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Sample records for conditional lethal mutants

  1. A nutritional conditional lethal mutant due to pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase deficiency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wanhao; Zhang, Li; Du, Wei; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2014-06-01

    The concept of auxotrophic complementation has been proposed as an approach to identify genes in essential metabolic pathways in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it has achieved limited success to date, possibly due to the low probability of finding mutations fit with the chemically defined profile. Instead of using the chemically defined culture media lacking specific nutrients, we used bare minimum culture medium, i.e., 4% sucrose, for adult Drosophila. We identified a nutritional conditional lethal mutant and localized a c.95C > A mutation in the Drosophila pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase gene [dPNPO or sugarlethal (sgll)] using meiotic recombination mapping, deficiency mapping, and whole genome sequencing. PNPO converts dietary vitamin B6 such as pyridoxine to its active form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP). The missense mutation (sgll(95)) results in the substitution of alanine to aspartate (p.Ala32Asp). The sgll(95) flies survive well on complete medium but all die within 6 d on 4% sucrose only diet, which can be rescued by pyridoxine or PLP supplement, suggesting that the mutation does not cause the complete loss of PNPO activity. The sgll knockdown further confirms its function as the Drosophila PNPO. Because better tools for positional cloning and cheaper whole genome sequencing have made the identification of point mutations much easier than before, alleviating the necessity to pinpoint specific metabolic pathways before gene identification, we propose that nutritional conditional screens based on bare minimum growth media like ours represent promising approaches for discovering important genes and mutations in metabolic pathways, thereby accelerating the establishment of in vivo models that recapitulate human metabolic diseases. PMID:24739647

  2. A Nutritional Conditional Lethal Mutant Due to Pyridoxine 5?-Phosphate Oxidase Deficiency in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Wanhao; Zhang, Li; Du, Wei; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2014-01-01

    The concept of auxotrophic complementation has been proposed as an approach to identify genes in essential metabolic pathways in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it has achieved limited success to date, possibly due to the low probability of finding mutations fit with the chemically defined profile. Instead of using the chemically defined culture media lacking specific nutrients, we used bare minimum culture medium, i.e., 4% sucrose, for adult Drosophila. We identified a nutritional conditional lethal mutant and localized a c.95C > A mutation in the Drosophila pyridoxine 5?-phosphate oxidase gene [dPNPO or sugarlethal (sgll)] using meiotic recombination mapping, deficiency mapping, and whole genome sequencing. PNPO converts dietary vitamin B6 such as pyridoxine to its active form pyridoxal 5?-phosphate (PLP). The missense mutation (sgll95) results in the substitution of alanine to aspartate (p.Ala32Asp). The sgll95 flies survive well on complete medium but all die within 6 d on 4% sucrose only diet, which can be rescued by pyridoxine or PLP supplement, suggesting that the mutation does not cause the complete loss of PNPO activity. The sgll knockdown further confirms its function as the Drosophila PNPO. Because better tools for positional cloning and cheaper whole genome sequencing have made the identification of point mutations much easier than before, alleviating the necessity to pinpoint specific metabolic pathways before gene identification, we propose that nutritional conditional screens based on bare minimum growth media like ours represent promising approaches for discovering important genes and mutations in metabolic pathways, thereby accelerating the establishment of in vivo models that recapitulate human metabolic diseases. PMID:24739647

  3. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  4. Pleiotropic phenotypes of a Yersinia enterocolitica flhD mutant include reduced lethality in a chicken embryo model

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Megan K; Carr, Nathan J; Iyer, Jyoti G; Horne, Shelley M; Gibbs, Penelope S; Prüß, Birgit M

    2008-01-01

    Background The Yersinia enterocolitica flagellar master regulator FlhD/FlhC affects the expression levels of non-flagellar genes, including 21 genes that are involved in central metabolism. The sigma factor of the flagellar system, FliA, has a negative effect on the expression levels of seven plasmid-encoded virulence genes in addition to its positive effect on the expression levels of eight of the flagellar operons. This study investigates the phenotypes of flhD and fliA mutants that result from the complex gene regulation. Results Phenotypes relating to central metabolism were investigated with Phenotype MicroArrays. Compared to the wild-type strain, isogenic flhD and fliA mutants exhibited increased growth on purines and reduced growth on N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and D-mannose, when used as a sole carbon source. Both mutants grew more poorly on pyrimidines and L-histidine as sole nitrogen source. Several intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycle, as well as several dipeptides, provided differential growth conditions for the two mutants. Gene expression was determined for selected genes and correlated with the observed phenotypes. Phenotypes relating to virulence were determined with the chicken embryo lethality assay. The assay that was previously established for Escherichia coli strains was modified for Y. enterocolitica. The flhD mutant caused reduced chicken embryo lethality when compared to wild-type bacteria. In contrast, the fliA mutant caused wild-type lethality. This indicates that the virulence phenotype of the flhD mutant might be due to genes that are regulated by FlhD/FlhC but not FliA, such as those that encode the flagellar type III secretion system. Conclusion Phenotypes of flhD and fliA mutants are related to central metabolism and virulence and correlate with gene regulation. PMID:18215272

  5. Lethal Mutants and Truncated Selection Together Solve a Paradox of the Origin of Life

    E-print Network

    of human civilization. Since the development of molecular biology, it has been known that the information-replication and proto- cell self-replication stages in the origin of life. Conclusions/Significance: We have applied and biological evolution. Citation: Saakian DB, Biebricher CK, Hu C-K (2011) Lethal Mutants and Truncated

  6. Conditional lethality strains for the biological control of Anastrepha species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pro-apoptotic cell death genes are promising candidates for biologically-based autocidal control of pest insects as demonstrated by tetracycline (tet)-suppressible systems for conditional embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Cc). However, for medfly...

  7. Lethal mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in a hypomorphic Med30 mouse mutant is ameliorated by ketogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Philippe; Fan, Weiwei; Chen, Yen-Hui; Tobita, Kimimasa; Downes, Michael R.; Wood, Malcolm R.; Sun, Lei; Xia, Yu; Ding, Ning; Spaeth, Jason M.; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Boyer, Thomas G.; Lo, Cecilia Wen Ya; Yen, Jeffrey; Evans, Ronald M.; Beutler, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Deficiencies of subunits of the transcriptional regulatory complex Mediator generally result in embryonic lethality, precluding study of its physiological function. Here we describe a missense mutation in Med30 causing progressive cardiomyopathy in homozygous mice that, although viable during lactation, show precipitous lethality 2–3 wk after weaning. Expression profiling reveals pleiotropic changes in transcription of cardiac genes required for oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial integrity. Weaning mice to a ketogenic diet extends viability to 8.5 wk. Thus, we establish a mechanistic connection between Mediator and induction of a metabolic program for oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation, in which lethal cardiomyopathy is mitigated by dietary intervention. PMID:22106289

  8. Synthetic lethality in ATM-deficient RAD50-mutant tumors underlie outlier response to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Iyer, Gopa; Hohl, Marcel; Asthana, Saurabh; Inagaki, Akiko; Schultz, Nikolaus; Hanrahan, Aphrothiti J.; Scott, Sasinya N.; Brannon, A. Rose; McDermott, Gregory C.; Pirun, Mono; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Kim, Philip; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Schwartz, Gary K.; Reuter, Victor; Bochner, Bernard H.; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Berger, Michael F.; Petrini, John H.J.; Solit, David B.; Taylor, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic solid tumors are almost invariably fatal. Patients with disseminated small-cell cancers have a particularly unfavorable prognosis with most succumbing to their disease within two years. Here, we report on the genetic and functional analysis of an outlier curative response of a patient with metastatic small cell cancer to combined checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) inhibition and DNA damaging chemotherapy. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a clonal hemizygous mutation in the Mre11 complex gene RAD50 that attenuated ATM signaling which in the context of Chk1 inhibition contributed, via synthetic lethality, to extreme sensitivity to irinotecan. As Mre11 mutations occur in a diversity of human tumors, the results suggest a tumor-specific combination therapy strategy whereby checkpoint inhibition in combination with DNA damaging chemotherapy is synthetically lethal in tumor but not normal cells with somatic mutations that impair Mre11 complex function. PMID:24934408

  9. Characterization of Synthetic-Lethal Mutants Reveals a Role for the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor Cdc24p in Vacuole Function and Na(+) Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    White, W. H.; Johnson, D. I.

    1997-01-01

    Cdc24p is the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for the Cdc42p GTPase, which controls cell polarity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify new genes that may affect cell polarity, we characterized six UV-induced csl (CDC24 synthetic-lethal) mutants that exhibited synthetic-lethality with cdc24-4(ts) at 23°. Five mutants were not complemented by plasmid-borne CDC42, RSR1, BUD5, BEM1, BEM2, BEM3 or CLA4 genes, which are known to play a role in cell polarity. The csl3 mutant displayed phenotypes similar to those observed with calcium-sensitive, Pet(-) vma mutants defective in vacuole function. CSL5 was allelic to VMA5, the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit C, and one third of csl5 cdc24-4(ts) cells were elongated or had misshapen buds. A cdc24-4(ts) ?vma5::LEU2 double mutant did not exhibit synthetic lethality, suggesting that the csl5/vma5 cdc24-4(ts) synthetic-lethality was not simply due to altered vacuole function. The cdc24-4(ts) mutant, like ?vma5::LEU2 and csl3 mutants, was sensitive to high levels of Ca(2+) as well as Na(+) in the growth media, which did not appear to be a result of a fragile cell wall because the phenotypes were not remedied by 1 M sorbitol. Our results indicated that Cdc24p was required in one V-ATPase mutant and another mutant affecting vacuole morphology, and also implicated Cdc24p in Na(+) tolerance. PMID:9286667

  10. Copyright 8 1988 by the Genetics Society of America Unlinked Noncomplementation: Isolationof New Conditional-Lethal

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Conditional-Lethal Mutations in Each of the Tubulin Genesof Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tim Steams and David of Saccharomycescereuziiae that code for proteins that interact with P-tubulin were sought by screening for unlinked

  11. The Structural Variation Is Associated with the Embryonic Lethality of a Novel Red Egg Mutant Fuyin-lre of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiongyan; Zhao, Qiaoling; Yang, Weike; Zhu, Shuifen; Wu, Fang; He, Rongfan; Dong, Zhanpeng; Huang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori presents several types of egg color mutations, all of which have been extensively discussed in sericulture. While the red egg mutation has been previously observed, lethal red-egg mutants have not been reported. In the present work, the red egg mutant Fuyin-lre (Fuyin-lethal red egg) was discovered from the Fuyin germplasm resource of B. mori. This mutant features red-colored eggs and embryonic lethality. Genetic analysis showed that Fuyin-lre follows recessive inheritance, with the red egg gene re governing the egg color, and the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre may be caused by mutations of other genes closely linked to re. Digital gene expression (DGE) was employed to compare the transcription profiles of Fuyin and Fuyin-lre eggs after 24 and 48 h of incubation. A total of 48 differentially expressed genes followed the same expression patterns in both groups at both time points (FDR < 0.01 and log 2 Ratio ? 1). Further analyses indicated that 8 out of the 48 genes (including re) were closely linked to re. These 8 genes were highly expressed in wild-type Fuyin and the red egg mutant re but showed nearly absent expression in Fuyin-lre. Sequencing of the re gene confirmed that the re gene itself does not induce embryonic lethality, and structure analysis showed that the structural variation of the region where the 8 genes were located may be associated with the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre. The present work provides a good foundation for future studies on the mechanism of embryonic lethality and embryonic development in Fuyin-lre. PMID:26030868

  12. Characteristics of Plant Essential Genes Allow for within- and between-Species Prediction of Lethal Mutant Phenotypes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, John P.; Seddon, Alexander E.; Moghe, Gaurav D.; Simenc, Matthew C.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2015-01-01

    Essential genes represent critical cellular components whose disruption results in lethality. Characteristics shared among essential genes have been uncovered in fungal and metazoan model systems. However, features associated with plant essential genes are largely unknown and the full set of essential genes remains to be discovered in any plant species. Here, we show that essential genes in Arabidopsis thaliana have distinct features useful for constructing within- and cross-species prediction models. Essential genes in A. thaliana are often single copy or derived from older duplications, highly and broadly expressed, slow evolving, and highly connected within molecular networks compared with genes with nonlethal mutant phenotypes. These gene features allowed the application of machine learning methods that predicted known lethal genes as well as an additional 1970 likely essential genes without documented phenotypes. Prediction models from A. thaliana could also be applied to predict Oryza sativa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae essential genes. Importantly, successful predictions drew upon many features, while any single feature was not sufficient. Our findings show that essential genes can be distinguished from genes with nonlethal phenotypes using features that are similar across kingdoms and indicate the possibility for translational application of our approach to species without extensive functional genomic and phenomic resources. PMID:26286535

  13. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  14. Effects of metallothionein on zinc metabolism in lethal-milk mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The lethal-milk mice (C57BL/6J-Im) exhibit various pleiotropic effects, including a congenital otolith defect, production of zinc-deficient milk, and clinical signs of a systemic Zn deficiency by one year of age. The clinical signs include alopecia, dermatitis, and skin lesions. The systemic zinc deficiency may be due to increased levels of metallothionein (MT) in the intestine and/or liver of Im mice. The untreated Im mice contain twice as much intestinal MT as do C57BL/6J-(+/sup im//+ /sup Im/) (B6) controls. This was determined by a sulfhydryl assay, by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method, and by the /sup 65/Zn-binding assay. Various concentrations of Cd or Zn were added to the drinking water three days before assaying for MT. Compared to B6 mice, the Im mice exhibited more MT in their liver by the /sup 65/Zn-MT binding assay (3-fold) and by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method (18-fold). The effects of the two zinc treatments did not differ significantly between Im and B6 mice. The retention and excretion of /sup 65/Zn (administered intraperitoneally) were determined over a 14-day period, but the results did not different between the Im and B6 mice. The increased concentrations of MT within the Im mice was not significantly different for the intestine and liver. Based on these data and other studies, the Im mice may exhibit alterations in zinc homeostasis due to some deregulation of MT metabolism, including the inner ear of the fetus, the lactating mammary gland, and the intestine and liver of adults by one year of age.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis contributes to a skeletal dysplasia resembling platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type, in a novel Col2a1 mutant mouse line.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Ichimura, Satoki; Sasaki, Kuniaki; Masuya, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Ikegawa, Shiro; Furuichi, Tatsuya

    2015-12-01

    In humans, mutations in the COL2A1 gene encoding the ?1(II) chain of type II collagen, create many clinical phenotypes collectively termed type II collagenopathies. However, the mechanisms generating this diversity remain to be determined. Here we identified a novel Col2a1 mutant mouse line by screening a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutant mouse library. This mutant possessed a p.Tyr1391Ser missense mutation in the C-propeptide coding region, and this mutation was located in positions corresponding to the human COL2A1 mutation responsible for platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type (PLSD-T). As expected, p.Tyr1391Ser homozygotes exhibited lethal skeletal dysplasias resembling PLSD-T, including extremely short limbs and severe dysplasia of the spine and pelvis. The secretion of the mutant proteins into the extracellular space was disrupted, accompanied by an abnormally expanded endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the up-regulation of ER stress-related genes in chondrocytes. Chondrocyte apoptosis was severely induced in the growth plate of the homozygotes. These findings strongly suggest that ER stress-mediated apoptosis caused by the accumulated mutant proteins in ER contributes to skeletal dysplasia in Co12a1 mutant mice and PLSD-T patients. PMID:26545783

  16. When a Fly Has to Fly to Reproduce: Selection against Conditional Recessive Lethals in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Andrea D.; Yampolsky, Lev Y.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experimental model suitable for demonstrating allele frequency change in Drosophila melanogaster populations caused by selection against an easily scorable conditional lethal, namely recessive flightless alleles such as apterous and vestigial. Homozygotes for these alleles are excluded from reproduction because the food source used…

  17. Conditional inactivation of TGF-? type II receptor in smooth muscle cells and epicardium causes lethal aortic and cardiac defects.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Dominique; Hneino, Mohammad; Bouazza, Lamia; Parlakian, Ara; Sasaki, Takako; Bricca, Giampiero; Li, Jacques Yuan

    2010-12-01

    To understand the role of TGF-? signaling in cardiovascular development, we generated mice with conditional deletion of the TGF-? type II receptor (T?RII) gene (Tgfbr2) in cells expressing the smooth muscle cell-specific protein SM22?. The SM22? promoter was active in tissues involved in cardiovascular development: vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), epicardium and myocardium. All SM22-Cre(+/-)/Tgfbr2 (flox/flox) embryos died during the last third of gestation. About half the mutant embryos exhibited heart defects (ventricular myocardium hypoplasia and septal defects). All mutant embryos displayed profound vascular abnormalities in the descending thoracic aorta (irregular outline and thickness, occasional aneurysms and elastic fiber disarray). Restriction of these defects to the descending thoracic aorta occurred despite similar levels of Tgfbr2 invalidation in the other portions of the aorta, the ductus arteriosus and the pulmonary trunk. Immunocytochemistry identified impairment of VSMC differentiation in the coronary vessels and the descending thoracic aorta as crucial for the defects. Ventricular myocardial hypoplasia, when present, was associated to impaired ?-SMA differentiation of the epicardium-derived coronary VSMCs. Tgfbr2 deletion in the VSMCs of the descending thoracic aorta diminished the number of ?-SMA-positive VSMC progenitors in the media at E11.5 and drastically decreased tropoelastin (from E11.5) and fibulin-5 (from E.12.5) synthesis and/or deposition. Defective elastogenesis observed in all mutant embryos and the resulting dilatation and probable rupture of the descending thoracic aorta might explain the late embryonic lethality. To conclude, during mouse development, TGF-? plays an irreplaceable role on the differentiation of the VSMCs in the coronary vessels and the descending thoracic aorta. PMID:20213136

  18. Synthetic Lethal Therapy for KRAS Mutant Non-small-cell Lung Carcinoma with Nanoparticle-mediated CDK4 siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cheng-Qiong; Xiong, Meng-Hua; Liu, Yang; Shen, Song; Du, Xiao-Jiao; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Dou, Shuang; Zhang, Pei-Zhuo; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The KRAS mutation is present in ~20% of lung cancers and has not yet been effectively targeted for therapy. This mutation is associated with a poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) and confers resistance to standard anticancer treatment drugs, including epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we exploited a new therapeutic strategy based on the synthetic lethal interaction between cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) downregulation and the KRAS mutation to deliver micellar nanoparticles (MNPs) containing small interfering RNA targeting CDK4 (MNPsiCDK4) for treatment in NSCLCs harboring the oncogenic KRAS mutation. Following MNPsiCDK4 administration, CDK4 expression was decreased, accompanied by inhibited cell proliferation, specifically in KRAS mutant NSCLCs. However, this intervention was harmless to normal KRAS wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Moreover, systemic delivery of MNPsiCDK4 significantly inhibited tumor growth in an A549 NSCLC xenograft murine model, with depressed expression of CDK4 and mutational KRAS status, suggesting the therapeutic promise of MNPsiCDK4 delivery in KRAS mutant NSCLCs via a synthetic lethal interaction between KRAS and CDK4. PMID:24496383

  19. Embryo-lethal phenotypes in early abp1 mutants are due to disruption of the neighboring BSM gene

    PubMed Central

    Michalko, Jaroslav; Dravecká, Marta; Bollenbach, Tobias; Friml, Ji?í

    2015-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein1 (ABP1) has been identified based on its ability to bind auxin with high affinity and studied for a long time as a prime candidate for the extracellular auxin receptor responsible for mediating in particular the fast non-transcriptional auxin responses. However, the contradiction between the embryo-lethal phenotypes of the originally described Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional knock-out alleles ( abp1-1 and abp1-1s) and the wild type-like phenotypes of other recently described loss-of-function alleles ( abp1-c1 and abp1-TD1) questions the biological importance of ABP1 and relevance of the previous genetic studies. Here we show that there is no hidden copy of the ABP1 gene in the Arabidopsis genome but the embryo-lethal phenotypes of abp1-1 and abp1-1s alleles are very similar to the knock-out phenotypes of the neighboring gene, BELAYA SMERT ( BSM). Furthermore, the allelic complementation test between bsm and abp1 alleles shows that the embryo-lethality in the abp1-1 and abp1-1s alleles is caused by the off-target disruption of the BSM locus by the T-DNA insertions. This clarifies the controversy of different phenotypes among published abp1 knock-out alleles and asks for reflections on the developmental role of ABP1. PMID:26629335

  20. [Cultivation conditions of the Aspergillus terricola mutant producing proteolytic enzyme].

    PubMed

    Aravina, L A; Ponomareva, V D; Tereshin, I M; Kasatkina, I D; Grekova, V K

    1976-01-01

    The effect of temperature, aeration and various foam suppressors on the growth of a mutant of Aspergillus terricola H-20 and on its production of proteolytic enzymes was studied. A high level of the proteolytic activity (12-15 PU/ml) was found at 28-30 degree C in conditions of aeration with the rate of oxygen dissolution being 0.38-0.86 g of oxygen per litre per hour. Synthesis of the enzyme was inhibited by a decrease in temperature to 22-24 degree C, a surplass (1.07 g O2 per litre per hour) or insufficient (0.18 g O2 per litre per hour) content of oxygen in the medium, and by addition of animal (sperm-whale) fat as a froth breaker to the medium. The best rate of protease biosynthesis was obtained upon stepwise addition of sunflower oil to the cultural broth. The best synthetic froth breakers for biosynthesis of the proteolytic enzyme are adecanol at a concentration of 0.1-1% and polymethylsiloxane PMS-A 154 as a water emulsion at a concentration of 0.5% of the medium volume. PMID:12453

  1. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  2. Use of a conditionally lethal gene in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to select for double recombinants and to entrap insertion sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yuping; Wolk, C.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Use of the sacB gene provides a simple, effective, positive selection for double recombinants in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, a filamentous cyanobacterium. This gene, which encodes the secretory levansucrase of Bacillus subtilis, was inserted into the vector portion of a suicide plasmid bearing a mutant version of a chromosomal gene. Cells of colonies in which such a plasmid had integrated into the Anabaena chromosome through single recombination were plated on solid medium containing 5% sucrose. Under this condition, the presence of the sacB gene is lethal. A small fraction of the cells from initially sucrose-sensitive colonies became sucrose resistant; the majority of these sucrose-resistant derivatives had undergone a second recombinational event in which the sacB-containing vector had been lost and the wild-type form of the chromosomal gene had been replaced by the mutant form. By the use of this technique, they mutated two selected genes in the chromosome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The conditionally lethal nature of the sacB gene was also used to detect insertion sequences from this Anabaena strain. Sucrose-resistant colonies derived from cells bearing a sacB-containing autonomously replicating plasmid were analyzed. Five different, presumed insertion sequences were found to have inserted into the sacB gene of the plasmids in these colonies. One of them, denoted IS892, was characterized by physical mapping. It is 1.7 kilobases in size and is present in at least five copies in the genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

  3. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  4. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  5. Identification of two DNA helicases UvrD and DinG as suppressors for lethality caused by mutant cspA mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok; Phadtare, Sangita; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-01-01

    CspA is a major cold shock-inducible protein (70 aa), and its major role in the cold shock response was shown to be as an RNA chaperone destabilizing secondary structure of mRNAs at low temperature. Previously, we showed that the overexpression of mutant cspA containing premature non-sense codons at various positions led to stalled ribosomes on mutant cspA transcripts, ultimately leading to cell death. This lethality is primarily due to the highly translatable cspA 5'-UTR that recruits most of the ribosomes from other mRNAs, which are then stalled at the abnormal stop codon. This was called the 'LACE' effect. We show here that non-sense mutation even at the 67th position as well as substitutions of aromatic amino acid residues present on the RNA-binding surface of CspA protein to alanine caused the LACE effect by trapping a substantial amount of ribosomes on cspA mRNAs. In an attempt to identify a suppressor(s), which may help the cells to recover from the inhibitory LACE effect, genetic screening of an Escherichia coli genomic library was performed. We isolated suppressors that contained the genomic fragments encoding uvrD and dinG, respectively, whose gene products are ATP-dependent DNA helicases. The nucleic acid-binding and ATPase activities of these two helicases were found to be essential for their suppression activity. This genomic screening offers an approach to shed light on the mechanistic of 5'-UTR of cspA mRNA and novel roles of E. coli helicases that function in DNA repair. PMID:22832783

  6. Conditional embryonic lethality to improve the sterile insect technique in Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schetelig, Marc F; Caceres, Carlos; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Franz, Gerald; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2009-01-01

    Background The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an environment-friendly method used in area-wide pest management of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae). Ionizing radiation used to generate reproductive sterility in the mass-reared populations before release leads to reduction of competitiveness. Results Here, we present a first alternative reproductive sterility system for medfly based on transgenic embryonic lethality. This system is dependent on newly isolated medfly promoter/enhancer elements of cellularization-specifically-expressed genes. These elements act differently in expression strength and their ability to drive lethal effector gene activation. Moreover, position effects strongly influence the efficiency of the system. Out of 60 combinations of driver and effector construct integrations, several lines resulted in larval and pupal lethality with one line showing complete embryonic lethality. This line was highly competitive to wildtype medfly in laboratory and field cage tests. Conclusion The high competitiveness of the transgenic lines and the achieved 100% embryonic lethality causing reproductive sterility without the need of irradiation can improve the efficacy of operational medfly SIT programs. PMID:19173707

  7. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  8. Drosophila Embryonic Cell-Cycle Mutants

    E-print Network

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee

    Nearly all cell division mutants in Drosophila were recovered in late larval/pupal lethal screens, with less than 10 embryonic lethal mutants identified, because larval development occurs without a requirement for cell ...

  9. Application of an inducible system to engineer unmarked conditional mutants of essential genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuji; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tomida, Junko; Tokuda, Hajime; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2010-09-01

    The Phi CTX-based integration vector pYM101 harboring a tightly controlled modified phage T7 early gene promoter/LacI(q) repressor (T7/LacI) system was constructed for the generation of unmarked conditional mutants in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Promoter activity of the T7/LacI system was demonstrated to be dependent on the presence of the inducer isopropyl -beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), as evaluated by measuring beta-galactosidase activity. In the absence of the inducer, the promoter was silent as its activity was lower than those of a promoter-less lacZ control. Unmarked conditional mutants of four predicted essential genes (lolCDE (PA2988-86), lpxC (PA4406), rho (PA5239), and def (PA0019)) were successfully constructed using this recombination system. In the absence of IPTG, the growth of all mutants was repressed; however, the addition of either 0.1 or 1mM IPTG restored growth rates to levels nearly identical to wild-type cells. It was therefore demonstrated that the inducible integration vector pYM101 is suitable for the creation of unmarked conditional mutants of P. aeruginosa, and is particularly useful for examining the function of essential genes. PMID:20538017

  10. Swimming Behaviour and Otolith Characteristics of wildtype and mutant Zebrafish (AIE) under diminished Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigele, J.; Anken, R.; Hilbig, R.

    During microgravity humans often suffer from sensorimotor disorders e g motion sickness a kinetosis Using fish as vertebrate model systems we could previously provide ample evidence that the individually different susceptibility to such disorders is based on an individually differently pronounced asymmetric mineralisation calcification of inner ear stones otoliths In the course of a preliminary study we subjected mutant zebrafish Danio rerio due to malformation of the inner ear - see below - this mutant was termed Asymmetric Inner Ear AIE to diminished gravity conditions during parabolic aircraft flight PF As compared to wildtype WT animals the mutants showed a pronounced kinetotic behaviour The gross-morphology of the inner ears of AIE and WT animals strikingly differed In WT specimens the saccular otoliths were located at the periphery of the inner ear whereas the utricular stones were positioned mediad as it is usually the case in teleosts in most AIE animals dissected however the respective otoliths were positioned in an opposite arrangement Moreover the mutants sported transparent otoliths whereas the otoliths of WT specimens had an opaque appearance This finding clearly indicates that mutant otoliths differed from wildtype ones in their lattice structure i e the calcium carbonate polymorph and thus the compostion of the proteinacious matrix which is a template for calcium carbonate deposition In the course of the present study the PF experiment is scheduled to be carried out in March 2006 we intend to statistically verify

  11. The Live Attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Triple-Deletion Mutant ?apxIC ?apxIIC ?apxIV-ORF1 Strain, SLW05, Immunizes Pigs against Lethal Challenge with Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulin; Ou, Jiwen; Zhang, Minmin; Xu, Juan; Liu, Huazhen; Liu, Jinlin; Yuan, Fangyan; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae both belong to the family Pasteurellaceae and are major respiratory pathogens that cause large economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. We previously constructed an attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 live vaccine prototype, SLW05 (?apxIC ?apxIIC ?apxIV-ORF1), which is able to produce nontoxic but immunogenic ApxIA, ApxIIA, and ApxIVA. This triple-deletion mutant strain was shown to elicit protective immunity against virulent A. pleuropneumoniae. In the present study, we investigated whether immunization with SLW05 could also protect against lethal challenge with virulent H. parasuis SH0165 (serovar 5) or MD0322 (serovar 4). The SLW05 strain was found to elicit a strong humoral antibody response in pigs and to confer significant protection against challenge with a lethal dose of H. parasuis SH0165 or MD0322. IgG subtype analysis revealed that SLW05 induces a bias toward a Th1-type immune response and stimulates interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-?) production. Moreover, antisera from SLW05-vaccinated pigs efficiently inhibited both A. pleuropneumoniae and H. parasuis growth in a whole-blood assay. This is the first report that a live attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae vaccine with SLW05 can protect against lethal H. parasuis infection, which provides a novel approach for developing an attenuated H. parasuis vaccine. PMID:23220998

  12. Gene expression profiles in developing nephrons using Lim1 metanephric mesenchyme-specific conditional mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You-Tzung; Kobayashi, Akio; Kwan, Kin Ming; Johnson, Randy L; Behringer, Richard R

    2006-01-01

    Background Lim1 is a homeobox gene that is essential for nephrogenesis. During metanephric kidney development, Lim1 is expressed in the nephric duct, ureteric buds, and the induced metanephric mesenchyme. Conditional ablation of Lim1 in the metanephric mesenchyme blocks the formation of nephrons at the nephric vesicle stage, leading to the production of small, non-functional kidneys that lack nephrons. Methods In the present study, we used Affymetrix probe arrays to screen for nephron-specific genes by comparing the expression profiles of control and Lim1 conditional mutant kidneys. Kidneys from two developmental stages, embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) and 18.5 (E18.5), were examined. Results Comparison of E18.5 kidney expression profiles generated a list of 465 nephron-specific gene candidates that showed a more than 2-fold increase in their expression level in control kidney versus the Lim1 conditional mutant kidney. Computational analysis confirmed that this screen enriched for kidney-specific genes. Furthermore, at least twenty-eight of the top fifty (56%) candidates (or their vertebrate orthologs) were previously reported to have a nephron-specific expression pattern. Our analysis of E14.5 expression data yielded 41 candidate genes that are up-regulated in the control kidneys compared to the conditional mutants. Three of them are related to the Notch signaling pathway that is known to be important in cell fate determination and nephron patterning. Conclusion Therefore, we demonstrate that Lim1 conditional mutant kidneys serve as a novel tissue source for comprehensive expression studies and provide a means to identify nephron-specific genes. PMID:16464245

  13. Chromosome condensation may enhance X-ray-related cell lethality in a temperature-sensitive mutant (tsBN2) of baby hamster kidney cells (BHK21)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, H.; Nishimoto, T.

    1987-03-01

    In the tsBN2 cell line, which has a temperature-sensitive defect in the regulatory mechanism for chromosome condensation, the lethal effect of X rays was enhanced by incubating the cells at a nonpermissive temperature (40 degrees C) following X irradiation. This enhancement was suppressed in the presence of cycloheximide, which inhibits induction of premature chromosome condensation. The findings obtained in the case of delayed incubation at 40 degrees C and in synchronized cells indicate that X-ray-related potentially lethal damage, which can be expressed by chromosome condensation, is produced in the cells at any stage of the cell cycle, but it is repairable for all cells except those at around the late G2-M phase, where chromosome condensation occurs at a permissive temperature (33.5 degrees C). These observations suggest that the high sensitivity of late G2-M cells to X rays is caused by the events associated with chromosome condensation.

  14. Conditional Budding Yeast Mutants with Temperature-Sensitive and Auxin-Inducible Degrons for Screening of Suppressor Genes.

    PubMed

    Devrekanli, Asli; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-01-01

    The conditional control of protein expression is useful to characterize the function of proteins, especially of those that are essential for cell viability. Two degron-based systems, temperature-sensitive and auxin-inducible degrons, can be used to generate conditional mutants of budding yeast, simply by transforming appropriate cells with PCR-amplified DNA. We describe a protocol for the generation of temperature-sensitive and auxin-inducible degron mutants. We also show that a conditional mutant with few spontaneous revertants was generated by combining two degron systems for the Inn1 protein. Finally, we describe a suppressor screening method that uses the dual degron-Inn1 mutant to identify mutant proteins that suppress Inn1-K31A, which has a defect in cytokinesis. PMID:26519318

  15. Growth stimulation in inflorescences of an Arabidopsis tubulin mutant under microgravity conditions in space.

    PubMed

    Hoson, T; Soga, K; Wakabayashi, K; Hashimoto, T; Karahara, I; Yano, S; Tanigaki, F; Shimazu, T; Kasahara, H; Masuda, D; Kamisaka, S

    2014-01-01

    Cortical microtubules are involved in plant resistance to hypergravity, but their roles in resistance to 1 g gravity are still uncertain. To clarify this point, we cultivated an Arabidopsis ?-tubulin 6 mutant (tua6) in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the Kibo Module of the International Space Station, and analyzed growth and cell wall mechanical properties of inflorescences. Growth of inflorescence stems was stimulated under microgravity conditions, as compared with ground and on-orbit 1 g conditions. The stems were 10-45% longer and their growth rate 15-55% higher under microgravity conditions than those under both 1 g conditions. The degree of growth stimulation tended to be higher in the tua6 mutant than the wild-type Columbia. Under microgravity conditions, the cell wall extensibility in elongating regions of inflorescences was significantly higher than the controls, suggesting that growth stimulation was caused by cell wall modifications. No clear differences were detected in any growth or cell wall property between ground and on-orbit 1 g controls. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules generally play an important role in plant resistance to the gravitational force. PMID:24148142

  16. Improved trehalose production from biodiesel waste using parent and osmotically sensitive mutant of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruhal, Rohit; Choudhury, Bijan

    2012-08-01

    Trehalose is an important nutraceutical of wide commercial interest in the food processing industry. Recently, crude glycerol was reported to be suitable for the production of trehalose using a food microbe, Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii, under static flask conditions. Similarly, enhanced trehalose yield was reported in an osmotically sensitive mutant of the same strain under anaerobic conditions. In the present study, an effort was made to achieve higher production of trehalose, propionic acid, and lactic acid using the parent and an osmotically sensitive mutant of P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii under aeration conditions. Under aeration conditions (200 rpm in shake flasks and 30 % air saturation in a batch reactor), biomass was increased and approximately 98 % of crude glycerol was consumed. In the parent strain, a trehalose titre of 361 mg/l was achieved, whereas in the mutant strain a trehalose titre of 1.3 g/l was produced in shake flask conditions (200 rpm). In the mutant strain, propionic and lactic acid yields of 0.53 and 0.21 g/g of substrate were also achieved with crude glycerol. Similarly, in controlled batch reactor culturing conditions a final trehalose titre of approximately 1.56 g/l was achieved with the mutant strain using crude glycerol as the substrate. Enhanced production of trehalose using P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii from waste under aeration conditions is reported here. Higher production of trehalose was not due to a higher yield of trehalose but to a higher final biomass concentration. PMID:22526328

  17. Tn5-induced mutants of Azotobacter vinelandii affected in nitrogen fixation under Mo-deficient and Mo-sufficient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Joerger, R.D.; Premakumar, R.; Bishop, P.E.

    1986-11-01

    Mutants of Azotobacter vinelandii affected in N/sub 2/ fixation in the presence of 1 ..mu..M Na/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ (conventional system), 50 nM V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, or under Mo deficiency (alternative system) have been isolated after Tn5 mutagenesis with the suicide plasmid pSUP1011. These mutants are grouped into four broad phenotypic classes. Mutants in the first class are Nif/sup -/ under Mo sufficiency but Nif/sup +/ under Mo deficiency or in the presence of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Mutants in the second class are Nif/sup -/ under all conditions. An FeMo-cofactor-negative mutant (NifB/sup -/) belongs to this class. The third mutant class consists of mutants incapable of N/sub 2/-dependent growth under Mo deficiency. Most of the mutants of this class are also affected in N/sub 2/ fixation in the presence of 1 ..mu..M Na/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/, with acetylene reduction rates ranging from 28 to 51% of the rates of the wild type. Strains constructed by genetic transfer of the Kan/sup r/ marker of mutants from this class into nifHDK or nifK deletion mutants showed N/sub 2/-dependent growth only in the presence of V/sup 2/O/sub 5/. The only mutant in the fourth class shows wild-type nitrogenase activity under Mo sufficiency, but only 10% of the acetylene reduction activity of the wild type in the presence of 50 nM V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The acetylene reduction rates of whole cells of this mutant are identical in Mo-deficient medium and in medium containing V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The conventional nitrogenase subunits are expressed in this mutant even under Mo deficiency or in the presence of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/; however, the NH/sub 4//sup +/-and Mo-repressible proteins normally seen under these conditions could not be detected on two-dimensional gels.

  18. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M.; Vega, José M.; Eliášová, Adriana; Rep?ák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J.; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress. PMID:26442073

  19. Design and utility of temperature-sensitive Gal4 mutants for conditional gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Kajari; VijayRaghavan, K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2007-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants are valuable tools to study the function of essential genes in vivo. Despite their widespread use, little is known about mechanisms responsible for the temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype, or of the transferability of ts mutants of a specific gene between organisms. Since ts mutants are typically generated by random mutagenesis it is difficult to isolate such mutants without efficient screening procedures. We have recently shown that it is possible to obtain ts mutants at high frequency by targeted mutations at either predicted, buried residues important for protein stability or at functional, ligand binding residues. The former class of residues can be identified solely from amino acid sequence and the latter from Ala scanning mutagenesis or from a structure of the protein:ligand complex. Several ts mutants of Gal4 in yeast were generated by mutating both categories of residues. Two of these ts mutants were also shown to result in tight and rapid ts reporter gene-expression in Drosophila when driven by either the elav or GMR promoters. We suggest possible mechanisms that might be responsible for such transferable ts phenotypes and also discuss some of the limitations and difficulties involved in rational design of ts mutants. PMID:18836309

  20. The Activity of Nodules of the Supernodulating Mutant Mtsunn Is not Limited by Photosynthesis under Optimal Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants. PMID:24727372

  1. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress. PMID:25582191

  2. A Conditional Mutant Having Paralyzed Cilia and a Block in Cytokinesis Is Rescued by Cytoplasmic Exchange in Tetrahymena Thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Pennock, D. G.; Thatcher, T.; Bowen, J.; Bruns, P. J.; Gorovsky, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Nineteen mutants that are conditional for both the ability to regain motility following deciliation and the ability to grow were isolated. The mutations causing slow growth were placed into five complementation groups. None of the mutations appears to affect energy production as all mutants remained motile at the restrictive temperature. In three complementation groups protein synthesis and the levels of mRNA encoding ?-tubulin or actin were largely unaffected at the restrictive temperature, consistent with the hypothesis that mutations in these three groups directly affect the assembly of functional cilia and growth. Complementation group 1 was chosen for further characterization. Both phenotypes were shown to be linked, suggesting they are caused by a single mutation. Group 1 mutants regenerated cilia at the restrictive temperature, but the cilia were nonmotile. This mutation also caused a block in cytokinesis at the restrictive temperature but did not affect nuclear divisions or DNA synthesis. The block in cell division was transiently rescued by wild-type cytoplasm exchanged when mutants were paired with wild-type cells during conjugation (round 1 of genomic exclusion). Thus, at least one mutation has been isolated that affects assembly of some microtubule-based structures in Tetrahymena (cilia during regeneration) but not others (nuclei divide at 38°), and the product of this gene is likely to play a role in both ciliary function and in cytokinesis. PMID:3224807

  3. Fluctuation Analysis: The Probability Distribution of the Number of Mutants under Different Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, F. M.; Gordon, D. M.; Levin, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    In the 47 years since fluctuation analysis was introduced by Luria and Delbruck, it has been widely used to calculate mutation rates. Up to now, in spite of the importance of such calculations, the probability distribution of the number of mutants that will appear in a fluctuation experiment has been known only under the restrictive, and possibly unrealistic, assumptions: (1) that the mutation rate is exactly proportional to the growth rate and (2) that all mutants grow at a rate that is a constant multiple of the growth rate of the original cells. In this paper, we approach the distribution of the number of mutants from a new point of view that will enable researchers to calculate the distribution to be expected using assumptions that they believe to be closer to biological reality. The new idea is to classify mutations according to the number of observable mutants that derive from the mutation when the culture is selectively plated. This approach also simplifies the calculations in situations where two, or many, kinds of mutation may occur in a single culture. PMID:2307353

  4. Conditions supporting repair of potentially lethal damage cause a significant reduction of ultraviolet light-induced division delay in synchronized and plateau-phase Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iliakis, G.; Nusse, M.

    1982-09-01

    Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) induced by uv light in synchronized and in plateau-phase cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells was studied by measuring cell survival. In particlar the influence of conditions supporting repair of PLD on growth kinetics was investigated. In synchronized G/sub 1/, S, or G/sub 2/ + M cells as well as in plateau-phase cells, uv light induced, almost exclusively, delay in the next S phase. A significant decrease of this delay was observed when the cells were incubated for 24 hr in balanced salt solution. Repair of PLD after uv irradiation was found to occur in plateau-phase cells and in cells in different phases of the cell cycle provided that after irradiation these were kept under conditions inhibiting cell multiplication (incubation in balanced salt solution or in conditioned medium). The repair time constant t/sub 50/ was significantly higher than those found for X irradiation (5-10 hr compared to 2 hr), and repair was not significantly inhibited by either 20 ..mu..g/ml cycloheximide or 2 mM caffeine in 24 hr.

  5. Enhancing the stability and ecological safety of mass-reared transgenic strains for field release by redundant conditional lethality systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in the genetic manipulation of agriculturally important insects now allows the development of genetic sexing and male sterility systems for more highly efficient biologically-based population control programs, most notably SIT, in fruit pests throughout the world. Potentially, these condit...

  6. Greenhouse-grown conditionally lethal tobacco plants obtained by expression of plastidic glutamine synthetase antisense RNA may contribute to biological safety.

    PubMed

    Migge; Becker

    2000-04-25

    A cDNA corresponding to plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS-2), an enzyme involved in photorespiration, was expressed in antisense orientation under the control of a leaf-specific soybean ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit gene promotor in transgenic tobacco to yield conditionally lethal plants. Three transgenic tobacco lines with decreased (at most 64%) foliar GS-2 activity were obtained. These plants grew normally when maintained in an atmosphere with a CO(2) partial pressure sufficiently high (300 Pa CO(2)) to suppress photorespiration. However, when photorespiration was initiated by the transfer of the plants to air (35 Pa CO(2)), ammonium accumulated in the leaves. With time, the transgenic plants exhibited severe chlorotic lesions and, eventually, the plants died. A stable atmosphere containing at least 300 Pa CO(2) can be established easily in the greenhouse but is unlikely to occur in a natural environment. Therefore, the transgenic tobacco plants with decreased leaf GS-2 activity may contribute to biological safety for production of desired proteins. PMID:10717316

  7. Role of enterobactin and intracellular iron in cell lethality during near-UV irradiation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoerter, J; Pierce, A; Troupe, C; Epperson, J; Eisenstark, A

    1996-09-01

    In Escherichia coli, fur mutants that constitutively express their native iron chelating agent, enterobactin, are significantly more sensitive to near-UV radiation (NUV) than wild type, An entA mutant, which is incapable of synthesizing enterobactin, is equal to wild type in resistance to NUV irradiation. However, the addition of Fe+3 enterobactin but not AI+3 enterobactin to entA cell suspensions just prior to irradiation results in an increased sensitivity to NUV irradiation. A fes mutant, which is unable to reduce and release iron from enterobactin, is significantly more sensitive to NUV irradiation than wild type. The addition of nontoxic levels of H2O2 (5 microM) just prior to irradiation significantly increases sensitivity of both fur and fes mutants. These results suggest that one mechanism by which NUV irradiation leads to cell lethality is by creating a transient iron overload, producing very favorable conditions for the production of highly deleterious free radicals through a variety of mechanisms that lead to oxidative stress and DNA damage including lethal and mutagenic lesions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that enterobactin is an endogenous chromophore for NUV and contributes to cell lethality via the destruction of its ligand, releasing Fe+2 into the cytoplasm to catalyze the production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals and other toxic oxygen species via the Haber-Weiss reaction. PMID:8806229

  8. Construction of phage mutants.

    PubMed

    Villafane, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have established that the most abundant life form, that of phages, has had major influence on the biosphere, bacterial evolution, bacterial genome, and lateral gene transmission. Importantly the phages have served and continue to serve as valuable model systems. Such studies have led to a renewed interest and activity in the study of phages and their genomes. In order to determine the details of the involvement of phages in these important processes and activities, it is critical to assign specific functions to the phage gene products. The initial functional and gene assignments can be made by general mutagenesis of the phage genomes and of these specific gene products. A very informative mutagenic protocol that has found renewed interest is that using hydroxylamine. This mutagenic protocol has been used to obtain gene mutations involved in the lysogenic cycle of the Salmonella enterica serovar Anatum var. 15+ phage epsilon34 (hereafter phage epsilon34) and to isolate conditional lethal mutants of phage epsilon34. A similar protocol using plasmid is also described. A plate complementation method is presented to determine quickly the number of genes which are present in the population of mutations isolated from hydroxylamine mutagenesis. PMID:19066824

  9. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen for Enhancers of par Mutants Reveals New Contributors to Early Embryonic Polarity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Diane G.; Hoose, Wendy A.; Kemphues, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    The par genes of Caenorhabditis elegans are essential for establishment and maintenance of early embryo polarity and their homologs in other organisms are crucial polarity regulators in diverse cell types. Forward genetic screens and simple RNAi depletion screens have identified additional conserved regulators of polarity in C. elegans; genes with redundant functions, however, will be missed by these approaches. To identify such genes, we have performed a genome-wide RNAi screen for enhancers of lethality in conditional par-1 and par-4 mutants. We have identified 18 genes for which depletion is synthetically lethal with par-1 or par-4, or both, but produces little embryo lethality in wild type. Fifteen of the 18 genes identified in our screen are not previously known to function in C. elegans embryo polarity and 11 of them also increase lethality in a par-2 mutant. Among the strongest synthetic lethal genes, polarity defects are more apparent in par-2 early embryos than in par-1 or par-4, except for strd-1(RNAi), which enhances early polarity phenotypes in all three mutants. One strong enhancer of par-1 and par-2 lethality, F25B5.2, corresponds to nop-1, a regulator of actomyosin contractility for which the molecular identity was previously unknown. Other putative polarity enhancers identified in our screen encode cytoskeletal and membrane proteins, kinases, chaperones, and sumoylation and deubiquitylation proteins. Further studies of these genes should give mechanistic insight into pathways regulating establishment and maintenance of cell polarity. PMID:22887819

  10. Early Forebrain Wiring: Genetic Dissection Using Conditional Celsr3 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Libing; Bar, Isabelle; Achouri, Younčs; Campbell, Kenneth; De Backer, Olivier; Hebert, Jean M.; Jones, Kevin; Kessaris, Nicoletta; de Rouvroit, Catherine Lambert; O’Leary, Dennis; Richardson, William D.; Goffinet, Andre M.; Tissir, Fadel

    2009-01-01

    Development of axonal tracts requires interactions between growth cones and the environment. Tracts such as the anterior commissure and internal capsule are defective in mice with null mutation of Celsr3. We generated a conditional Celsr3 allele, allowing regional inactivation. Inactivation in telencephalon, ventral forebrain, or cortex demonstrated essential roles for Celsr3 in neurons that project axons to the anterior commissure and subcerebral targets, as well as in cells that guide axons through the internal capsule. When Celsr3 was inactivated in cortex, subcerebral projections failed to grow, yet corticothalamic axons developed normally, indicating that besides guidepost cells, additional Celsr3-independent cues can assist their progression. These observations provide in vivo evidence that Celsr3-mediated interactions between axons and guidepost cells govern axonal tract formation in mammals. PMID:18487195

  11. Condition stabilization for Aspergillus niger FCBP-198 and its hyperactive mutants to yield high titres of alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Sobiya; Bajwa, Rukhsana; Shafique, Shazia

    2010-01-01

    A number of substrates were tested for the cultivation of microorganisms to produce a host of enzymes. The effect of different substrates (wheat and rice straw, sugar cane waste, wood waste), incubation temperatures (20-40 degrees C), initial pH levels (3.5-9.0), incubation periods (0-72 hours) and nitrogen sources (ammonium sulfate, urea, peptone, yeast extract, sodium nitrate) on growth and alpha-amylase activity was studied for the native and mutant strains. Maximum enzyme activity was observed at 1.5% wheat straw for Aspergillus niger FCBP-198 and An-Ch-4.7 and at 2% wheat straw for An-UV-5.6, with sodium nitrate as a principle nitrogen source. The optimum temperature for maximum enzyme activity was 30 degrees C for the parental strain, while An-UV-5.6 and An-Ch-4.7 thrived well at 32.5 degrees C. The best conditions of pH and incubation duration were 4.5 and 48 hours, respectively, for all the strains. Mass production under preoptimized growth conditions demonstrated the suitability of wheat straw for swift mycelial colonization and viability. PMID:20734811

  12. The conditional connexin43G138R mouse mutant represents a new model of hereditary oculodentodigital dysplasia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Sasse, Philipp; Schrickel, Jan W.; Watkins, Marcus; Kim, Jung-Sun; Rackauskas, Mindaugas; Troatz, Clemens; Ghanem, Alexander; Tiemann, Klaus; Degen, Joachim; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.; Civitelli, Roberto; Lewalter, Thorsten; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Willecke, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a dominant negatively inherited disorder with variable but characteristic anomalies of the fingers and toes, eyes, face and teeth, which are caused by mutations in the connexin 43 (Cx43) gene. All mutations analyzed so far have a negative influence on the conductance through gap junctional channels and hemichannels, as well as trafficking of Cx43 protein in transfected cells. In this study, we inserted the human Cx43G138R point mutation into the mouse Cx43 gene and generated mice conditionally expressing this mutation. All ODDD phenotypic manifestations observed in humans, including syndactyly and enamel hypoplasia as well as craniofacial, bone and heart anomalies, were also observed with significant penetrance in Cx43G138R mice. When this mutation was specifically expressed in cardiomyocytes, characteristic alterations in the electrocardiogram and spontaneous arrhythmias were recorded. In vitro studies with Cx43G138R-expressing cells revealed loss of the Cx43 P2 phosphorylation state, which was also absent in the mutated hearts. This loss has previously been associated with gap junctional dysfunction and increased cellular ATP release. The Cx43G138R mutated mice show significantly increased arrhythmogeneity ex vivo in Langendorff experiments with explanted hearts and in vivo in particular under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that the increased activity of ATP-releasing channels in Cx43G138R mutated cardiomyocytes may further reduce the already decreased gap junctional communication and thus aggravate arrhythmogenesis in the mouse mutant. PMID:18003637

  13. Optimization of flask culture medium and conditions for hyaluronic acid production by a Streptococcus equisimilis mutant nc2168

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong-Hao; Li, Jun; Liu, Li; Liu, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A mutant designated NC2168, which was selected from wild-type Streptococcus equisimilis CVCC55116 by ultraviolet ray combined with60Co-? ray treatment and does not produce streptolysin, was employed to produce hyaluronic acid (HA). In order to increase the output of HA in a flask, the culture medium and conditions for NC2168 were optimized in this study. The influence of culture medium ingredients including carbon sources, nitrogen sources and metal ions on HA production was evaluated using factional factorial design. The mathematical model, which represented the effect of each medium component and their interaction on the yield of HA, was established by the quadratic rotary combination design and response surface method. The model estimated that, a maximal yield of HA could be obtained when the concentrations of yeast extract, peptone, glucose, and MgSO4 were set at 3 g/100 mL, 2 g/100 mL, 0.5 g/100 mL and 0.15 g/100 mL, respectively. Compared with the values obtained by other runs in the experimental design, the optimized medium resulted in a remarkable increase in the output of HA and the maximum of the predicted HA production was 174.76 mg/L. The model developed was accurate and reliable for predicting the production of HA by NC2168.Cultivation conditions were optimized by an orthogonal experimental design and the optimal conditions were as follows: temperature 33°C, pH 7.8, agitation speed 200 rpm, medium volume 20 mL. PMID:24031987

  14. MUTANT SCREEN REPORT A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number

    E-print Network

    Sharan, Roded

    MUTANT SCREEN REPORT A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number Suppressors of the Synthetic Lethality a high copy number suppressor screen to search for genes that, when overexpressed, suppress the synthetic

  15. Strategy for enhanced transgenic strain development for embryonic conditionnal lethality in Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here the first reproductive sterility system for the tephritid pest, Anastrepha suspensa, is presented, based on lethality primarily in embryos heterozygous for a lethal conditional transgene combination. The tetracycline-suppressible system uses the cellularization-specific A. suspensa serendipity...

  16. Higher order Arabidopsis 14-3-3 mutants show 14-3-3 involvement in primary root growth both under control and abiotic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    van Kleeff, P. J. M.; Jaspert, N.; Li, K. W.; Rauch, S.; Oecking, C.; de Boer, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins are a family of conserved proteins that interact with numerous partner proteins in a phospho-specific manner, and can affect the target proteins in a number of ways; e.g. modification of enzymatic activity. We isolated T-DNA insertion lines in six 14-3-3 genes within the non-epsilon group that phylogenetically group in three closely related gene pairs. In total, 6 single, 3 double, 12 triple, and 3 quadruple mutants were generated. The mutants were phenotyped for primary root growth on control plates: single and double mutants were indistinguishable from WT, whereas six triples and all quadruples showed a shorter primary root. In addition, length of the first epidermal cell with a visible root hair bulge (LEH) was used to determine primary root elongation on medium containing mannitol and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). This analysis showed clear differences depending on the stress and 14-3-3 gene combinations. Next to the phenotypic growth analyses, a 14-3-3 pull-down assay on roots treated with and without mannitol showed that mannitol stress strongly affects the 14-3-3 interactome. In conclusion, we show gene specificity and functional redundancy among 14-3-3 proteins in primary root elongation under control and under abiotic stress conditions and changes in the 14-3-3 interactome during the onset of stress adaptation. PMID:25189593

  17. Exome sequencing for gene discovery in lethal fetal disorders - harnessing the value of extreme phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Filges, Isabel; Friedman, Jan M

    2015-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of Mendelian disorders, and many novel genes have been discovered to cause disease phenotypes when mutant. At the same time, next-generation sequencing approaches have enabled non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA in maternal blood. However, little attention has been paid to using whole exome and genome sequencing strategies for gene identification in fetal disorders that are lethal in utero, because they can appear to be sporadic and Mendelian inheritance may be missed. We present challenges and advantages of applying next-generation sequencing approaches to gene discovery in fetal malformation phenotypes and review recent successful discovery approaches. We discuss the implication and significance of recessive inheritance and cross-species phenotyping in fetal lethal conditions. Whole exome sequencing can be used in individual families with undiagnosed lethal congenital anomaly syndromes to discover causal mutations, provided that prior to data analysis, the fetal phenotype can be correlated to a particular developmental pathway in embryogenesis. Cross-species phenotyping allows providing further evidence for causality of discovered variants in genes involved in those extremely rare phenotypes and will increase our knowledge about normal and abnormal human developmental processes. Ultimately, families will benefit from the option of early prenatal diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25046514

  18. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  19. Infection in Mouse Peritoneal Cavity with a Pyrimidine-requiring Mutant and Naturally Occurring Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, L. G.; De Repentigny, J.; Turgeon, S.; Sonea, S.

