage Datat; As mentioned in the section above, river gage data was utilized to help determine the best UAVSAR datset to use for algorithm and processing methodology creation. The table below shows river gage readings with their corresponding UAVSAR flight ID. The datasets

  13. Elemental chemistry of sand-boil discharge used to trace variable pathways of seepage beneath levees during the 2011 Mississippi River flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water samples were collected from the Mississippi River, from sand boils near the toe of the levee on the Mississippi side of the river, and from actively flowing relief wells shortly after peak stage of the 2011 Mississippi River flood. Two distinct pathways for seepage under the levee were identif...

  14. EC and EM surveys of a levee of the Tuolumne River, Stanislaus County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, I.; Ferriz, H. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Tuolumne River Regional Park is built over a non-engineered levee, which allegedly included a portion of a 1920’s landfill. EC and EM surveys were conducted to substantiate this report. The conductivity measurements were acquired using a Geonics EM-31 MK2, Geonics EM-34, and the AGI Superstring Resistivity meters. The Geonics EM-31 MK2 acquired conductivity data in the horizontal and vertical dipole mode with theoretical penetration depths of 3 meters and 6 m respectively. The Geonics EM-34 acquired data at spacings of 10 and 20 m in both horizontal and vertical mode, with theoretical penetrations of 7.5 m, 15 m, and 30 m. The location of all electromagnetic measurements where tracked using a Trimble 114 GPS receiver. The AGI Superstring resistivity meter collected data in dipole-dipole mode over a 108-meter span with a four-meter spacing between each stake. The EM conductivity ranges from 20 mS/m to 50mS/m on the “background” portions of the levee, but the central portions of the profile include high conductivity anomalies (120 mS/m to 300 mS/m), which potentially represents the old landfill. The anomalies form “pockets” within the profile, rather than a continuous block, which leads us to believe that the profile cuts only the fringe of the landfill. Resistivity imaging confirms the presence of low resistivity materials (< 10 ohmm) at depths from 2 to 7 m, underlain by a zone of higher resistivities (20 to 80 ohmm) to a depth of 20 m. Because the area is used as a park, and is periodically irrigated, we cannot discount the possibility that some of the high conductivity/low resistivity anomalies could be related to increased water content in the soil.

  15. Possibilities for Using LIDAR and Photogrammetric Data Obtained with AN Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for Levee Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, K.; Ostrowski, W.; Szender, M.; Plutecki, W.; Salach, A.; Górski, K.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the possibilities for using an unmanned aerial system for evaluation of the condition of levees. The unmanned aerial system is equipped with two types of sensor. One is an ultra-light laser scanner, integrated with a GNSS receiver and an INS system; the other sensor is a digital camera that acquires data with stereoscopic coverage. Sensors have been mounted on the multirotor, unmanned platform the Hawk Moth, constructed by MSP company. LiDAR data and images of levees the length of several hundred metres were acquired during testing of the platform. Flights were performed in several variants. Control points measured with the use of the GNSS technique were considered as reference data. The obtained results are presented in this paper; the methodology of processing the acquired LiDAR data, which increase in accuracy when low accuracy of the navigation systems occurs as a result of systematic errors, is also discussed. The Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, as well as measurements of control points, were used to georeference the LiDAR data. Final accuracy in the order of centimetres was obtained for generation of the digital terrain model. The final products of the proposed UAV data processing are digital elevation models, an orthophotomap and colour point clouds. The authors conclude that such a platform offers wide possibilities for low-budget flights to deliver the data, which may compete with typical direct surveying measurements performed during monitoring of such objects. However, the biggest advantage is the density and continuity of data, which allows for detection of changes in objects being monitored.

  16. Losses of surface runoff, total solids, and nitrogen during bermudagrass establishment on levee embankments.

    PubMed

    Burwell, Robert W; Beasley, Jeffrey S; Gaston, Lewis A; Borst, Steven M; Sheffield, Ron E; Strahan, Ron E; Munshaw, Gregg C

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient and sediment runoff from newly constructed levee embankments pose a threat to water quality during soft armor vegetation establishment. Research was initiated in 2008 and 2009 to evaluate the effect of bermudagrass ( L.) coverage and N source on nutrient and sediment runoff from levee embankments during establishment. Bermudagrass plots were seeded at 195.3 kg pure live seed ha and fertilized at 50 kg N ha using a water-soluble N source, urea or NH-NO, or slow-release N source, S-coated urea (SCU) or urea formaldehyde (UF), with controls unfertilized. Vegetative cover percentage, time until the onset of runoff, runoff volume, and total solids (TS), NO-N, and NH-N concentrations were measured from simulated and natural rainfall events for 70 d in 2008 and 56 d in 2009. Bermudagrass at 90% grass cover delayed the onset of runoff an additional 441 to 538 s and reduced runoff volumes 74 to 84% of that exhibited at 10% grass cover. Nitrogen fertilizers did not accelerate bermudagrass growth sufficiently, however, to reduce TS loading compared with unfertilized bermudagrass in either year of the study. The application of urea and SCU resulted in cumulative N losses of 2.45 and 3.13 kg ha compared with 1.59 kg ha from the unfertilized bermudagrass in 2008, and 1.73 kg ha from NH-NO vs. 0.24 kg ha from controls in 2009. Only UF increased bermudagrass establishment without increasing cumulative N losses compared with unfertilized bermudagrass. Therefore, the benefit of greater erosion and runoff resistance expected from N-accelerated vegetative growth did not occur but had the unintended consequence of higher N losses when water-soluble N and SCU fertilizers were applied. PMID:21712593

  17. 76 FR 25310 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Zoar Levee and Diversion Dam, Dam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ...Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), Huntington District will prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to disclose potential impacts to the natural, physical, and human environment resulting from implementation of alternatives formulated to address reliability risks associated with Zoar Levee and Diversion Dam. These high......

  18. The Routing and Re-Routing of Difficult Knowledge: Social Studies Teachers Encounter "When the Levees Broke"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, H. James

    2011-01-01

    The author explores the articulations of six social studies student/teachers after a viewing of "When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts". The film, a documentary about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina on the people in and around New Orleans, constitutes an encounter with what Deborah Britzman (1998) calls "difficult…

  19. Classification of Soil Moisture on Vegetated Earthen Levees Using X and L Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrooghy, M.; Aanstoos, J. V.; Hasan, K.; Nobrega, R. A.; Younan, N. H.

    2011-12-01

    Earthen levees protect large areas of land in the US from flooding. Timely inspection and repairs can reduce the potential for catastrophic failures. Changes in spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture can reveal signs of instability and help identify zones of weakness. Since analytical and empirical models have shown a relationship between SAR backscatter and soil moisture, we are using SAR to classify soil moisture on levees. Estimation of soil moisture from SAR is challenging when the surface has any significant vegetation. For the levee application, the soil is typically covered with a uniform layer of grass. Our methodology is based on a supervised soil moisture classification using a back propagation neural network with four classes of low, medium, high, and very high soil moisture. Our methodology consists of the following steps: 1) segmentation of the levee area from background and exclusion of tree-covered areas; 2) extracting the backscattering and texture features such as GLCM (Grey-Level Co-occurrence Matrix) and wavelet features; 3) training the back propagation neural network classifier; and 4) testing the area of interest and validation of the results using ground truth data. Two sources of SAR imagery are tested with this method: (1) fully polarimetric L-band data from NASA's UAVSAR; and (2) dual-polarimetric X-band data from the German TerraSAR-X satellite. The study area is a 4 km stretch of levee along the lower Mississippi River in the United States. Field data collected simultaneously with image acquisition are utilized for training and validation. Preliminary results show classification accuracies of about 50% for the UAVSAR image and 30% for the TerraSAR-X image in vegetated areas. The figure below shows a soil moisture classification using UAVSAR on April 28, 2011.

  20. Evaluation of the use of reach transmissivity to quantify leakage beneath Levee 31N, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemeth, Mark S.; Wilcox, Walter M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ground- and surface-water model (MODBRANCH) was developed to estimate ground-water flow beneath Levee 31N in Miami-Dade County, Florida, and to simulate hydrologic conditions in the surrounding area. The study included compilation of data from monitoring stations, measurement of vertical seepage rates in wetlands, and analysis of the hydrogeologic properties of the ground-water aquifer within the study area. In addition, the MODBRANCH code was modified to calculate the exchange between surface-water channels and ground water using a relation based on the concept of reach transmissivity. The modified reach-transmissivity version of the MODBRANCH code was successfully tested on three simple problems with known analytical solutions. It was also tested and determined to function adequately on one field problem that had previously been solved using the unmodified version of the software. The modified version of MODBRANCH was judged to have performed satisfactorily, and it required about 60 percent as many iterations to reach a solution. Additionally, its input parameters are more physically-based and less dependent on model-grid spacing. A model of the Levee 31N area was developed and used with the original and modified versions of MODBRANCH, which produced similar output. The mean annual modeled ground-water heads differed by only 0.02 foot, and the mean annual canal discharge differed by less than 1.0 cubic foot per second. Seepage meters were used to quantify vertical seepage rates in the Everglades wetlands area west of Levee 31N. A comparison between results from the seepage meters and from the computer model indicated substantial differences that seemed to be a result of local variations in the hydraulic properties in the topmost part of the Biscayne aquifer. The transmissivity of the Biscayne aquifer was estimated to be 1,400,000 square feet per day in the study area. The computer model was employed to simulate seepage of ground water beneath Levee 31N

  1. The Stacked Channel-Levee Systems at the Middle Bengal Fan Imaged by High Resolution Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, T.; Spiess, V.; Breitzke, M.; Huebscher, C.

    2001-12-01

    The Bengal Fan is the largest submarine fan on Earth and covers the whole Bay of Bengal. The fan is built up by the sediment load of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers, which drain the Himalayan and react to tectonic and climatic changes on land. Therefore the Bengal Fan is well suited to study the linkage between processes on land and the marine sedimentary record. The sediment reaches the deep sea through a canyon deeply incised into the shelf, acting as a temporary trap. Turbidity currents transport the sediment episodically on the fan building successively several channel-levee systems, but only one channel is active at a time. In 1997 during R/V Sonne Cruise SO 125 to the Bay of Bengal, the morphology and structure of the Bengal Fan were studied at different distances from the shelf. In addition, the seismic data were used for an ODP drilling proposal "Drilling in the Bengal Fan" by France-Lanord, Spiess, Molnar & Curray. A main objective of the SO 125 Cruise was the investigation of the middle Bengal Fan at 16.5° N, especially of the architecture of the active channel-levee system. A closely spaced grid of Parasound sediment echosounder, Hydrosweep Swath Sounder and very high-resolution seismic data were collected in the vicinity of the active channel, completed by two long W-E Profiles to the west and the east of the active channel. As seismic sources a watergun with frequencies between 200 and 1600 Hz and a GI Gun with frequencies between 100 and 400 Hz were used in an alternating operation mode. At the middle Bengal Fan, the active channel is characterised by a high sinuosity and an exceptionally low gradient. By a combined Parasound and Hydrosweep survey more than 20 cut-off loops could be identified. The sedimentation on the levees varies strongly and depends on the relative position to the channel loops. The base of the active channel is characterised by high amplitude reflections in the seismic data, which are interpreted as coarse-grained sediments

  2. BUDDA (Bulge/Disk Decomposition Analysis) - um novo programa para análise estrutural de galáxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadotti, D. A.; de Souza, R. E.; Dos Anjos, S.

    2003-08-01

    Tem sido prática comum nos últimos anos estudar a distribuição de luminosidade em galáxias fazendo uso da informação contida em toda a imagem da galáxia, já que esta técnica tem se mostrado muito mais confiável do que o simples ajuste de perfis radiais de luminosidade. Através destes estudos bidimensionais, melhores resultados tem sido obtidos na análise e.g. do Plano Fundamental, de correlações entre os parâmetros estruturais de galáxias, de sub-estruturas como barras e anéis nucleares etc. Apresentamos um novo código bidimensional, o BUDDA, de análise estrutural de galáxias, que será disponibilizado para a comunidade. Desenvolvido por nós, o código determina os parâmetros estruturais de galáxias de forma prática e robusta, e pode ser aplicado genericamente em qualquer estudo sobre a formação, evolução e estrutura de galáxias. O programa ainda permite a avaliação direta de sub-estruturas, através de imagens residuais que são obtidas ao se subtrair, das imagens originais, bojo e disco sintéticos que melhor representam essas componentes da galáxia sob consideração. Será apresentada a forma de utilização do código, bem como séries de testes que atestam a sua funcionalidade. Além disso, os resultados da aplicação do código em uma amostra de 51 galáxias serão expostos como exemplo prático, e do seu enorme potencial de uso.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging, change detection, and stability assessment during the centerline trench levee seepage experiment using terrestrial light detection and ranging technology, Twitchell Island, California, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, Gerald W.; Howle, James; Bond, Sandra; Shriro, Michelle; Buck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A full scale field seepage test was conducted on a north-south trending levee segment of a now bypassed old meander belt on Twitchell Island, California, to understand the effects of live and decaying root systems on levee seepage and slope stability. The field test in May 2012 was centered on a north-south trench with two segments: a shorter control segment and a longer seepage test segment. The complete length of the trench area measured 40.4 meters (m) near the levee centerline with mature trees located on the waterside and landside of the levee flanks. The levee was instrumented with piezometers and tensiometers to measure positive and negative porewater pressures across the levee after the trench was flooded with water and held at a constant hydraulic head during the seepage test—the results from this component of the experiment are not discussed in this report. We collected more than one billion three-dimensional light detection and ranging (lidar) data points before, during, and after the centerline seepage test to assess centimeter-scale stability of the two trees and the levee crown. During the seepage test, the waterside tree toppled (rotated 20.7 degrees) into the water. The landside tree rotated away from the levee by 5 centimeters (cm) at a height of 2 m on the tree. The paved surface of the levee crown had three regions that showed subsidence on the waterside of the trench—discussed as the northern, central, and southern features. The northern feature is an elongate region that subsided 2.1 cm over an area with an average width of 1.35 m that extends 15.8 m parallel to the trench from the northern end of the trench to just north of the trench midpoint, and is associated with a crack 1 cm in height that formed during the seepage test on the trench wall. The central subsidence feature is a semicircular region on the waterside of the trench that subsided by as much as 6.2 cm over an area 3.4 m wide and 11.2 m long. The southern feature is an elongate

