Sample records for condition limits oral

  1. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

  6. Review of feline oral disease : 2. Other common conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Southerden

    2010-01-01

    Feline oral disease, comprising a range of dental and oral conditions, is frequently seen in general practice but is often underdiagnosed. An article in the January issue (In Practice, volume 32, pp 2–7) discussed the management of periodontitis and feline chronic gingivostomatitis. This article outlines the diagnosis and treatment options for a number of other common oral conditions occurring in

  7. Oral Conditions Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Mahboobi, Nastaran; Mahboobi, Nima; Karayiannis, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in more than 170 million chronically infected patients with no developed preventive vaccine is a globally important issue. In addition to expected hepatic manifestations, a number of extrahepatic manifestations, such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, glomerulonephritis, polyarteritis nodosa, rashes, renal disease, neuropathy, and lymphoma, have been reported following HCV infection, which are believed to be influenced by the virus or the host immune response. HCV combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin might be associated with side effects as well. The association of HCV with special oral conditions has also been reported recurrently; the mechanism of most of which remains unclear. This article reviews the association of HCV infection with some of the oral conditions such as oral health, Sjogren's syndrome, lichen planus and oral cancer. PMID:24195977

  8. Global Burden of Oral Conditions in 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Marcenes, W.; Kassebaum, N.J.; Bernabé, E.; Flaxman, A.; Naghavi, M.; Lopez, A.; Murray, C.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 Study produced comparable estimates of the burden of 291 diseases and injuries in 1990, 2005, and 2010. This article reports on the global burden of untreated caries, severe periodontitis, and severe tooth loss in 2010 and compares those figures with new estimates for 1990. We used disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs) metrics to quantify burden. Oral conditions affected 3.9 billion people, and untreated caries in permanent teeth was the most prevalent condition evaluated for the entire GBD 2010 Study (global prevalence of 35% for all ages combined). Oral conditions combined accounted for 15 million DALYs globally (1.9% of all YLDs; 0.6% of all DALYs), implying an average health loss of 224 years per 100,000 population. DALYs due to oral conditions increased 20.8% between 1990 and 2010, mainly due to population growth and aging. While DALYs due to severe periodontitis and untreated caries increased, those due to severe tooth loss decreased. DALYs differed by age groups and regions, but not by genders. The findings highlight the challenge in responding to the diversity of urgent oral health needs worldwide, particularly in developing communities. PMID:23720570

  9. Influence of combined oral contraceptives on the periodontal condition

    PubMed Central

    DOMINGUES, Roberta Santos; FERRAZ, Bruna Fidêncio Rahal; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; PASSANEZI, Euloir; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Most studies investigating the impact of oral contraceptives have been performed some years ago, when the level of sexual hormones was greater than the actual formulations. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of current combined oral contraceptives (COC) on periodontal tissues, correlating the clinical parameters examined with the total duration of continuous oral contraceptive intake. Material and methods Twenty-five women (19-35 years old) taking combined oral contraceptives for at least 1 year were included in the test group. The control group was composed by 25 patients at the same age range reporting no use of hormone-based contraceptive methods. Clinical parameters investigated included pocket probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcular bleeding index (SBI) and plaque index (Pl.I). Data were statistically evaluated by unpaired t test, Pearson's correlation test and Spearman's correlation test. Results The test group showed increased PD (2.228±0.011 x 2.154±0.012; p<0.0001) and SBI (0.229±0.006 x 0.148±0.005, p<0.0001) than controls. No significant differences between groups were found in CAL (0.435±0.01 x 0.412±0.01; p=0.11). The control group showed greater Pl.I than the test group (0.206±0.007 x 0.303±0.008; p<0.0001). No correlation between the duration of oral contraceptive intake, age and periodontal parameters was observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that the use of currently available combined oral contraceptives can influence the periodontal conditions of the patients, independently of the level of plaque accumulation or total duration of medication intake, resulting in increased gingival inflammation. PMID:22666846

  10. Bond Strengthening in Oral Bacterial Adhesion to Salivary Conditioning Films?

    PubMed Central

    van der Mei, Henny C.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; de Vries, Joop; Busscher, Henk J.

    2008-01-01

    Transition from reversible to irreversible bacterial adhesion is a highly relevant but poorly understood step in initial biofilm formation. We hypothesize that in oral biofilm formation, irreversible adhesion is caused by bond strengthening due to specific bacterial interactions with salivary conditioning films. Here, we compared the initial adhesion of six oral bacterial strains to salivary conditioning films with their adhesion to a bovine serum albumin (BSA) coating and related their adhesion to the strengthening of the binding forces measured with bacteria-coated atomic force microscopy cantilevers. All strains adhered in higher numbers to salivary conditioning films than to BSA coatings, and specific bacterial interactions with salivary conditioning films were accompanied by stronger initial adhesion forces. Bond strengthening occurred on a time scale of several tens of seconds and was slower for actinomyces than for streptococci. Nonspecific interactions between bacteria and BSA coatings strengthened twofold faster than their specific interactions with salivary conditioning films, likely because specific interactions require a closer approach of interacting surfaces with the removal of interfacial water and a more extensive rearrangement of surface structures. After bond strengthening, bacterial adhesion forces with a salivary conditioning film remained stronger than those with BSA coatings. PMID:18641154

  11. The effects of airborne fluorides on oral conditions in Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Haikel, Y.; Cahen, P.M.; Turlot, J.C.; Frank, R.M. (Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France))

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of dental caries and dental fluorosis, as well as various other oral conditions, in 2378 subjects (ages seven to 60) living in the fluoridated area of Khouribga and the non-fluoridated area of Beni Mellal, Morocco. The community index of dental fluorosis (CFI) ranged from 1.99 to 2.80 in the high-fluoride area: Over 90% of the population was affected, and more than one-third of the subjects showed moderate dental fluorosis. However, in Beni Mellal, more than 96% of the dentate subjects examined were free of dental fluorosis, and the CFI of 0.02 was considered not significant. Significant differences were observed between the two areas with respect to caries prevalence. DMFT and DMFS indices were markedly lower in the fluorosis area of Khouribga. The oral conditions of subjects appeared to be better in Khouribga, where the gingival and calculus indices were significantly lower than in Beni Mellal. The analyses of covariance showed no significant differences in plaque accumulation (PI) between the Khouribga and Beni Mellal samples. However, a close statistical correlation was found between PI and GI in Beni Mellal and Khouribga.

  12. Diagnostic aids for detection of oral precancerous conditions

    PubMed Central

    Messadi, Diana V

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer has a tendency to be detected at late stage which is detrimental to the patients because of its high mortality and morbidity rates. Early detection of oral cancer is therefore important to reduce the burden of this devastating disease. In this review article, the most common oral precancerous lesions are discussed and the importance of early diagnosis is emphasized. In addition, the most common non-invasive oral cancer devices that can aid the general practitioners in early diagnosis are also discussed. PMID:23743617

  13. Relationships between self-rated oral health, subjective symptoms, oral health behavior and clinical conditions in Japanese university students: a cross-sectional survey at Okayama University

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-rated oral health is a valid and useful summary indicator of overall oral health status and quality of life. However, few studies on perception of oral health have been conducted among Japanese young adults. This study investigated whether oral health behavior, subjective oral symptoms, or clinical oral status were associated with self-rated oral health in Japanese young adults. Methods This cross-sectional survey included 2,087 students (1,183 males, 904 females), aged 18 and 19 years, at Okayama University, Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed and an oral examination was performed. Results In a structural equation modeling analysis, the score of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) significantly affected self-rated oral health (p <0.05) and the effect size was highest. Malocclusion, subjective symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and stomatitis, and poor oral health behavior significantly induced self-rated poor oral health with small effect sizes (p <0.05). Clinical periodontal conditions and Oral Hygiene Index-simplified were not related to self-rated oral health. Conclusion Self-rated oral health was influenced by subjective symptoms of TMD and stomatitis, oral health behavior, the score of DMFT, and malocclusion. The evaluation of these parameters may be a useful approach in routine dental examination to improve self-rated oral health in university students. PMID:24195632

  14. [Association between social capital and oral health conditions and behavior].

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabella Azevedo; Goes, Paulo Sávio Angeiras de

    2014-06-01

    The theory of social capital seeks to explain social inequality in health through the interaction of social, economic and environmental factors and has been associated with many health problems, though there is still little research in the area of oral health. The scope of this study was to evaluate the association between social capital and socio-demographic and behavioral factors related to oral health among schoolchildren aged from 15 to 19. A random sample of 1,417 adolescents filled out a self-administered survey and the data were descriptively analyzed (simple frequencies, central tendency and variability measurement) and inferential statistics (Pearson's chi-square test). The results showed that the social capital which is more prevalent among adolescents was intermediate level, as well as between each of its dimensions, except for social action where the majority were classified as lower-leveled. Among the variables analyzed, social capital was statistically associated only with sex, with women being more likely to be classified under the 'low social capital' label. This area still needs considerable research to increase theoretical-conceptual and methodological maturity in order to better understand the social contexts that are essential for formulating effective public health policies. PMID:24897493

  15. Oral and Craniofacial Clinical Signs Associated to Genetic Conditions in Human Identification Part I: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Fouad; Aoun, Nicole; el Husseini, Hassan; Jassar, Houssam; Sayah, Fida; Salameh, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Forensic dentistry is one of the most reliable methods used in human identification when other technique as fingerprint, DNA, visual identification cannot be used. Genetic disorders have several manifestations that can target the intra-oral cavity, the cranio-facial area or any location in the human body. Materials and Methods: A literature search of the scientific database (Medline and Science Direct) for the years 1990 to 2014 was carried out to find out all the available papers that indicate oral, cranio-facial signs, genetic and human identification. Results: A table with 10 genetic conditions was described with oral and cranio-facial signs that can help forensic specialist in human identification. Conclusion: This review showed a correlation between genetics, facial and intra-oral signs that would help forensic ondontologist in the identification procedures. PMID:26028912

  16. Limit theorems for conditioned multitype Dawson-Watanabe processes

    E-print Network

    Champagnat, Nicolas - Institut de Mathématiques �lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

    Limit theorems for conditioned multitype Dawson-Watanabe processes and Feller diffusions Nicolas Abstract A multitype Dawson-Watanabe process is conditioned, in subcriti- cal and critical cases, on non-valued branching processes; conditioned Dawson-Watanabe process; critical and subcritical Dawson-Watanabe process

  17. Preoperative application of limited cone beam computerized tomography as an assessment tool before minor oral surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Nakagawa; K. Kobayashi; H. Ishii; A. Mishima; K. Asada; K. Ishibashi

    2002-01-01

    Abstract.We describe the preoperative application of limited cone beam computerized tomography (CT) using a Dental three-dimensional (3D)-CT as an assessment tool before minor oral surgery. The Dental 3D-CT provided 42.7mm-high and 30mm-wide rectangular solid images. This size covered the height of the mandible with standing teeth. Dental 3D-CT clearly demonstrated lesions in the maxillary and mandibular bone. Resorption of the

  18. Oral Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irène Hitz Lindenmüller; J. Thomas Lambrecht

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing\\/recovering from chemo-\\/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases.

  19. PCR Fingerprinting of Candida albicans Associated with Chronic Hyperplastic Candidosis and Other Oral Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KERRY L. BARTIE; DAVID W. WILLIAMS; MELANIE J. WILSON; A. JOHN C. POTTS; MICHAEL A. O. LEWIS

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to genotype strains of Candida albicans to determine whether specific types were associated with chronic hyperplastic candidosis (CHC). A total of 67 candidal isolates from CHC patients (n 17) and from patients with other oral conditions (n 21) were genotyped by PCR fingerprinting employing two interrepeat primer combinations (1245 and 1246 primers or 1251

  20. Limit theorems for conditioned multitype Dawson-Watanabe processes

    E-print Network

    Potsdam, Universität

    Limit theorems for conditioned multitype Dawson-Watanabe processes Nicolas Champagnat Project Palais 10 14469 Potsdam, Germany e-mail : roelly@math.uni-potsdam.de Abstract A multitype Dawson-WORDS: multitype measure-valued branching processes, conditioned Dawson-Watanabe process, critical and subcritical

  1. National Survey of Oral/Dental Conditions Related to Tobacco and Alcohol Use in Mexican Adults

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Ávila-Burgos, Leticia; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases are a major burden on individuals and health systems. The aim of this study was to determine whether consumption of tobacco and alcohol were associated with the prevalence of oral/dental problems in Mexican adults. Using data from the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2003, a cross-sectional study part of the World Health Survey, dental information from a representative sample of Mexico (n = 22,229, N = 51,155,740) was used to document self-reported oral/dental problems in the 12 months prior to the survey. Questionnaires were used to collect information related to sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and other risk factors. Three models were generated for each age group (18–30, 31–45 and 46–98 years). The prevalence of oral/dental conditions was 25.7%. Adjusting for sex, schooling, socioeconomic position, diabetes, and self-reported health, those who used tobacco (sometimes or daily) (OR = 1.15, p = 0.070; OR = 1.24, p < 0.01; and OR = 1.16, p < 0.05, for each age group respectively) or alcohol (moderate or high) (OR = 1.26, p < 0.001; OR = 1.18, p < 0.01 and OR = 1.30, p < 0.001, for each age group respectively) had a higher risk of reporting oral/dental problems. Because tobacco and alcohol use were associated with self-reported oral/dental problems in one out of four adults, it appears advisable to ascertain how direct is such link; more direct effects would lend greater weight to adopting measures to reduce consumption of tobacco and alcohol for the specific purpose of improving oral health. PMID:24642844

  2. Enhancement of oscillatory activity in the endopiriform nucleus of rats raised under abnormal oral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Hasumoto-Honjo, Miho; Sugai, Tokio; Segami, Natsuki; Kato, Nobuo

    2014-02-21

    Endopiriform nucleus (EPN) is located deep to the piriform cortex, and has neural connections with not only neighboring sensory areas but also subcortical areas where emotional and nociceptive information is processed. Well-balanced oral condition might play an important role in stability of brain activities. When the oral condition is impaired, several areas in the brain might be affected. In the present study, we investigated whether abnormal conditions of oral region influence neural activities in the EPN. Orthodontic appliance that generates continuous force and chronic pain-related stress was fixed to maxillary incisors of rats, and raised. Field potential recordings were made from the EPN of brain slices. We previously reported that the EPN has an ability to generate membrane potential oscillation. In the present study, we have applied the same methods to assess activities of neuron clusters in the EPN. In the case of normal rats, stable field potential oscillations were induced in the EPN by application of low-frequency electrical stimulation under the medium with caffeine. In the case of rats with the orthodontic appliance, stable field potential oscillations were also induced, but both duration of oscillatory activities and wavelet number were increased. The enhanced oscillations were depressed by blockade of NMDA receptors. Thus, impairment of oral health under application of continuous orthodontic force and chronic pain-related stress enhanced neural activities in the EPN, in which up-regulation of NMDA receptors may be concerned. These findings suggest that the EPN might be involved in information processing with regard to abnormal conditions of oral region. PMID:24406147

  3. Discrimination of premalignant conditions of oral cancer using Raman spectroscopy of urinary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elumalai, Brindha; Rajasekaran, Ramu; Aruna, Prakasarao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-03-01

    Oral cancers are considered to be one of the most commonly occurring malignancy worldwide. Over 70% of the cases report to the doctor only in advanced stages of the disease, resulting in poor survival rates. Hence it is necessary to detect the disease at the earliest which may increase the five year survival rate up to 90%. Among various optical spectroscopic techniques, Raman spectroscopy has been emerged as a tool in identifying several diseased conditions, including oral cancers. Around 30 - 80% of the malignancies of the oral cavity arise from premalignant lesions. Hence, understanding the molecular/spectral differences at the premalignant stage may help in identifying the cancer at the earliest and increase patient's survival rate. Among various bio-fluids such as blood, urine and saliva, urine is considered as one of the diagnostically potential bio-fluids, as it has many metabolites. The distribution and the physiochemical properties of the urinary metabolites may vary due to the changes associated with the pathologic conditions. The present study is aimed to characterize the urine of 70 healthy subjects and 51 pre-malignant patients using Raman spectroscopy under 785nm excitation, to know the molecular/spectral differences between healthy subjects and premalignant conditions of oral malignancy. Principal component analysis based Linear discriminant analysis were also made to find the statistical significance and the present technique yields the sensitivity and specificity of 86.3% and 92.9% with an overall accuracy of 90.9% in the discrimination of premalignant conditions from healthy subjects urine.

  4. Liquid chromatography of polymers under limiting conditions of desorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marián Šnauko; Dušan Berek

    2005-01-01

    Liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of desorption (LC LCD) is a method which allows molar mass independent elution of various synthetic polymers. A narrow, slowly moving zone of small molecules, which promotes full adsorption of one kind of polymer species within column (an adsorli) acts as an impermeable barrier for the fast moving macromolecules. The latter accumulate on the barrier

  5. Senescence occurs with hTERT repression and limited telomere shortening in human oral keratinocytes cultured with feeder cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mo K; Kameta, Ayako; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Baluda, Marcel A; Park, No-Hee

    2004-06-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and molecular alterations in normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK) during in vitro replication in two different culture conditions. The cells were cultured either in chemically defined Keratinocyte Growth Medium (KGM) without feeder layers or in serum-containing flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) medium with feeder layers. Primary NHOK underwent 22 +/- 3 population doublings (PDs) in KGM and 42 +/- 4 PDs in FAD medium, reflecting 52% increase in replication capacity with feeder layers. In both culture conditions, exponentially replicating NHOK demonstrated telomerase activity and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. Telomerase activity and hTERT expression were rapidly diminished in senescing NHOK, which exhibited small decrease of telomere length for the remaining limited cellular replications until the complete arrest of cell division. However, telomere length in senescent NHOK was 6.7 +/- 0.5 kilobase pairs (kbps), significantly longer than that (5.12 kbps) of senescent human fibroblasts. The onset of senescence was accompanied with marked induction of p16(INK4A), and this occurred in both culture systems using either KGM or FAD medium. These results indicate that replicative senescence of NHOK is associated with loss of telomerase activity followed by limited telomere shortening. PMID:15095283

  6. Oral myiasis.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  7. Homogenization limit of a parabolic equation with nonlinear boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Bendong

    Consider the parabolic equation u=a(u)u+f(u), -10, with nonlinear boundary conditions: u(-1,t)=g(u(-1,t)/?), u(1,t)=-g(u(1,t)/?), where ?>0 is a parameter, g is a function which takes values near its supremum "frequently". Each almost periodic function is a special example of g. We consider a time-global solution u of (E)-(NBC) and show that its homogenization limit as ??0 is the solution ? of (E) with linear boundary conditions: ?(-1,t)=supg, ?(1,t)=-supg, provided ? moves upward monotonically. When g is almost periodic, Lou (preprint) [21] obtained the (unique) almost periodic traveling wave U of (E)-(NBC). This paper proves that the homogenization limit of U is a classical traveling wave of (E)-(LBC).

  8. Oral Direct Renin Inhibition: Premise, Promise, and Potential Limitations of a New Class of Antihypertensive Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Moiz M.; Menon, Dileep V.; Victor, Ronald G.

    2008-01-01

    The first oral direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, recently received approval for the treatment of hypertension. This article addresses the premise, promise, and potential limitations of this new class of renin-angiotensin system inhibitor. While aliskiren adds to a list of > 100 drugs approved for the treatment of hypertension, its introduction into clinical medicine is of particular interest because of the novel mechanism of action— inhibition of renin’s catalytic activity, the most proximal and rate-limiting step in renin-angiotensin system activation. By producing more complete renin-angiotensin system inhibition than with existing agents, direct renin inhibitors may afford greater protection from hypertensive complications. Other potential advantages include additional blood pressure reduction when used in combination therapy, a placebo-like side-effect profile, avid renal concentration, and long duration of action. Potential limitations include modest levels of blood pressure reduction that are equivalent to but not greater than angiotensin receptor blockers, reduced gastrointestinal absorption with a high fat meal, and large reactive increases in renin secretion—the functional importance of which is under intense investigation. The results of outcomes trials are eagerly awaited. PMID:18374681

  9. Mercury speciation in marine sediments under sulfate-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Han, Seunghee; Narasingarao, Priya; Obraztsova, Anna; Gieskes, Joris; Hartmann, Aaron C; Tebo, Bradley M; Allen, Eric E; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2010-05-15

    Sediment profiles of total mercury (Hg) and monomethylmercury (MMHg) were determined from a 30-m drill hole located north of Venice, Italy. While the sediment profile of total Hg concentration was fairly constant between 1 and 10 m, that of the MMHg concentration showed an unexpected peak at a depth of 6 m. Due to the limited sulfate content (<1 mM) at the depth of 6 m, we hypothesized that the methylation of inorganic Hg(II) at this depth is associated with the syntrophic processes occurring between methanogens and sulfidogens. To test this hypothesis, anoxic sediment slurries were prepared using buried Venice Lagoon sediments amended with HgCl(2), and we monitored MMHg concentration in sediment slurries over time under two geochemical conditions: high sulfate (1-16 mM) and limited sulfate concentrations (<100 microM). After day 52 and onward from the addition of inorganic Hg(II), the MMHg concentrations were higher in sulfate-limited slurries compared to high sulfate slurries, along with methane production in both slurries. On the basis of these results, we argue that active methylation of inorganic Hg(II) occurs under sulfate-limited conditions possibly by syntrophic processes occurring between methanogens and sulfidogens. The environmental significance of syntrophic Hg(II) methylation should be further studied. PMID:20429556

  10. Feasibility and benefits of methanogenesis under oxygen-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zitomer, D.H.; Shrout, J.D. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Methanogenic and aerobic (or microaerophilic) biological processes are often considered mutually exclusive and separated as biological wastewater treatment options. However, under oxygen-limited conditions, both aerobic respiration and methanogenesis can be practically accomplished by a single mixed culture. This paper describes sustained batch culture, oxygen-limited methanogenic serum bottle and bench-scale systems. Serum bottle cultures exhibited methanogenic activity similar to or greater than that of a strictly anaerobic culture maintained in parallel. The COD removal efficiencies of anaerobic, oxygen-limited, and aerobic bench-scale reactors receiving 30,000 mg/l of sucrose were all greater than 93%, a system receiving 1 g O{sub 2}/L{sub R}-day achieved a lower final effluent COD than the strictly anaerobic reactor. After a shock-load of sucrose, the pH recovered in low-aeration batch reactors in 28--34 days, whereas anaerobic pH did not recover after 52 days of observation. In the future, methanogenesis under limited-aeration may be employed as an energy efficient treatment option to achieve low final COD concentrations, minimal biosolids generation, and mineralization of a broad range of specific organic chemicals.

  11. Significant oral graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with the FLU/MEL conditioning regimen

    PubMed Central

    Vokurka, Samuel; Svoboda, Tomas; Karas, Michal; Koza, Vladimir; Jindra, Pavel; Kazakov, Dmitry; Boudova, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Oral graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a significant complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) and there is no consistent information about its characteristics in patients after reduced-intensity conditioning regimen FLU/MEL (fludarabine 120 mg/m2 and melphalan 140mg/m2). Material/Methods This was a single-centre prospective observational study of patients after allogeneic SCT with FLU/MEL conditioning performed during the period 1/2005-12/2007. Characteristics of oral GVHD were observed in 71 patients. The observation was discontinued due to death, donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) or new chemotherapy administration. Results In 10/2010, the median duration of the observation of the cohort of the patients was 13 (0.2–69) months, and 42 (35–69) months in the still-ongoing 20/71 (28%) patients. Oral acute GVHD had sporadic 7% incidence, whereas oral chronic GVHD was observed in 33% of patients and persisted with median duration of 188 (11–665) days. Clinical and histopathological features were similar in both acute and chronic oral GVHD and included mucosal lichenoid changes, erythema, ulcerations and pseudomembranes, satellite necrosis, apoptotic bodies and lichenoid interface inflammation. Conclusions It is necessary to consider complex clinical symptomatology and pathological correlations when classifying the oral GVHD, because local oral symptoms and histopathological features in both acute and chronic oral GVHD forms can be similar. Even though the oral chronic GVHD was mild in the majority of patients, it can be considered as clinically significant due to its incidence, duration and symptomatology. The FLU/MEL conditioning regimen should not be considered as low-risk protocol in this context. PMID:21873943

  12. Variations in the Social Impact of Oral Conditions Among Older Adults in South Australia, Ontario, and North Carolina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Slade; A. J. Spencer; D. Locker; R. J. Hunt; R. P. Strauss; J. D. Beck

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies among older adults have demonstrated that oral disease frequently leads to dysfunction, discomfort, and disability. This study aimed to assess variations in the social impact of oral conditions among six strata of people aged 65 years and older: residents of metropolitan Adelaide and rural Mt Gambier, South Australia; residents of metropolitan Toronto-North York and non-metropolitan Simcoe-Sudbury counties, Ontario,

  13. A double blind, randomised placebo controlled trial of topical 2% viscous lidocaine in improving oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Painful infectious mouth conditions are a common presentation to emergency departments. Although self limiting, painful ulcerative lesions and inflamed mucosa can decrease oral intake and can lead to dehydration. Oral analgesia is of limited efficacy and is often refused by the patient. Despite widespread use of oral 2% viscous lidocaine for many years, there is little evidence for its efficacy as an analgesic and in aiding oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions. This study aims to establish the effectiveness of 2% viscous lidocaine in increasing oral intake in these children by comparing it with placebo. Methods/Design This study is a randomised double-blind placebo controlled trial of children between 6 months and 8 years of age with painful infectious mouth conditions defined as gingivostomatitis (herpetic or non herpetic), ulcerative pharyngitis, herpangina and hand foot and mouth disease as assessed by the treating clinician in association with a history of poor oral fluid intake. It will be conducted at a single tertiary paediatric emergency department in Melbourne Australia. 20 patients have already been randomised to receive 2% lidocaine or placebo in a pilot study to determine the sample size in a preplanned adaptive design. A further 80 patients will be randomised to receive either 2% lidocaine or placebo. The placebo agent is identical to lidocaine in terms of appearance, flavour and smell. All clinical and research staff involved, patients and their parents will be blinded to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint is the amount of fluid ingested by each child, expressed in ml/kg, within 60 minutes from the time of administration of the study mixture. Secondary endpoints are the proportion of patients ingesting 5 ml/kg and 10 ml/kg at 30 and 60 minutes after drug administration and the incidence of adverse events. Longer term outcomes will include the proportion of patients requiring hospital admission and length of emergency department stay. Discussion This trial will define the role of 2% lidocaine in the treatment of painful infectious mouth conditions Trial registration The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12609000566235. PMID:22104033

  14. Bacteriophages Limit the Existence Conditions for Conjugative Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A. Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. PMID:26037122

  15. Oral health conditions and behaviors among hearing impaired and normal hearing college students at Ratchasuda College, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vichayanrat, Tippanart; Kositpumivate, Waritorn

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to explore oral health and oral health related behaviors among hearing impaired and normal hearing students at Rachasuda College. The association between socioeconomic factors, hearing status, oral health behaviors, oral hygiene levels and dental caries status were also examined. The students filled out a self-administered questionnaire with assistance of a sign language video to obtain personal and behavior information. A total of 180 students, 83 normal hearing and 97 hearing impaired students completed the questionnaire and underwent an oral examination. The prevalences of caries were 53.6% and 50.6% among students with hearing impairment and normal hearing, respectively (p=0.354). After age stratification, the hearing impaired students aged 18-21 years had significantly less filled teeth (p=0.012), and those older than 21 years had less missing teeth due to caries than normal-hearing students (p=0.023). Poor oral hygiene was found in 51.8% and 42.2% of normal and hearing-impaired students, respectively (p=0.365). Caries status was significantly associated with maternal education level (OR 3.56; 95% CI: 1.52-8.32) and oral hygiene (OR 3.26; 95% CI: 1.64-6.45). The high prevalence of dental caries and poor oral hygiene among college students is alarming. Hearing impairment did not appear to affect the prevalences of these conditions compared to those with normal hearing. Oral health education tools need to be developed and utilized for both normal hearing and hearing impaired college students in Thailand. PMID:25417527

  16. Autofluorescence guided diagnostic evaluation of suspicious oral mucosal lesions: opportunities, limitations, and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2011-03-01

    Wide-filed autofluorescence examination is currently considered as a standard of care for screening and diagnostic evaluation of early neoplastic changes of the skin, cervix, lung, bladder, gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. Naturally occurring fluorophores within the tissue absorb UV and visible light and can re-emit some of this light at longer wavelengths in the form of fluorescence. This non-invasive tissue autofluorescence imaging is used in optical diagnostics, especially in the early detection of cancer. Usually, malignant transformation is associated with thickening of the epithelium, enhanced cellular density due to increased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio which may attenuate the excitation leading to a decrease in collagen autofluorescence. Hence, dysplastic and cancerous tissues often exhibit decreased blue-green autofluorescence and appear darker compared to uninvolved mucosa. Currently, there are three commercially available devices to examine tissue autofluorescence in the oral cavity. In this study we used the oral cancer screening device IdentafiTM 3000 to examine the tissue reflectance and autofluorescence of PML and confounding lesions of the oral cavity. Wide-field autofluorescence imaging enables rapid inspection of large mucosal surfaces, to aid in recognition of suspicious lesions and may also help in discriminate the PML (class 1) from some of the confounding lesions (class II). However, the presence of inflammation or pigments is also associated with loss of stromal autofluorescence, and may give rise to false-positive results with widefield fluorescence imaging. Clinicians who use these autofluorescence based oral cancer screening devices should be aware about the benign oral mucosal lesions that may give false positivity so that unnecessary patient's anxiety and the need for scalpel biopsy can be eliminated.

  17. Periadolescent oral manganese exposure affects conditioned place preference by cocaine and conditioned place aversion by lithium chloride in rats 

    E-print Network

    Lee, Samuel Ming Hin

    2013-02-22

    Manganese neurotoxicity compromises basal ganglia functions that could affect the limbic system and drug sensitivity. Male rats were orally exposed to manganese chloride (0, 100, 200 mg/kg/day Mn) for 15 days starting at postnatal day (PND) 28...

  18. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Anta, Juan A; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-01

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO2 show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 10(11)-10(13) Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of electron acceptors. PMID:24712803

  19. Fructose- and glucose-conditioned preferences in FVB mice: strain differences in post-oral sugar appetition.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2014-12-15

    Recent studies indicate that, unlike glucose, fructose has little or no post-oral preference conditioning actions in C57BL/6J (B6) mice. The present study determined whether this is also the case for FVB mice, which overconsume fructose relative to B6 mice. In experiment 1, FVB mice strongly preferred a noncaloric 0.1% sucralose + 0.1% saccharin (S+S) solution to 8% fructose in a 2-day choice test but switched their preference to fructose after separate experience with the two sweeteners. Other FVB mice displayed a stronger preference for 8% glucose over S+S. In a second experiment, ad libitum-fed FVB mice trained 24 h/day acquired a significant preference for a flavor (CS+) paired with intragastric (IG) self-infusions of 16% fructose over a different flavor (CS-) paired with IG water infusions. IG fructose infusions also conditioned flavor preferences in food-restricted FVB mice trained 1 h/day. IG infusions of 16% glucose conditioned stronger preferences in FVB mice trained 24- or 1 h/day. Thus, fructose has post-oral flavor conditioning effects in FVB mice, but these effects are less pronounced than those produced by glucose. Further studies of the differential post-oral conditioning effects of fructose and glucose in B6 and FVB mice should enhance our understanding of the physiological processes involved in sugar reward. PMID:25320345

  20. Autofluorescence guided diagnostic evaluation of suspicious oral mucosal lesions: opportunities, limitations, and pitfalls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadarajah Vigneswaran

    2011-01-01

    Wide-filed autofluorescence examination is currently considered as a standard of care for screening and diagnostic evaluation of early neoplastic changes of the skin, cervix, lung, bladder, gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. Naturally occurring fluorophores within the tissue absorb UV and visible light and can re-emit some of this light at longer wavelengths in the form of fluorescence. This non-invasive tissue

  1. Rate-Limiting Steps of Oral Absorption for Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs in Dogs; Prediction from a Miniscale Dissolution Test and a Physiologically-Based Computer Simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryusuke Takano; Kentaro Furumoto; Koji Shiraki; Noriyuki Takata; Yoshiki Hayashi; Yoshinori Aso; Shinji Yamashita

    2008-01-01

    Purpose  Nonlinear oral absorption due to poor solubility often impedes drug development. The purpose of this study was to elucidate\\u000a the rate-limiting process in oral absorption of Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class II (low solubility–high\\u000a permeability) drugs in order to predict nonlinear absorption of dose caused by solubility-limited absorption.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Oral absorption of danazol, griseofulvin, and aprepitant was predicted from a miniscale

  2. Understanding limit order book depth: conditioning on trade informativeness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helena Beltran; Albert J. Menkveld

    2004-01-01

    We study how a limit order book reacts to informed trades and adverse selection. We estimate Sandas'(2001) version of the classical Glosten (1994) order book model and accept it, but only for the first two prices displayed on each side of the book. We then relax one of the assumption and allow the level of private information in market orders

  3. Field condition limitations for thermography of marine composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Thomas S.

    1996-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been shown to be very effective in revealing damage in glass fiber composite boat hull structure for both solid laminate and foam core construction hulls. This paper addresses some of the parameters which can impact the effectiveness of the infrared thermal approach for these applications. Effects associated with surface condition, viewing angle, field-of-view, heat source type and intensity, and other conditions are discussed. An approach to providing a simple demonstration of the particular test approach is also discussed.

  4. The Limits of Knowledge Management in Contemporary Corporate Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on Jean-François Lyotard's (1984) seminal study "The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge" to reflect on two macro-level catastrophes: the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2009 (and its continuing effects throughout the Eurozone and elsewhere) and Fukushima. These two case studies probe aspects of these grand…

  5. Field condition limitations for thermography of marine composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas S. Jones

    1996-01-01

    Infrared thermography has been shown to be very effective in revealing damage in glass fiber composite boat hull structure for both solid laminate and foam core construction hulls. This paper addresses some of the parameters which can impact the effectiveness of the infrared thermal approach for these applications. Effects associated with surface condition, viewing angle, field-of-view, heat source type and

  6. Children's trust in unexpected oral versus printed suggestions: limitations of the power of print.

    PubMed

    Eyden, Julie; Robinson, Elizabeth J; Einav, Shiri

    2014-11-01

    Children have a bias to trust spoken testimony, yet early readers have an even stronger bias to trust print. Here, we ask how enduring is the influence of printed testimony: Can the learning be applied to new scenarios? Using hybrid pictures more dominant in one animal species (e.g., squirrel) than another (e.g., rabbit), we examined 3-6-year-olds' (N = 130) acceptance of an unexpected, non-dominant label suggested only orally or via print. Consistent with previous findings, early readers, but not pre-readers, accepted printed labels more frequently than when spoken. Children were then presented with identical but unlabelled hybrid exemplars and frequently applied the non-dominant labels to these. Despite early readers' prior greater acceptance of text, when oral suggestions were accepted they retained a greater influence. Findings highlight potential implications for educators regarding knowledge being applied to new scenarios: For early readers, unexpected information from text may be fragile, while a greater confidence might be placed in such information gained from spoken testimony. PMID:24986692

  7. Oral submucous fibrosis: a premalignant condition in a 14-year-old Indian girl.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Anshula; Kiran, Shital; Dhillon, Steffi; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old Indian girl presented with difficulty in mouth opening and burning sensation while eating. On examination, blanching of the oral mucosa with diffuse white pigmented lesion of size 3.5 to 2 cm along with melanotic pigmentation was seen on the left buccal mucosa posteriorly. The patient was diagnosed with oral submucous fibrosis. A comprehensive treatment plan was made based on conservative management that included motivation and intense counselling of the patient and her parents so that she quits the habit of chewing areca nut and tobacco, along with systemic treatment of vitamin B complex supplements, antioxidants, multivitamins and oral physiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the difficulties faced by the clinical practitioners in providing treatment because of the taboos and myths associated with surgical treatment modality in rural population as well as to emphasise the menace of increasing consumption and availability of tobacco and areca nut to children. PMID:24334472

  8. Al-hijamah and oral honey for treating thalassemia, conditions of iron overload, and hyperferremia: toward improving the therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Salah Mohamed; Baghdadi, Hussam; Abou-Taleb, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Hany Salah; Maria, Reham A; Ahmed, Nagwa S; Helmy Nabo, Manal Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Iron overload causes iron deposition and accumulation in the liver, heart, skin, and other tissues resulting in serious tissue damages. Significant blood clearance from iron and ferritin using wet cupping therapy (WCT) has been reported. WCT is an excretory form of treatment that needs more research efforts. WCT is an available, safe, simple, economic, and time-saving outpatient modality of treatment that has no serious side effects. There are no serious limitations or precautions to discontinue WCT. Interestingly, WCT has solid scientific and medical bases (Taibah mechanism) that explain its effectiveness in treating many disease conditions differing in etiology and pathogenesis. WCT utilizes an excretory physiological principle (pressure-dependent excretion) that resembles excretion through renal glomerular filtration and abscess evacuation. WCT exhibits a percutaneous excretory function that clears blood (through fenestrated skin capillaries) and interstitial fluids from pathological substances without adding a metabolic or detoxification burden on the liver and the kidneys. Interestingly, WCT was reported to decrease serum ferritin (circulating iron stores) significantly by about 22.25% in healthy subjects (in one session) and to decrease serum iron significantly to the level of causing iron deficiency (in multiple sessions). WCT was reported to clear blood significantly of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, uric acid, inflammatory mediators, and immunoglobulin antibodies (rheumatoid factor). Moreover, WCT was reported to enhance the natural immunity, potentiate pharmacological treatments, and to treat many different disease conditions. There are two distinct methods of WCT: traditional WCT and Al-hijamah (WCT of prophetic medicine). Both start and end with skin sterilization. In traditional WCT, there are two steps, skin scarification followed by suction using plastic cups (double S technique); Al-hijamah is a three-step procedure that includes skin suction using cups, scarification (shartat mihjam in Arabic), and second skin suction (triple S technique). Al-hijamah is a more comprehensive technique and does better than traditional WCT, as Al-hijamah includes two pressure-dependent filtration steps versus one step in traditional WCT. Whenever blood plasma is to be cleared of an excess pathological substance, Al-hijamah is indicated. We will discuss here some reported hematological and therapeutic benefits of Al-hijamah, its medical bases, methodologies, precautions, side effects, contraindications, quantitative evaluation, malpractice, combination with oral honey treatment, and to what extent it may be helpful when treating thalassemia and other conditions of iron overload and hyperferremia. PMID:25382989

  9. Operating condition limitations of high density QCW arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Jeremy; Levy, Joseph; Feeler, Ryan

    2012-03-01

    Northrop Grumman Cutting Edge Optronics (NGCEO) has developed a laser diode array package with minimal bar-tobar spacing. These High Density Stack (HDS) packages allow for a power density increase on the order of ~ 2.5x when compared to industry-standard arrays. Power densities as high as 15 kW/cm2 can be achieved when operated at 200 W/bar. This work provides a detailed description of the duty factor, pulse width and power limitations of high density arrays. The absence of the interposing heatsinks requires that all of the heat generated by the interior bars must travel through the adjacent bars to the electrical contacts. This results in limitations to the allowable operating envelope of the HDS arrays. Thermal effects such as wavelength shifts across large HDS arrays are discussed. An overview of recent HDS design and manufacturing improvements is also presented. These improvements result in reliable operation at higher power densities and increased duty factors. A comparison of the effect of bar geometry on HDS performance is provided. Test data from arrays featuring these improvements based on both full 1 cm wide diode bars as well as 3 mm wide mini-bars is also presented.

  10. Evaluation of oral tilmicosin efficacy against severe cryptosporidiosis in neonatal kids under field conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Paraud; I. Pors; C. Chartier

    2010-01-01

    Many compounds have been screened for their potential anti-cryptosporidial activity in ruminants but none of them has been totally efficient in controlling the disease. Macrolide antibiotics have demonstrated some activity against Cryptosporidium spp. in humans. Tilmicosin is a macrolide antibiotic, available in France in an oral form (Pulmotil® AC, Lilly France). The preventive efficacy of tilmicosin was evaluated in a

  11. Transient stability limit conditions analysis using a corrected transient energy function approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Da-Zhong Fang; T. S. Chung; Yao Zhang; Wennan Song

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue in developing tools for transient stability limit conditions analysis in on-line power system operation. Concepts, including corrected potential energy and corrected potential energy boundary surface, are proposed for improving use of hybrid method in transient stability limit conditions analysis. It is shown that the value of corrected transient energy function (CTEF), which is the sum

  12. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains. PMID:25625069

  13. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

  14. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin, E-mail: wenbin@ysu.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiangyi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Melnik, Roderick [M2NeT Lab, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo25, 75 University Ave. West, Ontario, Canada N2L 3C5 (Canada)] [M2NeT Lab, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo25, 75 University Ave. West, Ontario, Canada N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-4 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japan and Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 1, Lavyrentyev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)] [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-4 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japan and Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 1, Lavyrentyev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ?1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  15. An attempt to condition flavour preference induced by oral and/or postoral administration of 16% sucrose in pigs.

    PubMed

    Clouard, Caroline; Loison, Florence; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Val-Laillet, David

    2014-01-30

    The present study investigated the acquisition of conditioned flavour preferences in pigs using the caloric value and/or sweet taste of sucrose. Nine water-deprived juvenile pigs were given four three-day conditioning sessions during which they received flavoured solutions as conditioned stimuli (CS). The CS solutions were paired with three treatments that generated a gustatory and/or a caloric reinforcement (US). The CS++ solution was added with 16% sucrose and paired with an intraduodenal (ID) infusion of water, the CS+ solution was paired with an ID infusion of 16% sucrose and the CS- solution was paired with an ID infusion of water. One and two weeks after conditioning, the water-deprived pigs were subjected to two-choice preference tests with the unreinforced CS solutions. Solutions intake, behavioural activity and some drinking parameters were measured. Despite no difference in CS intake during conditioning, the animals spent less time inactive and more time standing during CS++ than CS+ conditioning. When receiving CS++, the pigs explored the drinking trough more than when receiving CS-. Compared to the CS- condition, the numbers of drinking episodes and intra-drinking episode (IDE) pauses were also 36% and 49% lesser in the CS++ condition, but these differences were not significant. During the two-choice tests, the pigs did not show significant preferences. Nevertheless, during the first session, the pigs seemed to show a slight preference for the CS++ (57% of total intake) compared to CS+. The duration of CS++ drinking episodes represented 64% of the total duration compared to CS+ and CS- . The total time spent drinking the CS++ also represented 57% of the total time in the CS++ vs. CS- test. To conclude, although no clear-cut preferences were found during two-choice tests, the oral perception of 16% sucrose during conditioning induced changes in behavioural activities, motivational responses and microstructure of CS intake, suggesting the importance of oral food perception for food selection processes in pigs. Further studies are needed to investigate the impact of water deprivation on the expression of flavour preferences in pigs. PMID:24184509

  16. LOCAL LIMITS OF CONDITIONED GALTON-WATSON TREES I: THE INFINITE SPINE CASE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LOCAL LIMITS OF CONDITIONED GALTON-WATSON TREES I: THE INFINITE SPINE CASE ROMAIN ABRAHAM AND JEAN becomes a.s. extinct. However, one can define in these two cases a tree with an infinite spine, that we

  17. Cumulus convection and lateral boundary conditions in a limited area model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E N Rajagopal; S. S. Singh

    1991-01-01

    Three versions of Kuo's cumulus parameterization have been tested in a limited area model to investigate their comparative\\u000a performances. Results show that the version of Anthes produces better forecasts than those produced by other versions. To\\u000a identify a suitable scheme of lateral boundary conditions for the limited area model, impact of two time-invariant and two\\u000a time-dependent boundary conditions have been

  18. Biomass and cellulosic ethanol production of forage sorghum under limited water conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage sorghum is one of the suggested crops to provide feedstock for biofuel production under water-limited conditions due to its stress tolerance and efficient water use; however, research is needed under these conditions to better understand its energy yield potential. This study presents result...

  19. Numerical Modelling of a Pulse Combustion Burner: Limiting Conditions of Stable

    E-print Network

    Vuik, Kees

    in the burner system. Self-sustained pulse combustion and high-intensity sound waves result if the systemNumerical Modelling of a Pulse Combustion Burner: Limiting Conditions of Stable Operation P.A. van a mathematical analysis of a simple model for thermal pulse combustion and determines conditions under which

  20. Impact of oral health conditions on the quality of life of preschool children and their families: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental caries, traumatic dental injury (TDI) and malocclusion are common oral health conditions among preschool children and can have both physical and psychosocial consequences. Thus, it is important to measure the impact these on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of children. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of oral health conditions on the OHRQoL of preschool children and their families. Methods A preschool-based, cross-sectional study was carried out with 843 preschool children in the city of Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered the Brazilian Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale and a questionnaire addressing socio-demographic data as well as the parent’s/caregiver’s perceptions regarding their child’s health. Clinical exams were performed by three researchers who had undergone a calibration process for the diagnosis of dental caries, TDI and malocclusion (K?=?0.83-0.85). Hierarchical Poisson regression was employed to determine the strength of associations between oral health conditions and OHRQoL (??=?5%). The multivariate model was run on three levels obeying a hierarchical approach from distal to proximal determinants: 1) socio-demographic data; 2) perceptions of health; and 3) oral health conditions. Results The prevalence of impact from oral health conditions on OHRQoL was 32.1% among the children and 26.2% among the families. The following variables were significantly associated with a impact on OHRQoL among the children: birth order of child (PR?=?1.430; 95% CI: 1.045-1.958), parent’s/caregiver’s perception of child’s oral health as poor (PR?=?1.732; 95% CI: 1.399-2.145), cavitated lesions (PR?=?2.596; 95% CI: 1.982-3.400) and TDI (PR?=?1.413; 95% CI: 1.161-1.718). The following variables were significantly associated with a impact on OHRQoL among the families: parent’s/caregiver’s perception of child’s oral health as poor (PR?=?2.116; 95% CI: 1.624-2.757), cavitated lesions (PR?=?2.809; 95% CI: 2.009-3.926) and type of TDI (PR?=?2.448; 95% CI: 1.288-4.653). Conclusion Cavitated lesions and TDI exerted a impact on OHRQoL of the preschool children and their families. Parents’/caregivers’ perception of their child’s oral health as poor and the birth order of the child were predictors of a greater impact on OHRQoL. PMID:24745700

  1. Effects of surface voids on burning rate measurements of pulverized coal at diffusion-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, D.J.; Schroeder, A.R.; Peters, J.E.; Buckius, R.O. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    1997-01-01

    This research explores the effects of voids (pores on the particle surface that are deeper than their surface radius) on burning area at diffusion-limited combustion conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and digital processing of images of quenched particles were used to quantify surface void area, perimeter, and reacting void wall area for voids with diameters larger than 1 {micro}m. After careful analysis, the most accurate determination of particle burning area at diffusion-limited conditions was achieved by measuring particle surface area using the technique of discrete revolution, subtracting surface void area, and adding reacting void wall area. In situ measurements of reacting coal particle temperatures and images were taken for three coals and spherocarb particles at conditions that limit the formation of CO{sub 2} from reacting carbon under various oxygen concentrations and heating rates. The results of these experiments indicate that correcting the measured surface area for void area and reacting void wall area produces calculated burning rates closely matching diffusion-limited burning rates for all conditions and all coals investigated. These results suggest that void area effects should be included for accurate determination of burning area at diffusion-limited conditions.

  2. Reducing Conservatism in Aircraft Engine Response Using Conditionally Active Min-Max Limit Regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Current aircraft engine control logic uses a Min-Max control selection structure to prevent the engine from exceeding any safety or operational limits during transients due to throttle commands. This structure is inherently conservative and produces transient responses that are slower than necessary. In order to utilize the existing safety margins more effectively, a modification to this architecture is proposed, referred to as a Conditionally Active (CA) limit regulator. This concept uses the existing Min-Max architecture with the modification that limit regulators are active only when the operating point is close to a particular limit. This paper explores the use of CA limit regulators using a publicly available commercial aircraft engine simulation. The improvement in thrust response while maintaining all necessary safety limits is demonstrated in a number of cases.

  3. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aldo Ofenheimer; Bruno Buchmayr; Ralf Kolleck; Marion Merklein

    2005-01-01

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic

  4. Oral Health Conditions and Dental Visits Among Pregnant and Nonpregnant Women of Childbearing Age in the United States, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999–2004

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Lorraine F.; Alverson, C. J.; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral diseases can be prevented or improved with regular dental visits. Our objective was to assess and compare national estimates on self-reported oral health conditions and dental visits among pregnant women and nonpregnant women of childbearing age by using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods We analyzed self-reported oral health information on 897 pregnant women and 3,971 nonpregnant women of childbearing age (15–44 years) from NHANES 1999–2004. We used ?2 and 2-sample t tests to assess statistical differences between groups stratified by age, race/ethnicity, poverty, and education. We applied the Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons. Results Our data show significant differences in self-reported oral health conditions and dental visits among women, regardless of pregnancy status, when stratified by selected sociodemographic characteristics. Significant differences were also found in self-reported oral health conditions and dental visits between pregnant and nonpregnant women, especially among young women, women from minority race/ethnicity groups, and women with less than high school education. Conclusion We found disparities in self-reported oral health conditions and use of dental services among women regardless of pregnancy status. Results highlight the need to improve dental service use among US women of childbearing age, especially young pregnant women, those who are non-Hispanic black or Mexican American, and those with low family income or low education level. Prenatal visits could be used as an opportunity to encourage pregnant women to seek preventive dental care during pregnancy. PMID:25232750

  5. Liquid Chromatography under Limiting Conditions of Desorption IV. Separation of Macromolecules According to Their Stereoregularity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dusan Berek; Tatsuki Kitayama; Koichi Hatada; Hirotaka Ihara; Ignac Capek; Eberhard Borsig

    2009-01-01

    Liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of adsorption (LC LCD) is a novel technique for separation of polymers that exhibit different extent of adsorption on the porous column packing of appropriate polarity. LC LCD is based on the selective “barrier effect” induced by a narrow zone of the adsorption promoting liquid that is introduced into column in front of separated macromolecules

  6. Genetic differentiation in Plantago major L. in growth and P uptake under conditions of P limitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Baas; M. L. Beusichem

    1990-01-01

    To study possible adaptive mechanisms inbred lines from three populations of Plantago major from sites that were found to differ in P availability were compared. In a pot experiment the growth and P uptake either in the presence or absence of Glomus fasciculatum was determined. Under these P-limited conditions it was shown by partitioning the relative growth rate (RGR, in

  7. PRODUCTION OF ITACONIC ACID BY PSEUDOZYMA ANTARCTICA NRRL Y-7808 UNDER NITROGEN-LIMITED GROWTH CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudozyma antarctica NRRL Y-7808 was found to produce itaconic acid from glucose and other sugars under nitrogen-limited growth conditions. Other Pseudozyma strains screened, including a second strain of Pseudozyma antarctica, did not produce this product; so itaconic acid production is not a comm...