    1967-01-01

    The lethal activity of a thymineless mutant of Staphylococcus aureus Wood 46 strain has been compared with that of three naturally occurring strains: parent Wood 46, Smith, and coagulase-negative SA-13. The thymineless mutant and the parent Wood 46 strain showed a sharp decline in culturable units from the peritoneal cavity in the first 4 hr after their injection. After 6 hr, that is, 2 hr before the mice began to die, the number of culturable units of the thymineless mutant was still declining, whereas that of the parent strain increased; for both strains, the number of units was still lower than that of the inoculum. Although the thymineless mutant, unlike the parent strain, was apparently unable to multiply in mouse peritoneal cavity, it killed mice at a similar rate. The highly virulent Smith strain known to multiply rapidly and the avirulent coagulase-negative SA-13 strain were used as additional controls. Under our experimental conditions, death of mice after the injection of the thymineless mutant in the peritoneal cavity did not seem to be due to bacterial multiplication but to toxicity, death being delayed by antitoxin. The pyrimidine-requiring auxotroph we used could be better material than killed bacteria to study some aspects of the lethal activity of S. aureus. Images PMID:6029050

  20. Drosophila Embryonic Cell-Cycle Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Park, Eugenia A.; Royzman, Irena; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly all cell division mutants in Drosophila were recovered in late larval/pupal lethal screens, with less than 10 embryonic lethal mutants identified, because larval development occurs without a requirement for cell division. Only cells in the nervous system and the imaginal cells that generate the adult body divide during larval stages, with larval tissues growing by increasing ploidy rather than cell number. Thus, most mutants perturbing mitosis or the cell cycle do not manifest a phenotype until the adult body differentiates in late larval and pupal stages. To identify cell-cycle components whose maternal pools are depleted in embryogenesis or that have specific functions in embryogenesis, we screened for mutants defective in cell division during embryogenesis. Five new alleles of Cyclin E were recovered, ranging from a missense mutation that is viable to stop codons causing embryonic lethality. These permitted us to investigate the requirements for Cyclin E function in neuroblast cell fate determination, a role previously shown for a null Cyclin E allele. The mutations causing truncation of the protein affect cell fate of the NB6-4 neuroblast, whereas the weak missense mutation has no effect. We identified mutations in the pavarotti (pav) and tumbleweed (tum) genes needed for cytokinesis by a phenotype of large and multinucleate cells in the embryonic epidermis and nervous system. Other mutations affecting the centromere protein CAL1 and the kinetochore protein Spc105R caused mitotic defects in the nervous system. PMID:23979936

  1. Massive programmed cell death in intestinal epithelial cells induced by three-dimensional growth conditions: suppression by mutant c-H-ras oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Deregulation of molecular pathways controlling cell survival and death, including programmed cell death, are thought to be important factors in tumor formation, disease progression, and response to therapy. Studies devoted to analyzing the role of programmed cell death in cancer have been carried out primarily using conventional monolayer cell culture systems. However the majority of cancers grow as three-dimensional solid tumors. Because gene expression, and possibly function, can be significantly altered under such conditions, we decided to analyze the control and characteristics of cell death using a compatible three- dimensional tissue culture system (multicellular spheroids) and compare the results obtained to those using two-dimensional monolayer cell culture. To do so we selected for study an immortalized, but nontumorigenic line of rat intestinal epithelial cells, called IEC-18, and several tumorigenic variants of IEC-18 obtained by transfection with a mutant (activated) c-H-ras oncogene. The rationale for choosing these cell lines was based in part on the fact that intestinal epithelial cells grow in vivo in a monolayer-like manner and form solid tumors only after sustaining certain genetic mutations, including those involving the ras gene family. We found that the IEC-18 cells, which grow readily and survive in monolayer cell culture, undergo massive cell death within 48-72 h when cultured as multicellular spheroids on a nonadhesive surface. This process was accompanied by a number of features associated with programmed cell death including chromatin condensation (Hoechst 33258 staining) apoptotic morphology, DNA degradation, and a virtual complete loss of colony forming (clonogenic) ability in the absence of apparent membrane damage as well as accumulation of lipid containing vacuoles in the cytoplasm. Moreover, enforced over-expression of a transfected bcl-2 gene could prevent this cell death process from taking place. In marked contrast, three different stably transfected ras clones of IEC-18 survived when grown as multicellular spheroids. In addition, an IEC cell line (called clone 25) carrying its mutant transfected ras under a glucocorticoid inducible promoter survived in three-dimensional culture only when the cells were exposed to dexamethasone. If exposure to dexamethasone was delayed for as long as 48 h the cells nevertheless survived, whereas the cells became irreversibly committed to programmed cell death (PCD) if exposed to dexamethasone after 72 h. These results suggest that intestinal epithelial cells may be programmed to activate a PCD pathway upon detachment from a physiologic two-dimensional monolayer configuration, and that this process of adhesion regulated programmed cell death (ARPCD) can be substantially suppressed by expression of a mutant ras oncogene.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8522614

  2. Cortical Efferents Lacking Mutant huntingtin Improve Striatal Neuronal Activity and Behavior in a Conditional Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Sánchez, Ana María; Burroughs, Courtney L.; Cavaliere, Stephen; Barton, Scott J.; Chen, Shirley; Yang, X. William

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal electrophysiological activity in the striatum, which receives dense innervation from the cerebral cortex, is believed to set the stage for the behavioral phenotype observed in Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative condition caused by mutation of the huntingtin (mhtt) protein. However, cortical involvement is far from clear. To determine whether abnormal striatal processing can be explained by mhtt alone (cell-autonomous model) or by mhtt in the corticostriatal projection cell–cell interaction model, we used BACHD/Emx1–Cre (BE) mice, a conditional HD model in which full-length mhtt is genetically reduced in cortical output neurons, including those that project to the striatum. Animals were assessed beginning at 20 weeks of age for at least the next 40 weeks, a range over which presymptomatic BACHD mice become symptomatic. Both open-field and nest-building behavior deteriorated progressively in BACHD mice relative to both BE and wild-type (WT) mice. Neuronal activity patterns in the dorsal striatum, which receives input from the primary motor cortex (M1), followed a similar age progression because BACHD activity changed more rapidly than either BE or WT mice. However, in the M1, BE neuronal activity differed significantly from both WT and BACHD. Although abnormal cortical activity in BE mice likely reflects input from mhtt-expressing afferents, including cortical interneurons, improvements in BE striatal activity and behavior suggest a critical role for mhtt in cortical output neurons in shaping the onset and progression of striatal dysfunction. PMID:25762686

  3. Arabidopsis genes essential for seedling viability: isolation of insertional mutants and molecular cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Budziszewski, G J; Lewis, S P; Glover, L W; Reineke, J; Jones, G; Ziemnik, L S; Lonowski, J; Nyfeler, B; Aux, G; Zhou, Q; McElver, J; Patton, D A; Martienssen, R; Grossniklaus, U; Ma, H; Law, M; Levin, J Z

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a large-scale genetic screen to identify genes with a seedling-lethal mutant phenotype. From screening approximately 38,000 insertional mutant lines, we identified >500 seedling-lethal mutants, completed cosegregation analysis of the insertion and the lethal phenotype for >200 mutants, molecularly characterized 54 mutants, and provided a detailed description for 22 of them. Most of the seedling-lethal mutants seem to affect chloroplast function because they display altered pigmentation and affect genes encoding proteins predicted to have chloroplast localization. Although a high level of functional redundancy in Arabidopsis might be expected because 65% of genes are members of gene families, we found that 41% of the essential genes found in this study are members of Arabidopsis gene families. In addition, we isolated several interesting classes of mutants and genes. We found three mutants in the recently discovered nonmevalonate isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway and mutants disrupting genes similar to Tic40 and tatC, which are likely to be involved in chloroplast protein translocation. Finally, we directly compared T-DNA and Ac/Ds transposon mutagenesis methods in Arabidopsis on a genome scale. In each population, we found only about one-third of the insertion mutations cosegregated with a mutant phenotype. PMID:11779813

  4. Conditional cannabinoid receptor type 1 mutants reveal neuron subpopulation-specific effects on behavioral and neuroendocrine stress responses.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Michel A; Marsicano, Giovanni; Wotjak, Carsten T; Lutz, Beat

    2008-09-01

    The complete genetic loss or pharmacological blockade of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) in mice results in both altered behavioral performance and increased stress hormone secretion in response to stressful encounters such as forced swim test (FST) exposure. CB1 is expressed on nerve terminals belonging to different neurotransmitter systems, including the glutamatergic and GABAergic system, where it is able to suppress excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, respectively. In the current study, we used the conditional mutagenesis approach in mice to investigate the neurotransmitter systems involved in these behavioral and neuroendocrine phenotypes in regard to CB1 signaling. Mice lacking CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1(-/-)) showed decreased passive stress coping (decreased immobility) in the FST, whereas mice lacking CB1 in principal forebrain neurons (CaMK-CB1(-/-)) and GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1(-/-)), respectively, behaved as littermate controls. However, we found increased FST-induced corticosterone secretion only in CaMK-CB1(-/-) mice, whereas Glu-CB1(-/-) and GABA-CB1(-/-) mice exhibited normal corticosterone release as compared to controls. Thus, behavioral and neuroendocrine acute stress coping in response to the FST is mainly influenced by CB1 signaling on different glutamatergic neuronal subpopulations, but not by CB1 on GABAergic neurons. PMID:18653287

  5. Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems. PMID:24867061

  6. Development and Characterization of a Xylose-Dependent System for Expression of Cloned Genes in Bacillus subtilis: Conditional Complementation of a Teichoic Acid Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Amit P.; Zhao, Xumei; Brown, Eric D.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a xylose-dependent expression system for tight and modulated expression of cloned genes in Bacillus subtilis. The expression system is contained on plasmid pSWEET for integration at the amyE locus of B. subtilis and incorporates components of the well-characterized, divergently transcribed xylose utilization operon. The system contains the xylose repressor encoded by xylR, the promoter and 5? portion of xylA containing an optimized catabolite-responsive element, and intergenic xyl operator sequences. We have rigorously compared this expression system to the isopropyl-?-d-thiogalactopyranoside-induced spac system using a thermostable ?-galactosidase reporter (BgaB) and found the xyl promoter-operator to have a greater capacity for modulated expression, a higher induction/repression ratio (279-fold for the xyl system versus 24-fold with the spac promoter), and lower levels of expression in the absence of an inducer. We have used this system to probe an essential function in wall teichoic acid biosynthesis in B. subtilis. Expression of the teichoic acid biosynthesis gene tagD, encoding glycerol-3-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, from the xylose-based expression system integrated at amyE exhibited xylose-dependent complementation of the temperature-sensitive mutant tag-12 when grown at the nonpermissive temperature. Plasmid pSWEET thus provides a robust new expression system for conditional complementation in B. subtilis. PMID:11133472

  7. Lethality of a dut (deoxyuridine triphosphatase) mutation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hajj, H H; Zhang, H; Weiss, B

    1988-01-01

    A chloramphenicol resistance gene was cloned into a plasmid-borne dut gene, producing an insertion mutation that was then transferred to the chromosome by allelic exchange. The mutation could not be acquired by haploid strains through substitutive recombination, even when two flanking markers were simultaneously transduced. The insertion was easily transferred, via generalized transduction, into the chromosomal dut region of strains harboring a lambda dut + transducing phage; however, the resulting dut mutant/lambda dut + merodiploid could not then be cured of the prophage. This apparent lethality of the mutation could not be explained by effects on adjacent genes; the dfp gene retained complementing activity, and a ttk insertion mutant was viable. The dut gene product, deoxyuridine triphosphatase, is known to reduce incorporation of uracil into DNA and to be required in the de novo synthesis of thymidylate. Therefore, an attempt was made to determine whether the dut insertion would be tolerated in strains carrying the following compensatory mutations: dcd (dCTP deaminase) and cdd (deoxycytidine deaminase), which should reduce dUTP formation; ung (uracil-DNA glycosylase), which should reduce fatally excessive excision repair; deoA (thymidine phosphorylase), which should enhance the utilization of exogenous thymidine; and sulA, which should reduce the lethal side effects of SOS regulon induction. These mutations, either alone or in various combinations, did not permit the survival of a haploid dut insertion mutant, suggesting that the dut gene product might have an essential function apart from its deoxyuridine triphosphatase activity. PMID:2830228

  8. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels.

  9. 316 .5'/^--^ LETHAL DOSES OF

    E-print Network

    inches long, were placed in each aquarium. The diluent in all cases was tap water of the University=i SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES Na 316 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF T FISH AND WILDLIFr f #12 A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner LETHAL DOSES

  10. Mutant PCNA alleles are associated with cdc phenotypes and sensitivity to DNA damage in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, M P; Wang, T S

    1998-03-01

    Twenty-eight site-directed mutations were introduced into the fission yeast gene (pcn1+) that encodes proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and their in vivo effects analyzed in a strain with a null pcn1 background. Mutants defective in enhancing processivity of DNA polymerase delta have previously been identified. In this study, we assessed all of the mutants for their sensitivities to temperature, hydroxyurea, UV irradiation and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and specific mutants were also tested for sensitivity to gamma irradiation. One cold-sensitive allele, pcn1-3, was characterized in detail. This mutant had a recessive cold-sensitive cdc phenotype and showed sensitivity to hydroxyurea, UV, and gamma irradiation. At the non-permissive temperature pcn1-3 protein was able to form homotrimers in solution and showed increased stimulation of both synthetic activity and processivity of DNA polymerase delta relative to the wild-type Pcn1+ protein. Epistasis analyses indicated that pcn1-3 is defective in the repair pathway involving rad2+ but not defective in the classical nucleotide excision repair pathway involving rad13+. Furthermore, pcn1-3 is either synthetically or conditionally lethal in null checkpoint rad backgrounds and displays a mitotic catastrophe phenotype in these backgrounds. A model for how pcn1-3 defects may affect DNA repair and replication is presented. PMID:9563836

  11. Comparative proteomics of a tor inducible Aspergillus fumigatus mutant reveals involvement of the Tor kinase in iron regulation.

    PubMed

    Baldin, Clara; Valiante, Vito; Krüger, Thomas; Schafferer, Lukas; Haas, Hubertus; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Brakhage, Axel A

    2015-07-01

    The Tor (target of rapamycin) kinase is one of the major regulatory nodes in eukaryotes. Here, we analyzed the Tor kinase in Aspergillus fumigatus, which is the most important airborne fungal pathogen of humans. Because deletion of the single tor gene was apparently lethal, we generated a conditional lethal tor mutant by replacing the endogenous tor gene by the inducible xylp-tor gene cassette. By both 2DE and gel-free LC-MS/MS, we found that Tor controls a variety of proteins involved in nutrient sensing, stress response, cell cycle progression, protein biosynthesis and degradation, but also processes in mitochondria, such as respiration and ornithine metabolism, which is required for siderophore formation. qRT-PCR analyses indicated that mRNA levels of ornithine biosynthesis genes were increased under iron limitation. When tor was repressed, iron regulation was lost. In a deletion mutant of the iron regulator HapX also carrying the xylp-tor cassette, the regulation upon iron deprivation was similar to that of the single tor inducible mutant strain. In line, hapX expression was significantly reduced when tor was repressed. Thus, Tor acts either upstream of HapX or independently of HapX as a repressor of the ornithine biosynthesis genes and thereby regulates the production of siderophores. PMID:25728394

  12. The Identification of Zebrafish Mutants Showing Alterations in Senescence-Associated Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Junzo; Koshimizu, Eriko; Qi, Jie; Nanjappa, Purushothama; Imamura, Shintaro; Islam, Asiful; Neuberg, Donna; Amsterdam, Adam; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    There is an interesting overlap of function in a wide range of organisms between genes that modulate the stress responses and those that regulate aging phenotypes and, in some cases, lifespan. We have therefore screened mutagenized zebrafish embryos for the altered expression of a stress biomarker, senescence-associated ?-galactosidase (SA-?-gal) in our current study. We validated the use of embryonic SA-?-gal production as a screening tool by analyzing a collection of retrovirus-insertional mutants. From a pool of 306 such mutants, we identified 11 candidates that showed higher embryonic SA-?-gal activity, two of which were selected for further study. One of these mutants is null for a homologue of Drosophila spinster, a gene known to regulate lifespan in flies, whereas the other harbors a mutation in a homologue of the human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (terf2) gene, which plays roles in telomere protection and telomere-length regulation. Although the homozygous spinster and terf2 mutants are embryonic lethal, heterozygous adult fish are viable and show an accelerated appearance of aging symptoms including lipofuscin accumulation, which is another biomarker, and shorter lifespan. We next used the same SA-?-gal assay to screen chemically mutagenized zebrafish, each of which was heterozygous for lesions in multiple genes, under the sensitizing conditions of oxidative stress. We obtained eight additional mutants from this screen that, when bred to homozygosity, showed enhanced SA-?-gal activity even in the absence of stress, and further displayed embryonic neural and muscular degenerative phenotypes. Adult fish that are heterozygous for these mutations also showed the premature expression of aging biomarkers and the accelerated onset of aging phenotypes. Our current strategy of mutant screening for a senescence-associated biomarker in zebrafish embryos may thus prove to be a useful new tool for the genetic dissection of vertebrate stress response and senescence mechanisms. PMID:18704191

  13. Synthetic lethal interaction of the mitochondrial phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin biosynthetic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vishal M; Thompson, Morgan N; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2005-10-21

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria contain enzymes required for synthesis of the phospholipids cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), which are enriched in mitochondrial membranes. Previous studies indicated that PE may compensate for the lack of CL, and vice versa. These data suggest that PE and CL have overlapping functions and that the absence of both lipids may be lethal. To address this hypothesis, we determined whether the crd1delta mutant, which lacks CL, was viable in genetic backgrounds in which PE synthesis was genetically blocked. Deletion of the mitochondrial PE pathway gene PSD1 was synthetically lethal with the crd1delta mutant, whereas deletion of the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum pathway genes PSD2 and DPL1 did not result in synthetic lethality. A 20-fold reduction in phosphatidylcholine did not affect the growth of crd1delta cells. Supplementation with ethanolamine, which led to increased PE synthesis, or with propanolamine, which led to synthesis of the novel phospholipid phosphatidylpropanolamine, failed to rescue the synthetic lethality of the crd1delta psd1delta cells. These results suggest that mitochondrial biosynthesis of PE is essential for the viability of yeast mutants lacking CL. PMID:16036913

  14. Characterization of cottonseed nutrients composition in near isogenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) mutant lines for fuzzless seed trait under well-watered and water stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton mutant near isogenic lines (NILs) for fuzzless seed trait has been used to investigate cell biology, genetic, and molecular processes of fiber initiation, development, fiber yield and quality. However, there is no information available on the effect of fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrie...

  15. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  16. Tityus serrulatus venom - A lethal cocktail.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Longhim, Heloisa Tavoni; Cremonez, Caroline Marroni; Oliveira, Guilherme Honda; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-15

    Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is the main scorpion species of medical importance in Brazil. Ts venom is composed of several compounds such as mucus, inorganic salts, lipids, amines, nucleotides, enzymes, kallikrein inhibitor, natriuretic peptide, proteins with high molecular mass, peptides, free amino acids and neurotoxins. Neurotoxins are considered the most responsible for the envenoming syndrome due to their pharmacological action on ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels. The major goal of this review is to present important advances in Ts envenoming research, correlating both the crude Ts venom and isolated toxins with alterations observed in all human systems. The most remarkable event lies in the Ts induced massive releasing of neurotransmitters influencing, directly or indirectly, the entire body. Ts venom proved to extremely affect nervous and muscular systems, to modulate the immune system, to induce cardiac disorders, to cause pulmonary edema, to decrease urinary flow and to alter endocrine, exocrine, reproductive, integumentary, skeletal and digestive functions. Therefore, Ts venom possesses toxins affecting all anatomic systems, making it a lethal cocktail. However, its low lethality may be due to the low venom mass injected, to the different venom compositions, the body characteristics and health conditions of the victim and the local of Ts sting. Furthermore, we also described the different treatments employed during envenoming cases. In particular, throughout the review, an effort will be made to provide information from an extensive documented studies concerning Ts venom in vitro, in animals and in humans (a total of 151 references). PMID:26522893

  17. Phosphate Homeostasis in Conditions of Phosphate Proficiency and Limitation in the Wild Type and the phoP Mutant of Streptomyces lividans

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Magali; Holland, Ian Barry; Virolle, Marie-Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate, as a constituent of the high energy molecules, ATP/GTP and polyphosphate, plays a crucial role in most of the metabolic processes of living organisms. Therefore, the adaptation to low Pi availability is a major challenge for bacteria. In Streptomyces, this adaptation is tightly controlled by the two component PhoR/PhoP system. In this study, the free intracellular Pi, ATP, ADP and polyP content of the wild type and the phoP mutant strain of S. lividans TK24 were analyzed at discrete time points throughout growth in Pi replete and limited media. PolyP length and content was shown to be directly related to the Pi content of the growth medium. In Pi repletion, ATP and high molecular weight (HMW) polyP contents were higher in the phoP mutant than in the WT strain. This supports the recently proposed repressive effect of PhoP on oxidative phosphorylation. High oxidative phosphorylation activity might also have a direct or indirect positive impact on HMW polyP synthesis. In Pi sufficiency as in Pi limitation, the degradation of these polymers was shown to be clearly delayed in the phoP mutant, indicating PhoP dependent expression of the enzymes involved in this degradation. The efficient storage of Pi as polyphosphate and/or its inefficient degradation in Pi in the phoP mutant resulted in low levels of free Pi and ATP that are likely to be, at least in part, responsible for the very poor growth of this mutant in Pi limitation. Furthermore, short polyP was shown to be present outside the cell, tightly bound to the mycelium via electrostatic interactions involving divalent cations. Less short polyP was found to be associated with the mycelium of the phoP mutant than with that of the WT strain, indicating that generation and externalization of these short polyP molecules was directly or indirectly dependent on PhoP. PMID:25978423

  18. Ethical language and decision-making for prenatally diagnosed lethal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Dominic; de Crespigny, Lachlan; Xafis, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Summary In clinical practice, and in the medical literature, severe congenital malformations such as trisomy 18, anencephaly, and renal agenesis are frequently referred to as ‘lethal’ or as ‘incompatible with life’. However, there is no agreement about a definition of lethal malformations, nor which conditions should be included in this category. Review of outcomes for malformations commonly designated ‘lethal’ reveals that prolonged survival is possible, even if rare. This article analyses the concept of lethal malformations and compares it to the problematic concept of ‘futility’. We recommend avoiding the term ‘lethal’ and suggest that counseling should focus on salient prognostic features instead. For conditions with a high chance of early death or profound impairment in survivors despite treatment, perinatal and neonatal palliative care would be ethical. However, active obstetric and neonatal management, if desired, may also sometimes be appropriate. PMID:25200733

  19. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed Central

    Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacological approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be “undruggable.” This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS mutant but not wild type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a re-evaluation of the approaches taken. Based on experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS mutant cancers. PMID:25878361

  20. Early events of lethal action by tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Raulston, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The immediate activities of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin, were investigated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The influence of carbon growth substate and the antibiotic exposure environment in the magnitude of activity were examined. Lethality by 8 {mu}g/ml tobramycin occurred rapidly (1 to 3 minutes). The release of specific cellular components into the supernatant was associated with lethality. This material was initially detected as an increase in UV-absorbance. Magnesium in the reaction mixture provided protection against lethality and leakage, but did not reverse lethal damage after a 3 minute tobramycin treatment. Also, uptake of {sup 3}H-tobramycin was reduced in the presence of magnesium. Cells grown with glucose as a carbon source were more susceptible than organic acid grown cells as was the rapidity and amount of cell damage. Analyses of the leakage material revealed a 2-fold increase of protein in the supernatant after a 1-3 minute treatment which paralleled lethality. A prominent 29 kDa protein was observed by SDS-PAGE in the released material, which has been identified as the periplasmic enzyme, {beta}-lactamase. The immediate activities of tobramycin did not involve (i) release of overall cell protein, (ii) massive loss of total pool amino acids, (iii) cell lysis, (iv) inhibition of proline uptake, (v) release of lipopolysaccharide, or (vi) leakage of ATP. Electron microscopy showed no apparent damage after a 3 minute exposure. 40% inhibition of protein synthesis had occurred by 3 minutes of exposure, while release of UV-absorbing material and lethality were detectable after only 1 minute. Resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa did not leak under the same experimental conditions, but one of two susceptible strains examined did show increased UV-absorbance following treatment.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a low phytic acid rice mutant reveals a mutation in the rice orthologue of maize mik.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a forward genetics approach, we isolated two independent low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants, N15-186 and N15-375. Both mutants are caused by single gene, recessive non-lethal mutations which result in approximately 75% (N15-186) and 43% (N15-375) reductions in seed phytic acid (inositol hexaki...

  2. Compartmentalized self-replication under fast PCR cycling conditions yields Taq DNA polymerase mutants with increased DNA-binding affinity and blood resistance

    PubMed Central

    Arezi, Bahram; McKinney, Nancy; Hansen, Connie; Cayouette, Michelle; Fox, Jeffrey; Chen, Keith; Lapira, Jennifer; Hamilton, Sarah; Hogrefe, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Faster-cycling PCR formulations, protocols, and instruments have been developed to address the need for increased throughput and shorter turn-around times for PCR-based assays. Although run times can be cut by up to 50%, shorter cycle times have been correlated with lower detection sensitivity and increased variability. To address these concerns, we applied Compartmentalized Self Replication (CSR) to evolve faster-cycling mutants of Taq DNA polymerase. After five rounds of selection using progressively shorter PCR extension times, individual mutations identified in the fastest-cycling clones were randomly combined using ligation-based multi-site mutagenesis. The best-performing combinatorial mutants exhibit 35- to 90-fold higher affinity (lower Kd) for primed template and a moderate (2-fold) increase in extension rate compared to wild-type Taq. Further characterization revealed that CSR-selected mutations provide increased resistance to inhibitors, and most notably, enable direct amplification from up to 65% whole blood. We discuss the contribution of individual mutations to fast-cycling and blood-resistant phenotypes. PMID:25177317

  3. Lethal and Amanitin-Resistance Mutations in the Caenorhabditis Elegans Ama-1 and Ama-2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, T. M.; Bullerjahn, AME.; Riddle, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans resistant to ?-amanitin have been isolated at a frequency of about 1.6 X 10(-6) after EMS mutagenesis of the wild-type strain, N2. Four new dominant resistance mutations have been studied genetically. Three are alleles of a previously identified gene, ama-1 IV, encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The fourth mutation defines a new gene, ama-2 V. Unlike the ama-1 alleles, the ama-2 mutation exhibits a recessive-lethal phenotype. Growth and reproduction of N2 was inhibited at a concentration of 10 ?g/ml amanitin, whereas ama-2/+ animals were inhibited at 100 ?g/ml, and 800 ?g/ml was required to inhibit growth of ama-1/+ larvae. We have also determined that two reference strains used for genetic mapping, dpy-11(e224)V and sma-1(e30)V, are at least four-fold more sensitive to amanitin that the wild-type strain. Using an amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) or ama-1(m322) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. The frequency of EMS-induced lethal ama-1 mutations is approximately 1.7 X 10(-3), 1000-fold higher than the frequency of amanitin-resistance alleles. Nine of the lethal alleles are apparent null mutations, and they exhibit L1-lethal phenotypes at both 20° and 25°. Six alleles result in partial loss of RNA polymerase II function as determined by their sterile phenotypes at 20°. All but one of these latter mutations exhibit a more severe phenotype at 25°C. We have also selected seven EMS-induced revertants of three different ama-1 lethals. These revertants restore dominant resistance to amanitin. The selection for revertants also produced eight new dominant amanitin resistance alleles on the balancer chromosome, nT1. PMID:3197954

  4. Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide…

  5. Cardiac-Specific Activation of IKK2 Leads to Defects in Heart Development and Embryonic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Katja; Boettger, Thomas; Illing, Annett; Kostin, Sawa; Walther, Paul; Braun, Thomas; Wirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-?B has been associated with a range of pathological conditions of the heart, mainly based on its function as a master regulator of inflammation and pro-survival factor. Here, we addressed the question what effects activation of NF-?B can have during murine heart development. We expressed a constitutively active (CA) mutant of IKK2, the kinase activating canonical NF-?B signaling, specifically in cardiomyocytes under the control of the ?-myosin heavy chain promoter. Expression of IKK2-CA resulted in embryonic lethality around E13. Embryos showed defects in compact zone formation and the contractile apparatus, and overall were characterized by widespread inflammation with infiltration of myeloid cells. Gene expression analysis suggested an interferon type I signature, with increased expression of interferon regulatory factors. While apoptosis of cardiomyocytes was only increased at later stages, their proliferation was decreased early on, providing an explanation for the disturbed compact zone formation. Mechanistically, this could be explained by activation of the JAK/STAT axis and increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. A rescue experiment with an I?B? superrepressor demonstrated that the phenotype was dependent on NF-?B. We conclude that activation of NF-?B is detrimental during normal heart development due to excessive activation of pro-inflammatory pathways. PMID:26539991

  6. Lethal factor, but not edema factor, is required to cause fatal anthrax in cynomolgus macaques after pulmonary spore challenge.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Julie A; Lovchik, Julie A; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F; Lyons, C Rick

    2014-12-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti-protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores. PMID:25285720

  7. Lethal Factor, but Not Edema Factor, Is Required to Cause Fatal Anthrax in Cynomolgus Macaques after Pulmonary Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutt, Julie A.; Lovchik, Julie A.; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L.; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F.; Lyons, C. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti–protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores. PMID:25285720

  8. Restoration of Dlk1 and Rtl1 Is Necessary but Insufficient to Rescue Lethality in Intergenic Differentially Methylated Region (IG-DMR)-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Ryota; Kono, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    In the Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted domain, an intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) regulates the parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes. The maternally inherited deletion of IG-DMR (IG-DMR(?/+)) results in perinatal lethality because of the overexpression of paternally expressed genes and repression of maternally expressed noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including Gtl2. To better understand the possible contribution of paternally expressed genes to the lethality, we attempted to rescue the lethality of IG-DMR(?/+) mutants by restoring the paternally expressed genes. Because the paternally inherited Gtl2 deletion (Gtl2(+/?)) induced a decrease in the expression of paternally expressed genes, we crossed female IG-DMR heterozygous mice and male Gtl2 heterozygous mutant mice. The resultant IG-DMR(?/+)/Gtl2(+/?) double mutant mice had normal expression levels of paternally expressed genes, and none of them showed perinatal lethality; however, most mice showed postnatal lethality with decreased expression of the maternally expressed ncRNAs. Thus, we inferred that paternally expressed genes are necessary for perinatal survivability and that maternally expressed ncRNAs are involved in postnatal lethality. PMID:20511218

  9. Lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millson, Charles E.; Wilson, Michael; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Mlkvy, Peter; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a large number of gastroduodenal disorders. Clearance of the bacteria has been shown to benefit patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and certain rare types of gastric tumors. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are the mainstay of current treatment strategies but side-effects, poor compliance, and drug resistance limit their usefulness. We sensitized H. pylori with toluidine blue, haematoporphyrin derivative, aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine, methylene blue or protoporphyrin IX prior to exposure to low-power laser light from either a gallium aluminum arsenide laser or a helium neon gas laser. All 5 sensitizers caused reductions of greater than 1000-fold in the number of viable bacteria. Light alone had no effect and only HpD caused a significant decrease in bacterial numbers without laser light. Next, we sensitized H. mustelae on explanted ferret gastric mucosa (ex vivo) with the same sensitizers and exposed them to light from a copper vapor pumped dye laser tuned appropriately. MB caused significant reductions in bacterial counts. Successful lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter pylori both in vitro and ex vivo raises the possibility of a local method for eradicating the bacteria, especially as the bacteria are only found in those parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are accessible to the endoscope.

  10. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  11. Construction of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and analysis of their growth under stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that is difficult to eliminate since it can survive under multiple stress conditions such as low pH and low temperature. Understanding its survival under stress conditions is important to control this pathogen in food. ABC transporters have been shown...

  12. Gene essentiality and synthetic lethality in haploid human cells.

    PubMed

    Blomen, Vincent A; Májek, Peter; Jae, Lucas T; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Staring, Jacqueline; Sacco, Roberto; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Olk, Nadine; Stukalov, Alexey; Marceau, Caleb; Janssen, Hans; Carette, Jan E; Bennett, Keiryn L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-11-27

    Although the genes essential for life have been identified in less complex model organisms, their elucidation in human cells has been hindered by technical barriers. We used extensive mutagenesis in haploid human cells to identify approximately 2000 genes required for optimal fitness under culture conditions. To study the principles of genetic interactions in human cells, we created a synthetic lethality network focused on the secretory pathway based exclusively on mutations. This revealed a genetic cross-talk governing Golgi homeostasis, an additional subunit of the human oligosaccharyltransferase complex, and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase ? adaptor hijacked by viruses. The synthetic lethality map parallels observations made in yeast and projects a route forward to reveal genetic networks in diverse aspects of human cell biology. PMID:26472760

  13. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  14. "Lethal" Fetal Anomalies and Elective Cesarean.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Mejebi T; White, Amina

    2015-11-01

    Deborah is a thirty-three-year-old who presented to labor and delivery at thirty-seven weeks gestation with complaints of contractions. Upon arrival, she explained that her fetus, Nathan, had been diagnosed with a "lethal" condition by her primary obstetrician. At twenty-two weeks gestation, an amniocentesis confirmed trisomy 13, a chromosomal abnormality leading to miscarriage or stillbirth in nearly one-half of affected pregnancies. During the admission process, Deborah voices the worry that due to Nathan's brain and heart structure, vaginal delivery could be traumatic and cause him to suffer. Deborah wishes for him to have as painless and as dignified a death as possible; cesarean section, she feels, will achieve this. Yet with her history of three prior vaginal deliveries, normally progressing labor, and poor fetal prognosis that is unlikely to improve with cesarean delivery, there is no maternal or fetal indication for a cesarean section. Should the obstetrician proceed with a cesarean delivery despite knowing that it would expose the mother to surgical risks with little or no corresponding fetal or neonatal benefit? PMID:26556142

  15. Construction of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame Deletions in the phosphotransferase transport system (PTS) and analysis of their growth under stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that is difficult to eliminate due to its ability to survive under different stress conditions such as low pH and high salt. To better control this pathogen in food, it is important to understand its survival mechanisms under these stress ...

  16. Crystallographic studies of the Anthrax lethal toxin. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The lethal form of Anthrax results from the inhalation of anthrax spores. Death is primarily due to the effects of the lethal toxin (Protective Antigen (PA) + Lethal Factor) from the causative agent, Bacillus anthracis. All the Anthrax vaccines currently in use or under development contain or produce PA, the major antigenic component of anthrax toxin, and there is a clear need for an improved vaccine for human use. In the previous report we described the first atomic resolution structure of PA, revealing that the molecule is composed largely of beta-sheets organized into four domains. This information can be used in the design. of recombinant PA vaccines. In this report we describe additional features of the full-length PA molecule derived from further crystallographic refinement and careful examination of the structure. We compare two crystal forms of PA grown at different pH values and discuss the functional implications. A complete definition of the function of each domain must await the crystal structure of the PA63 heptamer. We have grown crystals of the heptamer under both detergent and detergent-free conditions, and made substantial progress towards the crystal structure. The mechanism of anthrax intoxication in the light of our results is reviewed.

  17. Effect of vanillic acid on COQ6 mutants identified in patients with coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Doimo, Mara; Trevisson, Eva; Airik, Rannar; Bergdoll, Marc; Santos-Ocańa, Carlos; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Navas, Placido; Pierrel, Fabien; Salviati, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Human COQ6 encodes a monooxygenase which is responsible for the C5-hydroxylation of the quinone ring of coenzyme Q (CoQ). Mutations in COQ6 cause primary CoQ deficiency, a condition responsive to oral CoQ10 supplementation. Treatment is however still problematic given the poor bioavailability of CoQ10. We employed S. cerevisiae lacking the orthologous gene to characterize the two different human COQ6 isoforms and the mutations found in patients. COQ6 isoform a can partially complement the defective yeast, while isoform b, which lacks part of the FAD-binding domain, is inactive but partially stable, and could have a regulatory/inhibitory function in CoQ10 biosynthesis. Most mutations identified in patients, including the frameshift Q461fs478X mutation, retain residual enzymatic activity, and all patients carry at least one hypomorphic allele, confirming that the complete block of CoQ biosynthesis is lethal. These mutants are also partially stable and allow the assembly of the CoQ biosynthetic complex. In fact treatment with two hydroxylated analogues of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, namely, vanillic acid or 3-4-hydroxybenzoic acid, restored the respiratory growth of yeast ?coq6 cells expressing the mutant huCOQ6-isoa proteins. These compounds, and particularly vanillic acid, could therefore represent an interesting therapeutic option for COQ6 patients. PMID:24140869

  18. Multiple mutant of Escherichia coli synthesizing virtually thymineless DNA during limited growth.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hajj, H H; Wang, L; Weiss, B

    1992-01-01

    The dut gene of Escherichia coli encodes deoxyuridine triphosphatase, an enzyme that prevents the incorporation of dUTP into DNA and that is needed in the de novo biosynthesis of thymidylate. We produced a conditionally lethal dut(Ts) mutation and isolated a phenotypic revertant that had a mutation in an unknown gene tentatively designated dus (for dut suppressor). The dus mutation restored the ability of the dut mutant to grow at 42 degrees C without restoring its enzymatic activity or thymidylate independence. A strain was constructed bearing, in addition to these mutations, ones affecting the following genes and their corresponding products: ung, which produces uracil-DNA N-glycosylase, a repair enzyme that removes uracil from DNA; deoA, which produces thymidine (deoxyuridine) phosphorylase, which would degrade exogenous deoxyuridine; and thyA, which produces thymidylate synthase. When grown at 42 degrees C in minimal medium containing deoxyuridine, the multiple mutant displayed a 93 to 96% substitution of uracil for thymine in new DNA. Growth stopped after the cellular DNA had increased 1.6- to 1.9-fold and the cell mass had increased 1.7- to 2.7-fold, suggesting a general failure of macromolecular biosynthesis. DNA hybridization confirmed that the uracil-containing DNA was chromosomal and that new rounds of initiation must have occurred during its synthesis. Images PMID:1624437

  19. Conditionals

    E-print Network

    von Fintel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the classic accounts of the meaning of conditionals (material implication, strict implication, variably strict conditional) and discusses the difference between indicative and subjunctive/counterfactual ...

  20. Lipid biosynthesis in chloroplast mutants of barley.

    PubMed

    Appelqvist, L A; Boynton, J E; Henningsen, K W; Stumpf, P K; von Wettstein, D

    1968-07-01

    The capacity of leaf slices from light-grown seedlings of wild type barley and 10 xantha mutants at six different gene loci to incorporate acetate-(14)C into various lipids has been investigated. The fatty acid composition of the leaf lipids in these lethal mutants was similar to that of the wild type, but the fatty acid labeling pattern in the individual lipid classes can be drastically altered by these mutations, which affect chloroplast differentiation. A genetic block in chlorophyll synthesis, caused by mutations in the xan-f locus, leads to a repression of the formation of chloroplast membranes and of acetate incorporation into phospho-, sulfo-, and galacto-lipids (the acetate being preferentially channeled into a lipid fraction containing steroids and free fatty acids). Two leucine "auxotrophs" at different loci, which in the absence of leucine in the growth medium produce giant grana and accumulate some chlorophyll, differed considerably in the amount of labeling of their polar lipids during incubation. Leaves of xan-a(11), containing plastids with little chlorophyll, highly disorganized membrane systems, and large bodies with osmiophilic deposits, were nonetheless equal to wild type in their capacity to incorporate acetate-(14)C into phospho-, sulfo-, and galacto-lipids. The mutants at the xan-m locus have plastids with undispersed prolamellar bodies and osmiophilic packages of grana-like membranes associations. Leaf slices of these mutants synthesized considerably more linolenic acid-(14)C, which was incorporated into monogalactosyl diglycerides, than did slices of the wild type. This led to a labeling pattern of the fatty acids in the monogalactolipids which was remarkably similar to their endogenous fatty acid composition. PMID:5725883

  1. Deletion of peptide amidation enzymatic activity leads to edema and embryonic lethality in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk, Traci A; Ning, Yun; Hsu, Ming-Sing; Peng, Bonnie; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A; Pintar, John E

    2005-11-15

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) catalyzes the COOH-terminal amidation of peptide hormones. We previously had found high expression of PAM in several regions of the developing rodent. To determine the function of PAM during mouse embryogenesis, we produced a null mutant of the PAM gene. Homozygous mutants die in utero between e14.5 and e15.5 with severe edema that is likely due to cardiovascular deficits. These defects include thinning of the aorta and carotid arteries and are very similar to those of the recently characterized adrenomedullin (AM) gene KO despite the presence of elevated immunoreactive AM in PAM KO embryos. No peptide amidation activity was detected in PAM mutant embryos, and there was no moderation of the AM-like phenotype that could be expected if any alternative peptide amidation mechanism exists in the mouse. Despite the proposed contribution of amidated peptides to neuronal cell proliferation, no alteration in neuroblast proliferation was observed in homozygous mutant embryos prior to lethality. Mice heterozygous for the mutant PAM allele develop normally and express wildtype levels of several amidated peptides despite having one half the wildtype levels of PAM activity and PAM protein. Nonetheless, both an increase in adiposity and a mild glucose intolerance developed in aged (>10 months) heterozygous mice compared to littermate controls. Ablation of PAM thus demonstrates an essential function for this gene during mouse development, while alterations in PAM activity in the adult may underlie more subtle physiologic effects. PMID:16225857

  2. Live deaths online: internet suicide and lethality.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carolina A

    2012-01-01

    The Internet provides an infinite platform for the portrayal of lethal events. Beyond mere display, however, it dispenses information, allows for participation and sharing of content, and constitutes a virtual interactive forum. The Internet may ultimately shape society's approach to perceiving and dealing with death. Thus, psychiatrists may wish to be aware of these matters so that they may be considered in assessments and clinical care. In this article, the author attempts to identify key online locations where lethality is portrayed and how it may affect the individual patient and practitioner and the population at large. PMID:23233475

  3. Genome-Wide Screen for Oxalate-Sensitive Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae? †

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, V.; Stotz, H. U.; Hippchen, K.; Bakalinsky, A. T.

    2007-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor produced by phytopathogenic filamentous fungi. In order to discover yeast genes whose orthologs in the pathogen may confer self-tolerance and whose plant orthologs may protect the host, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library consisting of 4,827 haploid mutants harboring deletions in nonessential genes was screened for growth inhibition and survival in a rich medium containing 30 mM oxalic acid at pH 3. A total of 31 mutants were identified that had significantly lower cell yields in oxalate medium than in an oxalate-free medium. About 35% of these mutants had not previously been detected in published screens for sensitivity to sorbic or citric acid. Mutants impaired in endosomal transport, the rgp1?, ric1?, snf7?, vps16?, vps20?, and vps51? mutants, were significantly overrepresented relative to their frequency among all verified yeast open reading frames. Oxalate exposure to a subset of five mutants, the drs2?, vps16?, vps51?, ric1?, and rib4? mutants, was lethal. With the exception of the rib4? mutant, all of these mutants are impaired in vesicle-mediated transport. Indirect evidence is provided suggesting that the sensitivity of the rib4? mutant, a riboflavin auxotroph, is due to oxalate-mediated interference with riboflavin uptake by the putative monocarboxylate transporter Mch5. PMID:17644632

  4. Mice Expressing Mutant Trpv4 Recapitulate the Human TRPV4 Disorders††

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuqing; Lee, Brendan; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations in TRPV4 are known to cause a spectrum of skeletal dysplasias ranging from autosomal dominant brachyolmia to lethal metatropic dysplasia. To develop an animal model of these disorders, we created transgenic mice expressing either wild-type or mutant TRPV4. Mice transgenic for wild-type Trpv4 showed no morphological changes at embryonic day 16.5, but did have a delay in bone mineralization. Overexpression of a mutant TRPV4 caused a lethal skeletal dysplasia that phenocopied many abnormalities associated with metatropic dysplasia in humans, including dumbbell-shaped long bones, a small ribcage, abnormalities in the autopod, and abnormal ossification in the vertebrae. The difference in phenotype between embryos transgenic for wild-type or mutant Trpv4 demonstrates that an increased amount of wild-type protein can be tolerated and that an activating mutation of this protein is required to produce a skeletal dysplasia phenotype. PMID:24644033

  5. Effects of fuzzless cottonseed phenotype on cottonseed nutrient composition in near isogenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) mutant lines under well-watered and water stress conditions1

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Turley, Rickie B.

    2013-01-01

    There is no information available on the effect of fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrient composition (minerals, N, S, protein, and oil) under drought stress. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrients using five sets of near-isogenic lines (NILs). Each set consists of two lines that share the same genetic background, but differ in seed fuzziness (fuzzy, F; fuzzless, N). The near isogenic lines will enable us to compare the effect of the trait without confounding the genotypic background effects. We hypothesized that since the fuzzless trait involved in fiber initiation development, and was reported to be involved in biochemical, molecular, and genetic processes, this trait may also alter cottonseed nutrient composition. Results showed that NIL sets accumulated different levels of minerals in seeds and leaves, and the fuzzless trait (N) in most of the lines altered seed and leaf mineral accumulations when compared with fuzzy lines (F) or the control line. For example, K, P, Mg, Cu, and Na concentrations in seeds were higher in MD N and STV N than in their equivalent MD F and STV F lines. Leaf concentrations of Ca, K, Mg, S, B, Cu, and Fe in MD N lines were higher than MD F line. Lower levels of nutrients in seeds and leaves were observed under water stress conditions, especially Ca, Mg, N, and B in seeds.Generally and with few exceptions, seed protein was higher in fuzzy lines than in fuzzless lines; however, seed oil was higher in fuzzless lines than in fuzzy lines. Our research demonstrated that fuzzless trait altered the composition and level of nutrients in seed and leaves in well watered and water stressed plants. Differences in protein and oil between fuzzy and fuzzless seeds may indicate alteration in nitrogen and carbon fixation and metabolism. The differential accumulation of seed nutrients in this germplasm could be used by cotton breeders to select for higher cottonseed quality. PMID:24416037

  6. Deadly Lessons: Understanding Lethal School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark H., Ed.; Petrie, Carol V., Ed.; Braga, Anthony A., Ed.; McLaughlin, Brenda L., Ed.

    This collection of papers is the outcome of the National Academies' effort to glean information from six different case studies of student-perpetrated school shootings. Part 1, "Case Studies of Lethal School Violence," includes: "The Copycat Factor: Mental Illness, Guns, and the Shooting Incident at Heritage High School, Rockdale County, Georgia"…

  7. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Raymond C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry. PMID:16129826

  8. Superior triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless mutants of Scenedesmus obliquus: (I) mutant generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising platform for producing neutral lipids, to be used in the application for biofuels or commodities in the feed and food industry. A very promising candidate is the oleaginous green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, because it accumulates up to 45% w/w triacylglycerol (TAG) under nitrogen starvation. Under these conditions, starch is accumulated as well. Starch can amount up to 38% w/w under nitrogen starvation, which is a substantial part of the total carbon captured. When aiming for optimized TAG production, blocking the formation of starch could potentially increase carbon allocation towards TAG. In an attempt to increase TAG content, productivity and yield, starchless mutants of this high potential strain were generated using UV mutagenesis. Previous studies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that blocking the starch synthesis yields higher TAG contents, although these TAG contents do not surpass those of oleaginous microalgae yet. So far no starchless mutants in oleaginous green microalgae have been isolated that result in higher TAG productivities. Results Five starchless mutants have been isolated successfully from over 3,500 mutants. The effect of the mutation on biomass and total fatty acid (TFA) and TAG productivity under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions was studied. All five starchless mutants showed a decreased or completely absent starch content. In parallel, an increased TAG accumulation rate was observed for the starchless mutants and no substantial decrease in biomass productivity was perceived. The most promising mutant showed an increase in TFA productivity of 41% at 4 days after nitrogen depletion, reached a TAG content of 49.4% (% of dry weight) and had no substantial change in biomass productivity compared to the wild type. Conclusions The improved S. obliquus TAG production strains are the first starchless mutants in an oleaginous green microalga that show enhanced TAG content under photoautotrophic conditions. These results can pave the way towards a more feasible microalgae-driven TAG production platform. PMID:24920957

  9. Lethal and potentially lethal lesions induced by radiation--a unified repair model.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B

    1986-05-01

    A model of radiation action is described which unifies several of the major existing concepts which have been applied to cell killing. Called the lethal and potentially lethal (LPL) model, it combines the ideas of lesion interaction, irreparable lesions caused by single tracks, linear lesion fixation, lesion repair via first-order kinetics, and binary misrepair. Two different kinds of lesions are hypothesized: irreparable (lethal) and repairable (potentially lethal) lesions. They are tentatively being identified with DNA double-strand breaks of different severity. Two processes compete for depletion of the potentially lethal lesions: correct repair following first-order kinetics, and misrepair following second-order kinetics. Fixation of these lesions can also occur. The model applies presently only to plateau (stationary)-phase cells. Radiobiological phenomena described include effects of low dose rate, high LET, and repair kinetics as measured with repair inhibitors such as hypertonic solution and beta-arabinofuranosyladenine (beta-araA). One consequence of the model is that repair of sublethal damage and the slow component of the repair of potentially lethal damage are two manifestations of the same repair process. Hypertonic treatment fixes a completely new class of lesions which normally repair correctly. Another consequence of the model is that the initial slope of the survival curve depends on the amount of time available for repair after irradiation. The "dose-rate factor" occurring in several linear-quadratic formulations is shown to emerge when appropriate low-dose and long-repair-time approximations are made. PMID:3704115

  10. Functional genomics reveals the induction of inflammatory response and metalloproteinase gene expression during lethal Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cilloniz, Cristian; Ebihara, Hideki; Ni, Chester; Neumann, Gabriele; Korth, Marcus J; Kelly, Sara M; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G

    2011-09-01

    Ebola virus is the etiologic agent of a lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with mortality rates of up to 90%. Previous studies with Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV), mouse-adapted virus (MA-ZEBOV), and mutant viruses (ZEBOV-NP(ma), ZEBOV-VP24(ma), and ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma)) allowed us to identify the mutations in viral protein 24 (VP24) and nucleoprotein (NP) responsible for acquisition of high virulence in mice. To elucidate specific molecular signatures associated with lethality, we compared global gene expression profiles in spleen samples from mice infected with these viruses and performed an extensive functional analysis. Our analysis showed that the lethal viruses (MA-ZEBOV and ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma)) elicited a strong expression of genes 72 h after infection. In addition, we found that although the host transcriptional response to ZEBOV-VP24(ma) was nearly the same as that to ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma), the contribution of a mutation in the NP gene was required for a lethal phenotype. Further analysis indicated that one of the most relevant biological functions differentially regulated by the lethal viruses was the inflammatory response, as was the induction of specific metalloproteinases, which were present in our newly identify functional network that was associated with Ebola virus lethality. Our results suggest that this dysregulated proinflammatory response increased the severity of disease. Consequently, the newly discovered molecular signature could be used as the starting point for the development of new drugs and therapeutics. To our knowledge, this is the first study that clearly defines unique molecular signatures associated with Ebola virus lethality. PMID:21734050

  11. Growth and development of maize that contains mutant tubulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Wick

    2004-07-23

    Mutant maize plants containing a Mu transposon disrupting one of the five beta tubulin genes of interest were followed for several generations and hybridized with each other to produce plants containing disruptions in both copies of a single gene or disruption of more than one tubulin gene. Seedlings of some of these plants were grown under chilling conditions for a few weeks. After DOE funding ended, plants have been assessed to see whether mutant are more or less tolerant to chilling. Other mutant plants will be assessed for their male and female fertility relative to non-mutant siblings or other close relatives.

  12. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Melloni N.; Dunning, Jonathan P; Wiley, Ronald G; Chesler, Elissa J; Johnson, Dabney K; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  13. Carbon monoxide and lethal arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, J.P.; Schwartz, P.J.; Vanoli, E.; Stramba-Badiale, M.; De Ferrari, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of acute exposure to carbon monoxide on ventricular arrhythmias was studied in a previously described chronically maintained animal model of sudden cardiac death. In 60 percent of dogs with a healed anterior myocardial infarction, the combination of mild exercise and acute myocardial ischemia induces ventricular fibrillation. The events in this model are highly reproducible, thus allowing study by internal control analysis. Dogs that develop ventricular fibrillation during the test of exercise and acute myocardial ischemia are considered at high risk for sudden death and are defined as 'susceptible'; dogs that survive the test without a fatal arrhythmia are considered at low risk for sudden death and are defined as 'resistant.' In the current study, the effects of carboxyhemoglobin levels ranging from 5 to 15 percent were tested in resistant and susceptible dogs. A trend toward higher heart rates was observed at all levels of carboxyhemoglobin, although significant differences were observed only with 15 percent carboxyhemoglobin. This trend was observed at rest and during exercise in both resistant and susceptible dogs. In resistant animals, in which acute myocardial ischemia is typically associated with bradycardia even under the control condition, this reflex response occurred earlier and was augmented after exposure to carbon monoxide. This effect may depend on the increased hypoxic challenge caused by carbon monoxide, and thus on an augmentation of the neural reflex activation or a sensitization of the sinus node to acetylcholine induced by hypoxia. In both resistant and susceptible dogs, carbon monoxide exposure induced a worsening of ventricular arrhythmias in a minority of cases. This worsening was not reproducible in subsequent trials. These data indicate that acute exposure to carbon monoxide is seldom arrhythmogenic in dogs that have survived myocardial infarction. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E. (Cross Plains, WI); Pan, David (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  15. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  16. Rapid Antibiotic Resistance Evolution of GASP Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Kim, Hyunsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The GASP phenotype in bacteria is due to a mutation which enables the bacteria to grow under high stress conditions where other bacteria stop growing. We probe using our Death Galaxy microenvironment how rapidly the GASP mutant can evolve resistance to mutagenic antibiotics compared to wild-type bacteria, and explore the genomic landscape changes due to the evolution of resistance.

  17. Evolution of Chilean colonizing populations of Drosophila subobscura: lethal genes

    E-print Network

    Huey, Raymond B.

    ). For example, the high frequency of lethal genes is likely an indicator of centrality versus marginalityEvolution of Chilean colonizing populations of Drosophila subobscura: lethal genes and chromosomal+Business Media B.V. 2008 Abstract Knowledge of the frequency, distribution, and fate of lethal genes

  18. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  19. An Arabidopsis pex10 Null Mutant Is Embryo Lethal, Implicating Peroxisomes in an Essential Role during

    E-print Network

    functions in plants, including seed reserve mobilization, photorespiration, defense against oxidative stress during Plant Embryogenesis1 Imogen A. Sparkes, Federica Brandizzi, Stephen P. Slocombe, Mahmoud El-Shami2 , Chris Hawes, and Alison Baker* Centre for Plant Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT United

  20. Enhancement of Overgrowth by Gene Interactions in Lethal(2)giant Discs Imaginal Discs from Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Buratovich, M. A.; Bryant, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Recessive lethal mutations of the lethal(2)giant discs (l(2)gd) and lethal(2)fat (l(2)ft) loci of Drosophila melanogaster cause imaginal disc hyperplasia during a prolonged larval stage. Imaginal discs from l(2)ft l(2)gd or Gl(2)gd double homozygotes show more extensive overgrowth than in either single homozygote, and double homozygous l(2)ft l(2)gd mitotic clones in adult flies show much more overgrowth than is seen in clones homozygous for either l(2)gd or l(2)ft alone. dachsous (ds) also acts as an enhancer of l(2)gd, producing dramatically overgrown discs and causing failure to pupariate in double homozygotes. The comb gap (cg) mutation, which also interacts with ds, greatly enhances the tendency of imaginal discs from l(2)gd larvae to duplicate as they overgrow. If l(2)gd homozygotes are made heterozygous for l(2)ft, then several discs duplicate, indicating that l(2)ft acts as a dominant enhancer of l(2)gd. l(2)ft also acts as a dominant enhancer of l(2)gd, and conversely l(2)gd acts as a dominant modifier of l(2)ft. The enhancement of overgrowth caused by various mutant combinations is accompanied by changes in expression of Decapentaplegic and Wingless. These results show that tumor suppressor genes act in combination to control cell proliferation, and that tissue hyperplasia can be associated with ectopic expression of genes involved in pattern formation. PMID:9335602

  1. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  2. Isolation of antibiotic-resistant and antimetabolite-resistant mutants of Frankia strains EuI1c and Cc1.17.