  4. Effect of a levee setback on aquatic resources using two-dimensional flow and bioenergetics models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, Robert W.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Christopher S.; McCarthy, Sarah; Berge, Hans; Comanor, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Watershed restoration is the focus of many resource managers and can include a multitude of restoration actions each with specific restoration objectives. For the White River flowing through the cities of Pacific and Sumner, Washington, a levee setback has been proposed to reconnect the river with its historical floodplain to help reduce flood risks, as well as provide increased habitat for federally listed species of salmonids. The study presented here documents the use of a modeling framework that integrates two-dimensional hydraulic modeling with process-based bioenergetics modeling for predicting how changes in flow from reconnecting the river with its floodplain affects invertebrate drift density and the net rate of energy intake of juvenile salmonids. Modeling results were calculated for flows of 25.9 and 49.3 cubic meters per second during the spring, summer, and fall. Predicted hypothetical future mean velocities and depths were significantly lower and more variable when compared to current conditions. The abundance of low energetic cost and positive growth locations for salmonids were predicted to increase significantly in the study reach following floodplain reconnection, particularly during the summer. This modeling framework presents a viable approach for evaluating the potential fisheries benefits of reconnecting a river to its historical floodplain that integrates our understanding of hydraulic, geomorphology, and organismal biology.

  5. Development of Floating Wave Barriers for Cost Effective Protection of Irrigation and Catfish Pond Levees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeren, Y.; Wren, D. G.; Alonso, C. V.

    2007-12-01

    Earth levees for catfish ponds and irrigation water storage experience significant embankment erosion due to wind generated waves. Large seasonal fluctuations in water level make vegetative bank protection impractical, and other stabilization methods such as the use of old tires or riprap are not acceptable due to ecological and economic concerns. The goal of the present work is to define configurations and construction techniques for inexpensive floating breakwaters made of polyethylene irrigation tubing. Based on wave characteristics measured in an irrigation pond near Lonoke, Arkansas, a laboratory scale wave generating flume was designed, constructed, and used to test multiple wave barrier configurations for regular waves in deep and transitional water depths. Wave transmission characteristics were investigated for the following breakwater arrangements: (1) fully restrained, (2) vertically restrained with a single mooring line, (3) horizontally restrained with a rigid arm hinged at one end, and (4) horizontally restrained with piles at both sides of the breakwater. The test results show that cylindrical pipes can be used effectively as floating breakwaters and that wave transmission characteristics strongly depend on the draft of the breakwater and the mooring configuration. The use of multiple small cylinders instead of a single large one can reduce cost while maintaining the same level of wave attenuation. The wave characteristics measured in the field and the results of laboratory testing resulted in a final design that is to be tested at the prototype scale in an irrigation pond.

  6. Characterizing Land Surface Change and Levee Stability in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Using UAVSAR Radar Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen; Bawden, Gerald; Deverel, Steven; Dudas, Joel; Hensley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is one of the primary water sources for the state of California and represents a complex geographical area comprised of tidal marshland, levee rimmed islands that are used primarily for agriculture, and urban encroachment. Land subsidence has dropped many of the Delta islands 3 to >7 meters below mean sea level and requires nearly 1700 km of levees to maintain the integrity of the islands and flow of water through the Delta. The current average subsidence rates for each island varies, with 1.23 cm/yr on Sherman Island and 2.2 cm/yr for Bacon Island, as determined by ground-based instruments located at isolated points in the Delta. The Delta's status as the most critical water resource for the state, an endangered ecosystem, and an area continuously threatened with levee breakage from hydrostatic pressure and the danger of earthquakes on several major faults in the San Francisco area make it a focus of monitoring efforts by both the state and national government. This activity is now almost entirely done by ground-based efforts, but the benefits of using remote sensing for wide scale spatial coverage and frequent temporal coverage is obvious. The UAVSAR airborne polarimetric and differential interferometric L-band synthetic aperture radar system has been used to collected monthly images of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and much of the adjacent Suisun Marsh since July 2009 to characterize levee stability, image spatially varied subsidence, and assess how well the UAVSAR performs in an area with widespread agriculture production.

  7. Not all breaks are equal: Variable hydrologic and geomorphic responses to multiple intentional levee breaches along the lower Cosumnes River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. L.; Whipple, A. A.; Phillips, K. A.; Laird, J.; Holmes, E. J.; Viers, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplain and riparian areas provide some of the most dynamic and complex habitat mosaics found on Earth. The lateral connectivity of water and sediment during seasonal flood pulses is a key factor controlling the abiotic and biotic processes that determine floodplain habitat structure. However, riverside levees have largely eliminated floodplain hydrologic connection in human-dominated riverscapes, resulting in widespread loss of floodplain habitats and associated ecosystem services. Recently, an emphasis has been placed on the re-establishment of hydrogeomorphic processes to lowland river floodplains through the breaching of riverside levees, with the lower Cosumnes River in California's Central Valley being one exemplar for this approach to floodplain ecosystem restoration. Observations following more than two decades of intentional and accidental levee breaches identified highly variable hydrologic and geomorphic responses to restoration actions. Principal among these observations is that narrow (<75 m) breaches generate archetypal, lobate crevasse-splay complexes, but result in minimal geomorphic change within the main river channel. However, recent observations from a wide (>400 m) levee breach identified the development of multiple and overlapping crevasse-splay complexes, along with upstream bed erosion and downstream aggradation in the main river channel. We hypothesize that geomorphic change in the main river channel adjacent to this large levee breach is the result of flood basin filling and associated water surface drawdown at flood stage. Additionally, longitudinal variability in channel capacity results in large differences in floodplain hydrologic connectivity thresholds and the duration of floodplain inundation, which ultimately influence biotic responses to flooding. Our observations suggest not all levee breaches are created equal, and an understanding of levee breach and adjacent main channel geometry is key to predicting and evaluating both

  8. An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Joel C; Hilley, George E; Fildani, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to

  9. The Transition of Benthic Nutrient Sources after Planned Levee Breaches Adjacent to Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Parcheso, Francis; Cameron, Jason M.; Asbill, Jessica R.; Fend, Steven V.; Duff, John H.; Engelstad, Anita C.

    2010-01-01

    Four sampling trips were coordinated after planned levee breaches that hydrologically reconnected both Upper Klamath Lake and Agency Lake, Oregon, to adjacent wetlands. Sets of nonmetallic pore-water profilers were deployed during these trips in November 2007, June 2008, May 2009, and July 2009. Deployments temporally spanned the annual cyanophyte bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) and spatially involved three lake and four wetland sites. Profilers, typically deployed in triplicate at each lake or wetland site, provided high-resolution (centimeter-scale) estimates of the vertical concentration gradients for diffusive-flux determinations. Estimates based on molecular diffusion may underestimate benthic flux because solute transport across the sediment-water interface can be enhanced by processes including bioturbation, bioirrigation and groundwater advection. Water-column and benthic samples were also collected to help interpret spatial and temporal trends in diffusive-flux estimates. Data from these samples complement taxonomic and geochemical analyses of bottom-sediments taken from Upper Klamath Lake (UKL) in prior studies. This ongoing study provides information necessary for developing process-interdependent solute-transport models for the watershed (that is, models integrating physical, geochemical, and biological processes) and supports efforts to evaluate remediation or load-allocation strategies. To augment studies funded by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), the Department of the Interior supported an additional full deployment of pore-water profilers in November 2007 and July 2009, immediately following the levee breaches and after the crash of the annual summer AFA bloom. As observed consistently since 2006, benthic flux of 0.2-micron filtered, soluble reactive phosphorus (that is, biologically available phosphorus, primarily as orthophosphate; SRP) was consistently positive (that is, out of the sediment into the overlying water column) and

  10. Restoration of floodplain topography by sand-splay complex formation in response to intentional levee breaches, Lower Cosumnes River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsheim, Joan L.; Mount, Jeffrey F.

    2002-04-01

    Restoration of sustainable geomorphic processes that create floodplain topography through development of sand-splay complexes at intentional breaches is one method to promote variability in physical structure needed for habitat restoration. The topography of splay complexes provides a range of floodplain elevations that creates local variability in (i) inundation duration and frequency and depth to ground water that influence riparian vegetation establishment; and (ii) flow depth and velocity that create refuge for fish. Two intentional levee breaches along the lowland Cosumnes River, Central Valley, CA, were evaluated during water years 1999 and 2000 in order to document changes in morphology and relief associated with deposition of sand-splay complexes. During the study period, annual peak-flow recurrence intervals ranged from ˜1 to 3 years, and water flowed through the breaches for a minimum of 55 days during water year 1999 and 53 days during water year 2000. At the two study sites, rapid vertical accretion and scour occurred within the first several years after intentionally breaching the levee at the Accidental Forest floodplain (constructed in 1995) and at the Corps Breach floodplain (constructed in 1997). Splay complexes are organized into a variety of landforms, including lateral levees and lobes separated by new floodplain channels. Maximum deposition measured on the splay surface is 0.36 m/year, while maximum scour in channels is 0.27 m/year. Juxtaposition of floodplain splay deposition and adjacent channel scour creates relief ranging from ˜1.6 to 0.25 m that decreases with distance from the breach and that becomes more pronounced over time as higher magnitude floods scour channels in the old floodplain sediment and deposit new sand and silt onto the surface of the splay. The ratio of splay complex height to depth of formative flow is estimated as ˜0.4. Progradation of main and secondary splay channels takes place by down-floodplain sand transport

  11. Actual Condition of Paddy Field Levee Maintenance by Various Farm Households including Large-scale Farming in the Developed Land Renting Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yasuyo

    The survey of interview, resource acquisition, photographic operation, and questionnaire were carried out in the “n” Community in the “y” District in Hakusan City in Ishikawa Prefecture to investigate the actual condition of paddy field levee maintenance in the area where land-renting market was proceeding, large-scale farming was dominant, and the problems of geographically scattered farm-land existed. In the study zone, 1) an agricultural production legal person rent-cultivated some of the paddy fields and maintained the levees, 2) another agricultural production legal person rent-cultivated some of the soy bean fields for crop changeover and land owners maintained the levees. The results indicated that sufficient maintenance was executed on the levees of the paddy fields cultivated by the agricultural production legal person, the soy bean fields for crop changeover, and the paddy fields cultivated by the land owners. Each reason is considered to be the managerial strategy, the economic incentive, the mutual monitoring and cross-regulatory mechanism, etc.

  12. On mechanisms triggering the levees failure along the Foenna stream on 1st January 2006 and which caused the flooding in the urban area of Sinalunga, Tuscany Region (Italy). A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camici, Stefania; Moramarco, Tommaso; Brocca, Luca; Melone, Florisa; Lapenna, Vincenzo; Perrone, Angela; Loperte, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    On 1st January 2006, during an ordinary flood event, a levee failure along the Foenna stream caused the flooding in the urban area of Sinalunga, a small town located in Tuscany region (Italy). The event was monitored by a public agency with the responsibility for the control and maintenance of the natural channel networks. Long time before of flooding, people living in the surrounding area of the stream blamed the presence of wild animals and of numerous burrows along the levees. Although the numerous actions of maintenance along the levees mainly for removing the burrows, a levee seepage occurred during that flood. The presence of an outflow located on the downstream face, almost 2 m below the levee top, caused the spurt of brown water denoting the presence of sediment erosion. On the upstream face of levee, a little hole of about 30 cm at the same height of the outflow was discovered. Although the agency workers tried to close the hole by using appropriate blankets, in short time the top of the levee subsided and the overtopping flow caused a trapezoidal breach typical for an earth-fill embankment. The formation of breach was so fast that in a little more of one hour the urban area near to the Foenna stream was flooded causing high economic damages. Mechanisms triggered the levees failure are the object of this work. The analysis of the event has been first addressed to assess the state of-fact of levees conditions along the Foenna stream, thus to understand how much the activity of wild animals, in particular that of porcupine, may have affected the hydraulic safety of the embankment. At the purpose, after the event, topographical surveys of cross sections have been done along with tomographic surveys by geoelectric technique for investigating the possible presence, besides of burrows, also of tunnels dug into the levees by animals. Then, the analysis of hydrometeorological conditions of the event has allowed to better understand the evolution of the flood and