  8. Phosphorus limitation increases attachment in Agrobacterium tumefaciens and reveals a conditional functional redundancy in adhesin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Kim, Jinwoo; Danhorn, Thomas; Merritt, Peter M.; Fuqua, Clay

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial responses to phosphorus limitation, commonly inorganic phosphate (Pi), are important survival mechanisms in a variety of environments. The two-component sensor kinase PhoR and its cognate response regulator PhoB are central to the Pi limitation response of many bacteria and control the large Pho regulon. Limitation for Pi significantly increased attachment and biofilm formation by the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and this was driven by PhoB. Surprisingly, it was also found that both phoR and phoB were essential in A. tumefaciens. Expression of a plasmid-borne copy of the low affinity Pi transporter (pit) from Sinorhizobium meliloti in A. tumefaciens abolished the phoB and phoR essentiality in A. tumefaciens and allowed direct demonstration of the requirement for this regulatory system in the biofilm response. Increased attachment under Pi limitation required a unipolar polysaccharide (UPP) adhesin. Mutation of a polyisoprenylphosphate hexose-1-phosphate transferase (PHPT) called uppE abolished UPP production and prevented surface attachment under Pi-replete conditions, but this was rescued under Pi limitation, and this rescue required phoB. In low Pi conditions, either uppE or a paralogous gene Atu0102 is functionally redundant, but only uppE functions in UPP synthesis and attachment when Pi is replete. This conditional functional redundancy illustrates the influence of phosphorus availability on A. tumefaciens surface colonization. PMID:23103488

  9. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions — Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofenheimer, Aldo; Buchmayr, Bruno; Kolleck, Ralf; Merklein, Marion

    2005-08-01

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  10. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ofenheimer, Aldo [vif- Kompetenzzentrum das virtuelle Fahrzeug Forschungs-GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21A, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Institute for Materials Science, Welding and Forming, Graz University of Technology, Kopernikusgasse 24, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Buchmayr, Bruno [Institute for Metal Forming -- University of Leoben, Franz Josef Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Kolleck, Ralf [Institute for Tooling and Forming, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 21B/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Merklein, Marion [Manufacturing Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstrasse 11, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-08-05

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  11. Free fatty acid production in Escherichia coli under phosphate-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, J Tyler; Rose, Josh P; Pfleger, Brian F

    2013-06-01

    Microbially synthesized fatty acids are an attractive platform for producing renewable alternatives to petrochemically derived transportation fuels and oleochemicals. Free fatty acids (FFA) are a direct precursor to many high-value compounds that can be made via biochemical and ex vivo catalytic pathways. To be competitive with current petrochemicals, flux through these pathways must be optimized to approach theoretical yields. Using a plasmid-free, FFA-producing strain of Escherichia coli, a set of chemostat experiments were conducted to gather data for FFA production under phosphate limitation. A prior study focused on carbon-limited conditions strongly implicated non-carbon limitations as a preferred media formulation for maximizing FFA yield. Here, additional data were collected to expand an established kinetic model of FFA production and identify targets for further metabolic engineering. The updated model was able to successfully predict the strain's behavior and FFA production in a batch culture. The highest yield observed under phosphate-limiting conditions (0.1 g FFA/g glucose) was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.1 h(-1), and the highest biomass-specific productivity (0.068 g FFA/gDCW/h) was observed at a dilution rate of 0.25 h(-1). Phosphate limitation increased yield (?45 %) and biomass-specific productivity (?300 %) relative to carbon-limited cultivations using the same strain. FFA production under phosphate limitation also led to a cellular maintenance energy ?400 % higher (0.28 g/gDCW/h) than that seen under carbon limitation. PMID:23619909

  12. Quality of Life Measurement for Children with Life-Threatening Conditions: Limitations and a New Framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I-Chan Huang; Pey-Shan Wen; Dennis A. Revicki; Elizabeth A. Shenkman

    2011-01-01

    About 500,000 children are coping with life-threatening conditions (LTC) in the United States every year. Different service\\u000a programs such as an integrated pediatric palliative care program may benefit health-related quality of life (HRQOL) which\\u000a is a great concern of this children population and their families. However, evidence is limited about the appropriate HRQOL\\u000a instruments for use. This study aims to

  13. Testing Equality in Differential Ring Extensions Defined by PDE's and Limit Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ariane Péladan-germa

    2002-01-01

    .  ? We present here methods to test equality in differential extensions of effective rings. The extensions considered are obtained\\u000a by adjunction of formal power series solutions of given (non linear) systems of PDE's with initial\\/limit conditions. The equality\\u000a test is indeed the only operation that is not trivial in such extensions, and is hence a central problem for formally manipulating

  14. Identification of Siderophore Biosynthesis Genes Essential for Growth of Aeromonas salmonicida under Iron Limitation Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohsen Najimi; Manuel L. Lemos; Carlos R. Osorio

    2008-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, the etiological agent of furunculosis in fish, produces a catechol- type siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. In this study, the Fur titration assay (FURTA) was used to identify a cluster of six genes, asbG, asbF, asbD, asbC, asbB, and asbI, encoding proteins similar to components of the siderophore biosynthetic machinery in other bacteria. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses

  15. Enhanced efficacy of an attenuated Flavobacterium psychrophilum strain cultured under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Long, Amy; Fehringer, Tyson R; Swain, Marissa A; LaFrentz, Benjamin R; Call, Douglas R; Cain, Kenneth D

    2013-11-01

    An attenuated strain of Flavobacterium psychrophilum (CSF259-93B.17) has shown potential as a vaccine for prevention of bacterial coldwater disease (BCWD) in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Because BCWD outbreaks can result in high mortality in other salmonid species, specifically coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), the live-attenuated strain was tested as a vaccine in this species. Additionally, we hypothesized that culture of the vaccine strain under iron-limited conditions would lead to improved protection against BCWD. To test this hypothesis, coho salmon were either injection or immersion immunized with CSF259-93B.17 cultured in iron-replete or iron-limited medium. Resultant antibody titers were low and not significantly different between the two treatments regardless of vaccine delivery method (P > 0.05). Following injection challenge with a virulent F. psychrophilum strain, mortality for injection vaccinated fish was significantly reduced compared to the control but did not differ by treatment (P > 0.05). Relative percent survival (RPS) was high in both treatments (90% in iron-replete, 98% in iron-limited medium). Fish immunized by immersion with CSF259-93B.17 grown in iron-replete medium exhibited lower mortality (29.3%; RPS 46%) when compared to mock immunized fish, but this was not significant. However, mortality was significantly lower in fish immunized with CSF259-93B.17 grown in iron-limited medium (14.7%; RPS 73%) when compared to mock immunized fish. The results demonstrate that the live-attenuated F. psychrophilum strain can confer protection to coho salmon and vaccine efficacy is enhanced by culturing the strain under iron-limited conditions. PMID:23989039

  16. Sorbed-Phase Remediation under Diffusion-Limited Conditions: The Role of Equilibrium Driving Forces and Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. P.; Sabbah, I.; Paraskewich, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    For sorbed organic contaminants, slow diffusion from regions that are impermeable to fluid convection can be a principal limitation to contaminant "availability" during remediation, whether by pump-and-treat or transformation mechanisms, and whether under natural or "enhanced" conditions. Moreover, and as highlighted in the summary description of this AGU session, "efforts to account for diffusion limitations in the field are fraught with error because of physical and chemical heterogeneities, and nonlinear responses of diffusion to system perturbations." In particular, the definitions of rate parameters (coefficients) will depend strongly on the rate mechanisms that are assumed, and numerical estimates of their values will be dependent not only upon the heterogeneous chemistry and physics of the systems studied, but also upon assumptions made in regard to (1) the equilibrium thermodynamics (driving force for mass transfer), (2) the initial conditions of the system (e.g., at the on-set of a desorption study), and (3) the details of the experimental boundary conditions over the course of the observations. In this presentation, we will review some of our own experimental and modeling efforts that have aimed to quantify and "account" for diffusion effects in comparably well-characterized systems for which we have attempted to independently understand the above factors. Examples include organic chemical sorption and desorption in batch systems (finite bath uptake and infinite bath release from aquifer sands and surface soils), column systems (column studies involving macropore transport through sorbing solids of low-permeability), and a field scenario (diffusive contaminant release from a fine-grained aquitard into an overlying aquifer). Our emphasis will be on: (1) illustrating how issues of sorption nonlinearity, spatial heterogeneity, and sorption non-equilibrium (at the on-set of desorption) can interplay to cause very complex desorption/remediation behavior; and (2) demonstrating that such behavior is very difficult to interpret (much less predict) if the complicating factors are not properly accounted through independent experimental investigation. In light of our results, we pose questions regarding the extent to which "interpretive" modeling of phenomenological results is useful and to which prediction is possible. Although we doubt that geologic heterogeneities can ever be characterized to a level that allows mechanistic (or predictive) modeling of field-scale behavior, at least a qualitative understanding of the conceptual issues is nonetheless important in remediation design and risk assessment. For any "new" site of soil or sediment contamination, understanding of organic contaminant fate will always be incomplete without careful evaluation of the heterogeneity of the solid matrix and (we suggest) specific study of sorption on selected materials through the use of "probe" chemicals. Although the selection of the most important solids for study will always be a major question, continued basic research with selected materials can help guide the selection.

  17. Extreme oral myiasis.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Benny; Vyloppilli, Suresh; Ahsan, Auswaf; Anirudhan, Anroop

    2014-09-01

    Extreme oral myiasis is a rare condition, mostly affecting bedridden patients whose oral health care measures are neglected. Single stage manual removal of the maggots along with the necrotic tissue, debridement, and suturing under general anesthesia is the most effective way to treat the condition. Preventive measures are also equally important to eliminate the cause and recurrence.  PMID:25228190

  18. A vegetation sensitivity approximation for gross primary production in water limited conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claesson, Jonas; Nycander, Jonas

    2013-04-01

    The most severe impact of climate change on vegetation growth and agriculture is likely to occur under water-limited conditions. Under such conditions the plants optimize the inward flux of CO2 and the outward flux of water vapor (the transpiration) by regulating the size of the stomata openings. Higher temperature increases water loss through transpiration, forcing the plants to diminish the stomata openings, which decreases photosynthesis. This is counteracted by higher CO2 concentration, which allows plants to maintain the inward flux of CO2 through the smaller openings. These two counteracting effects, combined with the change in precipitation, determine the net change of biological productivity in a changed climate. Here, a vegetation sensitivity approximation (VSA) is introduced, in order to understand and estimate the combined effect of changed temperature, CO2-concentration and precipitation on gross primary production (GPP) to first order. According to the VSA, we have: ( ) ?CO2atm ? GP P = ?0 P Here ?CO2atm is the atmospheric CO2 concentration, ?0 is the baseline for atmospheric CO2 concentration, P is precipitation and ? is defined by: -s- ? = 1 - 11°C where s is the climate sensitivity i.e. the increase in temperature when atmospheric CO2 is doubled. The VSA is based on the physical laws of gas flux through the stomata openings, and is only valid under water-limited conditions. It assumes that the temperature depends logarithmically on the CO2 concentration with a given climate sensitivity. Transpiration is assumed to be a constant fraction of precipitation, which is reasonable under water-limited conditions. The VSA is compared to simulations with the dynamic vegetation model LPJ. The agreement is reasonable, and the deviations can be understood by comparison with Köppen's definition of arid climate: in an arid climate growth increases more according to LPJ than according to the VSA, and in non-arid conditions the reverse is true. Both the VSA and the LPJ simulations generally show increased growth with increasing CO2 levels and the resulting temperature increase, assuming precipitation to be unchanged. Thus, for constant precipitation the negative temperature effect is more than compensated by the positive effect of CO2.

  19. Limits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Liao

    Students will see how the idea of a limit can be presented both in formal epsilon-delta-style terms, and using corresponding animations. After calculating a limit for a simple example function, we point out that limits do not always exist.

  20. Response of plants to ectomycorrhizae in N-limited conditions: which factors determine its variation?

    PubMed

    Corrêa, A; Strasser, R J; Martins-Loução, M A

    2008-10-01

    In the present work, the following hypotheses were tested: (1) the negative effects of mycorrhization over host plant productivity in N-limited conditions are due to N retention by the fungal partner and not due to excessive C drainage; (2) If mycorrhization results in decreased N uptake, the host plant decreases its C investment in fungal growth. The effects of mycorrhization over a wide range of combinations between N availability, N concentration in plant tissues, and degree of mycorrhizal colonization were studied in Pinus pinaster L. mycorrhizal with Pisolithus tinctorius. Several plant productivity parameters, the seedlings' N status, chl a fluorescence (JIP test), and mycorrhizal colonization were measured. N was always limiting. A gradient of mycorrhizal effects over the host plant's growth and vitality was successfully obtained. The mycorrhizal effects on plant growth and N uptake were very strongly and positively correlated, and no evidence was found of a C limitation to growth, confirming hypothesis 1. Indications were found that the plants continued to provide C to the fungus although the N supplied by it was increasingly lower, denying hypothesis 2. A new index, the mycorrhizal N demand-supply balance, was found to efficiently explain, and to have a curvilinear relation with, the variation in response to mycorrhization. The mycorrhizal effect on host plant growth was not related to a negative effect on its photosynthetic performance and, therefore, reflected changes in resource allocation between host plant and mycorrhizal fungus, not in plant vitality. PMID:18719949

  1. Oceanographic Conditions Limit the Spread of a Marine Invader along Southern African Shores

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Katy R.; Zardi, Gerardo I.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Serrão, Ester A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species can affect the function and structure of natural ecological communities, hence understanding and predicting their potential for spreading is a major ecological challenge. Once established in a new region, the spread of invasive species is largely controlled by their dispersal capacity, local environmental conditions and species interactions. The mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is native to the Mediterranean and is the most successful marine invader in southern Africa. Its distribution there has expanded rapidly and extensively since the 1970s, however, over the last decade its spread has ceased. In this study, we coupled broad scale field surveys, Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) and Lagrangian Particle Simulations (LPS) to assess the current invaded distribution of M. galloprovincialis in southern Africa and to evaluate what prevents further spread of this species. Results showed that all environmentally suitable habitats in southern Africa have been occupied by the species. This includes rocky shores between Rocky Point in Namibia and East London in South Africa (approx. 2800 km) and these limits coincide with the steep transitions between cool-temperate and subtropical-warmer climates, on both west and southeast African coasts. On the west coast, simulations of drifting larvae almost entirely followed the northward and offshore direction of the Benguela current, creating a clear dispersal barrier by advecting larvae away from the coast. On the southeast coast, nearshore currents give larvae the potential to move eastwards, against the prevalent Agulhas current and beyond the present distributional limit, however environmental conditions prevent the establishment of the species. The transition between the cooler and warmer water regimes is therefore the main factor limiting the northern spread on the southeast coast; however, biotic interactions with native fauna may also play an important role. PMID:26114766

  2. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor...REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Examples of Conditions Which May...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor...REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Examples of Conditions Which May...

  4. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor...REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Examples of Conditions Which May...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor...REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Examples of Conditions Which May...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor...REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Examples of Conditions Which May...

  7. Discriminative ability of the generic and condition-specific Child-Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (Child-OIDP) by the Limpopo-Arusha School Health (LASH) Project: A cross-sectional study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hawa S Mbawalla; Matilda Mtaya; Joyce R Masalu; Pongsri Brudvik; Anne N Astrom

    2011-01-01

    Background  Generic and condition-specific (CS) oral-health-related quality-of-life (OHRQoL) instruments assess the impacts of general\\u000a oral conditions and specific oral diseases. Focusing schoolchildren from Arusha and Dar es Salaam, in Tanzania, this study\\u000a compared the discriminative ability of the generic Child OIDP with respect to dental caries and periodontal problems across\\u000a the study sites. Secondly, the discriminative ability of the generic-and the

  8. Assessment of Oral Conditions and Quality of Life in Morbid Obese and Normal Weight Individuals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Adriana Rodrigues; Sales-Peres, Arsênio; Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the impact of oral disease on the quality of life of morbid obese and normal weight individuals. Cohort was composed of 100 morbid-obese and 50 normal-weight subjects. Dental caries, community periodontal index, gingival bleeding on probing (BOP), calculus, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, dental wear, stimulated salivary flow, and salivary pH were used to evaluate oral diseases. Socioeconomic and the oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) questionnaires showed the quality of life in both groups. Unpaired Student, Fisher’s Exact, Chi-Square, Mann-Whitney, and Multiple Regression tests were used (p<0.05). Obese showed lower socio-economic level than control group, but no differences were found considering OIDP. No significant differences were observed between groups considering the number of absent teeth, bruxism, difficult mastication, calculus, initial caries lesion, and caries. However, saliva flow was low, and the salivary pH was changed in the obese group. Enamel wear was lower and dentine wear was higher in obese. More BOP, insertion loss, and periodontal pocket, especially the deeper ones, were found in obese subjects. The regression model showed gender, smoking, salivary pH, socio-economic level, periodontal pocket, and periodontal insertion loss significantly associated to obesity. However, both OIDP and BOP did not show significant contribution to the model. The quality of life of morbid obese was more negatively influenced by oral disease and socio-economic factors than in normal weight subjects. PMID:26177268

  9. Medicare's policy to limit payment for hospital-acquired conditions: the impact on safety net providers.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Megan; Martin, Timothy C; Orwat, John; Dyke, Kevin Van

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, Medicare implemented a policy limiting reimbursement to hospitals for treating avoidable hospital-acquired conditions (HACs). Although the policy will expand nationally to Medicaid programs in 2011, little is known about the impact on safety-net hospitals. Using data from the 2006 American Hospital Association Annual Survey and MEDPAR, we compared the incidence of cases that met the HACs criteria at safety-net and non-safety-net hospitals. We found that safety-net hospitals had an average of 65.5 HACs per 1,000 Medicare discharges compared with 57.6 at non-safety-net hospitals. Hospitals in the lowest quintile for financial margins had higher rates of HACs on average than other hospitals. Safety-net hospitals and hospitals with the lowest financial margins may be more likely than others to be affected by policies that reduce payment for HACs. PMID:21551939

  10. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    Along with afforestation, attempts have been made to combat desertification by managing soil crusts, and is has been reported that recovery rates of biocrusts are dependent on many factors, including the type, severity, and extent of disturbance; structure of the vascular plant community; conditions of adjoining substrates; availability of inoculation material; and climate during and after disturbance (Belnap & Eldridge 2001). Because biological soil crusts are known to be more stable on and to prefer fine substrates (Belnap 2001), the question arises as to how successful crust management practices can be applied to coarser soil. In previous studies we observed similar crust biomasses on finer soils under arid and on coarser soils under temperate conditions. We hypothesized that the higher water holding capacity of finer substrates would favor crust development, and that the amount of silt and clay in the substrate that is required for enhanced crust development would vary with changes in climatic conditions. In a global meta study, climatic and soil texture threshold values promoting BSC growth were derived. While examining literature sources, it became evident that the amount of studies to be incorporated into this meta analysis was reversely related to the amount of common environmental parameters they share. We selected annual mean precipitaion, mean temperature and the amount of silt and clay as driving variables for crust growth. Response variable was the "relative crust biomass", which was computed per literature source as the ratio between each individual crust biomass value of the given study to the study maximum value reported. We distinguished lichen, green algal, cyanobacterial and moss crusts. To quantify threshold conditions at which crust biomass responded to differences in texture and climate, we (I) determined correlations between bioclimatic variables, (II) calculated linear models to determine the effect of typical climatic variables with soil clay content and with study site as a random effect. (III) Threshold values of texture and climatc effects were identified using a regression tree. Three mean annual temperature classes for texture dependent BSC growth limitation were identified: (1) <9 °C with a threshold value of 25% silt and clay (limited growth on coarser soils), (2) 9-19 °C, where texture did have no influence on relative crust biomass, and (3) >19 °C at soils with <4 or >17% silt and clay. Because biocrust development is limited under certain climatic and soil texture conditions, it is suggested to consider soil texture for biocrust rehabilitation purposes and in biogeochemical modeling of cryptogamic ground covers. References Belnap, J. & Eldridge, D. 2001. Disturbance and Recovery of Biological Soil Crusts. In: Belnap, J. & Lange, O. (eds.) Biological Soil Crusts: Structure, Function, and Management, Springer, Berlin. Belnap, J. 2001. Biological Soil Crusts and Wind Erosion. In: Belnap, J. & Lange, O. (eds.) Fischer, T., Subbotina, M. 2014. Climatic and soil texture threshold values for cryptogamic cover development: a meta analysis. Biologia 69/11:1520-1530,

  11. Scoring oral mucositis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W Parulekar; R Mackenzie; G Bjarnason; R. C. K Jordan

    1998-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a common, dose limiting and potentially serious complication of both radiation and chemotherapy. Both these therapies are non-specific, interfering with the cellular homeostasis of both malignant and normal host cells. An important effect is the loss of the rapidly proliferating epithelial cells in the oral cavity, gut and in the bone marrow. Within the mouth, the loss

  12. Oral submucous fibrosis in a 9-year-old Indian girl

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Anuradha; Airen Sarkar, Priyanka; Shigli, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a premalignant condition strongly associated with the practice of chewing areca nut, a habit common among South Asian population. It is characterised by inflammation, increased deposition of submucosal collagen and formation of fibrotic bands in the oral and paraoral tissues, which increasingly limit mouth opening. A case of OSMF occurring in a 9-year-old Indian girl is presented. This paper discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation and treatment modalities of oral submucous fibrosis. PMID:22679326

  13. Comparative evapotranspiration rates of thirteen turfgrasses grown under both non-limiting soil moisture and progressive water stress conditions

    E-print Network

    Kim, Ki Sun

    1983-01-01

    rates of each species were measured under both non-limiting soil moisture and progressive water stress conditions. During the uniform cultural practices study, the grasses were mowed at a 3. 8 cm cutting height and fertilized with -1 -1 0. 25 kg N... height and nitrogen fertilization rate utilized for each turfgrass species during the Optimum Cultural System Study when grown under non-limiting soil moisture conditions . . . . . . . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 24 Comparative ET rates of twelve...

  14. Evaluation of limiting strains and strain distribution for interstitial free steel sheets while forming under different strain conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Narayanasamy; C. Sathiya Narayanan

    2007-01-01

    In this work, forming limit diagrams (FLDs) were experimentally evaluated for the interstitial free steel sheets of different thickness namely 0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.6mm. The limiting strains for these sheets under different strain conditions were studied. The forming limit diagrams for the above sheet metals were compared. The microstructural aspects, tensile properties and formability parameters were experimentally determined and

  15. Parameter identification of the SWAT model on the BANI catchment (West Africa) under limited data condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaibou Begou, Jamilatou; Jomaa, Seifeddine; Benabdallah, Sihem; Rode, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Due to the climate change, drier conditions have prevailed in West Africa, since the seventies, and the consequences are important on water resources. In order to identify and implement management strategies of adaptation to climate change in the sector of water, it is crucial to improve our physical understanding of water resources evolution in the region. To this end, hydrologic modelling is an appropriate tool for flow predictions under changing climate and land use conditions. In this study, the applicability and performance of the recent version of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT2012) model were tested on the Bani catchment in West Africa under limited data condition. Model parameters identification was also tested using one site and multisite calibration approaches. The Bani is located in the upper part of the Niger River and drains an area of about 101, 000 km2 at the outlet of Douna. The climate is tropical, humid to semi-arid from the South to the North with an average annual rainfall of 1050 mm (period 1981-2000). Global datasets were used for the model setup such as: USGS hydrosheds DEM, USGS LCI GlobCov2009 and the FAO Digital Soil Map of the World. Daily measured rainfall from nine rain gauges and maximum and minimum temperature from five weather stations covering the period 1981-1997 were used for model setup. Sensitivity analysis, calibration and validation are performed within SWATCUP using GLUE procedure at Douna station first (one site calibration), then at three additional internal stations, Bougouni, Pankourou and Kouoro1 (multi-site calibration). Model parameters were calibrated at daily time step for the period 1983-1992, then validated for the period 1993-1997. A period of two years (1981-1982) was used for model warming up. Results of one-site calibration showed that the model performance is evaluated by 0.76 and 0.79 for Nash-Sutcliffe (NS) and correlation coefficient (R2), respectively. While for the validation period the performance improved considerably with NS and R2 equal to 0.84 and 0.87, respectively. The degree of total uncertainties is quantified by a minimum P-factor of 0.61 and a maximum R-factor of 0.59. These statistics suggest that the model performance can be judged as very good, especially considering limited data condition and high climate, land use and soil variability in the studied basin. The most sensitive parameters (CN2, OVN and SLSUBBSN) are related to surface runoff reflecting the dominance of this process on the streamflow generation. In the next step, multisite calibration approach will be performed on the BANI basin to assess how much additional observations improve the model parameter identification.

  16. Oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ginger; Sutton, Eliza L

    2015-05-01

    Oral contraception (OC) remains a popular noninvasive, readily reversible approach for pregnancy prevention and, largely off label, for control of acne, hirsutism, dysmenorrhea, irregular menstruation, menorrhagia, and other menstrual-related symptoms. Many OC formulations exist, with generics offering lower cost and comparable efficacy. Certain medical conditions, including hypertension, migraine, breast cancer, and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), present contraindications. Blood pressure measurement is the only physical examination or testing needed before prescription. Although no OC is clearly superior to others, OCs containing the second-generation progestin levonorgestrel have been associated with lower VTE risk than those containing other progestins. PMID:25841596

  17. Performance of Airborne Precision Spacing Under Realistic Wind Conditions and Limited Surveillance Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Frederick; Santos, Michel; Krueger, William; Houston, Vincent E.

    2011-01-01

    With the expected worldwide increase of air traffic during the coming decade, both the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), as well as Eurocontrol's Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program have, as part of their plans, air traffic management (ATM) solutions that can increase performance without requiring time-consuming and expensive infrastructure changes. One such solution involves the ability of both controllers and flight crews to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater accuracy than they can today. Previous research has shown that time-based spacing techniques, wherein the controller assigns a time spacing to each pair of arriving aircraft, can achieve this goal by providing greater runway delivery accuracy and producing a concomitant increase in system-wide performance. The research described herein focuses on one specific application of time-based spacing, called Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), which has evolved over the past ten years. This research furthers APS understanding by studying its performance with realistic wind conditions obtained from atmospheric sounding data and with realistic wind forecasts obtained from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) short-range weather forecast. In addition, this study investigates APS performance with limited surveillance range, as provided by the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system, and with an algorithm designed to improve APS performance when ADS-B surveillance data is unavailable. The results presented herein quantify the runway threshold delivery accuracy of APS under these conditions, and also quantify resulting workload metrics such as the number of speed changes required to maintain spacing.

  18. 78 FR 11554 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane, Limit Pilot Forces for Sidestick Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane, Limit Pilot Forces...special conditions for the Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 airplane. This airplane will...applied for a type certificate for their new Model EMB-550 airplane. The Model...

  19. Phytoplankton copper requirement under iron limited condition in the coastal Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, H.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Kumar, P. P.

    2012-04-01

    Copper, a redox reactive transition metal, plays a vital role in many cellular redox reactions. Recent investigations show that many eukaryotic microorganisms including marine and coastal diatom utilize copper to perform a high affinity iron acquisition mechanism and the requirement of copper increases with decreasing iron concentrations. However, very less information is available about the role of copper in diatom physiology. Here we report for the first time about the copper utilization by coastal diatom during iron limited condition in the Bay of Bengal coast. The diatom Chaetoceros gracilis was isolated from the Visakhapatnam coast and was grown in different copper concentrations (15nM -1000nM). The concentration of total chlorophyll, the growth rate, the concentration of biogenic silica, the ratio of biogenic silica to particulate organic carbon and the ratio of total chlorophyll to particulate organic carbon were found to be increased with increasing copper concentration up to 125nM and decreased thereafter reaching a minimum value at 1000nM. 13C of Particulate organic carbon varied inversely with increasing copper concentrations indicating the signature of enhanced carbon fixation which is in agreement with the enhanced biomass and growth rate. However, to get a better understanding about the role of copper behind the enhanced growth, we had incubated the cells simultaneously in iron replete, copper replete and in varying copper concentration in presence of 200nM of iron. Surprisingly, in all cases significant enhancement in growth and biomass production was observed. The cells grown in only iron and added with copper showed very similar increase whereas, in presence of iron increasing copper concentration did not show any enhancement effect. Increased growth and biomass production in response to iron addition shows that phytoplankton growth is limited by iron in the study area. Furthermore, this observation indicates that in case of iron limitation the coastal diatom perform a high affinity iron acquisition mechanism where copper plays a vital role. Down regulation of high affinity iron acquisition mechanism was indicated by unaltered growth when copper was added in presence of iron. Collectively, our present study shows that copper likely plays an important role in the physiology of coastal diatom apart from the toxicological studies conducted earlier. A detailed investigation is needed to understand the high affinity iron acquisition mechanism existing in coastal diatom from the study area.

  20. In vivo effects of the pure aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist GNF-351 after oral administration are limited to the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Krausz, Kristopher W; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Tanaka, Naoki; Gowda, Krishne; Amin, Shantu G; Perdew, Gary H; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose GNF-351 is a potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) antagonist that inhibits dioxin response element-dependent and independent activities. Here, the absorption, metabolism and in vivo?AHR antagonist activity of GNF-351 were investigated. Experimental Approach LC-MS metabolomics was used to analyse GNF-351 metabolism in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes were employed to determine the enzymes involved in GNF-351 metabolism. Analysis of target AHR genes was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of GNF-351 towards AHR activation. Key Results Several phase I metabolites were generated after GNF-351 was incubated with microsomes from human or mouse liver and intestine, including two oxidized GNF-351 and one tri-demethylated GNF-351. Poor absorption from the intestine resulted in no detectable levels of GNF-351 in mouse serum (0–6?h) and urine (24?h) and almost all GNF-351 was found in the faeces after 24?h. Analysis of faeces further revealed all the in vitro phase I metabolites. Novel metabolites were detected, including one di-oxidized GNF-351, two oxidized and tri-demethylated GNF-351, one dehydrogenated product of oxidized GNF-351, and one sulfation product of di-oxidized GNF-351. Cytochromes P450 were demonstrated to be the major enzymes involved in metabolism of GNF-351. After oral administration to mice, GNF-351 readily inhibited ?-naphthoflavone-induced AHR activation in ileum and colon, but not that in the liver. Conclusion and Implications While poor absorption and extensive metabolism after oral administration limited the in vivo effects of the pure AHR antagonist GNF-351 in liver, it could be used to inhibit AHR activation in intestine and colon. PMID:24417285

  1. Application of Forming Limit Criteria Based on Plastic Instability Condition to Metal Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Seong-Chan; Ku, Tae-Wan; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-Soo; Song, Woo-Jin

    Metal forming processes such as hydroforming and sheet metal forming using tubular material and thin sheet metal have been widely used in lots of industrial fields for manufacturing of various parts that could be equipped with mechanical products. However, it is not easy to design sequential processes properly because there are various design variables that affect formability of the parts. Therefore preliminary evaluation of formability for the given process should be carried out to minimize time consumption and development cost. With the advances in finite element analysis technique over the decades, the formability evaluation using numerical simulation has been conducted in view of strain distribution and final shape. In this paper, the application of forming limit criteria is carried out for the tube hydroforming and sheet metal forming processes using theoretical background based on plastic instability conditions. Consequently, it is confirmed that the local necking and diffuse necking criteria of sheet are suitable for formability evaluation of both hydroforming and sheet metal forming processes.

  2. Quality of Life Measurement for Children with Life-Threatening Conditions: Limitations and a New Framework.

    PubMed

    Huang, I-Chan; Wen, Pey-Shan; Revicki, Dennis A; Shenkman, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    About 500,000 children are coping with life-threatening conditions (LTC) in the United States every year. Different service programs such as an integrated pediatric palliative care program may benefit health-related quality of life (HRQOL) which is a great concern of this children population and their families. However, evidence is limited about the appropriate HRQOL instruments for use. This study aims to validate psychometric properties of a generic HRQOL instrument, the Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL) 4.0, for children with LTC. The parent proxy-report was used. We conducted a telephone interview to collect data of 257 parents whose children had LTC and were enrolled in Medicaid. We used standard psychometric methods to validate the PedsQL: scale reliability, item-domain convergent/discriminant validity, and known-groups validity. We also conducted Rasch analysis to assess construct validity. Results suggest that the PedsQL did not demonstrate valid psychometric properties for measuring HRQOL in this population. Rasch analysis suggests that the contents of the items in all domains did not appropriately cover the latent HRQOL of children with LTC. We document several methodological challenges in using a generic instrument to measuring HRQOL and propose a new framework to improve HRQOL measures for children with LTC. The strategies include revising the content of existing items, designing new items, adding important themes (e.g., financial challenge), and applying computerized adaptive test to better select appropriate items for individual children with LTC. PMID:21760876

  3. Public Attitudes Towards Ancillary Information Revealed by Pharmacogenetic Testing Under Limited Information Conditions

    PubMed Central

    O’Daniel, Julianne M.; Tindall, Genevieve M.; Lipkus, Isaac R.; Agans, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing can inform drug dosing and selection by aiding in estimating a patient’s genetic risk of adverse response and/or failure to respond. Some PGx tests may generate ancillary clinical information unrelated to the drug treatment question for which testing is done – an informational “side effect.” We aimed to assess public interest and concerns about PGx tests and ancillary information. Methods We conducted a random-digit-dial phone survey of a sample of the U.S. public. Results We achieved an overall response rate of 42% (n=1,139). When the potential for ancillary information was presented, 85% (±2.82%) of respondents expressed interest in PGx testing, compared to 82% (±3.02%) prior to discussion of ancillary information. Most respondents (89%±2.27%) indicated that physicians should inform patients that a PGx test may reveal ancillary risk information before testing is ordered. Respondents’ interest in actually learning of the ancillary risk finding significantly differed based on disease severity, availability of an intervention, and test validity, even after adjusting for age, gender, education and race. Conclusion Under the limited information conditions presented in the survey, the potential of ancillary information does not negatively impact public interest in PGx testing. Interest in learning ancillary information is well-aligned with the public’s desire to be informed about potential benefits and risks prior to testing, promoting patient autonomy. PMID:21633294

  4. Condition for production of circulating proton beam with intensity greater than space charge limit.

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Dudnikov

    2002-11-19

    Transverse e-p instability in proton rings could be damped by increasing the beam density and the rate of secondary particles production above the threshold level, with the corresponding decrease of unstable wavelength {lambda} below the transverse beam size h (increase of beam density n{sub b} and ion density n{sub i} above the threshold level: n{sub b} + n{sub i} > {beta}{sup 2}/(r{sub e} h{sup 2}), where r{sub e} = e{sup 2}/mc{sup 2}). Such island of stability can be reached by a fast charge-exchange injection without painting and enhanced generation of secondary plasma, which was demonstrated in a small scale Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. With successful damping of e-p instability, the intensity of circulating proton beam, with a space charge neutralization was increased up to 6 times above a space charge limit. Corresponding tune shift without space charge neutralization should be up to {Delta}v=0.85 x 6 (in the ring with v = 0.85). In this paper, they review experimental observations of transverse instability of proton beams in various rings. they also discuss methods which can be used to damp the instability. Such experimental data could be useful for verification of computer simulation tools developed for the studies of the space charge and instabilities in realistic conditions.

  5. Secreted Pyomelanin of Legionella pneumophila Promotes Bacterial Iron Uptake and Growth under Iron-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huaixin; Chatfield, Christa H.; Liles, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical to the growth and virulence of Legionella pneumophila. Previously, we found that L. pneumophila uses both a ferrisiderophore pathway and ferrous iron transport to obtain iron. We now report that two molecules secreted by L. pneumophila, homogentisic acid (HGA) and its polymerized variant (HGA-melanin, a pyomelanin), are able to directly mediate the reduction of various ferric iron salts. Furthermore, HGA, synthetic HGA-melanin, and HGA-melanin derived from bacterial supernatants enhanced the ability of L. pneumophila and other species of Legionella to take up radiolabeled iron. Enhanced iron uptake was not observed with a ferrous iron transport mutant. Thus, HGA and HGA-melanin mediate ferric iron reduction, with the resulting ferrous iron being available to the bacterium for uptake. Upon further testing of L. pneumophila culture supernatants, we found that significant amounts of ferric and ferrous iron were associated with secreted HGA-melanin. Importantly, a pyomelanin-containing fraction obtained from a wild-type culture supernatant was able to stimulate the growth of iron-starved legionellae. That the corresponding supernatant fraction obtained from a nonpigmented mutant culture did not stimulate growth demonstrated that HGA-melanin is able to both promote iron uptake and enhance growth under iron-limiting conditions. Indicative of a complementary role in iron acquisition, HGA-melanin levels were inversely related to the levels of siderophore activity. Compatible with a role in the ecology and pathogenesis of L. pneumophila, HGA and HGA-melanin were effective at reducing and releasing iron from both insoluble ferric hydroxide and the mammalian iron chelates ferritin and transferrin. PMID:23980114

  6. Blood culture series benefit may be limited to selected clinical conditions: time to reassess.

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Simeunovic, G; Sharma, M; Fakih, M G; Johnson, L B; Briski, L; Lebar, W

    2015-04-01

    Blood cultures are often submitted as series (two to three sets per 24 hours) to maximize sample recovery. We assessed the actual benefit of additional sets. Blood cultures submitted from adults (?18 years old) over 1 year (1 February 2012 to 31 January 2013) were examined. The medical records of patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Cultures with commensal organisms were considered contamination in the absence of a source and clinical findings. The impact of additional sets on antibiotic therapy was estimated. We evaluated 15 394 blood cultures. They were submitted as two to five sets per 24 hours in 12 236 (79.5%) instances. Pathogens were detected in 1227 sets, representing 741 bacteremias, of which 618 (83.4%) were detected in the first set and 123 (16.6%) in the additional sets. Pathogens missed in the first set were recovered from patients receiving antibiotics (n = 72; 58.5%) and after undergoing a procedure (n = 54; 43.9%). The additional sets' results could have influenced antibiotic therapy in 76/6235 (1.2%) instances, including 40 (0.6%) antibiotic switches and 36 (0.6%) possible extensions of therapy. The potential impact of the detection of missed pathogens on antibiotic therapy was not apparent in patients who had an endovascular infection (26/27, 96.3%) and those who lacked an obvious source of pathogens (10/10, 100%). These findings suggest that one blood culture is probably adequate in patients with an obvious source of pathogens. Blood culture series are beneficial in patients without an obvious source of pathogens and in those with endovascular infections. It is time to reassess the benefit of blood culture series, perhaps limiting them to selected conditions. PMID:25658519

  7. Post-oral fat stimulation of intake and conditioned flavor preference in C57BL/6J mice: A concentration-response study.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2014-04-22

    Fat appetite is determined not only by orosensory (flavor) stimuli but also by the post-oral actions of dietary fat, which promote increased attraction to the flavors of high-fat foods. Experiment 1 presents a concentration-response analysis of how intragastric (IG) fat self-infusions stimulate intake and condition flavor preferences in C57BL/6J mice trained 1h/day. Separate groups of food-restricted mice consumed a flavored saccharin solution (the CS-) paired with IG self-infusions of water (Test 0) followed by a different flavored solution (the CS+) paired with IG self-infusions of 1.6, 3.2, 6.4 or 12.8% Intralipid (IL, soybean oil) (Tests 1-3). Following additional CS- and CS+ training sessions, a two-bottle CS+ vs. CS- choice test was conducted without infusions. Infusions of 3.2-12.8% IL stimulated CS+ licking in the first test session and more so in subsequent test sessions, and also conditioned significant CS+ preferences. These effects were similar to those previously observed with isocaloric glucose infusions (8-32%). IG infusion of 1.6% IL stimulated intake slightly but did not condition a CS+ preference comparable to the actions of isocaloric 4% glucose. Experiment 2 compared these subthreshold IL and glucose concentrations with that of a 1.6% IL+4% glucose infusion. This mixture stimulated 1-h CS+ licking more rapidly but generated a preference similar to that of 1.6% IL. In 23h/day tests, however, the IL+glucose mixture stimulated greater CS+ intakes and preferences than did 1.6% IL or 4% glucose. These findings show that fat, like glucose, rapidly generates concentration-dependent post-oral signals that stimulate intake and enhance preferences for energy-rich foods in mice. PMID:24582671

  8. Head-to-head, randomised, crossover study of oral versus subcutaneous methotrexate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: drug-exposure limitations of oral methotrexate at doses ?15?mg may be overcome with subcutaneous administration

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, Michael H; Jaffe, Jonathan S; Freundlich, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the relative bioavailability, safety and tolerability of oral methotrexate (MTX) and subcutaneous (SC) MTX administered via an auto-injector (MTXAI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In this randomised, multicenter, open-label, three-way crossover study, patients ?18?years with adult RA undergoing treatment with MTX for ?3?months were assigned to receive MTX 10, 15, 20 and 25?mg weekly in a random sequence of three treatments: oral, SC into the abdomen and SC into the thigh. For 24?h after administration of each treatment, blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis and injection sites were assessed. Results Forty-seven patients completed the study. Systemic exposure of oral MTX plateaued at doses ?15?mg/week. In contrast, SC MTX demonstrated a linear increase in systemic exposure that was greater than oral MTX at each dose. No unexpected AEs were noted for either formulation. Conclusions Unlike oral MTX, the systemic exposure of SC MTX did not plateau over the doses studied, particularly at doses ?15?mg/week. In this study, higher systemic MTX exposure was not associated with increases in AEs. Patients with an inadequate clinical response to oral MTX may benefit from higher drug exposure by switching to SC MTX. Trial registration number NCT01618968. PMID:24728329

  9. 1. Overview 2. Formulation 3. Control limits 4. Sample Path 5. Summary Optimal policy under weaker conditions

    E-print Network

    Ding, Yu

    conditions Eunshin Byon1 1Texas A&M University 1 / 18 #12;1. Overview 2. Formulation 3. Control limits 4 transition is not to state I + 1. ei : I + 1 row vector with a "1" in the ith position and "0" elsewhere. 41) (3) OB(y, ) = co + i V(y, ei )i (4) (5) 5 / 18 #12;1. Overview 2. Formulation 3. Control limits 4

  10. Utility and limitation of calciuric response to oral calcium load as a measure of intestinal calcium absorption: comparison with isotopic fractional calcium absorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Zerwekh; K. Sakhaee; C. Y. Pak

    1981-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium (Ca), indirectly measured from the calciuric response to oral Ca load (1g), was compared to the more directly obtained isotopic fractional absorption, alpha (from the fecal recovery of orally administered 47Ca). In 17 normal subjects and 30 patients with absorptive hypercalciuria (AH), there was a significant (P less than 0.001) correlation of alpha with the

  11. Hydrodynamic Limit for a Hamiltonian system with Boundary Conditions and Conservative Noise

    E-print Network

    Recanati, Catherine

    and energy are locally conserved. We prove that in the macroscopic limit the distributions of the elongation that the 3 conserved quantities (elongation, momentum and energy) satisfy in the limit an autonomous closed. Stochastic pertur- bation of the dynamics that conserves energy and momentum can give such ergodic property

  12. An Analysis of Sequential Variables in Pavlovian Conditioning Employing Extended and Limited Acquisition Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ronald Mellado; Capaldi, E. John

    2006-01-01

    Sequential theory's memory model of learning has been successfully applied in response contingent instrumental conditioning experiments (Capaldi, 1966, 1967, 1994; Capaldi & Miller, 2003). However, it has not been systematically tested in nonresponse contingent Pavlovian conditioning experiments. The present experiments attempted to determine if…

  13. Oral electricity.

    PubMed

    Certosimo, A J; O'Connor, R P

    1996-01-01

    "Oral electricity," "electrogalvanism," or "galvanic currents" has long been recognized as a potential source of oral pain and discomfort. This phenomenon of oral galvanism results from the difference in electrical potential between dissimilar restorative metals located in the mouth. In this case report, the literature is reviewed, and an interesting case study'is presented. The patient's clinical presentation, and the duration and constancy of the oral symptoms, pose diagnostic challenges. A simple, yet effective treatment regimen is proposed. PMID:8957826

  14. GCM Simulations of Neoproterozoic "Snowball Earth" Conditions: Implications for the Environmental Limits on Terrestrial Metazoans and Their Extraterrestrial Analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohl, L. E.; Chandler, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth intervals provide excellent opportunities to examine the environmental limits on terrestrial metazoans. A series of GCM simulations was run in order to quantify climatic conditions during these intervals. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Glycolytic flux is conditionally correlated with ATP concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a chemostat study under carbon- or nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, C; Nilsson, A; Blomberg, A; Gustafsson, L

    1997-01-01

    Anaerobic and aerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed at a constant dilution rate of 0.10 h(-1). The glucose concentration was kept constant, whereas the nitrogen concentration was gradually decreasing; i.e., the conditions were changed from glucose and energy limitation to nitrogen limitation and energy excess. This experimental setup enabled the glycolytic rate to be separated from the growth rate. There was an extensive uncoupling between anabolic energy requirements and catabolic energy production when the energy source was present in excess both aerobically and anaerobically. To increase the catabolic activity even further, experiments were carried out in the presence of 5 mM acetic acid or benzoic acid. However, there was almost no effect with acetate addition, whereas both respiratory (aerobically) and fermentative activities were elevated in the presence of benzoic acid. There was a strong negative correlation between glycolytic flux and intracellular ATP content; i.e., the higher the ATP content, the lower the rate of glycolysis. No correlation could be found with the other nucleotides tested (ADP, GTP, and UTP) or with the ATP/ADP ratio. Furthermore, a higher rate of glycolysis was not accompanied by an increasing level of glycolytic enzymes. On the contrary, the glycolytic enzymes decreased with increasing flux. The most pronounced reduction was obtained for HXK2 and ENO1. There was also a correlation between the extent of carbohydrate accumulation and glycolytic flux. A high accumulation was obtained at low glycolytic rates under glucose limitation, whereas nitrogen limitation during conditions of excess carbon and energy resulted in more or less complete depletion of intracellular storage carbohydrates irrespective of anaerobic or aerobic conditions. However, there was one difference in that glycogen dominated anaerobically whereas under aerobic conditions, trehalose was the major carbohydrate accumulated. Possible mechanisms which may explain the strong correlation between glycolytic flux, storage carbohydrate accumulation, and ATP concentrations are discussed. PMID:9393686

  16. 42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions...HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.12...

  17. 42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions...HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.12...

  18. Effects of operating conditions, compression ratio, and gasoline reformate on SI engine knock limits

    E-print Network

    Gerty, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    A set of experiments was performed to investigate the effects of air-fuel ratio, inlet boost pressure, hydrogen rich fuel reformate, and compression ratio on engine knock behavior. For each condition the effect of spark ...

  19. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review

    PubMed Central

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V.; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  20. 21 CFR 520.530 - Cythioate oral liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.530 Cythioate oral liquid. (a) Specifications... (3) Limitations. For oral use in dogs only. Do not...stress, or recovering from surgery. Federal law restricts...

  1. 21 CFR 520.530 - Cythioate oral liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.530 Cythioate oral liquid. (a) Specifications... (3) Limitations. For oral use in dogs only. Do not...stress, or recovering from surgery. Federal law restricts...

  2. 21 CFR 520.530 - Cythioate oral liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.530 Cythioate oral liquid. (a) Specifications... (3) Limitations. For oral use in dogs only. Do not...stress, or recovering from surgery. Federal law restricts...

  3. 40 CFR 122.44 - Establishing limitations, standards, and other permit conditions (applicable to State NPDES...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (a)(1) Technology-based effluent...dischargers, these technology based limitations...discharger subject to technology-based effluent...levels from intake water and without any...Part C of Safe Drinking Water Act...permit issued to a treatment works treating...

  4. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ...Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine Stoppage AGENCY: Federal...include engine size and the potential torque load imposed by sudden engine stoppage. These...envisioned when Sec. 25.361, which addresses loads imposed by engine seizure, was...

  5. Instability Driven by Sheath Boundary Conditions and Limited to Divertor Legs

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Cohen, R H

    2003-09-03

    An instability driven by an electron temperature gradient in combination with sheath boundary conditions at a divertor plate is considered. It is shown that there exists a mode localized between the divertor plate and the x point. Further propagation of the mode is terminated by a strong shear near the x point. A ''heuristic'' boundary condition at the control surface situated somewhat below the x point is suggested. The mode manifests a strong dependence on the radial tilt of the divertor plate, thereby providing some degree of control over the plasma transport in the divertor leg. Estimates of the diffusion coefficient show that it may reach the Bohm value.

  6. Adoption of improved irrigation and drainage reduction technologies under limiting environmental conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ariel Dinar; Mark B. Campbell; David Zilberman

    1992-01-01

    Modern irrigation technologies have been suggested as a means of conserving scarce water and reducing environmental pollution caused by irrigated agriculture. This paper applies an economic model of technology selection that provides a general framework to analyzing adoption of irrigation technologies under various environmental conditions. Data from the San Joaquin Valley of California is used to verify the theoretical relationships.