    PubMed

    Myers, Anna K; Tisa, Louis S

    2004-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant and antimetabolite-resistant mutants of the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacterium Frankia were isolated to provide strains with genetic backgrounds amenable to genetic analysis. The lethal and mutagenic effects of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and UV light on four Frankia strains were investigated. UV irradiation or EMS treatment of strain EuI1c cells resulted in the formation of two different colony types: rough and smooth. The smooth colonies were conditional sporulation mutants. In the case of EMS-induced cells of strain Cc1.17, resistance to lincomycin, ampicillin, and 5-fluorouracil occurred at a frequency of 1 x 10(-5), 1 x 10(-5), and 4 x 10(-5), respectively. The lincomycin-resistant mutants produced a yellow-tan pigment that was released into the growth medium. Resistance to tetracycline and lincomycin with EMS-induced cells of strain EuI1c occurred at a frequency of 3.2 x 10(-3) and 4.7 x 10(-4), respectively. These strains will be useful for the development of genetic methods for Frankia. PMID:15213750

  3. De novo inbred heterozygous Zeb2/Sip1 mutant mice uniquely generated by germ-line conditional knockout exhibit craniofacial, callosal and behavioral defects associated with Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Tsuyoshi; Nishizaki, Yuriko; Matsui, Fumiko; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki; Higashi, Yujiro

    2015-11-15

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MOWS) is caused by de novo heterozygous mutation at ZEB2 (SIP1, ZFHX1B) gene, and exhibit moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID), a characteristic facial appearance, epilepsy and other congenital anomalies. Establishing a murine MOWS model is important, not only for investigating the pathogenesis of this disease, but also for identifying compounds that may improve the symptoms. However, because the heterozygous Zeb2 knockout mouse could not be maintained as a mouse line with the inbred C57BL/6 background, it was difficult to use those mice for the study of MOWS. Here, we systematically generated de novo Zeb2 ?ex7/+ mice by inducing the Zeb2 mutation in the germ cells using conditional recombination system. The de novo Zeb2 ?ex7/+ mice with C57BL/6 background developed multiple defects relevant to MOWS, including craniofacial abnormalities, defective corpus callosum formation and the decreased number of parvalbumin interneurons in the cortex. In behavioral analyses, these mice showed reduced motor activity, increased anxiety and impaired sociability. Notably, during the Barnes maze test, immobile Zeb2 mutant mice were observed over repeated trials. In contrast, neither the mouse line nor the de novo Zeb2 ?ex7/+ mice with the closed colony ICR background showed cranial abnormalities or reduced motor activities. These results demonstrate the advantages of using de novo Zeb2 ?ex7/+ mice with the C57BL/6 background as the MOWS model. To our knowledge, this is the first time an inducible de novo mutation system has been applied to murine germline cells to produce an animal model of a human congenital disease. PMID:26319231

  4. Lethal infection thresholds of Paenibacillus larvae for honeybee drone and worker larvae (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Behrens, Dieter; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2010-10-01

    We compared the mortality of honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone and worker larvae from a single queen under controlled in vitro conditions following infection with Paenibacillus larvae, a bacterium causing the brood disease American Foulbrood (AFB). We also determined absolute P. larvae cell numbers and lethal titres in deceased individuals of both sexes up to 8 days post infection using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results show that in drones the onset of infection induced mortality is delayed by 1 day, the cumulative mortality is reduced by 10% and P. larvae cell numbers are higher than in worker larvae. Since differences in bacterial cell titres between sexes can be explained by differences in body size, larval size appears to be a key parameter for a lethal threshold in AFB tolerance. Both means and variances for lethal thresholds are similar for drone and worker larvae suggesting that drone resistance phenotypes resemble those of related workers. PMID:20545737

  5. Lethal and Sub-lethal Effects of UVB on Juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata)

    PubMed Central

    Ruelas, Debbie S.; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290–320 nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally-irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects. PMID:16996081

  6. Gene annotation and drug target discovery in Candida albicans with a tagged transposon mutant collection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Julia; Fung, Eula; Schlecht, Ulrich; Davis, Ronald W; Giaever, Guri; St Onge, Robert P; Deutschbauer, Adam; Nislow, Corey

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen, causing infections that can be lethal in immunocompromised patients. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for C. albicans, it lacks C. albicans' diverse morphogenic forms and is primarily non-pathogenic. Comprehensive genetic analyses that have been instrumental for determining gene function in S. cerevisiae are hampered in C. albicans, due in part to limited resources to systematically assay phenotypes of loss-of-function alleles. Here, we constructed and screened a library of 3633 tagged heterozygous transposon disruption mutants, using them in a competitive growth assay to examine nutrient- and drug-dependent haploinsufficiency. We identified 269 genes that were haploinsufficient in four growth conditions, the majority of which were condition-specific. These screens identified two new genes necessary for filamentous growth as well as ten genes that function in essential processes. We also screened 57 chemically diverse compounds that more potently inhibited growth of C. albicans versus S. cerevisiae. For four of these compounds, we examined the genetic basis of this differential inhibition. Notably, Sec7p was identified as the target of brefeldin A in C. albicans screens, while S. cerevisiae screens with this compound failed to identify this target. We also uncovered a new C. albicans-specific target, Tfp1p, for the synthetic compound 0136-0228. These results highlight the value of haploinsufficiency screens directly in this pathogen for gene annotation and drug target identification. PMID:20949076

  7. [Comparative study of a group of mutant strains of Trichoderma viride, producer of cellulolytic enzymes].

    PubMed

    Morozova, E S; Trenina, G A; Pleteneva, E A

    1975-01-01

    In the course of selection of Trichoderma viride, the producer of cellulolytic enzymes, the group of mutant strains characterized by a higher level of productivity are isolate. It is shown that the isolated mutants possess a number of common but differing them from original strains characters. These include: the small size of colonies ("dwarfs"), a lower capacity to carry out some biochemical reactions, and increased development rate and a higher resistance to lethal effect of nitrosoguanidine and nitrosoethyl urea. The data obtained indicate that in the series of populations of successively isolated mutants observed the stabilization of variability of the levels of C1 enzyme synthesis takes place. It is also shown that, unlike original cultures, the populations of mutant strains are characterized by a higher variability of Cx enzyme activity levels as compared with C1. PMID:1240816

  8. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J.; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster. PMID:26684454

  9. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster. PMID:26684454

  10. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  11. The effects of oil sands wastewater on fish resulting from exposure to sub-lethal concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholz, D.A.; Goudey, J.S.; Balch, G.C.; Nelson, L.R.; Gulley, J.; MacKinnon, M.

    1995-12-31

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of oil sands wastewater in flow through laboratory experiments as well as to artificial ponds containing sub-lethal concentrations of tailings pond water and fine tails in order to study the viability of the wet landscape remediation option. Large (200--300 g) fish were used for all the exposures in this preliminary study and the following data were collected: blood cell counts, sex hormone concentrations, sexual maturation, stress protein concentrations, PAH-metabolites in bile, condition factors, liver somatic indices, mixed function oxygenase induction, PAHs in muscle, external condition and the condition of internal organs. The data obtained from this study revealed no adverse effects upon fish during extended field exposures. Given similar exposure conditions in the release waters of a wet landscape reclamation, the data suggest that there may be no adverse effects upon fish, however, longer term studies, other indicator organisms and additional chronic tests should be conducted.

  12. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 defined mutants as live-attenuated vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Araceli E.; Mann, Barbara J.; Qin, Aiping; Cunningham, Aimee L.; Cole, Leah E.; Grassel, Christen; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Levine, Myron M.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the etiological agent of tularemia and a Tier 1 select agent, has been previously weaponized and remains a high priority for vaccine development. Ft tularensis (type A) and Ft holarctica (type B) cause most human disease. We selected six attenuating genes from the live vaccine strain (LVS; type B), F. novicida and other intracellular bacteria: FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742, FTT1019c (guaA), FTT1043 (mip) and FTT1317c (guaB) and created unmarked deletion mutants of each in the highly human virulent Ft strain Schu S4 (Type A) background. FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742 and FTT1043 Schu S4 mutants were not attenuated for virulence in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, Schu S4 gua mutants were unable to replicate in murine macrophages and were attenuated in vivo, with an i.n. LD50 > 105 CFU in C57BL/6 mice. However, the gua mutants failed to protect mice against lethal challenge with WT Schu S4, despite demonstrating partial protection in rabbits in a previous study. These results contrast with the highly protective capacity of LVS gua mutants against a lethal LVS challenge in mice, and underscore differences between these strains and the animal models in which they are evaluated, and therefore have important implications for vaccine development. PMID:25986219

  13. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 defined mutants as live-attenuated vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Qin, Aiping; Cunningham, Aimee L; Cole, Leah E; Grassel, Christen; Vogel, Stefanie N; Levine, Myron M; Barry, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the etiological agent of tularemia and a Tier 1 select agent, has been previously weaponized and remains a high priority for vaccine development. Ft tularensis (type A) and Ft holarctica (type B) cause most human disease. We selected six attenuating genes from the live vaccine strain (LVS; type B), F. novicida and other intracellular bacteria: FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742, FTT1019c (guaA), FTT1043 (mip) and FTT1317c (guaB) and created unmarked deletion mutants of each in the highly human virulent Ft strain Schu S4 (Type A) background. FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742 and FTT1043 Schu S4 mutants were not attenuated for virulence in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, Schu S4 gua mutants were unable to replicate in murine macrophages and were attenuated in vivo, with an i.n. LD50 > 10(5) CFU in C57BL/6 mice. However, the gua mutants failed to protect mice against lethal challenge with WT Schu S4, despite demonstrating partial protection in rabbits in a previous study. These results contrast with the highly protective capacity of LVS gua mutants against a lethal LVS challenge in mice, and underscore differences between these strains and the animal models in which they are evaluated, and therefore have important implications for vaccine development. PMID:25986219

  14. Characterization of New Punch Mutations: Identification of Two Additional Mutant Classes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, E. R.; O'Donnell, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The Punch locus of Drosophila melanogaster which encodes the pteridine biosynthetic enzyme, GTP cyclohydrolase, is genetically complex. Lethal alleles of the locus resolve into an array of interallelic complementation groups, and at least one class of mutations is developmentally specific, affecting GTP cyclohydrolase activity only in the heads of adults. All previously isolated Punch alleles were identified on the basis of a mutant eye color phenotype. By screening mutagenized chromosomes over Punch region deficiencies, we have now isolated new alleles on the basis of lethal and visible phenotypes. Most of these alleles fall into previously identified genetic classes, but two new classes of mutations were also found. One class contains two alleles that behave as dominant lethal mutations in some genetic backgrounds. The other class represents a second developmentally specific set of alleles that affect the function of the Punch locus only during embryogenesis. PMID:3136053

  15. Asthma and risk of lethal prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Platz, Elizabeth A; Drake, Charles G; Wilson, Kathryn M; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Kenfield, Stacey A; Mucci, Lorelei A; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C; Camargo, Carlos A; Giovannucci, Edward

    2015-08-15

    Inflammation, and more generally, the immune response are thought to influence the development of prostate cancer. To determine the components of the immune response that are potentially contributory, we prospectively evaluated the association of immune-mediated conditions, asthma and hayfever, with lethal prostate cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We included 47,880 men aged 40-75 years with no prior cancer diagnosis. On the baseline questionnaire in 1986, the men reported diagnoses of asthma and hayfever and year of onset. On the follow-up questionnaires, they reported new asthma and prostate cancer diagnoses. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relative risks (RRs). In total, 9.2% reported ever having been diagnosed with asthma. In all, 25.3% reported a hayfever diagnosis at baseline. During 995,176 person-years of follow-up by 2012, we confirmed 798 lethal prostate cancer cases (diagnosed with distant metastases, progressed to distant metastasis or died of prostate cancer [N = 625]). Ever having a diagnosis of asthma was inversely associated with risk of lethal (RR = 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]?= 0.51-1.00) and fatal (RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.42-0.96) disease. Hayfever with onset in the distant past was possibly weakly positively associated with risk of lethal (RR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.92-1.33) and fatal (RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.91-1.37) disease. Men who were ever diagnosed with asthma were less likely to develop lethal and fatal prostate cancer. Our findings may lead to testable hypotheses about specific immune profiles in the etiology of lethal prostate cancer. PMID:25648070

  16. Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

  17. Gonadosomatic mosaicism for lethal mutations in Drosophila lethal mutations disturbing larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.I.; Sakharova, N.Yu.

    1988-11-01

    Phenogenetic analysis of autonomous lethal mutations obtained by the method of gonadosomatic mosaicism which manifested during larval stages, established that the nuclei of hypodermal cells, salivary glands suprapharyngeal ganglion, pharynx, esophagus, gizzard, and hindgut are the derivatives of the same nucleus (from the first two nuclei of cleavage) as the nuclei of the cells of the imaginal-somatic tissues.

  18. Reanalysis of parabiosis of obesity mutants in the age of leptin

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wenwen; Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Lee, Jonah; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we set out to explain the differing effects of parabiosis with genetically diabetic (db) mice versus administration of recombinant leptin. Parabiosis of db mutant, which overexpress leptin, to wildtype (WT) or genetically obese (ob) mice has been reported to cause death by starvation, whereas leptin infusions do not produce lethality at any dose or mode of delivery tested. Leptin is not posttranslationally modified other than a single disulphide bond, raising the possibility that it might require additional factor(s) to exert the maximal appetite-suppressing effect. We reconfirmed the lethal effect of parabiosis of db mutant on WT mice and further showed that this lethality could not be rescued by administration of ghrelin or growth hormone. We then initiated a biochemical fractionation of a high-molecular-weight leptin complex from human plasma and identified clusterin as a major component of this leptin-containing complex. However, in contrast to previous reports, we failed to observe a leptin-potentiating effect of either exogenous or endogenous clusterin, and parabiosis of db clusterin?/? double-mutant to WT mice still caused lethality. Intriguingly, in parabiotic pairs of two WT mice, leptin infusion into one of the mice led to an enhanced starvation response during calorie restriction as evidenced by increased plasma ghrelin and growth-hormone levels. Moreover, leptin treatment resulted in death of the parabiotic pairs. These data suggest that the appetite suppression in WT mice after parabiosis to db mutants is the result of induced hyperleptinemia combined with the stress or other aspect(s) of the parabiosis procedure. PMID:26150485

  19. Reanalysis of parabiosis of obesity mutants in the age of leptin.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wenwen; Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Lee, Jonah; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2015-07-21

    In this study we set out to explain the differing effects of parabiosis with genetically diabetic (db) mice versus administration of recombinant leptin. Parabiosis of db mutant, which overexpress leptin, to wildtype (WT) or genetically obese (ob) mice has been reported to cause death by starvation, whereas leptin infusions do not produce lethality at any dose or mode of delivery tested. Leptin is not posttranslationally modified other than a single disulphide bond, raising the possibility that it might require additional factor(s) to exert the maximal appetite-suppressing effect. We reconfirmed the lethal effect of parabiosis of db mutant on WT mice and further showed that this lethality could not be rescued by administration of ghrelin or growth hormone. We then initiated a biochemical fractionation of a high-molecular-weight leptin complex from human plasma and identified clusterin as a major component of this leptin-containing complex. However, in contrast to previous reports, we failed to observe a leptin-potentiating effect of either exogenous or endogenous clusterin, and parabiosis of db clusterin(-/-) double-mutant to WT mice still caused lethality. Intriguingly, in parabiotic pairs of two WT mice, leptin infusion into one of the mice led to an enhanced starvation response during calorie restriction as evidenced by increased plasma ghrelin and growth-hormone levels. Moreover, leptin treatment resulted in death of the parabiotic pairs. These data suggest that the appetite suppression in WT mice after parabiosis to db mutants is the result of induced hyperleptinemia combined with the stress or other aspect(s) of the parabiosis procedure. PMID:26150485

  20. Enhancing CHK1 inhibitor lethality in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yong; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The present studies were initiated to determine whether inhibitors of MEK1/2 or SRC signaling, respectively, enhance CHK1 inhibitor lethality in primary human glioblastoma cells. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (CI-1040 (PD184352); AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01, AZD7762) to kill multiple primary human glioma cell isolates that have a diverse set of genetic alterations typically found in the disease. Inhibition of SRC family proteins also enhanced CHK1 inhibitor lethality. Combined treatment of glioma cells with (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitors enhanced radiosensitivity. Combined (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitor treatment led to dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6 ribosomal protein, whereas the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was increased. MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated cell death was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspases 3 and 7 as well as the caspase substrate (PARP). We also observed activation of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 effector proteins BAK and BAX and reduced levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family protein BCL-XL. Overexpression of BCL-XL alleviated but did not completely abolish MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor cytotoxicity in GBM cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-MEK pathway have the potential to interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill glioma cells. PMID:22313687

  1. Synthetic lethal screening in the mammalian central nervous system identifies Gpx6 as a modulator of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shema, Reut; Kulicke, Ruth; Cowley, Glenn S.; Stein, Rachael; Root, David E.; Heiman, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease, the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by a dramatic loss of deep-layer cortical and striatal neurons, as well as morbidity in midlife. Human genetic studies led to the identification of the causative gene, huntingtin. Recent genomic advances have also led to the identification of hundreds of potential interacting partners for huntingtin protein and many hypotheses as to the molecular mechanisms whereby mutant huntingtin leads to cellular dysfunction and death. However, the multitude of possible interacting partners and cellular pathways affected by mutant huntingtin has complicated efforts to understand the etiology of this disease, and to date no curative therapeutic exists. To address the general problem of identifying the disease-phenotype contributing genes from a large number of correlative studies, here we develop a synthetic lethal screening methodology for the mammalian central nervous system, called SLIC, for synthetic lethal in the central nervous system. Applying SLIC to the study of Huntington’s disease, we identify the age-regulated glutathione peroxidase 6 (Gpx6) gene as a modulator of mutant huntingtin toxicity and show that overexpression of Gpx6 can dramatically alleviate both behavioral and molecular phenotypes associated with a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. SLIC can, in principle, be used in the study of any neurodegenerative disease for which a mouse model exists, promising to reveal modulators of neurodegenerative disease in an unbiased fashion, akin to screens in simpler model organisms. PMID:25535386

  2. Mutations in KIAA0586 Cause Lethal Ciliopathies Ranging from a Hydrolethalus Phenotype to Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alby, Caroline; Piquand, Kevin; Huber, Céline; Megarbané, André; Ichkou, Amale; Legendre, Marine; Pelluard, Fanny; Encha-Ravazi, Ferechté; Abi-Tayeh, Georges; Bessičres, Bettina; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Laurent, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Sztriha, László; Zombor, Melinda; Szabó, Hajnalka; Failler, Marion; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Bole, Christine; Nitschké, Patrick; Nizon, Mathilde; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vekemans, Michel; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Thomas, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    KIAA0586, the human ortholog of chicken TALPID3, is a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary ciliogenesis. Its disruption in animal models causes defects attributed to abnormal hedgehog signaling; these defects include polydactyly and abnormal dorsoventral patterning of the neural tube. Here, we report homozygous mutations of KIAA0586 in four families affected by lethal ciliopathies ranging from a hydrolethalus phenotype to short-rib polydactyly. We show defective ciliogenesis, as well as abnormal response to SHH-signaling activation in cells derived from affected individuals, consistent with a role of KIAA0586 in primary cilia biogenesis. Whereas centriolar maturation seemed unaffected in mutant cells, we observed an abnormal extended pattern of CEP290, a centriolar satellite protein previously associated with ciliopathies. Our data show the crucial role of KIAA0586 in human primary ciliogenesis and subsequent abnormal hedgehog signaling through abnormal GLI3 processing. Our results thus establish that KIAA0586 mutations cause lethal ciliopathies. PMID:26166481

  3. Vitellogenin Receptor Mutation Leads to the Oogenesis Mutant Phenotype “scanty vitellin” of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yan-Xia; Luo, Juan; Katsuma, Susumu; Yang, Cong-Wen; Banno, Yutaka; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Shimada, Toru; Xia, Qing-You

    2013-01-01

    In insects, the vitellogenin receptor (VgR) mediates the uptake of vitellogenin (Vg) from the hemolymph by developing oocytes. The oogenesis mutant scanty vitellin (vit) of Bombyx mori (Bm) lacks vitellin and 30-kDa proteins, but B. mori egg-specific protein and BmVg are normal. The vit eggs are white and smaller compared with the pale yellow eggs of the wild type and are embryonic lethal. This study found that a mutation in the B. mori VgR gene (BmVgR) is responsible for the vit phenotype. We cloned the cDNA sequences encoding WT and vit BmVgR. The functional domains of BmVgR are similar to those of other low-density lipoprotein receptors. When compared with the wild type, a 235-bp genomic sequence in vit BmVgR is substituted for a 7-bp sequence. This mutation has resulted in a 50-amino acid deletion in the third Class B region of the first epidermal growth factor (EGF1) domain. BmVgR is expressed specifically in oocytes, and the transcriptional level is changed dramatically and consistently with maturation of oocytes during the previtellogenic periods. Linkage analysis confirmed that BmVgR is mutated in the vit mutant. The coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed that mutated BmVgR is able to bind BmVg but that BmVg cannot be dissociated under acidic conditions. The WT phenotype determined by RNA interference was similar to that of the vit phenotype for nutritional deficiency, such as BmVg and 30-kDa proteins. These results showed that BmVgR has an important role in transporting proteins for egg formation and embryonic development in B. mori. PMID:23515308

  4. Differential regulation and synthetic lethality of exclusive RB1 and CDKN2A mutations in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayoung; Song, Mee; Kim, Somin; Seo, Yujeong; Kim, Yonghwan; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2016-01-01

    Genetic alterations in lung cancer are distinctly represented in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Mutation of the RB1 and CDKN2A genes, which are tightly associated with cell cycle regulation, is exclusive to SCLC and NSCLC cells, respectively. Through the systematic analysis of transcriptome and proteome datasets for 318 cancer cell lines, we characterized differential gene expression and protein regulation in RB1-mutant SCLC and CDKN2A-mutant NSCLC. Many of the genes and proteins associated with RB1-mutant SCLC cell lines belong to functional categories of gene expression and transcription, whereas those associated with CDKN2A-mutant NSCLC cell lines were enriched in gene sets of the extracellular matrix and focal adhesion. These results indicate that the loss of RB1 and CDKN2A function induces distinctively different signaling cascades in SCLC and NSCLC cells. In addition, knockdown of the RB1 gene in CKDN2A-mutant cell lines (and vice versa) synergistically inhibits cancer cell proliferation. The present study on the exclusive role of RB1 and CDKN2A mutations in lung cancer subtypes demonstrates a synthetic lethal strategy for cancer regulation. PMID:26647789

  5. Selective targeting of KRAS-Mutant cells by miR-126 through repression of multiple genes essential for the survival of KRAS-Mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Toshifumi; Jones, Matthew F.; Subramanian, Murugan; Li, Xiao Ling; Ou, Oliver; Zhu, Yuelin; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M.; Hussain, S. Perwez; Gaedcke, Jochen; Ried, Thomas; Luo, Ji; Caplen, Natasha J.; Lal, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of hundreds of genes. However, identifying the critical targets within a miRNA-regulated gene network is challenging. One approach is to identify miRNAs that exert a context-dependent effect, followed by expression profiling to determine how specific targets contribute to this selective effect. In this study, we performed miRNA mimic screens in isogenic KRAS-Wild-type (WT) and KRAS-Mutant colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines to identify miRNAs selectively targeting KRAS-Mutant cells. One of the miRNAs we identified as a selective inhibitor of the survival of multiple KRAS-Mutant CRC lines was miR-126. In KRAS-Mutant cells, miR-126 over-expression increased the G1 compartment, inhibited clonogenicity and tumorigenicity, while exerting no effect on KRAS-WT cells. Unexpectedly, the miR-126-regulated transcriptome of KRAS-WT and KRAS-Mutant cells showed no significant differences. However, by analyzing the overlap between miR-126 targets with the synthetic lethal genes identified by RNAi in KRAS-Mutant cells, we identified and validated a subset of miR-126-regulated genes selectively required for the survival and clonogenicity of KRAS-Mutant cells. Our strategy therefore identified critical target genes within the miR-126-regulated gene network. We propose that the selective effect of miR-126 on KRAS-Mutant cells could be utilized for the development of targeted therapy for KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25245095

  6. Bacterial cell shape regulation: testing of additional predictions unique to the two-competing-sites model for peptidoglycan assembly and isolation of conditional rod-shaped mutants from some wild-type cocci.

    PubMed Central

    Lleo, M M; Canepari, P; Satta, G

    1990-01-01

    The two-competing-sites model for peptidoglycan assembly for bacterial cell shape regulation suggests that in rods, bacterial cell shape depends on the balance between two reactions (sites), one responsible for lateral wall elongation and the other responsible for septum formation. The two reactions compete with each other so that no lateral wall can be formed during septum formation and vice versa. When the site for lateral wall elongation overcomes that for septum formation, long rods or filaments are formed and cell division may be blocked. When the reaction leading to septum formation is hyperactive compared with the other, coccobacilli or cocci are formed. Other bacteria carry only one site for peptidoglycan assembly and can grow only as cocci. The two-competing-sites model predicts that two different types of cocci exist (among both morphology mutants and wild-type strains); one carries only the site for septum formation, whereas the other also carries the site for lateral wall elongation, the former site predominating over the latter. As a consequence of the inhibition (by antibiotics or by mutations) of septum formation in wild-type cocci of various species and in coccoid morphology mutants, some cocci are expected to undergo transition to rod shape and others are not. We have evaluated these predictions and show that they are in agreement. In fact, we found that among wild-type cocci belonging to 13 species, those of 6 species formed rods, whereas the remaining organisms maintained their coccal shape when septa were inhibited by antibiotics. Some coccoid morphology mutants of rod-shaped bacteria underwent coccus-to-rod transition after septum inhibition by antibiotics, whereas others maintained their coccal shape. When a mutation that causes septum inhibition was expressed in a morphology mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae grown as a coccus, transition to rod shape was observed. A total of 914 mutants unable to form colonies at 42 degrees C were isolated from the coccoid species mentioned above. Between 75 and 95% of the mutants isolated from the species that formed rods when septum formation was inhibited by antibiotics but none of those isolated from the others underwent coccus-to-rod transition upon incubation at the nonpermissive temperature. Images PMID:2361946

  7. Sub-lethal glyphosate exposure alters flowering phenology and causes transient male-sterility in Brassica spp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Herbicide resistance in weedy plant populations can develop through different mechanisms such as gene flow of herbicide resistance transgenes from crop species into compatible weedy species or by natural evolution of herbicide resistance or tolerance following selection pressure. Results from our previous studies suggest that sub-lethal levels of the herbicide glyphosate can alter the pattern of gene flow between glyphosate resistant Canola®, Brassica napus, and glyphosate sensitive varieties of B. napus and B. rapa. The objectives of this study were to examine the phenological and developmental changes that occur in Brassica crop and weed species following sub-lethal doses of the herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate. We examined several vegetative and reproductive traits of potted plants under greenhouse conditions, treated with sub-lethal herbicide sprays. Results Our results indicate that exposure of Brassica spp. to a sub-lethal dose of glyphosate results in altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. Flowering of all sensitive species was significantly delayed and reproductive function, specifically male fertility, was suppressed. Higher dosage levels typically contributed to an increase in the magnitude of phenotypic changes. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Brassica spp. plants that are exposed to sub-lethal doses of glyphosate could be subject to very different pollination patterns and an altered pattern of gene flow that would result from changes in the overlap of flowering phenology between species. Implications include the potential for increased glyphosate resistance evolution and spread in weedy communities exposed to sub-lethal glyphosate. PMID:24655547

  8. Identification of mouse mutant cells exhibiting the plastic mutant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Masatake; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Sakagami, Mari; Yamada, Yuji

    2010-08-01

    The initial processes involved in radiation carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We isolated mouse mutant cells exhibiting plasticity in their mutation phenotypes. These mutant cells were originally isolated from an irradiated cell population as 6-thioguanine resistant (6TGR) mutants that were deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt, E.C.2.4.2.8) activity at the frequency of approximately 6.2 x 10(-5). Approximately 10% of 6TGR cells showed plasticity in their mutant phenotypes and reverted to HAT-resistant (HATR), which is Hprt-proficient, wild type phenotype. Eventually we identified the plastic mutants in the un-irradiated wild type cell population as well and found that ionizing irradiation enhanced the frequency of the plastic mutation approximately 24 times. Treatment with 5-aza-cytidine did not affect the plasticity of mutant phenotypes identified in this study, suggesting that DNA methylation was not involved in the plastic changes of the mutant phenotypes. The plastic mutant phenotype identified in our study is a new type of genomic instability induced by ionizing irradiation, and it is likely to be involved in one of the primary changes that occur in the process of radiation carcinogenesis, and may explain one element of carcinogenesis, which is composed of multi-stages. PMID:20811140

  9. Alleged lethal sorcery in East Timor.

    PubMed

    Pollanen, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of cultural and social perspectives exists on the concept of sudden and unexpected death. In countries, without a formal system of death investigation, sudden death is shrouded in mysticism often based on traditional belief systems. This cultural perspective on sudden death is often at variance with medical and forensic concepts and may include explanations such as sorcery, magic, and voodoo. In this case report, the postmortem findings in an alleged victim of lethal 'black magic', known as ema halo by the indigenous people of East Timor, is described. The alleged victim died suddenly in front of witnesses. At autopsy, marked dilation of a bicuspid aortic valve with annuloaortic ectasia and a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm was found after exhumation of the body. The findings mitigated the local belief in witchcraft and established a natural manner of death. PMID:14687768

  10. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hajek, Ann E

    2010-04-23

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies. PMID:19923138

  11. Peri-implantation lethality in mice carrying megabase-scale deletion on 5qc3.3 is caused by Exoc1 null mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Seiya; Takami, Kohei; Daitoku, Yoko; Tanimoto, Yoko; Dinh, Tra Thi Huong; Mizuno-Iijima, Saori; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We found a novel spontaneous mouse mutant with depigmentation in the ventral body, which we called White Spotting (WS) mouse. Genetic investigation revealed deletion of a?>?1.2-Mb genomic region containing nine genes (Kit, Kdr, Srd5a3, Tmeme165, Clock, Pdcl2, Nmu, Exoc1, and Cep135). We designated this mutant allele KitWS. Interestingly, homozygous mutants (KitWS/WS) showed a peri-implantation lethal phenotype. Expression analyses of these nine genes in blastocysts suggested that Exoc1 was a prime candidate for this phenotype. We produced Exoc1 knockout mice, and the same peri-implantation lethal phenotype was seen in Exoc1?/? embryos. In addition, the polygenic effect without Exoc1 was investigated in genome-edited KitWE mice carrying the Mb-scale deletion induced by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As KitWE/WE embryos did not exhibit the abnormal phenotype, which was seen in KitWS/WS. We concluded that peri-implantation lethality in KitWS/WS was caused by a monogenic defect of Exoc1. PMID:26346620

  12. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  13. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H. (Pasadena, CA); Shao, Zhixin (Penzberg, DE); Zhao, Huimin (San Diego, CA); Giver, Lorraine J. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  14. Fitness Analyses of All Possible Point-Mutants for Regions of Genes in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hietpas, Ryan; Roscoe, Benjamin; Jiang, Li; Bolon, Daniel N. A.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing can accurately measure the relative abundance of hundreds of mutants in a single bulk competition experiment, which can give a direct readout of the fitness of each mutant. Here, we describe a protocol that we previously developed and optimized to measure the fitness effects of all possible individual codon substitutions for 10 amino acid regions of essential genes in yeast. Starting with a conditional strain (i.e., a temperature sensitive strain), we describe how to efficiently generate plasmid libraries of point mutants that can then be transformed to generate libraries of yeast. The yeast libraries are competed under conditions that select for mutant function. Deep sequencing analyses are used to determine the relative fitness of all mutants. This approach is faster and cheaper per mutant compared to analyzing individually isolated mutants. The protocol can be performed in ~4 weeks and many 10 amino acid regions can be analyzed in parallel. PMID:22722372

  15. Tumor-specific signaling to p53 is mimicked by Mdm2 inactivation in zebrafish: insights from mdm2 and mdm4 mutant zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chua, J S; Liew, H P; Guo, L; Lane, D P

    2015-11-26

    In mice, the deletion of either Mdm2 or Mdm4 results in a p53-dependent embryonic lethality. We used zinc-finger nucleases to construct mutations in the mdm2 and mdm4 genes of zebrafish. Although the loss of mdm2 results in a p53-dependent early embryonic lethality, mdm4 mutant fish are viable and grow to adulthood. We also found that an in-frame five-amino acid deletion in mdm2 creates a novel hypomorphic allele. The lethal phenotype observed in the mdm2 mutant fish could be partially rescued by injecting mRNA encoding functional Mdm2, and this required the E3 ligase activity of the protein. Complete rescue was obtained by crossing the mdm2 mutant fish onto a p53M214K mutant background. Although p53 mutant fish on a wild-type mdm2 background were shown to accumulate high levels of p53 protein specifically in tumor tissues, we detected extensive staining of p53 in many normal tissues of the mdm2-p53M214K double-mutant fish. Our results are suggestive of the hypothesis that p53 protein accumulates during tumor formation as a result of tumor-specific inactivation of the Mdm2 pathway. PMID:25746004

  16. Tumor-specific signaling to p53 is mimicked by Mdm2 inactivation in zebrafish: insights from mdm2 and mdm4 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chua, J S; Liew, H P; Guo, L; Lane, D P

    2015-01-01

    In mice, the deletion of either Mdm2 or Mdm4 results in a p53-dependent embryonic lethality. We used zinc-finger nucleases to construct mutations in the mdm2 and mdm4 genes of zebrafish. Although the loss of mdm2 results in a p53-dependent early embryonic lethality, mdm4 mutant fish are viable and grow to adulthood. We also found that an in-frame five-amino acid deletion in mdm2 creates a novel hypomorphic allele. The lethal phenotype observed in the mdm2 mutant fish could be partially rescued by injecting mRNA encoding functional Mdm2, and this required the E3 ligase activity of the protein. Complete rescue was obtained by crossing the mdm2 mutant fish onto a p53M214K mutant background. Although p53 mutant fish on a wild-type mdm2 background were shown to accumulate high levels of p53 protein specifically in tumor tissues, we detected extensive staining of p53 in many normal tissues of the mdm2–p53M214K double-mutant fish. Our results are suggestive of the hypothesis that p53 protein accumulates during tumor formation as a result of tumor-specific inactivation of the Mdm2 pathway. PMID:25746004

  17. Authorized Less Lethal Weapon Systems & Effective Ranges INDIVIDUAL OFFICER

    E-print Network

    Saffman, Mark

    Impact Munitions 1. Less Lethal Extended Range Kinetic Energy Munitions (Beanbag rounds) may be deployed less lethal impact munitions while on-duty after successfully completing training in its use. Authorized Grenadier Munitions 1. CN/CS or OC may be deployed through the use 37/40mm chemical agent delivery

  18. January 5, 2015 Policy on Firearms, Other Lethal Weapons,

    E-print Network

    January 5, 2015 Policy on Firearms, Other Lethal Weapons, Fireworks and Dangerous Objects the possession, use or storage of firearms, other lethal weapons, fireworks, and other dangerous objects.* Fireworks include but are not limited to firecrackers, rockets, roman candles, cherry bombs, toy cannons

  19. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l?1 TSS (25 mg cm?2 day?1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l?1 TSS (83 mg cm?2 day?1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  20. Loss of ypk1 function causes rapamycin sensitivity, inhibition of translation initiation and synthetic lethality in 14-3-3-deficient yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, Daniel; Horton, Lynn; DeChant, Anne; Hensold, Jack; Lemmon, Sandra K

    2002-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to phosphorylated proteins and regulate a variety of cellular activities as effectors of serine/threonine phosphorylation. To define processes requiring 14-3-3 function in yeast, mutants with increased sensitivity to reduced 14-3-3 protein levels were identified by synthetic lethal screening. One mutation was found to be allelic to YPK1, which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase. Loss of Ypk function causes hypersensitivity to rapamycin, similar to 14-3-3 mutations and other mutations affecting the TOR signaling pathway in yeast. Similar to treatment with rapamycin, loss of Ypk function disrupted translation, at least in part by causing depletion of eIF4G, a central adaptor protein required for cap-dependent mRNA translation initiation. In addition, Ypk1 as well as eIF4G protein levels were rapidly depleted upon nitrogen starvation, but not during glucose starvation, even though both conditions inhibit translation initiation. These results suggest that Ypk regulates translation initiation in response to nutrient signals, either through the TOR pathway or in a functionally related pathway parallel to TOR. PMID:12196392

  1. Synchrotron X-Ray Visualisation of Ice Formation in Insects during Lethal and Non-Lethal Freezing

    E-print Network

    Socha, Jake

    Synchrotron X-Ray Visualisation of Ice Formation in Insects during Lethal and Non-Lethal Freezing, United States of America Abstract Although the biochemical correlates of freeze tolerance in insects-rays to directly visualise real-time ice formation at 3.3 Hz in intact insects. We observed freezing in diapausing

  2. Single-step purification of recombinant anthrax lethal factor from periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Hou; Tsai, Mei-Fang; Chung, Chia-Pei; Chen, Po-Kong; Hu, Hsin-I; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Lin, Hung-Chi; Sun, Der-Shan

    2006-11-10

    Lethal toxin (LT) that composed by protective antigen and lethal factor (LF) is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. The treatments of LT in animals could reproduce most manifestations of B. anthracis infections that greatly improves our knowledge in LT-mediated pathogenesis and facilitates anthrax-related researches without having to directly contact the hazardous bacterium B. anthracis. The recombinant protein of LF (rLF), however, still lacks a simple purification method. Herein, we developed single-step nickel affinity purification of rLF with yield up to 3mg/l. By fusion to the leader sequence of outer membrane protein OmpA, rLF could easily be purified from the periplasm of Escherichia coli. To investigate whether the rLT is functional in our system, both wild type rLF and the catalytic mutant rLF that contains a single amino acid substitution at zinc-binding site (LF(E687A)), were subjected to macrophage cytotoxicity analysis. Our data showed that the rLT is fully functional, while the LF(E687A) fail to induce cell death of tested macrophage cells. These findings suggested that the purification protocol herein is a user-friendly method that allows researchers to obtain the functional rLF by single-step purification. PMID:16797097

  3. ZBTB42 mutation defines a novel lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS6)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nisha; Smith, Laura L.; Faqeih, Eissa; Mohamed, Jawahir; Gupta, Vandana A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) is a lethal autosomal recessive form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). LCCS is genetically heterogeneous with mutations in five genes identified to date, all with a role in the innervation or contractile apparatus of skeletal muscles. In a consanguineous Saudi family with multiple stillbirths presenting with LCCS, we excluded linkage to all known LCCS loci and combined autozygome analysis and whole-exome sequencing to identify a novel homozygous variant in ZBTB42, which had been shown to be enriched in skeletal muscles, especially at the neuromuscular junction. Knockdown experiments of zbtb42 in zebrafish consistently resulted in grossly abnormal skeletal muscle development and myofibrillar disorganization at the microscopic level. This severe muscular phenotype is successfully rescued with overexpression of the human wild-type ZBTB42 gene, but not with the mutant form of ZBTB42 that models the human missense change. Our data assign a novel muscular developmental phenotype to ZBTB42 in vertebrates and establish a new LCCS6 type caused by ZBTB42 mutation. PMID:25055871

  4. Piebald lethal (sl) acts early to disrupt the development of neural crest-derived melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Pavan, W J; Tilghman, S M

    1994-07-19

    Mice homozygous for the piebald lethal (sl) mutation have a predominantly white coat due to the absence of neural crest-derived melanocytes in the hair follicles. To investigate the time in embryonic development when the s1 gene affects the melanocyte lineage, we compared the distribution of melanocyte precursors in wild-type and mutant embryos, using an antibody specific for tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2). TRP-2 positive cells were first observed adjacent to the anterior cardinal vein in 10.5-day postcoitem wild-type embryos. From 11.5 to 13.5 days postcoitem, there was a nonuniform distribution of TRP-2 positive cells along the anterior-posterior axis, with the highest density of cells in the head and tail regions. Along the dorsal-ventral axis, the cells were restricted to positions lateral, but never dorsal, to the neural tube. In homozygous sl/sl embryos TRP-2 staining was restricted to the non-neural crest-derived melanocytes of the pigmented retinal epithelium and the telencephalon. Few positive cells were seen in areas that will form neural crest-derived melanocytes in the inner ear, skin, hair follicles, leg musculature, or heart. We conclude that the piebald lethal mutation acts prior to the onset of TRP-2 expression to disrupt the development of neural crest-derived melanocytes. The non-uniform distribution of melanoblasts in wild-type mice suggests that piebald acts stochastically to affect melanocyte development. PMID:8041763

  5. Human cathepsin L rescues the neurodegeneration and lethality incathepsin B/L double deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sevenich, Lisa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2006-01-09

    Cathepsin B (CTSB) and cathepsin L (CTSL) are two widelyexpressed cysteine proteases thought to predominantly reside withinlysosomes. Functional analysis of CTSL in humans is complicated by theexistence of two CTSL-like homologues (CTSL and CTSL2), in contrast tomice which contain only one CTSL enzyme. Thus transgenic expression ofhuman CTSL in CTSL deficient mice provides an opportunity to study the invivo functions of this human protease without interference by its highlyrelated homologue. While mice with single gene deficiencies for murineCTSB or CTSL survive without apparent neuromuscular impairment, murineCTSB/CTSL double deficient mice display degeneration of cerebellarPurkinje cells and neurons of the cerebral cortex, resulting in severehypotrophy, motility defects, and lethality during their third to fourthweek of life. Here we show that expression of human CTSL through agenomic transgene results in widespread expression of human CTSL in themouse which is capable of rescuing the lethality found in CTSB/CTSLdouble-deficient animals. Human CTSL is expressed in the brain of thesecompound mutants predominantly in neurons of the cerebral cortex and inPurkinje cells of the cerebellum, where it appears to prevent neuronalcell death.

  6. Analysis of spontaneous suppressor mutants from the photomixotrophically grown pmgA-disrupted mutant in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshiki; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Takako; Sonoike, Kintake; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Hihara, Yukako

    2015-12-01

    The pmgA-disrupted (?pmgA) mutant in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 suffers severe growth inhibition under photomixotrophic conditions. In order to elucidate the key factors enabling the cells to grow under photomixotrophic conditions, we isolated spontaneous suppressor mutants from the ?pmgA mutant derived from a single colony. When the ?pmgA mutant was spread on a BG11 agar plate supplemented with glucose, colonies of suppressor mutants appeared after the bleaching of the background cells. We identified the mutation site of these suppressor mutants and found that 11 mutants out of 13 had a mutation in genes related to the type 1 NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complex. Among them, eight mutants had mutations within the ndhF3 (sll1732) gene: R32stop, W62stop, V147I, G266V, G354W, G586C, and deletion of 7 bp within the coding region. One mutant had one base insertion in the putative -10 box of the ndhC (slr1279) gene, leading to the decrease in the transcripts of the ndhCKJ operon. Two mutants had one base insertion and deletion in the coding region of cupA (sll1734), which is co-transcribed with ndhF3 and ndhD3 and comprises together a form of NDH-1 complex (NDH-1MS complex) involved in inducible high-affinity CO2 uptake. The results indicate that the loss of the activity of this complex effectively rescues the ?pmgA mutant under photomixotrophic condition with 1 % CO2. However, little difference among WT and mutants was observed in the activities ascribed to the NDH-1MS complex, i.e., CO2 uptake and cyclic electron transport. This may suggest that the NDH-1MS complex has the third, currently unknown function under photomixotrophic conditions. PMID:25869635

  7. Targeting Mutant KRAS for Anticancer Therapeutics: A Review of Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanxiang; Kaiser, Christine E.; Frett, Brendan; Li, Hong-yu

    2015-01-01

    The RAS proteins play a role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant RAS signaling has been found to play a role in 30% of all cancers. KRAS, a key member of the RAS protein family, is an attractive cancer target, as frequent point mutations in the KRAS gene render the protein constitutively active. A number of attempts have been made to target aberrant KRAS signaling by identifying small molecule compounds that (1) are synthetic lethal to mutant KRAS, (2) block KRAS/GEF interactions, (3) inhibit downstream KRAS effectors, or (4) inhibit the post-translational processing of RAS proteins. In addition, inhibition of novel targets outside the main KRAS signaling pathway, specifically the cell cycle related kinase PLK1, has been shown have an effect in cells that harbor mutant KRAS. Herein we review the use of various high-throughput screening assays utilized to identify new small-molecule compounds capable of targeting mutant KRAS-driven cancers. PMID:23566315

  8. Isolation of pigmentation mutants of the green filamentous photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, B.K.; Keith, L.M.; Leovy, J.G.

    1984-07-01

    Mutants deficient in the production of bateriochlorophyll c (Bchl c) and one mutant lacking colored carotenoids were isolated from the filamentous gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Mutagenesis was achieved by using UV radiation or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Several clones were isolated that were deficient in Bchl c synthesis. All reverted. One double mutant deficient both in Bchl c synthesis and in the synthesis of colored carotenoids under anaerobic conditions was isolated. Isolation of a revertant in Bchl c synthesis from this double mutant produced a mutant strain of Chloroflexus that grew photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions and lacked colored carotenoids. Analysis of pigment contents and growth rates of the mutants revealed a positive association between growth rate and content of Bchl c under light-limiting conditions. 11 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Quantitative Proteomics of a Chloroplast SRP54 Sorting Mutant and Its Genetic Interactions with CLPC1 in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rutschow, Heidi; Ytterberg, A. Jimmy; Friso, Giulia; Nilsson, Robert; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2008-01-01

    cpSRP54 (for chloroplast SIGNAL RECOGNITION PARTICLE54) is involved in cotranslational and posttranslational sorting of thylakoid proteins. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cpSRP54 null mutant, ffc1-2, is pale green with delayed development. Western-blot analysis of individual leaves showed that the SRP sorting pathway, but not the SecY/E translocon, was strongly down-regulated with progressive leaf development in both wild-type and ffc1-2 plants. To further understand the impact of cpSRP54 deletion, a quantitative comparison of ffc2-1 was carried out for total leaf proteomes of young seedlings and for chloroplast proteomes of fully developed leaves using stable isotope labeling (isobaric stable isotope labeling and isotope-coded affinity tags) and two-dimensional gels. This showed that cpSRP54 deletion led to a change in light-harvesting complex composition, an increase of PsbS, and a decreased photosystem I/II ratio. Moreover, the cpSRP54 deletion led in young leaves to up-regulation of thylakoid proteases and stromal chaperones, including ClpC. In contrast, the stromal protein homeostasis machinery returned to wild-type levels in mature leaves, consistent with the developmental down-regulation of the SRP pathway. A differential response between young and mature leaves was also found in carbon metabolism, with an up-regulation of the Calvin cycle and the photorespiratory pathway in peroxisomes and mitochondria in young leaves but not in old leaves. The Calvin cycle was down-regulated in mature leaves to adjust to the reduced capacity of the light reaction, while reactive oxygen species defense proteins were up-regulated. The significance of ClpC up-regulation was confirmed through the generation of an ffc2-1 clpc1 double mutant. This mutant was seedling lethal under autotrophic conditions but could be partially rescued under heterotrophic conditions. PMID:18633119

  10. Characterization of mutations that are synthetic lethal with pol3-13, a mutated allele of DNA polymerase delta in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chanet, Roland; Heude, Martine

    2003-08-01

    The pol3-13 mutation is located in the C-terminal end of POL3, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of polymerase delta, and confers thermosensitivity onto the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain. To get insight about DNA replication control, we performed a genetic screen to identify genes that are synthetic lethal with pol3-13. Mutations in genes encoding the two other subunits of DNA polymerase delta (HYS2, POL32) were identified. Mutations in two recombination genes (RAD50, RAD51) were also identified, confirming that homologous recombination is necessary for pol3-13 mutant strain survival. Other mutations were identified in genes involved in repair and genome stability (MET18/ MMS19), in the control of origin-firing and/or transcription (ABF1, SRB7), in the S/G2 checkpoint (RAD53), in the Ras-cAMP signal transduction pathway (MKS1), in nuclear pore metabolism (SEH1), in protein degradation (DOC1) and in folding (YDJ1). Finally, mutations in three genes of unknown function were isolated (NBP35, DRE2, TAH18). Synthetic lethality between pol3-13 and each of the three mutants pol32, mms19 and doc1 could be suppressed by a rad18 deletion, suggesting an important role of ubiquitination in DNA replication control. We propose that the pol3-13 mutant generates replicative problems that need both homologous recombination and an intact checkpoint machinery to be overcome. PMID:12759774

  11. SCID mouse model for lethal Q fever.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Masako; Naganawa, Takashi; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Masegi, Toshiaki; Hirai, Katsuya

    2003-08-01

    Q fever, a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, has many manifestations in humans. Endocarditis is the most serious complication of Q fever. Animal models are limited to acute pulmonary or hepatic disease and reproductive disorders. An appropriate experimental animal model for Q fever endocarditis does not yet exist. In this study, severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice infected with C. burnetii showed persistent clinical symptoms and died, whereas immunocompetent mice similarly infected became asymptomatic and survived. The SCID mice examined in this study had severe chronic lesions in their primary organs: the heart, lung, spleen, liver, and kidney. The heart lesions of the SCID mice were similar to those in humans with chronic Q fever endocarditis: they had focal calcification and expanded macrophages containing C. burnetii. The 50% lethal dose of C. burnetii in SCID mice was at least 10(8) times less than that in immunocompetent mice. The SCID mouse is highly susceptible to C. burnetii, and the immunodeficiency of the host enhances the severity of Q fever. This animal model could provide a new tool for the study of chronic Q fever and Q fever in immunodeficient hosts. PMID:12874353

  12. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; de Bono, Johann S.; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. PMID:25232177

  13. Lethal body burdens of polar narcotics: Chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, A.P. van; Punte, S.S.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to measure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) the lethal body burden (LBB) of three chlorophenols that are known as polar narcotic chemicals. The LBBs of the chlorophenols were compared to LBBs of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to consider if the two classes of narcotic chemicals differ on a body burden level. The LBB of the most acidic chlorophenol was measured at two different levels of pH exposure to determine the influence of the degree of ionization on the magnitude of the LBB. Both n-octanol/water partition coefficients and n-hexane/water partition coefficients of the chlorophenols were determined at different pH levels to consider the influence of ionization on the partition coefficient and to determine the importance of a polar group in the organic phase on the partitioning behavior. Partitioning to n-octanol and n-hexane was used as input in a model to simulate the equilibrium partitioning between hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic and target and nontarget compartments in the fish.

  14. Sleep restores behavioral plasticity to Drosophila mutants.

    PubMed

    Dissel, Stephane; Angadi, Veena; Kirszenblat, Leonie; Suzuki, Yasuko; Donlea, Jeff; Klose, Markus; Koch, Zachary; English, Denis; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; van Swinderen, Bruno; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-18

    Given the role that sleep plays in modulating plasticity, we hypothesized that increasing sleep would restore memory to canonical memory mutants without specifically rescuing the causal molecular lesion. Sleep was increased using three independent strategies: activating the dorsal fan-shaped body, increasing the expression of Fatty acid binding protein (dFabp), or by administering the GABA-A agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP). Short-term memory (STM) or long-term memory (LTM) was evaluated in rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc) mutants using aversive phototaxic suppression and courtship conditioning. Each of the three independent strategies increased sleep and restored memory to rut and dnc mutants. Importantly, inducing sleep also reverses memory defects in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease. Together, these data demonstrate that sleep plays a more fundamental role in modulating behavioral plasticity than previously appreciated and suggest that increasing sleep may benefit patients with certain neurological disorders. PMID:25913403

  15. Conditional knockout mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chu-Xia

    2014-12-01

    In 2007, three scientists, Drs. Mario R. Capecchi, Martin J. Evans, and Oliver Smithies, received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their contributions of introducing specific gene modifications into mice. This technology, commonly referred to as gene targeting or knockout, has proven to be a powerful means for precisely manipulating the mammalian genome and has generated great impacts on virtually all phases of mammalian biology and basic biomedical research. Of note, germline mutations of many genes, especially tumor suppressors, often result in lethality during embryonic development or at developmental stages before tumor formation. This obstacle has been effectively overcome by the use of conditional knockout technology in conjunction with Cre-LoxP- or Flp-Frt-mediated temporal and/or spatial systems to generate genetic switches for precise DNA recombination. Currently, numerous conditional knockout mouse models have been successfully generated and applied in studying tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. This review summarizes some conditional mutant mouse models that are widely used in cancer research and our understanding of the possible mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. PMID:25447286

  16. Ectopic Noggin in a Population of Nfatc1 Lineage Endocardial Progenitors Induces Embryonic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Paige; Simmons, Olga; Wang, Jian; Hoang, Chinh Q.; Conway, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The initial heart is composed of a myocardial tube lined by endocardial cells. The TGF? superfamily is known to play an important role, as BMPs from the myocardium signal to the overlying endocardium to create an environment for EMT. Subsequently, BMP and TGF? signaling pathways synergize to form primitive valves and regulate myocardial growth. In this study, we investigated the requirement of BMP activity by transgenic over-expression of extracellular BMP antagonist Noggin. Using Nfatc1Cre to drive lineage-restricted Noggin within the endocardium, we show that ectopic Noggin arrests cardiac development in E10.5-11 embryos, resulting in small hearts which beat poorly and die by E12.5. This is coupled with hypoplastic endocardial cushions, reduced trabeculation and fewer mature contractile fibrils in mutant hearts. Moreover, Nfatc1Cre-mediated diphtheria toxin fragment-A expression in the endocardium resulted in genetic ablation and a more severe phenotype with lethality at E11 and abnormal linear hearts. Molecular analysis demonstrated that endocardial Noggin resulted in a specific alteration of TGF?/BMP-mediated signal transduction, in that, both Endoglin and ALK1 were downregulated in mutant endocardium. Combined, these results demonstrate the cell-autonomous requirement of the endocardial lineage and function of unaltered BMP levels in facilitating endothelium-cardiomyocyte cross-talk and promoting endocardial cushion formation. PMID:26090377

  17. Tetrahymena mutants with short telomeres.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S; Sheng, H; Niu, L; Henderson, E

    1998-10-01

    Telomere length is dynamic in many organisms. Genetic screens that identify mutants with altered telomere lengths are essential if we are to understand how telomere length is regulated in vivo. In Tetrahymena thermophila, telomeres become long at 30 degrees, and growth rate slows. A slow-growing culture with long telomeres is often overgrown by a variant cell type with short telomeres and a rapid-doubling rate. Here we show that this variant cell type with short telomeres is in fact a mutant with a genetic defect in telomere length regulation. One of these telomere growth inhibited forever (tgi) mutants was heterozygous for a telomerase RNA mutation, and this mutant telomerase RNA caused telomere shortening when overexpressed in wild-type cells. Several other tgi mutants were also likely to be heterozygous at their mutant loci, since they reverted to wild type when selective pressure for short telomeres was removed. These results illustrate that telomere length can regulate growth rate in Tetrahymena and that this phenomenon can be exploited to identify genes involved in telomere length regulation. PMID:9755196

  18. A molecular model for the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the mouse lethal yellow (A{sup y}) mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E.J.; Klebig, M.L.; Stubbs, L.J.; Russell, L.B.; Woychik, R.P.; Bultman, S.J. |; Vugt, M.J. van |

    1994-03-29

    Lethal yellow (A{sup y}) is a mutation at the mouse agouti locus in chromosome 2 that causes a number of dominant pleiotropic effects, including a completely yellow coat color, obesity, an insulin-resistant type II diabetic condition, and an increased propensity to develop a variety of spontaneous and induced tumors. Additionally, homozygosity for A{sup y} results in preimplantation lethality, which terminates development by the blastocyst stage. The A{sup y} mutation is the result of a 170-kb deletion that removes all but the promoter and noncoding first exon of another gene called Raly, which lies in the same transcriptional orientation as agouti and maps 280 kb proximal to the 3{prime} end of the agouti gene. The authors present a model for the structure of the A{sub y} allele that can explain the dominant pleiotropic effects associated with this mutation, as well as the recessive lethality, which is unrelated to the agouti gene.

  19. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  20. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  1. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  2. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  3. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference substances. These...numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The calculation of the dominant...implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection —(i)...

  4. Transposon insertions causing constitutive sex-lethal activity in Drosophila melanogaster affect Sxl sex-specific transcript splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Berstein, M.; Cline, T.W. |; Lersch, R.A.; Subrahmanyan, L.

    1995-02-01

    Sex-lethal (Sxl) gene products induce female development in Drosophila melanogaster and suppress the transcriptional hyperactivation of X-linked genes responsible for male X-chromosome dosage compensation. Control of Sxl functioning by the dose of X-chromosomes normally ensures that the female-specific functions of this developmental switch gene are only expressed in diplo-X individuals. Although the immediate effect of X-chromosome dose is on Sxl transcription, during most of the life cycle {open_quotes}on{close_quotes} vs. {open_quotes}off{close_quotes} reflects alternative Sxl RNA splicing, with the female (productive) splicing mode maintained by a positive feedback activity of SXL protein on Sxl pre-mRNA splicing. {open_quotes}Male-lethal{close_quotes} (Sxl{sup M}) gain-of-function alleles subvert Sxl control by X-chromosome dose, allowing female Sxl functions to be expressed independent of the positive regulators upstream of Sxl. As a consequence, Sxl{sup M} haplo-X animals (chromosomal males) die because of improper dosage compensation, and Sxl{sup m} chromosomal females survive the otherwise lethal effects of mutations in upstream positive regulators. Transcript analysis of double-mutant male-viable Sxl{sup M} derivatives in which the Sxl{sup M} insertion is cis to loss-of-function mutations, combined with other results reported here, indicates that the constitutive character of these Sxl{sup M} alleles is a consequence of an alteration of the structure of the pre-mRNA that allow some level of female splicing to occur even in the absence of functional SXL protein. Surprisingly, however, most of the constitutive character of Sxl{sup M} alleles appears to depend on the mutant alleles` responsiveness, perhaps greater than wild-type, to the autoregulatory splicing activity of the wild-type SXL proteins they produce. 47 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis. PMID:26327947

  6. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mat-Jan, F.; Alam, K.Y.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion.

  7. Towards an Informative Mutant Phenotype for Every Bacterial Gene

    PubMed Central

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjun; Leon, Dacia

    2014-01-01

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, in Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness. PMID:25112473

  8. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjen; Leon, Dacia; Arkin, Adam P.; Skerker, Jeffrey M.

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, inmore »Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.« less

  9. Germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa that responds to siderophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlang, G.; Williams, N. P.

    1977-01-01

    A conditionally germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa has been found to be partially curable by ferricrocin and other siderophores. The mutant conidia rapidly lose their membrane-bound siderophores when suspended in buffer or growth media. Germination is consequently delayed unless large numbers of conidia are present (positive population effect). This indicates that the mutant has a membrane defect involving the siderophore attachment site.