  13. Transition of Benthic Nutrient Sources after Engineered Levee Breaches Adjacent to Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, J. S.; Topping, B. R.; Carter, J. L.; Parchaso, F.; Cameron, J. M.; Asbill, J. R.; Carlson, R. A.; Fend, S. V.; Engelstad, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    Nonmetallic pore-water profilers were deployed during four sampling trips between November 2007 and July 2009 after engineered levee breaches on 30 October 2007, hydrologically reconnected both Upper Klamath Lake and Agency Lake, Oregon, to adjacent wetlands. Centimeter-scale measurements of the vertical dissolved-nutrient concentration gradients from the profilers served as the basis for diffusive-flux determinations. Wetland areas undergoing restoration and those being used for water storage around these lakes function very differently than nearby established wetlands within the Upper Klamath National Wildlife Refuge. Consistent with previous results from Upper Klamath Lake, benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in the wetlands was consistently positive, and when areally and seasonally averaged over the 13 km2 newly restored wetlands, an SRP flux to the overlying water column (~87,000 kg over the 3-month cyanophyte bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA)) exceeded the magnitude of riverine inputs (42,000 kg for that season). SRP benthic flux at a site within the restored wetland area ~0.5 km from the breach was elevated relative to all other lake and wetland sites (including another wetland site <0.1 km from the breached levee) in 2009 suggests that the restored wetlands, at least chemically, remain in a transition period following the hydrologic reconnection of the lake and wetland environments. Ammonium fluxes to the water column remained consistently positive throughout the sampling period, generating a toxicological concern for endangered fish populations at elevated summer pH. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations were lower than detection limits (<0.03 mg-P/L) at all lake and wetland sites following the levee breaches. As indicated in previous studies, SRP concentrations for 2009 sampling trips indicated higher concentrations at the end of the annual AFA bloom relative to its beginning, suggesting a limiting factor or factors other

  14. The possible role of Coriolis forces in structuring large-scale sinuous patterns of submarine channel-levee systems.

    PubMed

    Wells, Mathew; Cossu, Remo

    2013-12-13

    Submarine channel-levee systems are among the largest sedimentary structures on the ocean floor. These channels have a sinuous pattern and are the main conduits for turbidity currents to transport sediment to the deep ocean. Recent observations have shown that their sinuosity decreases strongly with latitude, with high-latitude channels being much straighter than similar channels near the Equator. One possible explanation is that Coriolis forces laterally deflect turbidity currents so that at high Northern latitudes both the density interface and the downstream velocity maximum are deflected to the right-hand side of the channel (looking downstream). The shift in the velocity field can change the locations of erosion and deposition and introduce an asymmetry between left- and right-turning bends. The importance of Coriolis forces is defined by two Rossby numbers, Ro(W) = U/Wf and Ro(R) = U/Rf, where U is the mean downstream velocity, W is the width of the channel, R is the radius of curvature and f is the Coriolis parameter. In a bending channel, the density interface is flat when Ro(R) - -1, and Coriolis forces start to shift the velocity maximum when [Row] < 5. We review recent experimental and field observations and describe how Coriolis forces could lead to straighter channels at high latitudes. PMID:24471273

  15. Large-scale flooding analysis in the suburbs of Tokyo Metropolis caused by levee breach of the Tone River using a 2D hydrodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Hai, Pham T; Magome, J; Yorozuya, A; Inomata, H; Fukami, K; Takeuchi, K

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the effects of climate change on flood disasters in urban areas, we applied a two dimensional finite element hydrodynamic model (2D-FEM) to simulate flood processes for the case analysis of levee breach caused by Kathleen Typhoon on 16 September 1947 in Kurihashi reach of Tone River, upstream of Tokyo area. The purpose is to use the model to simulate flood inundation processes under the present topography and land-use conditions with impending extreme flood scenarios due to climate change for mega-urban areas like Tokyo. Simulation used 100 m resolution topographic data (in PWRI), which was derived from original LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data, and levee breach hydrographic data in 1947. In this paper, we will describe the application of the model with calibration approach and techniques when applying for such fine spatial resolution in urban environments. The fine unstructured triangular FEM mesh of the model appeared to be the most capable of introducing of constructions like roads/levees in simulations. Model results can be used to generate flood mapping, subsequently uploaded to Google Earth interface, making the modeling and presentation process much comprehensible to the general public. PMID:20962401

  16. Pliocene facies trends and controls on deposition of lower gusher shallow gas reservoirs, North Coles Levee Field, San Joaquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.C.; Gillespie, J.M. )

    1994-04-01

    Net sand isochore maps of three Pliocene-age Lower Gusher sands in the Etchegoin Formation at North Coles Levee field, southern San Joaquin basin, California display geometries suggestive of deposition in delta front settings. The north-south depositional strike of these sands approximately parallels the orientation of the paleoshoreline. The sands thicken and display greater lateral continuity near distributary channel sands, which are oriented east-northeast approximately perpendicular to the shoreline. A comparison of the isochore maps of each of the three sand bodies show that they are stacked vertically above each other, indicating that the position of the shoreline remained stationary during deposition of the Gusher interval. This apparent stillstand of the shoreline is superimposed on an overall regression of the sea from the San Joaquin basin during the Pliocene. Therefore, we believe that the Lower Gusher sands were deposited during a period of relatively rapid basin subsidence, which negated the effects of the marine regression and caused vertical aggradation of shoreline facies in the North Coles Levee area. The Lower Gusher interval at North and South Coles Levee contains the most prolific shallow gas reservoirs on the Bakersfield Arch. A thorough knowledge of depositional trends in the Lower Gusher interval increases the probability of encountering reservoir-quality facies in exploration programs focusing on Pliocene gas.

  17. Monitoring of levees, bridges, pipelines, and other critical infrastructure during the 2011 flooding in the Mississippi River Basin: Chapter J in 2011 floods of the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Brenda K.; Burton, Bethany L.; Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Cannia, James C.; Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    During the 2011 Mississippi River Basin flood, the U.S. Geological Survey evaluated aspects of critical river infrastructure at the request of and in support of local, State, and Federal Agencies. Geotechnical and hydrographic data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at numerous locations were able to provide needed information about 2011 flood effects to those managing the critical infrastructure. These data were collected and processed in a short time frame to provide managers the ability to make a timely evaluation of the safety of the infrastructure and, when needed, to take action to secure and protect critical infrastructure. Critical infrastructure surveyed by the U.S. Geological Survey included levees, bridges, pipeline crossings, power plant intakes and outlets, and an electrical transmission tower. Capacitively coupled resistivity data collected along the flood-protection levees surrounding the Omaha Public Power District Nebraska City power plant (Missouri River Levee Unit R573), mapped the near-subsurface electrical properties of the levee and the materials immediately below it. The near-subsurface maps provided a better understanding of the levee construction and the nature of the lithology beneath the levee. Comparison of the capacitively coupled resistivity surveys and soil borings indicated that low-resistivity value material composing the levee generally is associated with lean clay and silt to about 2 to 4 meters below the surface, overlying a more resistive layer associated with sand deposits. In general, the resistivity structure becomes more resistive to the south and the southern survey sections correlate well with the borehole data that indicate thinner clay and silt at the surface and thicker sand sequences at depth in these sections. With the resistivity data Omaha Public Power District could focus monitoring efforts on areas with higher resistivity values (coarser-grained deposits or more loosely compacted section), which typically are

  18. Integrating remotely acquired and field data to assess effects of setback levees on riparian and aquatic habitat in glacial-melt water rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.; Black, R.W.; Voss, F.; Neale, C. M. U.

    2008-01-01

    Setback levees, in which levees are reconstructed at a greater distance from a river channel, are a promising restoration technique particularly for alluvial rivers with broad floodplains where river-floodplain connectivity is essential to ecological processes. Documenting the ecological outcomes of restoration activities is essential for assessing the comparative benefits of different restoration approaches and for justifying new restoration projects. Remote sensing of aquatic habitats offers one approach for comprehensive, objective documentation of river and floodplain habitats, but is difficult in glacial rivers because of high suspended-sediment concentrations, braiding and a lack of large, well-differentiated channel forms such as riffles and pools. Remote imagery and field surveys were used to assess the effects of recent and planned setback levees along the Puyallup River and, more generally, the application of multispectral imagery for classifying aquatic and riparian habitats in glacial-melt water rivers. Airborne images were acquired with a horizontal ground resolution of 0.5 m in three spectral bands (0.545-0.555, 0.665-0.675 and 0.790-0.810 ??m) spanning from green to near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Field surveys identified river and floodplain habitat features and provided the basis for a comparative hydraulic analysis. Broad categories of aquatic habitat (smooth and rough water surface), exposed sediment (sand and boulder) and vegetated surfaces (herbaceous and deciduous shrub/forest) were classified accurately using the airborne images. Other categories [e.g. conifers, boulder, large woody debtis (LWD)] and subdivisions of broad categories (e.g. riffles and runs) were not successfully classified either because these features did not form large patches that could be identified on the imagery or their spectral reflectances were not distinct from those of other habitat types. Airborne imagery was critical for assessing fine-scale aquatic habitat

  19. Time scales of change in chemical and biological parameters after engineered levee breaches adjacent to Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Wood, Tamara M.; Parcheso, Francis; Cameron, Jason M.; Asbill, Jessica R.; Carlson, Rick A.; Fend, Steven V.

    2012-01-01

    Eight sampling trips were coordinated after engineered levee breaches hydrologically reconnected both Upper Klamath Lake and Agency Lake, Oregon, to adjacent wetlands. The reconnection, by a series of explosive blasts, was coordinated by The Nature Conservancy to reclaim wetlands that had for approximately seven decades been leveed for crop production. Sets of nonmetallic porewater profilers (U.S. Patent 8,051,727 B1; November 8, 2011; http://www.uspto.gov/web/patents/patog/ week45/OG/html/1372-2/US08051727-20111108.html.) were deployed during these trips in November 2007, June 2008, May 2009, July 2009, May 2010, August 2010, June 2011, and July 2011 (table 1). Deployments temporally spanned the annual cyanophyte bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and spatially involved three lake and four wetland sites. Spatial and temporal variation in solute benthic flux was determined by the field team, using the profilers, over an approximately 4-year period beginning 3 days after the levee breaches. The highest flux to the water column of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was detected in the newly flooded wetland, contrasting negative or insignificant DOC fluxes at adjacent lake sites. Over the multiyear study, DOC benthic fluxes dissipated in the reconnected wetlands, converging to values similar to those for established wetlands and to the adjacent lake (table 2). In contrast to DOC, benthic sources of soluble reactive phosphorus, ammonium, dissolved iron and manganese from within the reconnected wetlands were consistently elevated (that is, significant in magnitude relative to riverine and established-wetland sources) indicating a multi-year time scale for certain chemical changes after the levee breaches (table 2). Colonization of the reconnected wetlands by aquatic benthic invertebrates during the study trended toward the assemblages in established wetlands, providing further evidence of a multiyear transition of this area to permanent aquatic habitat (table 3). Both the

  20. Modes of development of slope canyons and their relation to channel and levee features on the Ebro sediment apron, off-shore northeastern Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, S.; Ryan, William B. F.; Normark, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Six submarine slope canyons in an area of the northwestern Mediterranean, offshore from the Ebro River and Delta, were surveyed with bathymetric swathmapping (SeaBeam) and mid-range side-looking sonar (SeaMARC I). All of the canyons have slightly winding paths with concave-upwards gradients that are relatively steep shallower than 1,200 m. Two major types of canyons are identified on the basis of their morphologic character at the base of the slope; Type-I canyons lead to an unchannelled base-of-slope deposit and Type-II canyons are continuous with channel-levee systems that cross the rise. Four Type-I canyons were surveyed in the area. Two of these are broad, U-shaped, steep (average gradients of 1:14), do not indent the shelf, and terminate downslope at debris-flow deposits. These two canyons, the most northern in the area, have rounded heads with extensive gullies separated by knife-edge ridges. Relief of the canyon walls is about equal on both sides of the canyons, although the right-hand walls (looking downslope) are generally steeper. The other two Type-I canyons in the area are similar in that they do not indent the shelf, but they are much smaller and shallower and coalesce before terminating in the base-of-slope region. The two Type-II canyons that feed leveed-channels are U-shaped with flatter floors, longer profiles and gentler gradients than Type-I canyons. They are closer to the Valencia Valley and have relatively small cross-sectional areas. We propose a four-stage evolutionary sequence to explain the development of the canyons observed in this section on the prograding Ebro margin. During the initial stage, slumping and erosion on the slope creates a network of small gullies. During the next stage, headward growth of one (or more) gully leads to a major indentation of the shelf. This is the critical factor for developing a channel that will incise the slope and provide a major conduit for moving sediment to the basin. Stage 3 is characterized by the

  1. Mississippi River Flood of 2011 and the Activation of the Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway: Observations and Modeling of a Levee Breach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R. R.; Koenig, T. A.; McDonald, R. R.; Nelson, J. M.; Simoes, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    During 2011, record flooding has occurred in many parts of the central United States. As the flooding reached record levels for the Mississippi-Ohio River confluence at Cairo, Illinois, the 61 kilometer long and 8 kilometer wide Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway (Floodway) was activated to provide a lowering of upstream water levels through a controlled demolition of approximately 3,300 meters of levee at 10:00 PM on May 2, 2011. Prior to activation of the Floodway, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed 38 self-contained stage sensors throughout the Floodway to capture the change in water elevation through time at various locations. From April 29, 2011 to May 24, 2011, daily streamflow measurements were made upstream of the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, within the Floodway opening and outlets, and on the Mississippi River downstream of the Floodway opening. Additionally, velocity and bathymetric data were collected immediately downstream of the Floodway opening at Birds Point to characterize scour in the Floodway. The data provide a unique look at the impact of a controlled levee breach on river flows and hydraulics. The activation of the Floodway lowered the water level at Cairo, Illinois by 0.44 meters in the first 14 hours, while increasing the streamflow of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers in vicinity of Cairo, Illinois by 9,200 cubic meters per second. On May 2, prior to the activation of the Floodway, the measured combined streamflow of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers at Cairo, Illinois was 52,900 cubic meters per second with the Ohio River contributing 27,700 cubic meters per second. Following the controlled breach of the Birds Point levee (immediately downstream of Cairo, Illinois on the right descending bank) the night of May 2, 2011, the measured combined streamflow at Cairo, Illinois on May 3, 2011 increased to 62,100 cubic meters per second with the Ohio River increasing to 38,100 cubic meters per second, an increase of 10

  2. Depositional environments of late glacial to Holocene sediments on the deep water levees of Setúbal and Nazaré Canyons, offshore Portugal: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoletti, F. C.; Masson, D.; Innocenti, C.