  7. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...all benefits. However, benefits for pregnancy are not available until the individual...plan for 12 months to be eligible for pregnancy benefits is a subterfuge for a preexisting...to exclude benefits for a condition (pregnancy) that arose before the effective...

  8. Roles of NMDA and dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the acquisition and expression of flavor preferences conditioned by oral glucose in rats.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, J A D; Coke, T; Icaza-Cukali, D; Khalifa, N; Bodnar, R J

    2014-10-01

    Animals learn to prefer flavors associated with the intake of sugar (sucrose, fructose, glucose) and fat (corn oil: CO) solutions. Conditioned flavor preferences (CFP) have been elicited for sugars based on orosensory (flavor-flavor: e.g., fructose-CFP) and post-ingestive (flavor-nutrient: e.g., intragastric (IG) glucose-CFP) processes. Dopamine (DA) D1, DA D2 and NMDA receptor antagonism differentially eliminate the acquisition and expression of fructose-CFP and IG glucose-CFP. However, pharmacological analysis of fat (CO)-CFP, mediated by both flavor-flavor and flavor-nutrient processes, indicated that acquisition and expression of fat-CFP were minimally affected by systemic DA D1 and D2 antagonists, and were reduced by NMDA antagonism. Therefore, the present study examined whether systemic DA D1 (SCH23390), DA D2 (raclopride) or NMDA (MK-801) receptor antagonists altered acquisition and/or expression of CFP induced by oral glucose that should be mediated by both flavor-flavor and flavor-nutrient processes. Oral glucose-CFP was elicited following by training rats to drink one novel flavor (CS+, e.g., cherry) mixed in 8% glucose and another flavor (CS-, e.g., grape) mixed in 2% glucose. In expression studies, food-restricted rats drank these solutions in one-bottle sessions (2 h) over 10 days. Subsequent two-bottle tests with the CS+ and CS- flavors mixed in 2% glucose occurred 0.5 h after systemic administration of vehicle (VEH), SCH23390 (50-800 nmol/kg), raclopride (50-800 nmol/kg) or MK-801 (50-200 ?g/kg). Rats displayed a robust CS+ preference following VEH treatment (94-95%) which was significantly though marginally attenuated by SCH23390 (67-70%), raclopride (77%) or MK-801 (70%) at doses that also markedly reduced overall CS intake. In separate acquisition studies, rats received VEH, SCH23390 (50-400 nmol/kg), raclopride (50-400 nmol/kg) or MK-801 (100 ?g/kg) 0.5 h prior to ten 1-bottle training trials with CS+/8%G and CS-/2%G training solutions that was followed by six 2-bottle CS+ vs. CS- tests in 2% glucose conducted without injections. The significant and persistent CS+ preferences observed in the VEH (94-98%) group was significantly reduced by rats receiving SCH23390 at 400 nmol/kg (65-73%), raclopride at 200 or 400 nmol/kg (76-82%) or MK-801 at 100 ?g/kg (68-69%). Thus, systemic DA D1 and DA D2 receptor antagonism produced smaller reductions in the expression of oral glucose-CFP relative to fructose-CFP or IG-glucose-CFP. Correspondingly, systemic DA D1, DA D2 and NMDA receptor antagonism also produced smaller reductions in the acquisition of oral glucose-CFP relative to fructose-CFP or IG-glucose-CFP. These data suggest, but do not prove, that the magnitude and persistence of these receptor antagonist effects upon sugar-CFP might depend upon the individual or combined engagement of flavor-flavor and flavor-nutrient processes. PMID:25065714

  9. Validity conditions for stochastic chemical kinetics in diffusion-limited systems.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Daniel T; Petzold, Linda R; Seitaridou, Effrosyni

    2014-02-01

    The chemical master equation (CME) and the mathematically equivalent stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) assume that the reactant molecules in a chemically reacting system are "dilute" and "well-mixed" throughout the containing volume. Here we clarify what those two conditions mean, and we show why their satisfaction is necessary in order for bimolecular reactions to physically occur in the manner assumed by the CME and the SSA. We prove that these conditions are closely connected, in that a system will stay well-mixed if and only if it is dilute. We explore the implications of these validity conditions for the reaction-diffusion (or spatially inhomogeneous) extensions of the CME and the SSA to systems whose containing volumes are not necessarily well-mixed, but can be partitioned into cubical subvolumes (voxels) that are. We show that the validity conditions, together with an additional condition that is needed to ensure the physical validity of the diffusion-induced jump probability rates of molecules between voxels, require the voxel edge length to have a strictly positive lower bound. We prove that if the voxel edge length is steadily decreased in a way that respects that lower bound, the average rate at which bimolecular reactions occur in the reaction-diffusion CME and SSA will remain constant, while the average rate of diffusive transfer reactions will increase as the inverse square of the voxel edge length. We conclude that even though the reaction-diffusion CME and SSA are inherently approximate, and cannot be made exact by shrinking the voxel size to zero, they should nevertheless be useful in many practical situations. PMID:24511926

  10. Validity conditions for stochastic chemical kinetics in diffusion-limited systems

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Daniel T.; Petzold, Linda R.; Seitaridou, Effrosyni

    2014-01-01

    The chemical master equation (CME) and the mathematically equivalent stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) assume that the reactant molecules in a chemically reacting system are “dilute” and “well-mixed” throughout the containing volume. Here we clarify what those two conditions mean, and we show why their satisfaction is necessary in order for bimolecular reactions to physically occur in the manner assumed by the CME and the SSA. We prove that these conditions are closely connected, in that a system will stay well-mixed if and only if it is dilute. We explore the implications of these validity conditions for the reaction-diffusion (or spatially inhomogeneous) extensions of the CME and the SSA to systems whose containing volumes are not necessarily well-mixed, but can be partitioned into cubical subvolumes (voxels) that are. We show that the validity conditions, together with an additional condition that is needed to ensure the physical validity of the diffusion-induced jump probability rates of molecules between voxels, require the voxel edge length to have a strictly positive lower bound. We prove that if the voxel edge length is steadily decreased in a way that respects that lower bound, the average rate at which bimolecular reactions occur in the reaction-diffusion CME and SSA will remain constant, while the average rate of diffusive transfer reactions will increase as the inverse square of the voxel edge length. We conclude that even though the reaction-diffusion CME and SSA are inherently approximate, and cannot be made exact by shrinking the voxel size to zero, they should nevertheless be useful in many practical situations. PMID:24511926

  11. The condition of a finite Markov chain and perturbation bounds for the limiting probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C. D., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The inequalities bounding the relative error the norm of w- w squiggly/the norm of w are exhibited by a very simple function of E and A. Let T denote the transition matrix of an ergodic chain, C, and let A = I - T. Let E be a perturbation matrix such that T squiggly = T - E is also the transition matrix of an ergodic chain, C squiggly. Let w and w squiggly denote the limiting probability (row) vectors for C and C squiggly. The inequality is the best one possible. This bound can be significant in the numerical determination of the limiting probabilities for an ergodic chain. In addition to presenting a sharp bound for the norm of w-w squiggly/the norm of w an explicit expression for w squiggly will be derived in which w squiggly is given as a function of E, A, w and some other related terms.

  12. Performance of transient limiters under laboratory, simulated, and rocket-triggered lightning conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hasbrouck, R.T.; Johnson, J.P.; Breitmeier, J.

    1989-07-02

    We have designed and tested a prototype system that implements a lightning-protection method referred to as the ''fortress concept.'' The fortress, a structure similar to a Faraday cage, protects the critical system by surrounding it with a continuous metallic skin. Each electrical conductor that must enter the fortress is enclosed within a cable, which is, in turn, enclosed in a metallic shield that terminates at the entry point and is electrically bonded to the fortress' outer metallic surface. Within the fortress, each penetrating conductor is protected by a transient limiter. The system was tested by means of full-threat-level simulated lightning and actual lightening triggered by rockets. Several limited components were subsequently tested by using a laboratory-type surge generator to investigate certain anomalous responses. This paper reviews the fortress concept, discusses the operation of the limiters, and examines their performance. Explanations are offered for the anomalous responses, and several important design considerations and trade-offs are offered. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  13. The limits of the adaptation of life to extreme conditions (in connection with problems of exobiology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksenov, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Accommodation is discussed as a universal evolutionary principle which essentially will apply to all life forms, regardless of chemical base (carbon, silicon, etc.). Life forms must either adapt to extreme conditions or perish, and for any life form an extremum factor is any significant deviation in environmental parameters. The possibility of life forms existing in specific extraterrestrial environments is discussed, and a conclusion is drawn which unequivocally states that through many forms of accommodation life is possible in many different environments.

  14. Laser-assisted decomposition of alkylsiloxane monolayers at ambient conditions: rapid patterning below the diffraction limit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Balgar; S. Franzka; N. Hartmann

    2006-01-01

    Rapid patterning of octadecylsiloxane monolayers at ambient conditions is demonstrated using a focused laser beam at a wavelength\\u000a of 514 nm. Surface-oxidized silicon substrates have been coated and subsequently processed at distinct laser powers over a\\u000a wide range of writing speeds up to 25 mm\\/s. The method allows for a well-confined local decomposition of the monolayer with\\u000a an unexpectedly high lateral resolution

  15. Effective partial nitrification to nitrite by down-flow hanging sponge reactor under limited oxygen condition.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hui-Ping; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tandukar, Madan; Harada, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    Combining the processes of partial nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) is an attractive wastewater-treatment technology for nitrogen removal. In this study we investigated partial nitrification by implementing a closed down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor operated at controlled oxygen concentrations. Basic concept of DHS process is similar to that of trickling filter, in which oxygen concentration can be easily manipulated by controlling airflow to the reactor. The closed reactor was fed with artificial wastewater containing NH(4)Cl and operated with an HRT of 1.5h at 30 degrees C. Oxygen inside the reactor was maintained below 3% (1.2mgDO x L(-1)) (DO-dissolved oxygen) except during the startup periods. Five months of continuous operation showed that there was a strong relationship between oxygen concentration and nitrite production. The ratio of nitrite produced relative to ammonium oxidized increased by decreasing oxygen concentration. Partial nitrification was satisfactorily accomplished under oxygen limitation at around 0.5% in the gas phase (0.2mgDOL(-1)). The system showed a high ammonium-removal rate, at a maximum of 1.46kg NH(4)(+)-Nm(-3)day(-1), even at limited oxygen concentration. We also found that oxygen concentration played an important role in the production of nitrous oxide, which increased with decreasing oxygen concentration. PMID:17141821

  16. Changing oral care needs in the United States: The continuing need for oral medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig S. Miller; Joel B. Epstein; Ellis H. Hall; David Sirois

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to provide oral care providers evidence of oral conditions and medical compromise that is impacting the oral health and oral health needs of the public. Design: Data were analyzed based on current epidemiologic data, derived in large part from the Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, the National Center for Health Statistics, National Health

  17. 3D scalar model as a 4D perfect conductor limit: Dimensional reduction and variational boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Edery, Ariel [Physics Department, Bishop's University, 2600 College Street, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1M 0C8 (Canada); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Kohn Hall, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Graham, Noah [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Kohn Hall, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States); MacDonald, Ilana [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Physics Department, Bishop's University, 2600 College Street, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1M 0C8 (Canada)

    2009-06-15

    Under dimensional reduction, a system in D spacetime dimensions will not necessarily yield its D-1-dimensional analog version. Among other things, this result will depend on the boundary conditions and the dimension D of the system. We investigate this question for scalar and Abelian gauge fields under boundary conditions that obey the symmetries of the action. We apply our findings to the Casimir piston, an ideal system for detecting boundary effects. Our investigation is not limited to extra dimensions and we show that the original piston scenario proposed in 2004, a toy model involving a scalar field in 3D (2+1) dimensions, can be obtained via dimensional reduction from a more realistic 4D electromagnetic (EM) system. We show that for perfect conductor conditions, a D-dimensional EM field reduces to a D-1 scalar field and not its lower-dimensional version. For Dirichlet boundary conditions, no theory is recovered under dimensional reduction and the Casimir pressure goes to zero in any dimension. This ''zero Dirichlet'' result is useful for understanding the EM case. We then identify two special systems where the lower-dimensional version is recovered in any dimension: systems with perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) and Neumann boundary conditions. We show that these two boundary conditions can be obtained from a variational procedure in which the action vanishes outside the bounded region. The fields are free to vary on the surface and have zero modes, which survive after dimensional reduction.

  18. Growth and siderophore production of Xylella fastidiosa under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Pacheco, Flávia Tereza Hansen; Rodrigues, Jorge Luiz Mazza; Carrilho, Emanuel; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the production of siderophores by Xylella fastidiosa from the citrus bacteria isolate 31b9a5c (FAPESP - ONSA, Brazil) was investigated. The preliminary evidence supporting the existence of siderophore in X. fastidiosa was found during the evaluation of sequencing data generated in our lab using the BLAST-X tool, which indicated putative open reading frames (ORFs) associated with iron-binding proteins. In an iron-limited medium siderophores were detected in the supernatant of X. fastidiosa cultures. The endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens was also evaluated. Capillary electrophoresis was used to separate putative siderophores produced by X. fastidiosa. The bacterial culture supernatants of X. fastidiosa were identified negative for hydroxamate and catechol and positive for M. extorquens that secreted hydroxamate-type siderophores. PMID:16255148

  19. Morphine Stimulates Cell Migration of Oral Epithelial Cells by Delta-Opioid Receptor Activation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nada Charbaji; Monika Schäfer-Korting; Sarah Küchler

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most common side effects of chemoradiation regimens and manifestation can be dose-limiting for the therapy, can impair the patient's nutritional condition and quality of life due to severe pain. The therapeutic options are limited; often only an alleviation of the symptoms such as pain reduction by using systemic opioids is possible. Stimulating opioid receptors

  20. Conditions and limitations on learning in the adaptive management of mallard harvests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, F.A.; Kendall, W.L.; Dubovsky, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1995, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service adopted a protocol for the adaptive management of waterfowl hunting regulations (AHM) to help reduce uncertainty about the magnitude of sustainable harvests. To date, the AHM process has focused principally on the midcontinent population of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), whose dynamics are described by 4 alternative models. Collectively, these models express uncertainty (or disagreement) about whether harvest is an additive or a compensatory form of mortality and whether the reproductive process is weakly or strongly density-dependent. Each model is associated with a probability or 'weight,' which describes its relative ability to predict changes in population size. These Bayesian probabilities are updated annually using a comparison of population size predicted under each model with that observed by a monitoring program. The current AHM process is passively adaptive, in the sense that there is no a priori consideration of how harvest decisions might affect discrimination among models. We contrast this approach with an actively adaptive approach, in which harvest decisions are used in part to produce the learning needed to increase long-term management performance. Our investigation suggests that the passive approach is expected to perform nearly as well as an optimal actively adaptive approach, particularly considering the nature of the model set, management objectives and constraints, and current regulatory alternatives. We offer some comments about the nature of the biological hypotheses being tested and describe some of the inherent limitations on learning in the AHM process.

  1. Moglichkeiten und Grenzen von Modellen zur Beschreibung der Mundlichen Sprachkonpetenz Bilingualer precher (Possibilities and Limitations of Models for Describing the Oral Language Competence of Bilingual Speakers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliari, Angeliki

    A model for describing the oral language competence of bilingual speakers is presented. The model provides for the evaluation of the speaker on the phonological (based on native-speaker judgment), morphological (based on the formal written language), syntactic (based, in part on the complexity of the constructions used) and semantic pragmatic…

  2. Profiling of spatial metabolite distributions in wheat leaves under normal and nitrate limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Allwood, J William; Chandra, Surya; Xu, Yun; Dunn, Warwick B; Correa, Elon; Hopkins, Laura; Goodacre, Royston; Tobin, Alyson K; Bowsher, Caroline G

    2015-07-01

    The control and interaction between nitrogen and carbon assimilatory pathways is essential in both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic tissue in order to support metabolic processes without compromising growth. Physiological differences between the basal and mature region of wheat (Triticum aestivum) primary leaves confirmed that there was a change from heterotrophic to autotrophic metabolism. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the suitability and phenotypic reproducibility of the leaf growth conditions. Principal Component-Discriminant Function Analysis (PC-DFA) revealed distinct clustering between base, and tip sections of the developing wheat leaf, and from plants grown in the presence or absence of nitrate. Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight/Mass Spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) combined with multivariate and univariate analyses, and Bayesian network (BN) analysis, distinguished different tissues and confirmed the physiological switch from high rates of respiration to photosynthesis along the leaf. The operation of nitrogen metabolism impacted on the levels and distribution of amino acids, organic acids and carbohydrates within the wheat leaf. In plants grown in the presence of nitrate there was reduced levels of a number of sugar metabolites in the leaf base and an increase in maltose levels, possibly reflecting an increase in starch turnover. The value of using this combined metabolomics analysis for further functional investigations in the future are discussed. PMID:25680480

  3. Oral Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be caused by several things, including: Poor oral hygiene Some foods Dentures Gum disease Dry mouth Tobacco use Respiratory, ... other health problems Some medicines Practicing good oral hygiene and avoiding tobacco and some foods often helps people with bad-smelling breath. You ...

  4. Determination of Bacterial Weathering Ability in Nutrient Limited Conditions on Biotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, M. R.; Harsh, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial and fungal communities facilitate the weathering of minerals in oligotrophic soils. The bacterial communities reside in biofilms, consisting of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) such as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, and nuclei acids. Biotite, a 2:1 aluminosilicate mica, is a common primary mineral found in these low nutrient soils and is a source of potassium, magnesium and iron for both microorganisms and plants. Studies show that bacteria, when incubated with biotite flakes, can remove iron, potassium, and magnesium at higher quantities and increased rates compared to abiotic controls (Balogh-Brunstad et al., 2008; Calvaruso et al., 2006; Hopf et al. 2008; Uroz et al., 2007 and 2009). How this happens mechanistically is still unclear and this study seeks to shed light on this issue. We hypothesize that weathering by bacteria is selective; i.e., that the mechanism will depend on the limiting nutrient. Using a drip flow biofilm reactor, biofilms are grown on biotite coupons under non-turbulent, low sheer flow, with four different nutrient treatments. The nutrient treatments include a complete nutrient solution and the same solution without K, Mg, or Fe. In each treatment, we determine the concentration and cumulative release of each cation in the effluent. Congruent dissolution of biotite indicates that weathering is nonselective whereas incongruent dissolution suggests that the bacteria alter the weathering mechanism for a specific nutrient. The bacteria are selected from a bacterial inoculum collected from the roots of young White Pine (Pinus strobus) trees in the Saint Joseph National Forest, Idaho. The bacteria are isolated on plates and the best weathering species are selected using a microplate bioassay technique to determine the concentrations of K, Ca, Mg, and protons colorimetrically.

  5. Baclofen, raclopride, and naltrexone differentially affect intake of fat/sucrose mixtures under limited access conditions.

    PubMed

    Wong, K J; Wojnicki, F H W; Corwin, R L W

    2009-05-01

    This study assessed the effects of the opioid antagonist naltrexone, the dopamine 2-like (D2) antagonist raclopride, and the GABA(B) agonist baclofen on consumption of fat/sucrose mixtures (FSM) using a limited access protocol. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were grouped according to two schedules of access (Daily [D] or Intermittent [I]) to an optional FSM. Each FSM was created by whipping 3.2% (L), 10% (M), or 32% (H) powdered sugar into 100% vegetable shortening in a w/w manner (n=10 per group). One-hour intakes of the IL and IM groups were significantly greater than intakes of the respective DL and DM groups, thus fulfilling our operational definition of binge-type eating in these groups. Baclofen reduced intakes of the L and M mixtures regardless of access schedule, but failed to reduce intake of the H mixture. Naltrexone reduced intake in all groups, but potency was greater in IL rats than in DL rats. Furthermore, potency was attenuated in Intermittent rats, but enhanced in Daily rats, at higher sucrose concentrations. Raclopride reduced intake in the DL and stimulated intake in the IL groups, reduced intake in both M groups, and was without effect in both H groups. These results indicate that fat/sucrose mixtures containing relatively low concentrations of sucrose allow distinctions to be made between: 1) intakes stimulated by different access schedules and 2) opioid and dopaminergic modulation of those intakes. These results also suggest that brief bouts of food consumption involving fatty, sugar-rich foods may prove to be particularly resistant to pharmacological intervention. PMID:19217918

  6. Impact of Australian Dekkera bruxellensis strains grown under oxygen-limited conditions on model wine composition and aroma.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Chris D; Langhans, Geoffrey; Henschke, Paul A; Grbin, Paul R

    2013-12-01

    Spoilage of red wine by the yeast species Dekkera bruxellensis is a common problem for the global wine industry. When conditions are conducive for growth of these yeasts in wine, they efficiently convert non-volatile hydroxycinnamic acids into aroma-active ethylphenols, thereby reducing the quality of the wine. It has been demonstrated previously that dissolved oxygen is a key factor which stimulates D. bruxellensis growth in wine. We demonstrate that whereas the presence of oxygen accelerates the growth of this species, oxygen-limited conditions favour 4-ethylphenol production. Consequently, we evaluated wine spoilage potential of three D. bruxellensis strains (AWRI1499, AWRI1608 and AWRI1613) under oxygen-limited conditions. Each strain was cultured in a chemically-defined wine medium and the fermentation products were analysed using HPLC and HS-SPME-GC/MS. The strains displayed different growth characteristics but were equally capable of producing ethylphenols. On the other hand, significant differences were observed for 18 of the remaining 33 metabolites analysed and duo-trio sensory analysis indicated significant aroma differences between wines inoculated with AWRI1499 and AWRI1613. When these wines were spiked with low concentrations of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol, no sensorial differences could be perceived. Together these data suggest that the three predominant D. bruxellensis strains previously isolated during a large survey of Australian wineries do not differ substantively in their capacity to grow in, and spoil, a model wine medium. PMID:24010603

  7. Oil viscosity limitation on dispersibility of crude oil under simulated at-sea conditions in a large wave tank.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Ken; Belore, Randy C; Mullin, Joseph V; Guarino, Alan

    2010-09-01

    This study determined the limiting oil viscosity for chemical dispersion of oil spills under simulated sea conditions in the large outdoor wave tank at the US National Oil Spill Response Test Facility in New Jersey. Dispersant effectiveness tests were completed using crude oils with viscosities ranging from 67 to 40,100 cP at test temperature. Tests produced an effectiveness-viscosity curve with three phases when oil was treated with Corexit 9500 at a dispersant-to-oil ratio of 1:20. The oil viscosity that limited chemical dispersion under simulated at-sea conditions was in the range of 18,690 cP to 33,400 cP. Visual observations and measurements of oil concentrations and droplet size distributions in the water under treated and control slicks correlated well with direct measurements of effectiveness. The dispersant effectiveness versus oil viscosity relationship under simulated at sea conditions at Ohmsett was most similar to those from similar tests made using the Institut Francais du Pétrole and Exxon Dispersant Effectiveness (EXDET) test methods. PMID:20723943

  8. A strong conditional mutualism limits and enhances seed dispersal and germination of a tropical palm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klinger, R.; Rejmanek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Seed predation and seed dispersal can have strong effects on early life history stages of plants. These processes have often been studied as individual effects, but the degree to which their relative importance co-varies with seed predator abundance and how this influences seed germination rates is poorly understood. Therefore, we used a combination of observations and field experiments to determine the degree to which germination rates of the palm Astrocaryum mexicanum varied with abundance of a small mammal seed predator/disperser, Heteromysdesmarestianus, in a lowland tropical forest. Patterns of abundance of the two species were strongly related; density of H. desmarestianus was low in sites with low density of A. mexicanum and vice versa. Rates of predation and dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds depended on abundance of H. desmarestianus; sites with high densities of H. desmarestianus had the highest rates of seed predation and lowest rates of seed germination, but a greater total number of seeds were dispersed and there was greater density of seedlings, saplings, and adults of A. mexicanum in these sites. When abundance of H. desmarestianus was experimentally reduced, rates of seed predation decreased, but so did dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds. Critically, rates of germination of dispersed seeds were 5 times greater than undispersed seeds. The results suggest that the relationship between A. mexicanum and H. desmarestianus is a conditional mutualism that results in a strong local effect on the abundance of each species. However, the magnitude and direction of these effects are determined by the relative strength of opposing, but related, mechanisms. A. mexicanum nuts provide H. desmarestianus with a critical food resource, and while seed predation on A. mexicanum nuts by H. desmarestianus is very intense, A. mexicanum ultimately benefits because of the relatively high germination rates of its seeds that are dispersed by H. desmarestianus. ?? The Author(s) 2010.

  9. Oral lichen planus: An overview.

    PubMed

    Krupaa, R Jayasri; Sankari, S Leena; Masthan, K M K; Rajesh, E

    2015-04-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  10. Growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in chemostat cultures under carbon-, nitrogen-, or carbon- and nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, C; von Stockar, U; Marison, I; Gustafsson, L

    1993-01-01

    Aerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed under carbon-, nitrogen-, and dual carbon- and nitrogen-limiting conditions. The glucose concentration was kept constant, whereas the ammonium concentration was varied among different experiments and different dilution rates. It was found that both glucose and ammonium were consumed at the maximal possible rate, i.e., the feed rate, over a range of medium C/N ratios and dilution rates. To a small extent, this was due to a changing biomass composition, but much more important was the ability of uncoupling between anabolic biomass formation and catabolic energy substrate consumption. When ammonium started to limit the amount of biomass formed and hence the anabolic flow of glucose, this was totally or at least partly compensated for by an increased catabolic glucose consumption. The primary response when glucose was present in excess of the minimum requirements for biomass production was an increased rate of respiration. The calculated specific oxygen consumption rate, at D = 0.07 h-1, was more than doubled when an additional nitrogen limitation was imposed on the cells compared with that during single glucose limitation. However, the maximum respiratory capacity decreased with decreasing nitrogen concentration. The saturation level of the specific oxygen consumption rate decreased from 5.5 to 6.0 mmol/g/h under single glucose limitation to about 4.0 mmol/g/h at the lowest nitrogen concentration tested. The combined result of this was that the critical dilution rate, i.e., onset of fermentation, was as low as 0.10 h-1 during growth in a medium with a low nitrogen concentration compared with 0.20 h-1 obtained under single glucose limitation. PMID:8335637

  11. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In conclusion, the use of pig slurry to reclaim bare contaminated soils by heavy metals brings indirect positive effects by triggering a vegetation cover which can stabilize metals and increase soil quality (phytostabilization). Keywords: heavy metals, microbial biomass, enzyme activities, phytoremediation.

  12. Production of poly-?-hydroxybutyrate by thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19, under phosphate-limited conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motomu Nishioka; Katsuya Nakai; Masato Miyake; Yasuo Asada; Masahito Taya

    2001-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. MA19, grown autotrophically under phosphate-limited conditions at 50 °C, produced poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) when intracellular phosphate content was 0.043–0.076mmol per g of cellular components. In the culture for 260h using Ca3(PO4)2 as a phosphate source, strain MA19 accumulated PHB at 55% (w\\/w) of the dry cells and the amount of PHB produced was 2.4gl-1 which was almost twice that

  13. Simulating Biodegradation Under Mixing-limited Conditions Using Michaelis-Menten (Monod) Kinetic Expressions in a Particle Tracking Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the typical method of adding mass-action reaction terms to the advection-dispersion equation overestimates the field-scale reaction rates. The mismatch is usually attributed to poor mixing. A recent method, based on a purely Langragian particle tracking (PT) theoretical development, successfully reproduces the results of mixing-limited bimolecular reaction (A+B ? C) from two benchmark experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles. The reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities that govern whether: 1) reactant particles are collocated during a short time interval, and 2) two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. We extend the application of the PT method to biodegradation, which is commonly characterized by more complex Michaelis-Menten (Monod) chemical kinetics. The advantage of the PT method is that it explains the variation of reaction rate based on mixing-controlled particle collisions instead of using empirical parameters. The PT method is not only able to match the Michaelis-Menten (Monod) equation under ideal conditions, but also is able to capture the characteristics of non-ideal conditions such as imperfect mixing, disequilibrium, and limited availability of the active sites. Furthermore, for the ultimate goal of applying the Langragian PT method directly to the field scale problems, this method is implemented to the simulation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) biodegradation at the Schoolcraft, Michigan, site, where the hydraulic properties and reaction kinetics are well understood.

  14. Oxygen Response of the Wine Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 Grown under Carbon-Sufficient, Nitrogen-Limited Enological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aceituno, Felipe F.; Orellana, Marcelo; Torres, Jorge; Mendoza, Sebastián; Slater, Alex W.; Melo, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Discrete additions of oxygen play a critical role in alcoholic fermentation. However, few studies have quantitated the fate of dissolved oxygen and its impact on wine yeast cell physiology under enological conditions. We simulated the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations that occur after a pump-over during the winemaking process by sparging nitrogen-limited continuous cultures with oxygen-nitrogen gaseous mixtures. When the dissolved oxygen concentration increased from 1.2 to 2.7 ?M, yeast cells changed from a fully fermentative to a mixed respirofermentative metabolism. This transition is characterized by a switch in the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and an activation of NADH shuttling from the cytosol to mitochondria. Nevertheless, fermentative ethanol production remained the major cytosolic NADH sink under all oxygen conditions, suggesting that the limitation of mitochondrial NADH reoxidation is the major cause of the Crabtree effect. This is reinforced by the induction of several key respiratory genes by oxygen, despite the high sugar concentration, indicating that oxygen overrides glucose repression. Genes associated with other processes, such as proline uptake, cell wall remodeling, and oxidative stress, were also significantly affected by oxygen. The results of this study indicate that respiration is responsible for a substantial part of the oxygen response in yeast cells during alcoholic fermentation. This information will facilitate the development of temporal oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. PMID:23001663

  15. A Comparison Between the Burn Condition of Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Helium-3 Reaction and Stability Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear reaction of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion by the usual magnetic or inertial confinement suffers from a number of difficulties and problems caused by tritium handling, neutron damage to materials and neutron-induced radioactivity, etc. The study of the nuclear synthesis reaction of deuterium-helium-3 (D-3He) at low collision energies (below 1 keV) is of interest for its applications in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Spherical tokamak (ST) reactors have a low aspect ratio and can confine plasma with ??1. These capabilities of ST reactors are due to the use of the alternative D-3He reaction. In this work, the burn condition of D-3He reaction was calculated by using zero-dimensional particles and power equations, and, with the use of the parameters of the ST reactor, the stability limit of D-3He reaction was calculated and then the results were compared with those of D-T reaction. The obtained results show that the burn conditions of D-3He reaction required a higher temperature and had a much more limited temperature range in comparison to those of D-T reaction.

  16. Fate of dissolved toluene during steady infiltration throughout unsaturated soil: II. Biotransformation under nutrient-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-King, R.M. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Gillham, R.W.; Barker, J.F.; Sudicky, E.A. [Univ. of Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    Biotransformation rates for dissolved toluene in unsaturated sandy soil were determined in dynamic column infiltration experiments. Transformation rates under N-limited conditions and in the presence of sufficient oxygen were 8 to 35 mg (kg d){sup {minus}1} and appeared to follow zero order kinetics. Toluene-degrading microoganisms were demonstrated to increase significantly in both activity and numbers with exposure to toluene. Relatively low CO{sub 2} production to oxygen consumption ratios were observed during these experiments suggesting incomplete toluene mineralization. Over the ranges tested, water flux (20-80 cm d{sup {minus}1}) and toluene concentration (4-46 mg L{sup {minus}1}) appeared to have a secondary control on rate relative to nutrient and/or oxygen limitations. Under conditions where the oxygen concentration was near zero due to removal of toluene degradation in the soil columns, the transformation rate was sufficiently low to be insignificant relative to column residence time. 32 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Nateglinide Oral

    MedlinePLUS

    Nateglinide comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken three times daily. Take ... that contain alcohol or sugar; mesoridazine (Serentil); niacin; oral contraceptives (birth control pills); perphenazine (Trilafon); phenelzine (Nardil); ...

  18. Ampicillin Oral

    MedlinePLUS

    ... capsule, liquid, and pediatric drops to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 6 hours (four ... blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, probenecid (Benemid), rifampin, sulfasalazine, and vitamins.tell ...

  19. Oral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2013-01-01

    Oral vaccines are safe and easy to administer and convenient for all ages. They have been successfully developed to protect from many infectious diseases acquired through oral transmission. We recently found in animal models that formulation of oral vaccines in a nanoparticle-releasing microparticle delivery system is a viable approach for selectively inducing large intestinal protective immunity against infections at rectal and genital mucosae. These large-intestine targeted oral vaccines are a potential substitute for the intracolorectal immunization, which has been found to be effective against rectogenital infections but is not feasible for mass vaccination. Moreover, the newly developed delivery system can be modified to selectively target either the small or large intestine for immunization and accordingly revealed a regionalized immune system in the gut. Future applications and research endeavors suggested by the findings are discussed. PMID:23493163

  20. Oral Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  1. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  2. Oral Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  3. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePLUS

    ... virus type 2 (HSV-2) most often causes genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ... the virus to the genitals. Both oral and genital herpes viruses can sometimes be spread, even when you ...

  4. Pyruvate and lactate metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under fermentation, oxygen limitation, and fumarate respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Geydebrekht, Oleg V; Hill, Eric A; Reed, Jennifer L; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of a wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed the lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor-limited growth on lactate with O(2), lactate with fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensable for growth, the respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under conditions of O(2) limitation but was required for anaerobic growth, likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as an electron donor and an electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by a recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by the generation of proton motive force. PMID:21965410

  5. Metabolic and energetic control of Pseudomonas mendocina growth during transitions from aerobic to oxygen-limited conditions in chemostat cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Verdoni, N; Aon, M A; Lebeault, J M

    1992-01-01

    Several metabolic fluxes were analyzed during gradual transitions from aerobic to oxygen-limited conditions in chemostat cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina growing in synthetic medium at a dilution rate of 0.25 h-1. P. mendocina growth was glucose limited at high oxygen partial pressures (70 and 20% pO2) and exhibited an oxidative type of metabolism characterized by respiratory quotient (RQ) values of 1.0. A similar RQ value was obtained at low pO2 (2%), and detectable levels of acetic, formic, and lactic acids were determined in the extracellular medium. RQs of 0.9 +/- 0.12 were found at 70% pO2 for growth rates ranging from 0.025 to 0.5 h-1. At high pO2, the control coefficients of oxygen on catabolic fluxes were 0.19 and 0.22 for O2 uptake and CO2 production, respectively. At low pO2 (2%), the catabolic and anabolic fluxes were highly controlled by oxygen. P. mendocina showed a mixed-type fermentative metabolism when nitrogen was flushed into chemostat cultures. Ethanol and acetic, lactic, and formic acids were excreted and represented 7.5% of the total carbon recovered. Approximately 50% of the carbon was found as uronic acids in the extracellular medium. Physiological studies were performed under microaerophilic conditions (nitrogen flushing) in continuous cultures for a wide range of growth rates (0.03 to 0.5 h-1). A cell population, able to exhibit a near-maximum theoretical yield of ATP (YmaxATP = 25 g/mol) with a number of ATP molecules formed during the transfer of an electron towards oxygen along the respiration chain (P/O ratio) of 3, appears to have adapted to microaerophilic conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1444429

  6. Current Guidelines Have Limited Applicability to Patients with Comorbid Conditions: A Systematic Analysis of Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Burgers, Jako S.; Clancy, Carolyn; Westert, Gert P.; Schneider, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Guidelines traditionally focus on the diagnosis and treatment of single diseases. As almost half of the patients with a chronic disease have more than one disease, the applicability of guidelines may be limited. The aim of this study was to assess the extent that guidelines address comorbidity and to assess the supporting evidence of recommendations related to comorbidity. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic analysis of evidence-based guidelines focusing on four highly prevalent chronic conditions with a high impact on quality of life: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depressive disorder, diabetes mellitus type 2, and osteoarthritis. Data were abstracted from each guideline on the extent that comorbidity was addressed (general comments, specific recommendations), the type of comorbidity discussed (concordant, discordant), and the supporting evidence of the comorbidity-related recommendations (level of evidence, translation of evidence). Of the 20 guidelines, 17 (85%) addressed the issue of comorbidity and 14 (70%) provided specific recommendations on comorbidity. In general, the guidelines included few recommendations on patients with comorbidity (mean 3 recommendations per guideline, range 0 to 26). Of the 59 comorbidity-related recommendations provided, 46 (78%) addressed concordant comorbidities, 8 (14%) discordant comorbidities, and for 5 (8%) the type of comorbidity was not specified. The strength of the supporting evidence was moderate for 25% (15/59) and low for 37% (22/59) of the recommendations. In addition, for 73% (43/59) of the recommendations the evidence was not adequately translated into the guidelines. Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that the applicability of current evidence-based guidelines to patients with comorbid conditions is limited. Most guidelines do not provide explicit guidance on treatment of patients with comorbidity, particularly for discordant combinations. Guidelines should be more explicit about the applicability of their recommendations to patients with comorbidity. Future clinical trials should also include patients with the most prevalent combinations of chronic conditions. PMID:22028802

  7. The oral metagenome in health and disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pedro Belda-Ferre; Luis David Alcaraz; Ra'ul Cabrera-Rubio; H'ector Romero; Aurea Sim'on-Soro; Miguel Pignatelli; Alex Mira

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity of humans is inhabited by hundreds of bacterial species and some of them have a key role in the development of oral diseases, mainly dental caries and periodontitis. We describe for the first time the metagenome of the human oral cavity under health and diseased conditions, with a focus on supragingival dental plaque and cavities. Direct pyrosequencing

  8. Oral feeding.

    PubMed

    Alvárez-Falcón, Ana; Ruiz-Santana, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Early nutrition can help to improve energy and protein intake and decrease the negative impact of the metabolic response to surgery. A key goal is to identify patients who exhibit increased respiration risk before beginning oral alimentation. Once a simple bedside 3-oz (90 ml) challenge, or early intervention in the oral care, administered by a trained provider is passed, specific diet recommendations can be made safely and confidently without the need for further objective dysphagia testing. Gastrointestinal motility disorders occur as part of the pathophysiology of diseases and critical illness, or are a result of medication therapies or enteral feeding complications. Inadequate energy intake in the first 7 days following extubation have recently been described. It would be highly beneficial to determine when it is best to initiate timely oral alimentation for recovering extubated intensive care unit (ICU) and more specifically surgical ICU patients to support the maintenance and rebuilding of lean body mass, maintain hydration, and permit the ingestion of oral medications. In a cross-sectional multicenter study conducted in 18 Spanish ICUs, within the scope of the 2007 European Nutrition Day, only 95 of 348 investigated patients (27.3%) received oral nutritional support. Constipation and diarrhea were common adverse effects. Unexpectedly, however, constipation episodes were more frequent than diarrhea in the patients not receiving oral nutritional support. PMID:23075585

  9. 7 CFR 42.111 - Sampling plans for reduced condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and limit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and limit number for reduced inspection, Table III-B. 42.111 Section... STANDARDS FOR CONDITION OF FOOD CONTAINERS Procedures for...condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and...

  10. 7 CFR 42.111 - Sampling plans for reduced condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and limit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and limit number for reduced inspection, Table III-B. 42.111 Section... STANDARDS FOR CONDITION OF FOOD CONTAINERS Procedures for...condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and...

  11. Application of cytology and molecular biology in diagnosing premalignant or malignant oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ravi; Gupta, Anurag; Singh, Mamta; Ibrahim, Rahela

    2006-01-01

    Early detection of a premalignant or cancerous oral lesion promises to improve the survival and the morbidity of patients suffering from these conditions. Cytological study of oral cells is a non-aggressive technique that is well accepted by the patient, and is therefore an attractive option for the early diagnosis of oral cancer, including epithelial atypia and squamous cell carcinoma. However its usage has been limited so far due to poor sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing oral malignancies. Lately it has re-emerged due to improved methods and it's application in oral precancer and cancer as a diagnostic and predictive method as well as for monitoring patients. Newer diagnostic techniques such as "brush biopsy" and molecular studies have been developed. Recent advances in cytological techniques and novel aspects of applications of scraped or exfoliative cytology for detecting these lesions and predicting their progression or recurrence are reviewed here. PMID:16556320

  12. Mast cells and oral pathologies: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Reet; Dahiya, Parveen; Goyal, Niti; Kumar, Mukesh; Sharma, Neeta; Saini, Hans Raj

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are resident cells of several types of tissues and contain many granules rich in histamine and heparin. They are distributed preferentially about the micro-vascular endothelial cells in the oral mucosa. These cells play a key role in the inflammatory process and thus their number has been found to be altered in various oral pathological conditions such as oral pyogenic granuloma, oral lichen planus, leukoplakia, oral squamous cell carcinoma, periapical cysts etc. The present review article is aimed to describe the alteration in the number of MCs along with their probable roles in these pathological conditions. PMID:25810632

  13. ATP production from adenine by a self-coupling enzymatic process: high-level accumulation under ammonium-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, A; Fujio, T

    2001-03-01

    To improve ATP production from adenine, we optimized cultivation and reaction conditions for the ATP producing strain, Corynebacterium ammoniagenes KY13510. In the conventional method, 28% NH4OH has been used both to adjust pH during cultivation and reaction, and to provide nitrogen for cell growth. In the ATP-producing reaction, high concentrations of inorganic phosphate and magnesium ion are needed, which form magnesium ammonium phosphate (MgNH4PO4) precipitate. To keep inorganic phosphate and magnesium ions soluble in the reaction mixture, it was indispensable to add phytic acid as a chelating agent of divalent metal ions. Under such conditions, 37 mg/ml (61.2 mM) ATP was accumulated in 13 h (Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 21, 143 1985). If ammonium ion was depleted from the reaction mixture to avoid MgNH4 PO4 formation, we expected that there was no need to add phytic acid and ATP accumulation might be improved. Therefore, we obtained the cultured broth of C. ammoniagenes KY13510 strain with low ammonium ion content (less than 1 mg/ml as NH3) by the method that a part of alkali solution (28% NH4OH) for pH control was replaced with 10 N KOH. Using this culture broth, ATP producing reaction was done in 2-liter jar fermentor, controlling the pH of the reaction mixture with 10 N KOH. Under these conditions, the rate of ATP accumulation improved greatly, and 70.6 mg/ml (117 mM) ATP was accumulated in 28 h. The molar conversion ratio from adenine to ATP was about 82%. Phytic acid was slightly inhibitory to ATP formation under these ammonium-limited conditions. PMID:11330681

  14. Conditions?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Christy Wyckoff; Scott E. Henke; Kurt C. VerCauteren

    Research interests in feral hogs typically involve their negative impacts on ecosystems or their potential as a disease reservoir, especially with disease transmission to domestic swine. Authors within scientific literature state that feral hogs were captured as part of their research, but usually fail to mention specific conditions in which hogs were captured. Novice researchers of feral hogs must rely

  15. A relational understanding of sibling experiences of children with rare life-limiting conditions: findings from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Cari; Gibson, Faith; Adams, Sally; Anderson, Gillian; Forbat, Liz

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) and Batten disease are rare life-limiting conditions (LLCs) characterised by progressive and permanent physical and cognitive decline. The impact of such conditions on families, and notably on siblings, has not yet been described or documented. This paper presents data from a UK-wide study that sought to understand the family experience of supporting a child with the rare degenerative LLCs of MPS and Batten disease. The aim of this paper is to report sibling experiences related to these rare degenerative and progressive conditions, in order to inform the future development of supportive interventions. Eight siblings of children with MPS (n = 7) and Batten Disease (n = 1) participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews. A card sort technique was utilised to support and engage the children. Siblings are clearly impacted emotionally, pragmatically and relationally by the ill health of another child in the family. The data indicate four key themes which demonstrate impacts on siblings: perceptions of the condition and its symptoms, impact on daily life, emotional consequences and ways of coping. Siblings often had considerable knowledge of the condition and took on important roles in symptom management. However, these experiences were in the context of managing relationships within the family (often protecting parents from an awareness of how much they knew) and relationships at school (including distraction from learning and being bullied by peers). The data highlight how sibling experiences are generated through a combination of negative disability discourses and support through peers and family members. The data indicate how these features shift as a consequence of witnessing the advancement of their brother's or sister's condition and the emotional sequelae of disease progression. Exploration of siblings' experiences of living with such rare progressive and degenerative LLCs suggest the focus of interventions to support this group should address their emotional health and ways to overcome isolation and build connections with other siblings who share their unique experiences. Critically, the data suggest that sibling support should be cognisant of the trajectory of the illness as well as the family, school and peer relational contexts that siblings inhabit. PMID:23754839

  16. [Oral candidiasis: clinical features and control].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Candidiasis is the most commonly encountered fungal infection, and oral candidiasis is often observed as a local opportunistic infection. Oral candidiasis is clinically divided into three types: acute forms, chronic forms, and Candida-associated lesions. Candida adhesion and multiplication are largely regulated by the local and systemic factors of the host. The local factors include impairment of the oral mucosal integrity, which is usually impaired by hyposalivation, anticancer drugs/radiation for head and neck cancers, denture wearing, a decrease in the oral bacterial population, and poor oral hygiene. Among Candida species, oral candidiasis is mostly caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans), C. glabrata, or C. tropicalis. Oral Candida induces a variety of symptoms, such as oral mucosal inflammation manifesting as an uncomfortable feeling, pain, erythema, erosion, taste abnormalities, and hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. Candida overgrowth in the oral cavity may disseminate to distant organs. Therefore, in order to avoid the sequelae of systemic candidiasis, oral candidiasis should be rapidly controlled. Oral candidiasis is usually treated by the local application of antifungal drugs. However, oral candidiasis occasionally escapes the control of such local treatment due to the development of multi-drug resistant Candida strains and species or due to the suppression of salivation or cellular immune activity. When drug-resistant strains are suspected as the pathogens and when the host is generally compromised, the oral administration of combinations of antifungal drugs, enhancement of cellular immune activity, and improvement of the nutritional condition are recommended. PMID:21077293

  17. Conditional Solvation Thermodynamics of Isoleucine in Model Peptides and the Limitations of the Group-Transfer Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in extended penta-peptides, and in helical deca-peptides. Butane in gauche conformation serves as a small-molecule analog for the isoleucine side chain. Parsing the hydrophobic and hydrophilic contributions to hydration for the side chain shows that both of these aspects of hydration are context-sensitive. Furthermore, analyzing the solute–solvent interaction contribution to the conditional excess enthalpy of the side chain shows that what is nominally considered a property of the side chain includes entirely nonobvious contributions of the background. The context-sensitivity of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration and the conflation of background contributions with energetics attributed to the side chain limit the ability of a single scaling factor, such as the fractional solvent exposure of the group in the protein, to map the component energetic contributions of the model-compound data to their value in the protein. But ignoring the origin of cancellations in the underlying components the group-transfer model may appear to provide a reasonable estimate of the free energy for a given error tolerance. PMID:24650057

  18. Quality of life information and trust in physicians among families of children with life-limiting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, I-Chan; Kenzik, Kelly M; Sanjeev, Tuli Y; Shearer, Patricia D; Revicki, Dennis A; Nackashi, John A; Shenkman, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine information that parents of children with life-limiting conditions want to discuss with children’s physicians to assist decision-making, and whether the desire for this information is associated with parents’ trust in physicians. Study design: A cross-sectional study using a telephone survey. Patients and methods: Subjects comprised a random sample of 266 parents whose children were enrolled in Florida’s Medicaid Program. Parents were asked if they wanted to discuss information related to their children’s treatment, including quality of life (QOL), pain relief, spiritual beliefs, clinical diagnosis/laboratory data, changes in the child’s behavior due to treatment, changes in the child’s appearance due to treatment, chances of recovery, and advice from the physician and family/friends. The Wake Forest Physician Trust Scale was used to measure parents’ trust in physicians. We tested the relationships between parents’ age, race/ethnicity, education, parent-reported children’s health status, and the desired information. We also tested whether the desire for information was associated with greater trust in physicians. Results: Most parents wanted information on their children’s QOL (95%), followed by chance of recovery (88%), and pain relief (84%). Compared with nonHispanic whites, nonHispanic blacks and Hispanics showed a greater desire for information and a chance to discuss QOL information had greater trust in their children’s physicians than other information after adjusting for covariates (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Among children with life-limiting conditions, QOL is the most frequently desired information that parents would like to receive from physicians as part of shared decision-making. Parents’ desire for QOL information is associated with greater trust in their children’s physicians. PMID:21760753

  19. Simulating biodegradation under mixing-limited conditions using Michaelis-Menten (Monod) kinetic expressions in a particle tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; Benson, David A.

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that effective field-scale bioremediation reactions rates are significantly lower than batch- or lab-scale rates, when the same law of mass action is used to represent the reaction at both scales. The mismatch is usually attributed to poor mixing of reactants brought about by heterogeneity. A recent method, based on a purely Lagrangian particle tracking (PT) theoretical development, successfully reproduces the effects of mixing-limited bimolecular reaction (A + B ? C) from two benchmark experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles, and the small-scale physics are directly translated into a combination of two probabilities that govern whether: (1) reactant particles are collocated during a short time interval, and (2) two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The latter is due to thermodynamics and is independent of scale of mixing. The former directly accounts for the degree of mixing in any system. We extend the application of the PT method to biodegradation, which is commonly characterized by more complex Michaelis-Menten (Monod) chemical kinetics. The advantage of the PT method is that it explains the variation of reaction rate based on mixing-controlled particle collisions instead of using empirical parameters. The PT method not only matches the Michaelis-Menten (Monod) equation under ideal conditions, but also captures the characteristics of non-ideal conditions such as imperfect mixing, disequilibrium, and limited availability of the active sites. We show these using hypothetical systems and also successfully apply the method to a column study of carbon tetrachloride biodegradation.