  10. Hydrocarbon assimilation and biosurfactant production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A K; Käppeli, O; Fiechter, A; Reiser, J

    1991-01-01

    We isolated transposon Tn5-GM-induced mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG201 that were unable to grow in minimal media containing hexadecane as a carbon source. Some of these mutants lacked extracellular rhamnolipids, as shown by measuring the surface and interfacial tensions of the cell culture supernatants. Furthermore, the concentrated culture media of the mutant strains were tested for the presence of rhamnolipids by thin-layer chromatography and for rhamnolipid activities, including hemolysis and growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis. Mutant 65E12 was unable to produce extracellular rhamnolipids under any of the conditions tested, lacked the capacity to take up 14C-labeled hexadecane, and did not grow in media containing individual alkanes with chain lengths ranging from C12 to C19. However, growth on these alkanes and uptake of [14C]hexadecane were restored when small amounts of purified rhamnolipids were added to the cultures. Mutant 59C7 was unable to grow in media containing hexadecane, nor was it able to take up [14C]hexadecane. The addition of small amounts of rhamnolipids restored growth on alkanes and [14C]hexadecane uptake. In glucose-containing media, however, mutant 59C7 produced rhamnolipids at levels about twice as high as those of the wild-type strain. These results show that rhamnolipids play a major role in hexadecane uptake and utilization by P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:1648079

  11. 76 FR 6054 - Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... proposed on June 25, 2008 (73 FR 39584), regarding the use of ] chemical agents and other less-than-lethal... of Prisons 28 CFR Part 552 RIN 1120-AB46 Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation AGENCY: Bureau of... its proposed regulation on the use of chemical agents and other non-lethal (less-than-lethal) force...

  12. Physica A 364 (2006) 557564 Identification of lethal cluster of genes

    E-print Network

    Jeong, Hawoong

    2006-01-01

    Physica A 364 (2006) 557­564 Identification of lethal cluster of genes in the yeast transcription 2005 Available online 8 November 2005 Abstract Identification of essential or lethal genes would be one population of lethal genes, called lethal cluster, through microarray assay. We construct a gene

  13. Loss of cap structure causes mitotic defect in Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase mutants.

    PubMed

    Petcherskaia, Marina; McGuire, Jennifer M; Pherson, James M; Kirk, Karen E

    2003-04-01

    Mutation of the telomeric repeat sequence has severe cellular consequences in a variety of systems. A Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase template mutant, ter1-43AA, displays an acute mitotic chromosome segregation defect. In the study described here we investigated the molecular basis for this lethality. Although cloned ter1-43AA macronuclear telomeres had long tracts of wild-type G4T2 repeats, they were capped by a mixture of G4T3 repeats, shown previously to be non-lethal, and G4T4 repeats, the telomeric sequence normally found in hypotrichous ciliates such as Oxytricha. To test further the functionality of the G4T4 repeat sequence in T. thermophila, we devised a new template mutation, ter1-44+AA, that resulted in more uniform synthesis of this sequence at telomere caps in vivo. The ter1-44+AA mutant displayed the most severe mitotic defect reported to date, with up to 85% of the population having micronuclei in anaphase, providing firm evidence that the hypotrich repeat sequence is not functional in Tetrahymena. Surprisingly, in spite of the telomeric sequence mutation, neither the ter1-43AA nor ter1-44+AA mutant displayed any significant loss of telomere length regulation. These results demonstrate that loss of telomere cap integrity, rather than length regulation, leads to the anaphase defect. PMID:12707780

  14. Overexpression of dilp2 causes nutrient-dependent semi-lethality in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Muramatsu, Keigo; Funakoshi, Masabumi; Tsuda, Manabu; Aigaki, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) plays an important role as a systemic regulator of metabolism in multicellular organisms. Hyperinsulinemia, a high level of blood insulin, is often associated with impaired physiological conditions such as hypoglycemia, insulin resistance, and diabetes. However, due to the complex pathophysiology of hyperinsulinemia, the causative role of excess insulin/IGF signaling has remained elusive. To investigate the biological effects of a high level of insulin in metabolic homeostasis and physiology, we generated flies overexpressing Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2), which has the highest potential of promoting tissue growth among the Ilp genes in Drosophila. In this model, a UAS-Dilp2 transgene was overexpressed under control of sd-Gal4 that drives expression predominantly in developing imaginal wing discs. Overexpression of Dilp2 caused semi-lethality, which was partially suppressed by mutations in the insulin receptor (InR) or Akt1, suggesting that dilp2-induced semi-lethality is mediated by the PI3K/Akt1 signaling. We found that dilp2-overexpressing flies exhibited intensive autophagy in fat body cells. Interestingly, the dilp2-induced autophagy as well as the semi-lethality was partially rescued by increasing the protein content relative to glucose in the media. Our results suggest that excess insulin/IGF signaling impairs the physiology of animals, which can be ameliorated by controlling the nutritional balance between proteins and carbohydrates, at least in flies. PMID:24795642

  15. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate. PMID:26519470

  16. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate. PMID:26519470

  17. Proton suicide: general method for direct selection of sugar transport- and fermentation-defective mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, J.W.; Clark, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    A positive selection procedure was devised for bacterial mutants incapable of producing acid from sugars by fermentation. The method relied on the production of elemental bromine from a mixture of bromide and bromate under acidic conditions. When wild-type Escherichia coli cells were plated on media containing a fermentable sugar and an equimolar mixture of bromide and bromate, most of the cells were killed but a variety of mutants unable to produce acid from the sugar survived. Among these mutants were those defective in (i) sugar uptake, (ii) the glycolytic pathway, and (iii) the excretion. There were also novel mutants with some presumed regulatory defects affecting fermentation.

  18. High-throughput simultaneous screen and counterscreen identifies homoharringtonine as synthetic lethal with von Hippel-Lindau loss in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Nicholas C.; Pavía-Jiménez, Andrea; Tcheuyap, Vanina T.; Alexander, Shane; Vishwanath, Mridula; Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin; Williams, Noelle S.; Kapur, Payal; Posner, Bruce; McKay, Renée M.; Brugarolas, James

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 85% of primary renal neoplasms, and is rarely curable when metastatic. Approximately 70% of RCCs are clear-cell type (ccRCC), and in >80% the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene is mutated or silenced. We developed a novel, high-content, screening strategy for the identification of small molecules that are synthetic lethal with genes mutated in cancer. In this strategy, the screen and counterscreen are conducted simultaneously by differentially labeling mutant and reconstituted isogenic tumor cell line pairs with different fluorochromes and using a highly sensitive high-throughput imaging-based platform. This approach minimizes confounding factors from sequential screening, and more accurately replicates the in vivo cancer setting where cancer cells are adjacent to normal cells. A screen of ~12,800 small molecules identified homoharringtonine (HHT), an FDA-approved drug for treating chronic myeloid leukemia, as a VHL-synthetic lethal agent in ccRCC. HHT induced apoptosis in VHL-mutant, but not VHL-reconstituted, ccRCC cells, and inhibited tumor growth in 30% of VHL-mutant patient-derived ccRCC tumorgraft lines tested. Building on a novel screening strategy and utilizing a validated RCC tumorgraft model recapitulating the genetics and drug responsiveness of human RCC, these studies identify HHT as a potential therapeutic agent for a subset of VHL-deficient ccRCCs. PMID:26219258

  19. Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Min; Bernat, Gabor; Singh, Abhay K.; Mi, Hualing; Rogner, Matthias; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-09-10

    A mutant ( 5) of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 constructed by inactivating five inorganic carbon sequestration systems did not take up CO2 or HCO3– and was unable to grow in air with or without glucose. The 4 mutant in which BicA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3– uptake and grew under these conditions but more slowly than the wild-type strain. The 5 mutant required 1.7% CO2 to attain half the maximal growth rate. Electron transport activity of the mutants was strongly inhibited under high light intensities, with the 5 mutant more susceptible to high light than the 4 mutant. The results implicated the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy.

  20. [Characteristics of plague pathogen mutants, differing by pigment sorption signs].

    PubMed

    Podladchikova, O N; Ivanova, V S; Eremenko, N S; Lebedeva, S A

    2003-01-01

    Wild-type strains of plague agent Yersinia pestis are characterized by a pigmentation phenotype (Pgm+), which includes several traits: an ability of cells to adsorb pigments (Hms+), an ability to produce siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt+) and an ability to cause lethal infections in laboratory animals (Vir+) after subcutaneous injections. All these traits are encoded in the chromosomal pgm-locus, which gets rapidly lost due to deletion. One more trait related with the Pgm+ phenotype was detected in the present study, i.e. its siderophoric activity at 28 degrees C on the indication agar plates containing chrome azurol S (Sid+). After the four phenotypic characteristics of the Pgm+ phenotype were analyzed as well as after the four pgm-locus genes (hmsF, hmsR, irp2 and fyuA/psn) were detected by the method of hybridization and PCR, we compared 33 isogenous Pgm- mutants isolated from typical Y. pestis strain 923 by Hms-. The comparison showed that the mutants differed from each other according to the analyzed properties, which suggested that they were formed by different genetic mechanisms. Apart from the known mechanism of pgm-locus deletion, which causes an irreversible loss of Hms+, Ybt+ and Vir+ properties, two more mechanisms were detected. One of them is related with insertion damages to the pgm-locus genes, which also leads to the loss of the four traits but which can be reversed by the cultivation of cells at low temperature. The other mechanism is predetermined by unknown genetic processes ensuring the formation of mutants, which loose only their Hms+ properties and which can trigger its high-frequency reversion at 28 degrees C. PMID:12656044

  1. Identification of synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibition and microtubule-destabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Hugle, M; Belz, K; Fulda, S

    2015-12-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is frequently overexpressed in cancer, which correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, we investigated PLK1 as therapeutic target using rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) as a model. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs in preclinical RMS models and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of this synergism. PLK1 inhibitors (i.e., BI 2536 and BI 6727) synergistically induce apoptosis together with microtubule-destabilizing drugs (i.e., vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) and vinorelbine (VNR)) in several RMS cell lines (combination index <0.9) including a patient-derived primary RMS culture. Importantly, PLK1 inhibitors and VCR cooperate to significantly suppress RMS growth in two in vivo models, including a mouse xenograft model, without causing additive toxicity. In addition, no toxicity was observed in non-malignant fibroblast or myoblast cultures. Mechanistically, BI 2536/VCR co-treatment triggers mitotic arrest, which initiates mitochondrial apoptosis by inactivation of antiapoptotic BCL-2 family proteins, followed by BAX/BAK activation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of caspase-dependent or caspase-independent effector pathways. This conclusion is supported by data showing that BI 2536/VCR-induced apoptosis is significantly inhibited by preventing cells to enter mitosis, by overexpression of BCL-2 or a non-degradable MCL-1 mutant, by BAK knockdown, ROS scavengers, caspase inhibition or endonuclease G silencing. This identification of a novel synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs has important implications for developing PLK1 inhibitor-based combination treatments. PMID:26024389

  2. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  3. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light. PMID:25488603

  4. Hydrocarbon assimilation and biosurfactant production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.K.; Fiechter, A.; Reiser, J. ); Kaeppeli, O. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors isolated transposon Tn5-GM-induced mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG201 that were unable to grow in minimal media containing hexadecane as a carbon source. Some of these mutants lacked extracellular rhamnolipids, as shown by measuring the surface and interfacial tensions of the cell culture supernatants. Furthermore, the concentrated culture media of the mutant strains were tested for the presence of rhamnolipids by thin-layer chromatography and for rhamnolipid activities, including hemolysis and growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis. Mutant 65E12 was unable to produce extracellular rhamnolipids under any of the inhibition of Bacillus subtilis. Mutant 65E12 was unable to produce extracellular rhamnolipids under any of the conditions tested, lacked the capacity to take up {sup 14}C-labeled hexadecane, and did not grow in media containing individual alkanes with chain lengths ranging from C{sub 12} to C{sub 19}. However, growth on these alkanes and uptake of ({sup 14}C)hexadecane were restored when small amounts of purified rhamnolipids were added to the cultures. Mutant 59C7 was unable to grow in media containing hexadecane, nor was it able to take up ({sup 14}C)hexadecane uptake. The addition of small amounts of rhamnolipids restored on alkanes and ({sup 14}C)hexadecane uptake. In glucose-containing media, however, mutant 59C7 produced rhamnolipids at levels about twice as high as those of the wild-type strain. These results show that rhamnolipids play a major role in hexadecane uptake and utilization by P.aeruginosa.

  5. Effective Lethal Mutagenesis of Influenza Virus by Three Nucleoside Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and low mutational tolerance of many RNA viruses. This approach uses mutagenic drugs to increase viral mutation rates and burden viral populations with mutations that reduce the number of infectious progeny. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis as a strategy against influenza virus using three nucleoside analogs, ribavirin, 5-azacytidine, and 5-fluorouracil. All three drugs were active against a panel of seasonal H3N2 and laboratory-adapted H1N1 strains. We found that each drug increased the frequency of mutations in influenza virus populations and decreased the virus' specific infectivity, indicating a mutagenic mode of action. We were able to drive viral populations to extinction by passaging influenza virus in the presence of each drug, indicating that complete lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus populations can be achieved when a sufficient mutational burden is applied. Population-wide resistance to these mutagenic agents did not arise after serial passage of influenza virus populations in sublethal concentrations of drug. Sequencing of these drug-passaged viral populations revealed genome-wide accumulation of mutations at low frequency. The replicative capacity of drug-passaged populations was reduced at higher multiplicities of infection, suggesting the presence of defective interfering particles and a possible barrier to the evolution of resistance. Together, our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be a particularly effective therapeutic approach with a high genetic barrier to resistance for influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is an RNA virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality during annual epidemics. Novel therapies for RNA viruses are needed due to the ease with which these viruses evolve resistance to existing therapeutics. Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and the low mutational tolerance of most RNA viruses. It is thought to possess a higher barrier to resistance than conventional antiviral strategies. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis against influenza virus using three different drugs. We showed that influenza virus was sensitive to lethal mutagenesis by demonstrating that all three drugs induced mutations and led to an increase in the generation of defective viral particles. We also found that it may be difficult for resistance to these drugs to arise at a population-wide level. Our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be an attractive anti-influenza strategy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25589650

  6. Approaches to Identifying Synthetic Lethal Interactions in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jordan M.; Nguyen, Quy H.; Singh, Manpreet; Razorenova, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting synthetic lethal interactions is a promising new therapeutic approach to exploit specific changes that occur within cancer cells. Multiple approaches to investigate these interactions have been developed and successfully implemented, including chemical, siRNA, shRNA, and CRISPR library screens. Genome-wide computational approaches, such as DAISY, also have been successful in predicting synthetic lethal interactions from both cancer cell lines and patient samples. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages that need to be considered depending on the cancer type and its molecular alterations. This review discusses these approaches and examines case studies that highlight their use. PMID:26029013

  7. Branchio-oculo-facial syndrome: a three generational family with markedly variable phenotype including neonatal lethality.

    PubMed

    Titheradge, Hannah L; Patel, Chirag; Ragge, Nicola K

    2015-01-01

    Branchio-oculo-facial syndrome (BOFS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition with variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the TFAP2A gene. We report a three generational family with four affected individuals. The consultand has typical features of BOFS including infra-auricular skin nodules, coloboma, lacrimal duct atresia, cleft lip, conductive hearing loss and typical facial appearance. She also exhibited a rare feature of preaxial polydactyly. Her brother had a lethal phenotype with multiorgan failure. We also report a novel variant in TFAP2A gene. This family highlights the variable severity of BOFS and, therefore, the importance of informed genetic counselling in families with BOFS. PMID:25325185

  8. Mutant strains of Tetrahymena thermophila defective in thymidine kinase activity: Biochemical and genetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, K.V.; Pearlman, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Three mutant strains, one conditional, of Tetrahymena thermophila were defective in thymidine phosphorylating activity in vivo and in thymidine kinase activity in vitro. Nucleoside phosphotransferase activity in mutant cell extracts approached wild-type levels, suggesting that thymidine kinase is responsible for most, if not all, thymidine phosphorylation in vivo. Thymidine kinase activity in extracts of the conditional mutant strain was deficient when the cells were grown or assayed or both at the permissive temperature, implying a structural enzyme defect. Analysis of the reaction products from in vitro assays with partially purified enzymes showed that phosphorylation by thymidine kinase and nucleoside phosphotransferase occurred at the 5' position. Genetic analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was recessive and that mutations in each of the three mutant strains did not complement, suggesting allelism.

  9. The Generation and Genetic Analysis of Suppressors of Lethal Mutations in the Caenorhabditis Elegans Rol-3(v) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Barbazuk, W. B.; Johnsen, R. C.; Baillie, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans rol-3(e754) mutation is a member of a general glass of mutations affecting gross morphology, presumably through disruption of the nematode cuticle. Adult worms homozygous for rol-3(e754) exhibit rotation about their long axis associated with a left-hand twisted cuticle, musculature, gut and ventral nerve cord. Our laboratory previously isolated 12 recessive lethal alleles of rol-3. All these lethal alleles cause an arrest in development at either early or mid-larval stages, suggesting that the rol-3 gene product performs an essential developmental function. Furthermore, through the use of the heterochronic mutants lin-14 and lin-29, we have established that the expression of rol-3(e754)'s adult specific visible function is not dependent on the presence of an adult cuticle. In an attempt to understand rol-3's developmental role we sought to identify other genes whose products interact with that of rol-3. Toward this end, we generated eight EMS induced and two gamma irradiation-induced recessive suppressors of the temperature sensitive (ts) mid-larval lethal phenotype of rol-3(s1040ts). These suppressors define two complementation groups srl-1 II and srl-2 III; and, while they suppress the rol-3(s1040) lethality, they do not suppress the adult specific visible rolling phenotype. Furthermore, there is a complex genetic interaction between srl-2 and srl-1 such that srl-2(s2506) fails to complement all srl alleles tested. These results suggest that srl-1 and srl-2 may share a common function and, thus, possibly constitute members of the same gene family. Mutations in both srl-1 and srl-2 produce no obvious hermaphrodite phenotypes in the absence of rol-3(s1040ts); however, males homozygous for either srl-1 or srl-2 display aberrant tail morphology. We present evidence suggesting that the members of srl-2 are not allele specific with respect to their suppression of rol-3 lethality, and that rol-3 may act in some way to influence proper posterior morphogenesis. Finally, based on our genetic analysis of rol-3 and the srl mutations, we present a model whereby the wild-type products of the srl loci act in a concerted manner to negatively regulate the rol-3 gene. PMID:8138151

  10. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  11. STUDIES ON A NONDORMANT SUNFLOWER MUTANT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An unexpected sunflower mutant resulting from an interspecific cross of the wild perennial Helianthus divaricatus with cultivated HA 89 was identified. In this mutant, dormancy is not induced in the developing embryo. Instead, developing seeds of the mutant sunflower begin to germinate in the head a...

  12. CONSTRUCTION OF IN-FRAME, NON-POLAR, LKTA MUTANTS OF MANNHEIMIA HAEMOLYTICA USING A NEW TEMPERATURE CONDITIONAL PLASMID AND EFFICACY AS MODIFIED-LIVE MUCOSAL VACCINE CANDIDATES (ORAL PRESENT., INTL. PASTEURELLACEAE CONF.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 1.2 kb temperature-conditional plasmid origin of replication based on that of the 4.2 kb ampicillin-resistance plasmid of Mannheimia haemolytica was produced using a hydroxylamine mutagenesis technique. The origin was coupled to a kanamycin-resistance cassette based on that of Tn903 and a 1.0 kb ...

  13. Conditional control of gene function by an invertible gene trap in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Terri T.; Lu, Jianjun; Zhu, Meiying; Maddison, Lisette A.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Huskey, Lindsey; Ju, Bensheng; Hesselson, Daniel; Zhong, Tao P.; Page-McCaw, Patrick S.; Stainier, Didier Y.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2012-01-01

    Conditional mutations are essential for determining the stage- and tissue-specific functions of genes. Here we achieve conditional mutagenesis in zebrafish using FT1, a gene-trap cassette that can be stably inverted by both Cre and Flp recombinases. We demonstrate that intronic insertions in the gene-trapping orientation severely disrupt the expression of the host gene, whereas intronic insertions in the neutral orientation do not significantly affect host gene expression. Cre- and Flp-mediated recombination switches the orientation of the gene-trap cassette, permitting conditional rescue in one orientation and conditional knockout in the other. To illustrate the utility of this system we analyzed the functional consequence of intronic FT1 insertion in supv3l1, a gene encoding a mitochondrial RNA helicase. Global supv311 mutants have impaired mitochondrial function, embryonic lethality, and agenesis of the liver. Conditional rescue of supv311 expression in hepatocytes specifically corrected the liver defects. To test whether the liver function of supv311 is required for viability we used Flp-mediated recombination in the germline to generate a neutral allele at the locus. Subsequently, tissue-specific expression of Cre conditionally inactivated the targeted locus. Hepatocyte-specific inactivation of supv311 caused liver degeneration, growth retardation, and juvenile lethality, a phenotype that was less severe than the global disruption of supv311. Thus, supv311 is required in multiple tissues for organismal viability. Our mutagenesis approach is very efficient and could be used to generate conditional alleles throughout the zebrafish genome. Furthermore, because FT1 is based on the promiscuous Tol2 transposon, it should be applicable to many organisms. PMID:22908272

  14. TTSS2-deficient hha mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium exhibits significant systemic attenuation in immunocompromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Pati, Niladri Bhusan; Ray, Shilpa; Das, Susmita; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2014-02-15

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections are emerging as leading problem worldwide and the variations in host immune status append to the concern of NTS. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the causative agents of NTS infections and has been extensively studied. The inactivation of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) encoded type-III secretion system 2 (TTSS2) has been reported rendering the strain incapable for systemic dissemination to host sites and has also been proposed as live-attenuated vaccine. However, infections from TTSS2-deficient Salmonella have also been reported. In this study, mutant strain MT15 was developed by inactivation of the hemolysin expression modulating protein (hha) in TTSS2-deficient S. Typhimurium background. The MT15 strain showed significant level of attenuation in immune-deprived murine colitis model when tested in iNos(-/-), IL10(-/-), and CD40L(-/-) mice groups in C57BL/6 background. Further, the mutation in hha does not implicate any defect in bacterial colonization to the host gut. The long-term infection of developed mutant strain conferred protective immune responses to suitably immunized streptomycin pre-treated C57BL/6 mice. The immunization enhanced the CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell types involved in bacterial clearance. The serum IgG and luminal secretory IgA (sIgA) was also found to be elevated after the due course of infection. Additionally, the immunized C57BL/6 mice were protected from the subsequent lethal infection of Salmonella Typhimurium. Collectively, these findings implicate the involvement of hemolysin expression modulating protein (Hha) in establishment of bacterial infection. In light of the observed attenuation of the developed mutant strain, this study proposes the possible significance of SPI2-deficient hha mutant as an alternative live-attenuated vaccine strain for use against lethal Salmonella infections. PMID:24401482

  15. 5-Azacytidine Can Induce Lethal Mutagenesis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1? †

    PubMed Central

    Dapp, Michael J.; Clouser, Christine L.; Patterson, Steven; Mansky, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Ribonucleosides inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report the antiviral mechanism for the ribonucleoside analog 5-azacytidine (5-AZC). We hypothesized that the anti-HIV-1 activity of 5-AZC was due to an increase in the HIV-1 mutation rate following its incorporation into viral RNA during transcription. However, we demonstrate that 5-AZC's primary antiviral activity can be attributed to its effect on the early phase of HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, the antiviral activity was associated with an increase in the frequency of viral mutants, suggesting that 5-AZC's primary target is reverse transcription. Sequencing analysis showed an enrichment in G-to-C transversion mutations and further supports the idea that reverse transcription is an antiviral target of 5-AZC. These results indicate that 5-AZC is incorporated into viral DNA following reduction to 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine. Incorporation into the viral DNA leads to an increase in mutant frequency that is consistent with lethal mutagenesis during reverse transcription as the primary antiviral mechanism of 5-AZC. Antiviral activity and increased mutation frequency were also associated with the late phase of HIV-1 replication; however, 5-AZC's effect on the late phase was less robust. These results reveal that the primary antiviral mechanism of 5-AZC can be attributed to its ability to increase the HIV-1 mutation frequency through viral-DNA incorporation during reverse transcription. Our observations indicate that 5-AZC can affect two steps in HIV-1 replication (i.e., transcription and reverse transcription) but that its primary antiviral activity is due to incorporation during reverse transcription. PMID:19726509

  16. Influence of sub-lethal stresses on the survival of lactic acid bacteria after spray-drying in orange juice.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J; Borges, S; Teixeira, P

    2015-12-01

    The demand for new functional non-dairy based products makes the production of a probiotic orange juice powder an encouraging challenge. However, during drying process and storage, loss of viability of the dried probiotic cultures can occur, since the cells are exposed to various stresses. The influence of sub-lethal conditions of temperature, acidic pH and hydrogen peroxide on the viability of Pediococcus acidilactici HA-6111-2 and Lactobacillus plantarum 299v during spray drying in orange juice and subsequent storage under different conditions was investigated. At the end of storage, the survival of both microorganisms through simulated gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) conditions was also determined. The viability of cells previously exposed to each stress was not affected by the drying process. However, during 180 days of storage at room temperature, unlike P. acidilactici HA-6111-2, survival of L. plantarum 299v was enhanced by prior exposure to sub-lethal conditions. Previous exposure to sub-lethal stresses of each microorganism did not improve their viability after passage through simulated GIT. Nevertheless, as cellular inactivation during 180 days of storage was low, both microorganisms were present in numbers of ca. 10(7) cfu/mL at the end of GIT. This is an indication that both bacteria are good candidates for use in the development of an orange juice powder with functional characteristics. PMID:26338119

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bones and other connective tissues that form the body's supportive framework. All of the COL2A1 mutations that have been found to cause platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type occur in a region of the protein called the C-propeptide domain. ...

  18. Populations The Frequency Distribution of Lethal Chromosomes in Finite

    E-print Network

    Nei, Masatoshi

    The statistical techniques for studying the population dynamics of recessive lethal genes were developed mainly of completely recessive genes in which the mean gene frequency decreases as the population size decreases (cf by Wright,'-' who studied the distribution of gene frequencies in populations. In reality, however

  19. Lethal and subletha effects of sponge overgrowth on introduced dreissenid

    E-print Network

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Lethal and subletha effects of sponge overgrowth on introduced dreissenid s in the Great Lakes - St: Freshwater sponges in the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River system overgrow and kill introduced zebra (Dreissena pulymorpkza) and quagga mussels (DreisLse?aabugerasis) on solid substrates. Sponges overgrow

  20. An overview of the future of non-lethal weapons.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J B

    2001-01-01

    During the past decade, vast changes have occurred in the geopolitical landscape and the nature of the types of conflicts in which technologically developed countries have been involved. While the threat of conventional war remains, forces have been more frequently deployed in situations that require great restraint. Adversaries are often likely to be elusive and commingled with noncombatants. There has been some shift in public opinion away from tolerance of collateral casualties. Therefore there is a need to be able to apply force while limiting casualties. Non-lethal weapons provide part of the solution. Among the changes that will influence the future have been studies by the US and NATO concerning the use of non-lethal weapons, coincidental with increased funding for their development and testing. New concepts and policies have recently been formalized. Surprisingly, the most strident objections to the implementation of non-lethal weapons have come from organizations that are ostensibly designed to protect non-combatants. These arguments are specious and, while technically and academically challenging, actually serve to foster an environment that will result in the deaths of many more innocent civilians. They misconstrue technology with human intent. The reasons for use of force will not abate. Alternatives to bombs, missiles, tanks and artillery must therefore be found. Non-lethal weapons are not a panacea but do offer the best hope of minimizing casualties while allowing nations or alliances the means to use force in protection of national or regional interests. PMID:11578037

  1. Histopathological effects of anthrax lethal factor on rat liver.

    PubMed

    Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Ozbek, Elvan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has become an increasingly important scientific topic due to its potential role in bioterrorism. The lethal toxin (LT) of B. anthracis consists of lethal factor (LF) and a protective antigen (PA). This study investigated whether only lethal factor was efficient as a hepatotoxin in the absence of the PA. To achieve this aim, LF (100 µg/kg body weight, dissolved in sterile distilled water) or distilled water vehicle were intraperitoneally injected once into adult rats. At 24 h post-injection, the hosts were euthanized and their livers removed and tissue samples examined under light and electron microscopes. As a result of LF application, hepatic injury - including cytoplasmic and nuclear damage in hepatocytes, sinusoidal dilatation, and hepatocellular lysis - became apparent. Further, light microscopic analyses of liver sections from the LF-injected rats revealed ballooning degeneration and cytoplasmic loss within hepatocytes, as well as peri-sinusoidal inflammation. Additionally, an increase in the numbers of Kupffer cells was evident. Common vascular injuries were also found in the liver samples; these injuries caused hypoxia and pathological changes. In addition, some cytoplasmic and nuclear changes were detected within the liver ultrastructure. The results of these studies allow one to suggest that LF could be an effective toxicant alone and that PA might act in situ to modify the effect of this agent (or the reverse situation wherein LF modifies effects of PA) such that lethality results. PMID:24344743

  2. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  3. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  4. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  5. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  6. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  7. Analysis of Ebola Glycoprotein Sequences from Strains of Varying Lethality

    E-print Network

    Analysis of Ebola Glycoprotein Sequences from Strains of Varying Lethality Biochem 218 Spring 2002 Tammy Doukas tdoukas@stanford.edu I. Background and Significance Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a disease in humans, chimpanzees, and monkeys, caused by infection with Ebola virus, and associated with high

  8. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  9. The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative positioning serves as a barometer of…

  10. Genetic control of male fertility in Arabidopsis thaliana: structural analyses of postmeiotic developmental mutants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P E; Glover, J A; Lavithis, M; Craig, S; Singh, M B; Knox, R B; Dennis, E S; Chaudhury, A M

    1998-08-01

    Seven new male-sterile mutants (ms7-ms13) of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (ecotype columbia) are described that show a postmeiotic defect of microspore development. In ms9 mutants, microspores recently released from the tetrad appear irregular in shape and are often without exines. The earliest evidence of abnormality in ms12 mutants is degeneration of microspores that lack normal exine sculpturing, suggesting that the MS12 product is important in the formation of pollen exine. Teratomes (abnormally enlarged microsporocytes) are also occasionally present and each has a poorly developed exine. In ms7 mutant plants, the tapetal cytoplasm disintegrates at the late vacuolate microspore stage, apparently causing the degeneration of microspores and pollen grains. With ms8 mutants, the exine of the microspores appears similar to that of the wild type. However, intine development appears impaired and pollen grains rupture prior to maturity. In ms11 mutants, the first detectable abnormality appears at the mid to late vacuolate stage. The absence of fluorescence in the microspores and tapetal cells after staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and the occasional presence of teratomes indicate degradation of DNA. Viable pollen from ms10 mutant plants is dehisced from anthers but appears to have surface abnormalities affecting interaction with the stigma. Pollen only germinates in high-humidity conditions or during in-vitro germination experiments. Mutant plants also have bright-green stems, suggesting that ms10 belongs to the eceriferum (cer) class of mutants. However, ms10 and cer6 are non-allelic. The ms13 mutant has a similar phenotype to ms10, suggesting is also an eceriferum mutation. Each of these seven mutants had a greater number of flowers than congenic male-fertile plants. The non-allelic nature of these mutants and their different developmental end-points indicate that seven different genes important for the later stages of pollen development have been identified. PMID:9684354

  11. A multivariate model of stakeholder preference for lethal cat management.

    PubMed

    Wald, Dara M; Jacobson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n=1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI=0.94, RMSEA=0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management. PMID:24736744

  12. A Multivariate Model of Stakeholder Preference for Lethal Cat Management

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Dara M.; Jacobson, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n?=?1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI?=?0.94, RMSEA?=?0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management. PMID:24736744

  13. Out-crossing between 'Bacon' pollinizers and adjacent 'Hass' avocado and the identification of two new avocado lethal mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill) has an unusual flowering mechanism, diurnally synchronous protogynous dichogamy, which promotes cross pollination among avocado genotypes. In commercial groves, which usually contain pollinizer rows adjacent to the more desirable commercial cultivars, the rate of out-...

  14. Analysis of mutant quantity and quality in human-hamster hybrid AL and AL-179 cells exposed to 137Cs-gamma or HZE-Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldren, C.; Vannais, D.; Drabek, R.; Gustafson, D.; Kraemer, S.; Lenarczyk, M.; Kronenberg, A.; Hei, T.; Ueno, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We measured the number of mutants and the kinds of mutations induced by 137Cs-gamma and by HZE-Fe (56Fe [600 MeV/amu, LET = 190 KeV/micrometer) in standard AL human hamster hybrid cells and in a new variant hybrid, AL-179. We found that HZE-Fe was more mutagenic than 137Cs-gamma per unit dose (about 1.6 fold), but was slightly less mutagenic per mean lethal dose, DO, at both the S1 and hprt- loci of AL cells. On the other hand, HZE-Fe induced about nine fold more complex S1- mutants than 137Cs-gamma rays, 28% vs 3%. 137Cs-gamma rays induced about twice as many S1- mutants and hprt-mutants in AL-179 as in AL cells, and about nine times more of the former were complex, and potentially unstable kinds of mutations.

  15. Rhizobium japonicum mutant strains unable to grow chemoautotrophically with H2.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, R J

    1981-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strain SR grows chemoautotrophically on a mineral salts medium when incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow or that grow very poorly chemoautotrophically with H2 have been isolated from strain SR. The mutant isolation procedure involved mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate, penicillin selection under chemoautotrophic growth conditions, and plating of the survivors onto medium containing carbon. The resulting colonies were replica plated onto medium that did not contain carbon, and the plates were incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow under these conditions were chosen. Over 100 mutant strains with defects in chemoautotrophic metabolism were obtained. The phenotypes of the mutants fall into various classes. These include strains unable to oxidize H2 and strains deficient in CO2 uptake. Some of the mutant strains were capable of oxidizing H2 only when artificial electron acceptors were provided. Two mutant strains specifically lack activity of the key CO2-fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. Other mutant strains lack both H2-oxidizing ability and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity. PMID:6780521

  16. Inactivating mutations in MFSD2A, required for omega-3 fatty acid transport in brain, cause a lethal microcephaly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Nguyen, Long N; Yang, Hongbo; Zaki, Maha S; Kara, Majdi; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Akizu, Naiara; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Rosti, Basak; Scott, Eric; Schroth, Jana; Copeland, Brett; Vaux, Keith K; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Quek, Debra Q Y; Wong, Bernice H; Tan, Bryan C; Wenk, Markus R; Gunel, Murat; Gabriel, Stacey; Chi, Neil C; Silver, David L; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-07-01

    Docosahexanoic acid (DHA) is the most abundant omega-3 fatty acid in brain, and, although it is considered essential, deficiency has not been linked to disease. Despite the large mass of DHA in phospholipids, the brain does not synthesize it. DHA is imported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) through the major facilitator superfamily domain-containing 2a (MFSD2A) protein. MFSD2A transports DHA as well as other fatty acids in the form of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). We identify two families displaying MFSD2A mutations in conserved residues. Affected individuals exhibited a lethal microcephaly syndrome linked to inadequate uptake of LPC lipids. The MFSD2A mutations impaired transport activity in a cell-based assay. Moreover, when expressed in mfsd2aa-morphant zebrafish, mutants failed to rescue microcephaly, BBB breakdown and lethality. Our results establish a link between transport of DHA and LPCs by MFSD2A and human brain growth and function, presenting the first evidence of monogenic disease related to transport of DHA in humans. PMID:26005868

  17. Inactivating Mutations in MFSD2A, Required for Omega-3 Fatty Acid Transport in Brain, Cause a Lethal Microcephaly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Nguyen, Long N.; Yang, Hongbo; Zaki, Maha S.; Kara, Majdi; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Akizu, Naiara; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Rosti, Basak; Scott, Eric; Schroth, Jana; Copeland, Brett; Vaux, Keith K.; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Quek, Debra Q.Y.; Wong, Bernice H.; Tan, Bryan C.; Wenk, Markus R.; Gunel, Murat; Gabriel, Stacey; Chi, Neil C.; Silver, David L.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexanoic acid (DHA) is the most abundant omega-3 fatty acid in brain, and although considered essential, deficiency has not been linked to disease1,2. Despite the large mass of DHA in phospholipids, the brain does not synthesize it. DHA is imported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) through the Major Facilitator Superfamily Domain 2a (Mfsd2a)3. Mfsd2a transports DHA as well as other fatty acids in the form of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). We identify two families displaying MFSD2A mutations in conserved residues. Patients exhibited a lethal microcephaly syndrome linked to inadequate uptake of LPC lipids. The MFSD2A mutations impaired transport activity in a cell-based assay. Moreover, when expressed in mfsd2aa zebrafish morphants, mutants failed to rescue microcephaly, BBB breakdown and lethality. Our results establish a link between transport of DHA and LPCs by MFSD2A and human brain growth and function, presenting the first evidence of monogenic disease related to transport of DHA in humans. PMID:26005868

  18. Pathogenicity and Immunogenicity of a Mutant Strain of Listeria monocytogenes in the Chicken Infection Model?

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuelan; Tian, Debin; Jiao, Hongmei; Zhang, Chenju; Pan, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiaobo; Jiao, Xinan

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been exploited as a vaccine carrier based upon its ability to induce a strong cell-mediated immune response. At present, the safety of live, attenuated L. monocytogenes vaccines in patients is being studied in clinical trials. L. monocytogenes is also an attractive vaccine vector for use in poultry; however, the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of this organism in poultry remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of an actA- and plcB-deficient L. monocytogenes strain, yzuLM4?actA/plcB, and its wild-type parent strain, yzuLM4, in an avian infection model. The results showed that the wild-type strain could infect ISA brown chickens, causing serious tissue disruptions, including various degrees of degeneration, necrotic lesions, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver, spleen, heart, and kidney. However, the mutant strain showed reduced virulence in embryonated eggs compared with that of the parent strain (the 50% lethal dose [LD50] was 3 logs higher). The mutant strain also showed low virulence in chickens and was rapidly eliminated by the host. There were no obvious pathological changes in tissue sections, but the mutant strain still retained the ability to stimulate high levels of antibody against the protein listeriolysin O (LLO). Booster immunization with the mutant strain led to rapid bacterial clearance from the livers and spleens of chickens challenged by the intramuscular route or the oral route. Collectively, our data suggest that the wild-type serotype 1/2a L. monocytogenes strain can cause serious disease in chickens but the mutant strain with a deletion of the actA and plcB genes is less virulent but induces a strong immune response. This mutant strain of L. monocytogenes is therefore a promising candidate as a safe and effective vector for the delivery of heterologous antigens to prevent zoonosis and infectious disease in poultry. PMID:21228136

  19. Ion conductance of the stem of the anthrax toxin channel during lethal factor translocation.

    PubMed

    Schiffmiller, Aviva; Finkelstein, Alan

    2015-03-27

    The tripartite anthrax toxin consists of protective antigen, lethal factor (LF), and edema factor. PA63 (the 63-kDa, C-terminal part of protective antigen) forms heptameric channels in cell membranes that allow for the transport of LF and edema factor into the cytosol. These channels are mushroom shaped, with a ring of seven phenylalanine residues (known as the phenylalanine clamp) lining the junction between the cap and the stem. It is known that when LF is translocated through the channel, the phenylalanine clamp creates a seal that causes an essentially complete block of conduction. In order to examine ion conductance in the stem of the channel, we used Venus yellow fluorescent protein as a molecular stopper to trap LFN (the 30-kDa, 263-residue N-terminal segment of LF), as well as various truncated constructs of LFN, in mutant channels in which the phenylalanine clamp residues were mutated to alanines. Here we present evidence that ion movement occurs within the channel stem (but is stopped, of course, at the phenylalanine clamp) during protein translocation. Furthermore, we also propose that the lower region of the stem plays an important role in securing peptide chains during translocation. PMID:24996036

  20. Development of a non-lethal method for evaluating transcriptomic endpoints in Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus).

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Beckerton, Jean E; Mackenzie-Grieve, Jody; Stevenson, Mitchel R; Truelson, Robert L; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-07-01

    With increases in active mining and continued discharge associated with former mine operations, evaluating the health of watersheds in the Canadian Yukon Territory is warranted. Current environmental assessment approaches often employ guidelines established using sentinel species not relevant to Arctic monitoring programs. The present study focused on the successful development of a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay directed towards the indigenous Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) and examines the feasibility of using non-lethal sampling from the caudal fin as a means for evaluation of mRNA abundance profiles reflective of environmental conditions. In a proof of concept study performed blind, qPCR results from animals in an area with elevated water concentrations of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) and higher body burdens of Cd, Zn, and lead (Pb) were compared to a reference location in the Yukon Territory. Lower condition factor and a higher abundance of hepatic and caudal fin gene transcripts encoding the metallothionein isoforms (mta/mtb), in addition to elevated heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) and catalase (cat) mRNAs in liver, were observed in fish from the test site. The strong positive correlation between metal body burden and caudal fin mta/mtb mRNA abundance demonstrates a high potential for use of the Arctic grayling assay in non-lethal environmental monitoring programs. PMID:24780232

  1. 77 FR 6548 - Notice of Availability of Ballistic Survivability, Lethality and Vulnerability Analyses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Notice of Availability of Ballistic Survivability, Lethality and Vulnerability... Laboratory's (ARL's), Survivability, Lethality Analysis Directorate (SLAD) is a leader in...

  2. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjen; Leon, Dacia; Arkin, Adam P.; Skerker, Jeffrey M.

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, in Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.

  3. An allele of sequoia dominantly enhances a trio mutant phenotype to influence Drosophila larval behavior.

    PubMed

    Dean, Kathryn E; Fields, April; Geer, Marcus J; King, Eric C; Lynch, Brian T; Manohar, Rohan R; McCall, Julianne R; Palozola, Katherine C; Zhang, Yan; Liebl, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    The transition of Drosophila third instar larvae from feeding, photo-phobic foragers to non-feeding, photo-neutral wanderers is a classic behavioral switch that precedes pupariation. The neuronal network responsible for this behavior has recently begun to be defined. Previous genetic analyses have identified signaling components for food and light sensory inputs and neuropeptide hormonal outputs as being critical for the forager to wanderer transition. Trio is a Rho-Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor integrated into a variety of signaling networks including those governing axon pathfinding in early development. Sequoia is a pan-neuronally expressed zinc-finger transcription factor that governs dendrite and axon outgrowth. Using pre-pupal lethality as an endpoint, we have screened for dominant second-site enhancers of a weakly lethal trio mutant background. In these screens, an allele of sequoia has been identified. While these mutants have no obvious disruption of embryonic central nervous system architecture and survive to third instar larvae similar to controls, they retain forager behavior and thus fail to pupariate at high frequency. PMID:24376789

  4. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa

    PubMed Central

    Vuimo, Tatiana A.; Surov, Stepan S.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Korneeva, Vera A.; Vorobiev, Ivan I.; Orlova, Nadezhda A.; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in ‘global’ assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5–20 ?M, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  5. Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants affected in attachment to plant cells.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C J; Halperin, W; Nester, E W

    1982-12-01

    An analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants with Tn5 insertions in chromosomal DNA showed that the chromosome of A. tumefaciens codes for a specific ability of this bacterium to attach to plant cells. This ability is associated with tumorigenesis by A. tumefaciens, the ability of avirulent A. tumefaciens to inhibit tumorigenesis, and the ability to adsorb certain phages. A second class of chromosomal mutations affects tumorigenesis without altering the ability to attach to plant cells. The attachment of A. tumefaciens to plant cells was assayed by mixing radiolabeled bacteria with suspensions of tobacco tissue culture cells or freshly isolated Zinnia leaf mesophyll cells. Under the conditions of this assay, an avirulent Ti plasmid-cured strain attached to the same extent as the same strain containing pTiB6806. Six of eight avirulent mutants with Tn5 insertions in chromosomal DNA showed defective attachment, whereas two retained wild-type attachment ability. In contrast to the strains showing wild-type attachment, the attachment-defective mutants failed to inhibit tumorigenesis when inoculated onto Jerusalem artichoke slices before inoculation of a virulent strain and also showed a loss of sensitivity to two Agrobacterium phages. The loss of phage sensitivity appeared to be due to a loss of ability to adsorb the phages. Staining with Calcofluor indicated that the mutants retained the ability to synthesize cellulose fibrils, which have been implicated in the attachment process. Southern filter hybridizations demonstrated that each mutant contained a single Tn5 insertion, and genetic linkage between the Tn5 insertion in one mutant and the attachment phenotype has also been demonstrated. PMID:6292165

  6. B cells are not essential for Lactobacillus-mediated protection against lethal pneumovirus infection*

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Garcia-Crespo, Katia E.; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown previously that priming of respiratory mucosa with live Lactobacillus species promotes robust and prolonged survival from an otherwise lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a property known as heterologous immunity. Lactobacillus-priming results in a moderate reduction in virus recovery and a dramatic reduction in virus-induced proinflammatory cytokine production; the precise mechanisms underlying these findings remain to be elucidated. As B cells have been shown to promote heterologous immunity against respiratory virus pathogens under similar conditions, here we explore the role of B cells in Lactobacillus-mediated protection against acute pneumovirus infection. We found that Lactobacillus-primed mice feature elevated levels of airway immunoglobulins IgG, IgA and IgM and lung tissues with dense, B cell (B220+) enriched peribronchial and perivascular infiltrates with germinal centers consistent with descriptions of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. No B cells were detected in lung tissue of Lactobacillus-primed B-cell deficient ?MT mice or Jh mice, and Lactobacillus-primed ?MT mice had no characteristic infiltrates or airway immunoglobulins. Nonetheless, we observed diminished virus recovery and profound suppression of virus-induced proinflammatory cytokines CCL2, IFN-gamma, and CXCL10 in both wild-type and Lactobacillus-primed ?MT mice. Furthermore, L. plantarum-primed, B-cell deficient ?MT and Jh mice were fully protected from an otherwise lethal PVM infection, as were their respective wild-types. We conclude that B cells are dispensable for Lactobacillus-mediated heterologous immunity and were not crucial for promoting survival in response to an otherwise lethal pneumovirus infection. PMID:24748495

  7. B cells are not essential for Lactobacillus-mediated protection against lethal pneumovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Dyer, Kimberly D; Garcia-Crespo, Katia E; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Shaffer, Arthur L; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-06-01

    We have shown previously that priming of respiratory mucosa with live Lactobacillus species promotes robust and prolonged survival from an otherwise lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice, a property known as heterologous immunity. Lactobacillus priming results in a moderate reduction in virus recovery and a dramatic reduction in virus-induced proinflammatory cytokine production; the precise mechanisms underlying these findings remain to be elucidated. Because B cells have been shown to promote heterologous immunity against respiratory virus pathogens under similar conditions, in this study we explore the role of B cells in Lactobacillus-mediated protection against acute pneumovirus infection. We found that Lactobacillus-primed mice feature elevated levels of airway Igs IgG, IgA, and IgM and lung tissues with dense, B cell (B220(+))-enriched peribronchial and perivascular infiltrates with germinal centers consistent with descriptions of BALT. No B cells were detected in lung tissue of Lactobacillus-primed B cell deficient ?MT mice or Jh mice, and Lactobacillus-primed ?MT mice had no characteristic infiltrates or airway Igs. Nonetheless, we observed diminished virus recovery and profound suppression of virus-induced proinflammatory cytokines CCL2, IFN-?, and CXCL10 in both wild-type and Lactobacillus-primed ?MT mice. Furthermore, Lactobacillus plantarum-primed, B cell-deficient ?MT and Jh mice were fully protected from an otherwise lethal pneumonia virus of mice infection, as were their respective wild-types. We conclude that B cells are dispensable for Lactobacillus-mediated heterologous immunity and were not crucial for promoting survival in response to an otherwise lethal pneumovirus infection. PMID:24748495

  8. Lethal and Demographic Impact of Chlorpyrifos and Spinosad on the Ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, V; Saber, M; Rafiee-Dastjerdi, H; Kamita, S G

    2015-12-01

    The appropriate use of biological agents and chemical compounds is necessary to establish successful integrated pest management (IPM) programs. Thus, the off-target effects of pesticides on biological control agents are essential considerations of IPM. In this study, the effects of lethal and sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos and spinosad on the demographic parameters of Habrobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were assessed. Bioassays were carried out on immature and adult stages by using dipping and contact exposure of dry pesticide residue on an inert material, respectively. The lethal concentration (LC)50 values of chlorpyrifos and spinosad were 3.69 and 151.37 ppm, respectively, on the larval stage and 1.75 and 117.37 ppm, respectively, on adults. Hazard quotient (HQ) values for chlorpyrifos and spinosad were 400 and 2.2, respectively, on the larval stage and 857.14 and 2.84, respectively, on adults. A low lethal concentration (LC30) was used to assess the sublethal effects of both pesticides on the surviving females. In each treatment, 25 survivors were randomly selected and transferred into 6-cm Petri dishes. Adults were provided daily with last instars of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller) as a host until all of the females died. The number of eggs laid, percent of larvae hatched, longevity, and sex ratio were recorded. Stable population growth parameters were estimated by the Jackknife method. In control, chlorpyrifos, and spinosad treatments, the intrinsic rates of increase (r m) values were 0.23, 0.10, and 0.21, respectively. The results of this study suggest a relative compatibility between spinosad use and H. hebetor. Finally, further studies should be conducted under natural conditions to verify the compatibility of spinosad with H. hebetor in IPM programs. PMID:26280986

  9. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... agents or non-lethal weapons. The Warden may authorize the use of chemical agents or non-lethal...

  10. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  11. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  12. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  13. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. 552.25 Section 552.25 ...Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. The Warden may authorize the use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons only when the situation is such...

  14. 76 FR 6054 - Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...chemical agents or other less-than-lethal weapons may not be delegated below the position...authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical...chemical agents or other less-than-lethal weapons. The revision effectuated by this...

  15. A fragment of anthrax lethal factor delivers proteins to the cytosol without requiring protective antigen

    E-print Network

    Lieberman, Judy

    A fragment of anthrax lethal factor delivers proteins to the cytosol without requiring protective) Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is a 735-aa polypeptide that facili- tates the exit of anthrax lethal. Furthermore, these results enable us to propose a modified molecular mechanism of anthrax lethal toxin

  16. Technical contribution Application of non-lethal stable isotope analysis to assess feeding patterns of juvenile

    E-print Network

    -lethal) could be a substitute for muscle tissue (lethal) in SIA of juvenile pallid sturgeon, and (ii) evaluate = 0.89) but d13 C isotopes were weakly related (r2 = 0.16). Therefore, freezing is recommended the utility of a non-lethal technique to assess time integrated food habits of juvenile pallid sturgeon

  17. The occurrence of new mutants in the X-linked recessive Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    PubMed Central

    Francke, U; Felsenstein, J; Gartler, S M; Migeon, B R; Dancis, J; Seegmiller, J E; Bakay, F; Nyhan, W L

    1976-01-01

    In a population at equilibrium for a sex-linked lethal, one-third of the genes for that lethal must arise anew each generation. Therefore, one-third of all cases of Lesch-Nyhan disease, a severe X-linked recessive lethal disorder, should be new mutants. To test this hypothesis, we have collected 47 families, 20 with a single proband and 27 with multiple affected males in which the patients' mothers and other female relatives had been studied for heterozygosity. Available carrier detection tests identify heterozygous for HPRT deficiency in hair roots and skin fibroblasts. Only four mothers were found not to be carriers. This result deviates significantly from expected (P less than .001). Statistical tests for ascertainment effects indicated absence of bias for multiple proband families but strong bias in favor of families with many heterozygous females. When the analysis was limited to single proband families, the deviation from expected was still significant (P less than .01). The incidence of new mutants among the heterozygous mothers, as determined by the ratio of +/+ to +/- maternal grandmothers, should be one-half (see Appendix). Of all 20 maternal grandmothers studied, five were +/+ and 15 were +/- (P less than .05). Considering only the single proband families, the ratio of 5 +/+ to 8 +/- was not significantly different from expected. In four of the five cases in which the heterozygous mother of an affected individual was a new mutation, the age of her parents was considerably higher than the mean parental age in the population. This raises the possibility of a paternal age effect on X-linked mutations. There appears to be a true deficiency of new mutatnts among males but not among females. Data on additional Lesch-Nyhan families are needed before conclusions regarding a possible higher mutation rate in males can be drawn. PMID:1266847

  18. Salt stress-induced production of reactive oxygen- and nitrogen species and cell death in the ethylene receptor mutant Never ripe and wild type tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Poór, Péter; Kovács, Judit; Borbély, Péter; Takács, Zoltán; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2015-12-01

    The salt stress triggered by sublethal, 100 mM and lethal, 250 mM NaCl induced ethylene production as well as rapid accumulation of superoxide radical and H2O2 in the root tips of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Ailsa Craig) wild type and ethylene receptor mutant, Never ripe (Nr/Nr) plants. In the wild type plants superoxide accumulation confined to lethal salt concentration while H2O2 accumulated more efficiently under sublethal salt stress. However, in Nr roots the superoxide production was higher and unexpectedly, H2O2 level was lower than in the wild type under sublethal salt stress. Nitric oxide production increased significantly under sublethal and lethal salt stress in both genotypes especially in mutant plants, while peroxynitrite accumulated significantly under lethal salt stress. Thus, the nitro-oxidative stress may be stronger in Nr roots, which leads to the programmed death of tissues, characterized by the DNA and protein degradation and loss of cell viability under moderate salt stress. In Nr mutants the cell death was induced in the absence of ethylene perception. Although wild type roots could maintain their potassium content under moderate salt stress, K(+) level significantly declined leading to small K(+)/Na(+) ratio in Nr roots. Thus Nr mutants were more sensitive to salt stress than the wild type and the viability of root cells decreased significantly under moderate salt stress. These changes can be attributed to a stronger ionic stress due to the K(+) loss from the root tissues. PMID:26512971

  19. Uroporphyrin-accumulating mutant of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    S?s?rman, A; Chartrand, P; Proschek, R; Desrochers, M; Tardif, D; Lapointe, C

    1975-01-01

    An uroporphyrin III-accumulating mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 was isolated by neomycin. The mutant, designated SASQ85, was catalase deficient and formed dwarf colonies on usual media. Comparative extraction by cyclohexanone and ethyl acetate showed the superiority of the former for the extraction of the uroporphyrin accumulated by the mutant. Cell-free extracts of SASQ85 were able to convert 5-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen, but not to copro- or protoporphyrinogen. Under the same conditions cell-free extracts of the parent strain converted 5-aminolevulinic to uroporphyringen, coproporphyrinogen, and protoporphyrinogen. The conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen by cell-free extracts of the mutant was inhibited 98 and 95%, respectively, by p-chloromercuribenzoate and p-chloromercuriphenyl-sulfonate, indicating the presence of uroporphyrinogen synthetase activity in the extracts. Spontaneous transformation of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrin was not detectable under the experimental conditions used [4 h at 37 C in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-potassium phosphate buffer, pH 8.2]. The results indicate a deficient uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity of SASQ85 which is thus the first uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase-deficient mutant isolated in E. coli K-12. Mapping of the corresponding locus by P1-mediated transduction revealed the frequent joint transduction of hemE and thiA markers (frequency of co-transduction, 41 to 44%). The results of the genetic analysis suggest the gene order rif, hemE, thiA, metA; however, they do not totally exclude the gene order rif, thiA, hemE, metA. PMID:1104578

  20. Rabbit Model for Superantigen-Mediated Lethal Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Kristi L; Rotschafer, Jessica H; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly significant cause of serious human infections in the USA. Many of these illnesses are mediated by interactions between the host immune system and staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs). Several of these severe staphylococcal infections are initiated in the lungs, making this an important site to study. Here, we describe the rabbit model for investigating the role of staphylococcal SAgs in pulmonary-associated lethal infection and intoxication. PMID:26676039

  1. Intraguild relationships between sympatric predators exposed to lethal control: predator manipulation experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Terrestrial top-predators are expected to regulate and stabilise food webs through their consumptive and non-consumptive effects on sympatric mesopredators and prey. The lethal control of top-predators has therefore been predicted to inhibit top-predator function, generate the release of mesopredators and indirectly harm native fauna through trophic cascade effects. Understanding the outcomes of lethal control on interactions within terrestrial predator guilds is important for zoologists, conservation biologists and wildlife managers. However, few studies have the capacity to test these predictions experimentally, and no such studies have previously been conducted on the eclectic suite of native and exotic, mammalian and reptilian taxa we simultaneously assess. We conducted a series of landscape-scale, multi-year, manipulative experiments at nine sites spanning five ecosystem types across the Australian continental rangelands to investigate the responses of mesopredators (red foxes, feral cats and goannas) to contemporary poison-baiting programs intended to control top-predators (dingoes) for livestock protection. Result Short-term behavioural releases of mesopredators were not apparent, and in almost all cases, the three mesopredators we assessed were in similar or greater abundance in unbaited areas relative to baited areas, with mesopredator abundance trends typically either uncorrelated or positively correlated with top-predator abundance trends over time. The exotic mammals and native reptile we assessed responded similarly (poorly) to top-predator population manipulation. This is because poison baits were taken by multiple target and non-target predators and top-predator populations quickly recovered to pre-control levels, thus reducing the overall impact of baiting on top-predators and averting a trophic cascade. Conclusions These results are in accord with other predator manipulation experiments conducted worldwide, and suggest that Australian populations of native prey fauna at lower trophic levels are unlikely to be negatively affected by contemporary dingo control practices through the release of mesopredators. We conclude that contemporary lethal control practices used on some top-predator populations do not produce the conditions required to generate positive responses from mesopredators. Functional relationships between sympatric terrestrial predators may not be altered by exposure to spatially and temporally sporadic application of non-selective lethal control. PMID:23842144

  2. Intact alternation performance in high lethality suicide attempters.

    PubMed

    Keilp, John G; Wyatt, Gwinne; Gorlyn, Marianne; Oquendo, Maria A; Burke, Ainsley K; John Mann, J

    2014-09-30

    Suicide attempters often perform poorly on tasks linked to ventral prefrontal cortical (VPFC) function. Object Alternation (OA) - a VPFC probe - has not been used in these studies. In this study, currently depressed medication-free past suicide attempters whose most severe attempt was of high (n=31) vs. low (n=64) lethality, 114 medication-free depressed non-attempters, and 86 non-patients completed a computerized OA task. Participants also completed comparison tasks assessing the discriminant validity of OA (Wisconsin Card Sort), its concurrent validity relative to tasks associated with past attempt status (computerized Stroop task, Buschke Selective Reminding Test), and its construct validity as a VPFC measure (Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling Task). Against expectations, high lethality suicide attempters - the majority of whom used non-violent methods in their attempts with some planning - outperformed other depressed groups on OA, with no group differences observed on Wisconsin Card Sort. Despite intact performance on OA, past attempters exhibited deficits on the Stroop and Buschke. OA performance was associated with performance on Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling, confirming that OA measures a similar construct. VPFC dysfunction may not be a characteristic of all suicide attempters, especially those who make more carefully planned, non-violent - though potentially lethal - attempts. PMID:24878299

  3. Intact Alternation Performance in High Lethality Suicide Attempters

    PubMed Central

    Keilp, John G.; Wyatt, Gwinne; Gorlyn, Marianne; Oquendo, Maria A.; Burke, Ainsley K.; Mann, J. John

    2015-01-01

    Suicide attempters often perform poorly on tasks linked to ventral prefrontal cortical (VPFC) function. Object alternation (OA) - a VPFC probe – has not been used in these studies. In this study, currently depressed medication-free past suicide attempters whose most severe attempt was of high (n=31) vs. low (n=64) lethality, 114 medication-free depressed non-attempters, and 86 non-patients completed a computerized OA task. Participants also completed comparison tasks assessing the discriminant validity of OA (Wisconsin Card Sort), its concurrent validity relative to tasks associated with past attempt status (computerized Stroop task, Buschke Selective Reminding Test), and its construct validity as a VPFC measure (Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling Task). Against expectations, high lethality suicide attempters – the majority of whom used non-violent methods in their attempts with some planning - outperformed other depressed groups on OA, with no group differences observed on Wisconsin Card Sort. Despite intact performance on OA, past attempters exhibited deficits on the Stroop and Buschke. OA performance was associated with performance on Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling, confirming that OA measures a similar construct. VPFC dysfunction may not be characteristic of all suicide attempters, especially those who make more carefully planned, non-violent - though potentially lethal - attempts. PMID:24878299

  4. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) coupling codes for use with the vulnerability/lethality (VIL) taxonomy. Final report, June-October 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, M.H.