    2010-12-01

    The west Iberian margin is indented by a network of submarine canyons that create rugged seafloor morphology and act as major pathways for the transport of sediment from land to the abyssal plains. The Setúbal and Nazaré Canyons are part of this complex environment and strongly influence sediment distribution, capturing sediments from the Tagus River and the littoral cell transport respectively. Deep submarine sedimentary sequences thus reflect changes in sediment input and depositional environments. The high-resolution sedimentological study here presented was applied in four cores of the deep water levees of Nazaré and Setúbal Canyons in order to explore how sediment input to the canyons changed during the last glacial - interglacial transition, and how this reflects changing environmental conditions on land. By means of non-destructive corelogger measurements and analyses of spectral signatures, geochemical compositions and colour variations, it was possible to identify ice-rafted debris (IRD) deposits, to characterize hemipelagic and turbidite layers and to investigate terrestrial-derived sediments input variation during the last 26 ka. Preliminary results from the sedimentological and turbidite frequency analyses show that highest turbidite occurrence is recorded during the glacial stage, confirming that the generation of turbidity flows in submarine canyons is tightly related to low sea-level stands. We found that major peaks in frequency and thickness of turbidite deposits in the deep Portuguese margin are mainly coeval with abrupt climatic (H2 and 1) and sea-level changes (~ 19 and ~ 23 ka BP), as a consequence of which a major amount of continentally-derived material was transported into the deep sea. During the Holocene, the inception of sea-level rises, independent of their magnitude, has been found to be sufficient to generate turbidity currents, particularly in the Nazaré system. Moreover, a multiple regression analysis was attempted in order to

  3. Novel insights into the genetics of smoking behaviour, lung function, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (UK BiLEVE): a genetic association study in UK Biobank

    PubMed Central

    Wain, Louise V; Shrine, Nick; Miller, Suzanne; Jackson, Victoria E; Ntalla, Ioanna; Artigas, María Soler; Billington, Charlotte K; Kheirallah, Abdul Kader; Allen, Richard; Cook, James P; Probert, Kelly; Obeidat, Ma'en; Bossé, Yohan; Hao, Ke; Postma, Dirkje S; Paré, Peter D; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Reinmaa, Eva; Melén, Erik; O'Connell, Jared; Frangou, Eleni; Delaneau, Olivier; Freeman, Colin; Petkova, Desislava; McCarthy, Mark; Sayers, Ian; Deloukas, Panos; Hubbard, Richard; Pavord, Ian; Hansell, Anna L; Thomson, Neil C; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Morris, Andrew P; Marchini, Jonathan; Strachan, David P; Tobin, Martin D; Hall, Ian P

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Understanding the genetic basis of airflow obstruction and smoking behaviour is key to determining the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We used UK Biobank data to study the genetic causes of smoking behaviour and lung health. Methods We sampled individuals of European ancestry from UK Biobank, from the middle and extremes of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) distribution among heavy smokers (mean 35 pack-years) and never smokers. We developed a custom array for UK Biobank to provide optimum genome-wide coverage of common and low-frequency variants, dense coverage of genomic regions already implicated in lung health and disease, and to assay rare coding variants relevant to the UK population. We investigated whether there were shared genetic causes between different phenotypes defined by extremes of FEV1. We also looked for novel variants associated with extremes of FEV1 and smoking behaviour and assessed regions of the genome that had already shown evidence for a role in lung health and disease. We set genome-wide significance at p<5 × 10−8. Findings UK Biobank participants were recruited from March 15, 2006, to July 7, 2010. Sample selection for the UK BiLEVE study started on Nov 22, 2012, and was completed on Dec 20, 2012. We selected 50 008 unique samples: 10 002 individuals with low FEV1, 10 000 with average FEV1, and 5002 with high FEV1 from each of the heavy smoker and never smoker groups. We noted a substantial sharing of genetic causes of low FEV1 between heavy smokers and never smokers (p=2·29 × 10−16) and between individuals with and without doctor-diagnosed asthma (p=6·06 × 10−11). We discovered six novel genome-wide significant signals of association with extremes of FEV1, including signals at four novel loci (KANSL1, TSEN54, TET2, and RBM19/TBX5) and independent signals at two previously reported loci (NPNT and HLA-DQB1/HLA-DQA2). These variants also showed

  4. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Kroon, Jan

    1988-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and liquid methanol have been carried out. For both liquids an effective pair potential was used. The models were fitted to the heat of vaporization, pressure and various radial distribution functions resulting from diffraction experiments on liquids. In both simulations 216 molecules were put in a cubic periodical ☐. The system was loosely coupled to a temperature bath and to a pressure bath. Following an initial equilibration period relevant data were sampled during 15 ps. The distributions of oxygen—oxygen distances in hydrogen bonds obtained from the two simulations are essentially the same. The distribution obtained from crystal data is somewhat different: the maximum has about the same position, but the curve is much narrower, which can be expected merely from the fact that diffraction experiments only supply average atomic positions and hence average interatomic distances. When thermal motion is taken into account a closer likeness is observed.

  5. Levee Vegetation Review Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Matsui, Doris O. [D-CA-6

    2013-01-23

    01/24/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3080, which became Public Law 113-121 on 6/10/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Managing Enrollments When the Levee Breaks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This article features the text of a speech by Richard Whiteside, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Dean of Admission at Tulane University in New Orleans, that was presented during AACRAO's Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) Conference, November 15, 2005, in Chicago. In his speech, Whiteside recounts his personal story of living…

  7. Cibola High Levee Pond annual report 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, Gordon A.; Carpenter, Jeanette; Marsh, Paul C.

    2005-01-01

    Remaining work will be finished this coming summer and a final report describing CHLP and the ecology of these fish will be completed by the end of 2005. We offer our assistance to the Fish and Wildlife Service in the pond’s renovation and support for the creation of additional refuge ponds. Funding for this work ends September 2005.

  8. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro: the sequel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Van Eijck, Bouke P.; Kroon, Jan

    1991-02-01

    In the framework of our comparative research concerning hydrogen bonding in the crystalline and liquid phases we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid methanol. Six different rigid three site models are compared. Five of them had been reported in the literature and one (OM2) we developed by a fit to the experimental molar volume, heat of vaporization and neutron weighted radial distribution function. In general the agreement with experiment is satisfactory for the different models. None of the models has an explicit hydrogen bond potential, but five of the six models show a degree of hydrogen bonding comparable to experiments on liquid methanol. The analysis of the simulation hydrogen bonds indicates that there is a distinct preference of the O⋯O axis to lie in the acceptor lone pairs plane, but hardly any for the lone pair directions. Ab initio calculations and crystal structure statistics of OH⋯O hydrogen bonds agree with this observation. The O⋯O hydrogen bond length distributions are similar for most models. The crystal structures show a sharper O⋯O distribution. Explicit introduction of harmonic motion with a quite realistic root mean square amplitude of 0.08 Å to the thermally averaged crystal distribution results in a distribution comparable to OM2 although the maximum of the former is found at shorter distance. On the basis of the analysis of the static properties of all models we conclude that our OM2, Jorgenson's OPLS and Haughney, Ferrario and McDonald's HFM1 models are good candidates for simulations of liquid methanol under isothermal, isochoric conditions. Partly flexible and completely rigid OM2 are simulated at constant pressure and with fixed volume. The flexible simulations give essentially the same (correct) results under both conditions, which is not surprising because the flexible form was fitted under both conditions. Rigid OM2 has a similar potential energy but larger pressure in the isochoric case and larger energy and far larger volume in the isobaric case. Radial distribution functions and hydrogen bond geometries are very similar for all four cases. Only in the case of the osobaric rigid methanol does the volume expansion seem to be accompanied by a slight preference for tetrahedrality around the oxygen atom.

  9. Five Years after the Levees Broke: Bearing Witness through Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Renee

    2010-01-01

    As a teaching artist in public schools, the author is paired with classroom teachers to teach poetry and to give students an opportunity to experience their academic curriculum through the arts. At the beginning of the school year, she gave her students the on-going, yearlong assignment to watch the news, to pay attention. Knowing many of them…

  10. Biogeochemical implications of levee confinement in the lowermost Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, J. J.; Bianchi, T. S.; Alison, M. A.; Wysocki, L. A.; Campanella, R.

    With the recent formation of the Center for River-Ocean Studies (CeROS) at Tulane University in Louisiana (see http://www.tulane.edu/~ceros) and the emerging state-federal partnership that is creating river diversions to combat coastal land loss, increased attention is being paid to the lowermost Mississippi River, from Baton Rouge to the Gulf of Mexico, as a critical juncture and storage area for sediment particles and bio-active compounds.CeROS scientists, working with the US. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have undertaken a detailed re-assessment of the channel floor and water column of this region using geophysical and biogeochemical data collection, combined with historical data sets.

  11. Probabilistic seasonal Forecasts to deterministic Farm Leve Decisions: Innovative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwangi, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change and vulnerability are major challenges in ensuring household food security. Climate information services have the potential to cushion rural households from extreme climate risks. However, most the probabilistic nature of climate information products is not easily understood by majority of smallholder farmers. Despite the probabilistic nature, climate information have proved to be a valuable climate risk adaptation strategy at the farm level. This calls for innovative ways to help farmers understand and apply climate information services to inform their farm level decisions. The study endeavored to co-design and test appropriate innovation systems for climate information services uptake and scale up necessary for achieving climate risk development. In addition it also determined the conditions necessary to support the effective performance of the proposed innovation system. Data and information sources included systematic literature review, secondary sources, government statistics, focused group discussions, household surveys and semi-structured interviews. Data wasanalyzed using both quantitative and qualitative data analysis techniques. Quantitative data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Qualitative data was analyzed using qualitative techniques, which involved establishing the categories and themes, relationships/patterns and conclusions in line with the study objectives. Sustainable livelihood, reduced household poverty and climate change resilience were the impact that resulted from the study.

  12. Studies in wave barrier design and levee erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing demands on limited groundwater resources have created a growing need for the development of surface water resources for irrigation. On-farm reservoirs, along with tailwater recovery systems, can provide a means for reducing dependence on groundwater supplies. These reservoirs are surrou...

  13. Measuring the erosion of an irrigation reservoir levee

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing demands on limited groundwater resources in the Arkansas and Mississippi alluvial floodplain (commonly called the Delta) have created a growing need for the development of surface water resources for irrigation. On-farm reservoirs, along with tail-water recovery systems, are used to stor...

  14. When the Levee Breaks: Treating Adolescents and Families in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina brought to the surface serious questions about the capacity of the public health system to respond to community-wide disaster. The storm and its aftermath severed developmentally protective family and community ties; thus its consequences are expected to be particularly acute for vulnerable adolescents. Research confirms that…

  15. REPRODUCIBILITY OF SMALL SCALE HYDRAULIC EXPERIMENT ON CROSS-LEVEE BREACH BY OVERFLOW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Masato; Shimada, Tomonori

    River bank failure causes a heavy disaster. Many experiments had been conducted. Full-scale hydraulic experiment is very few, because of it has a limit to conduct in terms of space and budget. Therefore, many experiments were conducted in small scale and they need to be compared with the actual phenomenon. The large scale hydraulic experiment on river bank failure was conducted at Chiyoda experiment flume in 2008. We conducted small scale experiments on river bank failure and examined the reproducibility of the small scale experiments by comparison with the Chiyoda experiment. Fine-grained soil strongly influences the widening process of bank failure. In order to reproduce the results of experiment at Chiyoda experimental flume on dike failure, it is necessary to remove the fine material from the material of scaled dikes. And it is found that the time scale of widening process of bank failure follows the Froude similarity law.

  16. Native fish sanctuaries of the lower Colorado River: Cibola High Levee Pond, Desert Pupfish Pond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, G.

    2005-01-01

    Isolated by high mountains and harsh deserts, its fish community developed unique and specialized traits that helped them survive raging floods and prolonged droughts. Conditions were so unique that three quarters of the fish species are found nowhere else in the world?|

  17. 75 FR 11147 - Process for Requesting a Variance From Vegetation Standards for Levees and Floodwalls

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... period. SUMMARY: In the February 9, 2010 issue of the Federal Register (75 FR 6364), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), published its proposed update to its current process for requesting a variance... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers Process for Requesting a Variance From Vegetation Standards...