  20. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-30

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe growing by coupling organic matter oxidation to reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of these bacteria under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2 and fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation, which does not sustain growth but allows cells to survive for prolonged period. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of all ATP needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute much to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, and TCA cycle did not contribute significantly to substrate oxidation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation, however was important for anaerobic growth probably supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. Unexpectedly, obtained results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination between substrate-level phosphorylation and a respiratory process, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). Based on involved enzymes localization we hypothesize that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  1. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  2. Performance limitation and the role of core temperature when wearing light-weight workwear under moderate thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Philipp; Burtscher, Martin; Heinrich, Dieter; Bottoni, Giuliamarta; Caven, Barnaby; Bechtold, Thomas; Teresa Herten, Anne; Hasler, Michael; Faulhaber, Martin; Nachbauer, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to achieve an understanding about the relationship between heat stress and performance limitation when wearing a two-layerfire-resistant light-weight workwear (full-clothed ensemble) compared to an one-layer short sports gear (semi-clothed ensemble) in an exhaustive, stressful situation under moderate thermal condition (25°C). Ten well trained male subjects performed a strenuous walking protocol with both clothing ensembles until exhaustion occurred in a climatic chamber. Wearing workwear reduced the endurance performance by 10% (p=0.007) and the evaporation by 21% (p=0.003), caused a more pronounced rise in core temperature during submaximal walking (0.7±0.3 vs. 1.2±0.4°C; p?0.001) and from start till exhaustion (1.4±0.3 vs. 1.8±0.5°C; p=0.008), accelerated sweat loss (13±2 vs. 15±3gmin(-1); p=0.007), and led to a significant higher heart rate at the end of cool down (103±6 vs. 111±7bpm; p=0.004). Correlation analysis revealed that core temperature development during submaximal walking and evaporation may play important roles for endurance performance. However, a critical core temperature of 40°C, which is stated to be a crucial factor for central fatigue and performance limitation, was not reached either with the semi-clothed or the full-clothed ensemble (38.3±0.4 vs. 38.4±0.5°C). Additionally, perceived exertion did not increase to a higher extent parallel with the rising core temperature with workwear which would substantiate the critical core temperature theory. In conclusion, increased heat stress led to cardiovascular exercise limitation rather than central fatigue. PMID:25526658

  3. Clinical experience with thalidomide in the management of severe oral and genital ulceration in conditions such as Behçet's disease: use of neurophysiological studies to detect thalidomide neuropathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J M Gardner-Medwin; N J Smith; R J Powell

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the efficacy, dose, and safety profile, including neurophysiological testing of thalidomide used in 59 patients (including 23 with Behçet's disease) to treat severe oral or genital ulceration (OGU). METHODS--We identified prospectively subjects (including women of childbearing potential) who had persistent OGU over periods lasting one to 40 years and whose active ulceration was not controlled by other therapies.

  4. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions. PMID:25088485

  5. Advantages and Limitations of an In Vitro Lipolysis Model as a Predictive Tool in the Development of Lipid Based Oral Formulations or Lipophilic Drugs

    E-print Network

    Dahan, Arik

    2006-10-26

    > MCT > LCT 0 1 2 3 4 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 Time (hr) G r is e o f u lv i n a m o unt in t h e s e r o s a l s i de ( n g LCT MCT SCT 0.00E+00 2.00E-05 4.00E-05 6.00E-05 8.00E-05 1.00E-04 LCT MCT SCT P app ( c m / s e c ) 15 In vivo oral... In vitro dynamic lipolysis model Vitamin D 3 No IVIVC Dahan and Hoffman, Pharm Res 2006 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 8 12162024 Time (hr) P l as ma vi t a mi n D 3 c o n c . ( ? g / ml ) LCT MCT SCT Conclusion: Performance rank order: LCT > MCT > SCT...

  6. [An electro-stimulating oral splint for dry mouth treatment].

    PubMed

    Fedele, S; Wolff, A; Strietzel, F P; Granizo López, R M; Porter, S; Konttinen, Y T

    2008-11-01

    Dentists encounter regularly patients with xerostomia, which is the accepted term for dry mouth complaint. Left untreated, xerostomia can lead to psychosocial distress and to impaired quality of life. Oral complications of the most frequent cause of xerostomia, salivary gland hypofunction, include dental caries and candidiasis. In addition, quality of life is significantly hampered. The etiology of xerostomia is multiple, but the most common conditions are Sjögren's syndrome, radiotherapy to the head and neck and use of medications. Current therapies offered by dentists rely on saliva substitutes and stimulants such as chewing gum, and are somewhat limited by their short-term efficacy. Oral mucosal electro-stimulation increases salivary secretion and relieves symptoms of dry mouth in patients with xerostomia. Therefore, intra-oral electronic devices have been developed aimed at stimulating salivary gland function. They offer promise as an optional safe and non-chemical treatment of xerostomia. PMID:19263865

  7. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  8. Planning ahead with children with life-limiting conditions and their families: development, implementation and evaluation of ‘My Choices’

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The United Kingdom has led the world in the development of children’s palliative care. Over the past two decades, the illness trajectories of children with life-limiting conditions have extended with new treatments and better home-based care. Future planning is a critically under-researched aspect of children’s palliative care globally. This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of innovative child and parent-held palliative care planning resources. The resources were designed to facilitate parent and child thinking and engagement in future planning, and to determine care preferences and preferred locations of care for children with life-limiting conditions from diagnosis onwards. These resources fill a significant gap in palliative care planning before the end-of-life phase. Methods Drawing on contemporaneous research on producing evidence-based children’s health information, we collaborated with leading children’s not-for-profit organisations, parents, children, and professionals. A set of resources (My Choices booklets) were developed for parents and children and evaluated using interviews (parents, children, professionals) and questionnaires (professionals) and an open web-based consultation. Results Parents and children responded in three ways: Some used the booklets to produce detailed written plans with clear outcomes and ideas about how best to achieve desired outcomes. Others preferred to use the booklet to help them think about potential options. Remaining parents found it difficult to think about the future and felt there was no point because they perceived there to be no suitable local services. Professionals varied in confidence in their ability to engage with families to plan ahead and identified many challenges that prevented them from doing so. Few families shared their plans with professionals. Parents and children have far stronger preferences for home-care than professionals. Conclusion The My Choices booklets were revised in light of findings, have been endorsed by Together for Short Lives, and are free to download in English and Welsh for use by parents and young people globally. More work needs to be done to support families who are not yet receptive to planning ahead. Professionals would benefit from more training in person-centred approaches to future planning and additional communications skills to increase confidence and ability to engage with families to deliver sensitive palliative care planning. PMID:23384400

  9. Rapid post-oral stimulation of intake and flavor conditioning in rats by glucose but not a non-metabolizable glucose analog.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2014-06-22

    Mice adapted to drink a flavored saccharin solution (CS-) paired with intragastric (IG) self-infusions of water rapidly increase their intake of a new flavored solution (CS+) that is paired with IG glucose self-infusions. The present study extends this method to examine post-oral glucose appetition in rats. Food-restricted rats were trained to consume a CS- flavor (e.g., grape saccharin) paired with IG water in 5 daily 1-h tests. In the next 3 tests, they drank a CS+ (e.g., cherry saccharin) paired with IG glucose. Rats infused with 8% glucose increased intake significantly on CS+ Test 1, but those infused with 16% glucose showed only a small increase in intake, which may reflect a counteracting satiating effect. Both groups further increased CS+ intakes in Tests 2 and 3, and preferred (81%) the CS+ to the CS- in a two-bottle test without infusions. A second experiment investigated rats' responses to IG alpha-methyl-d-glucopyranoside (MDG), a non-metabolizable sugar analog which stimulates CS+ intake and preference in mice. The rats reduced their intake of the MDG-paired CS+ flavor over sessions, and preferred the CS- to the CS+ in the choice test. The glucose data show that rats, like mice, rapidly detect the sugar's positive post-oral effects that can stimulate intake within the first hour of exposure. The MDG avoidance may indicate a greater sensitivity to its post-oral inhibitory effects in rats than in mice, or perhaps slower clearance of MDG in rats. The test protocol described here can be used to investigate the peripheral and central processes involved in stimulation of intake by post-oral nutrients in rats. PMID:24811140

  10. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity Against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enzo A. Palombo

    2009-01-01

    Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The associ- ation between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of

  11. Oral sedation.

    PubMed

    Dionne, R

    1998-09-01

    "I fear a trip to the dentist more than I fear death" is the response one person gave in a national survey recently cited in USA Today. While clearly representing an extreme, the results of many surveys suggest that fear of dentistry is still prevalent and is a measure of the failure of current therapeutic approaches to reduce pain and anxiety sufficiently to enable people, especially those with special needs, to visit the dentist. Patients who are fearful would likely seek oral health care more regularly if anesthesia and sedation were more readily available. Taking into consideration that the safety of anxiolytic drugs is highly dependent on the drug, dose, and route of administration used, oral premedication should be the sedative technique used by most dentists because it is efficacious, requires little monitoring when appropriate doses are used, and is unlikely to result in serious morbidity. PMID:9852800

  12. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient. PMID:26015713

  13. Moral and professional responsibility of oral physician toward geriatric patient with interdisciplinary management - The time to act is now!

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Shalu; Kaur, Mandeep; Goel, Sumit; Bhatnagar, Puneet

    2011-01-01

    Mouth is the mirror of overall health. With advancements in oral health promotion and preventive measures instituted in developed countries, more people retain their natural teeth into their old age as compared to half a century ago. The effect of aging on oral health includes effect on oral mucosa, lips, teeth and other associated structures, and their functional activity leading to impairment of speech, mastication, swallowing and pain leading to anxiety and depression. Oral tissues are not limited to the teeth and supporting structures (periodontium) but also include salivary glands, temporomandibular joint, orofacial/mastication muscles, oropharyngeal mucosa, and oral sensory/motor nerve systems. In India, the second most populous country in the world, there is a rapidly growing population of older adults and there are 70 million elderly people over 60 years of age. Geriatric health problems with respect to the quality of life often remain neglected. Oral health care for an increasingly large segment of elderly people will be a fact of life for dentists everywhere. Oral health can be both a benchmark for and a determinant of the quality of life rather than the length of life span. Older adults are more susceptible to oral conditions or diseases due to an increase in chronic conditions and physical/mental disabilities. Thus, a careful initial interview ensuring that the dentist is familiar with the patient's health history, followed by a thorough oral examination plays a very important role. In this paper, we briefly review the age-related oral changes occurring in geriatric patients and the role of oral physician in imparting a healthy life to the elderly. PMID:21897734

  14. Oral medicine and the ageing population.

    PubMed

    Yap, T; McCullough, M

    2015-03-01

    The oral cavity is subject to age related processes such as cellular ageing and immunosenescence. The ageing population bears an increased burden of intraoral pathology. In oral medicine, the majority of presenting patients are in their fifth to seventh decade of life. In this review, we discuss the ageing population's susceptibility to mucosal disorders and the increased prevalence of potentially malignant disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma, as well as dermatoses including oral lichen planus and immunobullous conditions. We also address the ageing population's susceptibility to oral discomfort and explore salivary secretion, ulceration and the symptoms of oral burning. Finally, we will describe orofacial pain conditions which are more likely encountered in an older population. This update highlights clinical presentations which are more likely to be encountered in the ageing population in a general practice setting and the importance of screening both new and long-term patients. PMID:25762041

  15. Aerobactin Mediates Virulence and Accounts for Increased Siderophore Production under Iron-Limiting Conditions by Hypervirulent (Hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Ruth; MacDonald, Ulrike; Metzger, Daniel; Maltese, Lauren M.; Drake, Eric J.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) strains are an emerging variant of “classical” K. pneumoniae (cKP) that cause organ and life-threatening infection in healthy individuals. An understanding of hvKP-specific virulence mechanisms that enabled evolution from cKP is limited. Observations by our group and previously published molecular epidemiologic data led us to hypothesize that hvKP strains produced more siderophores than cKP strains and that this trait enhanced hvKP virulence. Quantitative analysis of 12 hvKP strains in iron-poor minimal medium or human ascites fluid showed a significant and distinguishing 6- to 10-fold increase in siderophore production compared to that for 14 cKP strains. Surprisingly, high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-mass spectrometry and characterization of the hvKP strains hvKP1, A1142, and A1365 and their isogenic aerobactin-deficient (?iucA) derivatives established that aerobactin accounted for the overwhelming majority of increased siderophore production and that this was not due to gene copy number. Further, aerobactin was the primary factor in conditioned medium that enhanced the growth/survival of hvKP1 in human ascites fluid. Importantly the ex vivo growth/survival of hvKP1 ?iucA was significantly less than that of hvKP1 in human ascites fluid, and the survival of outbred CD1 mice challenged subcutaneously or intraperitoneally with hvKP1 was significantly less than that of mice challenged with hvKP1 ?iucA. The lowest subcutaneous and intraperitoneal challenge inocula of 3 × 102 and 3.2 × 101 CFU, respectively, resulted in 100% mortality, demonstrating the virulence of hvKP1 and its ability to cause infection at a low dose. These data strongly support that aerobactin accounts for increased siderophore production in hvKP compared to cKP (a potential defining trait) and is an important virulence factor. PMID:24664504

  16. Pharmacokinetics of desmopressin administered as tablet and oral lyophilisate formulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    De Bruyne, Pauline; De Guchtenaere, Ann; Van Herzeele, Charlotte; Raes, Ann; Dehoorne, Jo; Hoebeke, Piet; Van Laecke, Erik; Vande Walle, Johan

    2014-02-01

    Desmopressin 120 ?g oral lyophilisate and 200 ?g tablet are considered bioequivalent, based on extrapolation of studies in a limited number of adults and on one dose-finding study of desmopressin oral lyophilisate in children. However, no comparative pharmacokinetic study in children was executed confirming this statement. No data are available on the influence of food intake on the bioavailability of desmopressin tablet in a pediatric setting, although studies in adults have documented that food intake results in a significantly lower desmopressin plasma concentration. In this study, we analyzed plasma concentrations of desmopressin oral lyophilisate and tablet with concomitant food intake. Twenty-three children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (mean age, 12.7 years) were recruited. Two tests were performed on two separate days in identical conditions with a standardized food and fluid intake. Desmopressin was administered as desmopressin tablet or desmopressin oral lyophilisate immediately after a meal. Desmopressin plasma concentration was measured at 1 h, 2 h, and 6 h postdosing. No significant difference in plasma concentration of 120 ?g desmopressin oral lyophilisate and 200 ?g tablet was demonstrated, even with concomitant food intake. A significant difference in variability was found, identifying a smaller variance for desmopressin oral lyophilisate plasma concentrations at all time points. This study demonstrates comparable plasma levels for desmopressin oral lyophilisate, despite the lower dose. The dosage for desmopressin oral lyophilisate is more predictable due to the significantly smaller variance. Therefore, desmopressin oral lyophilisate seems more suitable, especially in the younger age group for which time interval between dinner and drug administration is limited. PMID:23989967

  17. carrageenan\\/gelatin gel beads for the co-immobilization of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities degrading 2,4,6-trichlorophenol under air-limited conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Gardin; A. Pauss

    2001-01-01

    Alginate and 3-carrageenan gels were tested as bead materials for the co-immobilization of anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms for the mineralization of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol under air-limited conditions. Chemical, mechanical and thermal culture constraints were pre-defined and the gel resistances were established. Alginate was quickly eliminated because of its chemical instability in the culture media. In anaerobic conditions, the microorganisms transformed the substrates

  18. 78 FR 67320 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 series Airplane; Pitch and Roll Limiting by Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ...25-13-25-SC] Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 series Airplane; Pitch and...proposes special conditions for the Airbus Model A350-900 series airplanes. This airplane...applied for a type certificate for their new Model A350-900 series airplane. Later,...

  19. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a smoking ... Nicotine oral inhalation comes as a cartridge to inhale by mouth using a special inhaler. Follow the directions on ...

  20. Oxalic acid, versatile peroxidase secretion and chelating ability of Bjerkandera fumosa in rich and limited culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Gr?z, Marcin; Jarosz-Wilko?azka, Anna

    2011-08-01

    Efficient ligninolytic systems of wood-degrading fungi include not only oxidizing enzymes, but also low-molecular-weight effectors. The ability of Bjerkandera fumosa to secrete oxalic acid and versatile peroxidase (VP) in nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-limited media was studied. Higher activity of VP was determined in the nitrogen-limited media but greater concentration of oxalic acid was observed in the cultures of B. fumosa without nitrogen limitation. Ferric ions chelating ability of Bjerkandera fumosa studied in ferric ions limited media was correlated with the increased level of oxalic acid. The presence of hydroxamate-type siderophores in B. fumosa media were also detected. Oxalate decarboxylase was found to be responsible for regulation of oxalic acid concentration in the tested B. fumosa cultures. PMID:21892253

  1. GENERAL: Bifurcation of a Saddle-Node Limit Cycle with Homoclinic Orbits Satisfying the Small Lobe Condition in a Leech Neuron Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yooer, Chi-Feng; Xu, Jian-Xue; Zhang, Xin-Hua

    2009-08-01

    Mechanism of period-adding cascades with chaos in a reduced leech neuron model is suggested as the bifurcation of a saddle-node limit cycle with homoclinic orbits satisfying the “small lobe condition", instead of the blue-sky catastrophe. In every spiking adding, the new spike emerges at the end of the spiking phase of the bursters.

  2. The Importance of Awareness and Communication for the Inclusion of Young People with Life-Limiting and Life-Threatening Conditions in Mainstream Schools and Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asprey, Anthea; Nash, Tricia

    2006-01-01

    Anthea Asprey and Tricia Nash both belong to the Children's Hospice South West Research Group, based at the University of Exeter. In this article, they report one aspect of a research project designed to determine the adequacy of support for young people with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions in the education system. They describe here…

  3. Inhibition of feeding by a generalist insect due to increased volatile leaf terpenes under nitrate-limiting conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles A. Mihaliak; Denis Couvet; David E. Lincoln

    1987-01-01

    Nitrogen-limited plants ofHeterotheca subaxillaris accumulate greater quantities of leaf volatile terpenes than do nitrogen-rich plants. A series of feeding trials were performed to determine if such nitrate-limited plants are better defended against generalist-feeding insect herbivores. Soybean looper (Pseudoplusia includens) larvae were fed leaves fromH. subaxillaris rosettes grown under high and low nitrate supply regimes. Larval consumption, growth, and survival declined

  4. Oxalic acid, versatile peroxidase secretion and chelating ability of Bjerkandera fumosa in rich and limited culture conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcin Gr?z; Anna Jarosz-Wilko?azka

    Efficient ligninolytic systems of wood-degrading fungi include not only oxidizing enzymes, but also low-molecular-weight effectors.\\u000a The ability of Bjerkandera fumosa to secrete oxalic acid and versatile peroxidase (VP) in nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-limited media was studied. Higher activity\\u000a of VP was determined in the nitrogen-limited media but greater concentration of oxalic acid was observed in the cultures of\\u000a B. fumosa without

  5. Catabolite repression of the toluene degradation pathway in Pseudomonas putida harboring pWW0 under various conditions of nutrient limitation in chemostat culture.

    PubMed Central

    Duetz, W A; Marqués, S; Wind, B; Ramos, J L; van Andel, J G

    1996-01-01

    In earlier studies, the pathway of toluene and m- and p-xylene degradation (TOL pathway) in Pseudomonas putida (pWW0) was found to be subject to catabolite repression when the strain was grown at the maximal rate on glucose or succinate in the presence of an inducer. This report describes catabolite repression of the TOL pathway by succinate in chemostat cultures run at a low dilution rate (D = 0.05 h-1) under different conditions of inorganic-nutrient limitation. The activity of benzylalcohol dehydrogenase (BADH) in cell extracts was used as a measure of the expression of the TOL upper pathway. When cells were grown in the presence of 10 to 15 mM succinate under conditions of phosphate or sulfate limitation, the BADH activity in response to the nonmetabolizable inducer o-xylene was less than 2% of that of cells grown under conditions of succinate limitation. Less repression was found under conditions of ammonium or oxygen limitation (2 to 10% and 20 to 35%, respectively, of the BADH levels under succinate limitation). The BADH expression levels determined under the different growth conditions appeared to correlate well with the mRNA transcript levels from the upper pathway promoter (Pu), which indicates that repression was due to a blockage at the transcriptional level. The meta-cleavage pathway was found to be less susceptible to catabolite repression. The results obtained suggest that the occurrence of catabolite repression is related to a high-energy status of the cells rather than to a high growth rate or directly to the presence of growth-saturating concentrations of a primary carbon and energy source. PMID:8593060

  6. Oral Health and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Renata S.; Marlow, Nicole M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been described as a new epidemic. Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, and this number is predicted to increase by about 50% by year 2030.This article will review oral health manifestations of diabetes, and discuss associations between periodontal disease and diabetes. Although there is a strong body of evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and T2DM, oral health awareness is lacking among patients with diabetes and other health professionals. There is a need for the treating physician to be educated about the various oral manifestations of diabetes so that they can be diagnosed early and timely referrals to oral health specialists can be made. The established link between periodontitis and diabetes calls for an increased need to study ways to control both diseases, particularly among populations with health disparities and limited access to oral and health care. PMID:23531957

  7. Oral health as a predictive factor for oral mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Coracin, Fabio Luiz; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sergio; Gallottini, Marina H. C.; Saboya, Rosaura; Musqueira, Priscila Tavares; Barban, Alessandra; de Alencar Fischer Chamone, Dalton; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Nunes, Fabio Daumas

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Oral mucositis is a complication frequently associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, decreasing a patient's quality of life and increasing the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and severity of oral mucositis and to assess the correlation of this disease with the oral health of an individual at the time of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: Before transplantation, patients' oral health and inflammatory conditions were determined using the gingival index and the plaque index, which are based on gingival bleeding and the presence of dental plaque, respectively. Additionally, the dental health status was determined using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. The monitoring of oral mucositis was based on the World Health Organization grading system and was performed for five periods: from Day 0 to D+5, from D+6 to D+10, from D+11 to D+15, from D+16 to D+20, and from D+21 to D+30. RESULTS: A total of 97 patients (56% male and 44% female) who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo between January 2008 and July 2009 were prospectively examined. The incidence of ulcerative mucositis was highest from days +6 to +10 and from days +11 to +15 in the patients who underwent autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The data, including the dental plaque and periodontal status data, showed that these oral health factors were predictive of the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in a cohort of patients with similar conditioning regimens before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:23778491

  8. HIV antibody detection in oral fluids.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Oral fluids are a mixture of saliva and oral mucosal transudates (OMT). Saliva is a product of the salivary glands and contains mostly IgA, while OMT is mostly fluid in the subgingival space derived from the passive transport of plasma and contains mostly IgG. The IgG concentration, however, is much lower than that in serum. Testing for antibodies to HIV in oral fluids has been proposed as an alternative to antibody testing in blood. The fluids may be collected directly by dribbling into a receptacle and via absorption onto pads using specially designed collection devices. Only one commercially available HIV antibody test is, however, specifically designed for use with oral fluid samples. Some existing commercial tests designed to detect antibody to HIV in blood samples have been modified for use with oral fluids, but only limited information is available on their performance. Several studies suggest that using tests to detect HIV antibodies in oral fluids may be adequate for some situations, but a number of issues remain to be addressed. WHO therefore recommends that a full evaluation of the detection of HIV antibody in oral fluids be undertaken to address the issues before recommendations on HIV antibody testing using oral fluids are made. Such evaluation would gather information on the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of testing oral fluids. Ethical considerations when performing HIV testing using oral fluids would be the same as those for blood: non-coercion, informed consent, counseling, and confidentiality. PMID:8261568

  9. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Xi; J. R. Grandis

    2003-01-01

    Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the survival of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma has not significantly improved over the past several decades. Treatment options for recurrent or refractory oral cancers are limited. Gene therapy for oral cancer is currently under investigation in clinical trials. The goal of cancer gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into

  10. No evidence of carbon limitation with tree age and height in Nothofagus pumilio under Mediterranean and temperate climate conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Frida I.; Fajardo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Trees universally decrease their growth with age. Most explanations for this trend so far support the hypothesis that carbon (C) gain becomes limited with age; though very few studies have directly assessed the relative reductions of C gain and C demand with tree age. It has also been suggested that drought enhances the effect of C gain limitation in trees. Here tests were carried out to determine whether C gain limitation is causing the growth decay with tree age, and whether drought accentuates its effect. Methods The balance between C gain and C demand across tree age and height ranges was estimated. For this, the concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in stems and roots of trees of different ages and heights was measured in the deciduous temperate species Nothofagus pumilio. An ontogenetic decrease in NSCs indicates support for C limitation. Furthermore, the importance of drought in altering the C balance with ontogeny was assessed by sampling the same species in Mediterranean and humid climate locations in the southern Andes of Chile. Wood density (WD) and stable carbon isotope ratios (?13C) were also determined to examine drought constraints on C gain. Key Results At both locations, it was effectively found that tree growth ultimately decreased with tree age and height. It was found, however, that NSC concentrations did not decrease with tree age or height when WD was considered, suggesting that C limitation is not the ultimate mechanism causing the age/height-related declining tree growth. ?13C decreased with tree age/height at the Mediterranean site only; drought effect increased with tree age/height, but this pattern was not mirrored by the levels of NSCs. Conclusions The results indicate that concentrations of C storage in N. pumilio trees do not decrease with tree age or height, and that reduced C assimilation due to summer drought does not alter this pattern. PMID:21852277

  11. The Oral Health Status and the Treatment Needs of Salt Workers at Sambhar Lake, Jaipur, India

    PubMed Central

    Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Sharda, Archana Jagat; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Batra, Mehak; Daryani, Hemasha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Salt workers are exposed to the adversities of environmental conditions such as direct sunlight, salt dust and contact with brine, which have an impact on the health of workers. Since oral health is an integral part of the general health, we planned to determine its effect on the oral cavity. Objectives: To assess the oral health status and the treatment needs among the workers of Sambhar Salts Limited at Sambhar Lake, Jaipur, India. Material and Methods: A cross sectional, descriptive survey was conducted among 979 subjects (509 males; 470 females) who were aged between 19–68 years, who were the workers of Sambhar Salts Limited, Sambhar Lake, Jaipur, India. An interview on the demographic profile followed a clinical examination for recording the oral health status, based on the World Health Organization guidelines. The Chi–square test, t–test, One way Analysis of Variance and a Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. Results: Females had a significantly greater prevalence of dental fluorosis (71.7%) and periodontal disease (96.4%) as compared to males (p= 0.001). The mean number of healthy sextants (0.71 ± 0.09) and the mean DMFT (5.19 ± 4.11) were also significantly higher in females as compared to those in males (p=0.001). One surface filling (78.2%), followed by pulp care and restoration (76.1%) were the most prevalent treatment needs. The gender and oral hygiene practices for dental caries and periodontal disease were respectively identified as the best predictors. Conclusion: Considerable percentages of salt workers have demonstrated a higher prevalence of oral diseases. Higher unmet treatment needs suggest a poor accessibility and availability of oral health care, in addition to a low utilization of preventive or therapeutic oral health services. PMID:24086913

  12. A calibration methodology and model-based systems analysis for SBR's removing nutrients under limited aeration conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Güçlü Insel; Gürkan Sin; Dae Sung Lee; Peter A. Vanrolleghem

    2004-01-01

    A methodology was proposed for the model calibration of nutrient removing lab-scale SBR's under limited aeration. Based on in-process measurements and influent wastewater characterization, the ASM2d model was modified by adding an organic nitrogen module linked to the hydrolysis mechanism. After calibration the simulation results showed that enhanced biological nutrient removal occurred during the fill-period and under reduced aeration that

  13. Oral muscosal melanomas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce F Barker; William M Carpenter; Troy E Daniels; Michael A Kahn; Alan S Leider; Francina Lozada-Nur; Denis P Lynch; Raymond Melrose; Philip Merrell; Thomas Morton; Edmund Peters; Joseph A Regezi; Susan D Richards; Gordon M Rick; Michael D Rohrer; Lee Slater; Jeffery C. B Stewart; Charles E Tomich; Robert A Vickers; Norman K Wood; Stephen K Young

    1997-01-01

    A workshop to discuss primary oral melanomas was convened at the annual Western Society of Teachers of Oral Pathology meeting in Bannf, Alberta, Canada. Fifty oral melanomas, identified from the files of the participants, were reviewed in order to better understand the clinical features, histologic spectrum, and natural history of these perplexing lesions. Results confirmed that oral melanomas occur in

  14. Nutrition and oral cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James R. Marshall; Peter Boyle

    1996-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence on the relationship between nutrition and oral cancer is reviewed. Ecologic and case-control studies provide most of the evidence regarding the nutritional epidemiology of oral cancer. The ecologic evidence is that the considerable geographic variation in the incidence of oral cancer is consistent with variation in nutrition. Because incipient oral cancer is likely to affect the diets of

  15. Lifestyle risk factors for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Petti, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    The "style of life is the unique way in which individuals try to realize their fictional final goal and meet or avoid the three main tasks of life: work, community, love" (Alfred Adler, founder of the Individual Psychology). Lifestyle refers to the way individuals live their lives and how they handle problems and interpersonal relations. The lifestyle behaviours associated to oral cancer with convincing evidence are tobacco use, betel quid chewing, alcohol drinking, low fruit and vegetable consumption (the detrimental lifestyle is high fat and/or sugar intake, resulting in low fruit and/or vegetable intake). Worldwide, 25% of oral cancers are attributable to tobacco usage (smoking and/or chewing), 7-19% to alcohol drinking, 10-15% to micronutrient deficiency, more than 50% to betel quid chewing in areas of high chewing prevalence. Carcinogenicity is dose-dependent and magnified by multiple exposures. Conversely, low and single exposures do not significantly increase oral cancer risk. These behaviours have common characteristics: (i) they are widespread: one billion men, 250 million women smoke cigarettes, 600-1200 million people chew betel quid, two billion consume alcohol, unbalanced diet is common amongst developed and developing countries; (ii) they were already used by animals and human forerunners millions of years ago because they were essential to overcome conditions such as cold, hunger, famine; their use was seasonal and limited by low availability, in contrast with the pattern of consumption of the modern era, characterized by routine, heavy usage, for recreational activities and with multiple exposures; (iii) their consumption in small doses is not recognized as detrimental by the human body and activates the dopaminergic reward system of the brain, thus giving instant pleasure, "liking" (overconsumption) and "wanting" (craving). For these reasons, effective Public Health measures aimed at preventing oral cancer and other lifestyle-related conditions fail to realize their final goal to eradicate these lifestyles. Following Adler's theory and the principles of the "Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion", conditions such as education, sustainable resources, social justice, and equity must be satisfied before the implementation of physical health promotion campaigns. PMID:18674956

  16. Oral Probiotics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Time to Talk campaign . Top Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Bifidobacterium bifidum. Photo Credit: SciMAT/Photo Researchers, ... mild medical conditions. Color enhanced scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus. A spirochete bacteria ...

  17. Treatment of methyl tert-butyl ether vapors in a biotrickling filters. 2. Analysis of the rate-limiting step and behavior under transient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, N.Y.; Deshusses, M.A. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering] [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    1999-09-01

    Detailed experiments were performed with gas phase biotrickling filters treating vapors of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive of great environmental concern. A particular emphasis was placed on the analysis of the rate-limiting step, and it was found that the process was mostly limited by the biological reaction rather than by mass transfer. Further experiments involved the study of the dynamic behavior of the biotrickling filters under simulated field conditions. In all cases, the biotrickling filters adapted rapidly to the new conditions, and new steady states were obtained within hours. The relevance of the results and the implications as far as implementation of biotrickling filters for field MTBE treatment are discussed.

  18. Dwarf and tiller-enhancing 1 regulates growth and development by influencing boron uptake in boron limited conditions in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Ling-Long; Ren, Yu-Long; Wang, Zhi-Quan; Zhou, Kun-Neng; Liu, Xi; Wang, Dan; Zheng, Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Lin, Qi-Bing; Wang, Jiu-Lin; Wu, Fu-Qing; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiu-Ping; Wang, Chun-Ming; Zhai, Hu-Qu; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jian-Min

    2015-07-01

    Boron (B) is essential for plant growth, and B deficiency causes severe losses in crop yield. Here we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant named dwarf and tiller-enhancing 1 (dte1), which exhibits defects under low-B conditions, including retarded growth, increased number of tillers and impaired pollen fertility. Map-based cloning revealed that dte1 encodes a NOD26-LIKE INTRINSIC PROTEIN orthologous to known B channel proteins AtNIP5;1 in Arabidopsis and TASSEL-LESS1 in maize. Its identity was verified by transgenic complementation and RNA-interference. Subcellular localization showed DTE1 is mainly localized in the plasma membrane. The accumulation of DTE1 transcripts both in roots and shoots significantly increased within 3h of the onset of B starvation, but decreased within 1h of B replenishment. GUS staining indicated that DTE1s are expressed abundantly in exodermal cells in roots, as well as in nodal region of adult leaves. Although the dte1 mutation apparently reduces the total B content in plants, it does not affect in vivo B concentrations under B-deficient conditions. These data provide evidence that DTE1 is critical for vegetative growth and reproductive development in rice grown under B-deficient conditions. PMID:26025517

  19. Oral Care 2025 Innovation/Finance/Delivery

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yiling

    %) Enhanced benefits for related medical conditions (75%) Adult orthodontics (73%) Dental Implants (72 of Contents Dental Insurance Market Trends Dental Insurance Benefit Trends Value Proposition Differentiation Evidence Based Dental Benefits Oral Health and Overall Health Integration · BCBSMA Total Health Program

  20. Identifying root traits among MAR and non-MAR cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. cultivars that relate to performance under limited moisture conditions 

    E-print Network

    Cook, Charles Garland

    1985-01-01

    Traits Among NAR and non-NAR Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. Cultivars that Relate to Performance Under Limited Moisture Conditions. (December 1985) Charles Garland Cook, B. S. , Abilene Christian University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. L. S... to Wade and Brenda for their help in the typing and organization of this manuscript. I offer my most sincere gratitude to my parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Cook and for their encouragement and support. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT Page ACKNOWLEDGEMENT...

  1. Evaluation of an oral care protocol intervention in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in paediatric cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. K. F Cheng; A Molassiotis; A. M Chang; W. C Wai; S. S Cheung

    2001-01-01

    Oral mucositis is the most frequent and severe complication of chemotherapy in children with cancer that can aggravate the child's clinical condition and increase the risk of infection. This prospective comparative study was designed to determine the effectiveness of a preventive oral care protocol in reducing chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children with cancer. During an 8-month period, 42 children aged

  2. Comparative evapotranspiration rates of thirteen turfgrasses grown under both non-limiting soil moisture and progressive water stress conditions 

    E-print Network

    Kim, Ki Sun

    1983-01-01

    and transpiration from the plants growing thereon. ET rate is commonly expressed quantitatively as -2 -1 milligrams per square meter per second (mg m sec ) or as milli- meters per day (mm/day). The term ET rate is preferred to WUR in scientific literature... yield. Only a limited number of references are available concerning ET rate studies on turfgrasses (2, 4, 14, 15, 16, 22, 23, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 35, 41, 47, 51). The general zange reported for ET rates of most turfgrass is 2 to 6 mm (0. 1 to 0. 3...

  3. Comparative bioavailability of two oral formulations of clopidogrel: determination of clopidogrel and its carboxylic acid metabolite (SR26334) under fasting and fed conditions in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Brvar, Nina; Lachance, Sylvain; Lévesque, Ann; Breznik, Marjanca; Cvitkovi? Mar?i?, Lea; Merslavi?, Mateja; Grabnar, Iztok; Mateovi?-Rojnik, Tatjana

    2014-03-01

    Two randomized, single dose, 2-period, 2-sequence crossover studies were conducted to evaluate the comparative bioavailability of two clopidogrel formulations under fasting and fed conditions. Assessment of bioequivalence was based upon measurement of plasma concentrations of the parent drug, clopidogrel, and its major (inactive) metabolite, clopidogrel carboxylic acid, using improved methanol-free extraction. Bioequivalence of Krka's formulation to the innovator's formulation was demonstrated under both fasting and fed conditions on 205 volunteers. Confidence intervals for AUC0-t, AUC0-inf and Cmax of clopidogrel and its main metabolite were well within the acceptance range of 80.00 to 125.00 %. Food substantially increased the bioavailability of clopidogrel from both formulations, while no effect of food on the extent and rate of exposure to the metabolite was observed. The effect of food was comparable between the two formulations, as indicated by the same direction and rank of food impact on the bioavailability of both formulations. PMID:24670351

  4. Oral treprostinil for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Lartigue, J

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare yet progressive and life-threatening condition that, despite the availability of FDA-approved therapies, remains incurable. Prostacyclin analogues are a mainstay of therapy for patients with PAH, but in spite of demonstrated improvements in survival, exercise capacity and hemodynamics, these agents have been limited by poor pharmacokinetics and complex administration requirements. Treprostinil diolamine (Orenitram™; United Therapeutics) is a novel oral formulation that joins the approved parenteral and inhaled formulations (Remodulin® and Tyvaso®; United Therapeutics). It displays similar pharmacokinetic properties, while offering the potential for improved patient compliance through the convenience of oral dosing. Following the demonstration of improved exercise capacity as monotherapy in patients with de novo PAH (FREEDOM-M), treprostinil diolamine was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of patients with WHO group 1 PAH and continues to be evaluated in a number of clinical trials in this patient population. PMID:25187906

  5. Relative efficacy of water use in five varieties of Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench. under water-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Sankar, B; Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Kishorekumar, A; Somasundaram, R; Panneerselvam, R

    2008-03-15

    In the present investigation, five varieties of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench.) were screened for their water use efficiency under two water regimes, viz., 60% and 100% filed capacity. Drought stress was imposed at 60% field capacity from 30 to 70 days after sowing, while the control pots were maintained at 100% field capacity throughout the period of entire growth. Biomass and yield, leaf area duration, cumulative water transpired water use efficiency, net assimilation rate, mean transpiration rate and harvest index under water deficit level were measured. Water use efficiency significantly increases in all the okra varieties under water-limited environment. Drought stress decreased the biomass and yield, leaf area duration, cumulative water transpired, net assimilation rate, mean transpiration rate and harvest index in the okra varieties studied. But among the varieties, variety JK Haritha showed better results. None of the varieties studied had showed increased drought tolerance than the control. PMID:17988840

  6. Differential regulation of two types of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase in membrane lipid remodeling under phosphate-limited conditions in sesame plants

    PubMed Central

    Shimojima, Mie; Watanabe, Takahide; Madoka, Yuka; Koizumi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Masayuki P.; Masuda, Kyojiro; Yamada, Kyoji; Masuda, Shinji; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) limitation causes drastic lipid remodeling in plant membranes. Glycolipids substitute for the phospholipids that are degraded, thereby supplying Pi needed for essential biological processes. Two major types of remodeling of membrane lipids occur in higher plants: whereas one involves an increase in the concentration of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol in plastids to compensate for a decreased concentration of phosphatidylglycerol, the other involves digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) synthesis in plastids and the export of DGDG to extraplastidial membranes to compensate for reduced abundances of phospholipids. Lipid remodeling depends on an adequate supply of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), which is a substrate that supports the elevated rate of DGDG synthesis that is induced by low Pi availability. Regulation of MGDG synthesis has been analyzed most extensively using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, although orthologous genes that encode putative MGDG synthases exist in photosynthetic organisms from bacteria to higher plants. We recently hypothesized that two types of MGDG synthase diverged after the appearance of seed plants. This divergence might have both enabled plants to adapt to a wide range of Pi availability in soils and contributed to the diversity of seed plants. In the work presented here, we found that membrane lipid remodeling also takes place in sesame, which is one of the most common traditional crops grown in Asia. We identified two types of MGDG synthase from sesame (encoded by SeMGD1 and SeMGD2) and analyzed their enzymatic properties. Our results show that both genes correspond to the Arabidopsis type-A and -B isoforms of MGDG synthase. Notably, whereas Pi limitation up-regulates only the gene encoding the type-B isoform of Arabidopsis, low Pi availability up-regulates the expression of both SeMGD1 and SeMGD2. We discuss the significance of the different responses to low Pi availability in sesame and Arabidopsis. PMID:24312111

  7. Nanoparticles for oral delivery: Targeted nanoparticles with peptidic ligands for oral protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yeonhee; Cho, Yong Woo; Park, Kinam

    2012-01-01

    As the field of biotechnology has advanced, oral protein delivery has also made significant progress. Oral delivery is the most common method of drug administration with high levels of patient acceptance. Despite the preference of oral delivery, administration of therapeutic proteins has been extremely difficult. Increasing the bioavailability of oral protein drugs to the therapeutically acceptable level is still a challenging goal. Poor membrane permeability, high molecular weight, and enzymatic degradation of protein drugs have remained unsolved issues. Among diverse strategies, nanotechnology has provided a glimpse of hope in oral delivery of protein drugs. Nanoparticles have advantages, such as small size, high surface area, and modification using functional groups for high capacity or selectivity. Nanoparticles with peptidic ligands are especially worthy of notice because they can be used for specific targeting in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This article reviews the transport mechanism of the GI tract, barriers to protein absorption, current status and limitations of nanotechnology for oral protein delivery system. PMID:23123292

  8. Drug Testing in Oral Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Drummer, Olaf H

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade there have been considerable developments in the use of oral fluid (saliva) for drug testing. Oral fluid can provide a quick and non-invasive specimen for drug testing. However, its collection may be thwarted by lack of available fluid due to a range of physiological factors, including drug use itself. Food and techniques designed to stimulate production of oral fluid can also affect the concentration of drugs. Current applications are mainly focused on drugs of abuse testing in employees at workplaces where drug use has safety implications, in drivers of vehicles at the roadside and in other situations where drug impairment is suspected. Testing has included alcohol (ethanol) and a range of clinical tests eg antibodies to HIV, therapeutic drugs and steroids. Its main application has been for testing for drugs of abuse such as the amphetamines, cocaine and metabolites, opioids such as morphine, methadone and heroin, and for cannabis. Oral fluid concentrations of basic drugs such as the amphetamines, cocaine and some opioids are similar or higher than those in plasma. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major species present from cannabis use, displays similar concentrations in oral fluid compared to blood in the elimination phase. However, there is significant local absorption of the drug in the oral cavity which increases the concentrations for a period after use of drug. Depot effects occur for other drugs introduced into the body that allow local absorption, such as smoking of tobacco (nicotine), cocaine, amphetamines, or use of sub-lingual buprenorphine. Screening techniques are usually an adaptation of those used in other specimens, with an emphasis on the parent drug since this is usually the dominant species present in oral fluid. Confirmatory techniques are largely based on mass spectrometry (MS) with an emphasis on Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), due to low sample volumes and the low detection limits required. Drug testing outside laboratory environments has become widespread and provides presumptive results within minutes of collection of specimens. This review focuses on the developments, particularly over the last 10 years, and outlines the roles and applications of testing for drugs in oral fluid, describes the difficulties associated with this form of testing and illustrates applications of oral fluid testing for specific drugs. PMID:17268583

  9. Nitrogen availability impacts oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) plant water status and proline production efficiency under water-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Albert, Benjamin; Le Cahérec, Françoise; Niogret, Marie-Françoise; Faes, Pascal; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Leport, Laurent; Bouchereau, Alain

    2012-08-01

    Large amounts of nitrogen (N) fertilizers are used in the production of oilseed rape. However, as low-input methods of crop management are introduced crops will need to withstand temporary N deficiency. In temperate areas, oilseed rape will also be affected by frequent drought periods. Here we evaluated the physiological and metabolic impact of nitrate limitation on the oilseed rape response to water deprivation. Different amounts of N fertilizer were applied to plants at the vegetative stage, which were then deprived of water and rehydrated. Both water and N depletion accelerated leaf senescence and reduced leaf development. N-deprived plants exhibited less pronounced symptoms of wilting during drought, probably because leaves were smaller and stomata were partially closed. Efficiency of proline production, a major stress-induced diversion of nitrogen metabolism, was assessed at different positions along the whole plant axis and related to leaf developmental stage and water status indices. Proline accumulation, preferentially in younger leaves, accounted for 25-85% of the free amino acid pool. This was mainly due to a better capacity for proline synthesis in fully N-supplied plants whether they were subjected to drought or not, as deduced from the expression patterns of the proline metabolism BnP5CS and BnPDH genes. Although less proline accumulated in the oldest leaves, a significant amount was transported from senescing to emerging leaves. Moreover, during rehydration proline was readily recycled. Our results therefore suggest that proline plays a significant role in leaf N remobilization and in N use efficiency in oilseed rape. PMID:22526495

  10. [Oral form of fibrolipoma].

    PubMed

    Despotov, O; Ficheva, M; Avramov, T

    2003-01-01

    The pleomorphism of the tussies taking part in the formation of oral cavity is basis for the great majority of benign and malignant tumors. They often have similar clinical manifestations macroscopic view. Histological investigations help us for exact diagnosis and adequate treatment. Authors present a clinical case of 67 years old female treated in II ORL clinic of a tumour, originating from the floor of oral cavity, displacing tongue to the left. First complaints of the pathient a dating from 23 years. During that period the tumour gradually increased its dimensions and obstructed swallowing. The weight of the pathient of the time of the admitance at the hospital was 47 Kg. After operative removal of the tumour, the woman was in very good condition. The histological result--fibrolipoma. At the control examination (3 and 6 months after operation) she had increase her weight by 17 and 21 Kg respectively. This case present the conclusion that even benign tumours should be removed in shortes possible terms after the diagnoses. PMID:15587749

  11. Mobile microbiome: oral bacteria in extra-oral infections and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Han, Y W; Wang, X

    2013-06-01

    The link between oral infections and adverse systemic conditions has attracted much attention in the research community. Several mechanisms have been proposed, including spread of the oral infection due to transient bacteremia resulting in bacterial colonization in extra-oral sites, systemic injury by free toxins of oral pathogens, and systemic inflammation caused by soluble antigens of oral pathogens. Mounting evidence supports a major role of the systemic spread of oral commensals and pathogens to distant body sites causing extra-oral infections and inflammation. We review here the most recent findings on systemic infections and inflammation complicated by oral bacteria, including cardiovascular disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, respiratory tract infections, and organ inflammations and abscesses. The recently identified virulence mechanisms of oral species Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Streptococcus mutans, and Campylobacter rectus are also reviewed. A pattern emerges indicating that only select subtype(s) of a given species, e.g., F. nucleatum subspecies animalis and polymorphum and S. mutans non-c serotypes, are prone to extra-oral translocation. These findings advocate the importance of identification and quantification of potential pathogens at the subtype levels for accurate prediction of disease potential. PMID:23625375

  12. The oral environment: the challenge for antimicrobials in oral care products.

    PubMed

    Brading, M G; Marsh, P D

    2003-12-01

    For any antibacterial/ anti-plaque system from an oral care product to be effective, it must firstly be delivered and retained at relevant sites in the oral cavity and secondly, remain active within the chosen formulation to successfully target the biofilm cells within dental plaque. This must include inhibition of the growth and metabolism of relevant organisms associated with disease. This review will concentrate on understanding the environmental conditions in which such oral care products must work and summarise the activity within the oral cavity of the main antibacterial and anti-plaque agents in common oral care products, namely chlorhexidine, essential oils, metal salts and Triclosan. Routes to further enhance the activity of these products, together with the use of relatively novel formats such as confectionery products to provide added consumer oral health benefits will be considered. PMID:14725379

  13. The mucosal immune system in the oral cavity—an orchestra of T cell diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui-Qing; Zhang, Dun-Fang; Tu, Eric; Chen, Qian-Ming; Chen, WanJun

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system defends against a vast array of pathogens, yet it exhibits limited responses to commensal microorganisms under healthy conditions. The oral-pharyngeal cavity, the gateway for both the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, is composed of complex anatomical structures and is constantly challenged by antigens from air and food. The mucosal immune system of the oral-pharyngeal cavity must prevent pathogen entry while maintaining immune homeostasis, which is achieved via a range of mechanisms that are similar or different to those utilized by the gastrointestinal immune system. In this review, we summarize the features of the mucosal immune system, focusing on T cell subsets and their functions. We also discuss our current understanding of the oral-pharyngeal mucosal immune system. PMID:25105816

  14. Investigation of the physiological response to oxygen limited process conditions of Pichia pastoris Mut(+) strain using a two-compartment scale-down system.

    PubMed

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneities in production-scale bioreactors influence microbial growth and product quality due to insufficient mixing and mass transfer. For this reason, lots of efforts are being made to investigate the effects of gradients that impose stress in large-scale reactors in laboratory scale. We have implemented a scale-down model which allows separating a homogeneous part, a stirred tank reactor (STR), and a plug flow reactor (PFR) which mimics the inhomogeneous regimes of the large-scale fermenters. This scale-down model shows solutions to trigger oxygen limited conditions in the PFR part of the scale-down setup for physiological analysis. The goal of the study was to investigate the scale-up relevant physiological responses of Pichia pastoris strain to oxygen limited process conditions in the above mentioned two-compartment bioreactor setup. Experimental results with non-induced cultures show that the specific growth rate significantly decreased with increasing the exposure time to oxygen limitation. In parallel more by-products were produced. Examining physiological scalable key parameters, multivariate data analyses solely using on-line data revealed that different exposures to the oxygen limitation significantly affected the culture performance. This work with the small scale-downs setup reflects new approaches for a valuable process development tool for accelerating strain characterization or for verifying CFD simulations of large-scale bioreactors. As a novel methodological achievement, the combination of the two-compartment scale-down system with the proposed multivariate techniques of solely using on-line data is a valuable tool for recognition of stress effects on the culture performance for physiological bioprocess scale-up issues. PMID:23648104

  15. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment. PMID:26125159

  16. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Floyd E. Dewhirst; Erin A. Klein; Emily C. Thompson; Jessica M. Blanton; Tsute Chen; Lisa Milella; Catherine M. F. Buckley; Ian J. Davis; Marie-Lousie Bennett; Zoe V. Marshall-Jones

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S

  17. OD(X/sup 2/II) and SD(X/sup 2/II) from reactions of D atoms with OCS under bulk and precursor geometry limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeusler, D.; Rice, J.; Wittig, C.