    1995-07-01

    Based on the vulnerability Lethality (V/L) taxonomy developed by the Ballistic Vulnerability Lethality Division (BVLD) of the Survivability Lethality Analysis Directorate (SLAD), a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) coupling V/L analysis taxonomy has been developed. A nuclear EMP threat to a military system can be divided into two levels: (1) coupling to a system level through a cable, antenna, or aperture; and (2) the component level. This report will focus on the initial condition, which includes threat definition and target description, as well as the mapping process from the initial condition to damaged components state. EMP coupling analysis at a system level is used to accomplish this. This report introduces the nature of EMP threat, interaction between the threat and target, and how the output of EMP coupling analysis at a system level becomes the input to the component level analysis. Many different tools (EMP coupling codes) will be discussed for the mapping process, which correponds to the physics of phenomenology. This EMP coupling V/L taxonomy and the models identified in this report will provide the tools necessary to conduct basic V/L analysis of EMP coupling.

  5. Mutant IDH is sufficient to initiate enchondromatosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Makoto; Sasaki, Masato; Cairns, Rob A.; Inoue, Satoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Li, Wanda Y.; Snow, Bryan E.; Jones, Lisa D.; Wei, Qingxia; Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J.; Nadesan, Puviindran; Rockel, Jason; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Weng, Angela; Gross, Stefan; Straley, Kimberly; Gliser, Camelia; Xu, Yingxia; Wunder, Jay; Mak, Tak W.; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Enchondromas are benign cartilage tumors and precursors to malignant chondrosarcomas. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in the majority of these tumor types. How these mutations cause enchondromas is unclear. Here, we identified the spectrum of IDH mutations in human enchondromas and chondrosarcomas and studied their effects in mice. A broad range of mutations was identified, including the previously unreported IDH1-R132Q mutation. These mutations harbored enzymatic activity to catalyze ?-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). Mice expressing Idh1-R132Q in one allele in cells expressing type 2 collagen showed a disordered growth plate, with persistence of type X-expressing chondrocytes. Chondrocyte cell cultures from these animals or controls showed that there was an increase in proliferation and expression of genes characteristic of hypertrophic chondrocytes with expression of Idh1-R132Q or 2HG treatment. Col2a1-Cre;Idh1-R132Q mutant knock-in mice (mutant allele expressed in chondrocytes) did not survive after the neonatal stage. Col2a1-Cre/ERT2;Idh1-R132 mutant conditional knock-in mice, in which Cre was induced by tamoxifen after weaning, developed multiple enchondroma-like lesions. Taken together, these data show that mutant IDH or d-2HG causes persistence of chondrocytes, giving rise to rests of growth-plate cells that persist in the bone as enchondromas. PMID:25730874

  6. Assessing lethal and sub-lethal effects of trichlorfon on different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sónia; Oliveira, Rhaul; Pereira, Susana; Musso, Carolina; Domingues, Inęs; Bhujel, Ram C; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Nogueira, António J A

    2011-06-01

    Trichlorfon (TCF) is one of the most used veterinary pharmaceuticals not only to fight infestations but also as a preventive measure worldwide. The high concentrations used generate concerns about environmental and human health. In this work we assessed the acute toxicity of this compound to non-target organisms belonging to different trophic levels: Danio rerio (early life stages and adults), Daphnia magna and algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris), and studied the potential of the biomarkers cholinesterase (ChE), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and catalase (CAT) to assess sub-lethal effects of trichlorfon in zebrafish and daphnids. The fish embryo test followed the OECD draft guideline FET and was based on the exposure of newly fertilized eggs to 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 mg/L of TCF for 5 days; the fish acute test followed the OECD guideline 203 and was based on the exposure of adult fish to 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mg/L of TCF for 4 days; Daphnia sp. immobilization assay followed the OECD guideline 202 and was based on the exposure of juvenile daphnids to 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, 1 and 2 ?g/L of TCF for 2 days and the algae growth inhibition assay followed the OECD guideline 201 and was based on the exposure of the two species to 0, 1, 3.2, 10, 32, 100 and 300 mg/L of TCF for 4 days. Biomarker levels were measured after 96 h exposure to TCF in zebrafish early life stages and adults and after 48 h exposure in D. magna. Tested organisms seem to have dissimilar sensitivities towards TCF exposure. D. magna (48 h-LC(50)=0.29 ?g/L) was the most sensitive organism, followed by early life stages and adults of zebrafish (96 h-LC(50)=25.4 and 28.8 mg/L, respectively) and finally by the algae P. subcapitata (96 h-LC(50)=274.5 mg/L) and C. vulgaris (no effect observed). As daphnids are a source of food for organisms of higher trophic levels, the impairment on its population is prone to have consequences in the entire ecosystem. The biomarker activities measured in daphnids and fish seemed to be useful tools in the assessment of trichlorfon effects, especially ChE activity which was the most sensitive biomarker tested for all organisms. Trichlorfon was teratogenic for zebrafish embryos leading to anomalies in the absorption of the yolk sac, spine bending and pericardial oedemas. The present research suggests that further work is urgently needed in order to monitor environmental concentrations of trichlorfon and to test the long term effects of environmentally realistic concentrations of this compound. PMID:21473847

  7. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  8. Herpes simplex virus 2 ICP0 mutant viruses are avirulent and immunogenic: implications for a genital herpes vaccine.

    PubMed

    Halford, William P; Püschel, Ringo; Rakowski, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0(-) mutants are interferon-sensitive, avirulent, and elicit protective immunity against HSV-1 (Virol J, 2006, 3:44). If an ICP0(-) mutant of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) exhibited similar properties, such a virus might be used to vaccinate against genital herpes. The current study was initiated to explore this possibility. Several HSV-2 ICP0(-) mutant viruses were constructed and evaluated in terms of three parameters: i. interferon-sensitivity; ii. virulence in mice; and iii. capacity to elicit protective immunity against HSV-2. One ICP0(-) mutant virus in particular, HSV-2 0DeltaNLS, achieved an optimal balance between avirulence and immunogenicity. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS was interferon-sensitive in cultured cells. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS replicated to low levels in the eyes of inoculated mice, but was rapidly repressed by an innate, Stat 1-dependent host immune response. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS failed to spread from sites of inoculation, and hence produced only inapparent infections. Mice inoculated with HSV-2 0DeltaNLS consistently mounted an HSV-specific IgG antibody response, and were consistently protected against lethal challenge with wild-type HSV-2. Based on their avirulence and immunogenicity, we propose that HSV-2 ICP0(-) mutant viruses merit consideration for their potential to prevent the spread of HSV-2 and genital herpes. PMID:20808928

  9. Courtship and visual defects of cacophony mutants reveal functional complexity of a calcium-channel alpha1 subunit in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L A; Peixoto, A A; Kramer, E M; Villella, A; Hall, J C

    1998-01-01

    We show by molecular analysis of behavioral and physiological mutants that the Drosophila Dmca1A calcium-channel alpha1 subunit is encoded by the cacophony (cac) gene and that nightblind-A and lethal(1)L13 mutations are allelic to cac with respect to an expanded array of behavioral and physiological phenotypes associated with this gene. The cacS mutant, which exhibits defects in the patterning of courtship lovesong and a newly revealed but subtle abnormality in visual physiology, is mutated such that a highly conserved phenylalanine (in one of the quasi-homologous intrapolypeptide regions called IIIS6) is replaced by isoleucine. The cacH18 mutant exhibits defects in visual physiology (including complete unresponsiveness to light in certain genetic combinations) and visually mediated behaviors; this mutant (originally nbAH18) has a stop codon in an alternative exon (within the cac ORF), which is differentially expressed in the eye. Analysis of the various courtship and visual phenotypes associated with this array of cac mutants demonstrates that Dmca1A calcium channels mediate multiple, separable biological functions; these correlate in part with transcript diversity generated via alternative splicing. PMID:9649530

  10. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nine saccharomyces deletion mutants that show altered radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2004-01-07

    The availability of a genome-wide set of Saccharomyces deletion mutants provides a chance to identify all the yeast genes involved in DNA repair. Using X-rays, we are screening these mutants to identify additional genes that show increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. For each mutant identified as sensitive, we are confirming that the sensitivity phenotype co-segregates with the deletion allele and are obtaining multipoint survival-versus-dose assays in at least two haploid and one homozygous diploid strains. We present data for deletion mutants involving the genes DOT1, MDM20, NAT3, SPT7, SPT20, GCN5, HFI1, DCC1 and VID21/EAF1, and discuss their potential roles in repair. Eight of these genes have a clear radiation-sensitive phenotype when deleted, but the ninth, GCN5, has at most a borderline phenotype. None of the deletions confer substantial sensitivity to ultra-violet radiation, although one or two may confer marginal sensitivity. The DOT1 gene is of interest because its only known function is to methylate one lysine residue in the core of the histone H3 protein. We find that histone H3 mutants (supplied by K. Struhl) in which this residue is replaced by other amino-acids are also X-ray sensitive, seeming to confirm that methylation of the lysine-79 residue is required for effective repair of radiation damage.

  11. Japanese quail acute exposure to methamidophos: experimental design, lethal, sub-lethal effects and cholinesterase biochemical and histochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Foudoulakis, Manousos; Balaskas, Christos; Csato, Attila; Szentes, Csaba; Arapis, Gerassimos

    2013-04-15

    We exposed the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) to the organophosphate methamidophos using acute oral test. Mortality and sub-lethal effects were recorded in accordance to internationally accepted protocols. In addition cholinesterases were biochemically estimated in tissues of the quail: brain, liver and plasma. Furthermore, brain, liver and duodenum cryostat sections were processed for cholinesterase histochemistry using various substrates and inhibitors. Mortalities occurred mainly in the first 1-2h following application. Sub-lethal effects, such as ataxia, ruffled feathers, tremor, salivation and reduced or no reaction to external stimuli were observed. Biochemical analysis in the brain, liver and plasma indicates a strong cholinesterase dependent inhibition with respect to mortality and sub-lethal effects of the quail. The histochemical staining also indicated a strong cholinesterase inhibition in the organs examined and the analysis of the stained sections allowed for an estimation and interpretation of the intoxication effects of methamidophos, in combination with tissue morphology visible by Haematoxylin and Eosin staining. We conclude that the use of biochemistry and histochemistry for the biomarker cholinesterase, may constitute a significantly novel approach for understanding the results obtained by the acute oral test employed in order to assess the effects of methamidophos and other chemicals known to inhibit this very important nervous system enzyme. PMID:23146311

  12. Lethal Mutations Flanking the 68c Glue Gene Cluster on Chromosome 3 of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Madeline A.; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    1986-01-01

    We have conducted a genetic analysis of the region flanking the 68C glue gene cluster in Drosophila melanogaster by isolating lethal and semilethal mutations uncovered by deficiencies which span this region. Three different mutagens were used: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), ethyl nitrosourea (ENU) and diepoxybutane (DEB). In the region from 68A3 to 68C11, 64 lethal, semilethal, and visible mutations were recovered. These include alleles of 13 new lethal complementation groups, as well as new alleles of rotated, low xanthine dehydrogenase, lethal(3)517 and lethal(3)B76. Six new visible mutations from within this region were recovered on the basis of their reduced viability; all proved to be semiviable alleles of lethal complementation groups. No significant differences were observed in the distributions of lethals recovered using the three different mutagens. Each lethal was mapped on the basis of complementation with overlapping deficiencies; mutations that mapped within the same interval were tested for complementation, and the relative order of the lethal groups within each interval was determined by recombination. The cytological distribution of genes within the 68A3-68C11 region is not uniform: the region from 68A2,3 to 68B1,3 (seven to ten polytene chromosome bands) contains at least 13 lethal complementation groups and the mutation low xanthine dehydrogenase; the adjoining region from 68B1,3 to 68C5,6 (six to nine bands) includes the 68C glue gene cluster, but no known lethal or visible complementation groups; and the interval from 68C5,6 to 68C10,11 (three to five bands) contains at least three lethal complementation groups and the visible mutation rotated. The developmental stage at which lethality is observed was determined for a representative allele from each lethal complementation group. PMID:3082712

  13. Mutant p53 cooperates with the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex to regulate VEGFR2 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Neil T.; Fomin, Vitalay; Regunath, Kausik; Zhou, Jeffrey Y.; Zhou, Wen; Silwal-Pandit, Laxmi; Freed-Pastor, William A.; Laptenko, Oleg; Neo, Suat Peng; Bargonetti, Jill; Hoque, Mainul; Tian, Bin; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Engebraaten, Olav; Manley, James L.; Břrresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Neilsen, Paul M.; Prives, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Mutant p53 impacts the expression of numerous genes at the level of transcription to mediate oncogenesis. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), the primary functional VEGF receptor that mediates endothelial cell vascularization, as a mutant p53 transcriptional target in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Up-regulation of VEGFR2 mediates the role of mutant p53 in increasing cellular growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions. Mutant p53 binds near the VEGFR2 promoter transcriptional start site and plays a role in maintaining an open conformation at that location. Relatedly, mutant p53 interacts with the SWI/SNF complex, which is required for remodeling the VEGFR2 promoter. By both querying individual genes regulated by mutant p53 and performing RNA sequencing, the results indicate that >40% of all mutant p53-regulated gene expression is mediated by SWI/SNF. We surmise that mutant p53 impacts transcription of VEGFR2 as well as myriad other genes by promoter remodeling through interaction with and likely regulation of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. Therefore, not only might mutant p53-expressing tumors be susceptible to anti VEGF therapies, impacting SWI/SNF tumor suppressor function in mutant p53 tumors may also have therapeutic potential. PMID:26080815

  14. Isolation of a respiratory-deficient Kluyveromyces fragilis mutant for the production of ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraud, J.P.; Bourgi, J.; Stervinou, M.; Claisse, M.; Galzy, P.

    1987-05-01

    A respiratory-deficient mutant of Kluyveromyces fragilis was isolated using a ethidium bromide mutagenesis. It was characterized by a loss of cytochromes a + a3 and by an improvement of its inulinase activity. Under anaerobic conditions this mutant was always better than the wild strain for ethanol production especially from Jerusalem artichoke extracts containing large amounts of high polyfructosans (early extracts).

  15. Survival, growth, and localization of epiphytic fitness mutants of pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, G.A.; Lindow, S.E. )

    1994-10-01

    Among 82 epiphytic fitness mutants of a Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain that were characterized in a previous study, 4 mutants were particularly intolerant of the stresses associated with dry leaf surfaces. These four mutants each exhibited distinctive behaviors when inoculated into and into plant leaves. For example, while non showed measurable growth on dry potato leaf surfaces, they grew to different population sizes in the intercellular space of bean leaves and on dry bean leaf surfaces, and one mutant appeared incapable of growth in both environments although it grew well on moist bean leaves. The presence of the parental strain did not influence the survival of the mutants immediately following exposure of leaves to dry, high-light incubation conditions, suggesting that the reduced survival of the mutants did not result from an inability to produce extracellular factors in planta. On moist bean leaves that were colonized by either a mutant or the wild type, the proportion of the total epiphytic population that was located in sizes protected from a surface sterilant was smaller for the mutants than for the wild type, indicating that the mutants were reduced in their ability to locate, multiply in, and/or survive in such protected sites. This reduced ability was only one of possible several factors contributing to the reduced epiphytic fitness of each mutant. Their reduced fitness was not specific to the host plant bean, since they also exhibited reduced fitness on the nonhost plant potato; the functions altered in these strains are thus of interest for their contribution to the general fitness of bacterial epiphytes. 52 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Uncaging Mutants: Moving From Menageries to Menages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thousands of mutants of maize are a remarkable resource for study of plant physiology, phylogeny, cell biology, biochemistry, development, and molecular biology. Mutants are most often applied in research studies as "members of collections" rather than as select families of members relevant to ...

  17. Blocking anaplerotic entry of glutamine to TCA cycle sensitizes K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Saqcena, Mahesh; Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Hosny, Carol; Alhamed, Arwa; Chatterjee, Amrita; Foster, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo a metabolic transformation that allows for increased anabolic demands wherein glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates are shunted away for the synthesis of biological molecules required for cell growth and division. One of the key shunts is the exit of citrate from the mitochondria and the TCA cycle for the generation of cytosolic acetyl-CoA that can be used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. With the loss of mitochondrial citrate, cancer cells rely on the “conditionally essential” amino acid glutamine (Q) as an anaplerotic carbon source for TCA cycle intermediates. While Q deprivation causes G1 cell cycle arrest in non-transformed cells, its impact on the cancer cell cycle is not well characterized. We report here a correlation between bypass of the Q-dependent G1 checkpoint and cancer cells harboring K-Ras mutations. Instead of arresting in G1 in response to Q-deprivation, K-Ras driven cancer cells arrest in either S- or G2/M-phase. Inhibition of K-Ras effector pathways was able to revert cells to G1 arrest upon Q deprivation. Blocking anaplerotic utilization of Q mimicked Q deprivation – causing S- and G2/M-phase arrest in K-Ras mutant cancer cells. Significantly, Q deprivation or suppression of anaplerotic Q utilization created synthetic lethality to the cell cycle phase-specific cytotoxic drugs, capecitabine and paclitaxel. These data suggest that disabling of the G1 Q checkpoint could represent a novel vulnerability of cancer cells harboring K-Ras and possibly other mutations that disable the Q-dependent checkpoint. PMID:25023699

  18. Mutants of thermotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.J.; Fontana, D.R.; Poff, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum, strain HL50 were mutagenized with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, cloned, allowed to form pseudoplasmodia and screened for aberrant positive and negative thermotaxis. Three types of mutants were found. Mutant HO428 exhibits only positive thermotaxis over the entire temperature range (no negative thermotaxis). HO596 and HO813 exhibit weakened positive thermotaxis and normal negative thermotaxis. The weakened positive thermotactic response results in a shift toward warmer temperatures in the transition temperature from negative to positive thermotaxis. Mutant HO209 exhibits weakened positive and negative thermotactic responses and has a transition temperature similar to the 'wild type' (HL50).The two types of mutants represented by HO428, HO596 and HO813 support the model that positive and negative thermotaxis have separate pathways for temperature sensing. The type of mutants which contains HO209 suggests that those two pathways converge at some point before the response.

  19. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated ?-sheet structure.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lisa M; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; Park, Paul S-H

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated ?-sheet and reduced ?-helical content. The newly formed ?-sheet structure may facilitate the aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. The effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself. PMID:26358292

  20. Filgrastim Improves Survival in Lethally Irradiated Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Farese, Ann M.; Cohen, Melanie V.; Katz, Barry P.; Smith, Cassandra P.; Gibbs, Allison; Cohen, Daniel M.; MacVittie, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of individuals exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation is of paramount concern to health professionals and government agencies. We evaluated the efficacy of filgrastim to increase survival of nonhuman primates (NHP) exposed to an approximate mid-lethal dose (LD50/60) (7.50 Gy) of LINAC-derived photon radiation. Prior to total-body irradiation (TBI), nonhuman primates were randomized to either a control (n =22) or filgrastim-treated (n =24) cohorts. Filgrastim (10 ?g/kg/d) was administered beginning 1 day after TBI and continued daily until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was >1,000/?L for 3 consecutive days. All nonhuman primates received medical management as per protocol. The primary end point was all cause overall mortality over the 60 day in-life study. Secondary end points included mean survival time of decedents and all hematologic-related parameters. Filgrastim significantly (P < 0.004) reduced 60 day overall mortality [20.8% (5/24)] compared to the controls [59.1% (13/22)]. Filgrastim significantly decreased the duration of neutropenia, but did not affect the absolute neutrophil count nadir. Febrile neutropenia (ANC <500/?L and body temperature ?103°F) was experienced by 90.9% (20/22) of controls compared to 79.2% (19/24) of filgrastim-treated animals (P = 0.418). Survival was significantly increased by 38.3% over controls. Filgrastim, administered at this dose and schedule, effectively mitigated the lethality of the hematopoietic subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome. PMID:23210705

  1. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y.; Siemann, Stefan

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  2. Evaluating the formulae for integrated lethality in ethylene oxide sterilization using six different endospore forming strains of bacteria, and comparisons of integrated lethality for ethylene oxide and steam systems.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Gregg A; Gillis, John R; Krushefski, Garrett

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial endospores from six different species of bacteria were exposed to a spectrum of ethylene oxide (EtO) sterilizing conditions. Temperature was varied from 40 to 60 degrees C and the ethylene oxide concentration was varied from 300 to 750 mg/L. Relative humidity was maintained at 60+/-10% RH. The fraction negative procedure was used to determine the D value for each of the test conditions. Bacterial species tested included Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC # 9372, Bacillus smithii ATCC # 51232, Bacillus subtilis "5230" ATCC # 35021, Bacillus subtilis, DSM # 4181, Bacillus pumilus ATCC # 27142, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC # 7953. All spore preparations were inoculated on filter paper strips packaged in blue, sterilizable glassine pouches. G. stearothermophilus was the least resistant organism tested. The most resistant organisms tested were B. atrophaeus and B. subtilis "5230". The B. subtilis "5230" strain was slightly more resistant than B. atrophaeus at conditions of 54C and EtO concentrations of 400, 600, and 750 mg/L, as well as at 60C/750mg/L EtO. The other species were between these extremes. This empirical data allowed the application of the recently published formula for converting D values from one set of conditions to another and evaluations of accuracy. The measured D values also allowed the determination of Z values based on temperature variations. These formulae, when applied to process temperatures independent of gas concentration, result in a Z value of approximately 32 degrees C that appears to be similar for all species tested. These data support the application of the previously published formulae 1-6 and allow the same approach to integrated lethality for ethylene oxide processes as is commonly applied to steam sterilization. A review of steam sterilization and related principles was conducted for comparison of integrated lethality for these two methods of sterilization. Errors associated with D values, Z values, extrapolation, and integrated lethality for both methods of sterilization are discussed. PMID:15796136

  3. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sushma; Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-10-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  4. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity

    PubMed Central

    Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  5. Congenital lethal motor neuron disease with a novel defect in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Russell J.; Stevenson, Tamara J.; Xing, Lingyan; Newcomb, Tara M.; Nelson, Benjamin; Zeng, Wenqi; Li, Xiang; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Lu, Hong; Farwell Gonzalez, Kelly D.; Wei, Jia-Perng; Chao, Elizabeth C.; Prior, Thomas W.; Snyder, Pamela J.; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We describe a novel congenital motor neuron disease with early demise due to respiratory insufficiency with clinical overlap with spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress (SMARD) type 1 but lacking a mutation in the IGHMBP2 gene. Methods: Exome sequencing was used to identify a de novo mutation in the LAS1L gene in the proband. Pathogenicity of the mutation was validated using a zebrafish model by morpholino-mediated knockdown of las1l. Results: We identified a de novo mutation in the X-linked LAS1L gene in the proband (p.S477N). The mutation is in a highly conserved region of the LAS1L gene predicted to be deleterious by bioinformatic analysis. Morpholino-based knockdown of las1l, the orthologous gene in zebrafish, results in early lethality and disruption of muscle and peripheral nerve architecture. Coinjection of wild-type but not mutant human RNA results in partial rescue of the phenotype. Conclusion: We report a patient with a SMARD phenotype due to a mutation in LAS1L, a gene important in coordinating processing of the 45S pre-rRNA and maturation of the large 60S ribosomal subunit. Similarly, the IGHMB2 gene associated with SMARD type 1 has been suggested to have an important role in ribosomal biogenesis from its role in processing the 45S pre-rRNA. We propose that disruption of ribosomal maturation may be a common pathogenic mechanism linking SMARD phenotypes caused by both IGHMBP2 and LAS1L. PMID:24647030

  6. Mouse limbs expressing only the Gli3 repressor resemble those of Sonic hedgehog mutants.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ting; Wang, Chengbing; Yang, Mei; Wu, Chuanqing; Wang, Baolin

    2013-07-15

    Anterioposterior vertebrate limb patterning is controlled by opposing action between Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and the Gli3 transcriptional repressor. Unexpectedly, Gli3(?699) mutant mice, which are thought to express only a Gli3 repressor and not the full-length activator, exhibit limb phenotypes inconsistent with those of Shh mutant mice. Therefore, it remains debatable whether Shh patterns the anterioposterior limb primarily by inhibiting generation of the Gli3 repressor. However, one caveat is that Gli3(?699) may not be as potent as the natural form of Gli3 repressor because of the nature of the mutant allele. In the present study, we created a conditional Gli3 mutant allele that exclusively expresses Gli3 repressor in the presence of Cre recombinase. Using this mutant, we show that the phenotypes of mouse limbs expressing only the Gli3 repressor exhibit no or single digit, resembling those of Shh mutant limbs. Consistent with the limb phenotypes, the expression of genes dependent on Shh signaling is also inhibited in both mutants. This inhibition by the Gli3 repressor is independent of Shh. Thus, our study clarifies the current controversy and provides important genetic evidence to support the hypothesis that Shh patterns the anterioposterior limb primarily through the inhibition of Gli3 repressor formation. PMID:23644062

  7. Injury risk assessment of non-lethal projectile head impacts.

    PubMed

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as "force wall approach" suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the "force wall approach" and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  8. Suppressive effects of anthrax lethal toxin on megakaryopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Kong; Chang, Hsin-Hou; Lin, Guan-Ling; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Lai, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ting-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Liao, Chi-Yuan; Sun, Der-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) is a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. LT challenge suppresses platelet counts and platelet function in mice, however, the mechanism responsible for thrombocytopenia remains unclear. LT inhibits cellular mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are vital pathways responsible for cell survival, differentiation, and maturation. One of the MAPKs, the MEK1/2-extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway, is particularly important in megakaryopoiesis. This study evaluates the hypothesis that LT may suppress the progenitor cells of platelets, thereby inducing thrombocytopenic responses. Using cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells and mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells to perform in vitro differentiation, this work shows that LT suppresses megakaryopoiesis by reducing the survival of megakaryocytes. Thrombopoietin treatments can reduce thrombocytopenia, megakaryocytic suppression, and the quick onset of lethality in LT-challenged mice. These results suggest that megakaryocytic suppression is one of the mechanisms by which LT induces thrombocytopenia. These findings may provide new insights for developing feasible approaches against anthrax. PMID:23555687

  9. Equation of state and fragmentation issues in computational lethality analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the status of computational analysis of hypervelocity impact lethality in relatively nontechnical terms from the perspective of the author. It is not intended to be a review of the technical literature on the problems of concern. The discussion is focused by concentrating on two phenomenology areas which are of particular concern in computational impact studies. First, the material`s equation of state, specifically the treatment of expanded states of metals undergoing shock vaporization, is discussed. Second, the process of dynamic fragmentation is addressed. In both cases, the context of the discussion deals with inaccuracies and difficulties associated with numerical hypervelocity impact simulations. Laboratory experimental capabilities in hypervelocity impact for impact velocities greater than 10.0 km/s are becoming increasingly viable. This paper also gives recommendations for experimental thrusts which utilize these capabilities that will help to resolve the uncertainties in the numerical lethality studies that are pointed out in the present report.

  10. The discrete character of high-lethality youth violence.

    PubMed

    Zimring, Franklin E

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive lessons about high-lethality adolescent violence from study of the extraordinary increase, and then decrease, in youth homicide arrests over the period 1985-2001 in the United States. This effort continues a long tradition of exploring the possible causes of shifts in homicide rates by examining patterns of violence to see whether there are important changes in types of violence. The first section of the paper discusses two dimensions of criminal youth violence over the whole range of reported offenses. The second section shows that one subset of attacks--firearms cases--accounts for the major changes in youth homicide when it increased from 1985-1993 and during the years of decrease, 1994-2001. A third section explores the linkage between rates of adolescent homicide in various cultures and the relative rate of homicide among all ages. My central conclusion is that high-lethality violence among youth is not representative of the fighting and group assaults that are relatively frequent among adolescents. Instead, the attacks that often lead to death differ with respect to the use of weapons and, to some extent, geography. But there is usually a strong relationship between homicide rates for all ages and youth homicide rates in a particular location. PMID:15817745

  11. Injury Risk Assessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as “force wall approach” suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the “force wall approach” and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  12. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species. PMID:23643878

  13. Less-lethal munitions as extended-range impact weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbs, Ken

    1997-01-01

    With the proliferation of 'suicide by cop' incidents, the concept of less lethal (LL) impact munitions has definitely caught on. There is much to be said for sterile laboratory testing and wound ballistic studies, but having 'real world' operational data is invaluable. Two years ago, a data base was set up to collect this information. The data base continues to grow with incidents from a cross the country and others pursued internationally. Indications are that LL munitions deliver a similar amount of force as conventional police impact weapons i.e., police batons, PR-24's, nunchakus, etc. One advantage over conventional impact weapons, is that LL munitions can be used at much greater distances from a suspect or crown of rioters. This gave rise to the term: extended range impact weapons. Having the ability to examine numerous cases in which these LL munitions have been successfully used for the resolution of critical incidents, is beneficial in evaluating the application and defending the usage of these force options. This paper examines 187 less lethal shootings and discusses such things as: the distance the munitions were fired, the types of injuries sustained by the targeted suspect, the body area of impact, what, if any weapons the suspect was armed with, and the type of incident requiring police response.

  14. Non-lethal sampling for mercury evaluation in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Wilkinson L; de Oliveira, Robson F; dos Santos-Filho, Manoel; da Silva, Carolina J; Malm, Olaf; Ignácio, Áurea R A; Díez, Sergi

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that poses potential threats to ecosystems due to its toxicity to humans and wildlife. The development of non-lethal sampling techniques is a critical step for evaluation of Hg in threatened species in tropical floodplain environments, where most of Hg found is the result of land use and gold mining activities, and more methylation sites are available. We evaluated the spatial and seasonal effectiveness of caudal scutes and claws to estimate Hg bioaccumulation in crocodilians (Caiman yacare), in the scarcely documented Pantanal. Hence, we investigated the potential for Hg bioaccumulation in top predators according to its proximity to mining sites, and in water bodies with different hydrological characteristics and connectivity with the main river during two phases of the flood pulse (dry and flood). The highest Hg concentrations were detected in caimans captured close to mining activities, in claws (2176 ng g(-1) ww) and caudal scutes (388 ng g(-1) ww). THg concentration in claws was related to the flood season and its mean concentration was thirteen fold higher than Hg concentration in scutes during whole year. Both tissues were found to be effective as non-lethal sampling techniques for measuring Hg bioaccumulation in reptiles over time. Nevertheless, claw tissue seems to have a more consistent result, since its constitutional chemical characteristics makes it a better indicator of spatial patterns that influence on Hg exposure. PMID:26026900

  15. Generation of mice encoding a conditional null allele of Gcm2

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ziqiang; Opas, Evan E.; Vrikshajanani, Chakravarthy; Libutti, Steven K.; Levine, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells missing homolog 2 (GCM2) is a transcription factor that is expressed predominately in the pharyngeal pouches and, at later stages, in the developing and mature parathyroid glands. In humans, loss of GCM2 function, either through recessive apomorphic mutations or dominant inhibitor mutations in the human GCM2 gene, leads to isolated hypoparathyroidism. In mice, homozygous disruption of Gcm2 by conventional gene targeting results in parathyroid aplasia and hypoparathyroidism. In this study, we report the generation and functional characterization of mice encoding a conditional null allele of Gcm2. We demonstrate the functional integrity of the conditional Gcm2 allele and report successful in vivo deletion of exon 2 using Cre recombinase. The mice with conditional deletion of Gcm2 displayed phenotypes similar to those previously described for a conventional Gcm2 knockout, including perinatal lethality, hypocalemia, low or undetectable serum levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), and absent parathyroid glands. The production of a conditional mutant allele for Gcm2 represents a valuable resource for the study of the temporal- and spatial-specific roles for Gcm2, and for understanding the postnatal activities of GCM2 protein. PMID:24736975

  16. Using Gene Essentiality and Synthetic Lethality Information to Correct Yeast and CHO Cell Genome-Scale Models.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ratul; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-01-01

    Essentiality (ES) and Synthetic Lethality (SL) information identify combination of genes whose deletion inhibits cell growth. This information is important for both identifying drug targets for tumor and pathogenic bacteria suppression and for flagging and avoiding gene deletions that are non-viable in biotechnology. In this study, we performed a comprehensive ES and SL analysis of two important eukaryotic models (S. cerevisiae and CHO cells) using a bilevel optimization approach introduced earlier. Information gleaned from this study is used to propose specific model changes to remedy inconsistent with data model predictions. Even for the highly curated Yeast 7.11 model we identified 50 changes (metabolic and GPR) leading to the correct prediction of an additional 28% of essential genes and 36% of synthetic lethals along with a 53% reduction in the erroneous identification of essential genes. Due to the paucity of mutant growth phenotype data only 12 changes were made for the CHO 1.2 model leading to an additional correctly predicted 11 essential and eight non-essential genes. Overall, we find that CHO 1.2 was 76% less accurate than the Yeast 7.11 metabolic model in predicting essential genes. Based on this analysis, 14 (single and double deletion) maximally informative experiments are suggested to improve the CHO cell model by using information from a mouse metabolic model. This analysis demonstrates the importance of single and multiple knockout phenotypes in assessing and improving model reconstructions. The advent of techniques such as CRISPR opens the door for the global assessment of eukaryotic models. PMID:26426067

  17. Using Gene Essentiality and Synthetic Lethality Information to Correct Yeast and CHO Cell Genome-Scale Models

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Ratul; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D.

    2015-01-01

    Essentiality (ES) and Synthetic Lethality (SL) information identify combination of genes whose deletion inhibits cell growth. This information is important for both identifying drug targets for tumor and pathogenic bacteria suppression and for flagging and avoiding gene deletions that are non-viable in biotechnology. In this study, we performed a comprehensive ES and SL analysis of two important eukaryotic models (S. cerevisiae and CHO cells) using a bilevel optimization approach introduced earlier. Information gleaned from this study is used to propose specific model changes to remedy inconsistent with data model predictions. Even for the highly curated Yeast 7.11 model we identified 50 changes (metabolic and GPR) leading to the correct prediction of an additional 28% of essential genes and 36% of synthetic lethals along with a 53% reduction in the erroneous identification of essential genes. Due to the paucity of mutant growth phenotype data only 12 changes were made for the CHO 1.2 model leading to an additional correctly predicted 11 essential and eight non-essential genes. Overall, we find that CHO 1.2 was 76% less accurate than the Yeast 7.11 metabolic model in predicting essential genes. Based on this analysis, 14 (single and double deletion) maximally informative experiments are suggested to improve the CHO cell model by using information from a mouse metabolic model. This analysis demonstrates the importance of single and multiple knockout phenotypes in assessing and improving model reconstructions. The advent of techniques such as CRISPR opens the door for the global assessment of eukaryotic models. PMID:26426067

  18. Isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered mitochondrial respiration by chlorophyll fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Horrion, Bastien; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-12-10

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism for studying energetic metabolism. Most mitochondrial respiratory-deficient mutants characterized to date have been isolated on the basis of their reduced ability to grow in heterotrophic conditions. Mitochondrial deficiencies are usually partly compensated by adjustment of photosynthetic activity and more particularly by transition to state 2. In this work, we explored the opportunity to select mutants impaired in respiration and/or altered in dark metabolism by measuring maximum photosynthetic efficiency by chlorophyll fluorescence analyses (FV/FM). Out of about 2900 hygromycin-resistant insertional mutants generated from wild type or from a mutant strain deficient in state transitions (stt7 strain), 22 were found to grow slowly in heterotrophic conditions and 8 of them also showed a lower FV/FM value. Several disrupted coding sequences were identified, including genes coding for three different subunits of respiratory-chain complex I (NUO9, NUOA9, NUOP4) or for isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Overall, the comparison of respiratory mutants obtained in wild-type or stt7 genetic backgrounds indicated that the FV/FM value can be used to isolate mutants severely impaired in dark metabolism. PMID:26022424

  19. Photoinhibition of photosystem I in a pea mutant with altered LHCII organization.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A G; Morgan-Kiss, R M; Krol, M; Allakhverdiev, S I; Zanev, Yu; Sane, P V; Huner, N P A

    2015-11-01

    Comparative analysis of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) of leaves of the Costata 2/133 pea mutant with altered pigment composition and decreased level of oligomerization of the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complexes (LHCII) of PSII (Dobrikova et al., 2000; Ivanov et al., 2005) did not differ from that of WT. In contrast, photosystem I (PSI) activity of the Costata 2/133 mutant measured by the far-red (FR) light inducible P700 (P700(+)) signal exhibited 39% lower steady state level of P700(+), a 2.2-fold higher intersystem electron pool size (e(-)/P700) and higher rate of P700(+) re-reduction, which indicate an increased capacity for PSI cyclic electron transfer (CET) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than WT. The mutant also exhibited a limited capacity for state transitions. The lower level of oxidizable P700 (P700(+)) is consistent with a lower amount of PSI related chlorophyll protein complexes and lower abundance of the PsaA/PsaB heterodimer, PsaD and Lhca1 polypeptides in Costata 2/133 mutant. Exposure of WT and the Costata 2/133 mutant to high light stress resulted in a comparable photoinhibition of PSII measured in vivo, although the decrease of Fv/Fm was modestly higher in the mutant plants. However, under the same photoinhibitory conditions PSI photochemistry (P700(+)) measured as ?A820-860 was inhibited to a greater extent (50%) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than in the WT (22%). This was accompanied by a 50% faster re-reduction rate of P700(+) in the dark indicating a higher capacity for CET around PSI in high light treated mutant leaves. The role of chloroplast thylakoid organization on the stability of the PSI complex and its susceptibility to high light stress is discussed. PMID:26321219

  20. Lipopolysaccharides of Salmonella T Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, R. W.; Berst, M.; Ruschmann, E.; Lüderitz, O.; Westphal, O.

    1967-01-01

    The composition of lipopolysaccharides derived from various Salmonella T forms was studied. All T1-form lipopolysaccharides examined contained 14 to 22% each of both d-galactose and pentose in addition to 4 to 9% each of ketodeoxyoctonic acid, heptose, d-glucosamine, and d-glucose. The pentose was identified as d-ribose. The T2-form lipopolysaccharide examined did not contain a significant amount of pentose, nor more than the usual amounts of d-galactose. Periodate oxidation of T1 (lipo) polysaccharides followed by NaBH4 reduction revealed that ribose was almost quantitatively protected, galactose was destroyed, and threitol and mannose were newly formed. The latter two products probably originated from 4-linked galactose and heptose, respectively. Ribose and galactose were found in specific precipitates of T1 lipopolysaccharide with anti-T1 antiserum but were not found in specific precipitates of alkali-treated T1 lipopolysaccharide and of Freeman degraded polysaccharide with anti-T1 serum Ribose and galactose are present in these degraded preparations in the form of nondialyzable polymers. The T1-form mutant lipopolysaccharides lacked the O-specific sugars constituting the side-chains in the wild-type antigens. They did not produce the soluble O-specific haptenic polysaccharide known to be accumulated in RI strains. With these properties, T1 lipopolysaccharides resemble RII lipopolysaccharides. Like RII degraded polysaccharides, T1-degraded polysaccharides also contained glucosamine. Furthermore, strong cross-reactions were found to exist between T1 and RII lipopolysaccharides in both hemagglutination inhibition assays and in precipitation tests. It is proposed that T1 lipopolysaccharides represent RII lipopolysaccharides to which polymers consisting of ribose and galactose are attached. PMID:6057795

  1. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Stefanie M.; Thomas, Holly R.; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J.; Lees, Jacqueline A.; Yost, H. Joseph; Parant, John M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes. PMID:26044958

  2. RNA-Seq analysis in mutant zebrafish reveals role of U1C protein in alternative splicing regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rösel, Tanja Dorothe; Hung, Lee-Hsueh; Medenbach, Jan; Donde, Katrin; Starke, Stefan; Benes, Vladimir; Rätsch, Gunnar; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Precise 5? splice-site recognition is essential for both constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing. The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP)-specific protein U1C is involved in this first step of spliceosome assembly and important for stabilizing early splicing complexes. We used an embryonically lethal U1C mutant zebrafish, hi1371, to investigate the potential genomewide role of U1C for splicing regulation. U1C mutant embryos contain overall stable, but U1C-deficient U1 snRNPs. Surprisingly, genomewide RNA-Seq analysis of mutant versus wild-type embryos revealed a large set of specific target genes that changed their alternative splicing patterns in the absence of U1C. Injection of ZfU1C cRNA into mutant embryos and in vivo splicing experiments in HeLa cells after siRNA-mediated U1C knockdown confirmed the U1C dependency and specificity, as well as the functional conservation of the effects observed. In addition, sequence motif analysis of the U1C-dependent 5? splice sites uncovered an association with downstream intronic U-rich elements. In sum, our findings provide evidence for a new role of a general snRNP protein, U1C, as a mediator of alternative splicing regulation. PMID:21468032

  3. Phosphoglucomutase Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Adhya, Sankar; Schwartz, Maxime

    1971-01-01

    Bacteria with strongly depressed phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) activity are found among the mutants of Escherichia coli which, when grown on maltose, accumulate sufficient amylose to be detectable by iodine staining. These pgm mutants grow poorly on galactose but also accumulate amylose on this carbon source. Growth on lactose does not produce high amylose but, instead, results in the induction of the enzymes of maltose metabolism, presumably by accumulation of maltose. These facts suggest that the catabolism of glucose-1-phosphate is strongly depressed in pgm mutants, although not completely abolished. Anabolism of glucose-1-phosphate is also strongly depressed, since amino acid- or glucose-grown pgm mutants are sensitive to phage C21, indicating a deficiency in the biosynthesis of uridine diphosphoglucose or uridine diphosphogalactose, or both. All pgm mutations isolated map at about 16 min on the genetic map, between purE and the gal operon. PMID:4942754

  4. Pollen embryogenesis to induce, detect, and analyze mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The development of fully differentiated plants from individual pollen grains through a series of developmental phases that resemble embryogenesis beginning with the zygote was demonstrated during the mid-1960's. This technology opened the door to the use of haploid plants (sporophytes with the gametic number of chromosomes) for plant breeding and genetic studies, biochemical and metabolic studies, and the selection of mutations. Although pollen embryogenesis has been demonstrated successfully in numerous plant genera, the procedure cannot as yet be used routinely to generate large populations of plants for experiments. Practical results from use of the technology in genetic toxicology research to detect mutations have failed to fully realize the theoretical potential; further developments of the technology could overcome the limitations. Pollen embryogenesis could be used to develop plants from mutant pollen grains to verify that genetic changes are involved. Through either spontaneous or induced chromosome doubling, these plants can be made homozygous and used to analyze genetically the mutants involved. The success of this approach will depend on the mutant frequency relative to the fraction of pollen grains that undergo embryogenesis; these two factors will dictate population size needed for success. Research effort is needed to further develop pollen embryogenesis for use in the detection of genotoxins under both laboratory and in situ conditions.

  5. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin alters regulation of visceral sympathetic nerve discharge

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, A. A.; Fels, R. J.; Mosher, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis infection is a pathophysiological condition that is complicated by progressive decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Lethal toxin (LeTx) is central to the pathogenesis of B. anthracis infection, and the sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in physiological regulation of acute stressors. However, the effect of LeTx on sympathetic nerve discharge (SND), a critical link between central sympathetic neural circuits and MAP regulation, remains unknown. We determined visceral (renal, splenic, and adrenal) SND responses to continuous infusion of LeTx [lethal factor (100 ?g/kg) + protective antigen (200 ?g/kg) infused at 0.5 ml/h for ?6 h] and vehicle (infused at 0.5 ml/h) in anesthetized, baroreceptor-intact and baroreceptor (sinoaortic)-denervated (SAD) Sprague-Dawley rats. LeTx infusions produced an initial state of cardiovascular and sympathetic nervous system activation in intact and SAD rats. Subsequent to peak LeTx-induced increases in arterial blood pressure, intact rats demonstrated a marked hypotension that was accompanied by significant reductions in SND (renal and splenic) and heart rate (HR) from peak levels. After peak LeTx-induced pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses in SAD rats, MAP, SND (renal, splenic, and adrenal), and HR were progressively and significantly reduced, supporting the hypothesis that LeTx alters the central regulation of sympathetic nerve outflow. These findings demonstrate that the regulation of visceral SND is altered in a complex manner during continuous anthrax LeTx infusions and suggest that sympathetic nervous system dysregulation may contribute to the marked hypotension accompanying B. anthracis infection. PMID:22114180

  6. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Daniel J; Belenky, Peter A; Yang, Jason H; MacDonald, I Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T Y; Lobritz, Michael A; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G; Ye, Jonathan D; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S; Allison, Kyle R; Khalil, Ahmad S; Ting, Alice Y; Walker, Graham C; Collins, James J

    2014-05-20

    Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality. PMID:24803433

  7. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Daniel J.; Belenky, Peter A.; Yang, Jason H.; MacDonald, I. Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T. Y.; Lobritz, Michael A.; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G.; Ye, Jonathan D.; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S.; Allison, Kyle R.; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Ting, Alice Y.; Walker, Graham C.; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality. PMID:24803433

  8. Developmental toxicity (dominant lethal mutation) study on agent lewisite. Dominant lethal study of lewisite in male rats. Final report, 15 September 1988-14 June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, T.J.; Parker, R.M.; Dacre, J.C.; Denny, K.H.

    1993-12-01

    Lewisite (dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine, Agent L) was investigated as part of the US Army Toxicological Program on Chemical Agents. The study was conducted during January - April, 1990. Dosing was performed during 3-12 January, 1990. Twenty male CD rats per dose group were given 1.5, 0.75 or 0.375 mg/kg Lewisite or vehicle control (one ml sesame seed oil) daily by gavage for 5 days. Positive control males were given one ml sesame seed oil by gavage on Day 1-4 and on Day 5 they were given an intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg ethyl methanesulphonate, a known mutagen. Each male was mated to two virgin females (12 weeks of age) per counted and the uteri and contents were examined. Implantation sites were categorized as live/dead fetuses or early/late resorption. No significant differences inreproductive indices were seen between treatment groups and the control group with the exception of the positive control. Males were killed during Week 13 and necropsied. Sperm morphology/modify, testicular histopathologic evaluation and morphometric analysis of seminiferous tubule cross-sections revealed no differences among Lewisite-treated rats and rats given sesame seed oil. There was no indication of a dominant lethal mutagenic or other toxic effect on the male reproductive tract as a result of exposure to Lewisite, under the conditions of this study. The No Observable Adverse Effect Level was the highest dose used, 1.500 mg/kg.

  9. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 ..gamma..-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains. (ACR)

  10. Predictors of Lethality in Severe Leptospirosis in Urban Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Spichler, Anne S.; Vilaça, Pedro J.; Athanazio, Daniel A.; Albuquerque, Jose O. M.; Buzzar, Marcia; Castro, Bronislawa; Seguro, Antonio; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    To ascertain prognostic factors associated with fatal outcomes in severe leptospirosis, a retrospective case-control study was done using population-based surveillance data. Centralized death certificate reporting of leptospirosis mortality was combined with details of patients’ hospitalizations, which were obtained from hospitals representing all sectors of Săo Paulo city. Among identified leptospirosis cases, 89 lethal cases and 281 survivor cases were analyzed. Predictors of death included age > 40 years, development of oliguria, platelet count < 70,000/µL, creatinine > 3 mg/dL, and pulmonary involvement. The latter was the strongest risk factor with an estimated odds ratio of 6.0 (95% confidence interval: 3.0–12.0). Serologic findings with highest titer against Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni did not show significant differences between survivors and non-survivors. Lung involvement was an important predictor of death in leptospirosis in Săo Paulo, of relevance in leptospirosis-endemic regions where this complication is common. PMID:19052303

  11. Aroclor 1254 residues in birds: Lethal levels and loss rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, W.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Dyrland, R.A.; Hughes, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Lethal residues of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined experimentally in four species of wild birds (male common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula ), immature female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus ), adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater ) and immature female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)) given dietary dosage of 1,500 ppm of Aroclor 1254) until one-half had died, sacrificing the survivors, chemically analyzing the tissues, and comparing results in dead birds and survivors. For all species, residues of 310 ppm or higher in the brain showed increasing likelihood of death from PCB poisoning. Residues in dead birds did not differ among species except for starlings (Sturnus vulgaris ), which averaged slightly lower than the others. However, the species differed in the length of time to 50% mortality and in the levels of PCBs in brains at sacrifice.

  12. DDE in birds: Lethal residues and loss rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, W.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Dyrland, R.A.; Hughes, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Lethal brain residues of DDE were determined experimentally in four species of wild birds (male common grackels (Quiscalus quiscula ), immature female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus ), adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molathrus ater ), and immature female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris ) given dietary dosage of 1,500 ppm DDE until one-half had died, then sacrificing the survivors, chemically analyzing the tissues, and comparing results in dead birds and survivors. In all species, residues of 300 to 400 ppm of DDE in the brain were considered to show increasing likelihood of death from DDE, confirming results of an earlier study with a single species. Body residues (ppm wet weight) were not diagnostic, overlapping grossly in dead birds and survivors, but averaging higher in survivors.

  13. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection and lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Gower, David J; Doherty-Bone, Thomas; Loader, Simon P; Wilkinson, Mark; Kouete, Marcel T; Tapley, Benjamin; Orton, Frances; Daniel, Olivia Z; Wynne, Felicity; Flach, Edmund; Müller, Hendrik; Menegon, Michele; Stephen, Ian; Browne, Robert K; Fisher, Mathew C; Cunningham, Andrew A; Garner, Trenton W J

    2013-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is commonly termed the 'amphibian chytrid fungus' but thus far has been documented to be a pathogen of only batrachian amphibians (anurans and caudatans). It is not proven to infect the limbless, generally poorly known, and mostly soil-dwelling caecilians (Gymnophiona). We conducted the largest qPCR survey of Bd in caecilians to date, for more than 200 field-swabbed specimens from five countries in Africa and South America, representing nearly 20 species, 12 genera, and 8 families. Positive results were recovered for 58 specimens from Tanzania and Cameroon (4 families, 6 genera, 6+ species). Quantities of Bd were not exceptionally high, with genomic equivalent (GE) values of 0.052-17.339. In addition, we report the first evidence of lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilians. Mortality in captive (wild-caught, commercial pet trade) Geotrypetes seraphini was associated with GE scores similar to those we detected for field-swabbed, wild animals. PMID:23677560

  14. Launcher barrel for the lethality test system railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.R.; Christensen, K.E.; Cummings, C.E.; Calkins, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    A reusable plasma armature railgun barrel design is described. This barrel was designed and is being fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in a kinetic energy lethality test system. The performance goals for this barrel are (1) that it be able to withstand the loads generated when accelerating a 30-g projectile to a velocity of 15 km/s without sustaining permanent damage, (2) that it have multiple shot capability, and, (3) that it be capable of being repaired and/or modified. The barrel consists of a multipiece modular core contained in an outer structural shell. The core assembly, composed of rails and insulators, is accessible for repair or replacement. The outer structural shell is designed to allow access to the core and is used to preload the core compressively. The barrel design incorporates various features that will allow the use of stronger and stiffer materials such as structural ceramics and reinforced coppers as they become available.

  15. [Medical aspects of common non-lethal weapons].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian Niko; Grove, Christina; Monticelli, Fabio

    2014-03-01

    The development and provision of non-lethal weapons (NLW) allow military and law enforcement personnel to exploit gradual engagement in countering potentially hazardous threats. Chemical, kinetic and electrical weapons systems are used to curb violence in civilian crowds. With inappropriate usage, these technologies can cause potentially fatal injuries that are not only of clinical, but also of legal relevance. In this context, the practicing physician is faced with treatment as well as assessment issues of new forms of injuries. In order to assure medical care and to be able to draw competent expert's conclusions, a detailed knowledge of the medical effects of these NLW is necessary. The review at hand presents today's most popular NLW and gives an overview of their possible injury potential and required treatments. PMID:24254129

  16. Mutations in the Sup-38 Gene of Caenorhabditis Elegans Suppress Muscle-Attachment Defects in Unc-52 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, E. J.; Moerman, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Mutations in the unc-52 locus of Caenorhabditis elegans have been classified into three different groups based on their complex pattern of complementation. These mutations result in progressive paralysis (class 1 mutations) or in lethality (class 2 and 3 mutations). The paralysis exhibited by animals carrying class 1 mutations is caused by disruption of the myofilaments at their points of attachment to the cell membrane in the body wall muscle cells. We have determined that mutations of this class also have an effect on the somatic gonad, and this may be due to a similar disruption in the myoepithelial sheath cells of the uterus, or in the uterine muscle cells. Mutations that suppress the body wall muscle defects of the class 1 unc-52 mutations have been isolated, and they define a new locus, sup-38. Only the muscle disorganization of the Unc-52 mutants is suppressed; the gonad abnormalities are not, and the suppressors do not rescue the lethal phenotype of the class 2 and class 3 mutations. The suppressor mutations on their own exhibit a variable degree of gonad and muscle disorganization. Putative null sup-38 mutations cause maternal-effect lethality which is rescued by a wild-type copy of the locus in the zygote. These loss-of-function mutations have no effect on the body wall muscle structure. PMID:1427037

  17. GENETIC MAPPING OF MAIZE MUTANTS WITH SSR MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mapping of mutants in the Maize Mapping Project seeks to increase the value of the mutant resource with map information. Because the number of mutants is enormous, and is ever growing, we have worked to increase the rate and resolution by which mutants can be mapped with molecular markers. By prod...

  18. Isolation and Characterization of a Mutant of Escherichia coli Blocked in the Synthesis of Putrescine

    PubMed Central

    Hirshfield, I. N.; Rosenfeld, H. J.; Leifer, Z.; Maas, W. K.