  18. 75 FR 6364 - Process for Requesting a Variance From Vegetation Standards for Levees and Floodwalls

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... regulations.gov Web site is an anonymous access system, which means we will not know your identity or contact..., floodwalls, and appurtenant structures contained in Engineer Technical Letter (ETL) 1110-2-571-- Guidelines... Technical Letter (ETL) 1110-2-571, Guidelines for Landscape Planting and Vegetation Management at...

  19. WHEN THE LEVEE BREAKS: TREATING ADOLESCENTS AND FAMILIES IN THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina brought to the surface serious questions about the capacity of the public health system to respond to community-wide disaster. The storm and its aftermath severed developmentally protective family and community ties; thus its consequences are expected to be particularly acute for vulnerable adolescents. Research confirms that teens are at risk for a range of negative outcomes under conditions of life stress and family disorganization. Specifically, the multiple interacting risk factors for substance abuse in adolescence may be compounded when families and communities have experienced a major trauma. Further, existing service structures and treatments for working with young disaster victims may not address their risk for co-occurring substance abuse and traumatic stress reactions because they tend to be individually or peer group focused, and fail to consider the multi-systemic aspects of disaster recovery. This article proposes an innovative family-based intervention for young disaster victims, based on an empirically supported model for adolescent substance abuse, Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT; Liddle, 2002). Outcomes and mechanisms of the model’s effects are being investigated in a randomized clinical trial with clinically referred substance-abusing teens in a New Orleans area community impacted by Hurricane Katrina. PMID:18412822

  20. Driving under the influence--a level-I trauma center's experience.

    PubMed

    Fantus, R J; Zautcke, J L; Hickey, P A; Fantus, P P; Nagorka, F W

    1991-11-01

    Alcohol-impaired driving is a major issue confronting today's society. New legislation is emerging to help curtail this ongoing problem. To evaluate the legislative effects in terms of outcome pertaining to injured drivers, we analyzed the records of 116 consecutive motor vehicle drivers who were admitted to our trauma center over a 16-month period. Medical reports, police reports, and drivers' abstracts were reviewed. Of the 116 drives, 61 (53%) had blood alcohol concentrations that exceeded the legal limit (blood alcohol level greater than or equal to 100 mg/dL) on arrival at the emergency department. Only four of these patients were ticketed for driving under the influence and received the mandatory suspension of their driver's license. None was convicted of this offense, which carries criminal charges and a revocation of the driver's license. Mechanisms for efficient collection of blood specimens and mandatory occurrence reporting are two recommendations that merit investigation to obviate further escape of injured, intoxicated drivers from the legal net. In addition, alcohol rehabilitation and education cannot be overlooked and should warrant strong societal support. PMID:1942173

  1. 44 CFR 65.10 - Mapping of areas protected by levee systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., the freeboard must be established at one foot above the height of the one percent wave or the maximum wave runup (whichever is greater) associated with the 100-year stillwater surge elevation at the site.... Particular emphasis must be placed on the effects of wave attack and overtopping on the stability of...

  2. When the levee breaks: treating adolescents and families in the aftermath of hurricane katrina.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Cynthia L; Liddle, Howard A

    2008-04-01

    Hurricane Katrina brought to the surface serious questions about the capacity of the public health system to respond to community-wide disaster. The storm and its aftermath severed developmentally protective family and community ties; thus its consequences are expected to be particularly acute for vulnerable adolescents. Research confirms that teens are at risk for a range of negative outcomes under conditions of life stress and family disorganization. Specifically, the multiple interacting risk factors for substance abuse in adolescence may be compounded when families and communities have experienced a major trauma. Further, existing service structures and treatments for working with young disaster victims may not address their risk for co-occurring substance abuse and traumatic stress reactions because they tend to be individually or peer group focused, and fail to consider the multi-systemic aspects of disaster recovery. This article proposes an innovative family-based intervention for young disaster victims, based on an empirically supported model for adolescent substance abuse, Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT; Liddle, 2002). Outcomes and mechanisms of the model's effects are being investigated in a randomized clinical trial with clinically referred substance-abusing teens in a New Orleans area community impacted by Hurricane Katrina. PMID:18412822

  3. CONSEQUENCES OF HUMAN-ALTERED FLOODS: LEVEES, FLOODS, AND FLOODPLAIN FORESTS ALONG THE WISCONSIN RIVER. (R826600)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Effect of Levee and Channel Structures on Long Lava Flow Emplacement: Martian Examples from THEMIS and MOLA Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peitersen, M. N.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Christensen, P. R.; Bare, C.

    2003-01-01

    Long lava flows (discrete flow units with lengths exceeding 50 km) are easily identified features found on many planetary surfaces. An ongoing investigation is being conducted into the origin of these flows. Here, we limit our attention to long lava flows which show evidence of channel-like structures.

  5. When the levee breaks - public policy and holistic risk management - lessons from Katrina for coastal cities faced with rising storm surge flood risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir-Wood, R.

    2009-04-01

    In a period of accelerating sea level rise and increased tropical cyclone intensities, extreme 100 year coastal flood levels are rising rapidly along a number of tropical and subtropical coastlines. Meanwhile, whether from natural megadelta consolidation, post glacial rebound or overpumping of shallow aquifers, many coastal cities are sinking even faster than mean sea level is rising. Without significant investment in continually improved flood defence inevitably this means the risk of catastrophic flooding is rising, for many cities quite steeply. The experience of Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans may become seen as iconic for 21st Century catastrophe risk as more and more coastal cities are subject to similar calamities. The story of New Orleans also highlights many aspects of catastrophe risk management failures before and after extreme events. The city of New Orleans had already been flooded three times by storm surges in the 100 years before Katrina. After each flood, investments were made in improved flood defences but these investments dwindled through time as there appeared to be a reduced imperative to divert money to support abstract risk reduction. Meanwhile land subsidence and rising sea levels and storm surges meant that risk levels continued to rise, until the inevitable time when the city once again was flooded. As the city increasingly sinks below mean sea level the impact of each flood has become increasingly catastrophic, both in terms of areas flooded, property damage and casualties. While a major program of investment in improved flood defences has once again followed the catastrophic 2005 flood, Federal government agencies have given no assurance that levels of flood risk will be maintained below some designated threshold long term. Therefore another cycle of rising flood risk has now started that will inevitably eventually to lead to the city becoming reflooded. This cycle can only end with the eventual abandonment of much of the city area - an outcome that is deemed politically unacceptable. The loss consequences of rising levels of risk, improvements or degradation in flood defences and the potential outcomes of different catastrophic storm surges can only be explored in a Catastrophe loss model.

  6. A bill to allow a State or local government to construct levees on certain properties otherwise designated as open space lands.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Hoeven, John [R-ND

    2012-01-26

    07/23/2012 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Failed by the Yeas and Nays: (2/3 required): 126 - 254 (Roll no. 500). (text: CR H5105) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Failed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. To ensure that Federal assistance provided under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act for the construction of certain emergency levees is not conditioned on the subsequent dismantlement of those levees, except as provided for in a status certificate, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Kline, John [R-MN-2

    2011-10-24

    10/25/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. 75 FR 21252 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Statement/ Environmental Impact Report for Phase 3 of Reclamation District No. 17 100-Year Levee Seepage...-year Levee Seepage Area Project (LSAP). To implement Phase 3 of the LSAP, RD 17 is requesting... project. Portions of the RD 17 levee system including the section of levee along the south bank of...

  9. Costura Basica (Principios Basicos para el Estudiante con Impedimentos Leves y Moderados) Documento de Trabajo Guia Curricular para el Curso. Basic Sewing (Basic Principles for the Student with Light and Moderate Disabilities. Course Curriculum Guide. Working Document).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey. Office of Special Education.

    This guide has been prepared by the Puerto Rico Department of Public Instruction for special education teachers teaching domestic sewing. It includes informative and easy to comprehend material for students of both sexes with mild to moderate disabilities. The material is developed through varied strategies and activities that relate to the…

  10. Geomorphic changes on the Mississippi River flood plain at Miller City, Illinois, as a result of the flood of 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    1997-01-01

    During the 1993 floods on the upper Mississippi and Missouri rivers, the most dramatic changes to floodplains occurred at levee-break complexes where large discharges were concentrated through narrow breaks in levees. Scour and deposition associated with levee breaks adversely affected large areas of formerly productive bottomland. This case study of the levee-break complex at Miller City, Illinois, documents the geomorphic effects of a typical levee-break complex.

  11. Effect of River Training Project on Hydrodynamics Flow Circumstances by 2D Finite Element Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, B.; Li, D. F.; Hu, H. J.; Zhang, H. W.; Lou, L. H.; Chen, M.; Lv, Z. Y.

    Based on the verified two dimensional(2D) finite element model for river flow simulation, the effect of estuary training levees on the water flow and sediment movement in the Yellow River estuary is analyzed. For disclosing the effect of setting the two training levees on the flow and sediment motion, the calculation and analysis for the two projects, (one is no levees, the other is setting up two no levees) are given. The results show that when setting up two training levees, water flow is bound by levees and the water flows become more concentrated. As a result, velocity increases in the main channel, sediment carrying capacity of water flow increases correspondingly.

  12. 75 FR 18238 - United States Section; Final Environmental Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ..., overtopping, piping/sand boils, under-seepage, and severe surface and slope erosion. The flooding also... existing levee during the September 2008 flooding (including severe erosion, levee breaches, and...

  13. 77 FR 12818 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Rio Grande...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... of recent changes in levee design parameters and environmental resources in the study area. The... Quality in 1992. In May 1997, a draft SEIS evaluating the revised design of the proposed levee to... draft SEIS is being developed to evaluate effects of revised levee design and additional...

  14. Anatomy and growth pattern of Amazon deep-sea fan as revealed by long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) and high-resolution seismic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Damuth, J.E.; Flood, R.D.; Kowsmann, R.O.; Belderson, R.H.; Gorini, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Imaging of the Amazon deep-sea fan with long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) has, for the first time, revealed the anatomy, trends, and growth pattern of distributary channels on this fan. Only one channel-levee system was active at any given time and extended from the Amazon Submarine Canyon downslope onto the lower fan (> 4,200 m). Formation of new channel-levee systems occurred when a currently active channel-levee system was cut off and abandoned through avulsion, and a new channel-levee system was established nearby. Through time, successive channel-levee formation and abandonment built two broad levee complexes consisting of groups of overlapping, coalescing segments of channel-levee systems across the present fan surface. These, plus older, now buried levee complexes, indicate that fan growth is radially outward and downslope through development of successive levee complexes. The most striking characteristic of the distributary channels is their intricate, often recurving, meanders with sinuosities of up to 2.5. Cutoffs and abandoned meander loops indicate that the channels migrate laterally through time. Channel bifurcation results predominantly from avulsion when flows breach a channel levee, thereby abandoning the present channel and establishing a new channel-levee segment nearby. No clear evidence of channel branching (i.e., division of a single channel into two active segments) or braiding was observed. 22 figs.

  15. Hydrologic conditions: Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohout, Francis Anthony; Klein, Howard; Sherwood, C.B.; Leach, Stanley D.

    1964-01-01

    Thin layers of dense limestone of low permeability that occur near the top of the Biscayne aquifer in the vicinity of the north end of Levee 30 in Dade County, Florida are of hydrologic importance because they retard the downward infiltration of ponded water in Conservation Area No. 3. This retarding effect frequently results in high head differentials across the levee. Tests made in a small area adjacent to Levee 30 indicate that the coefficient of transmissibility of the aquifer is 3,600,000 gpd (gallons per day) per foot, and the coefficient of vertical permeability of the dense limestones is 13 gpd per square foot. If ground-water flow beneath the levee is laminar, the total inflow to the Levee 30 Canal from Conservation Area No. 3 will be about 350 mgd (million gallons per day), or 540 cfs (cubic feet per second), per mile length of levee when the head difference across the levee is 10 feet.

  16. Principios de Nutricion y Alimentacion del Adolescente (Para Estudiantes con Impedimentos Leves y Moderados). Guia Curricular para el Curso Documento de Trabajar. Principles of Nutrition and Food for the Adolescent (For Students with Light and Moderate Disabilities. Course Curriculum Guide. Working Document).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey. Office of Special Education.

    This curriculum guide, in Spanish, consists of a compilation of concepts, activities, and skills for the student with disabilities who receives services from the special education programs of Puerto Rico. Lesson plans cover the basic principles of nutrition, food handling, and food preparation for adolescents. The following units are presented…

  17. "Les Gosses, Ca Se Leve Tot Le Matin": L'Interpretation Generique du Syntagme Nominal Disloque au Moyen de Ce ou Ca (The Kids, Who Rise So Early in the Morning: The Generic Interpretation of the Dislocation of Noun Syntax by Means of the Pronouns "This" or "That").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlier, Anne

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the grammatical effect of inserting the pronouns, "ce" and "ca" in the position originally occupied by the subject noun. Suggests that this insertion can alter the interpretation of the syntax of the subject noun and explains this problem by discussing the inherent properties of pronouns and the properties resulting from their insertion…

  18. 7 CFR 701.5 - Land eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... caused as a result of a natural disaster that, if not treated, would: (i) Impair or endanger the land... other political subdivisions of a State; (3) Protected by a levee or dike that was not effectively and properly functioning prior to the disaster, or is protected, or intended to be protected, by a levee...

  19. 7 CFR 701.105 - Land eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... natural disaster that, if not treated, would: (i) Impair or endanger the land; (ii) Materially affect the... State; (3) Protected by a levee or dike that was not effectively and properly functioning prior to the disaster, or is protected, or intended to be protected, by a levee or dike not built to U.S. Army Corps...