    1987-10-08

    Reactions of D atoms with OCS were studied by 193-nm pulsed laser photolysis of DBr as a nearly monoenergetic D-atom source. Nascent OD(X/sup 2/II) and SD(X/sup 2/II) rotational, vibrational, spin-orbit, and ..lambda..-doublet populations were obtained under single-collision bulk conditions at 300 K. The SD channel is favored energetically (..delta.. H = -43 +/- 13 and 230 +/- 13 kJ mol/sup -1/ for the SD and OD channels, respectively) and is the dominant pathway ((SD)/(OD) = 5 +/- 2). Nascent OD(X/sup 2/II) products were also obtained from a precursor geometry limited (PGL) reaction by using the weakly bound van der Waals complex SCO-DBr. The OD(X/sup 2/II) rotational distributions are the same for both bulk and PGL conditions and can be reproduced by using a statistical model. Due to experimental difficulties, SD(X/sup 2/II) distributions could not be obtained under PGL conditions. The SD(X/sup 2/II) distribution obtained under bulk conditions is very nonstatistical, suggesting that this species is not formed via a long-lived DSCO intermediate complex in which vibrational energy is randomized.

  18. Over-expression of the Arabidopsis proton-pyrophosphatase AVP1 enhances transplant survival, root mass, and fruit development under limiting phosphorus conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haibing; Zhang, Xiao; Gaxiola, Roberto A; Xu, Guohua; Peer, Wendy Ann; Murphy, Angus S

    2014-07-01

    Phosphorus (P), an element required for plant growth, fruit set, fruit development, and fruit ripening, can be deficient or unavailable in agricultural soils. Previously, it was shown that over-expression of a proton-pyrophosphatase gene AVP1/AVP1D (AVP1DOX) in Arabidopsis, rice, and tomato resulted in the enhancement of root branching and overall mass with the result of increased mineral P acquisition. However, although AVP1 over-expression also increased shoot biomass in Arabidopsis, this effect was not observed in tomato under phosphate-sufficient conditions. AVP1DOX tomato plants exhibited increased rootward auxin transport and root acidification compared with control plants. AVP1DOX tomato plants were analysed in detail under limiting P conditions in greenhouse and field trials. AVP1DOX plants produced 25% (P=0.001) more marketable ripened fruit per plant under P-deficient conditions compared with the controls. Further, under low phosphate conditions, AVP1DOX plants displayed increased phosphate transport from leaf (source) to fruit (sink) compared to controls. AVP1DOX plants also showed an 11% increase in transplant survival (P<0.01) in both greenhouse and field trials compared with the control plants. These results suggest that selection of tomato cultivars for increased proton pyrophosphatase gene expression could be useful when selecting for cultivars to be grown on marginal soils. PMID:24723407

  19. Over-expression of the Arabidopsis proton-pyrophosphatase AVP1 enhances transplant survival, root mass, and fruit development under limiting phosphorus conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haibing; Zhang, Xiao; Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Xu, Guohua; Peer, Wendy Ann; Murphy, Angus S.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P), an element required for plant growth, fruit set, fruit development, and fruit ripening, can be deficient or unavailable in agricultural soils. Previously, it was shown that over-expression of a proton-pyrophosphatase gene AVP1/AVP1D (AVP1DOX) in Arabidopsis, rice, and tomato resulted in the enhancement of root branching and overall mass with the result of increased mineral P acquisition. However, although AVP1 over-expression also increased shoot biomass in Arabidopsis, this effect was not observed in tomato under phosphate-sufficient conditions. AVP1DOX tomato plants exhibited increased rootward auxin transport and root acidification compared with control plants. AVP1DOX tomato plants were analysed in detail under limiting P conditions in greenhouse and field trials. AVP1DOX plants produced 25% (P=0.001) more marketable ripened fruit per plant under P-deficient conditions compared with the controls. Further, under low phosphate conditions, AVP1DOX plants displayed increased phosphate transport from leaf (source) to fruit (sink) compared to controls. AVP1DOX plants also showed an 11% increase in transplant survival (P<0.01) in both greenhouse and field trials compared with the control plants. These results suggest that selection of tomato cultivars for increased proton pyrophosphatase gene expression could be useful when selecting for cultivars to be grown on marginal soils. PMID:24723407

  20. Mechanism of Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiation of 1,4-Bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene under Nonequilibrium Conditions: Condition-Dependent Rate Limitation and Lithium Chloride-Catalyzed Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Hoepker, Alexander C; Algera, Russell F; Ma, Yun; Collum, David B

    2015-05-20

    Lithiation of 1,4-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene with lithium diisopropylamide in tetrahydrofuran at -78 °C occurs under conditions at which the rates of aggregate exchanges are comparable to the rates of metalation. Under such nonequilibrium conditions, a substantial number of barriers compete to be rate limiting, making the reaction sensitive to trace impurities (LiCl), reactant concentrations, and isotopic substitution. Rate studies using the perdeuterated arene reveal odd effects of LiCl, including catalyzed rate acceleration at lower temperature and catalyzed rate inhibition at higher temperatures. The catalytic effects are accompanied by corresponding changes in the rate law. A kinetic model is presented that captures the critical features of the LiCl catalysis, focusing on the influence of LiCl-catalyzed re-aggregation of the fleeting monomer that can reside above, at, or below the equilibrium population without catalyst. PMID:25900574

  1. Method to identify potential phosphorus rate-limiting conditions in post-denitrification biofilm reactors within systems designed for simultaneous low-level effluent nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Joshua P; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Daigger, Glen T; deBarbadillo, Christine; Murthy, Sudhir; Sørensen, Kim H; Stinson, Beverly

    2012-12-01

    Water-quality standards requiring simultaneous low level effluent N and P concentrations are increasingly common in Europe and the United States of America. Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) and biologically active filters (BAFs) have been used as post-denitrification biofilm reactors in processes designed and operated for this purpose (Boltz et al., 2010a). There is a paucity of information describing systematic design and operational protocols that will minimize the potential for phosphorus rate-limited conditions as well as a lack of information describing the interaction between these post-denitrification biofilm reactors and unit processes that substantially alter phosphorus speciation (e.g., chemically enhanced clarification). In this paper, a simple mathematical model for estimating the threshold below which P becomes rate-limiting, and the model is presented and evaluated by comparing its predictions with operational data from post-denitrification MBBRs and BAFs. Ortho-phosphorus (PO(4)-P), which is the dissolved reactive component of total phosphorus, was a primary indicator of P rate-limiting conditions in the evaluated post-denitrification biofilm reactors. The threshold below which PO(4)-P becomes the rate-limiting substrate is defined: S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) = 0.0086 g P/g N and S(PO4-P):S(M) = 0.0013 g P/g COD. Additional analyses indicate J(NOx-N)(avg) =0.48 g/m2/d when S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) > 0.0086, and J(NOx-N)(avg) = 0.06 g/m2/d when S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) < 0.0086. Effluent nitrate-nitrogen plus nitrite-nitrogen concentration (S(NOx-N)) from the evaluated post-denitrification biofilm reactors began to rapidly increase when S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) was 0.01, approximately (consistent with the rate-limitation threshold of S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) < 0.0086 predicted by the mathematical model described in this paper). Depending on the processes used at a given WWTP, optimizing chemically enhanced clarification to increase the amount of PO(4)-P that remains in the clarifiers effluent stream, dosing phosphoric acid in the MBBR or BAF influent stream, and/or optimizing secondary process EBPR may overcome phosphorus rate-limitations in the biofilm-based post-denitrification process. PMID:23058109

  2. The oral medicine clinic--what is its role?

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewska, J M; Downer, C; Lopes, V

    1994-01-01

    The total number of new patients seen over a period of 12 months in an oral medicine department was 963. Of these 587 were seen by an oral physician, 168 by a liaison psychiatrist, 137 by an oral immunologist and 71 by a dermatologist with a special interest in diseases of the mouth. The broad categories of disease seen were: 364 with orofacial pain of non-dental origin; 263 with benign diseases of the oral mucosa; 149 with potentially malignant lesions, six with frank carcinomas; 100 with oral manifestations of a systemic disease; and 81 patients with conditions considered to be normal. PMID:8046724

  3. Successful oral acyclovir desensitization.

    PubMed

    Henry, R E; Wegmann, J A; Hartle, J E; Christopher, G W

    1993-05-01

    A 65-year-old woman with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) complicated by recurrent mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection developed angioedema on the initiation of her second course of oral acyclovir therapy. Oral rechallenge in hospital three days later confirmed acyclovir hypersensitivity. Vidarabine and foscarnet therapies were abandoned after treatment failure and unacceptable toxicity. Acyclovir desensitization was accomplished using a protocol derived from oral penicillin desensitization regimens. Mucocutaneous HSV infection responded to intravenous acyclovir followed by chronic oral suppression without recurrences of HSV or hypersensitivity. This report is an example of acyclovir hypersensitivity and successful oral desensitization. PMID:8498729

  4. Flux Analysis of the Metabolism of Clostridium cellulolyticum Grown in Cellulose-Fed Continuous Culture on a Chemically Defined Medium under Ammonium-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Desvaux, Mickaël; Petitdemange, Henri

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of cellulose degradation by the nonruminal, cellulolytic, mesophilic bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum was performed in cellulose-fed chemostat cultures with ammonium as the growth-limiting nutrient. At any dilution rate (D), acetate was always the main product of the catabolism, with a yield of product from substrate ranging between 37.7 and 51.5 g per mol of hexose equivalent fermented and an acetate/ethanol ratio always higher than 1. As D rose, the acetyl coenzyme A was rerouted in favor of ethanol pathways, and ethanol production could represent up to 17.7% of the carbon consumed. Lactate was significantly produced, but with increasing D, the specific lactate production rate declined, as did the specific rate of production of extracellular pyruvate. The proportion of the original carbon directed towards phosphoglucomutase remained constant, and the carbon surplus was balanced mainly by exopolysaccharide and glycogen biosyntheses at high D values, while cellodextrin excretion occurred mainly at lower ones. With increasing D, the specific rate of carbon flowing down catabolites increased as well, but when expressed as a percentage of carbon it declined, while the percentage of carbon directed through biosynthesis pathways was enhanced. The maximum growth and energetic yields were lower than those obtained in cellulose-limited chemostats and were related to an uncoupling between catabolism and anabolism leading to an excess of energy. Compared to growth on cellobiose in ammonium-limited chemostats (E. Guedon, M. Desvaux, and H. Petitdemange, J. Bacteriol. 182:2010–2017, 2000), (i) a specific consumption rate of carbon of as high as 26.72 mmol of hexose equivalent g of cells?1 h?1 could not be reached and (ii) the proportions of carbon directed towards cellodextrin, glycogen, and exopolysaccharide pathways were not as high as first determined on cellobiose. While the use of cellobiose allows highlighting of metabolic limitation and regulation of C. cellulolyticum under ammonium-limited conditions, some of these events should then rather be interpreted as distortions of the metabolism. Growth of cellulolytic bacteria on easily available carbon and nitrogen sources represents conditions far different from those of the natural lignocellulosic compounds. PMID:11525976

  5. Phycobilisome-Deficient Strains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Have Reduced Size and Require Carbon-Limiting Conditions to Exhibit Enhanced Productivity1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Bombelli, Paolo; Dennis, John S.; Scott, Stuart A.; Smith, Alison G.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing excessive light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms may increase biomass yields by limiting photoinhibition and increasing light penetration in dense cultures. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 harvests light via the phycobilisome, which consists of an allophycocyanin core and six radiating rods, each with three phycocyanin (PC) discs. Via targeted gene disruption and alterations to the promoter region, three mutants with two (pcpcT?C) and one (?CpcC1C2:pcpcT?C) PC discs per rod or lacking PC (olive) were generated. Photoinhibition and chlorophyll levels decreased upon phycobilisome reduction, although greater penetration of white light was observed only in the PC-deficient mutant. In all strains cultured at high cell densities, most light was absorbed by the first 2 cm of the culture. Photosynthesis and respiration rates were also reduced in the ?CpcC1C2:pcpcT?C and olive mutants. Cell size was smaller in the pcpcT?C and olive strains. Growth and biomass accumulation were similar between the wild-type and pcpcT?C under a variety of conditions. Growth and biomass accumulation of the olive mutant were poorer in carbon-saturated cultures but improved in carbon-limited cultures at higher light intensities, as they did in the ?CpcC1C2:pcpcT?C mutant. This study shows that one PC disc per rod is sufficient for maximal light harvesting and biomass accumulation, except under conditions of high light and carbon limitation, and two or more are sufficient for maximal oxygen evolution. To our knowledge, this study is the first to measure light penetration in bulk cultures of cyanobacteria and offers important insights into photobioreactor design. PMID:24760817

  6. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Ana M. C.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2006-01-01

    Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag) that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10) and Th3 (TGF-?) regulatory T cells (Tregs) plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-?, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral), formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy. PMID:17162357

  7. Neuromuscular Diseases and Conditions (and Oral Health)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dentist If you have Bell's palsy, visit a dental or medical specialist to see if the cause can be ... touch with your physician so they can coordinate dental and medical treatment if needed. Some medicines used to treat ...

  8. Oralidad, narración oral y narración oral escénica

    E-print Network

    Garzó n Cé spedes, Francisco

    1995-10-01

    narrador oral escénico y del público como interlocutores. También analizan la narración oral como una de las formas de hipnosis alternativa. Y se detienen en la Técnica: Cómo seleccionar el cuento, Cómo analizarlo, Cómo interiorizarlo y apropiárselo para..., sabiduría, estimulación, provocación, humildad, indefensión, transparencia; un acto de hipnosis alternativa, de belleza, audacia, pureza, indagación, lealtad, justicia, libertad, dignificación, solidaridad, amistad y amor. La oralidad, por tanto...

  9. Oral health and elite sport performance.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  10. Oral health and elite sport performance

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  11. Restricted mouth opening and trismus in oral oncology.

    PubMed

    Satheeshkumar, P S; Mohan, Minu P; Jacob, Jayan

    2014-06-01

    Restricted mouth opening (RMO) and trismus are terms commonly used in oral oncology in instances where there is difficulty in mouth opening. The term trismus in oral oncology is mainly used to indicate the radiation-induced fibrosis of the muscles of mastication. The treatment given for RMO as reported in the literature is given for muscular dysfunction trismus, whereas RMO in oral oncology can occur owing to various reasons other than muscular dysfunction. RMO occurs in various conditions of the oral cavity; in posterior pharyngeal infection, where it is termed reflectory trismus; in oral submucous fibrosis; in oral mucosal disorders; in the use of certain drugs; and in minor dental procedures of the posterior oral cavity. The usage of the term trismus in all RMO cases would complicate the treatment; thus, the word should not be used in all RMO cases. PMID:24842447

  12. Effect of overexpression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pad1p on the resistance to phenylacrylic acids and lignocellulose hydrolysates under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Larsson, S; Nilvebrant, N O; Jönsson, L J

    2001-10-01

    Lignocellulose hydrolysates, obtained by acid hydrolysis for production of bioethanol, contain, in addition to fermentable sugars, compounds that inhibit the fermenting micro-organism. One approach to alleviate the inhibition problem is to use genetic engineering to introduce increased tolerance. Phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase (Pad1p) catalyses a decarboxylation step, by which aromatic carboxylic acids are converted to the corresponding vinyl derivatives. Pad1p-overexpressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated in synthetic medium in the presence of model compounds, ferulic acid [(2 E)-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-enoic acid] and cinnamic acid [(2 E)-3-phenylprop-2-enoic acid], as well as in a dilute acid hydrolysate of spruce to examine the resistance against fermentation inhibitors. Overexpression of S. cerevisiae phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase (Pad1p) resulted in an improved growth rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of ferulic acid, cinnamic acid, and in a dilute acid hydrolysate of spruce. Vinyl guaiacol (2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol) was identified as a major metabolite of ferulic acid, and dihydroferulic acid [3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)propanoic acid] was detected under oxygen-limited conditions. Styrene (vinylbenzene) and dihydrocinnamic acid (3-phenylpropanoic acid) were identified as metabolites of cinnamic acid. Transformants overexpressing Pad1p had the ability to convert ferulic and cinnamic acid at a faster rate than a control transformant (PAD(C)) not overexpressing Pad1p. This enabled faster growth for Pad1p-overexpressing transformants under both aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. Pad1p activity was also studied using non-growing cells. The overexpressing transformants showed approximately tenfold higher activity than PAD(C). The Pad1p overexpressing transformants also showed a 22-25% faster glucose consumption rate, a 40-45% faster mannose consumption rate, and a 24-29% faster ethanol production rate in the dilute acid hydrolysate of spruce. PMID:11693915

  13. Oral drug delivery research in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mrsny, Randall J

    2012-07-20

    The oral delivery of drugs is considered by decision-makers in the pharmaceutical industry to be the most appealing route of administration. This belief has led to the identification of many very successful drugs, but also to the downfall of some promising therapeutics that failed to meet criteria required for sufficient oral bioavailability. Efforts to correct these deficiencies have led to a plethora of creative strategies to overcome the physical, chemical, and biological barriers that limit the efficient and consistent delivery of drugs that are not readily absorbed following oral administration. The goal of this perspective is to describe these barriers to oral drug delivery in relation to some of the work currently being undertaken by the community of European scientists. This perspective is not intended to be inclusive and the author apologizes in advance to the many scientists working in Europe whose recent work was not included. PMID:22342473

  14. Oral myiasis in a maxillofacial trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Vinit, Grandim Balarama Gupta; Jayavelu, Perumal; Shrutha, Santhebachali Prakasha

    2013-07-01

    Myiasis is a rare disease primarily caused by the invasion of tissue by larvae of certain dipteran flies. Oral myiasis is still more "rare" and "unique" owing to the fact that oral cavity rarely provides the necessary habitat conducive for a larval lifecycle. Common predisposing factors are poor oral hygiene, halitosis, trauma, senility, learning disabilities, physically and mentally challenged conditions. Oral myiasis can lead to rapid tissue destruction and disfigurement and requires immediate treatment. Treatment consists of manual removal of maggots from the oral cavity after application of chemical agents. Good sanitation, personal and environmental hygiene and cleanliness and special care for debilitated persons are the best methods to prevent oral myiasis. This case report describes the presentation of oral myiasis caused by musca nebulo (common house fly) in a 40-year-old male patient, with recent maxillofacial trauma. The patient was treated by manual removal larvae by topical application of turpentine oil, followed by surgical debridement of the wound and open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture. PMID:23956607

  15. Primary oral health care.

    PubMed

    Honkala, Eino

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to describe the background and evolution of primary oral health care (POHC), including the development of an oral health policy, by identifying the resources necessary for oral health services, reviewing the evidence of the effectiveness of oral health promotion and education, providing essential oral health care, and establishing evidence of the benefits of regular dental visits for effective POHC. At present, evidence for the effectiveness of oral health education and regular dental visits is very weak. Nevertheless, POHC needs to be developed as an integral part of primary health care (PHC). Therefore, a need exists to increase financial investment, resources and workforce in PHC to lower the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease in the Middle-East using the POHC approach. PMID:24503932

  16. Functional characterization of the rice UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 1, OsUGE1: a potential role in cell wall carbohydrate partitioning during limiting nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Guevara, David R; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Yaish, Mahmoud W; Mei-Bi, Yong; Rothstein, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Plants grown under inadequate mineralized nitrogen (N) levels undergo N and carbon (C) metabolic re-programming which leads to significant changes in both soluble and insoluble carbohydrate profiles. However, relatively little information is available on the genetic factors controlling carbohydrate partitioning during adaptation to N-limitation conditions in plants. A gene encoding a uridine-diphospho-(UDP)-glucose 4-epimerase (OsUGE-1) from rice (Oryza sativa) was found to be N-responsive. We developed transgenic rice plants to constitutively over-express the OsUGE-1 gene (OsUGE1-OX1-2). The transgenic rice lines were similar in size to wild-type plants at the vegetative stage and at maturity regardless of the N-level tested. However, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained 18-24% more sucrose and 12-22% less cellulose in shoots compared to wild-type when subjected to sub-optimal N-levels. Interestingly, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained proportionally more galactose and glucose in the hemicellulosic polysaccharide profile of plants compared to wild-type plants when grown under low N. The altered cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation in the OsUGE1-OX lines appears to be mediated by OsUGE1 via the repression of the cellulose synthesis associated genes, OsSus1, OsCesA4, 7, and 9. This relationship may implicate a novel control point for the deposition of UDP-glucose to the complex polysaccharide profiles of rice cell walls. However, a direct relationship between OsUGE1 and cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation requires further investigation. PMID:24788752

  17. Functional Characterization of the Rice UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 1, OsUGE1: A Potential Role in Cell Wall Carbohydrate Partitioning during Limiting Nitrogen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, David R.; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Yaish, Mahmoud W.; Mei-Bi, Yong; Rothstein, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants grown under inadequate mineralized nitrogen (N) levels undergo N and carbon (C) metabolic re-programming which leads to significant changes in both soluble and insoluble carbohydrate profiles. However, relatively little information is available on the genetic factors controlling carbohydrate partitioning during adaptation to N-limitation conditions in plants. A gene encoding a uridine-diphospho-(UDP)-glucose 4-epimerase (OsUGE-1) from rice (Oryza sativa) was found to be N-responsive. We developed transgenic rice plants to constitutively over-express the OsUGE-1 gene (OsUGE1-OX1–2). The transgenic rice lines were similar in size to wild-type plants at the vegetative stage and at maturity regardless of the N-level tested. However, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained 18–24% more sucrose and 12–22% less cellulose in shoots compared to wild-type when subjected to sub-optimal N-levels. Interestingly, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained proportionally more galactose and glucose in the hemicellulosic polysaccharide profile of plants compared to wild-type plants when grown under low N. The altered cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation in the OsUGE1-OX lines appears to be mediated by OsUGE1 via the repression of the cellulose synthesis associated genes, OsSus1, OsCesA4, 7, and 9. This relationship may implicate a novel control point for the deposition of UDP-glucose to the complex polysaccharide profiles of rice cell walls. However, a direct relationship between OsUGE1 and cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation requires further investigation. PMID:24788752

  18. Non-oral contraception

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirsten I. Black; Ali Kubba

    2008-01-01

    Non-oral contraception is increasingly being promoted by contraceptive experts as a more convenient and, in many cases, safer and more efficacious alternative to oral contraception. Injectables, implants and intrauterine methods offer the advantage of being long-acting and less user dependent, factors which may potentially improve contraceptive compliance. Combined contraceptive methods in non-oral delivery forms offer a choice for women who

  19. Christopher Draven Oral History

    E-print Network

    Draven, Christopher; Albin, Tami

    2010-01-12

    Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Christopher Draven Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin February 9, 2008 http...://hdl.handle.net/1808/5684 This interview was made possible by the generous support of the University of Kansas Libraries and the University of Kansas grants 2302114, 2301283, 2301334. © Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual...

  20. On the effects of assembly compression on the performance of liquid-feed DMFCs under methanol-limiting conditions: A 2D numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Salaberri, P. A.; Vera, M.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of assembly compression on the performance of liquid-feed DMFCs under methanol-limiting conditions is explored by means of a 2D/1D multiphysics across-the-channel model. The numerical formulation incorporates a comprehensive 2D description of the anode GDL, including two-phase phenomena, non-uniform anisotropic transport properties, and electrical contact resistances at the GDL/BPP interface. GDL effective properties are evaluated using empirical data corresponding to Toray® carbon paper. A simplified but physically sound 1D description, locally coupled to the 2D anode GDL model, is adopted to describe transport processes in the MPLs, membrane and cathode GDL, whereas the catalyst layers are treated as infinitely thin surfaces. Good agreement is found between the numerical results and previous experimental data. The interplay between assembly compression, bipolar plate material, and channel configuration is also investigated. The results show that there is an optimum GDL compression ratio in terms of overall power density, the optimal compression level being strongly dependent on bipolar plate material. Beyond the optimum, the detrimental effect of compression is larger in non-parallel flow fields due to the additional reduction of methanol transported by under-rib convection. The results suggest that, under certain conditions, this transport mechanism could be more important than diffusion in the anode of liquid-feed DMFCs.

  1. Growth of Acidithiobacillus Ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 in Thiosulfate Under Oxygen-Limiting Conditions Generates Extracellular Sulfur Globules by Means of a Secreted Tetrathionate Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Beard, Simón; Paradela, Alberto; Albar, Juan P; Jerez, Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    Production of sulfur globules during sulfide or thiosulfate oxidation is a characteristic feature of some sulfur bacteria. Although their generation has been reported in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, its mechanism of formation and deposition, as well as the physiological significance of these globules during sulfur compounds oxidation, are currently unknown. Under oxygen-sufficient conditions (OSC), A. ferrooxidans oxidizes thiosulfate to tetrathionate, which accumulates in the culture medium. Tetrathionate is then oxidized by a tetrathionate hydrolase (TTH) generating thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, and sulfate as final products. We report here a massive production of extracellular conspicuous sulfur globules in thiosulfate-grown A. ferrooxidans cultures shifted to oxygen-limiting conditions (OLC). Concomitantly with sulfur globule deposition, the extracellular concentration of tetrathionate greatly diminished and sulfite accumulated in the culture supernatant. A. ferrooxidans cellular TTH activity was negligible in OLC-incubated cells, indicating that this enzymatic activity was not responsible for tetrathionate disappearance. On the other hand, supernatants from both OSC- and OLC-incubated cells showed extracellular TTH activity, which most likely accounted for tetrathionate consumption in the culture medium. The extracellular TTH activity described here: (i) gives experimental support to the TTH-driven model for hydrophilic sulfur globule generation, (ii) explains the extracellular location of A. ferrooxidans sulfur deposits, and (iii) strongly suggests that the generation of sulfur globules in A. ferrooxidans corresponds to an early step during its adaptation to an anaerobic lifestyle. PMID:21833324

  2. Rare Bone Diseases and Their Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Foster, B.L.; Ramnitz, M.S.; Gafni, R.I.; Burke, A.B.; Boyce, A.M.; Lee, J.S.; Wright, J.T.; Akintoye, S.O.; Somerman, M.J.; Collins, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease. PMID:24700690

  3. Oral microbiota and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion. PMID:21523227

  4. Impact of inhalation therapy on oral health

    PubMed Central

    Godara, Navneet; Godara, Ramya; Khullar, Megha

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation therapy has been employed as the mainstay of the treatment in chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Beta-2 agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and sodium cromoglycate are often used alone or in combination in an inhaled form. Studies have shown that inhaled drugs used in the treatment have some adverse effects on the oral health based on their dosage, frequency, and duration of use. Several oral conditions such as xerostomia, dental caries, candidiasis, ulceration, gingivitis, periodontitis, and taste changes have been associated with inhalation therapy. Since the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases is rising, it is important to provide optimal oral care to the individuals receiving inhalation therapy. This article will review the influence of inhaled drugs on the oral health of individuals and adequate management and prevention of the same. PMID:22084541

  5. Oral manifestations of hematologic and nutritional diseases.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Bethanee J; Pirigyi, Megan; Mirowski, Ginat W

    2011-02-01

    Oral manifestations of hematologic and nutritional deficiencies can affect the mucous membranes, teeth, periodontal tissues, salivary glands, and perioral skin. This article reviews common oral manifestations of hematologic conditions starting with disorders of the white blood cells including cyclic hematopoiesis (cyclic neutropenia), leukemias, lymphomas, plasma cell dyscrasias, and mast cell disorders; this is followed by a discussion of the impact of red blood cell disorders including anemias and less common red blood cell dyscrasias (sickle cell disease, hemochromatosis, and congenital erythropoietic porphyria) as well as thrombocytopenia. Several nutritional deficiencies exhibit oral manifestations. The authors specifically discuss the impact of water-soluble vitamins (B2, B3, B6, B9, B12, and C), fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, and K) and the eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa on the oral mucosa. PMID:21093629

  6. Systematic review of the relation between smokeless tobacco and non-neoplastic oral diseases in Europe and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kallischnigg, Gerd; Weitkunat, Rolf; Lee, Peter N

    2008-01-01

    Background How smokeless tobacco contributes to non-neoplastic oral diseases is unclear. It certainly increases risk of oral mucosal lesions, but reviewers disagree as to other conditions. In some areas, especially South-East Asia, risk is difficult to quantify due to the many products, compositions (including non-tobacco ingredients), and usage practices involved. This review considers studies from Europe (in practice mainly Scandinavia) and from the USA. Methods Experimental and epidemiological studies published in 1963–2007 were identified that related risk of oral lesions to smokeless tobacco use. Data were assessed separately for oral mucosal lesions, periodontal and gingival diseases, dental caries and tooth loss, and oral pain. Results Oral mucosal lesions: Thirty-three epidemiological studies consistently show a strong dose-related effect of current snuff on oral mucosal lesion prevalence. In Scandinavia, users have a near 100% prevalence of a characteristic "snuff-induced lesion", but prevalence of the varied lesions reported in the USA is lower. Associations with chewing tobacco are weaker. The lack of clear association with former use suggests reversibility following cessation, consistent with experimental studies showing rapid lesion regression on quitting. Periodontal and gingival diseases: Two of four studies report a significant association of snuff with attachment loss and four out of eight with gingival recession. Snuff is not clearly related to gingivitis or periodontal diseases. Limited evidence suggests chewing tobacco is unrelated to periodontal or gingival diseases. Tooth loss: Swedish studies show no association with snuff, but one US study reported an association with snuff, and another with chewing tobacco. Dental caries: Evidence from nine studies suggests a possible relationship with use of smokeless tobacco, particularly chewing tobacco, and the risk of dental caries. Oral pain: Limited evidence precludes any clear conclusion. Conclusion This review confirms the strong association of current use of smokeless tobacco, particularly snuff, with prevalence of oral mucosal lesions. It provides suggestive evidence of an association of snuff use with gingival recession and attachment loss, and of chewing tobacco with dental caries. While smokeless tobacco clearly increases risk of oral mucosal lesions, interpretation for other endpoints is limited by study weaknesses, including poor confounding control. PMID:18452601

  7. Protein expression and transcription profiles of three strains of Aeromonas salmonicida ssp. salmonicida under normal and iron-limited culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aeromonas salmonicida is an important fish pathogen that produces a wide and varied array of virulence factors. Here we used iron deprivation by addition of the chelator 2’2-dipyridyl to induce the expression of several such virulence factors in three isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida (one avirulent and two virulent). By using SDS-PAGE followed by mass spectrometry, we identified proteins that appeared differentially expressed under these conditions. The differential transcription of the identified gene products were subsequently measured by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Results Our initial screening using SDS-PAGE identified five proteins that appeared differentially expressed in virulent and avirulent isolates or, within the same isolates, between bacteria cultivated under iron-rich or iron-deprived conditions. The transcription of the genes coding for these proteins were subsequently quantified by RT-qPCR. Results of this analysis demonstrated that the gene coding for alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC), a protein involved in oxidative stress response, was transcribed at a higher rate in the virulent strain as compared to the avirulent strain. Additionally, it was observed that addition of an iron chelator to the culture medium lead to a reduction of the transcription levels of the regulatory histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS). This was consistent in all three isolates. On the other hand, the transcription levels of the virulence array protein (VapA) and the protein ATP-synthetase F (ATPF) displayed only limited changes, despite being the dominant component of a protein fraction that displayed changes during the preliminary SDS-PAGE screening. This was true regardless of the culture conditions and of the isolates considered. Finally, transcription of the enzyme enolase was upregulated in the iron-deprived broths in all isolates. Conclusions We identified several genes differentially expressed under culture conditions known to lead to the overexpression of virulence factors. In addition, we identified alkyl hydroperoxide as being overexpressed in the virulent isolates compared to the avirulent isolates. The results from this study will contribute to enhance our understanding of the virulence of A. salmonicida and may suggest new directions for further research. PMID:24872729

  8. Dentition, oral hygiene, and risk of oral cancer: a case-control study in Beijing, People's Republic of China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tongzhang Zheng; Peter Boyle; Huanfang Hu; Jun Duan; Peijue Jiang; Daquan Ma; Liangpeng Shui; Shiru Niu; Crispian Scully; Brian MacMahon

    1990-01-01

    A case-control study of oral cancer was conducted in Beijing, People's Republic of China. The study was hospitalbased and controls were hospital in-patients matched to the cases by age and gender. A total of 404 case\\/control pairs were interviewed. This paper provides data regarding oral conditions as risk factors for oral cancer, with every patient having an intact mouth examined

  9. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fall Meeting AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands We ...

  10. signal processing and oral communication

    E-print Network

    Penn, Gerald

    SPOClab signal processing and oral communication Computational Linguistics, 5 December 2012 Frank University of Toronto #12;SPOClab signal processing and oral communication An introduction to SPOClab · SPOClab (Signal Processing and Oral Communication) is a new lab intersecting Computer Science

  11. GRADUATE COLLEGE ORAL DEFENSE RESULTS

    E-print Network

    Cho, Hokwon

    GRADUATE COLLEGE ORAL DEFENSE RESULTS THESIS, DISSERTATION/MUSIC DOCUMENT, PROFESSIONAL: Phone: MEANS OF PUBLICIZING ORAL DEFENSE Department email Posted flyer UNLV Today Department website GPSA/GPSA Lounge Other (specify): Date: ORAL DEFENSE

  12. Oral amelanotic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Adisa, A O; Olawole, W O; Sigbeku, O F

    2012-06-01

    Malignant melanomas of the mucosal regions of the head and neck are extremely rare neoplasms accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Approximately half of all head and neck melanomas occur in the oral cavity. Less than 2% of all melanomas lack pigmentation, in the oral mucosa however, up to 75% of cases are amelanotic. No etiologic factors or risk factors have been recognized for oral melanomas. Some authors have suggested that oral habits and selfmedication may be of etiological significance. Oral melanoma is rare but it is relatively frequent in countries like Japan, Uganda, and India. It is rarely identified under the age of 20 years. In Australia where cutaneous melanomas are relatively common primary melanoma of the oral mucosa is rare. The surface architecture of oral melanomas ranges from macular to ulcerated and nodular. The lesion is said to be asymptomatic in the early stages but may become ulcerated and painful in advanced lesions. The diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma is more difficult than that of pigmented lesions. The neoplasm consists of spindle-shaped cells with many mitotic figures and no cytoplasmic melanin pigmentation. Immunohistochemistry using S-100, HMB-45, Melan-A and MART-1 will help in establishing the correct diagnosis. Radical surgery with ample margins and adjuvant chemotherapy are appropriate management protocol for malignant melanoma. Oral melanoma is associated with poor prognosis but its amelanotic variant has even worse prognosis because it exhibits a more aggressive biology and because of difficulty in diagnosis which leads to delayed treatment. PMID:25161399

  13. Oral Lichenoid Lesions - A Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Venkatesh Vishwanath; Setlur, Krishnanand; Yerlagudda, Komali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral lichenoid lesions or reactions (OLLs/OLRs) are clinical and histological contemporaries of the classical oral lichen planus (OLP) that have generated a lot of debate in literature. In contrast to the idiopathic nature of OLP, OLLs are often associated with a known identifiable inciting factor. A superficial examination of these lesions clinically and histologically often reveals many similarities with OLP, but recent data indicate that distinguishable features do exist and form the basis of most classifications. Aims and Objectives: This paper attempts to collate available data in English literature on OLLs, highlight distinguishing features clinically and histologically and reflect on the malignant transformation potential and treatment modalities of the condition. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive search of medical and dental databases including PubMed, Ovid, Cochrane, Pubget, Researchgate, and non-medical search engines were utilized for the review. The search words included “oral lichen planus”, “oral lichenoid lesions”, “oral drug reactions”, “lichenoid dysplasia”, and “adverse effects of dental materials”. Review Results: OLLs seem to grossly underrated and most cases were clubbed as OLP. Definite clinical and histological features were uncovered to establish the identity of this lesion. Associations with dental restorative materials, drugs, and medications have been conclusively proven in the etiology of this condition. Specific markers are being utilized to diagnose the condition and monitor its progress. Conclusion: Substantial differentiating features were uncovered to delineate OLLs as a separate entity with definite etiology, pathogenesis, and a high malignant transformation rate compared with OLP. PMID:25657414

  14. A Deficiency in the Flavoprotein of Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Complex II Results in Elevated Photosynthesis and Better Growth in Nitrogen-Limiting Conditions1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Daniela; Meneses, Marco; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Araújo, Wagner L.; Tapia, Rodrigo; Gómez, Isabel; Holuigue, Loreto; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Jordana, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex II (succinate dehydrogenase [SDH]) plays roles both in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the respiratory electron transport chain. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), its flavoprotein subunit is encoded by two nuclear genes, SDH1-1 and SDH1-2. Here, we characterize heterozygous SDH1-1/sdh1-1 mutant plants displaying a 30% reduction in SDH activity as well as partially silenced plants obtained by RNA interference. We found that these plants displayed significantly higher CO2 assimilation rates and enhanced growth than wild-type plants. There was a strong correlation between CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and both mutant and silenced plants displayed increased stomatal aperture and density. By contrast, no significant differences were found for dark respiration, chloroplastic electron transport rate, CO2 uptake at saturating concentrations of CO2, or biochemical parameters such as the maximum rates of carboxylation by Rubisco and of photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, photosynthesis is enhanced in SDH-deficient plants by a mechanism involving a specific effect on stomatal function that results in improved CO2 uptake. Metabolic and transcript profiling revealed that mild deficiency in SDH results in limited effects on metabolism and gene expression, and data suggest that decreases observed in the levels of some amino acids were due to a higher flux to proteins and other nitrogen-containing compounds to support increased growth. Strikingly, SDH1-1/sdh1-1 seedlings grew considerably better in nitrogen-limiting conditions. Thus, a subtle metabolic alteration may lead to changes in important functions such as stomatal function and nitrogen assimilation. PMID:21921116

  15. Genes and oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jurel, Sunit Kumar; Gupta, Durga Shanker; Singh, Raghuwar D.; Singh, Mrinalini; Srivastava, Shilpi

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancers have been one of the leading causes of deaths particularly in the developing countries. Prime reason for this high mortality and morbidity is attributed to the delay in diagnosis and prompt treatment. Relentless research in the field of oncology has led to the advent of novel procedures for the early detection of oral cancers. Molecular biology is highly promising in this regard. It is a procedure that detects alterations at a molecular level much before they are seen under a microscope and much before clinical changes occur. Molecular studies serve as the basis by which we will eventually be able not only to augment clinical assessment and classification of oral lesions but also predict malignant potential of oral lesions, thus reducing the incidence and increasing the scope for early diagnosis and treatment of oral cancers. However, making such sophisticated tools available for the common man in developing countries is one of the most important challenges faced today. PMID:24959008

  16. An oral ulceration associated with Morgellons disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grosskopf, Courtney; Desai, Bhavik; Stoopler, Eric T

    2011-08-01

    Morgellons disease is a psycho-dermatologic condition in which patients report fibers or filaments "growing" out of their skin. This case report highlights an oral ulceration in a young woman associated with Morgellons disease, a condition that has not been previously described in the dental literature. An increasing number of individuals are self-reporting this condition and oral health care providers must be familiar with this disorder. PMID:21749875

  17. Oral Mucositis: understanding the pathology and management

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, M; Patapatiou, G; Domoxoudis, S; Pistevou-Gompaki, K; Papanikolaou, A

    2012-01-01

    Oral Mucositis is a common complication of cancer therapy which may limit the completion of treatment and affect the quality of life of the patient. As we have come to understand its pathogenesis new developments in its management and prevention have allowed us minimize this side effect. PMID:23935285

  18. Oral lesions in HIV infected individuals from Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Grupioni Lourenço; Luiz Tadeu; Moraes Figueiredo

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to diagnosis oral lesions related to HIV infection in individuals followed in the General Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Brazil. The presence of oral lesions was correlated with gender, age, smoking habit, levels of CD4 lymphocytes, HIV load, time of HIV seropositivity, AIDS condition, use

  19. Integration of non-oral bacteria into in vitro oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are polymicrobial communities that grow on surfaces in nature. Oral bacteria can spontaneously form biofilms on the surface of teeth, which may compromise the health of the teeth, or their surrounding (periodontal) tissues. While the oral bacteria exhibit high tropism for their specialized ecological niche, it is not clear if bacteria that are not part of the normal oral microbiota can efficiently colonize and grow within oral biofilms. By using an in vitro "supragingival" biofilm model of 6 oral species, this study aimed to investigate if 3 individual bacterial species that are not part of the normal oral microbiota (Eschericia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecails) and one not previously tested oral species (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) can be incorporated into this established supragingival biofilm model. Staphylococcus aureus and A. actinomycetemcomitans were able to grow efficiently in the biofilm, without disrupting the growth of the remaining species. They localized in sparse small aggregates within the biofilm mass. Enterococcus faecalis and E. coli were both able to populate the biofilm at high numbers, and suppressed the growth of A. oris and S. mutants. Enterococcus faecalis was arranged in a chain-like conformation, whereas E. coli was densely and evenly spread throughout the biofilm mass. In conclusion, it is possible for selected species that are not part of the normal oral microbiota to be introduced into an oral biofilm, under the given experimental micro-environmental conditions. Moreover, the equilibrated incorporation of A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. aureus in this oral biofilm model could be a useful tool in the study of aggressive periodontitis and peri-implantitis, in which these organisms are involved, respectively. PMID:25483866

  20. Initial Piloted Simulation Evaluation of the Reference-H High-Speed Civil Transport Design During Takeoff and Recovery From Limit Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.

    1999-01-01

    An initial assessment of a proposed High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) was conducted in the fall of 1995 at the NASA Langley Research Center. This configuration, known as the Industry Reference-H (Ref.-H), was designed by the Boeing Aircraft Company as part of their work in the High Speed Research program. It included a conventional tail, a cranked-arrow wing, four mixed-flow turbofan engines, and capacity for transporting approximately 300 passengers. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate and quantify operational aspects of the Reference-H configuration from a pilot's perspective with the additional goal of identifying design strengths as well as any potential configuration deficiencies. This study was aimed at evaluating the Ref.-H configuration at many points of the aircraft's envelope to determine the suitability of the vehicle to accomplish typical mission profiles as well as emergency or envelope-limit conditions. Pilot-provided Cooper-Harper ratings and comments constituted the primary vehicle evaluation metric. The analysis included simulated real-time piloted evaluations, performed in a 6 degree of freedom motion base NASA Langley Visual-Motion Simulator, combined with extensive bath analysis. The assessment was performed using the third major release of the simulation data base (known as Ref.-H cycle 2B).

  1. Mechanism of Oral Tolerance Induction to Therapeutic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaomei; Sherman, Alexandra; Liao, Gongxian; Leong, Kam W.; Daniell, Henry; Terhorst, Cox; Herzog, Roland W

    2012-01-01

    Oral tolerance is defined as the specific suppression of humoral and / or cellular immune responses to an antigen by administration of the same antigen through the oral route. Due to its absence of toxicity, easy administration, and antigen specificity, oral tolerance is a very attractive approach to prevent unwanted immune responses that cause a variety of diseases or that complicate treatment of a disease. Many researchers have induced oral tolerance to efficiently treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in different animal models. However, clinical trials yielded limited success. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of oral tolerance induction to therapeutic proteins is critical for paving the way for clinical development of oral tolerance protocols. This review will summarize progress on understanding the major underlying tolerance mechanisms and contributors, including antigen presenting cells, regulatory T cells, cytokines, and signaling pathways. Potential applications, examples for therapeutic proteins and disease targets, and recent developments in delivery methods are discussed. PMID:23123293

  2. Pathogenesis and treatment of oral candidosis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David; Lewis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Oral infections caused by yeast of the genus Candida and particularly Candida albicans (oral candidoses) have been recognised throughout recorded history. However, since the 1980s a clear surge of interest and associated research into these infections have occurred. This has largely been due to an increased incidence of oral candidosis over this period, primarily because of the escalation in HIV-infection and the AIDS epidemic. In addition, changes in medical practice leading to a greater use of invasive clinical procedures and a more widespread use of immunosuppressive therapies have also contributed to the problem. Whilst oral candidosis has previously been considered to be a disease mainly of the elderly and very young, its occurrence throughout the general population is now recognised. Candida are true ‘opportunistic pathogens’ and only instigate oral infection when there is an underlying predisposing condition in the host. Treatment of these infections has continued (and in some regards continues) to be problematic because of the potential toxicity of traditional antifungal agents against host cells. The problem has been compounded by the emergence of Candida species other than C. albicans that have inherent resistance against traditional antifungals. The aim of this review is to give the reader a contemporary overview of oral candidosis, the organisms involved, and the management strategies that are currently employed or could be utilised in the future. PMID:21547018

  3. Separation of parent homopolymers from poly(ethylene oxide) and polystyrene-based block copolymers by liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of desorption--1. Determination of the suitable molar mass range and optimization of chromatographic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rollet, Marion; Pelletier, Bérengère; Altounian, Anaïs; Berek, Dusan; Maria, Sébastien; Phan, Trang N T; Gigmes, Didier

    2015-05-01

    We studied molar mass limits for the LC LCD separation of parent polystyrene (PS) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) homopolymers from PEO/PS based block copolymers and we identified optimized chromatographic conditions. Time delays between barriers and sample injections were 0-2-3'10. Eluent was composed of dimethylformamide (DMF) 40 wt.% and 1-chlorobutane (CLB) 60 wt.%; Barrier 1 (B1), which retained block copolymer, was composed of 100 wt.% CLB and Barrier 2 (B2), which retained PEO, was a mixture of DMF and CLB, which proportions were adjusted to studied block copolymers. With B2 composed of DMF 23 wt.% and CLB 77 wt.%, we obtained successful separation of PS23K-b-PEO35K-b-PS23K (56.5 wt.% of PS, the subscripts indicate the molar mass in kg mol(-1) of each polymer part in the block copolymer) from its parent homopolymers. With B2 adjusted to DMF 30 wt.% and CLB 70 wt.%, PS2.3K-b-PEO3.1K (42.6 wt.% of PS) was also efficiently separated from its parent homopolymers. PMID:25801535

  4. Oral myiasis involving palatal mucosa of a young female

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Suresh; Tyagi, Shallu; Kumar, Prince; Puri, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    In literal terms myiasis is the invasion of the tissues and organs of human beings by fly larvae. This phenomenon is well documented in the skin, especially among animals and people in developed and developing countries. When the tissues of oral cavity are invaded by the parasitic larvae of flies, the condition is called as oral myiasis. With the paper we are presenting a case of 19-year-old female suffering from oral myiasis of upper lip and palate. The treatment consisted of manual removal of the larvae, surgical debridement of the wound and oral therapy with doxycycline used as a locally acting drug for faster and better recovery. PMID:24678227

  5. Oral fungal infections: an update for the general practitioner.

    PubMed

    Farah, C S; Lynch, N; McCullough, M J

    2010-06-01

    Oral candidosis is the most common fungal infection encountered in general dental practice. It manifests in a variety of clinical presentations which may mimic more sinister diseases, and can occasionally be refractory to treatment requiring the attention of an oral medicine specialist. Management of oral candidosis should always include a thorough investigation of underlying predisposing conditions, as the disease often presents when the patient is systemically compromised. This update highlights the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management strategies of oral Candidal lesions commonly encountered in dental practice. PMID:20553244

  6. Prophylaxis and treatment of chemo- and radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis – are there new strategies?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Karthaus; C Rosenthal; A Ganser

    1999-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a major dose-limiting toxic effect of intensive cancer chemotherapy. Oral complications may lead to dose reduction or delay in further cancer treatment. Mucositis can be caused directly by cytotoxic effects and indirectly by sustained neutropenia after cytostatic therapy. An impaired mucosal barrier predisposes to life-threatening septic complications during aplasia. The prevalence of an oral focus in febrile

  7. Methodology in Seeking Stakeholder Perceptions of Effective Technical Oral Presentations: An Exploratory Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Ena; Patil, Arun; Sargunan, Rajeswary Appacutty

    2010-01-01

    Engineering communication studies indicate the importance of oral presentations as an indispensable component of workplace oral communication activities; however, since there is limited literature regarding stakeholder perceptions of effective presentation skills and attributes in technical oral presentations or final year engineering project…

  8. Evaluation of a low-cost, portable imaging system for early detection of oral cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammed S Rahman; Nilesh Ingole; Darren Roblyer; Vanda Stepanek; Rebecca Richards-Kortum; Ann Gillenwater; Surendra Shastri; Pankaj Chaturvedi

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is an important global need to improve early detection of oral cancer. Recent reports suggest that optical imaging technologies can aid in the identification of neoplastic lesions in the oral cavity; however, there is little data evaluating the use of optical imaging modalities in resource limited settings where oral cancer impacts patients disproportionately. In this article, we evaluate

  9. Oral Lactoferrin Treatment of Experimental Oral Candidiasis in Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natsuko Takakura; Hiroyuki Wakabayashi; Hiroko Ishibashi; Susumu Teraguchi; Yoshitaka Tamura; Hideyo Yamaguchi; Shigeru Abe

    2003-01-01

    We assessed the potential of lactoferrin (LF), a multifunctional milk protein, for treatment of oral candi- diasis with immunosuppressed mice, which have local symptoms characteristic of oral thrush. Oral adminis- tration of bovine LF in drinking water starting 1 day before the infection significantly reduced the number of Candida albicans in the oral cavity and the score of lesions on

  10. Oral yeast carriage correlates with presence of oral epithelial dysplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M McCullough; M Jaber; A. W Barrett; L Bain; P. M Speight; S. R Porter

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a link between the presence of Candida albicans and the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of the present study was to assess the presence and level of colonisation of oral yeast in patients undergoing an incisional oral mucosal biopsy in order to assess whether the amount of oral yeast present correlated with

  11. Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know Oral chemo is any drug you take by mouth to treat cancer. ... be ready for oral chemo. What is oral chemotherapy? There are many types of chemotherapy (chemo). Oral ...