    1970-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli is described which is defective in the conversion of arginine to putrescine. The activity of the enzyme agmatine ureohydrolase is greatly reduced, whereas the activity of the other two enzymes of the pathway, the constitutive arginine decarboxylase and the inducible arginine decarboxylase, are within the normal range. The growth behavior of the mutant reflects the enzymatic block. It grows well in the absence of arginine, but only poorly in the presence of arginine. Under the former conditions, putrescine can be formed from ornithine as well as arginine, whereas under the latter conditions, because of feedback control, it can be formed only from arginine. PMID:4908780

  19. Non-lethal effect of the invasive predator Bythotrephes longimanus on Daphnia mendotae

    E-print Network

    Non-lethal effect of the invasive predator Bythotrephes longimanus on Daphnia mendotae KEVIN L Arbor, MI, U.S.A. SUMMARY 1. We evaluated the antipredator behaviour of Daphnia mendotae to the invasive (referred to as a non-lethal effect of the predator). 2. In a laboratory experiment, Daphnia in the absence

  20. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the

    E-print Network

    Starnbach, Michael

    . anthracis consists of two bipartite protein exotoxins, lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin. LT is composed of protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF), whereas edema toxin consists of PA and edema factor (EF). None of these three components, PA, LF, and EF, alone is toxic. Once combined, however, edema toxin

  1. BIOASSAY PROTOCOL FOR LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF FUNGAL PATHOGENS ON CHRYSOPERLA CARNEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This practice describes procedures for evaluating the lethal and sub-lethal effects of exposure to fungal pathogens on larvae and adults of the predatory insect Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens). his practice was developed and tested with the fungal insect pathogen Beauveria bassiana...

  2. Improving on Army Field Gauze for Lethal Vascular Injuries: Challenges in Dressing Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accounting for half of all deaths, uncontrolled hemorrhage remains the leading cause of death on the battlefield. Gaining hemostatic control of lethal vascular injuries sustained in combat using topical agents remains a challenge. Recent animal testing using a lethal arterial injury model compared a...

  3. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yanyi

    A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1 of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. A nthrax, a lethal infectious disease

  4. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  5. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  6. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  7. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  8. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  9. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

  10. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  11. Increased Genome Instability in Escherichia coli lon Mutants: Relation to Emergence of Multiple-Antibiotic-Resistant (Mar) Mutants Caused by Insertion Sequence Elements and Large Tandem Genomic Amplifications?

    PubMed Central

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Perreten, Vincent; Levy, Stuart B.

    2007-01-01

    Thirteen spontaneous multiple-antibiotic-resistant (Mar) mutants of Escherichia coli AG100 were isolated on Luria-Bertani (LB) agar in the presence of tetracycline (4 ?g/ml). The phenotype was linked to insertion sequence (IS) insertions in marR or acrR or unstable large tandem genomic amplifications which included acrAB and which were bordered by IS3 or IS5 sequences. Five different lon mutations, not related to the Mar phenotype, were also found in 12 of the 13 mutants. Under specific selective conditions, most drug-resistant mutants appearing late on the selective plates evolved from a subpopulation of AG100 with lon mutations. That the lon locus was involved in the evolution to low levels of multidrug resistance was supported by the following findings: (i) AG100 grown in LB broth had an important spontaneous subpopulation (about 3.7 × 10?4) of lon::IS186 mutants, (ii) new lon mutants appeared during the selection on antibiotic-containing agar plates, (iii) lon mutants could slowly grow in the presence of low amounts (about 2× MIC of the wild type) of chloramphenicol or tetracycline, and (iv) a lon mutation conferred a mutator phenotype which increased IS transposition and genome rearrangements. The association between lon mutations and mutations causing the Mar phenotype was dependent on the medium (LB versus MacConkey medium) and the antibiotic used for the selection. A previously reported unstable amplifiable high-level resistance observed after the prolonged growth of Mar mutants in a low concentration of tetracycline or chloramphenicol can be explained by genomic amplification. PMID:17220404

  12. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent Suicide Attempts

    PubMed Central

    McManama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2015-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of suicide attempts among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without substance abuse. Regression results indicated having depression comorbid with any other diagnosis was not associated with medical lethality. However, having a substance abuse disorder was associated with higher suicide attempt lethality, highlighting the importance of substance abuse as a risk factor for lethal suicide attempts in adolescents. This finding stimulates critical thinking around the understanding of suicidal behavior in youth and the development and implementation of treatment strategies for suicidal adolescents with substance abuse disorders. PMID:22646667

  13. Characterization of a Replication-Incompetent Pseudorabies Virus Mutant Lacking the Sole Immediate Early Gene IE180

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Brendan W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) encodes a single immediate early gene called IE180. The IE180 protein is a potent transcriptional activator of viral genes involved in DNA replication and RNA transcription. A PRV mutant with both copies of IE180 deleted was constructed 20 years ago (S. Yamada and M. Shimizu, Virology 199:366–375, 1994, doi:10.1006/viro.1994.1134), but propagation of the mutant depended on complementing cell lines that expressed the toxic IE180 protein constitutively. Recently, Oyibo et al. constructed a novel set of PRV IE180 mutants and a stable cell line with inducible IE180 expression (H. Oyibo, P. Znamenskiy, H. V. Oviedo, L. W. Enquist, A. Zador, Front. Neuroanat. 8:86, 2014, doi:10.3389/fnana.2014.00086), which we characterized further here. These mutants failed to replicate new viral genomes, synthesize immediate early, early, or late viral proteins, and assemble infectious virions. The PRV IE180-null mutant did not form plaques in epithelial cell monolayers and could not spread from primary infected neurons to second-order neurons in culture. PRV IE180-null mutants lacked the property of superinfection exclusion. When PRV IE180-null mutants infected cells first, subsequent superinfecting viruses were not blocked in cell entry and formed replication compartments in epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and neurons. Cells infected with PRV IE180-null mutants survived as long as uninfected cells in culture while expressing a fluorescent reporter gene. Transcomplementation with IE180 in epithelial cells restored all mutant phenotypes to wild type. The conditional expression of PRV IE180 protein enables the propagation of replication-incompetent PRV IE180-null mutants and will facilitate construction of long-term single-cell-infecting PRV mutants for precise neural circuit tracing and high-capacity gene delivery vectors. PMID:25389174

  14. Suppression of mutants aberrant in light intensity responses of complementary chromatic adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, E S; Kehoe, D M; Grossman, A R

    1997-01-01

    Complementary chromatic adaptation is a process in which cyanobacteria alter the pigment protein (phycocyanin and phycoerythrin) composition of their light-harvesting complexes, the phycobilisomes, to help optimize the absorbance of prevalent wavelengths of light in the environment. Several classes of mutants that display aberrant complementary chromatic adaptation have been isolated. One of the mutant classes, designated "blue" or FdB, accumulates high levels of the blue chromoprotein phycocyanin in low-intensity green light, a condition that normally suppresses phycocyanin synthesis. We demonstrate here that the synthesis of the phycocyanin protein and mRNA in the FdB mutants can be suppressed by increasing the intensity of green light. Hence, these mutants have a decreased sensitivity to green light with respect to suppression of phycocyanin synthesis. Although we were unable to complement the blue mutants, we did isolate genes that could suppress the mutant phenotype. These genes, which have been identified previously, encode a histidine kinase sensor and response regulator protein that play key roles in controlling complementary chromatic adaptation. These findings are discussed with respect to the mechanism by which light quality and quantity control the biosynthesis of the phycobilisome. PMID:9226271

  15. FOLIC ACID METABOLISM IN ANTIFOLIC-RESISTANT MUTANTS OF STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    PubMed

    JOHNSON, A H; HUTCHISON, D J

    1964-04-01

    Johnson, Alva H. (Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Rye, N.Y.), and Dorris J. Hutchison. Folic acid metabolism in antifolic-resistant mutants of Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 87:786-791. 1964.-Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 8043 and three of its mutants resistant to amethopterin were compared for their quantitative requirements for serine, purines, and thymine; for their quantitative requirements of folic acid (FA) for the synthesis de novo of serine, purines, and thymine; for the susceptibility to amethopterin of each pathway; and for the relative capacity of resting cells of each culture to synthesize N(5)-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-CHOFAH(4)) from FA and serine or FA and formate. The mutants were found to be both qualitatively and quantitatively different from one another and from the wild strain. The growth conditions, specifically the composition of the medium in which each mutant strain was selected, had a marked effect on the metabolic capacities of the mutants. The ability to synthesize serine, purines, and thymine, as observed from the FA requirements, directly reflected the level of resistance of each pathway to amethopterin. The resistant mutants were more efficient than the wild strain in the formation of 5-CHOFAH(4) from FA and formate and, furthermore, this formate activation paralleled their capacities in the synthesis de novo of serine. Alterations in purine and thymine biosyntheses were also observed. PMID:14137614

  16. Isolation and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in the induction of ethylene biosynthesis by cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. P.; Schuerman, P.; Woeste, K.; Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins elevate ethylene biosynthesis in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings via a post-transcriptional modification of one isoform of the key biosynthetic enzyme ACC synthase. In order to begin to dissect the signaling events leading from cytokinin perception to this modification, we have isolated a series of mutants that lack the ethylene-mediated triple response in the presence of cytokinin due to their failure to increase ethylene biosynthesis. Analysis of genetic complementation and mapping revealed that these Cin mutants (cytokinin-insensitive) represent four distinct complementation groups, one of which, cin4, is allelic to the constitutive photomorphogenic mutant fus9/cop10. The Cin mutants have subtle effects on the morphology of adult plants. We further characterized the Cin mutants by analyzing ethylene biosynthesis in response to various other inducers and in adult tissues, as well as by assaying additional cytokinin responses. The cin3 mutant did not disrupt ethylene biosynthesis under any other conditions, nor did it disrupt any other cytokinin responses. Only cin2 disrupted ethylene biosynthesis in multiple circumstances. cin1 and cin2 made less anthocyanin in response to cytokinin. cin1 also displayed reduced shoot initiation in tissue culture in response to cytokinin, suggesting that it affects a cytokinin signaling element.

  17. Recovery of Dominant, Autosomal Flightless Mutants of Drosophila Melanogaster and Identification of a New Gene Required for Normal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, R. M.; Ball, E.; Stark, M.; Lawn, A.; Sparrow, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    To identify further mutations affecting muscle function and development in Drosophila melanogaster we recovered 22 autosomal dominant flightless mutations. From these we have isolated eight viable and lethal alleles of the muscle myosin heavy chain gene, and seven viable alleles of the indirect flight muscle (IFM)-specific Act88F actin gene. The Mhc mutations display a variety of phenotypic effects, ranging from reductions in myosin heavy chain content in the indirect flight muscles only, to reductions in the levels of this protein in other muscles. The Act88F mutations range from those which produce no stable actin and have severely abnormal myofibrillar structure, to those which accumulate apparently normal levels of actin in the flight muscles but which still have abnormal myofibrils and fly very poorly. We also recovered two recessive flightless mutants on the third chromosome. The remaining five dominant flightless mutations are all lethal alleles of a gene named lethal(3)Laker. The Laker alleles have been characterized and the gene located in polytene bands 62A10,B1-62B2,4. Laker is a previously unidentified locus which is haplo-insufficient for flight. In addition, adult wild-type heterozygotes and the lethal larval trans-heterozygotes show abnormalities of muscle structure indicating that the Laker gene product is an important component of muscle. PMID:8056306

  18. Novel peroxisome clustering mutants and peroxisome biogenesis mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to identify and characterize the protein machinery that functions in the intracellular translocation and assembly of peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several genes encoding proteins that are essential for this process have been identified previously by Kunau and collaborators, but the mutant collection was incomplete. We have devised a positive selection procedure that identifies new mutants lacking peroxisomes or peroxisomal function. Immunofluorescence procedures for yeast were simplified so that these mutants could be rapidly and efficiently screened for those in which peroxisome biogenesis is impaired. With these tools, we have identified four complementation groups of peroxisome biogenesis mutants, and one group that appears to express reduced amounts of peroxisomal proteins. Two of our mutants lack recognizable peroxisomes, although they might contain peroxisomal membrane ghosts like those found in Zellweger syndrome. Two are selectively defective in packaging peroxisomal proteins and moreover show striking intracellular clustering of the peroxisomes. The distribution of mutants among complementation groups implies that the collection of peroxisome biogenesis mutants is still incomplete. With the procedures described, it should prove straightforward to isolate mutants from additional complementation groups. PMID:7902359

  19. Chemical- and irradiation-induced mutants of indica rice IR64 for forward and reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Li; Wu, Chanjian; Lei, Cailin; Baraoidan, Marietta; Bordeos, Alicia; Madamba, Ma Reina Suzette; Ramos-Pamplona, Marilou; Mauleon, Ramil; Portugal, Arlett; Ulat, Victor Jun; Bruskiewich, Richard; Wang, Guoliang; Leach, Jan; Khush, Gurdev; Leung, Hei

    2005-09-01

    IR64, the most widely grown indica rice in South and Southeast Asia, possesses many positive agronomic characteristics (e.g., wide adaptability, high yield potential, tolerance to multiple diseases and pests, and good eating quality,) that make it an ideal genotype for identifying mutational changes in traits of agronomic importance. We have produced a large collection of chemical and irradiation-induced IR64 mutants with different genetic lesions that are amenable to both forward and reverse genetics. About 60,000 IR64 mutants have been generated by mutagenesis using chemicals (diepoxybutane and ethylmethanesulfonate) and irradiation (fast neutron and gamma ray). More than 38,000 independent lines have been advanced to M4 generation enabling evaluation of quantitative traits by replicated trials. Morphological variations at vegetative and reproductive stages, including plant architecture, growth habit, pigmentation and various physiological characters, are commonly observed in the four mutagenized populations. Conditional mutants such as gain or loss of resistance to blast, bacterial blight, and tungro disease have been identified at frequencies ranging from 0.01% to 0.1%. Results from pilot experiments indicate that the mutant collections are suitable for reverse genetics through PCR-detection of deletions and TILLING. Furthermore, deletions can be detected using oligomer chips suggesting a general technique to pinpoint deletions when genome-wide oligomer chips are broadly available. M4 mutant seeds are available for users for screening of altered response to multiple stresses. So far, more than 15,000 mutant lines have been distributed. To facilitate broad usage of the mutants, a mutant database has been constructed in the International Rice Information System (IRIS; http: //www.iris.irri.org) to document the phenotypes and gene function discovered by users. PMID:16217604

  20. Functional comparison of three transformer gene introns regulating conditional female lethality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The trasformer gene plays a critical role in the sex determination pathways of many insects. We cloned two transformer gene introns from Anastrepha suspensa, the Caribbean fruit fly. These introns have sequences that putatively have a role in sex-specific splicing patterns that affect sex determinat...

  1. GAMPMS: Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening.

    PubMed

    Long, Thomas; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Tim

    2015-06-30

    The prominence of endogenous peptide ligands targeted to receptors makes peptides with the desired binding activity good molecular scaffolds for drug development. Minor modifications to a peptide's primary sequence can significantly alter its binding properties with a receptor, and screening collections of peptide mutants is a useful technique for probing the receptor-ligand binding domain. Unfortunately, the combinatorial growth of such collections can limit the number of mutations which can be explored using structure-based molecular docking techniques. Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening (GAMPMS) uses a genetic algorithm to conduct a heuristic search of the peptide's mutation space for peptides with optimal binding activity, significantly reducing the computational requirements of the virtual screening. The GAMPMS procedure was implemented and used to explore the binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ?3?2-isoform with a library of 64,000 ?-conotoxin (?-CTx) MII peptide mutants. To assess GAMPMS's performance, it was compared with a virtual screening procedure that used AutoDock to predict the binding affinity of each of the ?-CTx MII peptide mutants with the ?3?2-nAChR. The GAMPMS implementation performed AutoDock simulations for as few as 1140 of the 64,000 ?-CTx MII peptide mutants and could consistently identify a set of 10 peptides with an aggregated binding energy that was at least 98% of the aggregated binding energy of the 10 top peptides from the exhaustive AutoDock screening. PMID:25975567

  2. Placental defects are associated with male lethality in bare patches and striated embryos deficient in the NAD(P)H Steroid Dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL) Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Hugo; Cunningham, David; Wang, Xiaojian; Jiang, Fenglei; Humphries, Leon; Kelley, Richard I; Herman, Gail E

    2005-01-01

    NSDHL is a 3beta-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase that is involved in the removal of C-4 methyl groups in one of the later steps of cholesterol biosynthesis. Mutations in the Nsdhl gene are associated with the X-linked male lethal mouse mutations bare patches (Bpa) and striated (Str), as well as with most cases of human CHILD syndrome. To begin to examine the pathogenesis of these disorders, we have determined that affected male embryos for several Nsdhl alleles die in midgestation, between E10.5 and 13.5, while the majority of affected male embryos for the most severe allele, Nsdhl(Bpa1H), die prior to E9.5. Although no consistent anomalies were identified in affected male embryos themselves, the labyrinth layer of the fetal placenta was always thinner, with fewer fetal vessels and decreased proliferation of labyrinth trophoblast cells. X-inactivation is non-random in females in most lineages of the rodent placenta with preferential inactivation of the paternal X chromosome. For primary defects involving these extraembryonic lineages, heterozygous females with a mutant maternal X chromosome would be expected to have an identical placental phenotype to that found in affected male embryos. We hypothesize that abnormalities in cells of the allantoic mesoderm that undergo random X-inactivation and form the endothelial lining of the fetal vessels of the labyrinth are associated with the male lethality, perhaps through disruption of an as yet unidentified signaling pathway. PMID:15639195

  3. Mutagenic and lethal effects of near-ultraviolet radiation (290-400 nm) on bacteria and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstark, A.

    1987-01-01

    Despite decades of study of the effect of near-ultraviolet radiation (NUV) on bacterial cells, insights into mechanisms of deleterious alterations and subsequent recovery are just now emerging. These insights are based on observations that 1) damage by NUV may be caused by a reactive oxygen molecule, since H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ may be a photoproduct of NUV; 2) some, but not all, of the effects of NUV and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ are interchangeable; 3) there is an inducible regulon (oxyR) that responds to oxidative stress and is involved in protection against NUV; 4) a number of NUV-sensitive mutants are defective either in the capacity to detoxify reactive oxygen molecules or to repair DNA damage caused by NUV; and 5) recovery from NUV damage may not directly involve induction of the SOS response. Since several distinctly different photoreceptors and targets are involved, it is unknown whether NUV lethality and mutagenesis result from an accumulation of damages or whether there is a particularly critical photoeffect. To fully understand the mechanisms involved, it is important to identify the chromophore(s) of NUV, the mechanism of toxic oxygen species generation, the role of the oxidative defense regulon (oxyR), the specific lesions in the DNA, and the enzymatic events of subsequent repair. 131 references.

  4. Breakthrough of ultraviolet light from various brands of fluorescent lamps: Lethal effects on DNA repair-defective bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.E.; Biggley, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    In a comparative study of 17 pairs of 15 W fluorescent lamps intended for use in homes and purchased in local stores, we detect over 10-fold differences in UVB + UVC emissions between various lamps. This breakthrough of ultraviolet (UV) light is in part correlated with ability of lamps to kill DNA repair-defective recA{sup {minus}}uvrB{sup {minus}} Salmonella. Relative proficiency of lamps in eliciting photoreactivation of UV-induced DNA lesions also plays a prominent role in the relative rates of bacterial inactivation by emissions from different lamps. Lamps made in Chile, such as Phillips brand lamps and one type of General Electric lamp, produce far less UVB + UVC and fail to kill recA{sup {minus}} uvrB{sup {minus}} bacteria. In contrast, all tested lamps manufactured in the USA, Hungary, and Japan exhibit readily observed deleterious biological effects. When an E. coli recA{sup {minus}} uvrB{sup {minus}} phr{sup {minus}} (photolyase-negative) triple mutant is used for assay, lethal radiations are detected from all lamps, and single-hit exponential inactivation rates rather closely correlate to amount of directly measured UVB + UVC output of each pair of lamps. Although all lamps tested may meet international and Unite States standards for radiation safely, optimal practices in lamp manufacture are clearly capable of decreasing human exposure to indoor UV light. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Reconstructing the Lethal Part of the 1790 Eruption at Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, D.; Weaver, S. J.; Houghton, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    The most lethal known eruption from a volcano in the United States took place in November 1790 at Kilauea, killing perhaps 400-800 people (estimates range widely) who were crossing the summit on their way to a distant battle site. The eruption culminated ca. 300 years of sporadic explosive activity after the formation of Kilauea Caldera in about 1500. No contemporary account exists of the 1790 activity, but an eruption plume was observed from Kawaihae, 100 km NW of Kilauea, that probably was 10 km or higher. We are attempting to piece together the lethal event from a study of the 1790 and enclosing deposits and by using published accounts, written several decades later, based on interviews with survivors or others with knowledge of the tragedy. Determining what deposits actually formed in November 1790 is crucial. The best tie to that date is a deposit of phreatomagmatic lithic lapilli and ash that occurs SE of the caldera and must have been advected by high-level (>~10 km) westerly winds rather than low-level NE trade winds. It is the only contender for deposits from the high column observed in 1790. Small lapilli from the high column fell onto, and sank deeply into, a 3-5-cm-thick accretionary lapilli layer that was wet and likely no more than a few hours old. The wet ash occurs south of the caldera, where the lithic lapilli fell into it, and is also found west of the caldera in the saddle between Kilauea and Mauna Loa, where the victims were probably walking along a main foot trail still visible today. A lithic pyroclastic surge swept across the saddle, locally scouring away the wet accretionary lapilli layer but generally leaving a deposit <1 to 15 cm thick on the ash and embedding 1-cm lithic lapilli deeply within it. This indicates that the surge also erupted in November 1790, while the underlying ash was still wet. Though scattered ballistic blocks later fell in the area, the surge left the youngest continuous deposit on the west flank of Kilauea. An account written in 1843 by Rev. Sheldon Dibble describes the dead victims as lying on the surface or "sitting upright clasping with dying grasp their wives and children," not buried by ash or battered by falling debris, and "thoroughly scorched" but "in no place deeply burnt." These gruesome details suggest that the surge engulfed the victims, some of whom were clasping one another to keep from being blown away. The surge deposit covers an area of 12-15 sq km on the western flank of Kilauea between the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) and the main highway around the island. The fatalities probably took place in this area, now visited daily by 5000 travelers to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Several human footprints, barely discernible through the thin surge deposit, indent the surface of the accretionary lapilli ash near HVO. Do they record someone's last footsteps? We do not yet know when the eruption started or how many units older than the accretionary lapilli ash were also erupted in 1790. But we think we have identified the lethal surge of the eruption, and it is sobering to realize that it overwhelmed the place where this abstract is being written 221 years later.

  6. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  7. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  8. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  9. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  10. 9 CFR 430.4 - Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality exposed ready-to-eat products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...PRODUCT § 430.4 Control of Listeria monocytogenes in post-lethality...ready-to-eat products. (a) Listeria monocytogenes can...

  11. TOMATOMA: a novel tomato mutant database distributing Micro-Tom mutant collections.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Ariizumi, Tohru; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Fukuda, Naoya; Mizoguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Aoki, Koh; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-02-01

    The tomato is an excellent model for studies of plants bearing berry-type fruits and for experimental studies of the Solanaceae family of plants due to its conserved genetic organization. In this study, a comprehensive mutant tomato population was generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf, rapid-growth variety. In this and previous studies, a family including 8,598 and 6,422 M(2) mutagenized lines was produced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis and ?-ray irradiation, and this study developed and investigated these M(2) plants for alteration of visible phenotypes. A total of 9,183 independent M(2) families comprising 91,830 M(2) plants were inspected for phenotypic alteration, and 1,048 individual mutants were isolated. Subsequently, the observed mutant phenotypes were classified into 15 major categories and 48 subcategories. Overall, 1,819 phenotypic categories were found in 1,048 mutants. Of these mutants, 549 were pleiotropic, whereas 499 were non-pleiotropic. Multiple different mutant alleles per locus were found in the mutant libraries, suggesting that the mutagenized populations were nearly saturated. Additionally, genetic analysis of backcrosses indicated the successful inheritance of the mutations in BC(1)F(2) populations, confirming the reproducibility in the morphological phenotyping of the M(2) plants. To integrate and manage the visible phenotypes of mutants and other associated data, we developed the in silico database TOMATOMA, a relational system interfacing modules between mutant line names and phenotypic categories. TOMATOMA is a freely accessible database, and these mutant recourses are available through the TOMATOMA (http://tomatoma.nbrp.jp/index.jsp). PMID:21258066

  12. Pegfilgrastim Improves Survival of Lethally Irradiated Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Kim G; Farese, Ann M; Blaauw, Erica C; Gibbs, Allison M; Smith, Cassandra P; Katz, Barry P; Tong, Yan; Prado, Karl L; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-06-01

    Leukocyte growth factors (LGF), such as filgrastim, pegfilgrastim and sargramostim, have been used to mitigate the hematologic symptoms of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) after radiation accidents. Although these pharmaceuticals are currently approved for treatment of chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, such approval has not been granted for myelosuppression resulting from acute radiation exposure. Regulatory approval of drugs used to treat radiological or nuclear exposure injuries requires their development and testing in accordance with the Animal Efficacy Rule, set forth by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To date, filgrastim is the only LGF that has undergone efficacy assessment conducted under the Animal Efficacy Rule. To confirm the efficacy of another LGF with a shorter dosing regimen compared to filgrastim, we evaluated the use of pegfilgrastim (Neulasta(®)) in a lethal nonhuman primate (NHP) model of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Rhesus macaques were exposed to 7.50 Gy total-body irradiation (the LD(50/60)), delivered at 0.80 Gy/min using linear accelerator 6 MV photons. Pegfilgrastim (300 ?g/kg, n = 23) or 5% dextrose in water (n = 23) was administered on day 1 and 8 postirradiation and all animals received medical management. Hematologic and physiologic parameters were evaluated for 60 days postirradiation. The primary, clinically relevant end point was survival to day 60; secondary end points included hematologic-related parameters. Pegfilgrastim significantly (P = 0.0014) increased 60 day survival to 91.3% (21/23) from 47.8% (11/23) in the control. Relative to the controls, pegfilgrastim also significantly: 1. decreased the median duration of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia; 2. improved the median time to recovery of absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ?500/?L, ANC ?1,000/?L and platelet (PLT) count ?20,000/?L; 3. increased the mean ANC at nadir; and 4. decreased the incidence of Gram-negative bacteremia. These data demonstrate that pegfilgrastim is an additional medical countermeasure capable of increasing survival and neutrophil-related parameters when administered in an abbreviated schedule to a NHP model of lethal H-ARS. PMID:26035709

  13. Isolation and characterization of mammalian glycosylation mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, J.

    1986-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of Chinese Hamster Ovary mutants was done to better understand the pathway of Asn-linked glycosylation. B4-2-1 cells were previously isolated as being defective in the membrane glycoprotein, the mannose-6-phosphate receptor. These cells are shown to be defective in the synthesis of mannosylphosphoryldolichol (MPD) and also mannosylphosphorylretinol. The absence of MPD results in the synthesis of a single major oligosaccharide containing only five mannoses. This oligosaccharide is not a substrate for endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase F, although when present on the protein the oligosaccharide is capable of being released by peptide-N-glycosidase F. B4-2-1 was the parent cell for three new mutant cell lines. These cell lines were isolated by a screening procedure which monitored the incorporation of (/sup 3/H) mannose into acid-precipitable material. Two classes of mutant were obtained as defined by in vivo incorporation of (/sup 3/H) mannose.

  14. Automated behavioural fingerprinting of C. elegans mutants

    E-print Network

    Brown, André E X

    2013-01-01

    Rapid advances in genetics, genomics, and imaging have given insight into the molecular and cellular basis of behaviour in a variety of model organisms with unprecedented detail and scope. It is increasingly routine to isolate behavioural mutants, clone and characterise mutant genes, and discern the molecular and neural basis for a behavioural phenotype. Conversely, reverse genetic approaches have made it possible to straightforwardly identify genes of interest in whole-genome sequences and generate mutants that can be subjected to phenotypic analysis. In this latter approach, it is the phenotyping that presents the major bottleneck; when it comes to connecting phenotype to genotype in freely behaving animals, analysis of behaviour itself remains superficial and time consuming. However, many proof-of-principle studies of automated behavioural analysis over the last decade have poised the field on the verge of exciting developments that promise to begin closing this gap. In the broadest sense, our goal in this...

  15. Susceptibility to hepatotoxicity in transgenic mice that express a dominant-negative human keratin 18 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Ku, N O; Michie, S A; Soetikno, R M; Resurreccion, E Z; Broome, R L; Oshima, R G; Omary, M B

    1996-01-01

    Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/18) are intermediate filament phosphoglycoproteins that are expressed preferentially in simple-type epithelia. We recently described transgenic mice that express point-mutant human K18 (Ku, N.-O., S. Michie, R.G. Oshima, and M.B. Omary. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 131:1303-1314) and develop chronic hepatitis and hepatocyte fragility in association with hepatocyte keratin filament disruption. Here we show that mutant K18 expressing transgenic mice are highly susceptible to hepatotoxicity after acute administration of acetaminophen (400 mg/Kg) or chronic ingestion of griseofulvin (1.25% wt/wt of diet). The predisposition to hepatotoxicity results directly from the keratin mutation since nontransgenic or transgenic mice that express normal human K18 are more resistant. Hepatotoxicity was manifested by a significant difference in lethality, liver histopathology, and biochemical serum testing. Keratin glycosylation decreased in all griseofulvin-fed mice, whereas keratin phosphorylation increased dramatically preferentially in mice expressing normal K18. The phosphorylation increase in normal K18 after griseofulvin feeding appears to involve sites that are different to those that increase after partial hepatectomy. Our results indicate that hepatocyte intermediate filament disruption renders mice highly susceptible to hepatotoxicity, and raises the possibility that K18 mutations may predispose to drug hepatotoxicity. The dramatic phosphorylation increase in nonmutant keratins could provide survival advantage to hepatocytes. PMID:8770877

  16. Susceptibility to hepatotoxicity in transgenic mice that express a dominant-negative human keratin 18 mutant.

    PubMed

    Ku, N O; Michie, S A; Soetikno, R M; Resurreccion, E Z; Broome, R L; Oshima, R G; Omary, M B

    1996-08-15

    Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/18) are intermediate filament phosphoglycoproteins that are expressed preferentially in simple-type epithelia. We recently described transgenic mice that express point-mutant human K18 (Ku, N.-O., S. Michie, R.G. Oshima, and M.B. Omary. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 131:1303-1314) and develop chronic hepatitis and hepatocyte fragility in association with hepatocyte keratin filament disruption. Here we show that mutant K18 expressing transgenic mice are highly susceptible to hepatotoxicity after acute administration of acetaminophen (400 mg/Kg) or chronic ingestion of griseofulvin (1.25% wt/wt of diet). The predisposition to hepatotoxicity results directly from the keratin mutation since nontransgenic or transgenic mice that express normal human K18 are more resistant. Hepatotoxicity was manifested by a significant difference in lethality, liver histopathology, and biochemical serum testing. Keratin glycosylation decreased in all griseofulvin-fed mice, whereas keratin phosphorylation increased dramatically preferentially in mice expressing normal K18. The phosphorylation increase in normal K18 after griseofulvin feeding appears to involve sites that are different to those that increase after partial hepatectomy. Our results indicate that hepatocyte intermediate filament disruption renders mice highly susceptible to hepatotoxicity, and raises the possibility that K18 mutations may predispose to drug hepatotoxicity. The dramatic phosphorylation increase in nonmutant keratins could provide survival advantage to hepatocytes. PMID:8770877

  17. Regulation of Nucleotide Metabolism by Mutant p53 Contributes to its Gain-of-Function Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kollareddy, Madhusudhan; Dimitrova, Elizabeth; Vallabhaneni, Krishna C.; Chan, Adriano; Le, Thuc; Chauhan, Krishna M.; Carrero, Zunamys I.; Ramakrishnan, Gopalakrishnan; Watabe, Kounosuke; Haupt, Ygal; Haupt, Sue; Pochampally, Radhika; Boss, Gerard R.; Romero, Damian G.; Radu, Caius G.; Martinez, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutant p53 (mtp53) is an oncogene that drives cancer cell proliferation. Here we report that mtp53 associates with the promoters of numerous nucleotide metabolism genes (NMG). Mtp53 knockdown reduces NMG expression and substantially depletes nucleotide pools, which attenuates GTP dependent protein (GTPase) activity and cell invasion. Addition of exogenous guanosine or GTP restores the invasiveness of mtp53 knockdown cells, suggesting that mtp53 promotes invasion by increasing GTP. Additionally, mtp53 creates a dependency on the nucleoside salvage pathway enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) for the maintenance of a proper balance in dNTP pools required for proliferation. These data indicate that mtp53 harboring cells have acquired a synthetic sick or lethal phenotype relationship with the nucleoside salvage pathway. Finally, elevated expression of NMG correlates with mutant p53 status and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Thus, mtp53’s control of nucleotide biosynthesis has both a driving and sustaining role in cancer development. PMID:26067754

  18. Mutagenesis in the lacI gene target of E. coli: improved analysis for lacI(d) and lacO mutants.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Sarah J; Schaaper, Roel M

    2014-12-01

    The lacI gene of Escherichia coli has been a highly useful target for studies of mutagenesis, particularly for analysis of the specificity (spectrum) of mutations generated under a variety of conditions and in various genetic backgrounds. The gene encodes the repressor of the lac operon, and lacI-defective mutants displaying constitutive expression of the operon are readily selected. DNA sequencing of the lacI mutants has often been confined to the N-terminal region of the protein, as it presents a conveniently short target with a high density of detectably mutable sites. Mutants in this region are easily selected due to their dominance in a genetic complementation test (lacI(d) mutants). A potential complication in these studies is that constitutive expression of lac may also arise due to mutations in the lac operator (lacO mutants). Under some conditions, for example when analyzing spontaneous mutations, lacO mutants can comprise a very high fraction of the constitutive mutants due to a strong base-substitution hotspot in the lac operator. Such mutational hot spots diminish the return of the sequencing effort and do not yield significant new information. For this reason, a procedure to eliminate the lacO mutants prior to DNA sequencing is desirable. Here, we report a simple method that allows screening out of lacO mutants. This method is based on the lack of resistance of lacO mutants to kanamycin under conditions when the kan gene is expressed from a plasmid under control of the lac promoter-operator (lacPO). We show data validating the new approach with sets of known lacI(d) and lacO mutants, and further apply it to the generation of a new collection of spontaneous mutations, where lacO mutants have historically been a significant contributor. PMID:25771873

  19. Mutagenesis in the lacI gene target of E. coli: improved analysis for lacId and lacO mutants

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Sarah J.; Schaaper, Roel M.

    2014-01-01

    The lacI gene of E. coli has been a highly useful target for studies of mutagenesis, particularly for analysis of the specificity (spectrum) of mutations generated under a variety of conditions and in various genetic backgrounds. The gene encodes the repressor of the lac operon, and lacI-defective mutants displaying constitutive expression of the operon are readily selected. DNA sequencing of the lacI mutants has often been confined to the N-terminal region of the protein, as it presents a conveniently short target with a high density of detectably mutable sites. Mutants in this region are easily selected due to their dominance in a genetic complementation test (lacId mutants). A potential complication in these studies is that constitutive expression of lac may also arise due to mutations in the lac operator (lacO mutants). Under some conditions, for example when analyzing spontaneous mutations, lacO mutants can comprise a very high fraction of the constitutive mutants due to a strong base-substitution hotspot in the lac operator. Such mutational hot spots diminish the return of the sequencing effort and do not yield significant new information. For this reason, a procedure to eliminate the lacO mutants prior to DNA sequencing is desirable. Here, we report a simple method that allows screening out of lacO mutants. This method is based on the lack of resistance of lacO mutants to kanamycin under conditions when the kan gene is expressed from a plasmid under control of the lac promoter-operator (lacPO). We show data validating the new approach with sets of known lacId and lacO mutants, and further apply it to the generation of a new collection of spontaneous mutations, where lacO mutants have historically been a significant contributor. PMID:25771873

  20. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for Lin-44/Wnt in C. elegans Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartin, Samantha N.; Hudson, Martin L.; Yingling, Curtis; Ackley, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The C. elegans proteins PTP-3/LAR-RPTP and SDN-1/Syndecan are conserved cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in either ptp-3 or sdn-1 result in low penetrance embryonic developmental defects. Work from other systems has shown that syndecans can function as ligands for LAR receptors in vivo. We used double mutant analysis to test whether ptp-3 and sdn-1 function in a linear genetic pathway during C. elegans embryogenesis. Results We found animals with LOF in both sdn-1 and ptp-3 exhibited a highly penetrant synthetic lethality (SynLet), with only a small percentage of animals surviving to adulthood. Analysis of the survivors demonstrated that these animals had a synergistic increase in the penetrance of embryonic developmental defects. Together, these data strongly suggested PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in parallel during embryogenesis. We subsequently used RNAi to knockdown ~3,600 genes predicted to encode secreted and/or transmembrane molecules to identify genes that interacted with ptp-3 or sdn-1. We found that the Wnt ligand, lin-44, was SynLet with sdn-1, but not ptp-3. We used 4-dimensional time-lapse analysis to characterize the interaction between lin-44 and sdn-1. We found evidence that loss of lin-44 caused defects in the polarization and migration of endodermal precursors during gastrulation, a previously undescribed role for lin-44 that is strongly enhanced by the loss of sdn-1. Conclusions PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in compensatory pathways during C. elegans embryonic and larval development, as simultaneous loss of both genes has dire consequences for organismal survival. The Wnt ligand lin-44 contributes to the early stages of gastrulation in parallel to sdn-1, but in a genetic pathway with ptp-3. Overall, the SynLet phenotype provides a robust platform to identify ptp-3 and sdn-1 interacting genes, as well as other genes that function in development, yet might be missed in traditional forward genetic screens. PMID:25938228

  1. Evolutionary Mutant Models for Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, R. Craig; Cresko, William; Detrich, H. William; Postlethwait, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Although induced mutations in traditional laboratory animals have been valuable as models for human diseases, they have some important limitations. Here we propose a complementary approach to discover genes and mechanisms that might contribute to human disorders: the analysis of evolutionary mutant models whose adaptive phenotypes mimic maladaptive human diseases. If the type and mode of action of mutations favored by natural selection in wild populations are similar to those that contribute to human diseases, then studies in evolutionary mutant models have the potential to identify novel genetic factors and gene-by-environment interactions that affect human health and underlie human disease. PMID:19108930

  2. Connectivity Homology Enables Inter-Species Network Models of Synthetic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Jacunski, Alexandra; Dixon, Scott J; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-10-01

    Synthetic lethality is a genetic interaction wherein two otherwise nonessential genes cause cellular inviability when knocked out simultaneously. Drugs can mimic genetic knock-out effects; therefore, our understanding of promiscuous drugs, polypharmacology-related adverse drug reactions, and multi-drug therapies, especially cancer combination therapy, may be informed by a deeper understanding of synthetic lethality. However, the colossal experimental burden in humans necessitates in silico methods to guide the identification of synthetic lethal pairs. Here, we present SINaTRA (Species-INdependent TRAnslation), a network-based methodology that discovers genome-wide synthetic lethality in translation between species. SINaTRA uses connectivity homology, defined as biological connectivity patterns that persist across species, to identify synthetic lethal pairs. Importantly, our approach does not rely on genetic homology or structural and functional similarity, and it significantly outperforms models utilizing these data. We validate SINaTRA by predicting synthetic lethality in S. pombe using S. cerevisiae data, then identify over one million putative human synthetic lethal pairs to guide experimental approaches. We highlight the translational applications of our algorithm for drug discovery by identifying clusters of genes significantly enriched for single- and multi-drug cancer therapies. PMID:26451775

  3. Declines in the Lethality of Suicide Attempts Explain the Decline in Suicide Deaths in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Spittal, Matthew J.; Pirkis, Jane; Miller, Matthew; Studdert, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the epidemiology of a steep decrease in the incidence of suicide deaths in Australia. Methods National data on suicide deaths and deliberate self-harm for the period 1994–2007 were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. We calculated attempt and death rates for five major methods and the lethality of these methods. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the size and significance of method-specific time-trends in attempts and lethality. Results Hanging, motor vehicle exhaust and firearms were the most lethal methods, and together accounted for 72% of all deaths. The lethality of motor vehicle exhaust attempts decreased sharply (RR?=?0.94 per year, 95% CI 0.93–0.95) while the motor vehicle exhaust attempt rate changed little; this combination of motor vehicle exhaust trends explained nearly half of the overall decline in suicide deaths. Hanging lethality also decreased sharply (RR?=?0.96 per year, 95% CI 0.956–0.965) but large increases in hanging attempts negated the effect on death rates. Firearm lethality changed little while attempts decreased. Conclusion Declines in the lethality of suicide attempts–especially attempts by motor vehicle exhaust and hanging–explain the remarkable decline in deaths by suicide in Australia since 1997. PMID:22957084

  4. Connectivity Homology Enables Inter-Species Network Models of Synthetic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Jacunski, Alexandra; Dixon, Scott J.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic lethality is a genetic interaction wherein two otherwise nonessential genes cause cellular inviability when knocked out simultaneously. Drugs can mimic genetic knock-out effects; therefore, our understanding of promiscuous drugs, polypharmacology-related adverse drug reactions, and multi-drug therapies, especially cancer combination therapy, may be informed by a deeper understanding of synthetic lethality. However, the colossal experimental burden in humans necessitates in silico methods to guide the identification of synthetic lethal pairs. Here, we present SINaTRA (Species-INdependent TRAnslation), a network-based methodology that discovers genome-wide synthetic lethality in translation between species. SINaTRA uses connectivity homology, defined as biological connectivity patterns that persist across species, to identify synthetic lethal pairs. Importantly, our approach does not rely on genetic homology or structural and functional similarity, and it significantly outperforms models utilizing these data. We validate SINaTRA by predicting synthetic lethality in S. pombe using S. cerevisiae data, then identify over one million putative human synthetic lethal pairs to guide experimental approaches. We highlight the translational applications of our algorithm for drug discovery by identifying clusters of genes significantly enriched for single- and multi-drug cancer therapies. PMID:26451775

  5. Gene family encoding the major toxins of lethal Amanita mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Hallen, Heather E; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S; Walton, Jonathan D

    2007-11-27

    Amatoxins, the lethal constituents of poisonous mushrooms in the genus Amanita, are bicyclic octapeptides. Two genes in A. bisporigera, AMA1 and PHA1, directly encode alpha-amanitin, an amatoxin, and the related bicyclic heptapeptide phallacidin, a phallotoxin, indicating that these compounds are synthesized on ribosomes and not by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. alpha-Amanitin and phallacidin are synthesized as proproteins of 35 and 34 amino acids, respectively, from which they are predicted to be cleaved by a prolyl oligopeptidase. AMA1 and PHA1 are present in other toxic species of Amanita section Phalloidae but are absent from nontoxic species in other sections. The genomes of A. bisporigera and A. phalloides contain multiple sequences related to AMA1 and PHA1. The predicted protein products of this family of genes are characterized by a hypervariable "toxin" region capable of encoding a wide variety of peptides of 7-10 amino acids flanked by conserved sequences. Our results suggest that these fungi have a broad capacity to synthesize cyclic peptides on ribosomes. PMID:18025465

  6. Gene family encoding the major toxins of lethal Amanita mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Hallen, Heather E.; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    Amatoxins, the lethal constituents of poisonous mushrooms in the genus Amanita, are bicyclic octapeptides. Two genes in A. bisporigera, AMA1 and PHA1, directly encode ?-amanitin, an amatoxin, and the related bicyclic heptapeptide phallacidin, a phallotoxin, indicating that these compounds are synthesized on ribosomes and not by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. ?-Amanitin and phallacidin are synthesized as proproteins of 35 and 34 amino acids, respectively, from which they are predicted to be cleaved by a prolyl oligopeptidase. AMA1 and PHA1 are present in other toxic species of Amanita section Phalloidae but are absent from nontoxic species in other sections. The genomes of A. bisporigera and A. phalloides contain multiple sequences related to AMA1 and PHA1. The predicted protein products of this family of genes are characterized by a hypervariable “toxin” region capable of encoding a wide variety of peptides of 7–10 amino acids flanked by conserved sequences. Our results suggest that these fungi have a broad capacity to synthesize cyclic peptides on ribosomes. PMID:18025465

  7. [Lethal alveolar echinococcosis in a dog: clinical symptoms and pathology].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Anja; Conraths, Franz J; Schneemann, Christiane; Wienrich, Volker; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate a progressing spread of the fox tapeworm in Germany. Here we report on a case of lethal alveolar echinococcosis in a dog from Brandenburg. The patient was clinically presented with abdominal distension. Ultrasonic examination revealed severe structural alterations of the liver and in a fine needle aspiration cytology larval tape worm fragments were suspected. Explorative laparotomy suggested inoperable lesions and the animal was euthanized with unfavorable prognosis. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic echinococcosis. PCR analysis of the liver identified Echinococcus multilocularis, the so called "small fox tapeworm". The infection, reportable in Germany, is an important zoonotic disease that is transmitted by accidentally ingested tapeworm eggs shed by foxes or dogs. The prevalence between 7.6% and 16.7% in the fox population of Brandenburg is significantly lower than in the endemic regions of South and Southwest Germany, however, it is suspected to increase. This underlines the importance of a regional monitoring in domestic animals living in close contact to humans. In this regard, especially dogs should be taken into consideration as a potential definitive host and source of infection for people. PMID:24199383

  8. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Steven H.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin clean-up, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  9. Evolution of the Drosophila Feminizing Switch Gene Sex-lethal

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Thomas W.; Dorsett, Maia; Sun, Sha; Harrison, Melissa M.; Dines, Jessica; Sefton, Louise; Megna, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) controls all aspects of female development. Since melanogaster males lacking Sxl appear wild type, Sxl would seem to be functionally female specific. Nevertheless, in insects as diverse as honeybees and houseflies, Sxl seems not to determine sex or to be functionally female specific. Here we describe three lines of work that address the questions of how, when, and even whether the ancestor of melanogaster Sxl ever shed its non-female-specific functions. First, to test the hypothesis that the birth of Sxl's closest paralog allowed Sxl to lose essential ancestral non-female-specific functions, we determined the CG3056 null phenotype. That phenotype failed to support this hypothesis. Second, to define when Sxl might have lost ancestral non-female-specific functions, we isolated and characterized Sxl mutations in D. virilis, a species distant from melanogaster and notable for the large amount of Sxl protein expression in males. We found no change in Sxl regulation or functioning in the 40+ MY since these two species diverged. Finally, we discovered conserved non-sex-specific Sxl mRNAs containing a previously unknown, potentially translation-initiating exon, and we identified a conserved open reading frame starting in Sxl male-specific exon 3. We conclude that Drosophila Sxl may appear functionally female specific not because it lost non-female-specific functions, but because those functions are nonessential in the laboratory. The potential evolutionary relevance of these nonessential functions is discussed. PMID:20837995

  10. Lethal Lullabies: A History of Opium Use in Infants.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Poppy extract accompanied the human infant for more than 3 millenia. Motives for its use included excessive crying, suspected pain, and diarrhea. In antiquity, infantile sleeplessness was regarded as a disease. When treatment with opium was recommended by Galen, Rhazes, and Avicenna, baby sedation made its way into early medical treatises and pediatric instructions. Dabbing maternal nipples with bitter substances and drugging the infant with opium were used to hasten weaning. A freerider of gum lancing, opiates joined the treatment of difficult teething in the 17th century. Foundling hospitals and wet-nurses used them extensively. With industrialization, private use was rampant among the working class. In German-speaking countries, poppy extracts were administered in soups and pacifiers. In English-speaking countries, proprietary drugs containing opium were marketed under names such as soothers, nostrums, anodynes, cordials, preservatives, and specifics and sold at the doorstep or in grocery stores. Opium's toxicity for infants was common knowledge; thousands of cases of lethal intoxication had been reported from antiquity. What is remarkable is that the willingness to use it in infants persisted and that physicians continued to prescribe it for babies. Unregulated trade, and even that protected by governments, led to greatly increased private use of opiates during the 19th century. Intoxication became a significant factor in infant mortality. As late as 1912, the International Hague Convention forced governments to implement legislation that effectively curtailed access to opium and broke the dangerous habit of sedating infants. PMID:26163533

  11. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Labs (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the equipment, the Marines were given training in sticky foam characterization, toxicology, safety issues, cleanup and waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin cleanup, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  12. Potentially-lethal damage and radioprotection in human cells exposed to californium-252

    SciTech Connect

    Schroy, C.B.; Goud, S.N.; Magura, C.; Feola, J.M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Cultured human T-1E cells were irradiated with californium-252 neutrons and gamma rays. When 2 mm caffeine was present in the medium for 47 h after irradiation cell survival (assayed by colony formation) was decreased significantly. When 2 m dimethylsulfoxide was present during the irradiations radioprotection was observed using the same assay. The caffeine data indicate that potentially-lethal lesions exist in cells after californium exposure and that these lesions can be made lethal when they would otherwise be repaired. The DMSO data indicate that radioprotection from californium exposure can be achieved and that scanvengable free radicals play an important role in Cf-252 lethality.

  13. Amino Acid Substitutions Improve the Immunogenicity of H7N7HA Protein and Protect Mice against Lethal H7N7 Viral Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ashok raj, Kattur Venkatachalam; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza A H7N7/NL/219/03 virus creates a serious pandemic threat to human health because it can transmit directly from domestic poultry to humans and from human to human. Our previous vaccine study reported that mice when immunized intranasally (i.n) with live Bac-HA were protected from lethal H7N7/NL/219/03 challenge, whereas incomplete protection was obtained when administered subcutaneously (s.c) due to the fact that H7N7 is a poor inducer of neutralizing antibodies. Interestingly, our recent vaccine studies reported that mice when vaccinated subcutaneously with Bac-HA (H7N9) was protected against both H7N9 (A/Sh2/2013) and H7N7 virus challenge. HA1 region of both H7N7 and H7N9 viruses are differ at 15 amino acid positions. Among those, we selected three amino acid positions (T143, T198 and I211) in HA1 region of H7N7. These amino acids are located within or near the receptor binding site. Following the selection, we substituted the amino acid at these three positions with amino acids found on H7N9HA wild-type. In this study, we evaluate the impact of amino acid substitutions in the H7N7 HA-protein on the immunogenicity. We generated six mutant constructs from wild-type influenza H7N7HA cDNA by site directed mutagenesis, and individually expressed mutant HA protein on the surface of baculovirus (Bac-HAm) and compared their protective efficacy of the vaccines with Bac-H7N7HA wild-type (Bac-HA) by lethal H7N7 viral challenge in a mouse model. We found that mice immunized subcutaneously with Bac-HAm constructs T143A or T198A-I211V or I211V-T143A serum showed significantly higher hemagglutination inhibition and neutralization titer against H7N7 and H7N9 viruses when compared to Bac-HA vaccinated mice groups. We also observed low level of lung viral titer, negligible weight loss and complete protection against lethal H7N7 viral challenge. Our results indicated that amino acid substitution at position 143 or 211 improve immunogenicity of H7N7HA vaccine against H7N7/NL/219/03 virus. PMID:26030920

  14. The Light Sensitivity of ATP Synthase Mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    E-print Network

    for production or stability of the monocistronic atpH mRNA encoding CFO-III. In this and other ATP synthase in these experimental conditions is demonstrated. RESULTS The ac46 Mutant Lacks CFO-III Due to the Absence of the atp defect is the absence of CFO-III, a major chloroplast- encoded CFO subunit (Lemaire and Wollman, 1989a

  15. Regulation of Excitation Energy in a Wheat Mutant Deficient in Light-Harvesting Pigment Protein Complex 1

    PubMed Central

    Duysen, Murray E.; Freeman, Thomas P.; Williams, Norman D.; Olson, Linda L.

    1984-01-01

    Chloroplasts of the CD3 wheat mutant were deficient primarily in chlorophyll of light harvesting pigment proteins (LHPP) 1 and 2 and CP1a. The reduced level of protein associated with chlorophyll of LHPP1 and LHPP2 and the reduced level of low molecular weight polypeptides between 23 and 29 kilodaltons confirmed that the CD3 mutant was deficient in the LHPP complex. The high fluorescence emission ratio at 740 (F740) to 686 nanometers (F686) observed from chloroplasts of normal wheat following light induced phosphorylation of the LHPP complex was not noted from mutant chloroplasts. The long wavelength peak fluorescence emission (F740) was shifted to a shorter wavelength peak (F725) and was reduced in intensity compared to that of normal wheat thylakoids. The ratio of variable fluorescence to maximum fluorescence, a measure of PSII photochemical efficiency, was the same for the normal wheat and mutant leaves. The ratios of uncoupled photosystem I/photosystem II electron transport rates for mutant and normal wheat chloroplasts were similar at saturating light suggesting that absorbed excitation energy was distributed to the two photosystem reaction centers of the mutant in a similar manner as in the normal wheat. Proteins of the LHPP complex were differentially phosphorylated by action of a membrane protein kinase when both normal wheat and CD3 mutant thylakoids were irradiated without an electron transport chain acceptor. Even though the F740/F686 ratio was low in mutant thylakoids, the phosphorylation of the 27-kilodalton LHPP polypeptide was consistent with the mutant being in a state II condition. The data gave rise to the suggestion that the F740/F686 ratio might not indicate excitation energy distribution to the two photosystems in the mutant. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16663882

  16. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with pH-Sensitive Nanovalves for Delivery of Moxifloxacin Provide Improved Treatment of Lethal Pneumonic Tularemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Zilu; Clemens, Daniel L; Lee, Bai-Yu; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Horwitz, Marcus A; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2015-11-24

    We have optimized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) functionalized with pH-sensitive nanovalves for the delivery of the broad spectrum fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin (MXF) and demonstrated its efficacy in treating Francisella tularensis infections both in vitro and in vivo. We compared two different nanovalve systems, positive and negative charge modifications of the mesopores, and different loading conditions-varying pH, cargo concentration, and duration of loading-and identified conditions that maximize both the uptake and release capacity of MXF by MSNs. We have demonstrated in macrophage cell culture that the MSN-MXF delivery platform is highly effective in killing F. tularensis in infected macrophages, and in a mouse model of lethal pneumonic tularemia, we have shown that the drug-loaded MSNs are much more effective in killing F. tularensis than an equivalent amount of free MXF. PMID:26435204

  17. Rhizobium Lipooligosaccharides Rescue a Carrot Somatic Embryo Mutant.

    PubMed Central

    De Jong, AJ; Heidstra, R; Spaink, HP; Hartog, MV; Meijer, EA; Hendriks, T; Schiavo, FL; Terzi, M; Bisseling, T; Van Kammen, A; De Vries, SC

    1993-01-01

    At a nonpermissive temperature, somatic embryos of the temperature-sensitive (ts) carrot cell mutant ts11 only proceed beyond the globular embryo stage in the presence of medium conditioned by wild-type embryos. The causative component in the conditioned medium has previously been identified as a 32-kD acidic endochitinase. In search of a function for this enzyme in plant embryogenesis, several compounds that contain oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine were tested for their ability to promote ts11 embryo formation. Of these compounds, only the Rhizobium lipooligosaccharides or nodulation (Nod) factors were found to be effective in rescuing the formation of ts11 embryos. These results suggest that N-acetylglucosamine-containing lipooligosaccharides from bacterial origin can mimic the effect of the carrot endochitinase. This endochitinase may therefore be involved in the generation of plant analogs of the Rhizobium Nod factors. PMID:12271077

  18. MAIZE MUTANT MAPPING WITH SSR MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zea mays provides an ideal system for characterizing genes to determine genetic structure and expression in a higher crop plant. Thousands of independently isolated mutants in maize are available for research. We are facilitating this resource by establishing linkage information between these genes ...

  19. Yeast mutants overproducing iso-cytochromes c

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, F.; Cardillo, T.S.; Errede, B.; Friedman, L.; McKnight, G.; Stiles, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    For over 15 years, the iso-cytochrome c system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to investigate a multitude of problems in genetics and molecular biology. More recently, attention has been focused on using mutants for examining translation and transcriptional processes and for probing regulatory regions governing gene expression. In an effort to explore regulatory mechanisms and to investigate mutational alterations that lead to increased levels of gene products, we have isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce cytochrome c. In this paper we have briefly summarized background information of some essential features of the iso-cytochrome c system and we have described the types of mutants that overproduce iso-1-cytochrome c or iso-2-cytochrome c. Genetic procedures and recombinant DNA procedures were used to demonstrate that abnormally high amounts of gene products occur in mutants as result of duplications of gene copies or of extended alteration of regulatory regions. The results summarized in this paper point out the requirements of gross mutational changes or rearrangements of chromosomal segments for augmenting gene products.

  20. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Clark, David P. (Carbondale, IL)

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  1. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease. PMID:12933892

  2. Post Quantum Cryptography from Mutant Prime Knots

    E-print Network

    Annalisa Marzuoli; Giandomenico Palumbo

    2010-10-11

    By resorting to basic features of topological knot theory we propose a (classical) cryptographic protocol based on the `difficulty' of decomposing complex knots generated as connected sums of prime knots and their mutants. The scheme combines an asymmetric public key protocol with symmetric private ones and is intrinsecally secure against quantum eavesdropper attacks.