  20. Laboratory measurements of acoustic, electrical resistivity, and erodibility of soils as a function of compaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catastrophic floods resulting from the failure of dam and levee infrastructures can paralyze the economy and social life of large populations for long periods of time. The United States has over 100,000 miles of levees and the National Inventory of Dams lists approximately 79,000 U.S. dams. The de...

  1. 78 FR 61843 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement: Department of the Army Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ... crossings of the Federal Mississippi River and Tributaries (MR&T) Levee and the future New Orleans to Venice (NOV) Hurricane Protection Levee and could impact the Mississippi River Navigation Channel, Davis Pond... connection between the Mississippi River and the Basin to build, sustain, and maintain land. CPRA...

  2. 78 FR 6814 - Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Sacramento-San Joaquin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Islands and Levees Feasibility Study AGENCY: Department of the... Islands and Levees Feasibility Study (Delta Study). The EIS will be prepared in accordance with the... agency for compliance with NEPA. The Delta Study will evaluate alternatives to meet the study goals...

  3. Geophysical methods for the assessment of earthen dams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dams and levees are an integral part of the fluvial system in watersheds. Their stability is of utmost concern to the Nation and to those directly impacted should failure occur. There are some 88,000 dams and 110,000 miles of levees in the USA. Many of those are earthen embankments and structures su...

  4. 7. DETAIL OF INTAKE PIER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM EASTERN SACRAMENTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF INTAKE PIER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM EASTERN SACRAMENTO LEVEE. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  5. 5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF INTAKE PIER AND ACCESS BRIDGE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF INTAKE PIER AND ACCESS BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, FROM THE EASTERN LEVEE. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  6. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF INTAKE PIER AND ACCESS BRIDGE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF INTAKE PIER AND ACCESS BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM WESTERN LEVEE OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  7. 27 CFR 9.163 - Salado Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the levee on the east bank of the Delta-Mendota Canal in section 35, T5S, R7E; then (3) Proceed southeast approximately 0.3 miles along the Delta-Mendota Canal levee road to its intersection with...

  8. 27 CFR 9.163 - Salado Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the levee on the east bank of the Delta-Mendota Canal in section 35, T5S, R7E; then (3) Proceed southeast approximately 0.3 miles along the Delta-Mendota Canal levee road to its intersection with...

  9. 27 CFR 9.163 - Salado Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the levee on the east bank of the Delta-Mendota Canal in section 35, T5S, R7E; then (3) Proceed southeast approximately 0.3 miles along the Delta-Mendota Canal levee road to its intersection with...

  10. 27 CFR 9.163 - Salado Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the levee on the east bank of the Delta-Mendota Canal in section 35, T5S, R7E; then (3) Proceed southeast approximately 0.3 miles along the Delta-Mendota Canal levee road to its intersection with...

  11. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the Illinois Central Gulf (I.C.G.) Railroad and the Mississippi River levee system, on the southeast...) Boundary Description. (i) From the starting point generally southward along the Mississippi River levee... one closest to the Mississippi River is the boundary. (ii) From the intersection described...

  12. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Illinois Central Gulf (I.C.G.) Railroad and the Mississippi River levee system, on the southeast...) Boundary Description. (i) From the starting point generally southward along the Mississippi River levee... one closest to the Mississippi River is the boundary. (ii) From the intersection described...

  13. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the Illinois Central Gulf (I.C.G.) Railroad and the Mississippi River levee system, on the southeast...) Boundary Description. (i) From the starting point generally southward along the Mississippi River levee... one closest to the Mississippi River is the boundary. (ii) From the intersection described...

  14. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the Illinois Central Gulf (I.C.G.) Railroad and the Mississippi River levee system, on the southeast...) Boundary Description. (i) From the starting point generally southward along the Mississippi River levee... one closest to the Mississippi River is the boundary. (ii) From the intersection described...

  15. 33 CFR 208.10 - Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the levee which might affect the stability of the levee section; (iii) No seepage, saturated areas, or... sand boils or unusual wetness of the landward slope and to be certain that: (i) There are no... are occurring; (ii) No undue settlement has occurred which affects the stability of the wall or...

  16. 33 CFR 208.10 - Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the levee which might affect the stability of the levee section; (iii) No seepage, saturated areas, or... sand boils or unusual wetness of the landward slope and to be certain that: (i) There are no... are occurring; (ii) No undue settlement has occurred which affects the stability of the wall or...

  17. 33 CFR 208.10 - Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the levee which might affect the stability of the levee section; (iii) No seepage, saturated areas, or... sand boils or unusual wetness of the landward slope and to be certain that: (i) There are no... are occurring; (ii) No undue settlement has occurred which affects the stability of the wall or...

  18. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  19. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  20. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  1. Cyclic sediment deposition within Amazon deep-sea fan

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, P.L.; Flood, R.D.

    1988-08-01

    The Upper and middle Amazon Fan has grown in a cyclic fashion. An individual deposition cycle consists of (1) a widespread basal, acoustically transparent seismic unit (interpreted as debris-flow deposits) that fills and levels preexisting topographic lows, and (2) a levee complex built of overlapping channel-levee systems. Two and possibly three cycles have been identified within the Amazon Fan. The levee complex beneath one debris flow originated from a different submarine canyon than did the levee complex above the debris flow, suggesting that these levee complexes formed during different sea level lowstands. Calculations based on present sediment discharge of the Amazon River suggest that an entire levee complex can form within the time span of a single glacial stage, such as the Wisconsin; however, the levee complex probably could not have formed during the relatively short time interval when sea level rose rapidly at the end of a glacial stage. The basal seismic units (debris-flow deposits) may have been deposited at any time during sea level fluctuations. Although seismic evidence suggests that this cyclic sedimentation pattern may be related to glacio-eustatic sea level variations, cyclic fan growth may be attributed to other processes as well. For example, a bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) observed within the upper fan appears to be a gas hydrate. Migration of the hydrate phase boundary during sea level fluctuations and diapiric activity may be mechanisms for initiating widespread debris flows. 10 figs.

  2. Comparison of shallow-water and marsh-surface habitats associated with pipeline canals and natural channels in Louisiana salt marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozas, L.P.

    1992-11-01

    The primary objective of the study was to assess the effects of pipeline canals on the habitat function of inside-levee marshes. The degree to which inside-levee marshes function as nursery habitat for nekton residing in canals was examined by comparing densities of nekton on marshes adjacent to pipeline canals (inside-levee marshes) and natural tidal creeks. In addition, shallow subtidal habitats in the two environments (canals and natural channels) were compared by sampling nekton along the marsh edge at low tide and measuring predator encounter rates in both habitats.

  3. 76. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1860. #22358.) UPPER LEVEE FROM CHESTNUT STREET, 1860 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  4. 77. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1859. #377. Photographer: Illingworth.) LOWER LEVEE FROM JACKSON STREET, 1859 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  5. Case study of slope failures at Spilmans Island

    SciTech Connect

    Kayyal, M.K.; Hasen, M.

    1998-11-01

    This paper presents a case study for a dredge disposal site called Spilmans Island, located along the Houston-Galveston Ship Channel, east of Houston. Initially classified as a sand bar in the San Jacinto River, Spilmans Island evolved in recent years with the construction of perimeter levees to contain the flow of materials produced from dredging operations. These levees were often constructed on soft dredged sediments, and as the levees were raised, occasionally slope failures occurred. The objectives of this paper are to illustrate the importance of reconstructing the history of a site as a basis for geotechnical analyses, and to demonstrate the significance of keeping accurate records of past investigations, construction activities, slope failures and subsequent remedial measures. The results of the geotechnical investigation described in this paper offer a clear example of how such data can be used to provide reliable predictions on the stability conditions of raised levees.

  6. The Ebro Deep-Sea Fan system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.; Maldonado, A.; Coumes, F.; Got, H.; Manaco, A.

    1984-01-01

    The Ebro Fan System consists of en echelon channel-levee complexes, 50??20 km in area and 200-m thick. A few strong reflectors in a generally transparent seismic facies identify the sand-rich channel floors and levee crests. Numerous continuous acoustic reflectors characterize overbank turbidites and hemipelagites that blanket abandoned channel-levee complexes. The interlobe areas between channel complexes fill with homogeneous mud and sand from mass flow and overbank deposition; these exhibit a transparent seismic character. The steep continental rise and sediment 'drainage' of Valencia Trough at the end of the channel-levee complexes prevent the development of distributary channels and midfan lobe deposits. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  7. Comparing Denitrification Rates and Carbon Sources in Commercial Scale Upflow Denitrification Biological Filters in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerobic biological filtration systems employing nitrifying bacteria to remediate excess ammonia and nitrite concentrations are common components of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). However, significant water exchange may still be necessary to reduce nitrate concentrations to acceptable leve...

  8. Time-Frequency Methods for Structural Health Monitoring †

    PubMed Central

    Pyayt, Alexander L.; Kozionov, Alexey P.; Mokhov, Ilya I.; Lang, Bernhard; Meijer, Robert J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, Valeria V.; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams) using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany) and “strange” behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK) and a Rhine levee (Germany). PMID:24625740

  9. Community implementation dynamics: nutrient management in the New York City and Chesapeake Bay watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation of natural resources has implications for international, national, and local citizens. The creation of natural resource management and conservation strategies can be affected by engagement with local citizens and competing interests between agencies and stakeholders at the varying leve...

  10. 76 FR 29215 - Notice of Intent To Prepare Draft Environmental Impact Statements/Environmental Impact Reports...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... of the two project areas can be viewed at the SBFCA Web site at: http://www.sutterbutteflood.org... underseepage. The risk of levee failure coupled with the consequence of deep flooding presents a threat...

  11. Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  12. CITIZENS WATER QUALITY MONITORING & MARINE HABITAT ENHANCEMENT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plant 9,000 marsh grass plants along Bayou Lafourches banks, the regions hurricane protection levees, and the marshlands surrounding Bayou Lafourche, thereby enhancing coastal areas and marine habitat. These plantings will be designed to simultaneously raise community awareness ...

  13. EPA'S ADAPTIVE CONTROLS SYSTEM RESEARCH PROGRAM FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's control systems research is concentrated in three areas: electric motors, wind turbines, and combustion technologies. n general, these projects are concerned with pollution prevention through enhanced efficiency of operation and pollution control through lower emission leve...

  14. Determination of channel capacity of the Sacramento River between Ordbend and Glenn, Butte and Glenn counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    The adequacy of an 8.5-mi reach of the Sacramento River to carry flood flows is evaluated. The reach studied is in Butte and Glenn Counties, California, and extends northward from the present east-bank Sacramento River Flood Control Project levee near Glenn upstream to the Ord Ferry gaging station near Ordbend. There is a west-bank levee throughout the study reach. Flows analyzed range from 11,500 to 265,000 cfs. Computed water-surface elevations are based on topography obtained during September through November 1974. The present Sacramento River Flood Control Project levees at the downstream end of the study reach near Glenn are designed to contain flows up to 150,000 cfs. Water-surface elevations computed for flows of this magnitude are about 6 to 8 ft below the top of the existing west-bank levee throughout the study reach. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. 29 CFR 776.29 - Instrumentalities and channels of interstate commerce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... navigable channel of the river, since levees, dams, dikes and like structures, which hold back the waters in... improvement of the navigable channel. Thus, it has been held that site clearance work in the construction of...

  16. 9. VIEW OF THE PRESSURE CULVERT STILLING BASIN, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF THE PRESSURE CULVERT STILLING BASIN, LOOKING NORTH. NOTE THE LEVEE TO THE RIGHT. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  17. 76 FR 53423 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... levee improvement along the river corridor and the potential soil borrow sites. In order to implement... well as providing opportunities for ecosystem restoration and public recreation. USACE, acting as...

  18. Time-frequency methods for structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pyayt, Alexander L; Kozionov, Alexey P; Mokhov, Ilya I; Lang, Bernhard; Meijer, Robert J; Krzhizhanovskaya, Valeria V; Sloot, Peter M A

    2014-01-01

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams) using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany) and "strange" behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK) and a Rhine levee (Germany). PMID:24625740

  19. 78 FR 75370 - Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Flood...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ..., published in the Federal Register September 2, 1981, (46 FR 44083); the USIBWC hereby gives notice that the... levees. The wall would be 8 feet tall above the flood plain and require pilings to be driven 40 feet...

  20. 88. (Credit CBF) Twelve Mile Bayou Pumping Station and force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. (Credit CBF) Twelve Mile Bayou Pumping Station and force main for pumping water over levee and into the canal (Blind Bayou), March 1913. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  1. 75 FR 47808 - Alabama Municipal Electric Authority; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... Lock and Dam on the Chattahoochee River in Huston County, near the town of Columbia, Alabama. The... acres of land on the levee section of the Corps' facility, on the Alabama shore, opposite the river...