  12. Using Oral Language Skills to Build on the Emerging Literacy of Adult English Learners. CAELA Network Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradov, Patsy; Bigelow, Martha

    2010-01-01

    In addition to learning to read and write for the first time, adult English language learners with limited or emerging literacy skills must acquire oral English. Often, learners with limited print literacy in their first language have oral skills in English that exceed their English literacy skills (Geva & Zadeh, 2006). While this mismatch of oral

  13. Mannosylated niosomes as adjuvant-carrier system for oral genetic immunization against hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanyog; Singh, Paramjit; Mishra, Vivek; Vyas, S P

    2005-10-15

    Aim of the present study was to develop mannosylated niosomes as oral DNA vaccine carriers for the induction of humoral, cellular and mucosal immunity. Niosomes composed of span 60, cholesterol and stearylamine as constitutive lipids were prepared by reverse phase evaporation method and were coated with a modified polysaccharide o-palmitoyl mannan (OPM) in order to protect them from bile salt caused dissolution and enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal tract and to enhance their affinity towards the antigen presenting cells of Peyer's patches. Prepared niosomes were characterized in vitro for their size, shape, entrapment efficiency, ligand binding specificity and stability in simulated gastric fluid and simulated intestinal fluid. OPM coated niosomes were found to better stable in simulated GIT conditions. The immune stimulating activity was studied by measuring serum anti-HBsAg titer, secretory IgA level in intestinal and salivary secretions and cyokines level (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) in spleen homogenates following oral administration of niosomal formulations in Balb/c mice and compared with naked DNA as well as pure recombinant HBsAg injected intramuscularly. The serum anti-HBsAg titer obtained after oral administration of OPM coated niosomal formulations was although less as compared to that elicited by naked DNA and pure HBsAg administered intramuscularly, but the mice were seroprotective within 2 weeks and antibody level far above the clinically protective limit for humans was achieved. Intramuscular naked DNA and recombinant HBsAg did not elicited sIgA titer in mucosal secretions that was induced by oral administration of OPM coated niosomes. Similarly, cellular response (cytokines level) was absent in pure HBsAg treated animals. OPM coated niosomes produced humoral (both systemic and mucosal) and cellular immune response upon oral administration. The study signifies the potential of OPM coated niosomes as DNA vaccine carrier and adjuvant for effective oral immunization. PMID:15869802

  14. Increased belowground C release during initial plant development of Populus deltoides x nigra grown under light and C reserve limited conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Abiven, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Plants might be a key factor for the long-term stabilisation of carbon (C) in the soil, e.g. through enhanced physical protection of root-derived C against microbial decomposition in soil aggregates. On the other hand C released by the plants into the soil might promote the decomposition of native soil organic matter (SOM) through the stimulation of microbial activity. We measured the C budget of developing plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides x nigra, Cambisol soil) in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. In order to distinguish plant-derived from native C in the SOM and the soil CO2 efflux, we labelled the poplar shoots continuously with 13C-CO2 from first emergence of leaves (sprouting from stem cuttings). Throughout the experiment the CO2 fluxes (photosynthetic assimilation, dark respiratory loss, soil CO2 efflux) were measured frequently (every 30 min) and the 13C was traced in the soil CO2 efflux (1-2 times a week). After 10 weeks the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested and the distribution of the 13C distribution was analysed. The plants developed slowly (compared to previous experiments), most likely due to limitation in C reserves (long term cutting storage) and C supply (low light intensities). The amount of 13C recovered in the roots, microbial biomass and soil CO2 efflux was directly correlated with the leaf area of the different plant individuals. After 3-4 weeks of plant development we observed a high peak in the total soil CO2 efflux. During this time the relative belowground C release was increased massively over the basal rate of 17 % of net C assimilated, whereby the variability between the plant individuals was large. The smallest plants, i.e. the plants that were most resource limited, obtained the highest belowground C release accounting at the peak time for up to 57 % of net assimilated C. We hypothesize that the plants released specific compounds, which either directly (enzymatically) or indirectly (priming) enhanced the decomposition of native SOM as a survival mechanisms (e.g. mine for nutrients). The results of this study confirm linear correlations between aboveground plant traits (leaf area) and belowground C allocation into roots, microbial biomass and plant-derived respiration. However it also highlights that plant-soil systems are not permanently in a steady state. C allocation patterns can change massively when the plant is under stress, which affects other fluxes within the terrestrial C cycle, such as the microbial decomposition of SOM.

  15. Oral films as breakthrough tools for oral delivery of proteins/peptides.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pedro M; Fonte, Pedro; Sousa, Flávia; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Sarmento, Bruno; Pintado, Manuela E

    2015-08-10

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides demonstrate unique, peerless, pharmacological characteristics such as high specificity to receptors and superior biological mimicking of physiological mechanisms, resulting in a better therapeutic index compared to conventional chemical-derived drugs. However, proteins also present inherent bioavailability limitations. Thus, this paper proposes several effective tools to improve protein/peptide drugs stability, permeability and pharmacokinetics with special emphasis on oral polymeric films as oral delivery platforms. Indeed, oral films present inherent characteristics that can greatly enhance biological performance of proteins and peptides and patient compliance along with other advantages that are critically discussed in this review. A rational choice of excipients addressed in and manufacture processes are also focused. In addition, possible toxicity issues to be overtaken and critical analysis regarding current market tendencies respecting oral films and protein/peptides along with future prospects are disclosed. PMID:25979328

  16. Oral mucosal melanoma: a malignant trap

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanouil K Symvoulakis; Dionysios E Kyrmizakis; Emmanouil I Drivas; Anastassios V Koutsopoulos; Stylianos G Malandrakis; Charalambos E Skoulakis; John G Bizakis

    2006-01-01

    Oral mucosal melanomas are highly malignant tumors. The 'chameleonic' presentation of a mainly asymptomatic condition, the rarity of these lesions, the poor prognosis and the necessity of a highly specialized treatment are factors that should be seriously considered by the involved health provider. We present the case of a 75-year-old man who was referred to the Ear, Nose and Throat

  17. Orthographic Learning during Oral and Silent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Peter F.; Share, David L.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined orthographic learning in oral and silent reading conditions. Dutch third graders read, either aloud or silently, short texts containing novel target (pseudo) words. The acquisition of new word-specific orthographic knowledge was assessed several days later by comparing target spellings with homophonic spellings in tasks…

  18. Determinants of Oral Diseases in the African and Middle East Region.

    PubMed

    Chidzonga, M M; Carneiro, L C; Kalyanyama, B M; Kwamin, F; Oginni, F O

    2015-07-01

    Oral health policies must be developed that emphasize the role of social determinants in health and oral diseases. The aim of this report is to review literature on determinants of oral diseases and apply the concepts to promoting oral health in the African countries in the African and Middle East region (AMER). Structural and proximal determinants of oral diseases are common to those affected by other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Oral diseases are also heavily affected by issues of politics, poor health behaviors, underdeveloped health systems, and low oral health literacy. Wide-scale poverty exists in populations in the AMER. Oral health promotion and preventive oral health programs should therefore be integrated with those for general health and use the common risk factor approach (CRFA). Attempts should be made to improve the daily living conditions and reduce the incline of the social gradient. Oral health practitioners should use the CRFA when dealing with determinants of oral diseases and in the design of preventive oral health programs. The detrimental effects of the social determinants of health may be ameliorated by involving both the individual and community. Interventions in health promotion programs in the AMER need more research on the epidemiology of oral diseases and the role played by the social determinants of oral diseases, especially with regard to poverty. The high levels of poverty and low gross domestic product in most countries in the African region make it difficult to fund high-quality, affordable, accessible oral health services. PMID:26101337

  19. Mometasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... inhalation comes as a powder to inhale by mouth. It is usually inhaled twice daily or once ... doctor about how you should use your other oral and inhaled medications for asthma during your treatment ...

  20. Umeclidinium Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Umeclidinium oral inhalation is used in adults to control wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness caused by ... Umeclidinium comes as a powder to inhale by mouth using a special inhaler. It is usually inhaled ...

  1. Salmeterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... comes as a dry powder to inhale by mouth using a specially designed inhaler. When salmeterol is ... doctor about how you should take your other oral or inhaled medications for asthma during your treatment ...

  2. Triamcinolone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Triamcinolone comes as an aerosol to use by oral inhalation. It usually is inhaled three or four ... as possible through your nose while keeping your mouth shut. Open Mouth Technique: Open your mouth wide, ...

  3. Pentobarbital Oral and Rectal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as a capsule and liquid to take by mouth and as a suppository to be used rectally. ... Grisactin), medications for depression or seizures, metronidazole (Flagyl), oral contraceptives, propranolol (Inderal), quinidine, rifampin, sedatives, sleeping pills, ...

  4. Beclomethasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    QVAR® Oral Inhaler ... Beclomethasone comes as an aerosol to inhale by mouth. It usually is inhaled three or four times ... as possible through your nose while keeping your mouth shut. Open Mouth Technique: Open your mouth wide, ...

  5. Oral Melanotic Macule

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral melanotic macule is a non-cancerous (benign), dark spot found on the lips or inside the ... are more common in middle-aged people, in dark-skinned people, and in females. Signs and Symptoms ...

  6. Oral compound nevus.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lyzete Berriel; Consalaro, Alberto; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sérgio; da Silva Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio; Tinoco-Araújo, José Endrigo

    2014-02-01

    The melanocytic nevus is a benign and focal proliferation of nevus cells that can be congenital or acquired. Intraoral lesions are uncommon, and the etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. The occurrence rate of oral compound nevus is about 5.9% to 16.5% of all oral melanocytic nevi. A 22-year-old male patient presented with a dark brown macule on the buccal mucosa of the maxilla in the region of tooth 26. The lesion was elliptical, 0.7 x 0.5 cm, well circumscribed, asymptomatic, and the evolution time was unknown. An excisional biopsy was performed and microscopic analysis revealed nests of nevus cells in the epithelium and underlying connective tissue that were compatible with melanocytic compound nevus. Owing to the clinical similarity between oral melanocytic nevus and oral melanoma, a histopathological analysis is mandatory for definitive diagnosis. PMID:24612575

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  8. Orality, History, and \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lewis Carl Seifert

    2002-01-01

    Patrick Chamoiseau's Creole Folktales (1988) makes a concerted effort to reproduce the oral storytelling of the Creole slaves of the French Antilles in order to explore and promote the cultural and literary notion of \\

  9. Naomi Nelson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Naomi; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

    2009-09-18

    Oral history interview with Naomi Nelson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Kansas City, Kansas, on September 18, 2009. In this interview, Naomi Nelson describes her early childhood experiences attending church in Wilsey, Kansas. After marriage, she...

  10. Oral Health Presentation Objectives

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and mouth care we can develop dental caries or tooth decay. This is caused by bacteria in our mouths, increase calcium intake, tobacco prevention (chew r/t oral cancer and dental decay). 4. Dental Decay

  11. Karen Cooksey Oral History

    E-print Network

    Cooksey, Karen; Heidrick, Sarah

    2009-11-09

    Oral history interview with Karen Cooksey conducted by Sarah Heidrick in Salina, Kansas, on November 9, 2009. In this interview, Karen Cooksey describes her experiences belonging to the congregations of the Methodist ...

  12. Extended Abstracts Oral Presentations,

    E-print Network

    Extended Abstracts Oral Presentations, Sessions & Workshops United Nations Convention to Combat Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) 2nd Scientific Conference and are strengthening our scientific to the well) Stafford Odengo (Child carry water) Dibyendu Dey Choudhury (Women transporting water) Citation

  13. Dan Chaverin Oral History

    E-print Network

    Chaverin, Dan; Shriner, Clint

    2009-12-06

    Oral history interview with Dan Chaverin conducted by Clint Shriner in Lenexa, Kansas, on December 6, 2009. In this interview, Dan Chaverin, executive pastor of Westside Family Church in Lenexa, Kansas, discusses the operations, missions...

  14. Glenn Lindell Oral History

    E-print Network

    Lindell, Glenn; Caton, Jeffrey

    2009-10-24

    Oral history interview with Glenn Lindell conducted by Jeffrey Caton in Johnson County, Kansas, on October 24, 2009. In this interview, Glen Lindell, pastor emeritus of the Hillcrest Covenant Church in Prairie Village, Kansas, discusses his training...

  15. Terry Koenig Oral History

    E-print Network

    Koenig, Terry L.; Helmer, Lauren

    2010-11-16

    Oral history interview with Terry Koenig conducted by Lauren Helmer in Lawrence, Kansas, on November 16, 2010. In this interview, Terry Koenig discusses her childhood growing up as a member of the Missouri Synod Lutheran Church, the importance...

  16. Janice Bryant Oral History

    E-print Network

    Bryant, Janice; Helmer, Lauren

    2010-12-29

    Oral history interview with Janice Bryant conducted by Lauren Helmer in Marion, Kansas, on December 29, 2010. In this interview, Janice Bryant, a former church secretary for Valley Methodist Church, discusses the history, organization, and programs...

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Disabilities – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, and behavioral challenges common in patients with developmental disabilities and offers ... Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health ...

  18. Beverly Boyd Oral History

    E-print Network

    Boyd, Beverly; Teichgraeber, Steve

    2010-11-12

    Oral history interview with Beverly Boyd conducted by Steve Teichgraeber in Lawrence, Kansas, on November 12, 2010. In this interview, Beverly Boyd discusses the life of Saint Rose-Phillippine Duchesne (1769-1852), a Catholic nun of the Society...

  19. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of substances. The most common causes are food, food additives, drugs, oral hygiene products, and dental materials. Q: Are there any specific foods that are more commonly implicated in intraoral hypersensitivity ...

  20. Edith Bogart Oral History

    E-print Network

    Bogart, Edith; Miller, Timothy

    2010-09-14

    Oral history interview with Edith Bogart conducted by Timothy Miller in Lawrence, Kansas, on September 14, 2010. In this interview, Edith Bogart discusses her experiences with a variety of denominations, including Episcopalian, Jehovah's Witnesses...

  1. The ZmASR1 Protein Influences Branched-Chain Amino Acid Biosynthesis and Maintains Kernel Yield in Maize under Water-Limited Conditions1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Virlouvet, Laetitia; Jacquemot, Marie-Pierre; Gerentes, Denise; Corti, Hélène; Bouton, Sophie; Gilard, Françoise; Valot, Benoît; Trouverie, Jacques; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Falque, Matthieu; Damerval, Catherine; Rogowsky, Peter; Perez, Pascual; Noctor, Graham; Zivy, Michel; Coursol, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR) proteins were first described about 15 years ago as accumulating to high levels during plant developmental processes and in response to diverse stresses. Currently, the effects of ASRs on water deficit tolerance and the ways in which their physiological and biochemical functions lead to this stress tolerance remain poorly understood. Here, we characterized the ASR gene family from maize (Zea mays), which contains nine paralogous genes, and showed that maize ASR1 (ZmASR1) was encoded by one of the most highly expressed paralogs. Ectopic expression of ZmASR1 had a large overall impact on maize yield that was maintained under water-limited stress conditions in the field. Comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of wild-type and ZmASR1-overexpressing leaves led to the identification of three transcripts and 16 proteins up- or down-regulated by ZmASR1. The majority of them were involved in primary and/or cellular metabolic processes, including branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis. Metabolomic and transcript analyses further indicated that ZmASR1-overexpressing plants showed a decrease in BCAA compounds and changes in BCAA-related gene expression in comparison with wild-type plants. Interestingly, within-group correlation matrix analysis revealed a close link between 13 decreased metabolites in ZmASR1-overexpressing leaves, including two BCAAs. Among these 13 metabolites, six were previously shown to be negatively correlated to biomass, suggesting that ZmASR1-dependent regulation of these 13 metabolites might contribute to regulate leaf growth, resulting in improvement in kernel yield. PMID:21852416

  2. Multispectral optical imaging device for in vivo detection of oral neoplasia

    E-print Network

    Roblyer, Darren

    benign conditions, such as lichen planus, inflammation, and hyperkeratosis, mimic the clinical presenMultispectral optical imaging device for in vivo detection of oral neoplasia Darren Roblyer Rebecca detection of oral neoplasia. The MDM acquires in vivo images of oral tissue in fluorescence, narrow- band NB

  3. Oral Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathi, BN; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, GV

    2014-01-01

    ’Crohn's disease’ is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

  4. The Human Oral Metagenome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Mullany; Philip Warburton; Elaine Allan

    \\u000a The human oral cavity is estimated to contain more than 750 bacterial species (Jenkinson and Lamont, 2005; Paster et al.,\\u000a 2006). Although this figure is controversial, the fact remains that up to half of the species in the oral microbiota cannot\\u000a yet be cultivated in the laboratory. Therefore, metagenomics is a powerful way of accessing these unculturable bacteria in\\u000a order

  5. Illness-related behaviour and utilization of oral health services among adult city-dwellers in Burkina Faso: evidence from a household survey

    PubMed Central

    Varenne, Benoît; Petersen, Poul Erik; Fournet, Florence; Msellati, Philippe; Gary, Jean; Ouattara, Seydou; Harang, Maud; Salem, Gérard

    2006-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, the availability and accessibility of oral health services are seriously constrained and the provision of essential oral care is limited. Reports from the region show a very low utilization of oral health care services, and visits to dental-care facilities are mostly undertaken for symptomatic reasons. The objectives of the present study were to describe the prevalence of oral symptoms among adults in Ouagadougou, capital city of Burkina Faso and the use of oral health services and self-medication in response to these symptoms and to measure the associations between predisposing, enabling and needs factors and decisions to seek oral health care. Methods The conceptual design of the study was derived from both the Andersen-Newman model of health care utilization and the conceptual framework of the WHO International Collaborative Study of Oral Health Outcomes. Data were obtained by two-stage stratified sampling through four areas representative of different stages of urbanization of Ouagadougou. The final study population comprised 3030 adults aged 15 years or over and the response rate was 65%. Results Overall, 28% of the respondents had experienced an oral health problem during the past 12 months; a high proportion (62%) reported pain or acute discomfort affecting daily life. In response to symptoms, only 28% used oral health facilities, 48% used self-medication and 24% sought no treatment at all. Multivariate analyses revealed that several socio-economic and socio-cultural factors such as religious affiliation, material living conditions and participation in a social network were significantly associated with the use of oral health care services by adults who had experienced oral health problems during the previous year. Conclusion The proportion of people who have obtained oral health care is alarmingly low in Ouagadougou and self-medication appears to be an important alternative source of care for adult city-dwellers. Decision-makers in sub-Saharan countries must seek to ensure that access to essential oral health care is improved. PMID:17192172

  6. Oral and systemic photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L; Halliday, Gary M

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection can be provided not only by ultraviolet (UV) blockers but also by oral substances. Epidemiologically identified associations between foods and skin cancer and interventional experiments have discovered mechanisms of UV skin damage. These approaches have identified oral substances that are photoprotective in humans. UV inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production causing an energy crisis, which prevents optimal skin immunity and DNA repair. Enhancing ATP production with oral nicotinamide protects from UV immunosuppression, enhances DNA repair and reduces skin cancer in humans. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to photodamage. Nontoxic substances consumed in the diet, or available as oral supplements, can protect the skin by multiple potential mechanisms. These substances include polyphenols in fruit, vegetables, wine, tea and caffeine-containing foods. UV-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) contributes to photodamage. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and food substances reduce production of this lipid mediator. Fish oils are photoprotective, at least partially by reducing PGE2 . Orally consumed substances, either in the diet or as supplements, can influence cutaneous responses to UV. A current research goal is to develop an oral supplement that could be used in conjunction with other sun protective strategies in order to provide improved protection from sunlight. PMID:24313740

  7. Novel colorimetric sensor for oral malodour.

    PubMed

    Alagirisamy, Nethaji; Hardas, Sarita S; Jayaraman, Sujatha

    2010-02-19

    Volatile sulphur compounds are the primary constituents of oral malodour. Quantitative tools for the detection of oral malodour are beneficial to evaluate the intensity of malodour, analyse its causes and monitor the effectiveness of customized treatments. We have developed an objective, cost effective, do-it-yourself colorimetric sensor for oral malodour quantification. The sensor consisted of a sensing solution, a gas sampling unit for collecting a known volume of mouth air and a photometric detector. The sensing solution was iodine and the depletion of iodine on reaction with hydrogen sulphide was detected colorimetrically using starch. The detection limit of the sensor is 0.05 microg L(-1) of hydrogen sulphide, which is fit-for-purpose for oral malodour detection in healthy subjects as well as halitosis patients. Volatile sulphur compounds in mouth air were quantified in healthy human volunteers using this portable sensor and the detected levels were in the range of 0.2-0.4 microg L(-1). There was a good correlation between the VSC levels detected by the colorimetric sensor and halimeter (R(2)=0.934). The developed sensor can be easily fabricated in the laboratory, and it shows high potential to be used as a clinical evaluation tool for oral malodour assessments. PMID:20113721

  8. Composition and development of oral bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The oral bacterial microbiome encompasses ca. 700 commonly occurring phylotypes, approximately half of which can be present at any time in any individual. These bacteria are largely indigenous to the oral cavity; this limited range suggests that interactions between the various phylotypes, and between the phylotypes and their environment, are crucial for their existence. Molecular cataloging has confirmed many basic observations on the composition of the oral microbiome that were formulated well before ribosomal RNA-based systematics, but the power and the scope of molecular taxonomy has resulted in the discovery of new phylotypes and, more importantly, the speed and detail of molecular analyses are impossible to achieve through classical approaches. Community structure varies with location within the mouth, and changes in community structure are related to disease initiation and disease progression. Factors that influence the formation and the evolution of communities include selective adherence to epithelial or tooth surfaces, specific cell-to-cell binding as a driver of early community composition, and interorganismal interaction leading to alteration of the local environment, which represents the first step on the road to oral disease. A comprehensive understanding of how these factors interact to drive changes in the composition of the oral microbial community can lead to new strategies for the inhibition of periodontal diseases and dental caries. PMID:24320954

  9. Candida in potentially malignant oral disorders.

    PubMed

    Sankari, S Leena; Gayathri, K; Balachander, N; Malathi, L

    2015-04-01

    Oro-pharyngeal cancer is a significant component in the global burden of cancer. A considerable proportion of oral squamous carcinomas develop from preexsiting potentially malignant disorder of the oral cavity. The term potentially malignant oral disorders (PMD) were proposed for the precancerous lesions and conditions by World Health Organization in 2007. PMD are considered an in-between clinical state, which showed increased risk for cancer development. Etiology of PMD is multifactorial. Tobacco and alcohol are the major risk factors. In recent years, role of candidal infection is recognized as a significant factor in the development of PMD. There is an enduring discussion whether Candida infection can be a cause of PMD or a superimposed infection in a preexisting lesion. This article highlights the association between Candida and PMD. PMID:26015698

  10. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer™, an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient's pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline. PMID:24019797

  11. Candida spp. in oral cancer and oral precancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Gall, Francesca; Colella, Giuseppe; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Rossiello, Raffaele; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Liguori, Giorgio

    2013-07-01

    To assess the presence of Candida spp. in lesions of the oral cavity in a sample of patients with precancer or cancer of the mouth and evaluate the limitations and advantages of microbiological and histological methods, 103 subjects with precancerous or cancerous lesions and not treated were observed between 2007 and 2009. The presence of Candida in the lesions was analyzed by microbiological and histological methods. Cohen's k statistic was used to assess the agreement between culture method and staining techniques. Forty-eight (47%) patients had cancer and 55 (53%) patients had precancerous lesions. Candida spp. were isolated from 31 (30%) patients with cancerous lesions and 33 (32%) with precancerous lesions. C. albicans was the most frequent species isolated in the lesions. The k value showed a fair overall agreement for comparisons between culture method and PAS (0.2825) or GMS (0.3112). This study supports the frequent presence of Candida spp. in cancer and precancerous lesions of the oral cavity. Both microbiological investigations and histological techniques were reliable for detection of Candida spp. It would be desirable for the two techniques to be considered complementary in the detection of yeast infections in these types of lesions. PMID:23912870

  12. A basic limitation of the split window method for SST retrievals when applied to a wide range of water vapor conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, Denise E.

    1989-01-01

    The split window method for retrieving sea surface temperatures (SST) from satellite-based observations is evaluated from radiative transfer calculations, and shown to have an inherent limitation that arises from a linear assumption in the correction scheme. This general limitation leads to significant errors (of several degrees in some cases) in the retrieved SST; the theoretical basis for the error is examined.

  13. Oral Leukoplakia – an Update

    PubMed Central

    PARLATESCU, Ioanina; GHEORGHE, Carmen; COCULESCU, Elena; TOVARU, Serban

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to assess the current state of science on oral leukoplakia. Although it is considered a potentially malignant disorder the overall malignant progression of oral leukoplakia is of the order of 5% and even more. Nowadays there are no currently accepted markers to distinguish those that may progress to cancer from those that may not. The current golden standard is considered the presence of epithelial dysplasia on the tissue biopsy of the lesion. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia is a rare form of OL which has multiple recurrences, is refractory to treatment and has malignant transformation in a short period. It is considered a true premalignant lesion. The management of oral leukoplakia varies from a "wait and see" attitude and topical chemopreventive agents to complete surgical removal. PMID:25553134

  14. Minnesota Immigrant Oral Histories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    How can the Hmong history of Minnnesota be best understood? One good place to start is with oral histories of their own experiences. Various Hmong experiences, along with other ethnic groups, are told with a flourish on the Minnesota Immigrant Oral Histories site. Created by the Minnesota Historical Society, this site contains over 360 oral history interviews conducted between 1967 and 2012. Visitors can click on any of the groups listed to get started, then find detailed transcripts, streaming audio, and thumbnail sketches of participants. The Tibetan collection is quite a gem as visitors can learn about the U.S. Tibetan Resettlement Project from 1990. Overall, it's a wonderful way to learn about the diversity of the people who have come to call Minnesota home.

  15. Nanoporous sorbent material as an oral phosphate binder and for aqueous phosphate, chromate, and arsenate removal

    PubMed Central

    Sangvanich, Thanapon; Ngamcherdtrakul, Worapol; Lee, Richard; Morry, Jingga; Castro, David; Fryxell, Glen E.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate removal is both biologically and environmentally important. Biologically, hyperphosphatemia is a critical condition in end-stage chronic kidney disease patients. Patients with hyperphosphatemia are treated long-term with oral phosphate binders to prevent phosphate absorption to the body by capturing phosphate in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract followed by fecal excretion. Environmentally, phosphate levels in natural water resources must be regulated according to limits set forth by the US Environmental Protection Agency. By utilizing nanotechnology and ligand design, we developed a new material to overcome limitations of traditional sorbent materials such as low phosphate binding capacity, slow binding kinetics, and negative interference by other anions. A phosphate binder based on iron-ethylenediamine on nanoporous silica (Fe-EDA-SAMMS) has been optimized for substrates and Fe(III) deposition methods. The Fe-EDA-SAMMS material had a 4-fold increase in phosphate binding capacity and a broader operating pH window compared to other reports. The material had a faster phosphate binding rate and was significantly less affected by other anions than Sevelamer HCl, the gold standard oral phosphate binder, and AG® 1-X8, a commercially available anion exchanger. It had less cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells than lanthanum carbonate, another prescribed oral phosphate binder. The Fe-EDA-SAMMS also had high capacity for arsenate and chromate, two of the most toxic anions in natural water. PMID:25554735

  16. The Human Oral Microbiome? † ?

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Chen, Tuste; Izard, Jacques; Paster, Bruce J.; Tanner, Anne C. R.; Yu, Wen-Han; Lakshmanan, Abirami; Wade, William G.

    2010-01-01

    The human oral cavity contains a number of different habitats, including the teeth, gingival sulcus, tongue, cheeks, hard and soft palates, and tonsils, which are colonized by bacteria. The oral microbiome is comprised of over 600 prevalent taxa at the species level, with distinct subsets predominating at different habitats. The oral microbiome has been extensively characterized by cultivation and culture-independent molecular methods such as 16S rRNA cloning. Unfortunately, the vast majority of unnamed oral taxa are referenced by clone numbers or 16S rRNA GenBank accession numbers, often without taxonomic anchors. The first aim of this research was to collect 16S rRNA gene sequences into a curated phylogeny-based database, the Human Oral Microbiome Database (HOMD), and make it web accessible (www.homd.org). The HOMD includes 619 taxa in 13 phyla, as follows: Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Euryarchaeota, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, SR1, Synergistetes, Tenericutes, and TM7. The second aim was to analyze 36,043 16S rRNA gene clones isolated from studies of the oral microbiota to determine the relative abundance of taxa and identify novel candidate taxa. The analysis identified 1,179 taxa, of which 24% were named, 8% were cultivated but unnamed, and 68% were uncultivated phylotypes. Upon validation, 434 novel, nonsingleton taxa will be added to the HOMD. The number of taxa needed to account for 90%, 95%, or 99% of the clones examined is 259, 413, and 875, respectively. The HOMD is the first curated description of a human-associated microbiome and provides tools for use in understanding the role of the microbiome in health and disease. PMID:20656903

  17. Oral cleft prevention program (OCPP)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects with significant medical, psychosocial, and economic ramifications. Oral clefts have a complex etiology with genetic and environmental risk factors. There are suggestive results for decreased risks of cleft occurrence and recurrence with folic acid supplements taken at preconception and during pregnancy with a stronger evidence for higher than lower doses in preventing recurrence. Yet previous studies have suffered from considerable design limitations particularly non-randomization into treatment. There is also well-documented effectiveness for folic acid in preventing neural tube defect occurrence at 0.4 mg and recurrence with 4 mg. Given the substantial burden of clefting on the individual and the family and the supportive data for the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation as well as its low cost, a randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness of high versus low dose folic acid for prevention of cleft recurrence is warranted. Methods/design This study will assess the effect of 4 mg and 0.4 mg doses of folic acid, taken on a daily basis during preconception and up to 3 months of pregnancy by women who are at risk of having a child with nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without palate (NSCL/P), on the recurrence of NSCL/P. The total sample will include about 6,000 women (that either have NSCL/P or that have at least one child with NSCL/P) randomly assigned to the 4 mg and the 0.4 mg folic acid study groups. The study will also compare the recurrence rates of NSCL/P in the total sample of subjects, as well as the two study groups (4mg, 0.4 mg) to that of a historical control group. The study has been approved by IRBs (ethics committees) of all involved sites. Results will be disseminated through publications and presentations at scientific meetings. Discussion The costs related to oral clefts are high, including long term psychological and socio-economic effects. This study provides an opportunity for huge savings in not only money but the overall quality of life. This may help establish more specific clinical guidelines for oral cleft prevention so that the intervention can be better tailored for at-risk women. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00397917 PMID:23181832

  18. Oral and perioral candidosis.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Ray, T L

    1994-06-01

    The following article has been assembled from the current literature and our clinical experience to provide a comprehensive review of oral and perioral candidal infections. A brief review of the epidemiology and pathogenesis is followed by a description of the various clinical signs and symptoms associated with oral candidosis. Methods useful in arriving at a diagnosis of candidal infection as well as a number of effective therapeutic modalities are discussed. In addition, special considerations relating to the treatment of patients with other concurrent mucosal diseases and long-term antifungal maintenance regimes are addressed. PMID:8060823

  19. Oral myiasis: case report.

    PubMed

    Jimson, S; Prakash, C A; Balachandran, C; Raman, M

    2013-01-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare disease caused by larvae of dipteran flies. Houseflies are strongly suspected of transmitting at least 65 diseases to humans, including typhoid fever, dysentery and cholera. Flies regurgitate and excrete wherever they come to rest and thereby mechanically are the root cause for disease organisms. A case of oral myiasis caused by Chrysomya bezziana in the maxillary anterior region in a 40-year-old patient is presented. Manual removal of maggots, and surgical debridement of wound was done followed by broad-spectrum anti-parasitic medications. A note on the identification of the larva and histopathology of the tissue is also highlighted here. PMID:24552939

  20. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Verma, Shyam B; Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Patil, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. PMID:25914554

  1. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  2. 7 CFR 42.111 - Sampling plans for reduced condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and limit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...OF FOOD CONTAINERS Procedures for Stationary Lot Sampling and Inspection § 42.111 Sampling...Reduced Condition of Container Inspection Code Lot size ranges—Number of containers in lot Type of Plan Acceptable quality levels...

  3. 7 CFR 42.111 - Sampling plans for reduced condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and limit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...OF FOOD CONTAINERS Procedures for Stationary Lot Sampling and Inspection § 42.111 Sampling...Reduced Condition of Container Inspection Code Lot size ranges—Number of containers in lot Type of plan Sample size Acceptable...

  4. 7 CFR 42.111 - Sampling plans for reduced condition of container inspection, Tables III and III-A; and limit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...OF FOOD CONTAINERS Procedures for Stationary Lot Sampling and Inspection § 42.111 Sampling...Reduced Condition of Container Inspection Code Lot size ranges—Number of containers in lot Type of plan Sample size Acceptable...

  5. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PCOS is healthy nutrition, exercise, and medications. Adolescent girls and young women are frequently prescribed oral contraceptive ... endometriosis. Oral contraceptive pills lower hormone levels in girls with PCOS and regulate their menstrual periods. Hormone ...

  6. Tips for Good Oral Health during Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pregnant. Getting oral health care, practicing good oral hygiene, eating healthy foods, and practicing other healthy behaviors will help keep ... Keep getting oral health care, practicing good oral hygiene, eating healthy foods, and practicing other healthy behaviors. ? Take care of ...

  7. GENOMICS OF ORAL BACTERIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret J. Duncan

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbi- ology research community has benefited through

  8. Genomics of Oral Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret J. Duncan

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators’ ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects

  9. Oral Communication in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Noting that oral communication skills need continuous refinement, this document outlines various methods of practicing these skills, such as literature circles in reading; a reader's theater; presentations of book reports; story telling; a poetry reading club; and choral reading. The document describes literature circles as small groups of readers…

  10. WRITING ORAL DRILLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEY, JAMES W.

    ALL ORAL LANGUAGE DRILLS MAY BE SEPARATED INTO TWO TYPES--(1) MIM-MEM OR MIMICRY MEMORIZATION DRILLS OR (2) PATTERN PRACTICE DRILLS. THESE TWO LARGER CATEGORIES CAN BE SUB-DIVIDED INTO A NUMBER OF OTHER TYPES, SUCH AS TRANSFORMATION AND SUBSTITUTION DRILLS. THE USE OF ANY PARTICULAR TYPE DEPENDS ON THE PURPOSE TO WHICH THE DRILL IS PUT. IN ANY…

  11. Unusual extensive physiologic melanin pigmentation of the oral cavity: a clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Mallikarjuna, K; Gupta, S; Shukla, S; Chaurasia, S

    2013-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the oral cavity. Oral pigmentations may be physiological or pathological in nature. It may represent as a localized anomaly of limited significance or the presentation of potentially life threatening multisystem disease. Oral pigmentation has a multifactorial etiology. Most of the oral pigmentations are physiologic. Evaluation of a patient with pigmented lesions should include a full medical and dental history, extraoral and intraoral examinations. In this article, we report a case of extensive physiologic pigmentation of the oral cavity in a 12 year old female patient, posing a diagnostic challenge. PMID:23886725

  12. Oral Papillomatosis in Canada Lynx (Lynx canadensis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa L. Wolfe; Terry R. Spraker

    2007-01-01

    We observed 11 cases of oral papillomatosis among 48 free-ranging Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) that had been shipped to Colorado for translocation purposes. Lesions were 1-3 mm, multifocal, nonpigmented ses- sile masses and occurred on the ventral lingual surface. Adverse clinical signs were not ob- served. Six of the 11 cases resolved and the remainder appeared to be self-limiting when

  13. Microbiota and their role in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoecke, B; De Ryck, T; Stringer, A; Van de Wiele, T; Keefe, D

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis in patients undergoing cancer therapy is a significant problem. Its prevalence ranges between 20 and 100%, depending on treatment type and protocols and patient-based variables. Mucositis is self-limiting when uncomplicated by infection. Unfortunately, the incidence of developing a local or systemic infection during the course of the treatment is very high. At this stage, it is unclear which role oral microbiota play in the onset, duration, and severity of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, there is growing interest in this underexplored topic, and new studies are being undertaken to unravel their impact on the pathogenesis of mucositis. PMID:24456144

  14. CREATIVE EXPERIENCES IN ORAL LANGUAGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HENRY, MABEL WRIGHT, ED.

    IDEAS FOR THE CREATIVE USE OF ORAL LANGUAGE IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM ARE PRESENTED IN THIS SYMPOSIUM. PART 1, "THE NEED FOR CREATIVE EXPERIENCES IN ORAL LANGUAGE" BY M.W. HENRY, IS CONCERNED WITH THE INTERRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CREATIVE ORAL LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES AND THE ACQUISITION OF READING AND WRITING SKILLS. PART 2, "CHORIC INTERPRETATION" BY…

  15. Oral Manifestations of Viral Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis P. Lynch

    other chapters dealing with specific viruses. Second, the clinical oral manifestations of such infections are described, with an emphasis on the differential diagnosis of specific oral viral lesions. Third, the methods used in the diagno- sis of oral viral lesions are presented. Fourth, a summary of current therapeutic management strategies is presented, along with their relation- ship to long-term prognosis.

  16. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  17. Oral therapy for Pruritus Ani

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurence Griffin Bodkin

    1945-01-01

    Summary  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 1. \\u000a \\u000a 42 Cases of Pruritus Ani were treated, with oral medication and local applications.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 2. \\u000a \\u000a History of the duration of symptoms varied from 1 to 30 years. Three cases also had Pruritus Vulvae.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 3. \\u000a \\u000a A formula containing Takadiastase and Sodium Dilantin made an effective combination. Dilantin alone did not control the condition.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 4. \\u000a \\u000a Soap and water are avoided at

  18. Oral Phenytoin Toxicity Causing Sinus Arrest: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Thimmisetty, Ravi K.; Gorthi, Janardhana Rao

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of sinus node arrest leading to symptomatic junctional bradycardia from oral phenytoin toxicity, which is a rare presentation. Our patient had no prior cardiac history and was on phenytoin therapy for seizure disorder. Although bradycardia is more commonly associated with intravenous phenytoin and there were few case reports of bradycardia with oral phenytoin reported, the literature is limited. In this case report, we also reviewed the pathophysiology of phenytoin-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:25343048

  19. Failure of a schedule-induction procedure to increase ethanol intake in an established limited-access self-administration condition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herman H. Samson; Ann Chappell

    2003-01-01

    Determining mechanisms that can increase ethanol consumption during a single drinking bout is central to understanding alcohol abuse. When rodents are used as models to study excessive drinking, most often limited and transient increases in bout size are found with various manipulations. In a variety of studies, investigators have reported that schedule-induced drinking can result in excessive consumption of either

  20. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of Soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO2] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on 1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the ma...

  1. Beyond microbial community composition: functional activities of the oral microbiome in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Pinedo, Ana E.; Frias-Lopez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbiome plays a relevant role in the health status of the host and is a key element in a variety of oral and non-oral diseases. Despite advances in our knowledge of changes in microbial composition associated with different health conditions the functional aspects of the oral microbiome that lead to dysbiosis remain for the most part unknown. In this review, we discuss the progress made towards understanding the functional role of the oral microbiome in health and disease and how novel technologies are expanding our knowledge on this subject. PMID:25862077

  2. Beyond microbial community composition: functional activities of the oral microbiome in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Duran-Pinedo, Ana E; Frias-Lopez, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    The oral microbiome plays a relevant role in the health status of the host and is a key element in a variety of oral and non-oral diseases. Despite advances in our knowledge of changes in microbial composition associated with different health conditions the functional aspects of the oral microbiome that lead to dysbiosis remain for the most part unknown. In this review, we discuss the progress made towards understanding the functional role of the oral microbiome in health and disease and how novel technologies are expanding our knowledge on this subject. PMID:25862077

  3. Oral Biofilm Architecture on Natural Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M. Barbara M.; Degener, John E.; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmür, Rudolf; M. Harmsen, Hermie J.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species. PMID:20195365

  4. The digestive disorders (diarrhoea) following weaning can be largely limited through the control of the climatic conditions, the utilization of slatted floor and especially a disconti-

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    millithermies /hour/ pig. By means of an automatic regulator (I.T.P.(*) patent) it was possible at any moment, - the feeding level should be taken into account when choosing the ambient conditions as ad libitum fed pigs to be treated directly related with the feeding level. During the treatment, the different pollution parameters

  5. Deep-Sea Research, 1973,Vol.20, pp. 315 to 323. PergamonPress. Printed in Great Britain. Limiting conditions for salt-fingering at an interface

    E-print Network

    Huppert, Herbert

    energy stored in the salt field to form salt fingers in all parts of the ocean where hot, salty water; in revised form 30 October 1972; accepted 2 November 1972) Abstract--Conditions for which salt fingers can be formed at the interface between hot, salty water above colder, fresher water are investigated both

  6. Absolute Convergence and Conditional Convergence The convergence tests I've discussed (such as the Ratio Test and Limit Comparsion) apply to positive

    E-print Network

    Ikenaga, Bruce

    8-7-2005 Absolute Convergence and Conditional Convergence The convergence tests I've discussed convergence if a series has negative terms? If there are only finitely many negative terms, you can "chop them, the Alternating Series Test may tell you that the series converges. But there are series to which it does

  7. Addressing geriatric oral health concerns through national oral health policy in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhinav; Purohit, Bharathi M

    2015-01-01

    There is an escalating demand for geriatric oral healthcare in all developed and developing countries including India. Two-thirds of the world’s elderly live in developing countries. This is a huge population that must receive attention from policy-makers who will be challenged by the changing demands for social and health services including oral health services. Resources are limited thus rather than being aspirational in wanting to provide all treatment needed for everybody, this critique presents a road map of how we might answer the present and future geriatric oral health concerns in a most efficient manner in a developing country. Viewing the recent Indian demographic profile and the trends in oral health, pertinent policy subjects have been discussed concerning the oral health needs of the elderly and also the associated challenges which include strategies to improve quality of life, strategies to train and educate the dental workforce and above all the role of healthcare systems towards realization of better aged society in India and other developing countries. PMID:25584351

  8. Clinical behaviour of malignant transforming oral lichen planus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Mignogna; L. Lo Russo; S. Fedele; E. Ruoppo; L. Califano; L. Lo Muzio

    2002-01-01

    Aims: At present oral lichen planus (OLP) is classified among precancerous conditions but very few data are available in literature regarding prognosis of OLP-related cancers. The aim of this paper is to evaluate clinical long-term behaviour of OLP-related oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs).Methods: Clinical history and data from follow-up regarding 21 patients undergoing malignant transformation of OLP have been critically

  9. Cancer and oral lichen planus in a Swedish population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per-Olof Rödström; Mats Jontell; Ulf Mattsson; Erik Holmberg

    2004-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is generally regarded as a premalignant condition. The objective of the present study was to assess the number of oral malignant tumours in a retrospective analysis of 1028 patients (mean age=55 years; range=18–86; female, n=667; men, n=351) who between 1978 to end of 1993 were diagnosed with OLP at the Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg University, Sweden.

  10. Damaging Oral Habits

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results. PMID:25954079

  11. Damaging oral habits.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results. PMID:25954079

  12. Classification of oral cancers using Raman spectroscopy of serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi; Talathi, Sneha; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancers are the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, with low 5-year disease free survival rates, attributable to late detection due to lack of reliable screening modalities. Our in vivo Raman spectroscopy studies have demonstrated classification of normal and tumor as well as cancer field effects (CFE), the earliest events in oral cancers. In view of limitations such as requirement of on-site instrumentation and stringent experimental conditions of this approach, feasibility of classification of normal and cancer using serum was explored using 532 nm excitation. In this study, strong resonance features of ?-carotenes, present differentially in normal and pathological conditions, were observed. In the present study, Raman spectra of sera of 36 buccal mucosa, 33 tongue cancers and 17 healthy subjects were recorded using Raman microprobe coupled with 40X objective using 785 nm excitation, a known source of excitation for biomedical applications. To eliminate heterogeneity, average of 3 spectra recorded from each sample was subjected to PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Findings indicate average classification efficiency of ~70% for normal and cancer. Buccal mucosa and tongue cancer serum could also be classified with an efficiency of ~68%. Of the two cancers, buccal mucosa cancer and normal could be classified with a higher efficiency. Findings of the study are quite comparable to that of our earlier study, which suggest that there exist significant differences, other than ?- carotenes, between normal and cancerous samples which can be exploited for the classification. Prospectively, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  13. Carotenoids in nestling Montagu’s harriers: variations according to age, sex, body condition and evidence for diet-related limitations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Audrey Sternalski; François Mougeot; Cyril Eraud; Benoît Gangloff; Alexandre Villers; Vincent Bretagnolle

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are colored pigments forming the basis of many avian social traits. Before their utilization carotenoids must\\u000a be acquired through diet and mobilized for specific uses. The relationships between carotenoid-based coloration, circulating\\u000a carotenoids and body condition have been well studied in adult birds, but little is known in nestlings. Here, we investigated\\u000a variations in carotenoid-based coloration in a raptor nestling,

  14. [Oral candidiasis and dentures].

    PubMed

    Ahariz, M; Loeb, I; Courtois, P

    2010-04-01

    Yeasts belonging to the Candida genus usually colonize the human oral cavity. Immunocompromised patients or individuals with an imbalance of their oral microflora can develop yeast infections from this reservoir. However, saliva protects oral mucosa against candidosis; in turn, dry mouth is associated with increased yeast counts and candidosis risk. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown Candida incorporation into biofilms covering different biomaterials such as dentures: these biofilms may be an increased risk factor for invasive candidosis when the host immune system is compromised. Daily denture brushing is recommended to all wearers. Family or healthcare workers must take over this task when there is autonomy loss, especially in the elderly. In case of candidosis in denture wearers, decontamination of dentures is mandatory. Antimycotics (azoles, nystatin) must be kept for curative treatments of infected patients; they are less active against Candida biofilms on dentures and could lead to emergent resistance if applied daily to dentures against yeast colonization. There are several antiphlogistic solutions with antifungal properties. Nevertheless, literature data does not integrate all aspects of denture care: welfare of denture wearers, prevention of candidosis, biomaterial defects after decontamination processing, and taking into account possible Candida biofilm development. Daily brushing of dentures remains the key recommendation. PMID:20347465

  15. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, N.; Amaechi, B.; Niederman, R.; Acevedo, A.-M.; Vianna, R.; Ganss, C.; Ismail, A.; Honkala, E.

    2011-01-01

    The IADR Global Oral Health Inequalities Task Group on Dental Caries has synthesized current evidence and opinion to identify a five-year implementation and research agenda which should lead to improvements in global oral health, with particular reference to the implementation of current best evidence as well as integrated action to reduce caries and health inequalities between and within countries. The Group determined that research should: integrate health and oral health wherever possible, using common risk factors; be able to respond to and influence international developments in health, healthcare, and health payment systems as well as dental prevention and materials; and exploit the potential for novel funding partnerships with industry and foundations. More effective communication between and among the basic science, clinical science, and health promotion/public health research communities is needed. Translation of research into policy and practice should be a priority for all. Both community and individual interventions need tailoring to achieve a more equal and person-centered preventive focus and reduce any social gradient in health. Recommendations are made for both clinical and public health implementation of existing research and for caries-related research agendas in clinical science, health promotion/public health, and basic science. PMID:21490233

  16. The Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 Has Three High-Affinity Iron-Scavenging Systems Functional under Iron Limitation Conditions but Dispensable for Pathogenesis?¶

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexander M.; Wildermuth, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    High-affinity iron scavenging through the use of siderophores is a well-established virulence determinant in mammalian pathogenesis. However, few examples have been reported for plant pathogens. Here, we use a genetic approach to investigate the role of siderophores in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000) virulence in tomato. DC3000, an agronomically important pathogen, has two known siderophores for high-affinity iron scavenging, yersiniabactin and pyoverdin, and we uncover a third siderophore, citrate, required for growth when iron is limiting. Though growth of a DC3000 triple mutant unable to either synthesize or import these siderophores is severely restricted in iron-limited culture, it is fully pathogenic. One explanation for this phenotype is that the DC3000 triple mutant is able to directly pirate plant iron compounds such as heme/hemin or iron-nicotianamine, and our data indicate that DC3000 can import iron-nicotianamine with high affinity. However, an alternative explanation, supported by data from others, is that the pathogenic environment of DC3000 (i.e., leaf apoplast) is not iron limited but is iron replete, with available iron of >1 ?M. Growth of the triple mutant in culture is restored to wild-type levels by supplementation with a variety of iron chelates at >1 ?M, including iron(III) dicitrate, a dominant chelate of the leaf apoplast. This suggests that lower-affinity iron import would be sufficient for DC3000 iron nutrition in planta and is in sharp contrast to the high-affinity iron-scavenging mechanisms required in mammalian pathogenesis. PMID:21441525

  17. Assessing the Heat Stress and Establishing the Limits for Work in a Hot Mine

    PubMed Central

    Wyndham, C. H.; Allan, A. McD.; Bredell, G. A. G.; Andrew, R.

    1967-01-01

    The management of the mine at Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia decided to enquire into the following questions with regard to men working underground in hot conditions: (a) Which of the various heat stress indices predicts most accurately the effects on workmen of the various heat stress factors which occur in the mine at Mount Isa? (b) How best should the limits of heat stress be judged at which the normal 8-hour shift should be reduced to a 6-hour shift, or at which work should be stopped? With these objects in mind, oral temperatures were measured on 86 workmen after three hours of ordinary work in the mine and also on 36 occasions on 29 volunteers after three hours of stepping on and off a stool at a work rate of 1,560 ft. lb./min. These men were studied in different environmental heat stresses over the range that occurs in the mine. Dry bulb air temperatures (D.B.), wet bulb temperatures (W.B.), velocity of air movements, and globe temperatures (G.T.) were measured in the micro-climate in which each man worked. An estimate was made of the work rate of the 86 workmen. From these estimates and measurements, the predicted 4-hourly sweat rate (P4SR) and corrected effective temperature (C.E.T.) values were determined for each heat stress condition. P4SR values varied between 0·9 and 6·5 and C.E.T. between 70° and 95°F. Correlation coefficients were calculated between oral temperatures and W.B.s, C.E.T.s, and P4SRs and are 0·51, 0·64, and 0·75 respectively. Further analysis was confined to C.E.T. and P4SR. Plots of oral temperature on P4SR for conditions where G.T. was more than 10°F. above D.B. were found to fall well below the rest of the plots, indicating that P4SR exaggerates the effect of mean radiant temperature. These data were therefore excluded from the rest of the analysis. Regression equations were calculated for oral temperature on P4SR and for oral temperature on C.E.T. for (a) men `on the job', for (i) conditions where D.B. was more than 10°F. above W.B. and (ii) for conditions where D.B. was less than 10°F. above W.B., and (b) for men `stepping'. This analysis showed that one overall regression line can be used for all three conditions for oral temperature on P4SR, but for oral temperature on C.E.T. at least two different regression lines would be needed. Also the correlation coefficients between oral temperature and P4SR were generally higher than between oral temperature and C.E.T. For the prediction of oral temperature in the mine at Mount Isa the P4SR index is to be preferred to the C.E.T. scale. These results indicate that the emphasis given to G.T. in the P4SR index is too great. A multi-variance analysis of the P4SR index shows that, in the middle of the range of heat stress conditions examined, a unit change in P4SR would be obtained by about the same change in W.B. and G.T. This is at variance with the present results and also with the experimental findings of the M.R.C. Climatic Physiology Unit at Singapore. It appears, therefore, that the P4SR index should be revised in this regard. When it came to setting limits of heat stress for a 6-hour shift and for `stop-work', it was decided to base the limit for the 6-hour shift on a 1:100 probability of men reaching an oral temperature of 100·5°F. (rectal temperature of 101·5°F.) and to base the `stop work' limit on a 1:2,000 probability of reaching an oral temperature of 101·5°F. (rectal temperature of 102·5°F.). The reasons for this choice of physiological criteria are given in full in the paper. P4SR values at which these limits are reached were determined by calculating 1:100 and 1:2,000 probability belts to the overall regression line of oral temperature on P4SR. The P4SR value at the intersection of the 1:100 probability limit and the oral temperature of 100·5°F. is 3·8 and the P4SR value at the intersection of the 1:2,000 probability limit and the oral temperature of 101·5°F. is 5·0. These then are the limits of heat stress in th

  18. Hepatitis B vaccination and associated oral manifestations: a non-systematic review of literature and case reports.

    PubMed

    Tarakji, B; Ashok, N; Alakeel, R; Azzeghaibi, Sn; Umair, A; Darwish, S; Mahmoud, Rs; Elkhatat, E

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis B vaccine has been administered in children and adults routinely to reduce the incidence of the disease. Even though, hepatitis B vaccine is considered as highly safe, some adverse reactions have been reported. A literature search was carried out in PubMed, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface, searching used the following keywords: Hepatitis B vaccine and complications from 1980 to 2014. A total of 1147 articles were obtained out of which articles, which discuss the complications occurring orally or occurring elsewhere in the body, which have the potential to manifest orally after hepatitis B vaccination were selected. A total of 82 articles were identified which included 58 case series or case reports, 15 review articles, 4 cross sectional studies, 3 prospective cohort studies, one retrospective cohort study and a case control study. After reviewing the literature, we observed that complications seen after Hepatitis B vaccination are sudden infant death syndrome, multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, vasculititis optic neuritis, anaphylaxis, systemic lupus erytymatosus, lichen planus and neuro-muscular disorder. Of these complications, some are manifested orally or have the potential to manifest orally. Although, most of the complications are self-limiting, some are very serious conditions, which require hospitalization with immediate medical attention. PMID:25506472

  19. Analysis of imidacloprid and pyrimethanil in shallot (Allium ascalonicum) grown under greenhouse conditions using tandem mass spectrometry: establishment of pre-harvest residue limits.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hyouk; Park, Joon-Seong; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Na, Tae-Woong; Shim, Jae-Han

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the original Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe method was used for the extraction of imidacloprid and pyrimethanil followed by a rapid clean-up through dispersive solid-phase extraction technique with primary secondary amine sorbent and magnesium sulfate in shallot. Residues were analyzed using LC-tandem mass spectrometry in positive-ion electrospray ionization mode. The limits of detection and quantification were estimated to be 0.006 and 0.02?mg/kg, respectively. The samples were fortified at two different concentration levels (0.2 and 1.0?mg/kg), and the recoveries ranged between 79.7 and 83.9% with relative standard deviation values?limits (PHRL). The rate of disappearance of imidacloprid and pyrimethanil on shallot was described with first-order kinetics (imidacloprid, y(2) ?=?0.9670; pyrimethanil, y(2) ?=?0.9841), with half-lives of 2.87 and 2.08?days, respectively. Based on the dissipation patterns of the pesticide residues, the PHRL was recommended at 7.86?mg/kg for 14?days (PHRL14 ) and 1.98?mg/kg for 7?days (PHRL7 ) before harvest for imidacloprid, and 21.64?mg/kg for 7?days (PHRL7 ) and 9.28?mg/kg for 4?days (PHRL4 ) before harvest for pyrimethanil in shallot. PMID:22949075

  20. Renal Excretion of Sodium During Oral Water Loading in Man

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Metzger; Liliana S. Vaamonde; C. A. Vaamonde; S. Papper

    1969-01-01

    Summary The renal excretion of sodium following an oral sustained 20 ml\\/kg water load was studied in 10 normal volunteers and in 13 patients without evidence of renal, hepatic, cardiovascular or endocrine disease. The study was performed under conditions controlled for sodium content of the diet, time of the day and posture. Under the described conditions the diuresis following the

  1. Adjusting the light in the limit conditions of consciousness by the means of ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) and of subordinated systems

    PubMed Central

    Aliu, Octavian Florin

    2014-01-01

    Background: In our activity in the Ambulance Service of Bucharest Municipality during March 2002 – March 2003 we studied a casuistry of patients who had fallen in a coma of varying degrees. To aid better understanding of coma, the concept of “pre-coma stage” or “diencephalic 0 stage” was introduced. This concept complements the Arseni classification already used in medical practice, because some doctors alternatively use the term of “inaugural coma” for the same condition that we call diencephalic “0 stage”. In the median hypothalamus and on the retino-hypothalamic path (SCN - AN) optical waves are transmitted, probably in the near infrared spectral range (800–1000 nm) in what we term the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS). These waves would constitute a means of transmitting information via the ARAS about the infradian biorhythm of coordination (frequencies below 1 cycle/28 hours), essential for the modulation and pre-processing of the consciousness and wakefulness, a fact which has already been demonstrated in animals. Methods: The current work is based on observations made on a group of 51 patients with the precoma and coma conditions, and on a thorough study of the specialized (especially Romanian) literature. Also, we used validated scientific proof of torture in conditions of lack of light. Results: We found a perfect interpenetration between the ARAS and the following two complementary subsystems: 1. The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, that has the role of coordinating the periodicity of some biological functions depending on the circadian rhythm; and 2. The main photoperiodic organ, the pineal gland (epiphysis), which together with the ARAS has a role in the photoperiodicity modulation of some biological functions during the state of vigilance. PMID:25071308

  2. Consensus statement: Oral health and elite sport performance.

    PubMed

    Needleman, I; Ashley, P; Fine, P; Haddad, F; Loosemore, M; de Medici, A; Donos, N; Newton, T; van Someren, K; Moazzez, R; Jaques, R; Hunter, G; Khan, K; Shimmin, M; Brewer, J; Meehan, L; Mills, S; Porter, S

    2014-11-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25415018

  3. Approaches for Enhancing Oral Bioavailability of Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Renukuntla, Jwala; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Boddu, Sai HS.; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs faces immense challenge partially due to the gastrointestinal (GI) environment. In spite of considerable efforts by industrial and academic laboratories, no major breakthrough in the effective oral delivery of polypeptides and proteins has been accomplished. Upon oral administration, gastrointestinal epithelium acts as a physical and biochemical barrier for absorption of proteins resulting in low bioavailability (typically less than 1–2%). An ideal oral drug delivery system should be capable of a) maintaining the integrity of protein molecules until it reaches the site of absorption, b) releasing the drug at the target absorption site, where the delivery system appends to that site by virtue of specific interaction, and c) retaining inside the gastrointestinal tract irrespective of its transitory constraints. Various technologies have been explored to overcome the problems associated with the oral delivery of macromolecules such as insulin, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, calcitonin, human growth factor, vaccines, enkephalins, and interferons, all of which met with limited success. This review article intends to summarize the physiological barriers to oral delivery of peptides and proteins and novel pharmaceutical approaches to circumvent these barriers and enhance oral bioavailability of these macromolecules. PMID:23428883

  4. Diagnostic aids in the screening of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization has clearly indentified prevention and early detection as major objectives in the control of the oral cancer burden worldwide. At the present time, screening of oral cancer and its pre-invasive intra-epithelial stages, as well as its early detection, is still largely based on visual examination of the mouth. There is strong available evidence to suggest that visual inspection of the oral mucosa is effective in reducing mortality from oral cancer in individuals exposed to risk factors. Simple visual examination, however, is well known to be limited by subjective interpretation and by the potential, albeit rare, occurrence of dysplasia and early OSCC within areas of normal-looking oral mucosa. As a consequence, adjunctive techniques have been suggested to increase our ability to differentiate between benign abnormalities and dysplastic/malignant changes as well as to identify areas of dysplasia/early OSCC that are not visible to naked eye. These include the use of toluidine blue, brush biopsy, chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence. The present paper reviews the evidence supporting the efficacy of the aforementioned techniques in improving the identification of dysplastic/malignant changes of the oral mucosa. We conclude that available studies have shown promising results, but strong evidence to support the use of oral cancer diagnostic aids is still lacking. Further research with clear objectives, well-defined population cohorts, and sound methodology is strongly required. PMID:19284694

  5. Phosphate Homeostasis in Conditions of Phosphate Proficiency and Limitation in the Wild Type and the phoP Mutant of Streptomyces lividans

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Magali; Holland, Ian Barry; Virolle, Marie-Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate, as a constituent of the high energy molecules, ATP/GTP and polyphosphate, plays a crucial role in most of the metabolic processes of living organisms. Therefore, the adaptation to low Pi availability is a major challenge for bacteria. In Streptomyces, this adaptation is tightly controlled by the two component PhoR/PhoP system. In this study, the free intracellular Pi, ATP, ADP and polyP content of the wild type and the phoP mutant strain of S. lividans TK24 were analyzed at discrete time points throughout growth in Pi replete and limited media. PolyP length and content was shown to be directly related to the Pi content of the growth medium. In Pi repletion, ATP and high molecular weight (HMW) polyP contents were higher in the phoP mutant than in the WT strain. This supports the recently proposed repressive effect of PhoP on oxidative phosphorylation. High oxidative phosphorylation activity might also have a direct or indirect positive impact on HMW polyP synthesis. In Pi sufficiency as in Pi limitation, the degradation of these polymers was shown to be clearly delayed in the phoP mutant, indicating PhoP dependent expression of the enzymes involved in this degradation. The efficient storage of Pi as polyphosphate and/or its inefficient degradation in Pi in the phoP mutant resulted in low levels of free Pi and ATP that are likely to be, at least in part, responsible for the very poor growth of this mutant in Pi limitation. Furthermore, short polyP was shown to be present outside the cell, tightly bound to the mycelium via electrostatic interactions involving divalent cations. Less short polyP was found to be associated with the mycelium of the phoP mutant than with that of the WT strain, indicating that generation and externalization of these short polyP molecules was directly or indirectly dependent on PhoP. PMID:25978423

  6. Esophageal melanocytosis in oral opium consumption.

    PubMed

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Asadian, Fatemeh; Taghavi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal melanocytosis is a rare and benign condition, characterized by melanocytic proliferation of the esophageal squamous epithelium with heavy melanin deposition. The etiology and pathogenesis has not been exactly known but it seems to be a chronic stimulus such as gastroesophageal reflux. This condition is very rare and about 35 cases have been reported so far, most of which have been from India and Japan. Herein, we present a case of esophageal melanocytosis in a patient with long history of oral opium consumption. To the best of our knowledge, such a history has not been reported. PMID:24719715

  7. Innovative Oral Treatments of Uterine Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabry, Mohamed; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2012-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyoma), the benign tumors of the uterine wall, are very common cause of morbidity in reproductive age women usually in the form of excessive vaginal bleeding, chronic pelvic pain, miscarriage and infertility. These tumors are the leading indication for hysterectomy in the United States. Uterine fibroids are about 4 times higher in blacks compared to whites and constitute a major health disparity challenge. The estimated cost of uterine fibroids is up to $34.4 billion annually. Additionally, women who suffer from this disease and desire to maintain their future fertility have very limited treatment choices. Currently, there is no effective long-term medicinal treatment for uterine fibroids. While surgery has traditionally been the gold standard for the treatment of uterine fibroids, there is growing interest towards orally administered medications for the management of leiomyoma-related symptoms. In this paper, we will discuss these promising innovative oral medical treatments in detail. PMID:22518167

  8. Posaconazole dose depends on dosage form; limit magnesium sulfate premix to 20 gram bags; vancomycin injection for oral use given intramuscularly; phenylephrine injection needs dilution for intravenous bolus use; similar drug names confused.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2014-10-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:25477608

  9. Toward improving the oral health of Americans: an overview of oral health status, resources, and care delivery. Oral Health Coordinating Committee, Public Health Service.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Dental and oral diseases may well be the most prevalent and preventable conditions affecting Americans. More than 50 percent of U.S. children, 96 percent of employed U.S. adults, and 99.5 percent of Americans 65 years and older have experienced dental caries (also called cavities). Millions of Americans suffer from periodontal diseases and other oral conditions, and more than 17 million Americans, including 10 million Americans 65 years or older, have lost all of their teeth. Preventive dental services are known to be effective in preventing and controlling dental diseases. Unfortunately, groups at highest risk for disease--the poor and minorities--have lower rates of using dental care than the U.S. average. Cost is the principal barrier to dental care for many Americans. Of the $38.7 billion spent for dental services in 1992, public programs, including Medicaid, paid for less than 4 percent of dental expenditures. More than 90 percent of care was paid for either out-of-pocket by dental consumers or through private dental insurance. Americans are at risk for other oral health problems as well. Oropharyngeal cancer strikes approximately 30,000 Americans each year and results in an estimated 8,000 deaths annually. Underlying medical or handicapping conditions, ranging from rare genetic diseases to more common chronic diseases, affect millions of Americans and can lead to oral health problems. Among persons with compromised immune systems, oral diseases and conditions can have a significant impact on health. Oral diseases and conditions, though nearly universal, can be prevented easily and controlled at reasonable cost.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8265750

  10. Oral manifestations in transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  11. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  12. Restriction of transpiration rate under high vapour pressure deficit and non-limiting water conditions is important for terminal drought tolerance in cowpea.

    PubMed

    Belko, N; Zaman-Allah, M; Diop, N N; Cisse, N; Zombre, G; Ehlers, J D; Vadez, V

    2013-03-01

    Drought stress is a major constraint on cowpea productivity, since the crop is grown under warm conditions on sandy soils having low water-holding capacity. For enhanced performance of crops facing terminal drought stress, like cowpea, water-saving strategies are crucial. In this work, the growth and transpiration rate (TR) of 40 cowpea genotypes with contrasting response to terminal drought were measured under well-watered conditions across different vapour pressure deficits (VPD) to investigate whether tolerant and sensitive genotypes differ in their control of leaf water loss. A method is presented to indirectly assess TR through canopy temperature (CT) and the index of canopy conductance (Ig). Overall, plants developed larger leaf area under low than under high VPD, and there was a consistent trend of lower plant biomass in tolerant genotypes. Substantial differences were recorded among genotypes in TR response to VPD, with tolerant genotypes having significantly lower TR than sensitive ones, especially at times with the highest VPD. Genotypes differed in TR response to increasing VPD, with some tolerant genotypes exhibiting a clear VPD breakpoint at about 2.25?kPa, above which there was very little increase in TR. In contrast, sensitive genotypes presented a linear increase in TR as VPD increased, and the same pattern was found in some tolerant lines, but with a smaller slope. CT, estimated with thermal imagery, correlated well with TR and Ig and could therefore be used as proxy for TR. These results indicate that control of water loss discriminated between tolerant and sensitive genotypes and may, therefore, be a reliable indicator of terminal drought stress tolerance. The water-saving characteristics of some genotypes are hypothesised to leave more soil water for pod filling, which is crucial for terminal drought adaptation. PMID:22823007

  13. Oligotyping analysis of the human oral microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Eren, A. Murat; Borisy, Gary G.; Huse, Susan M.; Mark Welch, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project provided a census of bacterial populations in healthy individuals, but an understanding of the biomedical significance of this census has been hindered by limited taxonomic resolution. A high-resolution method termed oligotyping overcomes this limitation by evaluating individual nucleotide positions using Shannon entropy to identify the most information-rich nucleotide positions, which then define oligotypes. We have applied this method to comprehensively analyze the oral microbiome. Using Human Microbiome Project 16S rRNA gene sequence data for the nine sites in the oral cavity, we identified 493 oligotypes from the V1-V3 data and 360 oligotypes from the V3-V5 data. We associated these oligotypes with species-level taxon names by comparison with the Human Oral Microbiome Database. We discovered closely related oligotypes, differing sometimes by as little as a single nucleotide, that showed dramatically different distributions among oral sites and among individuals. We also detected potentially pathogenic taxa in high abundance in individual samples. Numerous oligotypes were preferentially located in plaque, others in keratinized gingiva or buccal mucosa, and some oligotypes were characteristic of habitat groupings such as throat, tonsils, tongue dorsum, hard palate, and saliva. The differing habitat distributions of closely related oligotypes suggest a level of ecological and functional biodiversity not previously recognized. We conclude that the Shannon entropy approach of oligotyping has the capacity to analyze entire microbiomes, discriminate between closely related but distinct taxa and, in combination with habitat analysis, provide deep insight into the microbial communities in health and disease. PMID:24965363

  14. Diseases of the Oral Cavity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zohra Zaidi; Sean W. Lanigan

    \\u000a The oral cavity can provide valuable clues to cutaneous disorders, and should be included in every skin examination. A number\\u000a of skin diseases have oral manifestations, such as pemphigus, erythema multiforme, SLE, lichen planus, psoriasis, viral infections,\\u000a etc. Most of the lesions are in the form of ulcers or white patches.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a The mucous membrane of the oral cavity is covered

  15. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  16. Measurement of Warfarin in the Oral Fluid of Patients Undergoing Anticoagulant Oral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghimenti, Silvia; Lomonaco, Tommaso; Onor, Massimo; Murgia, Laura; Paolicchi, Aldo; Fuoco, Roger; Ruocco, Lucia; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Di Francesco, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients on warfarin therapy undergo invasive and expensive checks for the coagulability of their blood. No information on coagulation levels is currently available between two controls. Methodology A method was developed to determine warfarin in oral fluid by HPLC and fluorimetric detection. The chromatographic separation was performed at room temperature on a C-18 reversed-phase column, 65% PBS and 35% methanol mobile phase, flow rate 0.7 mL/min, injection volume 25 µL, excitation wavelength 310 nm, emission wavelength 400 nm. Findings The method was free from interference and matrix effect, linear in the range 0.2–100 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.2 ng/mL. Its coefficient of variation was <3% for intra-day measurements and <5% for inter-day measurements. The average concentration of warfarin in the oral fluid of 50 patients was 2.5±1.6 ng/mL (range 0.8–7.6 ng/mL). Dosage was not correlated to INR (r?=??0.03, p?=?0.85) but positively correlated to warfarin concentration in the oral fluid (r?=?0.39, p?=?0.006). The correlation between warfarin concentration and pH in the oral fluid (r?=?0.37, p?=?0.009) confirmed the importance of pH in regulating the drug transfer from blood. A correlation between warfarin concentration in the oral fluid and INR was only found in samples with pH values ?7.2 (r?=?0.84, p?=?0.004). Conclusions Warfarin diffuses from blood to oral fluid. The method allows to measure its concentration in this matrix and to analyze correlations with INR and other parameters. PMID:22164240

  17. Apoplastic infusion of sucrose into stem internodes during female flowering does not increase grain yield in maize plants grown under nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yunfeng; Li, Chunjian; Fritschi, Felix B

    2013-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) limitation reduces leaf growth and photosynthetic rates of maize (Zea mays), and constrains photosynthate translocation to developing ears. Additionally, the period from about 1 week before to 2 weeks after silking is critical for establishing the reproductive sink capacity necessary to attain maximum yield. To investigate the influence of carbohydrate availability in plants of differing N status, a greenhouse study was performed in which exogenous sucrose (Suc) was infused around the time of silking into maize stems grown under different N regimes. N deficiency significantly reduced leaf area, leaf longevity, leaf chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate. High N-delayed leaf senescence, particularly of the six uppermost leaves, compared to the other two N treatments. While N application increased ear leaf soluble protein concentration, it did not influence glucose and suc concentrations. Interestingly, ear leaf starch concentration decreased with increasing N application. Infusion of exogenous suc tended to increase non-structural carbohydrate concentrations in the developing ears of all N treatments at silking and 6 days after silking. However, leaf photosynthetic rates were not affected by suc infusion, and suc infusion failed to increase grain yield in any N treatment. The lack of an effect of suc infusion on ear growth and the high ear leaf starch concentration of N-deficient maize, suggest that yield reduction under N deficiency may not be due to insufficient photosynthate availability to the developing ear during silking, and that yield reduction under N deficiency may be determined at an earlier growth stage. PMID:23061679

  18. Improving the oral health of frail and functionally dependent elderly.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A; Wallace, J; Deutsch, A; King, P

    2015-03-01

    The Australian Government endorsed a national evidence based oral health model when it introduced the first Nursing Home Oral and Dental Health Plan in 2010. Called Better Oral Health in Residential Care, it promotes a multidisciplinary approach with doctors, nurses, care workers and dental professionals sharing responsibility for the four key processes of oral health screening, oral health care planning, daily oral hygiene and access to dental treatment. Frail and dependent residents are most conveniently treated on-site, hence an aged care/dental partnership is encouraged to facilitate the use of portable dental equipment in the delivery of dental care. Currently, few dentists provide services to residential aged care facilities (RACFs), with loss of clinical time in practice, difficulty in providing clinical care in a non-dental environment and lack of referral pathways from the RACFs to the dentists contributing to the problem. The need to establish a model of care involving dental hygienists/oral health therapists in RACFs has merit. Minimal intervention treatment using glass ionomer cement (GIC) and silver fluoride is ideal in aged care. However, GIC has limitation in dry mouths with low pH caused by polypharmacy or disease. Palliative and definitive treatment techniques need to be individualized with consideration of a patient's ability to maintain their own mouths as well as their mental and physical competence. The range of products available to address the oral diseases common to the frail elderly is growing. The oral health care provider is required to establish a preventive regime that is tailored to the patient's needs, is realistic and under revision as the patient's needs change. PMID:25762046

  19. Immune Disorders (and Oral Health)

    MedlinePLUS

    Immune Disorders Rheumatoid Arthritis Lupus Erythematosus Scleroderma (Progressive Systemic Sclerosis) Selective Immunoglobulin Deficiencies Thymic Hypoplasia Dermatomyositis X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia Ataxia Telangiectasia Rheumatoid Arthritis Oral Effects ...

  20. Rhinoscleroma of nose extruding into oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Preethi; Rc, Pramod; Kv, Suresh; Desai, Dinkar; Pandit, Siddharth; Ingaleshwar, Pramod S

    2015-04-01

    Rhinoscleroma (RS) is a rare chronic granulomatous disease of the upper airways affecting nasal cavity, nasopharynx, and paranasal sinuses. Klebsiella rhinoscleromatisis the causative agent of this infection and Mikulicz cells are specific to this lesion. RS is commonly seen in poorer regions such as Central Africa, South America, Middle East, India and Indonesia. It is predominantly found in rural areas and people with poor socio-economic conditions. Most patients present with chronic rhinitis, sneezing, headache and deviated nasal septum similar to current case. An association with oral cavity has not been reported previously, as per authors' knowledge. This report describes a rare case of RS of nasal cavity extending into the oral cavity. PMID:25933455

  1. Allison Oral History

    E-print Network

    Albin, Tami; Allison

    2014-03-13

    date of publication Citing Under the Rainbow Oral History Interviews Your citation should include information that will allow people to find this transcript. Please consult a citation guide (Chicago, MLA, ALA) for the correct citation style for audio/video interviews...—I lost it on the meth. And in 2001 I was raped by three men and the doctor gave me all kinds of pills. I mean, I think he felt sorry for me and he just—(laugh) he gave me Percocet, Lortab. There was a lot of physical damage from the rape...

  2. Training in oral medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewska, J M

    2001-01-01

    88 members of the UK specialty society of oral medicine were asked about career satisfaction and their views on training programmes. 70% responded (79% of consultants and all accredited trainees). Men work longer hours than women, report less control over their work and experience more stress. Although high work satisfaction is reported, nearly one-third regret their choice of specialty. Men more than women do locum work while training. Most respondents would welcome flexible training, job shares, financial support during training and a mentoring scheme. PMID:11234205

  3. Michael Johnson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Michael; Albin, Tami

    2009-12-16

    ) for the correct citation style for audio/video interviews or transcripts. Please be sure to include: Narrator’s name e.g. Bill Smith Interviewer’s Name e.g. Tami Albin Date of interview e.g. March 26, 2009 Name of project and location e.g. Under... support groups or whatever like that and then it just turned into, Well there's Michael Johnson January 4, 2009 5 Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas porn online too. (laugh) So it's like—it's like you just kind...

  4. Limited list: limited effects?

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J; Bond, C M

    1985-08-24

    During the first month after the limited National Health Service drug list came into effect 17 cooperative general practitioners recorded the actions taken when a now prohibited drug would formerly have been prescribed. An average of 6% of direct surgery contacts with patients and 8% of indirect contacts with patients were affected by the new regulations, but in 2% and 4% of cases respectively the patient received the same pharmacological substance under a different (generic or approved) name. Where a real change in pharmacological constitution or formulation had been required four fifths of these substitutes were considered by the doctors to result in less effective treatment. In 1% of contacts no drug was issued or recommended where one would formerly have been given. PMID:3928035

  5. Oral malignant melanoma: A case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Manigandan, T; Sagar, G Vikram; Amudhan, A; Hemalatha, V T; Babu, N Aravinda

    2014-07-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma is a rare malignancy with the tendency to metastasize and locally invade tissues more readily than other malignant tumor of the oral cavity. It occurs approximately four times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw usually on the palate or alveolar gingiva. The chameleonic presentation of malignant melanoma, its asymptomatic condition, rarity of the lesion, poor prognosis and the necessity of a highly specialized treatment are factors that should be seriously considered by the involved health care provider. Herein we report a rare and interesting case of oral malignant melanoma of the maxillary anterior gingiva, which was clinically and histopathologically diagnosed with a brief review of literature, has been discussed. PMID:25191086

  6. NADH plays the vital role for chiral pure D-(-)-2,3-butanediol production in Bacillus subtilis under limited oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Wang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao; Liu, Weixi; Shi, Ting; Wang, Guanglu; Tang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Xueming

    2014-10-01

    Compared with traditional pathogenic producers, Bacillus subtilis as a Class I microorganism offers many advantages for industrial-scale 2,3-butanediol production. Unlike previous reports in which two stereoisomers (with a ratio of 3:2) were produced, we first found that wild type B. subtilis 168 generates only D-(-)-2,3-butanediol (purity >99%) under low oxygen conditions. The total high yield of 2,3-butanediol and acetoin, and acetoin reductase enzyme assay indicate that it is the high level of NADH availability, instead of high acetoin reductase activity, contributes more to 2,3-butanediol production in B. subtilis. The strategy for increasing the pool of NADH availability, the key factor for 2,3-butanediol production, was designed through low dissolved oxygen control, adding reducing substrates and rationally metabolic engineering. A transhydrogenase encoded by udhA was introduced to provide more NADH from NADPH and allowed enhanced 2,3-butanediol production. Finally, BSF20 produced 49.29?g/L D(-)-2,3-butanediol. These results demonstrated that B. subtilis is a competitive producer for chiral 2,3-butanediol production. PMID:24788512

  7. The capability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to recruit zinc under conditions of limited metal availability is affected by inactivation of the ZnuABC transporter.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Melania; Mastropasqua, Maria Chiara; Cerasi, Mauro; Pacello, Francesca; Consalvo, Ada; Chirullo, Barbara; Mortensen, Brittany; Skaar, Eric P; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Pasquali, Paolo; Battistoni, Andrea

    2015-06-10

    The ability of a large number of bacterial pathogens to multiply in the infected host and cause disease is dependent on their ability to express high affinity zinc importers. In many bacteria, ZnuABC, a transporter of the ABC family, plays a central role in the process of zinc uptake in zinc poor environments, including the tissues of the infected host. To initiate an investigation into the relevance of the zinc uptake apparatus for Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity, we have generated a znuA mutant in the PA14 strain. We have found that this mutant strain displays a limited growth defect in zinc depleted media. The znuA mutant strain is more sensitive than the wild type strain to calprotectin-mediated growth inhibition, but both the strains are highly resistant to this zinc sequestering antimicrobial protein. Moreover, intracellular zinc content is not evidently affected by inactivation of the ZnuABC transporter. These findings suggest that P. aeruginosa is equipped with redundant mechanisms for the acquisition of zinc that might favor P. aeruginosa colonization of environments containing low levels of this metal. Nonetheless, deletion of znuA affects alginate production, reduces the activity of extracellular zinc-containing proteases, including LasA, LasB and protease IV, and decreases the ability of P. aeruginosa to disseminate during systemic infections. These results indicate that efficient zinc acquisition is critical for the expression of various virulence features typical of P. aeruginosa and that ZnuABC also plays an important role in zinc homeostasis in this microorganism. PMID:25751674

  8. Oral Conversations Online: Redefining Oral Competence in Synchronous Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamy, Marie-Noelle

    2004-01-01

    In this article the focus is on methodology for analysing learner-learner oral conversations mediated by computers. With the increasing availability of synchronous voice-based groupware and the additional facilities offered by audio-graphic tools, language learners have opportunities for collaborating on oral tasks, supported by visual and textual…

  9. Oral Microbiome Profiles: 16S rRNA Pyrosequencing and Microarray Assay Comparison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiyoung Ahn; Liying Yang; Bruce J. Paster; Ian Ganly; Luc Morris; Zhiheng Pei; Richard B. Hayes

    2011-01-01

    ObjectivesThe human oral microbiome is potentially related to diverse health conditions and high-throughput technology provides the possibility of surveying microbial community structure at high resolution. We compared two oral microbiome survey methods: broad-based microbiome identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and targeted characterization of microbes by custom DNA microarray.MethodsOral wash samples were collected from 20 individuals at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer

  10. Reported Rates of Diarrhea Following Oral Penicillin Therapy in Pediatric Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Jemima; Ismael, Zareen; Long, Paul F.; Barker, Charlotte I.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) is a well-recognized adverse reaction to oral penicillins. This review analyzed the literature to determine the incidence of AAD following amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, and penicillin V oral therapy in pediatric clinical trials. METHODS: An advanced search was conducted in MEDLINE and Embase databases for articles in any language reporting the incidence of AAD following oral penicillin therapy for any indicated infection in children (0–17 years). The search was limited to clinical trials. Articles were excluded if treatment was related to chronic conditions, involved concomitant antimicrobials, or if the dose or number of patients was not specified. RESULTS: Four hundred thirty-five articles relating to clinical trials were identified (307 from Embase; 128 from MEDLINE). Thirty-five articles reporting on 42 studies were included for analysis. The indications included acute otitis media, sinusitis, pharyngitis, and pneumonia. Thirty-three trials reported on amoxicillin/clavulanate, 6 on amoxicillin, and 3 on penicillin V. In total, the 42 trials included 7729 children who were treated with an oral penicillin. On average, 17.2% had AAD. Data were pooled for each penicillin. The AAD incidence was 19.8% for amoxicillin/clavulanate, 8.1% for amoxicillin, and 1.2% for penicillin V. The amoxicillin/clavulanate data were analyzed according to formulation: pooled-average. The incidence of ADD was 24.6% for the 4:1 formulation, 12.8% for the 7:1 formulation, 19.0% for the 8:1 formulation, and 20.2% for the 14:1 formulation. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate substantially increased incidence of AAD following use of amoxicillin/clavulanate, compared to use of amoxicillin and penicillin V, as well as varying AAD rates with diffierent amoxicillin/clavulanate formulations. These findings warrant consideration when prescribing. The underlying mechanisms of AAD in children remain unclear. PMID:25964726

  11. The Bifidobacterium dentium Bd1 Genome Sequence Reflects Its Genetic Adaptation to the Human Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Marco; Turroni, Francesca; Zomer, Aldert; Foroni, Elena; Giubellini, Vanessa; Bottacini, Francesca; Canchaya, Carlos; Claesson, Marcus J.; He, Fei; Mantzourani, Maria; Mulas, Laura; Ferrarini, Alberto; Gao, Beile; Delledonne, Massimo; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Oggioni, Marco; Gupta, Radhey S.; Zhang, Ziding; Beighton, David; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; O'Toole, Paul W.; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2009-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, one of the relatively dominant components of the human intestinal microbiota, are considered one of the key groups of beneficial intestinal bacteria (probiotic bacteria). However, in addition to health-promoting taxa, the genus Bifidobacterium also includes Bifidobacterium dentium, an opportunistic cariogenic pathogen. The genetic basis for the ability of B. dentium to survive in the oral cavity and contribute to caries development is not understood. The genome of B. dentium Bd1, a strain isolated from dental caries, was sequenced to completion to uncover a single circular 2,636,368 base pair chromosome with 2,143 predicted open reading frames. Annotation of the genome sequence revealed multiple ways in which B. dentium has adapted to the oral environment through specialized nutrient acquisition, defences against antimicrobials, and gene products that increase fitness and competitiveness within the oral niche. B. dentium Bd1 was shown to metabolize a wide variety of carbohydrates, consistent with genome-based predictions, while colonization and persistence factors implicated in tissue adhesion, acid tolerance, and the metabolism of human saliva-derived compounds were also identified. Global transcriptome analysis demonstrated that many of the genes encoding these predicted traits are highly expressed under relevant physiological conditions. This is the first report to identify, through various genomic approaches, specific genetic adaptations of a Bifidobacterium taxon, Bifidobacterium dentium Bd1, to a lifestyle as a cariogenic microorganism in the oral cavity. In silico analysis and comparative genomic hybridization experiments clearly reveal a high level of genome conservation among various B. dentium strains. The data indicate that the genome of this opportunistic cariogen has evolved through a very limited number of horizontal gene acquisition events, highlighting the narrow boundaries that separate commensals from opportunistic pathogens. PMID:20041198

  12. GlnR Negatively Regulates the Transcription of the Alanine Dehydrogenase Encoding Gene ald in Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32 under Nitrogen Limited Conditions via Specific Binding to Its Major Transcription Initiation Site

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Ding, Xiao-Ming; Yao, Yu-Feng; Hu, Jun; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium assimilation is catalyzed by two enzymatic pathways, i.e., glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) and alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) in Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, the AlaDH pathway is the major route for ammonium assimilation, while the GS/GOGAT pathway takes over when the extracellular nitrogen supply is limited. The global nitrogen regulator GlnR was previously characterized to activate the transcription of the GS encoding gene glnA in response to nitrogen limitation and is demonstrated in this study as a repressor for the transcription of the AlaDH encoding gene ald, whose regulation is consistent with the switch of the ammonium assimilation pathways from AlaDH to GS/GOGAT responding to nitrogen limitation. Three transcription initiation sites (TISs) of ald were determined with primer extension assay, among which transcription from aldP2 contributed the major transcripts under nitrogen-rich conditions but was repressed to an undetectable level in response to nitrogen limitation. Through DNase I footprinting assay, two separate regions were found to be protected by GlnR within ald promoter, within which three GlnR binding sites (a1, b1 sites in region I and a2 site in region II) were defined. Interestingly, the major TIS aldP2 is located in the middle of a2 site within region II. Therefore, one may easily conclude that GlnR represses the transcription of ald via specific binding to the GlnR binding sites, which obviously blocks the transcription initiation from aldP2 and therefore reduces ald transcripts. PMID:25144373

  13. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... changing. Reviewed: January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Women's Oral Health Burning Mouth Syndrome in Middle-aged Women Dentists ... May Decrease Chances of Oral Cancer Important Oral Health Considerations for Women at All Life Stages Is Kissing Dangerous to ...

  14. 37 CFR 41.73 - Oral hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Appeals § 41.73 Oral hearing. (a) An oral hearing should be...desirable for a proper presentation of the appeal. An...the briefs without an oral hearing will receive...Upon a showing of good cause,...

  15. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... desktop! more... Why is Oral Health Important for Men? Article Chapters Why is Oral Health Important for ... then the other. Updated: February 2007 Related Articles: Men's Oral Health Is Kissing Dangerous to Your Health? ...

  16. 43 CFR 4.1608 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Oral presentations. 4.1608 Section 4.1608...Circular A-76 § 4.1608 Oral presentations. (a) Upon request of the...appellant, an opportunity for an oral presentation to the appeals official...

  17. 12 CFR 1102.36 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Oral presentations. 1102.36 Section 1102...Proceedings § 1102.36 Oral presentations. (a) In general. A party does not have a right to an oral presentation. Under this section, a...

  18. 48 CFR 570.107 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral presentations. 570.107 Section 570.107 Federal...REAL PROPERTY General 570.107 Oral presentations. You may use oral presentations for acquisitions of leasehold interests...

  19. Occurrence and risk factors of oral candidiasis treated with oral antifungals in seniors using inhaled steroids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy A. Kennedy; Claudine Laurier; Denyse Gautrin; Heberto Ghezzo; Michèle Paré; Jean-Luc Malo; André-Pierre Contandriopoulos

    2000-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a frequent side effect of inhaled corticosteroids (iCSTs). This study estimated occurrence and significance of risk factors of OC treated with antifungals in users of iCSTs under conditions of normal use. This retrospective analysis used data drawn from drug insurance plan records in Quebec, Canada. The sample contained 27,000 seniors using anti-asthma medications during 1990. Three

  20. Oral lichen planus: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Mollaoglu

    2000-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a disease that can persist in some patients for a long time. The buccal mucosa, tongue and gingiva are the most common sites, whereas palatal lesions are uncommon. Oral lichen planus affects women more often than men in a ratio of 2:3. It can present in a number of forms: reticular, papular, plaque-like, erosive, atrophic and

  1. Oral care post stroke: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Kwok, C; McIntyre, A; Janzen, S; Mays, R; Teasell, R

    2015-01-01

    Health concerns post stroke may be the result of, or exacerbated by, neglected oral health care (OHC). However, OHC may be challenging post stroke due to hemiparesis, hemiplegia, a lack of coordination, and/or cognitive deficits. The objective of this study was to conduct a scoping review and summarise the current state of knowledge pertaining to OHC post stroke. A literature search was conducted using the multiple databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, etc.). Combinations of multiple keywords were searched: oral, dental, health, care, hygiene, teeth, dentures, tooth brushing, stroke, cardiovascular health and cardiovascular disease. A grey literature search was also conducted. Articles included were those published in English between 1970 and July 2013, which focused on at least one aspect of OHC among a stroke population. For clinical trials, ?50% of the sample must have sustained a stroke. In total, 60 articles met inclusion and focused on three primary area: (i) OHC Importance/Stroke Implications; (ii) Current Research; and (iii) Current Practice. It was found that OHC concerns are mainly related to mastication, dysphagia/nutrition, hygiene, prostheses and quality of life. Research indicates that there is limited specialised and individual care provided, and there are few assessment tools, guidelines and established protocols for oral health that are specific to the stroke population. Further, dental professionals' and nurses' knowledge of OHC is generally inadequate; hence, proper education for health professionals in acute and rehabilitation settings, patients, and caregivers has been discussed. PMID:25244419

  2. Touch imprint cytology: a rapid diagnostic tool for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geetha, L; Astekar, M; Ashok, K N; Sowmya, G V

    2015-07-01

    Techniques for intraoperative pathologic examination of oral squamous cell carcinoma are rare in the literature. We evaluated the advantages and limitations of touch imprint cytology for intraoperative diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. We used 30 incisional biopsies of clinically diagnosed oral squamous cell carcinoma and compared touch imprint cytology to histopathological sections. Touch imprint cytology showed 24 specimens positive for malignancy, two suspicious for malignancy and four inadequate specimens. The accuracy of the test was 93.2%. Touch imprint cytology is an accurate, simple, rapid and cost-effective method that aids diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma during operation, but it does not replace incisional biopsy. PMID:25801179

  3. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    PubMed Central

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka³a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20–30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having professional hygiene procedures performed and caries lesions filled. Baseline examination and the examination two years afterwards, evaluated clinical and laboratory parameters of oral cavity environment. Caries incidence was determined based on DMFT and DMFS values, oral cavity hygiene on Plaque Index (acc. Silness & Loe) and Hygiene Index (acc. O’Leary), and the gingival status on Gingival Index (acc. Loe & Silness) and Gingival Bleeding Index (acc. Ainamo & Bay). Saliva osmolarity, pH and concentrations of Ca2+, Pi, Na+, Cl?, total protein, albumins, F? and Sr2+ were determined. Results The results confirmed ongoing changeability of the oral cavity environment. After 2 years of the study reduction in oral cavity hygiene parameters PLI and HI (P<0.1), and gingival indices as well as lower saliva concentration of Ca2+ (P<.001), Pi (P<.06), K+ (P<.04), Sr2+ (P<.03), Na+ (P<.1), against the baseline values, were observed. Total protein and albumin saliva concentrations were also significantly lower. Conclusion Physiological oral cavity environment is subject to constant, individually different, changes which should be considered when analysing studies that employ oral cavity environment parameters. PMID:19212491

  4. Oral hyaline ring granuloma.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Gallesio, Cesare; Campisi, Paola; Roccia, Fabio; Berrone, Sid

    2013-01-01

    Hyaline ring granuloma is a rare oral lesion with an unclear and controversial etiology, characterized by the presence of rings of palely eosinophilic structureless material (the so-called hyaline rings) with multinucleated giant cells around and within the very same rings.Various theories have been proposed about the pathogenesis of hyaline ring granulomas. Many authors consider a vegetable origin, suggesting that it may represent a reaction to foreign material such as food (and in particular pulses). Instead, other authors deny this possibility, proposing that the hyaline rings might represent degenerated blood vessels, degenerated collagen, or fibrosed extravasated serum proteins.The aim of this article is to present a case of hyaline ring granuloma and to briefly review the literature. PMID:23348341

  5. Oral and sublingual immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases have continued to increase throughout the developed world. Subcutaneous immunotherapy has been a mainstay of treatment for allergic rhinitis and asthma, however, some patients are precluded from treatment. On the other hand, in the case of food allergy, treatments simply do not exist. Oral and sublingual immunotherapy, with its superior safety and ease of administration, offers an alternative for patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma and has also been promising as a potential treatment for food allergy. The review summarizes significant advances from the past year including further data on the effectiveness of existing treatments, preliminary data on novel treatments, and further understanding of the mechanisms of these new therapies. PMID:25133094

  6. Oral melanoacanthoma: A rare case of diffuse oral pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anish Ashok; Nainani, Purshotam; Upadhyay, Bipin; Kavle, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    The clinical presentation of diffuse pigmentation can be alarming to the patient as well as the clinician. A histopathologic examination of a pigmented lesion is necessary in most of the cases in the oral cavity. Oral melanoacanthoma is a very rare diffuse pigmentation with no specific treatment required. It shows increased number of dendritic melanocytes in an acanthotic epithelium. We present a rare case of diffuse pigmentation in the oral cavity whose diagnosis was done on the basis of clinical presentation and histopathology. Also immunohistochemistry was done. PMID:23248484

  7. Passage Equivalency and Predictive Validity of Oral Reading Fluency Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Checca, Christopher Jason

    2012-01-01

    The use of oral reading fluency (ORF) passages within a Response to Intervention (RTI) framework is examined. Significant limitations within the current ORF research are discussed. The passage equivalency and readability scores for DIBELS Next, AIMSweb, and a school district's curriculum's ORF passages are evaluated using…

  8. Oral analgesia in the treatment of post-cesarean pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Jakobi; Zeev Weiner; Ido Solt; Ilana Alpert; Joseph Itskovitz-Eldor; Etan Z. Zimmer

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Cesarean section is one of the most common operations. The new technologies of postoperative pain treatment such as patient-controlled analgesia, are expensive and may limit women caring for their newborns shortly after delivery. The present study assessed patient satisfaction with oral analgesia following cesarean section. Study design: An open prospective study was conducted on all women who had a

  9. Multiple long-standing massive oral mandibular granuloma gravidarum (pregnancy tumour)

    PubMed Central

    Rihani, Farouk Bassam; Ersheidat, Ala’ Ahmad; Alsmadi, Hasan Faiz; Al-Nahar, Lina A

    2013-01-01

    Oral granuloma gravidarum (OGG) is a distinct clinical entity used to describe pyogenic granuloma developing mainly on the gingiva of pregnant women, possibly propagated by gingival high levels of active progesterone and poor oral hygiene. We report herein a 41-year-old woman presented 7?months after childbirth with two painless masses of OGG in mandibular gingiva that developed at the end of first trimester and increased gradually in size even after delivery. Surgical excisional biopsy was performed under general anaesthesia with extraction of periodontally involved mandibular anterior teeth. Proper oral hygiene in pregnant women is mandatory to prevent such oral condition. PMID:23813519

  10. Urogynecologic conditions: pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nabila; Garely, Alan D

    2015-03-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a commonly encountered condition that often is multifactorial. Etiologies include gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, and neurologic conditions. Laboratory tests, imaging, and surgical intervention are not always helpful in identifying the etiology of pelvic pain. For appropriate management of this complex disease process, a detailed history and physical examination, and a multidisciplinary approach are needed. Pelvic pain may be caused by endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, adenomyosis, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, or other factors. Evaluation may include keeping a pain diary; laboratory tests, such as a pregnancy test, urinalysis, or tests for sexually transmitted infections; ultrasonography of abnormalities detected on physical examination; and laparoscopy. Specific first-line treatments include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and oral contraceptives for endometriosis; progestins, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs, aromatase inhibitors, or hysterectomy for adenomyosis; and education, food avoidance, and behavioral modifications for interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Surgical options include nerve transection procedures, laparoscopic uterosacral nerve ablation, and presacral neurectomy, although data on effectiveness are limited. PMID:25756374

  11. Clinical management of oral and perioral candidosis.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Lilly, J P

    1996-04-01

    Oral candidosis is a diagnosable and treatable mucosal disease that may be complicated by various other local or systemic disease conditions. Dependable diagnosis always should include a combination of clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of candidal disease as well as positive cytologic or direct culture results. The management of candidal infections should be individualized for each patient, with concern for interactions with current medications, immune status, other concurrent mucosal diseases, and exogenous infectious sources. In selecting the appropriate therapeutic agent(s) the clinician should consider patient health factors, location and severity of infection, and the probability of chronicity. PMID:8725583

  12. The characteristics of spontaneously forming physically cross-linked hydrogels composed of two water-soluble phospholipid polymers for oral drug delivery carrier I: hydrogel dissolution and insulin release under neutral pH condition.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kwangwoo; Watanabe, Junji; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2004-11-01

    Hydrogels bearing a phospholipid polar group, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), were prepared from two aqueous solutions of polymers, water-soluble poly[MPC-co-methacrylic acid (MA)] (PMA) and poly[MPC-co-n-butyl methacrylate (BMA)] (PMB). The hydrogel, which was formed by physical cross-linking spontaneously without any chemical reactions and/or any physical stimuli, showed a controllable insulin release through a pH change in the medium by changing the hydrogen bonds. In this study, the mechanical strength, erosion of the hydrogel caused by polymer dissociation, and the release of insulin were examined with attention to the following three parameters of the MPC polymer: molecular weight of the polymers, composition of PMA and PMB (PMA/PMB ratio), and polymer concentration inside the hydrogel. The hydrogel with the highest mechanical strength was obtained at a PMA/PMB ratio = 3/7 (v/v, by volume ratio) while the hydrogel with the slowest dissolution was obtained at a ratio of 5/5 (v/v). The release was in good match with the dissolution and followed anomalous transport for all, but the diffusion exponent n changed according to the PMA/PMB ratio. An increase in the polymer concentration inside the hydrogel caused an increase in the mechanical strength of the hydrogel. When the polymer concentration was more than 20 wt.%, the absorption of water under neutral pH condition (pH 6.8) was observed. The release of insulin was suppressed below 10% during the swelling process of the hydrogel under neutral pH condition, while release was accelerated during the erosion process of the hydrogel. The relationship between erosion of the hydrogel and the release of the insulin depended on the erosion process of the hydrogel but differed according to the PMA/PMB ratio. PMID:15489127

  13. Elite athletes and oral health.

    PubMed

    Bryant, S; McLaughlin, K; Morgaine, K; Drummond, B

    2011-09-01

    Elite athletes follow demanding training regimes to achieve optimal performance. Training incorporates strategies which coincide with risk factors for dental caries and erosion. The important role of a disease-free oral cavity for peak performance is often overlooked and oral health may be compromised. This initial exploratory study aimed to identify risk factors for dental caries and erosion in elite triathletes. Questionnaires regarding training, diet and oral health were distributed to a sample of elite triathletes in New Zealand. A further sample of 10 athletes was randomly selected from the Dunedin triathlon club to participate in a clinical oral examination. Sports drinks were consumed by 83.9% of the triathletes while training; for 48.4% consumption of both sports drinks and water was described as 'little sips often, from a bottle'. Eating during training sessions was reported by 93.5% of participants; of those 62.1% ate only during cycling training. Only 3.2% perceived training as high risk to oral health. All clinical examination cases were assessed as high risk for developing caries. The diet of elite triathletes is consistent with a high risk profile for caries and erosion. Future research should be aimed at oral health promotion programs for the athletes, coaches and oral-health providers. PMID:21590645

  14. Illness-related behaviour and utilization of oral health services among adult city-dwellers in Burkina Faso: evidence from a household survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benoît Varenne; Poul Erik Petersen; Florence Fournet; Philippe Msellati; Jean Gary; Seydou Ouattara; Maud Harang; Gérard Salem

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In sub-Saharan Africa, the availability and accessibility of oral health services are seriously constrained and the provision of essential oral care is limited. Reports from the region show a very low utilization of oral health care services, and visits to dental-care facilities are mostly undertaken for symptomatic reasons. The objectives of the present study were to describe the prevalence

  15. Transepithelial transport of nanoparticles targeted to the neonatal Fc receptor for oral delivery applications

    E-print Network

    Pridgen, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are poised to have a tremendous impact on the treatment of many diseases, but their broad application is limited because currently they can only be administered by parenteral methods. Oral administration ...

  16. Retiring some myths about aging and oral health.

    PubMed

    Martin, R E

    1994-09-01

    Research on the oral health status of elderly populations has been limited in frequency and scope. There is a lack of good descriptive and longitudinal data on salivary gland function, oral mucosal status, and oral sensory performance in health and disease across the adult life span. Thus, confusion for practitioners and patients alike arises from unsubstantiated stereotypes about aging and oral health. There are some commonalities in the origins of the myths discussed in this article. First, many aging generalizations were based on studies that did not account for the health and medication status of the subjects. Second, most aging studies are cross-sectional designs which can result in misleading conclusions due to the age cohort effect. Third, many studies on the histology of aging oral tissues were laboratory animal studies, with results that cannot be generalized to human populations. Fourth, findings on oral health changes are often confounded or influenced by differences in functional status (e.g., the ability to care for oneself), nutritional health, health beliefs and expectations within the study subjects. Fifth, other changes due to aging may have an indirect effect on oral health, for example, an age-related decline in immune function. Sixth, the "older-old" group of elderly commonly labor under misconceptions of normal aging changes. Historically they have not sought dental care as often as the younger elders. This health care seeking behavior is expected to change dramatically when the baby boom generation joins the elderly ranks. The goals of oral health care for the elderly are consistent with those of other health care providers involved in geriatric care, namely maximizing functional performance, fostering independence, and enhancing their quality of life. Dental professionals would be well advised to apply a healthy dose of skepticism to any generalizations about debilitating changes in oral health due to aging alone. Most changes in oral health experienced by the elderly are not the result of age itself, but are the consequences of systemic disease, pharmacotherapy, functional disabilities, and cognitive impairment. When unexplained deleterious changes are seen in the oral health of elderly patients, the knowledgeable and reflective practitioner will account for local, systemic, and environmental factors in formulating a plan of care. In the opening paragraph, questions were posed about the mucosal integrity of a "little old lady." The most beneficial approach for her and all our older patients is to plan treatment utilizing current knowledge about aging and avoiding the traps created by myths and stereotypes. It is time to retire these myths before the baby boomers join the ranks of the retired. PMID:9584720

  17. Oral disease profiles in chronic graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Bassim, C W; Fassil, H; Mays, J W; Edwards, D; Baird, K; Steinberg, S M; Cowen, E W; Naik, H; Datiles, M; Stratton, P; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2015-04-01

    At least half of patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD), the leading cause of morbidity and non-relapse mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, have oral manifestations: mucosal lesions, salivary dysfunction, and limited mouth-opening. cGVHD may manifest in a single organ or affect multiple organ systems, including the mouth, eyes, and the skin. The interrelationship of the 3 oral manifestations of cGVHD with each other and with the specific manifestations of extraoral cGVHD has not been studied. In this analysis, we explored, in a large group of patients with cGVHD, the potential associations between: (1) oral mucosal disease and erythematous skin disease, (2) salivary gland dysfunction and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and (3) limited mouth-opening and sclerotic skin cGVHD. Study participants, enrolled in a cGVHD Natural History Protocol (NCT00331968, n = 212), underwent an oral examination evaluating: (1) mucosal cGVHD [NIH Oral Mucosal Score (OMS)], (2) salivary dysfunction (saliva flow and xerostomia), and (3) maximum mouth-opening measurement. Parameters for dysfunction (OMS > 2, saliva flow ? 1 mL/5 min, mouth-opening ? 35 mm) were analyzed for association with skin cGVHD involvement (erythema and sclerosis, skin symptoms), lacrimal dysfunction (Schirmer's tear test, xerophthalmia), Lee cGVHD Symptom Scores, and NIH organ scores. Oral mucosal disease (31% prevalence) was associated with skin erythema (P < 0.001); salivary dysfunction (11% prevalence) was associated with lacrimal dysfunction (P = 0.010) and xerostomia with xerophthalmia (r = 0.32, P = 0.001); and limited mouth-opening (17% prevalence) was associated with skin sclerosis (P = 0.008) and skin symptoms (P = 0.001). There was no association found among these 3 oral cGVHD manifestations. This analysis supports the understanding of oral cGVHD as 3 distinct diseases: mucosal lesions, salivary gland dysfunction, and mouth sclerosis. Clear classification of oral cGVHD as 3 separate manifestations will improve clinical diagnosis, observational research data collection, and the definitions of outcome measures in clinical trials. PMID:25740857

  18. Oral focal mucinosis: case report

    PubMed Central

    GERMANO, F.; ABATE, R.; SANTINI, F.; DRI, M.; ARCURI, C.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral focal mucinosis (OFM) is an uncommon disease of unknown aetiology. It is considered to be the oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis and cutaneous myxoid cyst and it is characterized by a focal myxoid degeneration of the connective tissue. A preoperative diagnosis is almost impossible, and the clinical suspicion, usually made by exclusion, must be confirmed by a bioptic examination followed by histological observations. The Authors report a case of focal oral mucinosis diagnosed and treated in a male adult patient. PMID:23285343

  19. Oral cysticercosis: a clinical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a potentially fatal parasitic disease caused by cysticercus cellulosae, the larval stage of Taenia solium. Oral cysticercosis is a rare entity and represents difficulty in clinical diagnosis. This article reports two cases of oral cysticercosis involving buccal and labial mucosa. Both the cases presented with solitary, nodular swelling that had been clinically diagnosed as a mucocele. Histopathology of excisional biopsy revealed it to be cysticercosis. Single, cystic nodular swelling of oral cavity may be the only evidence of cysticercosis and may present first to dentist. These cases emphasise the role of dentist and thorough histopathological examination in the early diagnosis of disease that can prevent potential systemic complication. PMID:23580668

  20. Elements in oral health programs.

    PubMed

    Lam, Anty

    2014-03-01

    Demographically, dental caries remains the single most common disease of childhood. Various campaigns have been carried out to promote and to improve the oral health of children. However, the prevalence of dental caries was still more than 50% in many communities. This article reviews different approaches used in dental health programs in industrialized and developing countries. To build a comprehensive oral health preventive program, three elements are essential. They are oral health education/instruction, primary prevention measures and secondary prevention measures. PMID:24851389

  1. Autologous Transplantation of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Sheets Cultured on an Amniotic Membrane Substrate for Intraoral Mucosal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-01-01

    The human amniotic membrane (AM) is a thin intrauterine placental membrane that is highly biocompatible and possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring properties. Using AM, we developed a novel method for cultivating oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets. We investigated the autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells cultured on AM in patients undergoing oral surgeries. We obtained specimens of AM from women undergoing cesarean sections. This study included five patients without any history of a medical disorder who underwent autologous cultured oral epithelial transplantation following oral surgical procedures. Using oral mucosal biopsy specimens obtained from these patients, we cultured oral epithelial cells on an AM carrier. We transplanted the resultant cell sheets onto the oral mucosal defects. Patients were followed-up for at least 12 months after transplantation. After 2–3 weeks of being cultured on AM, epithelial cells were well differentiated and had stratified into five to seven layers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cultured cells expressed highly specific mucosal epithelial cell markers and basement membrane proteins. After the surgical procedures, no infection, bleeding, rejection, or sheet detachment occurred at the reconstructed sites, at which new oral mucous membranes were evident. No recurrence was observed in the long-term follow-up, and the postoperative course was excellent. Our results suggest that AM-cultured oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets represent a useful biomaterial and feasible method for oral mucosal reconstruction. However, our primary clinical study only evaluated their effects on a limited number of small oral mucosal defects. PMID:25915046

  2. Update On Oral Lichen Planus: Etiopathogenesis and Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Scully; M. Beyli; M. C. Ferreiro; G. Ficarra; Y. Gill; M. Griffiths; P. Holmstrup; S. Mutlu; S. Porter; D. Wray

    1998-01-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a relatively common disorder of the stratified squamous epithelia, which is, in many ways, an enigma. This paper is the consensus outcome of a workshop held in Switzerland in 1995, involving a selection of clinicians and scientists with an interest in the condition and its management. The oral (OLP) eruptions usually have a distinct clinical morphology

  3. Transition from Tube to Oral Feeding in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKirdy, Laura S.; Sheppard, Justine J.; Osborne, Mary L.; Payne, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: A school-based treatment program for tube-fed children with medically complex conditions and food refusal was implemented to facilitate the children's transition to oral feeding and advance their eating skills. Method: The program combined educational and therapeutic goals. It was implemented in a regional public school for children with…

  4. Role of oral exfoliative cytology in predicting premalignant potential of oral submucous fibrosis: A short study.

    PubMed

    Jaitley, Shweta; Agarwal, Pankaj; Upadhyay, Ramballabh

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken with an aim of determining the cytological features observed in mucosal smears of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) patients and comparing them with that of features of normal mucosal cells. The observed features were than analyzed for their reliability in detecting malignant changes in this premalignant condition. Objective of the study was to conduct an oral exfoliative cytology (OEC) study on 30 clinically diagnosed cases of OSF and 30 cases of clinically normal mucosa with no other systemic disease. We observed that all the smears from clinically normal buccal mucosa showed Class I cytology. The exfoliated cells were of normal size and shape with normal staining intensity and normal nuclear characteristics. All the 30 cases of our study group showed features suggestive of benign atypical cytological changes (Class II cytology). In the present study, despite the small number of cases, cytological features consistently observed in all the cases, were indicative of a premalignant change and emphasized a regular follow-up of patients. Early detection of a premalignant oral lesion promises to improve the survival rate of patients suffering from these conditions. PMID:26148621

  5. [Benign increase in intracranial pressure during oral contraception (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Janzik, H H

    1973-10-01

    The case of a 27-year-old woman treated with oral contraceptives (most recently with Anovlar) who developed intracranial hypertension is reported. The woman presented with visual disturbances, fatigue, and headaches. Oculo-circulatory and cerebral neoplastic diseases were not present, but high intracranial pressure was noted; no etiological clarification could be found. Discontinuation of contraceptive medication was followed by near-normalization of vision and disappearance of other symptoms. During a 3-year follow-up period no neurological disorders apart from mild limitation of the visual field could be observed. A connection between the elevated intracranial pressure and oral contraception seems probable. PMID:4744374

  6. Smart Talk: Improving Children's Oral Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Janie F.; Perkins, J. Helen

    2003-01-01

    Encourages caregivers to engage children in oral language activities that will help children develop skills necessary for reading and writing. Examines: (1) oral language as a predecessor to reading; (2) talking leading to learning; and (3) rich oral environment as a scaffold. Concludes with examples of oral-language activities for infants,…

  7. Teaching Oral Communication in Grades K-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Ann L.; Burk, Tamara L.

    Focusing exclusively on the art and science of oral communication for grades K-8, this book explains fundamental concepts in contemporary oral communication instruction and suggests practical strategies for implementing a competency-based approach to oral communication in an integrated classroom setting. The book also emphasizes oral communication…

  8. Older Adults (and Oral Health)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  9. Nutrition, diet and oral health.

    PubMed

    Rugg-Gunn, A J

    2001-12-01

    Teeth are valued, not least for their contribution to appearance and social acceptability. The cost of treating oral disease, though, is high--about 2.2 billion pounds in the UK in 1999-2000. Nutrition and diet are major determinants of oral health or disease and the purpose of this lecture was to review their impact on the more important oral diseases: defects in the structure and appearance of teeth, dental caries, dental erosion, periodontal disease, noma, and oral cancer. There is growing realisation of the detrimental impact of dental impairment on food choice, nutrient intake and nutritional status. A common feature of many of these diseases is that the causes are well known. However, they are not yet preventable because their aetiology (and prevention) is intimately involved with lifestyle. Nevertheless, there are some hopeful signs of progress being made in several areas. PMID:11768570

  10. Oral dependence and dependent behavior.

    PubMed

    Shilkret, C J; Masling, J

    1981-04-01

    Eighty undergraduates were asked to solve a series of difficult puzzles, with the instructions that they could ask for help as often as necessary. Half the subjects had an experimenter of the same sex and half of the opposite sex. The subjects were categorized as high or low dependent based on the percentage of oral dependent responses they gave on the Rorschach test. The results indicated that while the male subjects generally performed as predicted (with high oral dependent males asking for help more than low oral dependent males), the opposite results were obtained for females. Additional analyses suggested that what has been called oral dependence consists of at least two factors that relate in different ways to other variables. PMID:16370730

  11. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral contraceptives are a very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent the spread of ... on another day, use a backup method of birth control (such as a condom and/or a spermicide) ...

  12. Social Capital and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Tangade, Pradeep; Rajwar, Yogesh Chand; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Social determinants have always been an important element of the oral health. It has been seen that social aspects like the organizations and relations influence the health of population. A new domain named social capital has come up into limelight which refers to “features of social organization, such as trust, norms and networks that can improve the efficacy of society by facilitating coordinated actions”. The bonds between individuals, both in intimate relationships and in voluntary associations have been claimed to have health promoting effects. Oral health can never be segregated from general health as they are bidirectional in their relationship. Therefore determinants of general health and its promotion are interlinked with that of oral health. So, this review tries to figure out the effects of social capital on various aspects of oral health. PMID:25386549

  13. [Oral hygiene with tongue cleaners].

    PubMed

    Neander, Klaus-Dieter

    2004-04-01

    The investigation presented here is part of a series of studies on oral hygiene that deal with a very common problem occurring in everyday practice. Two different methods of mouth cleaning were tested in a comparative study on 150 subjects. At least in German-speaking countries, our methodology was groundbreaking in that measuring tools for evaluation of the oral hygiene measures implemented had not been available thus far. The results of this study clearly showed that the typical method of oral hygiene (gauze wrapped around a wooden spatula and toothbrush) produces much poorer cleaning results than the method using tongue cleaners. Surprisingly, we also observed that the eating habits of the participants "treated" with tongue cleaners improved markedly. Thus, we were able to conclusively demonstrate a connection between oral hygiene and nutritional deficiency. PMID:15137672

  14. Oral agents in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Frau, J; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Diseasemodifying drugs licensed for MS treatment have been developed to reduce relapse rates and halt disease progression. The majority of current MS drugs involve regular, parenteral administration, affecting long-term adherence and thus reducing treatment efficacy. Over the last two decades great progress has been made towards developing new MS therapies with different modes of action and biologic effects. In particular, oral drugs have generated much interest because of their convenience and positive impact on medication adherence. Fingolimod was the first launched oral treatment for relapsing-remitting MS; recently, Teriflunomide and Dimethyl fumarate have also been approved as oral disease-modifying agents. In this review, we summarize and discuss the history, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of oral agents that have been approved or are under development for the selective treatment of MS. PMID:25924620

  15. The Importance of Oral Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetherington, M. Sue

    1982-01-01

    Offers the results of a survey taken at the College of Charleston in South Carolina indicating that faculty members, recent graduates, and employers all feel that college education in communication should stress training in oral communication skills. (JL)

  16. Tigemonam, an oral monobactam.

    PubMed

    Chin, N X; Neu, H C

    1988-01-01

    Tigemonam is an orally administered monobactam. At less than or equal to 1 microgram/ml it inhibited the majority of strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter diversus, Proteus spp., Providencia spp., Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Serratia marcescens, and Yersinia enterocolitica. At less than or equal to 0.25 microgram/ml it inhibited Haemophilus spp., Neisseria spp., and Branhamella catarrhalis. It did not inhibit Pseudomonas spp. or Acinetobacter spp. Tigemonam was more active than cephalexin and amoxicillin-clavulanate and inhibited many members of the family Enterobacteriaceae resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and gentamicin. Some Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii strains resistant to aminothiazole iminomethoxy cephalosporins and aztreonam were resistant to tigemonam. The MIC for 90% of hemolytic streptococci of groups A, B, and C and for Streptococcus pneumoniae was 16 micrograms/ml, but the MIC for 90% of enterococci, Listeria spp., Bacteroides spp., and viridans group streptococci was greater than 64 micrograms/ml. Tigemonam was not hydrolyzed by the common plasmid beta-lactamases such as TEM-1 and SHV-1 or by the chromosomal beta-lactamases of Enterobacter, Morganella, Pseudomonas, and Bacteroides spp. Tigemonam inhibited beta-lactamases of E. cloacae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but did not induce beta-lactamases. The growth medium had a minimal effect on the in vitro activity of tigemonam, and there was a close agreement between the MICs and MBCs. PMID:3279906

  17. Southern Oral History Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Since the rise of interest in social history in the United States, a number of academics and public citizens have remained committed to preserving the voices and perspectives of everyday people. The Southern Oral History Program (SOHP) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a rather fine example of such a commitment. Founded in 1973, the SOHP has recorded over 2900 interviews with people from all walks of life, and their website contains a generous sampling of this material. First-time visitors may wish to start by watching "Spoken Memories", which provides a nice introduction to the history and work of SOHP. Afterwards, they can sample some of the online audio archives, or listen to the "Interview of the Month" feature. For those who wish to read as they listen, the interviews are complemented by transcripts in several different file formats. Visitors should also feel welcome to browse through the online finding aid to the SOHP's collection and offer their own feedback or inquiries.

  18. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  19. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  20. Menopause and the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Mutneja, Puneet; Dhawan, Pankaj; Raina, Anudeep; Sharma, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    Menopause is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to be aware of the symptoms and health care needs of peri-menopausal/menopausal/postmenopausal women. This article attempts to provide an insight into the multifarious oral manifestations at menopause along with the relevant prosthodontic implications. PMID:22837914

  1. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Poul Erik Petersen; Denis Bourgeois; Hiroshi Ogawa; Saskia Estupinan-Day; Charlotte Ndiaye

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases

  2. Communication in the Oral History Interview: Investigating Problems of Interpreting Oral Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, E. Culpepper; And Others

    The application of hermeneutic theory to the study of the oral history interview is proposed in this paper. The first section of the paper indicates why the oral interview is central to the approach of the oral historian; it then defines oral history as a communicative process and suggests an approach to investigating the oral interview that uses…

  3. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  4. 21 CFR 872.6650 - Massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...tip for oral hygiene is a rigid, pointed device intended to be used manually to stimulate and massage the gums to promote good periodontal (gum) condition. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  5. Critical review of topical management of oral hairy leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Brasileiro, Cláudia B; Abreu, Mauro Henrique NG; Mesquita, Ricardo A

    2014-01-01

    Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is a disease associated with Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections. OHL is usually an asymptomatic lesion, but in some cases treatment is recommended to reestablish the normal characteristics of the tongue, to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms, to improve patient comfort and for cosmetic reasons. Proposed treatments for this condition include surgery, systemic antiviral treatment and topical management. Topical treatment is an inexpensive and safe therapy that is easy to apply, noninvasive, free of systemic adverse effects and effective over a long period of time. The aim of this study was to present a review of the literature for topical therapy for OHL. Gentian violet, retinoids, podophyllin, acyclovir and podophyllin associated with topical antiviral drugs were used to treat OHL. Reports with this focus are limited, and since 2010, no new studies have been published that discuss the efficacy of topical treatments for OHL. Podophyllin with acyclovir cream was found to be effective, causing regression of lesions with no recurrences. Additional searches are necessary to provide clinical evidence of topical management effectiveness. PMID:25032199

  6. Antifungal drug resistance of oral fungi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masakazu Niimi; Norman A. Firth; Richard D. Cannon

    2010-01-01

    Fungi comprise a minor component of the oral microbiota but give rise to oral disease in a significant proportion of the population.\\u000a The most common form of oral fungal disease is oral candidiasis, which has a number of presentations. The mainstay for the\\u000a treatment of oral candidiasis is the use of polyenes, such as nystatin and amphotericin B, and azoles

  7. Oral manifestations associated with HIV infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mostafa Nokta

    2008-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict progression to AIDS. The lesions commonly associated\\u000a with the infection include oral candidiasis, herpes simplex infection, oral Kaposi’s sarcoma, oral hairy leukoplakia, parotid\\u000a gland enlargement, gingival diseases, xerostomia, and recurrent oral ulcerations. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral\\u000a therapy has changed the epidemiology of some of the

  8. Oral myiasis--a case report.

    PubMed

    Singla, Vikas

    2013-09-01

    Myiasis, a term introduced by William Hope in 1840, refers to the invasion of tissues and organs of animals and human wounds and certain body cavities by the dipteran larvae, which manifests as subcutaneous furunculoid or boil-like lesions. Oral myiasis is a rare pathology and a risk to the patient's life. A higher incidence is seen in rural areas, affecting the tropical and subtropical zones of Africa and America. It can be secondary to medical or anatomic conditions, such as cancrum oris, neglected mandibular fracture, cerebral palsy, mouth breathing, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and use of mechanical ventilation. Myiasis also has been described after tooth extraction. All these conditions more easily allow the infestation of human tissues. Myiasis affecting the orodental complex is rare. This case report describes oral myiasis in a 25-year-old male patient who was a gardener by profession. The lesion was treated with turpentine oil, which forced the larvae out, and irrigated with normal saline solution. PMID:23647876

  9. Proton Gradient Regulation 5-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow under ATP- or Redox-Limited Conditions: A Study of ?ATPase pgr5 and ?rbcL pgr5 Mutants in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Xenie; Steinbeck, Janina; Dent, Rachel M.; Takahashi, Hiroko; Richaud, Pierre; Ozawa, Shin-Ichiro; Houille-Vernes, Laura; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Rappaport, Fabrice; Grossman, Arthur R.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Hippler, Michael; Alric, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii proton gradient regulation5 (Crpgr5) mutant shows phenotypic and functional traits similar to mutants in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog, Atpgr5, providing strong evidence for conservation of PGR5-mediated cyclic electron flow (CEF). Comparing the Crpgr5 mutant with the wild type, we discriminate two pathways for CEF and determine their maximum electron flow rates. The PGR5/proton gradient regulation-like1 (PGRL1) ferredoxin (Fd) pathway, involved in recycling excess reductant to increase ATP synthesis, may be controlled by extreme photosystem I acceptor side limitation or ATP depletion. Here, we show that PGR5/PGRL1-Fd CEF functions in accordance with an ATP/redox control model. In the absence of Rubisco and PGR5, a sustained electron flow is maintained with molecular oxygen instead of carbon dioxide serving as the terminal electron acceptor. When photosynthetic control is decreased, compensatory alternative pathways can take the full load of linear electron flow. In the case of the ATP synthase pgr5 double mutant, a decrease in photosensitivity is observed compared with the single ATPase-less mutant that we assign to a decreased proton motive force. Altogether, our results suggest that PGR5/PGRL1-Fd CEF is most required under conditions when Fd becomes overreduced and photosystem I is subjected to photoinhibition. CEF is not a valve; it only recycles electrons, but in doing so, it generates a proton motive force that controls the rate of photosynthesis. The conditions where the PGR5 pathway is most required may vary in photosynthetic organisms like C. reinhardtii from anoxia to high light to limitations imposed at the level of carbon dioxide fixation. PMID:24623849

  10. Application of oral history to economics: Family Economic History

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Manijeh Sabi

    Application of Oral History to Economics: Family Economic History The assignment will connect an oral history approach to the examination of economic concepts such as opportunity cost of attending school, economic crises (inflation and unemployment, etc.), and standard of living over time. Particularly, students will interview parents, grandparents, or family members from older generations regarding the types of work they performed, economic decisions they have made, and the economic conditions while they were growing up. The project develops a student's ability to understand and integrate these concepts from a variety of perspectives and real world situation.

  11. Defining mechanisms of action of interleukin-11 on the progression of radiation-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Sonis, S T; Peterson, R L; Edwards, L J; Lucey, C A; Wang, L; Mason, L; Login, G; Ymamkawa, M; Moses, G; Bouchard, P; Hayes, L L; Bedrosian, C; Dorner, A J

    2000-07-01

    Oral ulcerative mucositis is a common toxicity associated with drug and radiation therapy for cancer. It impacts on quality of life and economic outcomes, as well as morbidity and mortality. Mucositis is often associated with dose limitations for chemotherapy or is a cause for dose interruption for radiation. The complexity of mucositis as a biological process has only been recently appreciated. It has been suggested that the condition represents a sequential interaction of oral mucosal cells and tissues, pro-inflammatory cytokines and local factors such as saliva and the oral microbiota. The recognition that the pathophysiology of mucositis is a multifactorial process was partially suggested by the observation that interleukin-11 (IL-11), a pleotropic cytokine, favorably altered the course of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in an animal model. In the current study, we evaluated a series of biologic and morphologic outcomes to determine their roles and sequence in the development of experimental radiation-induced mucositis and to evaluate the effects of IL-11 in attenuating them. Our results suggest that IL-11 favorably modulates acute radiation-induced mucositis by attenuating pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Data are also presented which help define the pathobiological sequence of mucositis. PMID:10899677

  12. Oral antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infective endocarditis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of oral antibiotic therapy in treating infective endocarditis (IE) is not well established. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Scopus for studies in which oral antibiotic therapy was used for the treatment of IE. Results Seven observational studies evaluating the use oral beta-lactams (five), oral ciprofloxacin in combination with rifampin (one), and linezolid (one) for the treatment of IE caused by susceptible bacteria reported cure rates between 77% and 100%. Two other observational studies using aureomycin or sulfonamide, however, had failure rates >75%. One clinical trial comparing oral amoxicillin versus intravenous ceftriaxone for streptococcal IE reported 100% cure in both arms but its reporting had serious methodological limitations. One small clinical trial (n = 85) comparing oral ciprofloxacin and rifampin versus conventional intravenous antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated right-sided S. aureus IE in intravenous drug users (IVDUs) reported cure rates of 89% and 90% in each arm, respectively (P =0.9); however, drug toxicities were more common in the latter group (62% versus 3%; P <0.01). Major limitations of this trial were lack of allocation concealment and blinding at the delivery of the study drug(s) and assessment of outcomes. Conclusion Reported cure rates for IE treated with oral antibiotic regimens vary widely. The use of oral ciprofloxacin in combination with rifampin for uncomplicated right-sided S. aureus IE in IVDUs is supported by one small clinical trial of relatively good quality and could be considered when conventional IV antibiotic therapy is not possible. PMID:24624933

  13. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palombo, Enzo A.

    2011-01-01

    Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described. PMID:19596745

  14. Alcohol-induced gastritis prevents oral tolerance induction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, M C; Menezes, J S; Cassali, G D; Martins-Filho, O A; Cara, D C; Faria, A M C

    2006-01-01

    Despite several reports on the immunological relationship between inflammatory bowel diseases and immunoregulatory mechanisms in the gut, systematic studies addressing the impact of inflammatory processes in the gastric mucosa on events, such as oral tolerance, are still limited. Herein, we report the establishment of a novel murine model of gastritis induced by short-term administration of ethanol. The major immumological features of this clinical entity are characterized, as well as its impact on the induction of oral tolerance. Our data demonstrate that ethanol ingestion during 4 consecutive days triggered an acute inflammatory reaction in the stomach referred as ethanol-induced gastritis and characterized by hyperaemia, oedema and mixed mononuclear/polymorphonuclear cell infiltrate. Besides local immunological changes, such as high levels of gastric interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-?, systemic alterations are also observed, including increased IL-4 synthesis, enhanced levels of serum IgE and absence of IL-10 production by spleen cells. Moreover, ethanol-induced gastritis prevents oral tolerance induction to ovalbumin (OVA) as demonstrated by unaltered anti-OVA humoral and cellular immune responses in treated animals. Tissue eosinophilia after footpad immunization with OVA suggests that oral treatment with ethanol induced an allergic-type reaction. Taken together, our findings indicate that short-term ethanol ingestion is associated with gastric inflammatory events able to break immunoregulatory mechanisms that maintain mucosal homeostasis and oral tolerance. PMID:17034584

  15. Allergic reactions to oral drugs: A case\\/non-case study from an Italian spontaneous reporting database (GIF)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Salvo; Giovanni Polimeni; Paola Maria Cutroneo; Roberto Leone; Anita Confortic; Ugo Moretti; Domenico Motola; Marco Tuccori; Achille Patrizio Caputi

    2008-01-01

    Despite the wide number of studies investigating on drug-induced allergy, limited data focused on allergies associated with orally administered drugs are available.The aim of the study is to evaluate allergic drug reactions associated with oral drug use, using an Italian spontaneous reporting database of adverse drug reactions (ADRs).Spontaneous reports associated with oral drugs retrieved from seven Italian regions (GIF research

  16. Conventional and alternative antifungal therapies to oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; de Carvalho Moraes, Julianna Joanna; Höfling, José Francisco

    2010-10-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common form of oral candidal infection, with Candida albicans being the principal etiological agent. Candida adheres directly or via an intermediary layer of plaque-forming bacteria to denture acrylic. Despite antifungal therapy to treat denture stomatitis, infection is reestablished soon after the treatment ceases. In addition, many predisposing factors have been identified as important in the development of oral candidiasis, including malnourishment, common endocrine disorders, such as diabetis mellitus, antibacterial drug therapy, corticosteroids, radiotherapy and other immunocompromised conditions, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These often results in increased tolerance to the most commonly used antifungals. So this review suggests new therapies to oral candidiasis. PMID:24031562

  17. Conventional and alternative antifungal therapies to oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; de Carvalho Moraes, Julianna Joanna; Höfling, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common form of oral candidal infection, with Candida albicans being the principal etiological agent. Candida adheres directly or via an intermediary layer of plaque-forming bacteria to denture acrylic. Despite antifungal therapy to treat denture stomatitis, infection is reestablished soon after the treatment ceases. In addition, many predisposing factors have been identified as important in the development of oral candidiasis, including malnourishment, common endocrine disorders, such as diabetis mellitus, antibacterial drug therapy, corticosteroids, radiotherapy and other immunocompromised conditions, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These often results in increased tolerance to the most commonly used antifungals. So this review suggests new therapies to oral candidiasis. PMID:24031562

  18. An insight into salivary markers in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Krishna Prasad, Ramnarayan Belur; Sharma, Akhilesh; Babu, Harsha Mysore

    2013-05-01

    Salivary diagnostics has fascinated many researcheres and has been tested as a valuable tool in the diagnosis of many systemic conditions and for drug monitoring. Advances in the field of molecular biology, salivary genomics and proteomics have led to the discovery of new molecular markers for oral cancer diagnosis, therapeutics and prognosis. Oral cancer is a potentially fatal disease and the outcome of the treatment and prognosis largely depends on early diagnosis. Abnormal cellular products elucidated from malignant cells can be detected and measured in various body fluids including saliva and constitute tumor markers. This article discusses the various salivary tumor markers and their role in oral pre-cancer and cancer. PMID:24019794

  19. Changes in Abundance of Oral Microbiota Associated with Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Brian L.; Kuczynski, Justin; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Huey, Bing; Corby, Patricia M.; Queiroz, Erica L. S.; Nightingale, Kira; Kerr, A. Ross; DeLacure, Mark D.; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Olshen, Adam B.; Albertson, Donna G.

    2014-01-01

    Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus) and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia) was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth) from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence. PMID:24887397

  20. Comparison of multispectral wide-field optical imaging modalities to maximize image contrast for objective discrimination of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblyer, Darren; Kurachi, Cristina; Stepanek, Vanda; Schwarz, Richard A.; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Lee, J. Jack; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-11-01

    Multispectral widefield optical imaging has the potential to improve early detection of oral cancer. The appropriate selection of illumination and collection conditions is required to maximize diagnostic ability. The goals of this study were to (i) evaluate image contrast between oral cancer/precancer and non-neoplastic mucosa for a variety of imaging modalities and illumination/collection conditions, and (ii) use classification algorithms to evaluate and compare the diagnostic utility of these modalities to discriminate cancers and precancers from normal tissue. Narrowband reflectance, autofluorescence, and polarized reflectance images were obtained from 61 patients and 11 normal volunteers. Image contrast was compared to identify modalities and conditions yielding greatest contrast. Image features were extracted and used to train and evaluate classification algorithms to discriminate tissue as non-neoplastic, dysplastic, or cancer; results were compared to histologic diagnosis. Autofluorescence imaging at 405-nm excitation provided the greatest image contrast, and the ratio of red-to-green fluorescence intensity computed from these images provided the best classification of dysplasia/cancer versus non-neoplastic tissue. A sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85% were achieved in the validation set. Multispectral widefield images can accurately distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue; however, the ability to separate precancerous lesions from cancers with this technique was limited.

  1. Acquisition and maturation of oral microbiome throughout childhood: An update

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Monteiro-Silva, Filipa

    2014-01-01

    Traditional microbiology concepts are being renewed since the development of new microbiological technologies, such as, sequencing and large-scale genome analysis. Since the entry into the new millennium, a lot of new information has emerged regarding the oral microbiome. This revision presents an overview of this renewed knowledge on oral microbial community acquisition in the newborn and on the evolution of this microbiome to adulthood. Throughout childhood, the oral microbial load increases, but the microbial diversity decreases. The initial colonizers are related to the type of delivery, personal relationships, and living environment. These first colonizers seem to condition the subsequent colonization, which will lead to more complex and stable ecosystems in adulthood. These early oral microbial communities, therefore, play a major role in the development of the adult oral microbiota and may represent a source of both pathogenic and protective microorganisms in a very early stage of human life. The implications of this knowledge on the daily clinical practice of odontopediatrics are highlighted. PMID:25097637

  2. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development (autonomy, self-esteem, locus of control), life expectations (marriage, college, career), dating behavior, age at 1st intercourse, perceived risk for becoming pregnant, personal attributes (sex, birth control, acquisition of birth control, pregnancy, parents' and peers' feelings toward sex and birth control), and previous experiences with birth control. PMID:1679420

  3. Oral health in groups of refugees in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, M

    1993-01-01

    In recent years the impact of ever-increasing numbers of refugees on the resources of the host countries has become a global concern. Health personnel face unanticipated demands complicated by different cultural, ethnic and religious factors and an unfamiliar disease panorama. Sweden today has around 1 million immigrants, 15% of the population. The aim of this thesis was to describe oral status with respect to caries and periodontal conditions, to analyse the need for dental treatment, to evaluate the effect of a preventive dental health programme, to study attitudes and knowledge of preventive dentistry and to describe and analyse utilization of dental services by different groups of adult refugees in Sweden. Three different methods were used: a descriptive clinical survey of a random sample of 193 Chilean and 92 Polish refugees, an experimental survey of a random sample of 159 Chilean refugees and a register survey, using national health statistics, consisting of a random sample of 2,489 refugees arriving in Sweden 1975-1985. The Chilean and Polish refugees had markedly poorer oral status than corresponding Swedish population groups. No association could be found between oral health or estimated treatment need and the length of time in Sweden. The simplified preventive program in the form of group discussion had a lasting effect on improved periodontal conditions and also improved knowledge of dental health care in the group of Chilean refugees. The register survey showed a generally low utilization of dental services but a high dental consumption among adult refugees in Sweden. The total treatment time for a course of treatment showed no marked decrease with subsequent courses of treatment. Immigration may have a profound effect on oral health care needs in a given population by introducing undetermined accumulated needs for oral care, and by stimulating changes in attitudes to and preferences in oral health and care. PMID:8503097

  4. Partnerships for better oral health.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, E

    2003-05-01

    Improving oral health in populations who do not easily access the private dental office or the available community care site is a challenge to dental hygienists and others concerned with the health and well-being of all. Partnerships for improved oral health have been part of the community health efforts for many years and in many countries. With the knowledge, skills, and resources that are held by specific groups and organisations combined into a larger entity of a partnership or coalition, greater impact on oral health issue may be possible. Agencies and individuals interested in making improvements in oral health status in any particular target group may begin a process of working with others who have an interest in improving the health and well being of that target group. In a world that is increasingly synergistic and mutually dependent, improvements in oral health can be advanced by considering the elements of successful coalition building and forming partnerships with multiple organisations and individuals. PMID:16451530

  5. Oral immunotherapy for allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Waka; Fukuda, Ken; Harada, Yosuke; Yagita, Hideo; Fukushima, Atsuki

    2014-11-01

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy is expected to be a desirable treatment for allergic diseases. Currently, antigen-specific immunotherapy is performed by administering disease-causing antigens subcutaneously or sublingually. These approaches induce long-term remission in patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma. The oral route is an alternative to subcutaneous and sublingual routes, and can also induce long-term remission, a phenomenon known as "oral tolerance." The effectiveness of oral tolerance has been reported in the context of autoimmune diseases, food allergies, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis in both human patients and animal models. However, few studies have examined its efficacy in animal models of allergic conjunctivitis. Previously, we showed that ovalbumin feeding suppressed ovalbumin-induced experimental allergic conjunctivitis, indicating the induction of oral tolerance is effective in treating experimental allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years, transgenic rice has been developed that can induce oral tolerance and reduce the severity of anaphylaxis. The major Japanese cedar pollen antigens in transgenic rice, Cryptomeria japonica 1 and C. japonica 2, were deconstructed by molecular shuffling, fragmentation, and changes in the oligomeric structure. Thus, transgenic rice may be an effective treatment for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:25289722

  6. Oral anti-diabetics in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Islam, Najmul

    2015-05-01

    A large proportion of Muslim patients with type 2 diabetes fast during the month of Ramadan worldwide. Hypoglycaemia is one of the major complications associated with long periods without food during the fasting hours. There is also a risk of hyperglycaemia due to over indulgence in food during the two main meals of Suhur and Iftar. Healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the risk of fasting and be competent to provide Ramadan adjusted diabetes care particularly adjustment of oral anti diabetics. This review article has taken into consideration observational studies, randomized trial data, pathophysiology and practical experience in recommending adjustment in oral anti-diabetics during fasting in type-2 diabetics. Metformin and Thiazolidinediones (TZD'S) being insulin sensitizers need minimum adjustment with low risk of hypoglycaemia. Older generation Sulphonylureas (SU) pose a high risk of hypoglycaemia but the newer generations of Sulphonylureas have a reasonable safety profile. Alpha- Glucosidase inhibitors are safe during fasting but their use is limited due to the side effects. PMID:26013783

  7. [Contemplations on responsibility for oral healthcare].

    PubMed

    Slootweg, P J; de Baat, C

    2012-05-01

    The academic dental education in The Netherlands has been extended to 6 years, among other reasons in order to make it possible for responsibility for oral healthcare to be borne in a wide medical context. It is the job of the 3 national dental schools to make this happen. The new dentist should know and recognize all (peri-)oral disorders and oral symptoms of systemic diseases, and he should be able to deliver oral healthcare to medically compromised patients. Accepting this responsibility is required for dentistry to be transformed into medical oral healthcare and for dentists to be upgraded to oral physicians. PMID:22667192

  8. The application of vizilite in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Sambandham, Thirugnana; Masthan, K M K; Kumar, M Sathish; Jha, Abhinav

    2013-01-01

    This article depicts the various applications of Vizilite plus in oral cancer. The oral cavity demonstrates a variety of red and white, pigmented and vesiculo- bullous lesions. Oral cancer still happens to carry the highest mortality worldwide, especially in India. In India, the prime focus is on the downstreaming of oral cancer from an advanced stage to an early diseased state. The techniques that are promoted to facilitate an earlier detection and diagnosis of an oral malignancy include Toluidine blue, ViziLite Plus with TBlue, ViziLite, Microlux DL, Orascoptic DK, VEL scope, Oral CDx and brush biopsy. PMID:23450083

  9. The Application of Vizilite in Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sambandham, Thirugnana; Masthan, K. M. K.; Kumar, M. Sathish; Jha, Abhinav

    2013-01-01

    This article depicts the various applications of Vizilite plus in oral cancer. The oral cavity demonstrates a variety of red and white, pigmented and vesiculo- bullous lesions. Oral cancer still happens to carry the highest mortality worldwide, especially in India. In India, the prime focus is on the downstreaming of oral cancer from an advanced stage to an early diseased state. The techniques that are promoted to facilitate an earlier detection and diagnosis of an oral malignancy include Toluidine blue, ViziLite Plus with TBlue, ViziLite, Microlux DL, Orascoptic DK, VEL scope, Oral CDx and brush biopsy. PMID:23450083

  10. Patient self-monitoring of oral anticoagulant therapy: potential benefits and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Douketis, J D

    2001-01-01

    Coumarin derivatives are widely used oral anticoagulants for patients with chronic atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, valvular heart disease, myocardial infarction or a mechanical prosthetic heart valve. Because of the narrow therapeutic window associated with coumarins and the potential for drug interactions, frequent monitoring of anticoagulation is required to maintain the International Normalized Ratio (INR) between 2.0 to 3.5 for most clinical indications. Monitoring of oral anticoagulant therapy is placing a considerable burden on healthcare providers because many patients require life-long treatment with coumarins, and because of an increasing number of elderly patients with conditions that are treated with coumarins. A novel approach that might, in part, address this healthcare need is patient self-monitoring of anticoagulation with a portable coagulometer. Several cohort studies and randomized controlled trials have found that anticoagulation self-monitoring is as good as, or better than, conventional monitoring in a specialized anticoagulation clinic or by a general practitioner. The advantages of anticoagulation self-monitoring include reduced patient inconvenience relating to anticoagulation clinic visits and laboratory monitoring of warfarin therapy, and fewer INR levels outside the therapeutic INR range if INR measurements are preformed more frequently with anticoagulation self-monitoring. Thus, anticoagulation self-monitoring has the potential to reduce the incidence of thromboembolic and bleeding episodes in patients who are receiving long term oral anticoagulant therapy. The potential drawbacks of anticoagulation self-monitoring include the costs of the portable coagulometer. Additionally, self-monitoring is limited to patients who have the cognitive and physical capabilities to perform the technique required for the portable coagulometer. PMID:14728024

  11. Extensive Myiasis infestation associated with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Sudharani; Wankhede, Pranali; Munde, Anita; Shaikh, Safia

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is the condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots). The deposited eggs develop into larvae, which penetrate deep structures causing adjacent tissue destruction. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in tropical countries and hot climate regions, and associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions, alcoholism and senility. The diagnosis of Myiasis is basically made by the presence of larvae. The reported cases of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer in the literature are few. This paper reports two cases of oral and maxillofacial Myiasis involving larvae in patients with squamous cell carcinoma in adult males. The condition was managed by manual removal of the larvae, one by one, with the help of forceps and subsequent management through proper health care. PMID:25709682

  12. Growth of normal oral keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma cells in a novel protein-free defined medium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nobuyuki Kamata; Kazuhiro Yokoyama; Ryoichi Fujimoto; Naohiro Ueda; Eiji Hayashi; Hiroaki Nakanishi; Masaru Nagayama

    1999-01-01

    Summary  A novel protein-free synthetic medium was developed for the culture of normal human oral keratinocytes. This medium, designated\\u000a PFM-7, supports the serial cultivation of primary or secondary normal oral keratinocytes in protein-free, chemically defined\\u000a conditions. Normal oral keratinocytes in PFM-7 exhibited nearly equal growth in mass culture without noticeable changes in\\u000a morphology, response to added growth factors, or gene expression

  13. Florida Citrus Industry Oral Histories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    What's so special about oranges? They are a major cash crop for Florida and other warm weather places, and this fascinating oral history project from the University of South Florida (USF) explores the very nature of this industry. Working together with the USF's Patel Center for Global Studies, oral historian William Mansfield conducted 20 interviews regarding the impact of globalization on the Florida citrus industry. Visitors can listen to or read the interviews, as well as look over the online exhibition, "Selling Sunshine: Florida's Citrus Industry." The exhibition details Florida's unique relationship with the citrus industry, incorporating documents, promotional material, and post cards with its information. The website hosts a remarkable collection that will be of interest to oral historians, folks with an interest in Florida, and many others.

  14. [Pollinosis and oral allergy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Glück, U

    1990-05-01

    Allergic diseases are frequent, affecting 10%-15% of the population. The atopic symptoms manifest mainly as pollinosis or bronchial asthma. Many of the atopic patients have an additional food-related allergy, often due to a cross-reactivity between pollen allergens (birch, hazelnut, alder, mugwort) and food allergens. The foods which most frequently elicit oral, gastro-intestinal or anaphylactic symptoms are fruits such as apples, peaches, cherries or apricots, but also nuts and vegetables from the botanic group of the compositae (celery, carrots, fennel, sunflower kernels, camomile, parsley, etc.). While fruits mainly cause oral symptoms (aphthae, stomatitis, swelling of the lips or tongue, pharyngitis, hoarseness and laryngeal oedema), nuts and celery can often also induce acute generalized symptoms, such as severe laryngeal oedema, bronchial asthma, urticaria or allergic shock. In our experience these patients tend to minimize their oral symptoms and the practitioner has often to ask about them specifically. PMID:2373647

  15. Oral health: orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Improper tooth alignment due to crowding, malocclusion, and missing teeth can cause difficulties with eating and speech, and premature wear. It is estimated that more than 20% of children would benefit from orthodontic treatment to correct these conditions, many of which will persist into adulthood if not corrected. Orthodontic care is gaining popularity among adults for similar concerns, as well as for correction of cosmetic issues. The psychological effects of malocclusion should not be ignored. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children undergo evaluation at the first recognition of an orthodontic condition and no later than age 7 years. Some children will need early treatment to help eliminate developing conditions and improve the foundations of the bite, which can ease later treatment in adolescence. For others, treatment in adolescence without early treatment is recommended. Standard cemented braces or clear, removable aligners may be used, depending on the patient's corrective needs. Average treatment time is approximately 2 years; this may be shortened by the use of accelerative techniques. Routine preventive dental care should be continued during the treatment period. PMID:25594451

  16. Modified oral metronidazole desensitization protocol.

    PubMed

    Gendelman, Samantha R; Pien, Lily C; Gutta, Ravi C; Abouhassan, Susan R

    2014-03-01

    The Center for Disease Control guidelines recommend desensitization to metronidazole in patients with trichomoniasis and hypersensitivity to metronidazole. There is only one published oral metronidazole desensitization protocol. The purpose of this study was to design a new, more gradual oral desensitization protocol to decrease systemic reactions that may occur when using the previously published protocol. We present two patients with presumed IgE-mediated allergy to metronidazole who underwent oral desensitization using our modified protocol. Case 1 was a 65-year-old woman with trichomoniasis who presented for metronidazole desensitization with a history of intraoperative anaphylaxis and positive skin tests to metronidazole. The patient tolerated six doses of the modified desensitization but developed systemic symptoms of nasal congestion and diffuse pruritus after the 25- and 100-mg doses. Both reactions were treated with intravenous (i.v.) antihistamines. Because of gastrointestinal irritation, the desensitization was completed at a dose of 250 mg orally every 6 hours. Case 2 was a 42-year-old woman with trichomoniasis and a history of hives immediately after administration of i.v. metronidazole who presented for desensitization. The patient had negative skin-prick and intradermal testing to metronidazole. She developed lip tingling and pruritus on her arms 15 minutes after the 10-mg dose. Fexofenadine at 180 mg was given orally and symptoms resolved. She tolerated the rest of the protocol without reaction and received a total dose of 2 g of metronidazole. Our oral metronidazole desensitization for presumed IgE-mediated reactions offers a second option for physicians wishing to use a more gradual escalation in dose. PMID:24612959

  17. Noninvasive imaging of oral premalignancy and malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Krasieva, T.; Jung, W.; You, J. S.; Chen, Z.; Osann, K.; Tromberg, B.

    2005-04-01

    Objectives: Early detection of cancer and its curable precursors remains the best way to ensure patient survival and quality of life. Despite significant advances in treatment, oral cancer still results in 10,000 U.S. deaths annually, mainly due to the late detection of most oral lesions. Specific aim was to use a combination of non-invasive optical in vivo technologies to test a multi-modality approach to non-invasive diagnostics of oral premalignancy and malignancy. Methods: In the hamster cheek pouch model (120 hamsters), in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) mapped epithelial, subepithelial and vascular change throughout carcinogenesis in specific, marked sites. In vivo multi-wavelength multi-photon (MPM) and second harmonic generated (SHG) fluorescence techniques provided parallel data on surface and subsurface tissue structure, specifically collagen presence and structure, cellular presence, and vasculature. Images were diagnosed by 2 blinded, pre-standardized investigators using a standardized scale from 0-6 for all modalities. After sacrifice, histopathological sections were prepared and pathology evaluated on a scale of 0-6. ANOVA techniques compared imaging diagnostics with histopathology. 95% confidence limits of the sensitivity and specificity were established for the diagnostic capability of OCT/ODT+ MPM/SHG using ROC curves and kappa statistics. Results: Imaging data were reproducibly obtained with good accuracy. Carcinogenesis-related structural and vascular changes were clearly visible to tissue depths of 2mm. Sensitivity (OCT/ODT alone: 71-88%; OCT+MPM/SHG: 79-91%) and specificity (OCT alone: 62-83%;OCT+MPM/SHG: 67-90%) compared well with conventional techniques. Conclusions: OCT/ODT and MPM/SHG are promising non-invasive in vivo diagnostic modalities for oral dysplasia and malignancy. Supported by CRFA 30003, CCRP 00-01391V-20235, NIH (LAMMP) RR01192, DOE DE903-91ER 61227, NIH EB-00293 CA91717, NSF BES-86924, AFOSR FA 9550-04-1-0101.

  18. Oral contraceptives and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Tom

    1969-01-01

    Oral contraceptives can cause liver damage and jaundice but this is very rare in women in the United Kingdom. The drugs are contraindicated where there is a history of recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and acute or chronic disturbance of liver function which can be congenital or acquired. It is not yet known whether the oestrogenic or progestogenic components of oral contraceptives cause the hepatic abnormalities. The available data suggest that neither oestrogens nor progestogens in low doses impair hepatic excretory processes. The full implications of the continued administration of oestrogens and progestogens for many years on liver proteins are not yet known.

  19. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  20. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease and in health promotion may assist countries to implement effective public health programmes to the benefit of the poor and disadvantaged population groups worldwide. PMID:16211160