  3. Corynebacterium diphtheriae putative tellurite-resistance protein (CDCE8392_0813) contributes to the intracellular survival in human epithelial cells and lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; Antunes, Camila Azevedo; dos Santos, Cintia Silva; Pereira, José Augusto Adler; Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; de Luna, Maria das Graças; Azevedo, Vasco; Hirata, Raphael; Burkovski, Andreas; Asad, Lídia Maria Buarque de Oliveira; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the aetiologic agent of diphtheria, also represents a global medical challenge because of the existence of invasive strains as causative agents of systemic infections. Although tellurite (TeO32-) is toxic to most microorganisms, TeO32--resistant bacteria, including C. diphtheriae, exist in nature. The presence of TeO32--resistance (TeR) determinants in pathogenic bacteria might provide selective advantages in the natural environment. In the present study, we investigated the role of the putative TeR determinant (CDCE8392_813gene) in the virulence attributes of diphtheria bacilli. The disruption of CDCE8392_0813 gene expression in the LDCIC-L1 mutant increased susceptibility to TeO32- and reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide), but not to other antimicrobial agents. The LDCIC-L1 mutant also showed a decrease in both the lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans and the survival inside of human epithelial cells compared to wild-type strain. Conversely, the haemagglutinating activity and adherence to and formation of biofilms on different abiotic surfaces were not regulated through the CDCE8392_0813 gene. In conclusion, the CDCE8392_813 gene contributes to the TeR and pathogenic potential of C. diphtheriae. PMID:26107188

  4. A null c-myc mutation causes lethality before 10.5 days of gestation in homozygotes and reduced fertility in heterozygous female mice.

    PubMed

    Davis, A C; Wims, M; Spotts, G D; Hann, S R; Bradley, A

    1993-04-01

    To directly assess c-myc function in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and embryogenesis, we have used homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells to generate both heterozygous and homozygous c-myc mutant ES cell lines. The mutation is a null allele at the protein level. Mouse chimeras from seven heterozygous cell lines transmitted the mutant allele to their offspring. The analysis of embryos from two clones has shown that the mutation is lethal in homozygotes between 9.5 and 10.5 days of gestation. The embryos are generally smaller and retarded in development compared with their littermates. Pathologic abnormalities include the heart, pericardium, neural tube, and delay or failure in turning of the embryo. Heterozygous females have reduced fertility owing to embryonic resorption before 9.5 days of gestation in 14% of implanted embryos. c-Myc protein is necessary for embryonic survival beyond 10.5 days of gestation; however, it appears to be dispensable for cell division both in ES cell lines and in the embryo before that time. PMID:8458579

  5. The relationship between dNTP pool levels and mutagenesis in an Escherichia coli NDP kinase mutant

    PubMed Central

    Nordman, Jared; Wright, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Loss of nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk) function in Escherichia coli results in an increased frequency of spontaneous mutation and an imbalance in dNTP pool levels. It is presumed that the imbalance in dNTP pool levels is responsible for the mutator phenotype of an E. coli ndk mutant. A human homologue of Ndk and potential suppressor of tumor metastasis, nm23-H2, can complement the mutagenic phenotype of an E. coli ndk mutant. Here, we show that the antimutagenic property of nm23-H2 in E. coli is independent of dNTP pool levels, indicating that dNTP pool imbalance is not responsible for the mutator phenotype associated with the loss of ndk function. We have identified multiple genetic interactions between ndk and genes involved in the metabolism of dUTP, a potentially mutagenic precursor of thymidine biosynthesis. We show that loss of ndk function is synergistic with a dut-1 mutation and synthetically lethal with the loss of thymidine kinase function. Our results suggest that Ndk prevents the accumulation of dUTP in vivo. Based on these results and biochemical studies of Ndk, we propose that the mutagenic phenotype of an ndk mutant is caused by excess misincorporation of uracil in place of thymidine combined with a defect in the uracil base excision pathway. PMID:18621712

  6. Fission yeast dam1-A8 mutant is resistant to and rescued by an anti-microtubule agent

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Karen; Masuda, Hirohisa; Dhut, Susheela; Toda, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    The Dam1/DASH outer kinetochore complex is required for high-fidelity chromosome segregation in budding and fission yeast. Unlike budding yeast, the fission yeast complex is non-essential, however it promotes bipolar microtubule attachment in conjunction with microtubule-depolymerising kinesin-8 Klp5 and Klp6. Here, we screened for dam1 temperature sensitive mutants in a klp5 null background and identified dam1-A8 that contains two amino acid substitutions in the C-terminus (H126R and E149G). dam1-A8klp5 mutant cells display massive chromosome missegregation with lagging chromosomes and monopolar attachment of sister chromatids to one SPB (spindle pole body). Unexpectedly contrary to a deletion mutant that is hypersensitive to microtubule-destabilising drugs, dam1-A8 is resistant and furthermore the temperature sensitivity of dam1-A8klp5 is rescued by addition of these drugs. This indicates that the hyper-stabilised rigidity of kinetochore-spindle mal-attachments is the primary cause of lethality. Our result shows that fine-tuning of Dam1 activity is essential for chromosome bi-orientation.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Perithecial Development Mutants in Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas E.

    1978-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants that block perithecial development in Neurospora crassa are described. Several classes of mutants have been isolated after UV mutagenesis, and those that block perithecial development when used as the female (protoperithecial) component of a cross have been further characterized. These mutants fall into 29 complementation groups. Twelve of the 33 mutants block development at the protoperithecial stage; no other clustering of block points is observed. Many of the mutants show an altered vegetative growth rate as well; in several mutants this lower growth rate cosegregates with the female sterile phenotype. Only one mutant also blocks development of the perithecium when used as the conidial parent. None of the mutants are temperature sensitive; two can be suppressed by growth on a complete crossing medium. There is no indication that the mutants are at or in the mating-type locus, nor are any of the mutants mating-type specific. Genetic mosaics have been formed using mixtures of mutant and marked wild-type nuclei; no mutants are cell autonomous by this criterion. The significance of these results in terms of "developmental" mutants isolated in other organisms and in relation to models of eukaryotic development is discussed. PMID:17248793

  8. Lethal levels of selected water quality variables to larval and juvenile Lost River and shortnose suckers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, M.K.; Monda, D.P.; Bellerud, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource managers hypothesize that occasional fish kills during summer-early fall in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, may be linked to unfavorable water quality conditions created by massive algal blooms. In a preliminary effort to address this concern, short-term (96-h-long) laboratory tests were conducted with larval and juvenile Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) suckers to determine the upper median lethal concentrations (LC50s; also referred to as median tolerance limits) for pH, un-ionized ammonia, and water temperature, and the lower LC50s for dissolved oxygen. The mean LC50s varied among species and life stages as follows: for pH, 10.30-10.39; for un-ionized ammonia, 0.48-1.06 mg litre-1; for temperature, 30.35-31.82??C; and for dissolved oxygen, 1.34-2.10 mg litre-1. Comparisons of 95% confidence limits indicated that, on average, the 96-h LC50s were not significantly different from those computed for shorter exposure times (i.e., 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h). According to two-way analysis of variance, LC50s for the four water quality variables did not vary significantly (p > 0.05) between fish species. However, LC50s for pH (exposure times of 24 h and 48 h) and dissolved oxygen (exposure times of 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h) differed significantly (p ??? 0.05) between life stages, whereas LC50s for un-ionized ammonia and water temperature did not exhibit significant differences. In general, larvae were more sensitive than juveniles to high pH and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. When compared to ambient water quality conditions in Upper Klamath Lake, our results strongly suggest that near-anoxic conditions associated with the senescence phase of algal blooms are most likely to cause high mortalities of larval and juvenile suckers.

  9. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in KIF14 as a novel cause of an autosomal recessive lethal fetal ciliopathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Filges, I; Nosova, E; Bruder, E; Tercanli, S; Townsend, K; Gibson, W T; Röthlisberger, B; Heinimann, K; Hall, J G; Gregory-Evans, C Y; Wasserman, W W; Miny, P; Friedman, J M

    2014-09-01

    Gene discovery using massively parallel sequencing has focused on phenotypes diagnosed postnatally such as well-characterized syndromes or intellectual disability, but is rarely reported for fetal disorders. We used family-based whole-exome sequencing in order to identify causal variants for a recurrent pattern of an undescribed lethal fetal congenital anomaly syndrome. The clinical signs included intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), severe microcephaly, renal cystic dysplasia/agenesis and complex brain and genitourinary malformations. The phenotype was compatible with a ciliopathy, but not diagnostic of any known condition. We hypothesized biallelic disruption of a gene leading to a defect related to the primary cilium. We identified novel autosomal recessive truncating mutations in KIF14 that segregated with the phenotype. Mice with autosomal recessive mutations in the same gene have recently been shown to have a strikingly similar phenotype. Genotype-phenotype correlations indicate that the function of KIF14 in cell division and cytokinesis can be linked to a role in primary cilia, supported by previous cellular and model organism studies of proteins that interact with KIF14. We describe the first human phenotype, a novel lethal ciliary disorder, associated with biallelic inactivating mutations in KIF14. KIF14 may also be considered a candidate gene for allelic viable ciliary and/or microcephaly phenotypes. PMID:24128419

  10. Shape of dose-survival curves for mammalian cells and repair of potentially lethal damage analyzed by hypertonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlit, W.; Heyder, I.R.

    1981-09-01

    During the usual procedure of testing cell survival by colony-forming ability, repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) takes place. By incubating the cells in hypertonic suspension a certain part of this repair can be inhibited, leading to an exponential dose-survival curve as expected from the Poisson distribution of lethal events in the cells. If such a hypertonic treatment is performed after increasing intervals following irradiation with x rays, curves with increasing shoulder length are obtained. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics of this repair shows that PLD is repaired for about 1 h after irradiation by a saturated repair system which eliminates about one lesion per 15 min per cell independent of the applied absorbed dose. PLD not eliminated by this last system is repaired by an unsaturated system with a time constant of several hours. Repair of PLD after x irradiation proceeds quantitatively in this way in plateau-phase cells suspended in a conditioned medium, which seems optimal for such repair. If these cells are suspended after irradiation in normal nutrient medium a certain fraction of the PLD is transformed into irreparable damage. The final survival after repair in nutrient medium is then identical with that obtained by the usual measurement of colony-forming ability on nutrient agar. This indicates that the shoulder in dose-survival curves for plateau phase cells ispartly due to repair of PLD and partly due to manifestation of this damage during repair time.

  11. TLR signaling controls lethal encephalitis in WNV-infected brain

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri, Amir H.; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Flynn, Claudia; Berger, Michael; Xiao, Nengming; Fox, Howard S.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to be activated in Central Nervous System (CNS) viral infections and are recognized to be a critical component in innate immunity. Several reports state a role for particular TLRs in various CNS viral infections. However, excessive TLR activation was previously reported by us in correlation with a pathogenic, rather than a protective, outcome, in a model of SIV encephalitis. Here we aimed at understanding the impact of TLR-mediated pathways by evaluating the early course of pathogenesis in the total absence of TLR signaling during CNS viral infections. We utilized a mouse model of sublethal West Nile virus (WNV) infection. WNV is an emerging neurotropic flavivirus, and a significant global cause of viral encephalitis. The virus was peripherally injected into animals that simultaneously lacked two key adaptor molecules of TLR signaling, MyD88 and TRIF. On day 2 pi (post infection), MyD88/Trif?/? mice showed an increased susceptibility to WNV infection, and revealed an impairment in innate immune cytokines, when compared to wild type mice (WT). By day 6 pi, there was an increase in viral burden and robust expression of inflammatory cytokines as well as higher cell infiltration into the CNS in MyD88/Trif?/?, when compared to infected WT. A drastic increase in microglia activation, astrogliosis, and inflammatory trafficking were also observed on day 6 pi in MyD88/Trif?/?. Our observations show a protective role for TLR signaling pathways in preventing lethal encephalitis at early stages of WNV infection. PMID:24928618

  12. Recombinant raccoon pox vaccine protects mice against lethal plague

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osorio, J.E.; Powell, T.D.; Frank, R.S.; Moss, K.; Haanes, E.J.; Smith, S.R.; Rocke, T.E.; Stinchcomb, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Using a raccoon poxvirus (RCN) expression system, we have developed new recombinant vaccines that can protect mice against lethal plague infection. We tested the effects of a translation enhancer (EMCV-IRES) in combination with a secretory (tPA) signal or secretory (tPA) and membrane anchoring (CHV-gG) signals on in vitro antigen expression of F1 antigen in tissue culture and the induction of antibody responses and protection against Yersinia pestis challenge in mice. The RCN vector successfully expressed the F1 protein of Y. pestis in vitro. In addition, the level of expression was increased by the insertion of the EMCV-IRES and combinations of this and the secretory signal or secretory and anchoring signals. These recombinant viruses generated protective immune responses that resulted in survival of 80% of vaccinated mice upon challenge with Y. pestis. Of the RCN-based vaccines we tested, the RCN-IRES-tPA-YpF1 recombinant construct was the most efficacious. Mice vaccinated with this construct withstood challenge with as many as 1.5 million colony forming units of Y. pestis (7.7??104LD50). Interestingly, vaccination with F1 fused to the anchoring signal (RCN-IRES-tPA-YpF1-gG) elicited significant anti-F1 antibody titers, but failed to protect mice from plague challenge. Our studies demonstrate, in vitro and in vivo, the potential importance of the EMCV-IRES and secretory signals in vaccine design. These molecular tools provide a new approach for improving the efficacy of vaccines. In addition, these novel recombinant vaccines could have human, veterinary, and wildlife applications in the prevention of plague. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Origin of the lethal gas burst from Lake Monoun, Cameroun

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Devine, J.D.; Tchua, F.M.; Presser, F.M.; Pringle, M.K.W.; Evans, William C.

    1987-01-01

    On 15 August, 1984, a lethal gas burst issued from a submerged 96-m-deep crater in Lake Monoun in Cameroun, western Africa, killing 37 people. The event was associated with a landslide from the eastern crater rim, which slumped into deep water. Waters below 50 m are anoxic, dominated by high Fe2+ (???600 mg/l) and HCO3- (??? 1900 mg/l), anoxic and supersaturated with siderite, which is a major component of the crater floor sediments. The unusually high Fe2+ levels are attributed to reduction of laterite-derived ferric iron gradually brought into the lake as loess and in river input. Sulfur compounds are below detection limits in both water and gas. Gases effervescing from depressurized deep waters are dominantly CO2 with minor CH4, having ??13C of -7.18 and -54.8 per mil, respectively. Bacterial decomposition of organic matter may account for the methane, but 14C of lake water indicates that only 10% of the carbon is modern, giving an apparent age of 18,000 years. The dominant source of carbon is therefore attributed to long-term emission of CO2 as volcanic exhalation from vents within the crater, which led to gradual build-up of HCO3- in the lake. The density stratification of the lake may have been upset by an earthquake and underwater landslide on 15 August, which triggered overturn of the lake and caused nucleation of CO2 in the deep water. The resultant ebullition of CO2 from deep lake waters led to a gas burst at the surface and locally generated a water wave up to 5 m high. People travelling through the gas cloud were asphyxiated, presumably from CO2, and suffered skin discoloration from unidentified components. ?? 1987.

  14. Cellulose fermentation by an asporogenous mutant and an ethanol-tolerant mutant of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Tailliez, P.; Girard, H.; Longin, R.; Beguin, P.; Millet, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Two mutants of Clostridium thermocellum were isolated after UV light mutagenesis. Mutant A1, selected as asporogenous, exhibited a fermentation pattern similar to that of the wild type. However, at pH 6.5, the mutant degraded 12% more cellulose than did the wild type, leading to enhanced ethanol production. Mutant 647, selected as ethanol tolerant, was able to grow in medium containing 4% ethanol. During the early stage of the exponential growth phase, ethanol was produced as the main product, up to a concentration of about 9 g/liter. After 3 days of culture, 48.3 g (89% of the initial amount) of degraded cellulose per liter was fermented into 12.7 g of ethanol per liter.

  15. Effects of DDE on experimentally poisoned free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis): Lethal brain concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Kroll, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Adult female free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) were collected at Bracken Cave, Texas, and shipped to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Treated mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) containing 107 ppm DDE were fed to 17 bats; five other bats were fed untreated mealworms. After 40 days on dosage, during which one dosed bat was killed accidentally, four dosed bats were frozen and the remaining 17 were starved to death. The objective was to elevate brain levels of DDE to lethality and measure these concentrations. After the feeding period, dosed bats weighed less than controls. After starvation, the body condition of dosed bats was poorer than that of controls even though there was no difference in the amounts of carcass fat. During starvation, dosed bats lost weight faster than controls. Also, four dosed bats exhibited the prolonged tremoring that characterizes DDE poisoning. DDE increased in brains of starving bats as fat was metabolized. The estimated mean brain concentration of DDE diagnostic of death was 519 ppm with a range of 458-564 ppm. These values resemble diagnostic levels known for two species of passerine birds, but they exceed published levels for two free-tailed bats from Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico.

  16. Anthrax lethal toxin suppresses high glucose induced VEGF over secretion through a post-translational mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Wang, Xin; Xie, Ping; Yuan, Song-Tao; Liu, Qing-Huai

    2015-01-01

    AIM To prove anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) blocks the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation by degrading the MAPK/ERK kinases (MEKs) to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. METHODS Human adult retinal pigmented epithelium (ARPE) cells were cultured and treated with normal glucose, high glucose or high glucose with LeTx for additional 24, 48 or 72h for viable cell count. Total RNA from the ARPE was isolated for reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The conditioned medium of ARPE cells treated in different group for 48h was filtered and diluted to detect the concentration of VEGF by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. Evaluate the role of MEK/MAPK pathway in the secretion of VEGF by immunoblotting. RESULTS In this study, we proved high glucose induced activation of the MAPK extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and p38 in the ARPE cell line was blocked by anthrax LeTx. LeTx also inhibited high glucose induced ARPE cell over proliferation. CONCLUSION LeTx suppressed high glucose induced VEGF over secretion in the ARPE cells, mainly through a post-translational mechanism. PMID:26085990

  17. Lethal Thermal Impact at Periphery of Pyroclastic Surges: Evidences at Pompeii

    PubMed Central

    Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe; Petrone, Pierpaolo; Pappalardo, Lucia; Guarino, Fabio M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The evaluation of mortality of pyroclastic surges and flows (PDCs) produced by explosive eruptions is a major goal in risk assessment and mitigation, particularly in distal reaches of flows that are often heavily urbanized. Pompeii and the nearby archaeological sites preserve the most complete set of evidence of the 79 AD catastrophic eruption recording its effects on structures and people. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigate the causes of mortality in PDCs at Pompeii and surroundings on the bases of a multidisciplinary volcanological and bio-anthropological study. Field and laboratory study of the eruption products and victims merged with numerical simulations and experiments indicate that heat was the main cause of death of people, heretofore supposed to have died by ash suffocation. Our results show that exposure to at least 250°C hot surges at a distance of 10 kilometres from the vent was sufficient to cause instant death, even if people were sheltered within buildings. Despite the fact that impact force and exposure time to dusty gas declined toward PDCs periphery up to the survival conditions, lethal temperatures were maintained up to the PDCs extreme depositional limits. Conclusions/Significance This evidence indicates that the risk in flow marginal zones could be underestimated by simply assuming that very thin distal deposits, resulting from PDCs with poor total particle load, correspond to negligible effects. Therefore our findings are essential for hazard plans development and for actions aimed to risk mitigation at Vesuvius and other explosive volcanoes. PMID:20559555

  18. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...cover the entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment....

  19. Herpes simplex virus 1 interaction with Toll-like receptor 2 contributes to lethal encephalitis

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    Herpes simplex virus 1 interaction with Toll-like receptor 2 contributes to lethal encephalitis-1) is the most commonly diagnosed cause of sporadic (nonepidemic) encephalitis in humans. Without hosts, including disseminated infection, pneumonia, and hepatitis, encephalitis is commonly seen

  20. Lethal Effects of Helianthemum lippii (L.) on Acanthamoeba castellanii Cysts in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Badria, F.A.; Hetta, M.H.; Sarhan, Rania M.; Ezz El-Din, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. commonly cause Acanthamoeba keratitis which is typically associated with the wear of contact lenses. Therefore, finding an economic, efficient, and safe therapy of natural origin is of outmost importance. This study examined the in vitro lethal potential of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Helianthemum lippii (L.) (sun roses) against Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts isolated from patients with amoebic keratitis. Both extracts proved to be potent as regard to their lethal effects on A. castellanii cysts with comparable results to chlorhexidine. The ethyl acetate was more promising with cumulative lethality. It showed a highly significant lethal percentage along the duration of treatment. The analysis of the more potent ethyl acetate extract revealed the presence of 2.96 mg/100 g of total phenolics, 0.289 mg/100 ml of total flavonoids and 37 mg/100 mg of total tannins which highlighted their phytomedicinal role. PMID:25031463

  1. Synthetic Lethal Interaction between Oncogenic KRAS Dependency and STK33 Suppression in Human Cancer Cells

    E-print Network

    Scholl, Claudia

    An alternative to therapeutic targeting of oncogenes is to perform “synthetic lethality” screens for genes that are essential only in the context of specific cancer-causing mutations. We used high-throughput RNA interference ...

  2. Variability in mutational fitness effects prevents full lethal transitions in large quasispecies populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Simó, Carles; Martínez, Regina; Solé, Ricard V.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2014-04-01

    The distribution of mutational fitness effects (DMFE) is crucial to the evolutionary fate of quasispecies. In this article we analyze the effect of the DMFE on the dynamics of a large quasispecies by means of a phenotypic version of the classic Eigen's model that incorporates beneficial, neutral, deleterious, and lethal mutations. By parameterizing the model with available experimental data on the DMFE of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Tobacco etch virus (TEV), we found that increasing mutation does not totally push the entire viral quasispecies towards deleterious or lethal regions of the phenotypic sequence space. The probability of finding regions in the parameter space of the general model that results in a quasispecies only composed by lethal phenotypes is extremely small at equilibrium and in transient times. The implications of our findings can be extended to other scenarios, such as lethal mutagenesis or genomically unstable cancer, where increased mutagenesis has been suggested as a potential therapy.

  3. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality Daniel J 30, 2014) Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets

  4. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment. (2) F...

  5. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment. (2) F...

  6. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment. (2) F...

  7. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...entire germ cell cycle. The offspring of these females are scored for lethal effects corresponding to the effects on mature sperm, mid or late stage spermatids, early spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia at the time of treatment. (2) F...

  8. Liver damage by the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) lethal factor.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, H; Kikuchi, T; Konno, K

    1990-01-01

    Upon autopsy of mice injected with the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) lethal factor, a change in color of the liver, swelling of the gall bladder and jaundice were observed. After administration of the lethal factor into mice, activities of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), acid phosphatase (ACP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were significantly elevated in serum. Hepatic ALP also increased markedly but hepatic GOT, GPT and ACP showed a tendency to decrease. Activity of hepatic LDH first decreased and then returned to control level. Histopathological studies showed that severe degenerative changes such as enlargement and necrosis of hepatocytes were caused in the mouse liver by the lethal factor. These results strongly suggested that the A. planci lethal factor is a potent hepatotoxin. PMID:2389250

  9. Forum in immunology Live attenuated mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    E-print Network

    Forum in immunology Live attenuated mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as candidate vaccines against tuberculosis Vasan K. Sambandamurthy, William R. Jacobs Jr. * Department of Microbiology to manipulate Mycobacterium tuberculosis have led to the construction of defined mutants and to the study

  10. Mutant p53: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand

    PubMed Central

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Del Sal, Giannino

    2015-01-01

    Encoded by the mutated variants of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene, mutant p53 proteins are getting an increased experimental support as active oncoproteins promoting tumor growth and metastasis. p53 missense mutant proteins are losing their wild-type tumor suppressor activity and acquire oncogenic potential, possessing diverse transforming abilities in cell and mouse models. Whether various mutant p53s differ in their oncogenic potential has been a matter of debate. Recent discoveries are starting to uncover the existence of mutant p53 downstream programs that are common to different mutant p53 variants. In this review, we discuss a number of studies on mutant p53, underlining the advantages and disadvantages of alternative experimental approaches that have been used to describe the numerous mutant p53 gain-of-function activities. Therapeutic possibilities are also discussed, taking into account targeting either individual or multiple mutant p53 proteins in human cancer.

  11. Identification of potential synthetic lethal genes to p53 using a computational biology approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of genes that are synthetic lethal to p53 is an important strategy for anticancer therapy as p53 mutations have been reported to occur in more than half of all human cancer cases. Although genome-wide RNAi screening is an effective approach to finding synthetic lethal genes, it is costly and labor-intensive. Methods To illustrate this approach, we identified potentially druggable genes synthetically lethal for p53 using three microarray datasets for gene expression profiles of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines, one next-generation sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, and one gene expression data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) project. We selected the genes which encoded kinases and had significantly higher expression in the tumors with functional p53 mutations (somatic mutations) than in the tumors without functional p53 mutations as the candidates of druggable synthetic lethal genes for p53. We identified important regulatory networks and functional categories pertinent to these genes, and performed an extensive survey of literature to find experimental evidence that support the synthetic lethality relationships between the genes identified and p53. We also examined the drug sensitivity difference between NCI-60 cell lines with functional p53 mutations and NCI-60 cell lines without functional p53 mutations for the compounds that target the kinases encoded by the genes identified. Results Our results indicated that some of the candidate genes we identified had been experimentally verified to be synthetic lethal for p53 and promising targets for anticancer therapy while some other genes were putative targets for development of cancer therapeutic agents. Conclusions Our study indicated that pre-screening of potential synthetic lethal genes using gene expression profiles is a promising approach for improving the efficiency of synthetic lethal RNAi screening. PMID:24025726

  12. Reexamination of alcohol dehydrogenase structural mutants in Drosophila using protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollocher, H.; Place, A.R.

    1987-06-01

    Using protein blotting and an immuno-overlay procedure, the authors have reexamined the cross-reacting material produced by ADH null-activity mutants generated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Of the 13 mutants, 11 have an immunodetectable polypeptide of wild-type size. The native and urea denatured isoelectric points (pI) establish that 7 of 13 of the mutations have no effect on protein charge. The electrophoretic mobilities of each variant on increasing percent acrylamide gels (Ferguson analysis), reveal that 9 of the 11 immunodetectable mutations have retained the ability form dimers under native conditions. None of the inactive mutant proteins has the ability to form the adduct-bound isozyme. The authors have found no correlation between protein pI and i vivo stability. The observed frequencies of specific charge class alterations do not dispute the propensity of G:A transitions previously found for EMS mutagenesis.

  13. Phenotype of a Temperature-Sensitive, Respiration-Deficient (cyt) Mutant of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Setsuko; Iwamoto, Yoshihisa; Nagao, Minako; Sugimura, Takashi; Ohsumi, Masako

    1972-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive respiration-deficient mutant of yeast lacks hemoproteins and accumulates coproporphyrin III when cultivated at elevated temperatures. Cells grown at 20 C respired normally and contained cytochromes a, b, and c. Cells grown at 35 C showed respiration-deficient mutant characters; they did not respire, lacked cytochromes, and accumulated coproporphyrin III. Addition of protoporphyrin IX or protohemin IX to the culture medium restored the respiratory activity of this mutant during growth at 35 C. The activities of various enzymes, including succinate-2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP), reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2)-DCPIP, succinate-cytochrome c, and NADH2-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, and cytochrome oxidase, and the cytochrome c content of cells cultured in various conditions were determined. Changes in the number and structure of mitochondria were associated with changes in respiratory activity. Images PMID:4333381

  14. Phenotype of a temperature-sensitive, respiration-deficient (cyt) mutant of yeast.

    PubMed

    Miyake, S; Iwamoto, Y; Nagao, M; Sugimura, T; Osumi, M

    1972-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive respiration-deficient mutant of yeast lacks hemoproteins and accumulates coproporphyrin III when cultivated at elevated temperatures. Cells grown at 20 C respired normally and contained cytochromes a, b, and c. Cells grown at 35 C showed respiration-deficient mutant characters; they did not respire, lacked cytochromes, and accumulated coproporphyrin III. Addition of protoporphyrin IX or protohemin IX to the culture medium restored the respiratory activity of this mutant during growth at 35 C. The activities of various enzymes, including succinate-2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP), reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH(2))-DCPIP, succinate-cytochrome c, and NADH(2)-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, and cytochrome oxidase, and the cytochrome c content of cells cultured in various conditions were determined. Changes in the number and structure of mitochondria were associated with changes in respiratory activity. PMID:4333381

  15. Isolation of viral coat protein mutants with altered assembly and aggregation properties

    PubMed Central

    Peabody, David S.; Al-Bitar, Lina

    2001-01-01

    A method was developed to screen bacteria for synthesis of mutant proteins with altered assembly and solubility properties using bacteriophage MS2 coat protein as a model self-associating protein. Colonies expressing coat protein from a plasmid were covered with an agarose overlay under conditions that caused the lysis of some of the cells in each colony. The proteins thus liberated diffused through the overlay at rates depending on their molecular sizes. After transfer of the proteins to a nitrocellulose membrane, probing with coat protein-specific antiserum revealed spots whose sizes and intensities were related to the aggregation state of coat protein. The method was employed in the isolation of assembly defective mutants and to find soluble variants of an aggregation-prone coat protein mutant. PMID:11713333

  16. CHO glycosylation mutants as potential host cells to produce therapeutic proteins with enhanced efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiqing; Chan, Kah Fai; Haryadi, Ryan; Bardor, Muriel; Song, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    CHO glycosylation mutants, pioneered by Stanley and co-workers, have proven to be valuable tools in glycobiology and biopharmaceutical research. Here we aim to provide a summary of our efforts to isolate industrially applicable CHO glycosylation mutants, termed CHO-gmt cells, using cytotoxic lectins and zinc-finger nuclease technology. The genetic defects in the glycosylation machinery in these cells lead to the production of recombinant glycoproteins with consistent and unique glycan structures. In addition, these mutant cells can be easily adapted to serum-free medium in suspension cultures, the condition used by the biotech industry for large-scale production of recombinant therapeutics. In light of the critical impact of glycosylation on biopharmaceutical performances, namely, safety and efficacy, the CHO-gmt lines have enormous potential in producing glycoprotein therapeutics with optimal glycosylation profiles, thus, representing a panel of ideal host cell lines for producing recombinant biopharmaceuticals with improved safety profiles and enhanced efficacy. PMID:23142953

  17. Mutations in SID2, a novel gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cause synthetic lethality with sic1 deletion and may cause a defect during S phase.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, M D; Muńoz, C X; Knox, K S; Williams, B E; Lu, L L; Cross, F R; Vallen, E A

    2001-01-01

    SIC1 encodes a nonessential B-type cyclin/CDK inhibitor that functions at the G1/S transition and the exit from mitosis. To understand more completely the regulation of these transitions, mutations causing synthetic lethality with sic1 Delta were isolated. In this screen, we identified a novel gene, SID2, which encodes an essential protein that appears to be required for DNA replication or repair. sid2-1 sic1 Delta strains and sid2-21 temperature-sensitive strains arrest preanaphase as large-budded cells with a single nucleus, a short spindle, and an approximately 2C DNA content. RAD9, which is necessary for the DNA damage checkpoint, is required for the preanaphase arrest of sid2-1 sic1 Delta cells. Analysis of chromosomes in mutant sid2-21 cells by field inversion gel electrophoresis suggests the presence of replication forks and bubbles at the arrest. Deleting the two S phase cyclins, CLB5 and CLB6, substantially suppresses the sid2-1 sic1 Delta inviability, while stabilizing Clb5 protein exacerbates the defects of sid2-1 sic1 Delta cells. In synchronized sid2-1 mutant strains, the onset of replication appears normal, but completion of DNA synthesis is delayed. sid2-1 mutants are sensitive to hydroxyurea indicating that sid2-1 cells may suffer DNA damage that, when combined with additional insult, leads to a decrease in viability. Consistent with this hypothesis, sid2-1 rad9 cells are dead or very slow growing even when SIC1 is expressed. PMID:11560884

  18. CARDIOLIPIN CONTENT OF WILD TYPE AND MUTANT YEASTS IN RELATION TO MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Jakovcic, S.; Getz, G. S.; Rabinowitz, M.; Jakob, H.; Swift, H.

    1971-01-01

    The phospholipid composition of various strains of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and several of their derived mitochondrial mutants grown under conditions designed to induce variations in the complement of mitochondrial membranes has been examined. Wild type and petite (cytoplasmic respiratory deficient) yeasts were fractionated into various subcellular fractions, which were monitored by electron microscopy and analyzed for cytochrome oxidase (in wild type) and phospholipid composition. 90% or more of the phospholipid, cardiolipin was found in the mitochondrial membranes of wild type and petite yeast. Cardiolipin content differed markedly under various growth conditions. Stationary yeast grown in glucose had better developed mitochondria and more cardiolipin than repressed log phase yeast. Aerobic yeast contained more cardiolipin than anaerobic yeast. Respiration-deficient cytoplasmic mitochondrial mutants, both suppressive and neutral, contained less cardiolipin than corresponding wild types. A chromosomal mutant lacking respiratory function had normal cardiolipin content. Log phase cells grown in galactose and lactate, which do not readily repress the development of mitochondrial membranes, contained as much cardiolipin as stationary phase cells grown in glucose. Cytoplasmic mitochondrial mutants respond to changes in the glucose concentration of the growth medium by variations in their cardiolipin content in the same way as wild type yeast does under similar growth conditions. It is concluded that cardiolipin content of yeast is correlated with, and is a good indicator of, the state of development of mitochondrial membrane. PMID:4322761

  19. Changes in photosynthesis and pigmentation in an agp deletion mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiaoling; Wu, Qingyu; Wu, Guifang; Zhao, Nanming

    2003-03-01

    The agp gene encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is involved in cyanobacterial glycogen synthesis. By in vitro DNA recombination technology, agp deletion mutant (agp-) of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was constructed. This mutation led to a complete absence of glycogen biosynthesis. As compared with WT (wild type), a 60% decrease in ratio of the c-phycocyanine/chlorophyll a and no significant change in the carotenoid/chlorophyll a were observed in agp- cells. The agp- mutant had 38% less photosynthetic capacity when grown in light over 600 micromol m(-2) s(-1). Under lower light intensity, the final biomass of the mutant strain was only 1.1 times of that of the WT strain under mixotrophic condition after 6 d culture. Under higher light intensity, however, the final biomass of the WT strain under mixotrophic conditions was 3 times that of the mutant strain after 6 d culture and 1.5 times under photoautotrophic conditions. The results indicate that there is a minimum requirement for glycogen synthesis for normal growth and development in cyanobacteria. PMID:12882559

  20. Cocaine toxicity: concurrent influence of dopaminergic, muscarinic and sigma receptors in mediating cocaine-induced lethality.

    PubMed

    Ritz, M C; George, F R

    1997-02-01

    The concurrent influence of dopaminergic, sigma and muscarinic neurotransmitter systems in mediating cocaine-induced lethality is predicted by previous receptor binding results from our laboratories. The present results demonstrate that pharmacological manipulations of these predicted neurotransmitter systems alter the occurrence of cocaine-induced lethality in C57BL/6J mice. The dopamine reuptake inhibitor bupropion increased the number of occurrences of lethality produced by (-) cocaine, while the dopaminergic D1 antagonist SCH 23390, the muscarinic M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and the sigma ligand (+) SKF 10047 all significantly, but only partially, antagonized (-) cocaine-induced lethality. In addition, the protective effects against lethality of the drug combinations SCH 23390 + pirenzepine or SCH 23390 + SKF 10047 were greater than any of these drugs used alone. These results are consistent with those from the previous receptor binding studies, and provide converging supportive evidence that the lethal effects of cocaine depend upon concurrent interactions with dopaminergic, muscarinic M1 and sigma receptor sites. PMID:9085400

  1. Pyruvate carboxylase from Rhizobium etli: mutant characterization, nucleotide sequence, and physiological role.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, M F; Encarnación, S; Araíza, G; Vargas, M C; Dávalos, A; Peralta, H; Mora, Y; Mora, J

    1996-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), a biotin-dependent enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, was hypothesized to play an important anaplerotic role in the growth of Rhizobium etli during serial subcultivation in minimal media containing succinate (S. Encarnación, M. Dunn, K. Willms, and J. Mora, J. Bacteriol. 177:3058-3066, 1995). R. etli and R. tropici pyc::Tn5-mob mutants were selected for their inability to grow in minimal medium with pyruvate as a sole carbon source. During serial subcultivation in minimal medium containing 30 mM succinate, the R. etli parent and pyc mutant strains exhibited similar decreases in growth rate with each subculture. Supplementation of the medium with biotin prevented the growth decrease of the parent but not the mutant strain, indicating that PYC was necessary for the growth of R. etli under these conditions. The R. tropici pyc mutant grew normally in subcultures regardless of biotin supplementation. The symbiotic phenotypes of the pyc mutants from both species were similar to those of the parent strains. The R. etli pyc was cloned, sequenced, and found to encode a 126-kDa protein of 1,154 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous to other PYC sequences, and the catalytic domains involved in carboxylation, pyruvate binding, and biotinylation are conserved. The sequence and biochemical data show that the R. etli PYC is a member of the alpha4, homotetrameric, acetyl coenzyme A-activated class of PYCs. PMID:8830693

  2. New mutant phenotype data curation system in the Saccharomyces Genome Database

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Maria C.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Nash, Robert; Wong, Edith; Binkley, Gail; Engel, Stacia R.; Hitz, Benjamin; Hong, Eurie L.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) organizes and displays molecular and genetic information about the genes and proteins of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutant phenotype screens have been the starting point for a large proportion of yeast molecular biological studies, and are still used today to elucidate the functions of uncharacterized genes and discover new roles for previously studied genes. To greatly facilitate searching and comparison of mutant phenotypes across genes, we have devised a new controlled-vocabulary system for capturing phenotype information. Each phenotype annotation is represented as an ‘observable’, which is the entity, or process that is observed, and a ‘qualifier’ that describes the change in that entity or process in the mutant (e.g. decreased, increased, or abnormal). Additional information about the mutant, such as strain background, allele name, conditions under which the phenotype is observed, or the identity of relevant chemicals, is captured in separate fields. For each gene, a summary of the mutant phenotype information is displayed on the Locus Summary page, and the complete information is displayed in tabular format on the Phenotype Details Page. All of the information is searchable and may also be downloaded in bulk using SGD's Batch Download Tool or Download Data Files Page. In the future, phenotypes will be integrated with other curated data to allow searching across different types of functional information, such as genetic and physical interaction data and Gene Ontology annotations. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:20157474

  3. REGISTRRATION OF AN INDUCED SEMIDWARF MUTANT OF RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mutant for semidwarfism was induced in the long grain Drew. The mutant, designated DR1, was 27 cm shorter than its parent and 7330 compared to 8060 kg/ha for its parent. Grain dimensions and amylose content were similar to the parent. The new recessive mutant was nonallic to sd1, the worldwide ...

  4. Cancer Cell Allele-Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    E-print Network

    Vazquez, Alexei

    Cancer Cell Article Allele-Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation Xin Yu,1,4,6 Alexei Vazquez,1 Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using as either DNA contact mutants (e.g., p53R273H ) when the mutation occurs in a DNA binding residue

  5. Isolation and characterization of a low phytic acid rice mutant reveals a mutation in the rice orthologue of maize MIK.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Andaya, C B; Newman, J W; Goyal, S S; Tai, T H

    2008-11-01

    Using a forward genetics approach, we isolated two independent low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants, N15-186 and N15-375. Both mutants are caused by single gene, recessive non-lethal mutations, which result in approximately 75% (N15-186) and 43% (N15-375) reductions in seed phytic acid (inositol hexakisphosphate). High-performance liquid chromatography and GC-MS analysis of seed extracts from N15-186 indicated that, in addition to phytic acid, inositol monophosphate was significantly reduced whereas inorganic phosphorus and myo-inositol were greatly increased when compared with wild-type. The changes observed in N15-186 resemble those previously described for the maize lpa3 mutant. Analysis of N15-375 revealed changes similar to those observed in previously characterized rice lpa1 mutants (i.e. significant reduction in phytic acid and corresponding increase in inorganic phosphorus with little or no change in inositol phosphate intermediates or myo-inositol). Further genetic analysis of the N15-186 mutant indicated that the mutation, designated lpa N15-186, was located in a region on chromosome 3 between the microsatellite markers RM15875 and RM15907. The rice orthologue of maize lpa3, which encodes a myo-inositol kinase, is in this interval. Sequence analysis of the N15-186 allele of this orthologue (Os03g52760) revealed a single base pair change (C/G to T/A) in the first exon of the gene, which results in a nonsense mutation. Our results indicate that lpa N15-186 is a mutant allele of the rice myo-inositol kinase (OsMIK) gene. Identification and characterization of lpa mutants, such as N15-186, will facilitate studies on the regulation of phytic acid biosynthesis and accumulation and help address questions concerning the contribution of the inositol lipid-dependent and independent biosynthetic pathways to the production of seed phytic acid. PMID:18726583

  6. Activity of the response regulator CiaR in mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 altered in acetyl phosphate production

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Patrick; Meiers, Marina; Brückner, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    The two-component regulatory system (TCS) CiaRH of Streptococcus pneumoniae is implicated in competence, ß-lactam resistance, maintenance of cell integrity, bacteriocin production, host colonization, and virulence. Depending on the growth conditions, CiaR can be highly active in the absence of its cognate kinase CiaH, although phosphorylation of CiaR is required for DNA binding and gene regulation. To test the possibility that acetyl phosphate (AcP) could be the alternative phosphodonor, genes involved in pyruvate metabolism were disrupted to alter cellular levels of acetyl phosphate. Inactivating the genes of pyruvate oxidase SpxB, phosphotransacetylase Pta, and acetate kinase AckA, resulted in very low AcP levels and in strongly reduced CiaR-mediated gene expression in CiaH-deficient strains. Therefore, alternative phosphorylation of CiaR appears to proceed via AcP. The AcP effect on CiaR is not detected in strains with CiaH. Attempts to obtain elevated AcP by preventing its degradation by acetate kinase AckA, were not successful in CiaH-deficient strains with a functional SpxB, the most important enzyme for AcP production in S. pneumoniae. The ciaH-spxB-ackA mutant producing intermediate amounts of AcP could be constructed and showed a promoter activation, which was much higher than expected. Since activation was dependent on AcP, it can apparently be used more efficiently for CiaR phosphorylation in the absence of AckA. Therefore, high AcP levels in the absence of CiaH and AckA may cause extreme overexpression of the CiaR regulon leading to synthetic lethality. AckA is also involved in a regulatory response, which is mediated by CiaH. Addition of acetate to the growth medium switch CiaH from kinase to phosphatase. This switch is lost in the absence of AckA indicating metabolism of acetate is required, which starts with the production of AcP by AckA. Therefore, AckA plays a special regulatory role in the control of the CiaRH TCS. PMID:25642214

  7. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    SciTech Connect

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be seriously injured during violent confrontations. The very low density of the high expansion foam also makes it more suitable for indoor use. This paper summarizes the results of the project.

  8. Serine:glyoxylate aminotransferase mutant of barley

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Murray, A.; Joy, K.; Lea, P.

    1987-08-01

    A photorespiratory mutant of barley (LaPr 85/84), deficient in both of the major peaks of serine:glyoxylate aminotransferase activity detected in the wild type, also lacks serine:pyruvate and asparagine:glyoxylate aminotransferase activities. Genetic analysis of the mutation demonstrated that these three activities are all carried on the same enzyme. The mutant, when placed in air, accumulated a large pool of serine, showed the expected rate (50%) of ammonia release during photorespiration but produced CO/sub 2/ at twice the wild type rate when it was fed (/sup 14/C) glyoxylate. Compared with the wild type, LaPr 85/84 exhibited abnormal transient changes in chlorophyll a fluorescence when the CO/sub 2/ concentration of the air was altered, indicating that the rates of the fluorescence quenching mechanisms were affected in vivo by the lack of this enzyme.

  9. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/? and ?/? mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  10. Lethal and sublethal effects of marine sediment extracts on fish cells and chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Marsha L.; Kocan, Richard M.

    1984-03-01

    The cost of conducting conventional chronic bioassays with every potentially toxic compound found in marine ecosystems is prohibitive; therefore short-term toxicity tests which can be used for rapid screening were developed. The tests employ cultured fish cells to measure lethal, sublethal or genotoxic effects of pure compounds and complex mixtures. The sensitivity of these tests has been proven under laboratory conditions; the following study used two of these tests, the anaphase aberration test and a cytotoxicity assay, under field conditions. Sediment was collected from 97 stations within Puget Sound, Washington. Serial washings of the sediment in methanol and dichloromethane yielded an organic extract which was dried, dissolved in DMSO and incubated as a series of dilutions with rainbow trout gonad (RTG-2) cells. The toxic effects of the extract were measured by examining the rate of cell proliferation and the percentage of damaged anaphase figures. Anaphase figures were considered to be abnormal if they exhibited non-disjunctions, chromosome fragments, or chromosome bridges. A second cell line (bluegill fry, BF-2) was also tested for cell proliferation and was included because, unlike the RTG-2 cell line, it contains little or no mixed function oxygenase activity. Of 97 stations tested, 35 showed no genotoxic activity, 42 showed high genotoxic activity (P?.01) and the remainder were intermediate. Among the toxic sites were several deep water stations adjacent to municipal sewage outfalls and four urban waterways contaminated by industrial and municipal effluents. Extracts from areas that showed genotoxic effects also inhibited cell proliferation and were cytotoxic to RTG-2 cells. Few effects were noted in the MFO deficient BF-2 cells. Short term in vitro tests provide aquatic toxicologists with a versatile and cost effective tool for screening complex environments. Through these tests one can identify compounds or geographic regions that exhibit high cytotoxic or genotoxic potential.

  11. Genetic and physiological characterization of a Rhizobium etli mutant strain unable to synthesize poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed Central

    Cevallos, M A; Encarnación, S; Leija, A; Mora, Y; Mora, J

    1996-01-01

    Rhizobium etli accumulates poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in symbiosis and in free life. PHB is a reserve material that serves as a carbon and/or electron sink when optimal growth conditions are not met. It has been suggested that in symbiosis PHB can prolong nitrogen fixation until the last stages of seed development, but experiments to test this proposition have not been done until now. To address these questions in a direct way, we constructed an R. etli PHB-negative mutant by the insertion of an Omega-Km interposon within the PHB synthase structural gene (phaC). The identification and sequence of the R. etli phaC gene are also reported here. Physiological studies showed that the PHB-negative mutant strain was unable to synthesize PHB and excreted more lactate, acetate, pyruvate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, fumarate, and malate than the wild-type strain. The NAD+/NADH ratio in the mutant strain was lower than that in the parent strain. The oxidative capacity of the PHB-negative mutant was reduced. Accordingly, the ability to grow in minimal medium supplemented with glucose or pyruvate was severely diminished in the mutant strain. We propose that in free life PHB synthesis sequesters reductive power, allowing the tricarboxylic acid cycle to proceed under conditions in which oxygen is a limiting factor. In symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris, the PHB-negative mutant induced nodules that prolonged the capacity to fix nitrogen. PMID:8626293

  12. Further studies on O sub 2 -resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelitch, I. )

    1990-02-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M{sub 4} progeny of an O{sub 2}-resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O{sub 2} has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M{sub 3} mutant produced M{sub 4} progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F{sub 1} progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M{sub 3} mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO{sub 2} as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO{sub 2}-free 21% O{sub 2} and 36% less in CO{sub 2}-free 42% O{sub 2} compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less {sup 14}CO{sub 2} per (1-{sup 14}C)glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O{sub 2} where the stoichiometry of CO{sub 2} release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  13. Catechol oxygenases of Pseudomonas putida mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Bayly, R C; McKenzie, D I

    1976-01-01

    Investigation of a mutant strain of Pseudomonas putida NCIB 10015, strain PsU-E1, showed that it had lost the ability to produce catechol 1,2-oxygenase after growth with catechol. Additional mutants of both wild-type and mutant strains PsU-E1 have been isolated that grow on catechol, but not on benzoate, yet still form a catechol 1,2-oxygenase when exposed to benzoate. These findings indicate that either there are separately induced catechol 1,2-oxygenase enzymes, or that there are two separate inducers for the one catechol 1,2-oxygenase enzyme. Comparisons of the physical properties of the catechol 1,2-oxygenases formed in response to the two different inducers show no significant differences, so it is more probable that the two proteins are the product of the same gene. Sufficient enzymes of the ortho-fission pathway are induced in the wild-type strain by the initial substrate benzoate (or an early intermediate) to commit that substrate to metabolism by ortho fission exclusively. A mechanism exists that permits metabolism of catechol by meta fission if the ortho-fission enzymes are unable to prevent its intracellular accumulation. PMID:956121

  14. Evaluation and design of non-lethal laser dazzlers utilizing microcontrollers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Keith Jack

    Current non-lethal weapons suffer from an inability to meet requirements for uses across many fields and purposes. The safety and effectiveness of these weapons are inadequate. New concepts have provided a weapon utilizing lasers to flashblind a target's visual system. Minimal research and testing have been conducted to investigate the efficiency and safety of these weapons called laser dazzlers. Essentially a laser dazzler is comprised of a laser beam that has been diverged with the use of a lens to expand the beam creating an intensely bright flashlight. All laser dazzlers to date are incapable of adjusting to external conditions automatically. This is important, because the power of these weapons need to change according to distance and light conditions. At long distances, the weapon is rendered useless because the laser beam has become diluted. At near distances, the weapon is too powerful causing permanent damage to the eye because the beam is condensed. Similarly, the eye adapts to brightness by adjusting the pupil size, which effectively limits the amount of light entering the eye. Laser eye damage is determined by the level of irradiance entering the eye. Therefore, a laser dazzler needs the ability to adjust output irradiance to compensate for the distance to the target and ambient light conditions. It was postulated if an innovative laser dazzler design could adjust the laser beam divergence then the irradiance at the eye could be optimized for maximum vision disruption with minimal risk of permanent damage. The young nature of these weapons has lead to the rushed assumptions of laser wavelengths (color) and pulsing frequencies to cause maximum disorientation. Research provided key values of irradiance, wavelength, pulsing frequency and functions for the optical lens system. In order for the laser dazzler to continuously evaluate the external conditions, luminosity and distance sensors were incorporated into the design. A control system was devised to operate the mechanical components meeting calculated values. Testing the conceptual laser dazzlers illustrated the complexities of the system. A set irradiance value could be met at any distance and light condition, although this was accomplished by less than ideal methods. The final design included two lasers and only one optical system. The optical system was only capable of providing constant irradiance of one laser or the other allowing only single laser operation. For dual laser operation, the optical system was calibrated to offset the losses of each laser as distance was changed. Ultimately, this provided a constant combined irradiance with a decreasing green irradiance and increasing red irradiance as distance was increasing. Future work should include enhancements to the mechanical components of the laser dazzler to further refine accuracy. This research was intended to provide a proof of concept and did so successfully.

  15. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusion of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ?10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.

  16. Interaction of ?A3-Crystallin with Deamidated Mutants of ?A- and ?B-Crystallins

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Ekta; Hegde, Shylaja; Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion; Srivastava, Om

    2015-01-01

    Interaction among crystallins is required for the maintenance of lens transparency. Deamidation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in crystallins, which results in incorrect interaction and leads to aggregate formation. Various studies have established interaction among the ?- and ?-crystallins. Here, we investigated the effects of the deamidation of ?A- and ?B-crystallins on their interaction with ?A3-crystallin using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) methods. SPR analysis confirmed adherence of WT ?A- and WT ?B-crystallins and their deamidated mutants with ?A3-crystallin. The deamidated mutants of ?A–crystallin (?A N101D and ?A N123D) displayed lower adherence propensity for ?A3-crystallin relative to the binding affinity shown by WT ?A-crystallin. Among ?B-crystallin mutants, ?B N78D displayed higher adherence propensity whereas ?B N146D mutant showed slightly lower binding affinity for ?A3-crystallin relative to that shown by WT ?B-crystallin. Under the in vivo condition (FLIM-FRET), both ?A-deamidated mutants (?A N101D and ?A N123D) exhibited strong interaction with ?A3-crystallin (32±4% and 36±4% FRET efficiencies, respectively) compared to WT ?A-crystallin (18±4%). Similarly, the ?B N78D and ?B N146D mutants showed strong interaction (36±4% and 22±4% FRET efficiencies, respectively) with ?A3-crystallin compared to 18±4% FRET efficiency of WT ?B-crystallin. Further, FLIM-FRET analysis of the C-terminal domain (CTE), N-terminal domain (NTD), and core domain (CD) of ?A- and ?B-crystallins with ?A3-crystallin suggested that interaction sites most likely reside in the ?A CTE and ?B NTD regions, respectively, as these domains showed the highest FRET efficiencies. Overall, results suggest that similar to WT ?A- and WT?B-crystallins, the deamidated mutants showed strong interactionfor ?A3-crystallin. Variable in vitro and in vivo interactions are most likely due to the mutant’s large size oligomers, reduced hydrophobicity, and altered structures. Together, the results suggest that deamidation of ?-crystallin may facilitate greater interaction and the formation of large oligomers with other crystallins, and this may contribute to the cataractogenic mechanism. PMID:26657544

  17. New therapeutic strategies for BRAF mutant colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic BRAF mutations are found in ~10% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) and predict poor prognosis. Although BRAF inhibitors have demonstrated striking efficacy in BRAF mutant melanomas, BRAF inhibitor monotherapy is ineffective in BRAF mutant CRC. Over the past few years, studies have begun to define the molecular mechanisms underlying the relative resistance of BRAF mutant CRC to BRAF inhibitors, leading to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that are showing promising clinical activity in initial clinical trials. Our current understanding of the mechanisms of BRAF inhibitor resistance in BRAF mutant CRC and the therapeutic approaches currently in clinical trials for BRAF mutant CRC are reviewed herein.

  18. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Matthew D.; Wilder, Julie A.; Mega, William M.; Hutt, Julie A.; Kuehl, Philip J.; Valderas, Michelle W.; Chew, Lawrence L.; Liang, Bertrand C.; Squires, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-?FF-315-E308D) and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel), elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 ?g. PMID:26207820

  19. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew D; Wilder, Julie A; Mega, William M; Hutt, Julie A; Kuehl, Philip J; Valderas, Michelle W; Chew, Lawrence L; Liang, Bertrand C; Squires, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-?FF-315-E308D) and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel), elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 ?g. PMID:26207820

  20. Targeted disruption of the Walker–Warburg syndrome gene Pomt1 in mouse results in embryonic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Willer, Tobias; Prados, Belén; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Renner-Müller, Ingrid; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; Lommel, Mark; Coloma, Antonio; Valero, M. Carmen; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Tanner, Widmar; Wolf, Eckhard; Strahl, Sabine; Cruces, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    O-mannosylation is an important protein modification in eukaryotes that is initiated by an evolutionarily conserved family of protein O-mannosyltransferases. The first mammalian protein O-mannosyltransferase gene described was the human POMT1. Mutations in the hPOMT1 gene are responsible for Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS), a severe recessive congenital muscular dystrophy associated with defects in neuronal migration that produce complex brain and eye abnormalities. During embryogenesis, the murine Pomt1 gene is prominently expressed in the neural tube, the developing eye, and the mesenchyme. These sites of expression correlate with those in which the main tissue alterations are observed in WWS patients. We have inactivated a Pomt1 allele by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells and produced chimeras transmitting the defect allele to offspring. Although heterozygous mice were viable and fertile, the total absence of Pomt1–/– pups in the progeny of heterozygous intercrosses indicated that this genotype is embryonic lethal. An analysis of the mutant phenotype revealed that homozygous Pomt1–/– mice suffer developmental arrest around embryonic day (E) 7.5 and die between E7.5 and E9.5. The Pomt1–/– embryos present defects in the formation of Reichert's membrane, the first basement membrane to form in the embryo. The failure of this membrane to form appears to be the result of abnormal glycosylation and maturation of dystroglycan that may impair recruitment of laminin, a structural component required for the formation of Reichert's membrane in rodents. The targeted disruption of mPomt1 represents an example of an engineered deletion of a known glycosyltransferase involved in O-mannosyl glycan synthesis. PMID:15383666

  1. Multi-locus phylogeny of lethal amanitas: Implications for species diversity and historical biogeography

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lethal amanitas (Amanita section Phalloideae) are a group of wild, fatal mushrooms causing many poisoning cases worldwide. However, the diversity and evolutionary history of these lethal mushrooms remain poorly known due to the limited sampling and insufficient gene fragments employed for phylogenetic analyses. In this study, five gene loci (nrLSU, ITS, rpb2, ef1-? and ?-tubulin) with a widely geographic sampling from East and South Asia, Europe, North and Central America, South Africa and Australia were analysed with maximum-likelihood, maximum-parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. Biochemical analyses were also conducted with intention to detect amatoxins and phalloidin in 14 representative samples. Result Lethal amanitas were robustly supported to be a monophyletic group after excluding five species that were provisionally defined as lethal amanitas based on morphological studies. In lethal amanitas, 28 phylogenetic species were recognised by integrating molecular phylogenetic analyses with morphological studies, and 14 of them represented putatively new species. The biochemical analyses indicated a single origin of cyclic peptide toxins (amatoxins and phalloidin) within Amanita and suggested that this kind of toxins seemed to be a synapomorphy of lethal amanitas. Molecular dating through BEAST and biogeographic analyses with LAGRANGE and RASP indicated that lethal amanitas most likely originated in the Palaeotropics with the present crown group dated around 64.92 Mya in the early Paleocene, and the East Asia–eastern North America or Eurasia–North America–Central America disjunct distribution patterns were primarily established during the middle Oligocene to Miocene. Conclusion The cryptic diversity found in this study indicates that the species diversity of lethal amanitas is strongly underestimated under the current taxonomy. The intercontinental sister species or sister groups relationships among East Asia and eastern North America or Eurasia–North America–Central America within lethal amanitas are best explained by the diversification model of Palaeotropical origin, dispersal via the Bering Land Bridge, followed by regional vicariance speciation resulting from climate change during the middle Oligocene to the present. These findings indicate the importance of both dispersal and vicariance in shaping the intercontinental distributions of these ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:24950598

  2. Purification and characterization of a lethal factor in venom from the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci).

    PubMed

    Shiomi, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, H; Kikuchi, T

    1988-01-01

    A lethal factor in venom of the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) was obtained in an electrophoretically pure state by chromatography on CM-cellulose and Sephadex G-100. The purified lethal factor is a basic (pI 10.6) glycoprotein (carbohydrate content 3.5%). The mol. wt was estimated to be 20,000 by gel filtration or 25,000 by SDS-disc electrophoresis, suggesting that the lethal factor has no subunit structure. Despite its basicity, the lethal factor was richer in acidic amino acids than in basic amino acids. The lethal factor had an LD50 of 0.43 mg/kg (i.p. injection into mice). Hemolytic, edema-forming and capillary permeability-increasing activities, though very weak, were also exhibited by the lethal factor, while hemorrhagic and phospholipase A activities were not present. PMID:3245052

  3. Isolation and Characterization of NaCl-Sensitive Mutants of Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Zuleta, Luiz Fernando G.; Italiani, Valéria C. S.; Marques, Marilis V.

    2003-01-01

    An attempt to characterize Caulobacter crescentus genes important for the response to high concentrations of NaCl was initiated by the isolation of mutants defective in survival in the presence of 85 mM NaCl. A transposon Tn5 library was screened, and five strains which contained different genes disrupted by the transposon were isolated. Three of the mutants had the Tn5 in genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, one had the Tn5 in the nhaA gene, which encodes a Na+/H+ antiporter, and one had the Tn5 in the ppiD gene, which encodes a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase. All the mutant strains showed severe growth arrest in the presence of 85 mM NaCl, but only the nhaA mutant showed decreased viability under these conditions. All the mutants except the nhaA mutant showed a slightly reduced viability in the presence of 40 mM KCl, but all the strains showed a more severe reduction in viability in the presence of 150 mM sucrose, suggesting that they are defective in responding to osmotic shock. The promoter regions of each disrupted gene were cloned in lacZ reporter vectors, and the pattern of expression in response to NaCl and sucrose was determined; this showed that both agents induced ppiD and nhaA gene expression but did not induce the other genes. Furthermore, the ppiD gene was not induced by heat shock, indicating that it does not belong to the ?32 regulon, as opposed to what was observed for its Escherichia coli homolog. PMID:12788696

  4. Sex-lethal, master and slave: a hierarchy of germ-line sex determination in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Oliver, B; Kim, Y J; Baker, B S

    1993-11-01

    Female sex determination in the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster is regulated by genes functioning in the soma as well as genes that function within the germ line. Genes known or suspected to be involved in germ-line sex determination in Drosophila melanogaster have been examined to determine if they are required upstream or downstream of Sex-lethal+, a known germ-line sex determination gene. Seven genes required for female-specific splicing of germ-line Sex-lethal+ pre-mRNA are identified. These results together with information about the tissues in which these genes function and whether they control sex determination and viability or just sex determination in the germ line have been used to deduce the genetic hierarchy regulating female germ-line sex determination. This hierarchy includes the somatic sex determination genes transformer+, transformer-2+ and doublesex+ (and by inference Sex-lethal+), which control a somatic signal required for female germ-line sex determination, and the germ-line ovarian tumor genes fused+, ovarian tumor+, ovo+, sans fille+, and Sex-lethal+, which are involved in either the reception or interpretation of this somatic sex determination signal. The fused+, ovarian tumor+, ovo+ and sans fille+ genes function upstream of Sex-lethal+ in the germ line. PMID:8187645

  5. Efficacy of ST-246 versus lethal poxvirus challenge in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Grosenbach, Douglas W.; Berhanu, Aklile; King, David S.; Mosier, Stacie; Jones, Kevin F.; Jordan, Robert A.; Bolken, Tove’ C.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    The threat of smallpox as a bioweapon and the emerging threat of human monkeypox, among other poxviral diseases, highlight the need for effective poxvirus countermeasures. ST-246, which targets the F13L protein in vaccinia virus and its homologs in other orthopoxvirus species, provides full protection from lethal poxviral disease in numerous animal models and seems to be safe in humans. All previous evaluations of ST-246 efficacy have been in immunocompetent animals. However, the risk of severe poxviral disease is greater in immunodeficient hosts. Here we report on the efficacy of ST-246 in preventing or treating lethal poxviral disease in immunodeficient mice. After lethal challenge with the Western Reserve strain of vaccinia, Nude, SCID, and JH knockout mice additionally depleted of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were not fully protected by ST-246, although survival was significantly extended. However, CD4+ T cell deficient, CD8+ T cell deficient, JH knockout, and JH knockout mice also deficient for CD4+ or CD8+ T cells survived lethal challenge when treated with ST-246 starting on the day of challenge. Delaying treatment until 72 h after infection reduced ST-246 efficacy in some models but provided full protection from lethal challenge in most. These findings suggest that ST-246 may be effective in controlling smallpox or other pathogenic orthopoxviruses in some immunodeficient human populations for whom the vaccine is contraindicated. PMID:20080762

  6. Terrorist Attacks Escalate in Frequency and Fatalities Preceding Highly Lethal Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Andy; Sainudiin, Raazesh; Sibley, Chris G.; Schimel, Jeff; Webber, David

    2014-01-01

    Highly lethal terrorist attacks, which we define as those killing 21 or more people, account for 50% of the total number of people killed in all terrorist attacks combined, yet comprise only 3.5% of terrorist attacks. Given the disproportionate influence of these incidents, uncovering systematic patterns in attacks that precede and anticipate these highly lethal attacks may be of value for understanding attacks that exact a heavy toll on life. Here we examined whether the activity of terrorist groups escalates–both in the number of people killed per attack and in the frequency of attacks–leading up to highly lethal attacks. Analyses of terrorist attacks drawn from a state-of-the-art international terrorism database (The Global Terrorism Database) showed evidence for both types of escalation leading up to highly lethal attacks, though complexities to the patterns emerged as well. These patterns of escalation do not emerge among terrorist groups that never commit a highly lethal attack. PMID:24755753

  7. Beliefs and attitudes toward lethal management of deer in Cuyahoga Valley National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, D.C.; Skerl, K.; Shank, E.M.; Lime, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    We used the theory of reasoned action to help understand attitudes and beliefs about lethal management of deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP), Ohio. We used a mail-back survey to collect data from Ohio residents in the surrounding 9-county area. Two strata were defined: residents <10 km from CVNP (near n = 369) and residents =10 km from CVNP (far n = 312). Respondents indicated that lethal control of deer was acceptable (near 71%??4.7%, far 62%??5.5%) and taking no action to reduce deer populations was unacceptable (near 75%??4.5%, far 72%??5.1%). Beliefs about outcomes of lethal control and evaluation of those outcomes proved to be strong predictors of the acceptability of lethal control of deer in CVNP. Lethal control was more acceptable if it was done to prevent severe consequences for humans (e.g., spread of disease, car collisions) or the natural environment (e.g., maintain a healthy deer herd) than to prevent negative aesthetic impacts or personal property damage. Results from the study can be used to assist managers at CVNP as they make decisions regarding alternatives for deer management in the park and to inform others managing abundant deer populations of socially relevant impacts of management actions.

  8. Lethal ovitrap deployment for Aedes aegypti control: potential implications for non-target organisms.

    PubMed

    Long, Sharron A; Jacups, Susan P; Ritchie, Scott A

    2015-06-01

    In Australia, dengue control combines source reduction with lethal ovitraps to reduce Aedes aegypti populations during outbreaks. Lethal ovitraps are considered a sustainable and environmentally friendly method of controlling container-inhabiting mosquitoes, however, to-date, this claim has not been quantified. This study assesses the potential impact of lethal ovitraps on non-target organisms when used to control Ae. aegypti in tropical Australia. For retention of specimens, we substituted standard sticky ovitraps for lethal ovitraps. We collected 988 Ae. aegypti and 44,132 non-target specimens over 13 months from 16 sites. Although Ae. aegypti comprised only 2.2% of the total collection, they were were the eighth most dominant taxa collected, on the 93(rd) percentile. Of the non-target organisms, Collembola were the dominant taxa, 44.2%, with 36.8% and 10.5% Diptera and Hymenoptera, respectively. Of the Dipterans, 61% were family Phoridae. Lethal ovitraps were visited by 90 insect or invertebrate families in total. Ovitraps are attractive to Collembola, Phoridae, Sciaridae, Formicidae, and Culicidae, with minimal attraction by Apidae and other commonly monitored non-target organisms. For container-inhabiting mosquitoes, LOs are cost effective operationally, requiring minimal staff resources for placement and retrieval. PMID:26047194

  9. The Unc-22(iv) Region of Caenorhabditis Elegans: Genetic Analysis of Lethal Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. V.; Rogalski, T. M.; Donati, L. M.; Baillie, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The organization of essential genes in the unc-22 region, defined by the deficiency sDf2 on linkage group IV, has been studied. Using the balancer nT1 (IV;V), which suppresses recombination over 49 map units, 294 lethal mutations on LGIV(right) and LGV(left) were recovered using EMS mutagenesis. Twenty-six of these mutations fell into the unc-22 region. Together with previously isolated lethal mutations, there is now a total of 63 lethal mutations which fall into 31 complementation groups. Mutations were positioned on the map using eight overlapping deficiencies in addition to sDf2. The lethal alleles and deficiencies in the unc-22 region were characterized with respect to their terminal phenotypes. Mapping of these lethal mutations shows that sDf2 deletes a minimum of 1.8 map units and a maximum of 2.5 map units. A minimum estimate of essential gene number for the region using a truncated Poisson calculation is 48. The data indicate a minimum estimate of approximately 3500 essential genes in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. PMID:3396868

  10. Forward genetic screen for auxin-deficient mutants by cytokinin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Luo, Pan; Di, Dong-Wei; Wang, Li; Wang, Ming; Lu, Cheng-Kai; Wei, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Zi; Amakorová, Petra; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ond?ej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Identification of mutants with impairments in auxin biosynthesis and dynamics by forward genetic screening is hindered by the complexity, redundancy and necessity of the pathways involved. Furthermore, although a few auxin-deficient mutants have been recently identified by screening for altered responses to shade, ethylene, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) or cytokinin (CK), there is still a lack of robust markers for systematically isolating such mutants. We hypothesized that a potentially suitable phenotypic marker is root curling induced by CK, as observed in the auxin biosynthesis mutant CK-induced root curling 1 / tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 (ckrc1/taa1). Phenotypic observations, genetic analyses and biochemical complementation tests of Arabidopsis seedlings displaying the trait in large-scale genetic screens showed that it can facilitate isolation of mutants with perturbations in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling. However, unlike transport/signaling mutants, the curled (or wavy) root phenotypes of auxin-deficient mutants were significantly induced by CKs and could be rescued by exogenous auxins. Mutants allelic to several known auxin biosynthesis mutants were re-isolated, but several new classes of auxin-deficient mutants were also isolated. The findings show that CK-induced root curling provides an effective marker for discovering genes involved in auxin biosynthesis or homeostasis. PMID:26143750

  11. Lethal temperature for pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, in infested wood using microwave energy.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Kelli; Uzunovic, Adnan; Gething, Brad; Dale, Angela; Leung, Karen; Ostiguy, Nancy; Janowiak, John J

    2010-06-01

    To reduce the risks associated with global transport of wood infested with pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, microwave irradiation was tested at 14 temperatures in replicated wood samples to determine the temperature that would kill 99.9968% of nematodes in a sample of ? 100,000 organisms, meeting a level of efficacy of Probit 9. Treatment of these heavily infested wood samples (mean of > 1,000 nematodes/g of sapwood) produced 100% mortality at 56 °C and above, held for 1 min. Because this "brute force" approach to Probit 9 treats individual nematodes as the observational unit regardless of the number of wood samples it takes to treat this number of organisms, we also used a modeling approach. The best fit was to a Probit function, which estimated lethal temperature at 62.2 (95% confidence interval 59.0-70.0) °C. This discrepancy between the observed and predicted temperature to achieve Probit 9 efficacy may have been the result of an inherently limited sample size when predicting the true mean from the total population. The rate of temperature increase in the small wood samples (rise time) did not affect final nematode mortality at 56 °C. In addition, microwave treatment of industrial size, infested wood blocks killed 100% of > 200,000 nematodes at ? 56 °C held for 1 min in replicated wood samples. The 3(rd)-stage juvenile (J3) of the nematode, that is resistant to cold temperatures and desiccation, was abundant in our wood samples and did not show any resistance to microwave treatment. Regression analysis of internal wood temperatures as a function of surface temperature produced a regression equation that could be used with a relatively high degree of accuracy to predict internal wood temperatures, under the conditions of this study. These results provide strong evidence of the ability of microwave treatment to successfully eradicate B. xylophilus in infested wood at or above 56 °C held for 1 min. PMID:22736846

  12. Arabidopsis Protein Repair L-Isoaspartyl Methyltransferases: Predominant Activities at Lethal Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Villa, Sarah T; Xu, Qilong; Downie, A Bruce; Clarke, Steven G

    2006-12-01

    Protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferases (EC 2.1.1.77; PIMT or PCMT) are enzymes that initiate the full or partial repair of damaged L-aspartyl and L-asparaginyl residues, respectively. These enzymes are found in most organisms and maintain a high degree of sequence conservation. Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis L. Heynh.) is unique among eukaryotes in that it contains two genes, rather than one, that encode PIMT isozymes. We describe a novel Arabidopsis PIMT isozyme, designated AtPIMT2??, encoded by the PIMT2 gene (At5g50240). We characterized the enzymatic activity of the recombinant AtPIMT2?? in comparison to the other AtPIMT2 isozymes, AtPIMT1, and to the human PCMT ortholog, to better understand its role in Arabidopsis. All Arabidopsis PIMT isozymes are active over a relatively wide pH range. For AtPIMT2?? maximal activity is observed at 50 °C (a lethal temperature for Arabidopsis); this activity is almost ten times greater than the activity at the growth temperature of 25 °C. Interestingly, enzyme activity decreases after pre-incubation at temperatures above 30°C. A similar situation is found for the recombinant AtPIMT2? and the AtPIMT2? isozymes, as well as for the AtPIMT1 and human PCMT1 enzymes. These results suggest that the short-term ability of these methyltransferases to initiate repair under extreme temperature conditions may be a common feature of both the plant and animal species. PMID:21076691

  13. Infantile lethal variant of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome associated with hydrops fetalis

    SciTech Connect

    Terespolsky, D.; Siegel-Bartelt, J.; Weksberg, R.; Farrell, S.A.

    1995-11-20

    Simpson-Golabi Behmel syndrome (SGBS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by pre- and postnatal macrosomia, minor facial anomalies, and variable visceral, skeletal, and neurological abnormalities. Since its first description by Simpson et al., a wide clinical range of cases has been reported. There is great variability in severity, ranging from a mild form associated with long-term survival to an early lethal form with multiple congenital anomalies and severe mental retardation. In 8 reported families, affected individuals died in infancy. Here we present 4 maternally related, male cousins with a severe variant of SGBS. One of these males was aborted therapeutically at 19 weeks of gestation following the detection of multicystic kidneys on ultrasound. The 3 liveborn males were hydropic at birth with a combination of craniofacial anomalies including macrocephaly; apparently low-set, posteriorly angulated ears; hypertelorism; short, broad nose with anteverted nares; large mouth with thin upper vermilion border; prominent philtrum; high-arched or cleft palate; short neck; redundant skin; hypoplastic nails; skeletal defects involving upper and lower limbs; gastrointestinal and genitourinary anomalies. All 3 patients were hypotonic and neurologically impaired from birth. With the exception of a trilobate left lung in one patient, the cardiorespiratory system was structurally normal. All patients died within the first 8 weeks of life of multiple complications including pneumonia and sepsis. Two SGBS kindreds, with moderate expression of the condition, have been mapped to Xq27. It is not known whether severe, familiar cases, such as ours, are genetically distinct from and map to another locus. Final resolution of the genetic basis of the phenotypic variability in SGBS must await cloning and mutation analysis of the SGBS gene(s). 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Lethal carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency in newborns: A molecular-genetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Taroni, F.; Gellera, C.; Cavadini, P.

    1994-09-01

    Classically, CPT II deficiency presents in young adults with recurrent episodes of paroxysmal myoglobinuria triggered by prolonged exercise, cold, or fever. More severe forms of CPT II deficiency have recently been observed in children and newborns. Here, were present biochemical and molecular studies of lethal neonatal CPT II deficiency in a premature Haitian infant of nonconsanguineous parents. He presented at birth with severe respiratory distress, cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. His condition worsened and he died on the 4th day of life. Postmortem examination showed hypertrophied, dilated heart, and lipid storage in liver, heart and kidney. An older sibling had died unexpectantly at 4 days of age with postmortem evidence of fatty infiltration of liver, kidney, heart and muscle. Biochemical study of cultured fibroblasts demonstrated dramatic reduction of palmitate oxidation (to < 3%) and very low residual CPT II activity ({le}15%). No CPT II protein was detected by Western blot analysis of fibroblasts. However, immunoprecitation of cells pulse-labeled with L-[{sup 35}S] methionine demonstrated normal amounts of newly synthesized CPT II, thus suggesting altered stability of the enzyme. To identify the molecular defect in his patient, individual CPT II exons were amplified by genomic PCR and directly sequenced. A missense mutation was found in exon 4, resulting in the nonconservative amino acid substitution at codon 227 (Pro227Leu). SSCP analysis of a genomic PCR fragment encompassing the mutation demonstrated that the patient was homozygous and the parents were heterozygous for this mutation. The mutation was detected neither in a large number of controls nor in other CPT II deficient patients. Finally, CPT II activity in COS-1 cells transfected with mutated CPT II cDNA was <8% than that in cells transfected with wild-type cDNA, thus demonstrating the pathogenic role of this mutation.

  15. Sub-lethal effects caused by the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine to the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Pedriali, Alessandra; Riva, Consuelo; Binelli, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Illicit drugs have been recognized as emerging environmental pollutants that could represent a potential risk for aquatic communities. Even if many studies have shown the occurrence of several drugs of abuse and their metabolites in freshwaters in the High ng/L to Low ?g/L range worldwide, no information on their potentially harmful effects on non-target organisms is available. The aim of this study was to investigate sub-lethal effects induced by the main metabolite of cocaine, the benzoylecgonine (BE), on the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha. Mussels were exposed under semi-static conditions for 14 days to two environmentally relevant BE concentrations (0.5 ?g/L and 1 ?g/L) and induced adverse effects were evaluated through the application of a suite of ten different biomarkers. We applied on bivalve hemocytes the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay, the DNA diffusion assay and the micronucleus test (MN test) to investigate DNA injuries, while the neutral red retention assay (NRRA) was used to assess BE cytotoxicity. Catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities, as well as the lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyl content (PCC), were measured as oxidative stress indices in zebra mussel homogenates. Significant decrease in lysosomal membrane stability and imbalances of defense enzyme activities were found at both exposure concentrations, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress in BE toxicity. Significant increases in LPO and PCC, as well as in primary (DNA strand breaks) and fixed DNA damage (apoptotic and micronucleated cell frequency), were found at the highest BE treatment, confirming that adverse effects to macromolecules were due to the increase of BE-induced oxidative stress. PMID:23266551

  16. Differences in Expression of Key DNA Damage Repair Genes after Epigenetic-Induced BRCAness Dictate Synthetic Lethality with PARP1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wiegmans, Adrian P; Yap, Pei-Yi; Ward, Ambber; Lim, Yi Chieh; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2015-10-01

    The triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype represents a cancer that is highly aggressive with poor patient outcome. Current preclinical success has been gained through synthetic lethality, targeting genome instability with PARP inhibition in breast cancer cells that harbor silencing of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are a class of drugs that mediate epigenetic changes in expression of HR pathway genes. Here, we compare the activity of the pan-HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the class I/IIa HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), and the HDAC1/2-specific inhibitor romidepsin (ROMI) for their capability to regulate DNA damage repair gene expression and in sensitizing TNBC to PARPi. We found that two of the HDACis tested, SAHA and ROMI, but not VPA, indeed inhibit HR repair and that RAD51, BARD1, and FANCD2 represent key proteins whose inhibition is required for HDACi-mediated therapy with PARP inhibition in TNBC. We also observed that restoration of BRCA1 function stabilizes the genome compared with mutant BRCA1 that results in enhanced polyploid population after combination treatment with HDACi and PARPi. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of the key HR protein RAD51 represents a mechanism for this resistance, promoting aberrant repair and the enhanced polyploidy observed. These findings highlight the key components of HR in guiding synthetic lethality with PARP inhibition and support the rationale for utilizing the novel combination of HDACi and PARPi against TNBC in the clinical setting. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(10); 2321-31. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26294743

  17. DBA/2J Genetic Background Exacerbates Spontaneous Lethal Seizures but Lessens Amyloid Deposition in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Harriet M.; Onos, Kristen D.; Pepper, Keating W.; Graham, Leah C.; Akeson, Ellen C.; Byers, Candice; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Frankel, Wayne N.; Howell, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterized by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and neuronal dysfunction. Early onset AD (EOAD) is commonly caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP) or genes involved in the processing of APP including the presenilins (e.g. PSEN1 or PSEN2). In general, mouse models relevant to EOAD recapitulate amyloidosis, show only limited amounts of NFTs and neuronal cell dysfunction and low but significant levels of seizure susceptibility. To investigate the effect of genetic background on these phenotypes, we generated APPswe and PSEN1de9 transgenic mice on the seizure prone inbred strain background, DBA/2J. Previous studies show that the DBA/2J genetic background modifies plaque deposition in the presence of mutant APP but the impact of PSEN1de9 has not been tested. Our study shows that DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice are significantly more prone to premature lethality, likely to due to lethal seizures, compared to B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice—70% of DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice die between 2-3 months of age. Of the DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice that survived to 6 months of age, plaque deposition was greatly reduced compared to age-matched B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice. The reduction in plaque deposition appears to be independent of microglia numbers, reactive astrocytosis and complement C5 activity. PMID:25933409

  18. Delayed degradation of chlorophylls and photosynthetic proteins in Arabidopsis autophagy mutants during stress-induced leaf yellowing

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Ye-Sol; Park, Ohkmae K.; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2014-01-01

    Plant autophagy, one of the essential proteolysis systems, balances proteome and nutrient levels in cells of the whole plant. Autophagy has been studied by analysing Arabidopsis thaliana autophagy-defective atg mutants, but the relationship between autophagy and chlorophyll (Chl) breakdown during stress-induced leaf yellowing remains unclear. During natural senescence or under abiotic-stress conditions, extensive cell death and early yellowing occurs in the leaves of atg mutants. A new finding is revealed that atg5 and atg7 mutants exhibit a functional stay-green phenotype under mild abiotic-stress conditions, but leaf yellowing proceeds normally in wild-type leaves under these conditions. Under mild salt stress, atg5 leaves retained high levels of Chls and all photosystem proteins and maintained a normal chloroplast structure. Furthermore, a double mutant of atg5 and non-functional stay-green nonyellowing1-1 (atg5 nye1-1) showed a much stronger stay-green phenotype than either single mutant. Taking these results together, it is proposed that autophagy functions in the non-selective catabolism of Chls and photosynthetic proteins during stress-induced leaf yellowing, in addition to the selective degradation of Chl–apoprotein complexes in the chloroplasts through the senescence-induced STAY-GREEN1/NYE1 and Chl catabolic enzymes. PMID:24510943

  19. A nondesensitizing kainate receptor point mutant.

    PubMed

    Nayeem, Naushaba; Zhang, Yihong; Schweppe, Devin K; Madden, Dean R; Green, Tim

    2009-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) desensitization can be modulated by mutations that change the stability of a dimer formed by the agonist binding domain. Desensitization of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors can be blocked by a single point mutation (e.g., GluR2 L483Y) that stabilizes this dimer in an active conformation. In contrast, desensitization of kainate receptors can be slowed, but not blocked, by similar dimer interface mutations. Only covalent cross-linking via introduced disulfides has been previously shown to block kainate receptor desensitization completely. We have now identified an apparently nondesensitizing GluR6 point mutant (D776K) located at the apex of the ligand binding (S1S2) domain dimer interface. Asp776 is one of a cluster of four charged residues in this region that together mediate direct dimer interactions and contribute to the binding sites for one chloride and two sodium ions. Despite the localized +4 change in the net charge of the S1S2 dimer, the D776K mutation actually increased the thermodynamic stability of the dimer. Unlike GluR6 wild type, the D776K mutant is insensitive to external cations but retains sensitivity to external anions. We therefore hypothesize that the unexpected phenotype of this charge reversal mutation results from the substitution of the sodium ions bound within the dimer interface by the introduced lysine NH(3)(+) groups. The nondesensitizing D776K mutant provides insights into kainate receptor gating and represents a potentially useful new tool for dissecting kainate receptor function. PMID:19561126

  20. Attacks on German public figures, 1968-2004: warning behaviors, potentially lethal and non-lethal acts, psychiatric status, and motivations.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jens; Meloy, J Reid; Guldimann, Angela; Ermer, Anneliese

    2011-01-01

    Fourteen non-terrorist attackers of public figures in Germany between 1968 and 2004 were intensively studied, with a particular focus on warning behaviors, attack behaviors, and the relationship between psychiatric diagnosis, symptoms, and motivations for the assault. A large proportion of the attackers were severely mentally ill, and most likely to be in the potentially lethal rather than the non-lethal group. A new typology of seven warning behaviors was applied to the data, and all were present, most frequently fixation and pathway warning behavior, and least frequently a direct threat. Psychiatric diagnosis could be closely linked to motivation when analyzed at the level of symptom and content of thought, often delusional. Most of the attacks were directed at political figures, and the majority occurred after 1995. PMID:21381093

  1. A Model for the Estimation of Penetrating Wound Lethality Based on Combat Casualty Data

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, William J.; Merkler, Jules; Long, William B.; Dolce, Joseph R.; Champion, Howard R.

    1981-01-01

    The probability that a given combat wound is lethal provides a quantitative basis for the assessment of wounds, comparison of body armors, and estimation of medical workload requirements in various military scenarios. The present paper describes a new lethality model for penetrating injuries. The model employs a new injury classification called PEBL. PEBL codes are constructed by appending additional significant digits to the appropriate codes from the Hospital Adaptation of the International Classification of the World Health Organization (H-ICDA Codes), widely used in both civilian and military hospitals for injury classification. PEBL attains greater specificity by providing for injury size, bone injury characteristics, partial organ damage, and distinguishing peripheral blood vessels and nerves. Probability of lethality estimates were obtained for PEBL codes based on computerized wound data available on 3600 combat casualties.

  2. Comparison of the lethal effects of chemical warfare nerve agents across multiple ages.

    PubMed

    Wright, Linnzi K M; Lee, Robyn B; Vincelli, Nicole M; Whalley, Christopher E; Lumley, Lucille A

    2016-01-22

    Children may be inherently more vulnerable than adults to the lethal effects associated with chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) exposure because of their closer proximity to the ground, smaller body mass, higher respiratory rate, increased skin permeability and immature metabolic systems. Unfortunately, there have only been a handful of studies on the effects of CWNA in pediatric animal models, and more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. Using a stagewise, adaptive dose design, we estimated the 24h median lethal dose for subcutaneous exposure to seven CWNA in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at six different developmental times. Perinatal (postnatal day [PND] 7, 14 and 21) and adult (PND 70) rats were more susceptible than pubertal (PND 28 and 42) rats to the lethal effects associated with exposure to tabun, sarin, soman and cyclosarin. Age-related differences in susceptibility were not observed in rats exposed to VM, Russian VX or VX. PMID:26621540

  3. Alterations in growth, photosynthesis, and respiration in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L. ) deficient in chloroplast phosphoglucomutase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Caspar, T.; Huber, S.C.; Somerville, C.

    1985-09-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. which lacks leaf starch was isolated by screening for plants which did not stain with iodine. When grown in a 12-h photoperiod, leaves of the wild-type accumulated substantial amounts of starch but lower levels of soluble sugars. Under these conditions, the mutant accumulated relatively high levels of soluble sugars. Rates of growth and net photosynthesis of the mutant and wild-type were indistinguishable when the plants were grown in constant illumination. However, in a short photoperiod, the growth of the mutant was severely impaired, the rate of photosynthesis was depressed relative to the wild-type, and the rate of dark respiration, which was high following the onset of darkness, exhibited an uncharacteristic decay throughout the dark period. The depressed photosynthetic capacity of the mutant may also reflect a metabolic adaptation to the accumulation of high levels of soluble carbohydrate which mimics the effects of alterations in source/sink ratio. The activities of sucrose phosphate synthase and acid invertase are significantly higher in the mutant than in the wild-type whereas ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity is lower. This suggests that the activities of these enzymes may be modulated in response to metabolite concentrations or flux through the pathways.

  4. Altered chloroplast structure and function in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity have altered chloroplast membrane lipid composition. This caused an increase in the number of regions of appressed membrane per chloroplast and a decrease in the average number of thylakoid membranes in the appressed regions. The net effect was a significant decrease in the ratio of appressed to nonappressed membranes. A comparison of 77 K fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes from the mutant and wild type indicated that the ultrastructural changes were associated with an altered distribution of excitation energy transfer from antenna chlorophyll to photosystem II and photosystem I in the mutant. The changes in leaf lipid composition did not significantly affect growth or development of the mutant under standard conditions. However, at temperatures above 28{degree}C the mutant grew slightly more rapidly than the wild type, and measurements of temperature-induced fluorescence yield enhancement suggested an increased thermal stability of the photosynthetic apparatus of the mutant. These effects are consistent with other evidence suggesting that membrane lipid composition is an important determinant of chloroplast structure but has relatively minor direct effects on the function of the membrane proteins associated with photosynthetic electron transport.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii deficient in the CO sub 2 concentrating mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Moroney, J.V.; Manual, L.J. ); Husic, H.D. ); Tolbert, N.E. ); Kitayama, M.; Togasaki, R.K. )

    1989-03-01

    A Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant has been isolated that cannot grow photoautotrophically on low CO{sub 2} concentrations but can grow on elevated CO{sub 2}. In a test cross, the high CO{sub 2}-requirement for growth showed a 2:2 segregation. This mutant, designated CIA-5, had a phenotype similar to previously identified mutants that were defective in some aspect of CO{sub 2} accumulation. Unlike previously isolated mutants, CIA-5 did not have detectable levels of the periplasmic carbonic anhydrase, an inducible protein that participates in the acquisition of CO{sub 2} by C. reinhardtii. CIA-5 also did not accumulate inorganic carbon to levels higher than could be accounted for by diffusion. This mutant strain did not synthesize any of the four polypeptides preferentially made by wild type C. reinhardtii when switched from an environment containing elevated CO{sub 2} levels to an environment low in CO{sub 2}. It is concluded that this mutant fails to induce the CO{sub 2} concentrating system and is incapable of adapting to low CO{sub 2} conditions.

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF SOYBEAN CYST NEMATODE, HETERODERA GLYCINES, DNA SEQUENCES WITH HIGH SIMILARITY TO THOSE OF CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS WITH MUTANT LETHAL PHENOTYPES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines) is a devastating pest of soybean causing one-half to one billion dollars in losses to the US economy per year and over ten billion worldwide. The genome sequence of SCN is not well characterized nor fully sequenced. However, Caenorhabditis elegans gen...

  7. Methylone-induced hyperthermia and lethal toxicity: role of the dopamine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Piao, Ying-Shan; Hall, Frank Scott; Moriya, Yuki; Ito, Miki; Ohara, Arihisa; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-06-01

    Methylone (2-methylamino-1-[3,4-methylenedioxy-phenyl]propan-1-one), an amphetamine analog, has emerged as a popular drug of abuse worldwide. Methylone induces hyperthermia, which is thought to contribute toward the lethal consequences of methylone overdose. Methylone has been assumed to induce hyperthermic effects through inhibition of serotonin and/or dopamine transporters (SERT and DAT, respectively). To examine the roles of each of these proteins in methylone-induced toxic effects, we used SERT and DAT knockout (KO) mice and assessed the hyperthermic and lethal effects caused by a single administration of methylone. Methylone produced higher rates of lethal toxicity compared with other amphetamine analogs in wild-type mice. Compared with wild-type mice, lethality was significantly lower in DAT KO mice, but not in SERT KO mice. By contrast, only a slight diminution in the hyperthermic effects of methylone was observed in DAT KO mice, whereas a slight enhancement of these effects was observed in SERT KO mice. Administration of the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 and the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride reduced methylone-induced hyperthermia, but these drugs also had hypothermic effects in saline-treated mice, albeit to a smaller extent than the effects observed in methylone-treated mice. In contradistinction to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, which induces its toxicity through SERT and DAT, these data indicate that DAT, but not SERT, is strongly associated with the lethal toxicity produced by methylone, which did not seem to be dependent on the hyperthermic effects of methylone. DAT is therefore a strong candidate molecule for interventions aimed at preventing acute neurotoxic and lethal effects of methylone. PMID:25794333

  8. Effect of N-1/C-8 Ring Fusion and C-7 Ring Structure on Fluoroquinolone Lethality?

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Muhammad; Marks, Kevin R.; Schwanz, Heidi A.; German, Nadezhda; Drlica, Karl; Kerns, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Quinolones rapidly kill bacteria by two mechanisms, one that requires protein synthesis and one that does not. The latter, which is measured as lethal action in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol, is enhanced by N-1 cyclopropyl and C-8 methoxy substituents, as seen with the highly lethal compound PD161144. In some compounds, such as levofloxacin, the N-1 and C-8 substituents are fused. To assess the effect of ring fusion on killing, structural derivatives of levofloxacin and PD161144 differing at C-7 were synthesized and examined with Escherichia coli. A fused-ring derivative of PD161144 exhibited a striking absence of lethal activity in the presence of chloramphenicol. In general, ring fusion had little effect on lethal activity when protein synthesis was allowed, but fusion reduced lethal activity in the absence of protein synthesis to extents that depended on the C-7 ring structure. Additional fused-ring fluoroquinolones, pazufloxacin, marbofloxacin, and rufloxacin, also exhibited reduced activity in the presence of chloramphenicol. Energy minimization modeling revealed that steric interactions of the trans-oriented N-1 cyclopropyl and C-8 methoxy moieties skew the quinolone core, rigidly orient these groups perpendicular to core rings, and restrict the rotational freedom of C-7 rings. These features were not observed with fused-ring derivatives. Remarkably, structural effects on quinolone lethality were not explained by the recently described X-ray crystal structures of fluoroquinolone-topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes, suggesting the existence of an additional drug-binding state. PMID:20855738

  9. Lethal combat and sex ratio evolution in a parasitoid wasp

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    for testing how behavior and life histories are adjusted in response to environmental variation. One by theory, a large number of animal species have been shown to adjust their offspring sex ratios (proportion male) conditionally, laying less female-biased sex ratios as the number of females that lay eggs

  10. The lethal and sub-lethal consequences of entomopathogenic nematode infestation and exposure for adult pine weevils, Hylobius abietis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Girling, R D; Ennis, D; Dillon, A B; Griffin, C T

    2010-07-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) frequently kill their host within 1-2 days, and interest in EPN focuses mainly on their lethality. However, insects may take longer to die, or may fail to die despite being infected, but little is known about the effects of EPN infection on insects, other than death. Here we investigate both lethal and sub-lethal effects of infection by two EPN species, Steinernema carpocapsae and Heterorhabditis downesi, on adults of the large pine weevil, Hylobius abietis. Following 12h nematode-weevil contact in peat, S. carpocapsae killed a significantly higher proportion of weevils (87-93%) than H. downesi (43-57%) at all concentrations tested. Less than 10% of weevils were dead within 2 days, and weevils continued to die for up to 10 days after exposure (LT(50) of 3 days or more). In a separate experiment, live weevils dissected 6 days after a 24h exposure to nematodes on filter paper harbored encapsulated and dead nematodes, showing that weevils could defend themselves against infection. Some live weevils also harbored live nematodes 6 days after they had been removed from the nematode infested medium. Feeding by weevils was not affected by infection with, or exposure to, either species of EPN. We discuss these results in relation to the use of EPN in biological control against H. abietis. PMID:20382152

  11. Potentiation by caffeine of potentially lethal fast-neutron damage in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schroy, C.B.; Furcinitti, P.S.; Todd, P.; Kukulinsky, N.E.

    1980-11-01

    Caffeine was found to potentiate single-dose fast-neutron-induced killing of human T-1 cells when present at 2 mM for 60 hr or more after (and 10 hr before) irradiation. Analyses of survival curves of cells treated with neutrons or X rays with and without caffeine indicate that only the linear, low-dose portion of survival curves is modified. Potentiation of lethality by caffeine is attributed mainly to its effects on single-hit potentially lethal lesions, possibly certain DNA double-strand breaks.

  12. Kinetics of Lethal Adsorption of Colicin E2 by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, R.; Hedges, A. J.

    1967-01-01

    The kinetics of lethal adsorption of colicin E2 by Escherichia coli C6 were studied by means of survivor plots. These were determined by a method which allowed rapid sampling of the reaction mixture and estimation of approximate confidence limits for the plotted data. The results were consistent with the predictions of a hypothetical model that assumed a single-hit mechanism of colicin action upon a bacterial population whose cells varied in their number of specific (lethal) receptors for colicin. The possibility of nonlethal adsorption is discussed. PMID:5340307

  13. Lethal osteochondrodysplasia and de novo autosomal translocation involving the long arm of chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Fryns, J.P.; Legius, E.; Van den Berghe, H.; Moerman, P.; Vandenberghe, K.; Maroteaux, P.

    1994-06-01

    Recently, we diagnosed a de noco t(4q;11q) with apparent breakpoints at 4q23 and 11q13 [karyotype: 46,XX,t(4;11)(q23;q13)] in a first trimester female fetus with a lethal chondrodysplasia. After the observation reported by Urioste et al. (1994) the presena finding of a de novo autosomal translocation with one breakpoint in the proximal part of 4q in another fetus with lethal osteochondrodysplasia may be a further indication toward the possible location of a gene cluster in this autosomal region. 1 ref.

  14. Relative toxicity testing of spacecraft materials. 1: Spacecraft materials. [lethality of pyrolysates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    In chamber thermodegradation procedures were used to access the lethality to rats of the pyrolysis/combustion products of three foams, an adhesive backed metallic tape and RTV silicone rubber adhesive sealant used in spacecraft construction. The role of carbon monoxide in the overall pyrolysate toxicity was also investigated. Post exposure observation of the rats, histological evaluation of selected organs, carbon monoxide concentration in the chamber atmosphere during exposure and the percent carboxyhemoglobin in the animals expiring in the chamber are discussed. Thermogravimetric analysis and dosage response results are given. The lethal effect of the RTV silicon appears to be due to physical obstruction of the respiratory system by particulate matter from pyrolysis.

  15. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  16. Biochemical and Genetic Characterization of ?-Glucosidase Mutants in Saccharomyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Tingle, Marjorie; Halvorson, Harlyn O.

    1972-01-01

    Mutants with reduced activity for ?-glucosidase (?-d-glucoside glucohydrolase EC 3.2.1.21) were isolated from the haploid yeast Saccharomyces lactis. Tetrad analysis indicated that in each mutant a single genetic factor, closely linked or allelic to the structural gene for ?-glucosidase (B locus), is responsible for the decreased activity. ?-Glucosidases produced by wild-type and mutant strains are similar in molecular size and charge but differ in catalytic properties, thermal stability, and serological specificity, indicating that mutants are in the structural gene. All mutants retained their capacity to be induced by either methyl-?-d-glucoside or glucose. In all cases, the mutant phenotype was dominant in heterozygous diploids. PMID:5062915

  17. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, J.P.

    1997-07-29

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned. 15 figs.

  18. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, James P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned.

  19. Isolation of mouse cell proteoglycan mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, K.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    The sulfated proteoglycans on the surface of cultured mammalian cells have been implicated in a variety of phenomena. To obtain more direct evidence for the role of these molecules in specific cellular functions, they are isolating mutants that produce altered sulfated proteoglycans from a cloned line of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells. This cell type was selected because it exhibits contact inhibition of growth and there is extensive information on its' cell surface and extracellular proteoglycans and other glycoproteins. Cells were chemically mutagenized and subjected to one or more cycles of radiation suicide in the presence of /sup 35/S-sulfate. By replica plating, 150 clones, which appear to incorporate abnormal amounts of /sup 35/S-sulfate, have been selected. After recloning three times via the replica plating technique, the proteoglycans of 29 clones have thus far been analyzed. They have identified four clones which appear to make altered amounts of either cell surface heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate. The biochemical bases for the altered levels of the proteoglycans are under study. Of particular interest, however, is the fact that in this limited collection of mutants the chemical alterations correlate with specific altered cellular morphologies.

  20. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  1. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  2. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity

    PubMed Central

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na+ ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA–isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves. PMID:25873666

  3. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na(+) ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA-isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves. PMID:25873666

  4. Feasibility of High-Power Diode Laser Array Surrogate to Support Development of Predictive Laser Lethality Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W H; Rubenchik, A M; Springer, H K

    2011-01-13

    Predictive modeling and simulation of high power laser-target interactions is sufficiently undeveloped that full-scale, field testing is required to assess lethality of military directed-energy (DE) systems. The cost and complexity of such testing programs severely limit the ability to vary and optimize parameters of the interaction. Thus development of advanced simulation tools, validated by experiments under well-controlled and diagnosed laboratory conditions that are able to provide detailed physics insight into the laser-target interaction and reduce requirements for full-scale testing will accelerate development of DE weapon systems. The ultimate goal is a comprehensive end-to-end simulation capability, from targeting and firing the laser system through laser-target interaction and dispersal of target debris; a 'Stockpile Science' - like capability for DE weapon systems. To support development of advanced modeling and simulation tools requires laboratory experiments to generate laser-target interaction data. Until now, to make relevant measurements required construction and operation of very high power and complex lasers, which are themselves costly and often unique devices, operating in dedicated facilities that don't permit experiments on targets containing energetic materials. High power diode laser arrays, pioneered by LLNL, provide a way to circumvent this limitation, as such arrays capable of delivering irradiances characteristic of De weapon requires are self-contained, compact, light weight and thus easily transportable to facilities, such as the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where testing with energetic materials can be performed. The purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of using such arrays to support future development of advanced laser lethality and vulnerability simulation codes through providing data for materials characterization and laser-material interaction models and to validate the accuracy of code predictions. This project was a Feasibility Study under the LLNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program.

  5. Functional Rescue of Retinal Degeneration-Associated Mutant RPE65 Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Minghao; Li, Songhua; Hu, Jane; Jin, Heather H; Jacobson, Samuel G; Bok, Dean

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 different mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with inherited retinal degeneration. Although some missense mutations have been shown to abolish isomerase activity of RPE65, the molecular bases leading to loss of function and retinal degeneration remain incompletely understood. Here we show that several missense mutations resulted in significant decrease in expression level of RPE65 in the human retinal pigment epithelium cells. The 26S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 13, a newly identified negative regulator of RPE65, mediated degradation of mutant RPE65s, which were misfolded and formed aggregates in the cells. Many mutations, including L22P, T101I, and L408P, were mapped on nonactive sites of RPE65. Enzyme activities of these mutant RPE65s were significantly rescued at low temperature, whereas mutant RPE65s with a distinct active site mutation could not be rescued under the same conditions. 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) displayed a significant synergistic effect on the low temperature-mediated rescue of the mutant RPE65s. Our results suggest that a low temperature eye mask and PBA, a FDA-approved oral medicine, may provide a promising "protein repair therapy" that can enhance the efficacy of gene therapy for delaying retinal degeneration caused by RPE65 mutations. PMID:26427455

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson disease: evidence in mutant PARK2 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zanellati, Maria C.; Monti, Valentina; Barzaghi, Chiara; Reale, Chiara; Nardocci, Nardo; Albanese, Alberto; Valente, Enza M.; Ghezzi, Daniele; Garavaglia, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PARK2, encoding Parkin, cause an autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinson Disease (JPD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of PARK2 mutations on mitochondrial function and morphology in human skin fibroblasts. We analyzed cells obtained from four patients clinically characterized by JPD, harboring recessive mutations in PARK2. By quantitative PCR we found a reduction (<50%) of PARK2 transcript in all patients but one; however Western Blot analysis demonstrated the virtual absence of Parkin protein in all mutant fibroblasts. Respiration assays showed an increment of oxygen consumption, which was uncoupled to ATP cellular levels. This finding was probably due to presence of altered mitochondrial membrane potential (??m), confirmed by JC-1 analysis. The mitochondrial network was comparable between mutant and control cells but, interestingly, a “chain-like” network was found only in mutant fibroblasts. Dissipation of ??m usually leads to mitochondrial fragmentation in healthy cells and eventually to mitophagy; however, this behavior was not observed in patients' fibroblasts. The absence of mitochondrial fragmentation in mutant Parkin fibroblasts could results in accumulation of damaged mitochondria not targeted to mitophagy. This condition should increase the oxidative stress and lead to cellular dysfunction and death. Our results suggest that PARK2 mutations cause mitochondrial impairment, in particular reduction in ATP cellular levels and alteration of ??m, even in non-neuronal cells and confirm the hypothesis that Parkin holds a pivotal role in pro-fission events. PMID:25815004

  7. Mechanism of the Anticoagulant Activity of Thrombin Mutant W215A/E217A

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Prafull S.; Page, Michael J.; Chen, Zhiwei; Bush-Pelc, Leslie; Di Cera, Enrico

    2009-09-15

    The thrombin mutant W215A/E217A (WE) is a potent anticoagulant both in vitro and in vivo. Previous x-ray structural studies have shown that WE assumes a partially collapsed conformation that is similar to the inactive E* form, which explains its drastically reduced activity toward substrate. Whether this collapsed conformation is genuine, rather than the result of crystal packing or the mutation introduced in the critical 215-217 {beta}-strand, and whether binding of thrombomodulin to exosite I can allosterically shift the E* form to the active E form to restore activity toward protein C are issues of considerable mechanistic importance to improve the design of an anticoagulant thrombin mutant for therapeutic applications. Here we present four crystal structures of WE in the human and murine forms that confirm the collapsed conformation reported previously under different experimental conditions and crystal packing. We also present structures of human and murine WE bound to exosite I with a fragment of the platelet receptor PAR1, which is unable to shift WE to the E form. These structural findings, along with kinetic and calorimetry data, indicate that WE is strongly stabilized in the E* form and explain why binding of ligands to exosite I has only a modest effect on the E*-E equilibrium for this mutant. The E* {yields} E transition requires the combined binding of thrombomodulin and protein C and restores activity of the mutant WE in the anticoagulant pathway.

  8. Phospholipase D ? knock-out mutants are tolerant to severe drought stress.

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Ayelen M; Valińas, Matías A; Scuffi, Denise; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Ten Have, Arjen; García-Mata, Carlos; Laxalt, Ana M

    2015-11-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in different plant processes, ranging from responses to abiotic and biotic stress to plant development. Phospholipase D? (PLD?) is activated in dehydration and salt stress, producing the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. In this work we show that pld? Arabidopsis mutants were more tolerant to severe drought than wild-type plants. PLD? has been shown to be required for ABA regulation of stomatal closure of isolated epidermal peels. However, there was no significant difference in stomatal conductance at the whole plant level between wild-type and pld? mutants. Since PLD hydrolyses structural phospholipids, then we looked at membrane integrity. Ion leakage measurements showed that during dehydration of leaf discs pld? mutant has less membrane degradation compared to the wild-type. We further analyzed the mutants and showed that pld? have higher mRNA levels of RAB18 and RD29A compared to wild-type plants under normal growth conditions. Transient expression of AtPLD? in Nicotiana benthamiana plants induced a wilting phenotype. These findings suggest that, in wt plants PLD? disrupt membranes in severe drought stress and, in the absence of the protein (PLD? knock-out) might drought-prime the plants, making them more tolerant to severe drought stress. The results are discussed in relation to PLD? role in guard cell signaling and drought tolerance. PMID:26340512

  9. Subchronic chloroform priming protects mice from a subsequently administered lethal dose of chloroform

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Binu K.; Anand, Sathanandam S.; Palkar, Prajakta S.; Mumtaz, Moiz M.; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-10-01

    Protection offered by pre-exposure priming with a small dose of a toxicant against the toxic and lethal effects of a subsequently administered high dose of the same toxicant is autoprotection. Although autoprotection has been extensively studied with diverse toxicants in acute exposure regimen, not much is known about autoprotection after priming with repeated exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate this concept following repeated exposure to a common water contaminant, chloroform. Swiss Webster (SW) mice, exposed continuously to either vehicle (5% Emulphor, unprimed) or chloroform (150 mg/kg/day po, primed) for 30 days, were challenged with a normally lethal dose of chloroform (750 mg chloroform/kg po) 24 h after the last exposure. As expected, 90% of the unprimed mice died between 48 and 96 h after administration of the lethal dose in contrast to 100% survival of mice primed with chloroform. Time course studies indicated lower hepato- and nephrotoxicity in primed mice as compared to unprimed mice. Hepatic CYP2E1, glutathione levels (GSH), and covalent binding of {sup 14}C-chloroform-derived radiolabel did not differ between livers of unprimed and primed mice after lethal dose exposure, indicating that protection in liver is neither due to decreased bioactivation nor increased detoxification. Kidney GSH and glutathione reductase activity were upregulated, with a concomitant reduction in oxidized glutathione in the primed mice following lethal dose challenge, leading to decreased renal covalent binding of {sup 14}C-chloroform-derived radiolabel, in the absence of any change in CYP2E1 levels. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) intervention led to 70% mortality in primed mice challenged with lethal dose. These data suggest that higher detoxification may play a role in the lower initiation of kidney injury observed in primed mice. Exposure of primed mice to a lethal dose of chloroform led to 40% lower chloroform levels (AUC{sub 15-360min}) in the systemic circulation. Exhalation of {sup 14}C-chloroform was unchanged in primed as compared to unprimed mice (AUC{sub 1-6h}). Urinary excretion of {sup 14}C-chloroform was higher in primed mice after administration of the lethal dose. However, neither slightly higher urinary elimination nor unchanged expiration can account for the difference in systemic levels of chloroform. Liver and kidney regeneration was inhibited by the lethal dose in unprimed mice leading to progressive injury, organ failure, and 90% mortality. In contrast, sustained and highly stimulated compensatory hepato- and nephrogenic repair prevented the progression of injury resulting in 100% survival of primed mice challenged with the lethal dose. These findings affirm the critical role of tissue regeneration and favorable detoxification (only in kidney) of the lethal dose of chloroform in subchronic chloroform priming-induced autoprotection.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of all two-component regulatory system mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Taku; Aiba, Hirofumi; Masuda, Yasushi; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Sugiura, Masahito; Wanner, Barry L; Mori, Hirotada; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2002-10-01

    We have systematically examined the mRNA profiles of 36 two-component deletion mutants, which include all two-component regulatory systems of Escherichia coli, under a single growth condition. DNA microarray results revealed that the mutants belong to one of three groups based on their gene expression profiles in Luria-Bertani broth under aerobic conditions: (i) those with no or little change; (ii) those with significant changes; and (iii) those with drastic changes. Under these conditions, the anaeroresponsive ArcB/ArcA system, the osmoresponsive EnvZ/OmpR system and the response regulator UvrY showed the most drastic changes. Cellular functions such as flagellar synthesis and expression of the RpoS regulon were affected by multiple two-component systems. A high correlation coefficient of expression profile was found between several two-component mutants. Together, these results support the view that a network of functional interactions, such as cross-regulation, exists between different two-component systems. The compiled data are avail-able at our website (http://ecoli.aist-nara.ac.jp/xp_analysis/ 2_components). PMID:12366850

  11. The Cell Polarity Scaffold Lethal Giant Larvae Regulates Synapse Morphology and Function Jon Staples and Kendal Broadie

    E-print Network

    Broadie, Kendal S.

    The Cell Polarity Scaffold Lethal Giant Larvae Regulates Synapse Morphology and Function Jon Staples and Kendal Broadie Department of Biological Sciences, Kennedy Center for Research on Human #12;1 SUMMARY Lethal Giant Larvae (LGL) is a cytosolic cell polarity scaffold whose loss dominantly

  12. Maize Chlorotic Mottle Machlomovirus and Wheat Streak Mosaic Rymovirus Concentrations Increase in the Synergistic Disease Corn Lethal Necrosis

    E-print Network

    Scheets, Kay

    in the Synergistic Disease Corn Lethal Necrosis Kay Scheets1 Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics for revision October 20, 1997; accepted December 8, 1997 Corn lethal necrosis (CLN) is caused cereals. Interactions between MCMV and wheat streak mosaic rymovirus (WSMV) in N28Ht corn produced MCMV

  13. A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. We isolated 11 lethal lines that map...

  14. Adiposity induces lethal cytokine storm after systemic administration of stimulatory immunotherapy regimens in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Maverakis, Emanuel; Spencer, Richard G.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Siddiqui, Sana; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a contributing factor in cancer occurrence. We recently demonstrated that systemic immunotherapy (IT) administration in aged, but not young, mice resulted in induction of rapid and lethal cytokine storm. We found that aging was accompanied by increases in visceral fat similar to that seen in young obese (ob/ob or diet-induced obese [DIO]) mice. Yet, the effects of aging and obesity on inflammatory responses to immunotherapeutics are not well defined. We determine the effects of adiposity on systemic IT tolerance in aged compared with young obese mice. Both young ob/ob- and DIO-generated proinflammatory cytokine levels and organ pathologies are comparable to those in aged ad libitum mice after IT, culminating in lethality. Young obese mice exhibited greater ratios of M1/M2 macrophages within the peritoneal and visceral adipose tissues and higher percentages of TNF+ macrophages in response to ?CD40/IL-2 as compared with young lean mice. Macrophage depletion or TNF blockade in conjunction with ?CD40/IL-2 prevented cytokine storms in young obese mice and protected from lethality. Calorie-restricted aged mice contain less visceral fat and displayed reduced cytokine levels, protection from organ pathology, and protection from lethality upon ?CD40/IL-2 administration. Our data demonstrate that adiposity is a critical factor in the age-associated pathological responses to systemic anti-cancer IT. PMID:25366964

  15. High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene Glycol Prevents Lethal Sepsis Due to Intestinal Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    E-print Network

    Lee, Ka Yee C.

    High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene Glycol Prevents Lethal Sepsis Due to Intestinal Pseudomonas: During stress, erosion of protective intestinal mucus occurs in association with adherence to and disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier by in- vading opportunistic microbial pathogens. The aims

  16. Potential Non-lethal Deterrence Methods for Pacific Harbor Seals and California Sea Lions

    E-print Network

    Potential Non-lethal Deterrence Methods for Pacific Harbor Seals and California Sea Lions from Pacific harbor seals and California sea lions from damaging gear or depredating catch, ONLY IF ACTIVELY deter a seal or sea lion in such a manner that you cause injury to another person, you may be liable

  17. The lethal fighting of larvae in many parasitoid species is a striking example of

    E-print Network

    Mayhew, Peter

    The lethal fighting of larvae in many parasitoid species is a striking example of sibling rivalry. Theory has suggested that such fighting, and subsequent solitary development, might be irreversible larvae, with the retention of fighting behaviour, is one way to escape the trap of solitary development

  18. Synthetic dosage lethality in the human metabolic network is highly predictive of tumor growth and

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    to predict gene essentiality in shRNA cancer cell line screens. Moving to clinical tumors, we show that (ii is lethal. SDLs offer a promising way to kill cancer cells by inhibiting the activity of SDL partners) SDLs are significantly underrepresented in tumors. Further- more, breast cancer tumors with SDLs active

  19. ATR inhibition selectively sensitizes G1 checkpoint-deficient cells to lethal premature

    E-print Network

    Nghiem, Paul

    . This lethal event is prevented by a highly conserved checkpoint involving an unknown, caffeine-sensitive mediator. Here, we have examined the possible involvement of the caffeine-sensitive ATM and ATR protein kinases in this checkpoint. We show that caffeine's ability to inhibit ATR (but not ATM) causes PCC

  20. Introduction Niemann-Pick C disease (NPC) is a lethal, neuronopathic autoso-

    E-print Network

    Introduction Niemann-Pick C disease (NPC) is a lethal, neuronopathic autoso- mal recessive and ensuing course. Two disease-causing genes, NPC1 (NM000271) and NPC2 (NM006432), have been identified [3, 4]. About 95% of human NPC disease is caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene [5]. Both NPC1 and NPC2