  2. The impacts of sediment supply, flow hydrology and channel restoration on floodplain sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjankar, R. M.; Yager, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Physical processes and riparian ecosystems on many floodplains around the world have been severely impacted by human activities. For example, an 80 km long reach of the Kootenai River floodplain in Idaho is completely disconnected from the channel because of levee construction and upstream dam operation. River channelization and reductions in flood magnitudes, frequencies and sediment supplies have decreased floodplain sedimentation rates and significantly impeded the regeneration of riparian forests. To better understand historical (prior to the dam and levees) floodplain processes, we constructed a 2D hydrodynamic model that calculates flow, sediment transport and sedimentation rates on a portion of the Kootenai floodplain. We calculated the historical variability in sediment transport and deposition rates using a range of flow magnitudes and sediment supplies. To assess the errors in our calculations, we used a range of sediment transport equations to calculate sediment flux. The predicted sedimentation rates varied with the flood magnitude, sediment supply and spatial position on the floodplain. These simulations also allowed us to compare historical floodplain processes with those could occur after floodplain restoration. One potential restoration scenario includes the intentional breaching of levees to allow floodplain reconnection. The levees currently channelize a 25 year recurrence interval (RI) flood. After the levee breach, a flood with a historical RI of 1.1 years would reconnect the floodplain to the channel. Our results suggest that floodplain processes may be restored through a combination of dam operational changes and levee removal.

  3. Modeling flood dynamics along the superelevated channel belt of the Yellow River over the last 3000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunzhen; Overeem, Irina; Kettner, Albert J.; Gao, Shu; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2015-07-01

    The Yellow River, China, experienced >1000 levee breaches during the last 3000 years. A reduced-complexity model is developed in this study to explore the effects of climate change and human activity on flood levels, levee breaches, and river avulsions. The model integrates yearly morphological change along a channel belt with daily river fluxes and hourly evolution of levee breaches. Model sensitivity analysis reveals that under natural conditions, superelevation of the channel belt dominates flood frequency. When there is significant human-accelerated basin erosion and breach repair, the dominant factors shift to a combination of mean annual precipitation, superelevation, critical shear stress of weak channel banks, and the time interval between breach initiation and its repair. The effect of precipitation on flood frequency is amplified by land use changes in the hinterland, particularly in the erodible Loess Plateau. Uncertainty analysis estimates the most likely values of the dominant factors for six historical periods between 850 B.C. and A.D. 1839, which are used to quantitatively reconstruct flood dynamics. During 850 B.C. to A.D. 1839, when the sediment load increased fourfold, the breach recurrence interval was shortened from more than 500 years to less than 6 years, and the breach outflow rate increased ~27 times. River management practices during A.D. 1579 to A.D. 1839 focused on levees and triggered a severe positive feedback of increased levee heights and flood hazard exacerbation. Raising the levee heights proved to be ineffective for sustainable flood management.

  4. Strategic floodplain reconnection for the Lower Tisza River, Hungary: Opportunities for flood-height reduction and floodplain-wetland reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Ross J.; Swanson, Taylor L.; Remo, Jonathan W. F.; Kiss, Timea

    2015-02-01

    During the late 19th Century, the Tisza River's vast floodplain-wetland system was largely disconnected by levees, facilitating "reclamation" for agriculture and resulting in an estimated loss of over 90% of historical wetlands. While levees have been successful in preventing catastrophic flooding for a century, Lower Tisza flood stage records have been set repeatedly during the last 15 years. The decrease in the Tisza's current floodway carrying capacity has reduced the flood-protection level of the Tisza's aging levee system. Recently in Hungary, "Room for the River" policies have gained more prominence. To explore the possibilities of a room for the river approach along the Lower Tisza, we assess eight potential floodplain-reconnection scenarios between Csongrád, Hungary and the Hungary-Serbia border. A novel framework using hydrodynamic and geospatial modeling was used to perform planning-level evaluations of the tradeoffs between floodplain-reconnection scenarios and enhancement of the existing levee system. The scenarios evaluated include levee removal and levee setbacks to strategically reconnect significant historical wetlands while reducing flood levels. Scenario costs and human population impacts are also assessed. Impacts of reconnecting the Lower Tisza floodplain are compared to heightening levees, the prevailing strategy over the previous century. From a purely construction-cost perspective, heightening Lower Tisza levees is potentially the most cost-effective and politically expedient solution (i.e., impacts the least number of people). However, levee-heightening does not solve the long-term problem of reduced flood conveyance, which has been attributed to aggradation and increased floodplain roughness, nor does it result in wetland reconnection or enhancement of other floodplain ecosystem services. The suite of reconnection options we evaluate provides engineers, planners, and decision makers a framework from which they can further evaluate

  5. Historical Channel Change on the Upper Gila River, Arizona and New Mexico in Response to Anthropogenic Modifications and Extreme Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawon, J. E.; Levish, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    Over the past century, the majority of alluvial reaches along the upper Gila River in Arizona and New Mexico have been leveed in an attempt to protect adjacent property from flood damage. In addition, the demand for irrigation has prompted the construction of diversion dams in these alluvial reaches to divert water for agriculture. Detailed geomorphic mapping and investigation of historical channel change along the upper Gila River reveals that many channel modifications are catalysts for major channel change and can result in catastrophic property loss rather than safeguarding valuable farmland. Channel widths were measured every kilometer for approximately 160 km from Safford Valley, Arizona through Cliff-Gila Valley, New Mexico for eight decades to develop a quantitative analysis of channel change. An overall pattern of channel narrowing and widening coincides with periods of few large floods and periods of multiple large floods, respectively. Furthermore, reaches along the upper Gila River with greater channel modifications have experienced more variation in channel width than reaches with fewer modifications. Although the average width of the upper Gila River is very similar to the width of the 1935 channel, the lateral position of the channel is very different in many reaches. Many channel changes in recent decades are unprecedented in previous historical aerial photography and reveal that the upper Gila River is currently eroding stream banks that are several hundred years to thousands of years old. These changes are consistently associated with artificial channel constrictions, such as levees, bank protection, and bridges, that have been built and rebuilt following large floods and that have accelerated natural channel narrowing during periods of few large floods. Examples of geomorphic responses due to channel modifications along the upper Gila River include lateral erosion upstream of levees and diversion dams, redirection of flow over diversion dams into

  6. Post-Katrina Fecal Contamination in Violet Marsh near New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Furey, John S.; Fredrickson, Herbert; Foote, Chris; Richmond, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Fecal material entrained in New Orleans flood waters was pumped into the local environment. Violet Marsh received water pumped from St. Bernard Parish and the Lower Ninth Ward. Sediment core samples were collected from canals conducting water from these areas to pump stations and from locations within Violet Marsh. Viable indicator bacteria and fecal sterols were used to assess the levels of fecal material in sediment deposited after the levee failures and deeper sediments deposited before. Most of the cores had fecal coliform levels that exceed the biosolids criterion. All of the cores had fecal sterols that exceeded the suggested environmental quality criterion. Our data show both a long history of fecal contamination in Violet Marsh and an increase in fecal loading corresponding to the failure of the levee system. The work was performed as part of the Interagency Performance Evaluation Task Force investigation into the consequences of the failures of the New Orleans levee system. PMID:17617670

  7. Effects of the curvature of a lava channel on flow dynamics and crust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerio, Antonella; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2011-11-01

    Bends in lava channels are often observed in volcanic fields. The curvature of a channel affects flow dynamics and surface morphology and may be a trigger for the formation of lava tube. We propose a model to describe the effects of curvature on velocity, shear stress and the formation of crust at the flow surface. Lava is described as a Newtonian, homogeneous, isotropic and incompressible fluid. The steady-state solution of the Navier-Stokes equation is found for a unidirectional flow, in cylindrical coordinates. The flow levees are described as arcs of concentric circumferences, with their centres in the origin of the coordinate system. Under the assumption that the gravity force has no radial component, in the bend the fluid moves parallel to the levees. The velocity is assumed to depend on the radial coordinate only. As an effect of curvature, velocity and shear stress are asymmetric with respect to the centre of the channel. The maximum of surface velocity is shifted toward the internal levee, and the shear stress has larger values close to the internal levee. This effect is greater for wider channels. Heat radiation and convection into the atmosphere are considered as the main cooling mechanisms and the temperature distribution along the channel is calculated. Crust formation at the flow surface is considered under the assumption that solid lava is a plastic body. The amount of crust coverage is mainly controlled by the channel width: narrow channels have a greater coverage than wide channels for a given radius of curvature. The effect of a bend is to favour the crust growth toward the internal levee, while the crust coverage toward the external levee decreases. The presence of a bend in a lava channel may favour the formation of a lava tube. The analytical solution will serve as a benchmark for numerical models. Understanding the mechanism of formation of lava tubes is crucial to the simulation of actual lava flows and to evaluation of the associated hazard.

  8. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Buras, Louisiana (New Orleans to Venice, Louisiana, Hurricane Protection Project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold A.

    1977-01-01

    Eight core-material-sampling sites were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as possible borrow areas for fill material to be used in levee contruction near Buras, La. Eleven receiving-water sites also were selected to represent the water that will contact the porposed levees. Analyses of selected nutrients, metals, pesticides, and other organic constitutents were performed upon these bed-material and native-water samples as well as upon elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Galliano, Louisiana: Larose to Golden Meadow, Louisiana, Hurricane Protection Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold L.

    1977-01-01

    Seven core-material-sampling sites were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as possible borrow areas for fill material to be used in levee construction near Galliano La. Four receiving-water sites also were selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed levees. Analyses of selected nutrients, metals, pesticides, and other organic constituents were performed upon these bed-material and native-water samples as well as upon elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Architecture and depositional pattern of the Bengal Fan with respect to shelf distance imaged with high-resolution seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, T.; Spiess, V.; Breitzke, M.; Huebscher, C.

    2003-04-01

    Large submarine fans were recently the target of investigations to evaluate both, their hydrocarbon reservoir potential and their potential as recorder of long- and short-term climatic changes. For both objectives a detailed knowledge of the specific architectural elements is required. The Bengal Fan (the largest submarine fan on Earth) covers the whole Bay of Bengal and is fed by the Ganges and Brahmaputra river sediments, which derived from the drainage of the Himalayan. The amount and nature of these river sediments reacts to tectonic and climatic changes on land, making the Bengal Fan a suitable study area for the link of land and marine processes. The sediments reach the deep sea through a canyon deeply incised into the shelf, also acting as temporary trap. Turbidity currents transport the sediments episodically from the canyon onto the fan, building successively a stack of channel-levee systems, with only one active channel at a time though. In 1997 during R/V Sonne Cruise SO 125 to the Bay of Bengal, the morphology and structure of the Bengal Fan were studied with high-resolution seismics. On four long W-E latitudinal transects at 17°, 14°, 11° and 8°N, the southernmost crossing DSDP Site 218, seismic data were collected to characterise the distribution and character of fan deposits as a function of distance to the shelf. Here we present GI Gun data (100-500 Hz) from these transects to discuss the vertical sequence of architectural elements in occurrence, size and shape as well as downfan changes. Basically, the Bengal Fan consists of numerous channel-levee systems intercalated by High Amplitude Reflector Packets (HARPS). Whereas the channel-levee systems were building up by channelized turbidity currents, the HARPS are deposited by unchannelized turbidity currents, either as a result of levee avulsions or as a result of terminating channel-levee systems. Large mass-flow deposits as slumps or debris flows could not be identified. In particular, the

  11. Channel systems and lobe construction in the Mississippi Fan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, L. E.; Kenyon, Neil H.; Bouma, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Morphological features on the Mississippi Fan in the eastern Gulf of Mexico were mapped using GLORIA II, a long-range side-scan sonar system. Prominent is a sinuous channel flanked by well-developed levees and occasional crevasse splays. The channel follows the axis and thickest part of the youngest fan lobe; seismic-reflection profiles offer evidence that its course has remained essentially constant throughout lobe development. Local modification and possible erosion of levees by currents indicates a present state of inactivity. Superficial sliding has affected part of the fan lobe, but does not appear to have been a factor in lobe construction. ?? 1982 A. M. Dowden, Inc.

  12. Sedimentation, accretion, and subsidence in marshes of Barataria Basin, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, R.S.; DeLaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr.

    1983-05-01

    Vertical accretion and sediment accumulation rates were determined from the distribution of /sup 137/Cs in cores collected from fresh water, intermediate, brackish, and salt marshes in the Barataria Basin, Louisiana. Vertical accretion rates vary from about 1.3 cm.yr/sup -1/ in levee areas to 0.7 in backmarshes. Mineral sediment content of the marsh soil profile decreased with distance from the coast. Except in natural levee areas, marsh accretion rates are less than subsidence measured by water level data, however this alone cannot account for observed land-loss patterns in the basin area.

  13. Morphology of the Ebro fan valleys from SeaMARC and sea beam profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alonso, B.; Kastens, K.A.; Maldonado, A.; Malinverno, A.; Nelson, C.H.; O'Connell, S.; Palanques, A.; Ryan, William B. F.

    1985-01-01

    The northern continental slope off the Ebro Delta has a badland topography indicating major slope erosion and mass movement of material that deposits sediment into a ponded lobe. The southern slope has a low degree of mass movement activity and slope valleys feed channel levee-complexes on a steep continental rise. The last active fan valley is V-shaped with little meandering and its thalweg merges downstream with the Valencia Valley. The older and larger inactive channel-levee complex is smoother, U-shaped, and meanders more than the active fan valley. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  14. 75. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, ca. 1870s. #22006. Photographer: Illingworth.) VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, SHOWING THE UPPER LEVEE AND BLUSS (on left) TO WHICH THE HIGH BRIDGE WAS BUILT - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  15. INTRASPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN GROWTH AND YIELD OF SOYBEAN EXPOSED TO ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION UNDER GREENHOUSE AND FIELD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty-three soybean cultivars were grown in a greenhouse under a daily dose of either 0 or10.1 kJ/sq m biologically effective ultraviolet-B (UV-BsubBE) radiation until reproductive maturity. Of these, six selected cultivars were also grown in the field with similar enhanced leve...

  16. Photosynthetic water use efficiency and biomass of Sorghastrum nutans (C4) and Solidago canadensis (C3) in three soils along a CO2 concentration gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water use efficiency (WUE) of leaf photosynthetic carbon uptake is a key regulator of plant production in grasslands. However WUE may differ with soil type because of differences in soil moisture retention and plant uptake efficiency. We measured soil water content (SWC, 0-30 cm, %), leaf-leve...

  17. Internal geometry, seismic facies, and petroleum potential of canyons and inner fan channels of the Indus submarine fan

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, T.R.; Webb, J.E.

    1986-02-01

    The Indus Fan, the second largest submarine fan in the world, covers 1,250,000 km/sup 2/ (500,000 mi/sup 2/) and contains sediment more than 7 km (23,000 ft) thick. Multichannel (24-fold) CDP seismic data provide the bases for evaluating the Indus Fan and consist of four seismic facies. Of these, only the high-amplitude, discontinuous (H-D) facies is thought to contain reservoir-quality sandstones. The H-D facies is confined to the axes of leveed channels. Canyon-channel systems that fed the fan in the past can be divided into three zones. The degradational zone is composed of an erosional canyon complex filled by prodelta mud. The transitional zone, located near the canyon mouth, consists of superimposed channels that initially were erosional but eventually aggraded and developed levees. The headward termination of the H-D facies occurs in this zone. The aggradational zone consists of superimposed leveed channels confined solely by their own levees. The proximal termination of the H-D facies near canyon mouths implies the presence of reservoir-quality sandstone surrounded by source/seal mudstone in the transitional zone. This stratigraphic trapping geometry and structural leads may represent a vast, untapped petroleum province.

  18. Leading in the Worst of Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Cynthia B.; Taylor, Denny

    2006-01-01

    On Monday, August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina and the floodwaters from the breeched levees destroyed all 14 schools in Louisiana's St. Bernard Parish. Although most residents had been evacuated before the hurricane hit, 1,500 men, women, and children rode out the storm in Chalmette High School. The district superintendent and the school leadership…

  19. Single Aflatoxin Contaminated Corn Kernel Analysis with Fluorescence Hyperspectral Image

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, among others. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin leve...

  20. Hyperspectral image classification and development of fluorescence index for single corn kernels infected with Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites predominantly produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin leve...

  1. Delta Subsidence in California: The Sinking Heart of the State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Ikehara, M.E.; Galloway, D.L.; Jones, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta of California once was a great tidal freshwater marsh blanketed by peat and peaty alluvium. Beginning in the late 1800s, levees were built along the stream channels, and the land thus protected from flooding was drained, cleared, and planted. Although the Delta is now an exceptionally rich agricultural area (over a $500 million crop value in 1993), its unique value is as a source of freshwater for the rest of the State. It is the heart of a massive north-to-south waterdelivery system. Much of this water is pumped southward for use in the San Joaquin Valley and elsewhere in central and southern California. The leveed tracts and islands help to protect water-export facilities in the southern Delta from saltwater intrusion by displacing water and maintaining favorable freshwater gradients. However, ongoing subsidence behind the levees reduces levee stability and, thus, threatens to degrade water quality in the massive north-to-south water-transfer system.

  2. Hard Incongruence Between ITS and Plastid Phylogenetic Trees in Amaryllidaceae Tribe Hippeastreae (Asparagales)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amaryllidaceae tribe Hippeastreae constitutes a horticulturally valuable group of American endemics, characterized by disploidy and polyploidy (x = 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; 2n = 10-150). It is a clade putatively descended (in part) from an ancient hybridization event. Its taxonomy at the generic leve...

  3. Public Opinion on Long Island about the Vietnam War: A School Year Project Using Local Sources and Perspectives in the Classroom and in Student Research Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlett, Charles

    2004-01-01

    A school-year research experiment using primary resources to teach an important national issue--protest movements against the Vietnam War at the local level--is an excellent way to motivate students and energize classroom teaching. Every local community in America has its own story to tell about the war in Vietnam. Whether it is about a local son…

  4. In utero glucocorticoid (GLC) exposure and maternal undernutrition reduce fetal skeletal muscle mass by different mechanisms in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both maternal undernutrition and exposure of the fetus to above normal levels of GLC impair skeletal muscle growth. The degree to which the effects of maternal undernutrition on fetal skeletal muscle growth are a direct result of nutrient deficit or secondary to the presence of above normal GLC leve...

  5. Making Ethnic Citizens: The Politics and Practice of Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Graham K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the politics and practice of education in Malaysia within the context of ethnicity and nation building. Public education in Malaysia--particularly, but not exclusively, at the pre-university level--is promoted as a nation-building tool, seeking to inculcate a sense of Malaysian-ness and patriotism. Simultaneously, however,…

  6. Three dimensional numerical modeling of flow and pollutant transport in a flooding area of 2008 US Midwest Flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents the development and application of a three-dimensional numerical model for simulating the flow field and pollutant transport in a flood zone near the confluence of the Mississippi River and Iowa River in Oakville, Iowa. Due to a levee breaching along the Iowa River during the US ...

  7. Mathematical modeling of flooding due to river bank failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Carniello, Luca; Defina, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Modeling of flooding events resulting from bank overflooding and levee breaching is of relevant social and environmental interest. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic models integrating the shallow water equations turn out to be very effective tools for the purpose at hand. Many of the available models also use 1D channel elements, fully coupled to the 2D model, to simulate the flow of small channels dissecting the urban and rural areas, and 1D elements, referred to as 1D-links, to efficiently model the flow over levees, road and rail embankments, bunds, the flow through control gates, either free or submerged, and the operation of other hydraulic structures. In this work we propose a physically-based 1D-link to model breach formation and evolution in fluvial levees, and levee failure due to either piping or overtopping. The proposed 1D-link is then embedded in a 1D-2D hydrodynamic model, thus accounting for critical feedbacks between breach formation and changes in the hydrodynamic flow field. The breach model also includes the possibility of simulating breach closure, an important feature particularly in the view of hydraulic risk assessment and management of the emergency. The model is applied to five different case studies and the results of the numerical simulations compare favorably with field observations displaying a good agreement in terms of urban and rural flooded areas, water levels within the channel, final breach widths, and water volumes flowed through the breach.

  8. Simulated response and effects to oil exposure in an estuarine fish species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental toxicity data alone lack ecological relevance to assess more realistic situations, such as variable exposure to a contaminant and long-term impact. Evaluating the implications of sublethal effects or behavioral response to exposure requires long-term, population-leve...

  9. Geotechnical reconnaissance of the Mississippi River Delta flood-protection system after Hurricane Katrina: Chapter 3C in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luna, Ronaldo; Summers, David; Hoffman, David; Rogers, J. David; Sevi, Adam; Witt, Emitt C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the post-Hurricane Katrina conditions of the flood-protection system of levees and floodwalls that failed in the environs of the Mississippi River Delta and New Orleans, La. Damage conditions and suggested mechanisms of failure are presented from the geotechnical point of view.

  10. Cigarrillos de mentol | Smokefree Español

    Cancer.gov

    ¿Qué es el mentol? El mentol es una sustancia encontrada naturalmente en las plantas de menta, tales como la menta fresca y la hierbabuena. Deja una sensación refrescante y se usa frecuentemente para aliviar el dolor y la irritación leve, y para prevenir infecciones [1].

  11. 76 FR 35104 - Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Atchafalaya River From Mile Marker 117 (Morgan City Railroad...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone closing the Atchafalaya River to all commercial traffic from MM 117 (Morgan City Railroad Bridge) to MM 0 (Simmesport, LA). This temporary safety zone is needed to protect the general public, vessels and tows from destruction, and the levee system from destruction, loss or injury due to hazards associated with rising flood...

  12. Erodibility characteristics of embankment materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erosion is one of the least reliably defined elements of many hydraulic projects. Earthen embankments (i.e. dams and levees) are an example of hydraulic projects in which erosion and material erodibility have not been reliably defined in the past. Recent as well as past embankment failures have he...

  13. Coherence of erodibility for erosion processes and different scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erosion is one of the least reliably defined elements of many hydraulic projects. Earthen embankments (i.e. dams and levees) are an example of hydraulic projects for which erosion and erodibility have not been reliably defined in the past. Characterizing material erodibility is one of the essentia...

  14. Physiological effects of Meloidogyne incognita infection on cotton genotypes with differing levels of resistance in the greenhouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse tests were conducted to evaluate 1) the effect of Meloidogyne incognita infection in cotton on plant growth and physiology including the height-to-node ratio, chlorophyll content, dark adapted quantum yield of photosystem II, and leaf area, and 2) the extent to which moderate or high leve...

  15. Nocturnal intermittency in surface CO2 concentrations in sub-Saharan Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data obtained over four adjacent fields of differing management practices in Zimbabwe illustrate the role of atmospheric intermittency as a mechanism for transferring CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere above. At night, limited atmospheric mixing permits CO2 concentrations to increase to leve...

  16. Creating a disease risk map for West Nile virus for surveillance in Central Texas using a Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following the discovery of the West Nile virus (WNv) in Brazos County, TX in 2002, mosquito research personnel at Texas A&M University established a routine WNv mosquito vector surveillance program in the county. In 2004, a map of Brazos County was created depicting areas that had a heightened leve...

  17. Connecting the Disconnected: Scholar Activists and Education Reform in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniella Ann

    2014-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans on August 29, 2005, the failure of the levees resulted in the largest single human-made disaster in the United States. In addition to the physical devastation of the city, the landscape of public schools in New Orleans was permanently altered, as was the national dialogue about school reform in the…

  18. Lessons: Katrina and Beginning Anew

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirylo, James D.

    2005-01-01

    New Orleans, fondly known in better days for its spectacular cuisine, cool jazz, and good times, was the leading story on television news broadcasts the world over when a massive hurricane came. As Katrina took its destructive path, culminating in the devastating rupture of ill-prepared levee systems, the world was riveted by stories about the…

  19. From Classroom to Gallery: Building Community and Preserving Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Kate

    2012-01-01

    When the levees broke during Hurricane Katrina in 2005, eighty percent of New Orleans flooded, and the citizens who returned to the evacuated city had to rebuild their homes, cultural institutions, and school system. This article records how The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, University of New Orleans, was able to collaborate with a charter school…

  20. Revisiting the Gulf Coast after Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In August 2005, the world witnessed one of the most destructive natural disasters on America's mainland. Hurricane Katrina, followed a month later by Hurricane Rita, brought more than broken levees, flooded streets and homes, and destroyed businesses. It caused changes in the dynamics and the demographic and cultural makeup of the region. One of…

  1. Good News for New Orleans: Early Evidence Shows Reforms Lifting Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    What happened to the New Orleans public schools following the tragic levee breeches after Hurricane Katrina is truly unprecedented. Within the span of one year, all public-school employees were fired, the teacher contract expired and was not replaced, and most attendance zones were eliminated. The state took control of almost all public schools…

  2. Predicting wind-driven waves in small reservoirs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The earthen levees commonly used for irrigation reservoirs are subjected to significant embankment erosion due to wind-generated waves. The design of bank protection measures relies on adequate prediction of wave characteristics based on wind conditions and fetch length. Current formulations are ba...

  3. EFFICIENCY OF INDIRECT SELECTION FOR DRY MATTER YIELD BASED ON FRESH MATTER YIELD IN LOLIUM PERENNE L. SWARD PLOTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage dry matter yield (DMY) is a high-priority trait in breeding perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). However, determining dry matter concentration is highly labor intensive. Indirect selection based on fresh matter yield (FMY) would be easier, quicker and less expensive and, for a similar leve...

  4. EPIC and APEX: Model use, calibration, and validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) and Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender (APEX) models have been developed to assess a wide variety of agricultural water resource, water quality, and other environmental problems. The EPIC model is designed to be applied at a field-scale leve...

  5. The Occurrence of Mycotoxins in Corn (Maize) Plant Debris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus and Fusarium spp. when present in corn, can cause serious toxicological problems in animals and humans. Little is known about their occurrence in crop residue post-harvest. This study determined naturally occurring aflatoxin, fumonisin, and zearalenone (F-2) leve...

  6. 14. PROJECT PLAN, INTAKE PIER, RAW WATER CONDUITS, PUMPING STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. PROJECT PLAN, INTAKE PIER, RAW WATER CONDUITS, PUMPING STATION FORCE MAINS, TREATED WATER PIPELINES, AND FILTRATION PLANT, SHEET 1 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  7. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF INTAKE PIER AND ACCESS BRIDGE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF INTAKE PIER AND ACCESS BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTH. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. 16. INTAKE PIER, PLANS ELEVATIONS, AND SECTIONS, SHEETS 5 OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTAKE PIER, PLANS ELEVATIONS, AND SECTIONS, SHEETS 5 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  9. 76 FR 79209 - Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for the Shasta Crayfish in Cassel, Shasta County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... occur in the future during routine maintenance of a water intake pipe on the south side of the pond... applicable legal requirements, and consistent with the Service's Safe Harbor Policy (64 FR 32717), the... flow. The water from the spring is ponded by a levee that was originally built in the early...

  10. 18. INTAKE PIER, BRIDGE DETAILS, SHEET 9 OF 117, 1920. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTAKE PIER, BRIDGE DETAILS, SHEET 9 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA