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Sample records for conditional lethal mutants

  1. A conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium induces a protective response in mice.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A; Villagra, Nicols A; Jerez, Sebastin A; Fuentes, Juan A; Mora, Guido C

    2016-02-01

    Here we present the design of a conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) which growth depends on tetracycline (Tet). Four mutants of S. Typhimurium, with Tet-conditional growth, were created by inserting the tetRA cassette. Three of the mutants presented a conditional-lethal phenotype invitro. One mutant in the yabB gene remained conditional inside cells and did not persisted after 24h in cell cultures. The capacity of S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA to invade deep organs was investigated in intraperitoneally (IP) infected mice fed with or without chlortetracycline (CTet), a Tet analog with lower antibiotic activity. The yabB::tetRA mutant was undetectable in liver or spleen of animals under normal diet, while in mice under diet including CTet, yabB::tetRA invaded at a level comparable to the WT in mice under normal diet. Moreover, yabB::tetRA produced a strong humoral-immunoresponse after one IP immunization with 10(6) bacteria, measured as serum reactivity against S. Typhimurium whole cell extract. By contrast, oral immunization with 10(6) bacteria was weaker and variable on inducing antibodies. Consistently, IP infected mice were fully protected in a challenge with 10(4) oral S. Typhimurium, while protection was partial in orally immunized mice. Our data indicate that S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA is a conditionally attenuated strain capable of inducing a protective response in mice in non-permissive conditions. PMID:26792728

  2. Conditional lethal phosphatidylserine decarboxylase mutants of Escherichia coli. Mapping of the structural gene for phosphatidylserine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Hawrot, E; Kennedy, E P

    1976-11-17

    The final step in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine, the major membrane lipid of Escherichia coli, is catalyzed by the membrane-bound enzyme, phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. A variation of a procedure for localized mutagenesis (Hong and Ames, 1971) was employed to generate conditional lethal mutants in phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. In our modification, an episome carrying the psd gene closely linked to purA+ was heavily mutagenized in vivo in a strain also lysogenic for phage P1CMclr100. After induction of a phage lytic cycle, the purA+ marker was transduced to a purA- recipient. A majority of the Pur+ transductants thus contained a psd gene originating from the heavily mutagenized episomal strain. Three mutants were isolated in which temperature-sensitive growth is caused by thermosensitive phosphatidylserine decarboxylase activity that is defective in vivo at the non-permissive temperature. All 3 mutations were mapped at the same location as psd1, being cotransduced with melA, purA, and ampA. The gene order in this region, as determined by a phage Pl-meidated, three-factor cross is ampA-psd-purA. psd+ is dominant to the psd mutant alleles. PMID:796663

  3. A nutritional conditional lethal mutant due to pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase deficiency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wanhao; Zhang, Li; Du, Wei; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2014-06-01

    The concept of auxotrophic complementation has been proposed as an approach to identify genes in essential metabolic pathways in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it has achieved limited success to date, possibly due to the low probability of finding mutations fit with the chemically defined profile. Instead of using the chemically defined culture media lacking specific nutrients, we used bare minimum culture medium, i.e., 4% sucrose, for adult Drosophila. We identified a nutritional conditional lethal mutant and localized a c.95C > A mutation in the Drosophila pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase gene [dPNPO or sugarlethal (sgll)] using meiotic recombination mapping, deficiency mapping, and whole genome sequencing. PNPO converts dietary vitamin B6 such as pyridoxine to its active form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP). The missense mutation (sgll(95)) results in the substitution of alanine to aspartate (p.Ala32Asp). The sgll(95) flies survive well on complete medium but all die within 6 d on 4% sucrose only diet, which can be rescued by pyridoxine or PLP supplement, suggesting that the mutation does not cause the complete loss of PNPO activity. The sgll knockdown further confirms its function as the Drosophila PNPO. Because better tools for positional cloning and cheaper whole genome sequencing have made the identification of point mutations much easier than before, alleviating the necessity to pinpoint specific metabolic pathways before gene identification, we propose that nutritional conditional screens based on bare minimum growth media like ours represent promising approaches for discovering important genes and mutations in metabolic pathways, thereby accelerating the establishment of in vivo models that recapitulate human metabolic diseases. PMID:24739647

  4. A Nutritional Conditional Lethal Mutant Due to Pyridoxine 5?-Phosphate Oxidase Deficiency in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Wanhao; Zhang, Li; Du, Wei; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2014-01-01

    The concept of auxotrophic complementation has been proposed as an approach to identify genes in essential metabolic pathways in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it has achieved limited success to date, possibly due to the low probability of finding mutations fit with the chemically defined profile. Instead of using the chemically defined culture media lacking specific nutrients, we used bare minimum culture medium, i.e., 4% sucrose, for adult Drosophila. We identified a nutritional conditional lethal mutant and localized a c.95C > A mutation in the Drosophila pyridoxine 5?-phosphate oxidase gene [dPNPO or sugarlethal (sgll)] using meiotic recombination mapping, deficiency mapping, and whole genome sequencing. PNPO converts dietary vitamin B6 such as pyridoxine to its active form pyridoxal 5?-phosphate (PLP). The missense mutation (sgll95) results in the substitution of alanine to aspartate (p.Ala32Asp). The sgll95 flies survive well on complete medium but all die within 6 d on 4% sucrose only diet, which can be rescued by pyridoxine or PLP supplement, suggesting that the mutation does not cause the complete loss of PNPO activity. The sgll knockdown further confirms its function as the Drosophila PNPO. Because better tools for positional cloning and cheaper whole genome sequencing have made the identification of point mutations much easier than before, alleviating the necessity to pinpoint specific metabolic pathways before gene identification, we propose that nutritional conditional screens based on bare minimum growth media like ours represent promising approaches for discovering important genes and mutations in metabolic pathways, thereby accelerating the establishment of in vivo models that recapitulate human metabolic diseases. PMID:24739647

  5. Conditional lethality of cell shape mutations of Salmonella typhimurium: rodA and mre mutants are lethal on solid but not in liquid medium.

    PubMed

    Costa, C S; Antón, D N

    1999-03-01

    Round-cell (rodA, mre, divD) derivatives of a conditional alaS mutant of Salmonella typhimurium were studied under conditions allowing expression of tolerance to lethal cell shape mutations (41 degrees C), and under nontolerant conditions (30 degrees C). The rodA22::Tn10d(Kan) derivative grew normally (OD650 nm) in LB-broth at 30 degrees C; however, doubling of total cell count took much longer (130 min) than at 41 degrees C (57 min). Although the cells were able to divide in LB-broth at 30 degrees C, viable count on LB-agar at 30 degrees C was 10(3)-fold lower than on LB-agar at 41 degrees C. Phase-contrast microscopy of rodA cells incubated under different conditions showed that their size increased on LB-soft agar at 30 degrees C, but they failed to divide and finally lysed. In contrast, division occurred in LB-broth at 30 degrees C and also in LB-broth and LB-soft agar at 41 degrees C. The mre-17::Tn10d(Kan) derivative acted like the rodA strain whereas the divD135::Tn10d(Kan) mutant behaved normally both at 30 degrees C and 41 degrees C. It is concluded that rodA and mre mutations delay cell division, but are lethal only on solid medium. Mutations conferring tolerance to "lethal" rodA and mre mutations improve division performance both in liquid and solid media. PMID:9922463

  6. Conditionally lethal ribosomal protein mutants: characterization of a locus required for modification of 50S subunit proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, S R; Maples, V F; Champney, W S

    1977-01-01

    Mutagenized P1 bacteriophage were used to transduce a marker (aroE) adjacent to the cluster or ribosomal protein genes located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Linked temperature-sensitive transductants were isolated and characterized. A mutant unable to grow at 44 degrees was found to be defective in protein synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. At the restrictive temperature mutant cells lost all polyribosomes. Analysis of the ribosomal proteins revealed alterations in at least four 50S subunit proteins. The mutation (called rimE1, ribosomal protein modification) mapped between rpsE and aroE. It is suggested that the rimE locus is the structural gene for an activity that modifies a selected number of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:322127

  7. Glycoprotein IV of bovine herpesvirus 1-expressing cell line complements and rescues a conditionally lethal viral mutant.

    PubMed

    Fehler, F; Herrmann, J M; Saalmller, A; Mettenleiter, T C; Keil, G M

    1992-02-01

    Glycoprotein IV (gIV) of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), a homolog of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, represents a major component of the viral envelope and a dominant immunogen. To analyze the functional role of gIV during BHV-1 replication, cell line BUIV3-7, which constitutively expresses gIV, was constructed and used for the isolation of gIV- BHV-1 mutant 80-221, in which the gIV gene was replaced by a lacZ expression cassette. On complementing gIV-expressing cells, the gIV- BHV-1 replicated normally but was unable to form plaques and infectious progeny on noncomplementing cells. Further analysis showed that gIV is essential for BHV-1 entry into target cells, whereas viral gene expression, DNA replication, and envelopment appear unchanged in both noncomplementing and complementing cells infected with phenotypically complemented gIV- BHV-1. The block in entry could be overcome by polyethylene glycol-induced membrane fusion. After passaging of gIV- BHV-1 on complementing cells, a rescued variant, BHV-1res, was isolated and shown to underexpress gIV in comparison with its wild-type parent. Comparison of the penetration kinetics of BHV-1 wild type, phenotypically complemented gIV- BHV-1, and BHV-1res indicated that penetration efficiency correlated with the amount of gIV present in virus particles. In conclusion, we show that gIV of BHV-1 is an essential component of the virion involved in virus entry and that the amount of gIV in the viral envelope modulates the penetration efficiency of the virus. PMID:1309917

  8. Extragenic Suppression and Synthetic Lethality among Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii Mutants Resistant to anti-Microtubule Drugs

    PubMed Central

    James, S. W.; Silflow, C. D.; Thompson, M. D.; Ranum, LPW.; Lefebvre, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    The antimicrotubule agents oryzalin (ORY), colchicine (COL) and taxol (TAX) were used to select three recessive, conditional lethal (ts(-)) mutants which defined two new essential loci, ory1 and cor1. The two ory1 mutants conferred resistance to ORY, TAX, and COL; the cor1 mutant conferred resistance only to COL. Each of the mutants displayed wild-type sensitivity to a number of unrelated inhibitors. Assembly and disassembly of flagellar microtubules in the ory1 mutants displayed wild-type sensitivity to ORY and COL, suggesting that the ory1 gene product either does not participate in these processes or the ory1 gene product alone is not sufficient to confer resistance. The ory1 locus mapped to linkage group X; cor1 was mapped to the left arm of linkage group XII. A synthetic lethal interaction was observed between ory1 and cor1 mutations, i.e., inferred ory1 cor1 double mutants were inviable at the permissive temperature. The conditional lethal phenotype of ory1-1 was used to select many spontaneous TS(+) revertants, which arose at high frequencies. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of the revertants demonstrated that (1) the revertants fell into four phenotypic classes, including some which conferred supersensitivity to ORY and others which conferred cold-sensitive lethality, (2) reversion was caused in most or all cases by extragenic suppressors, (3) suppressor mutations displayed complex behavior in heterozygous (sup/+) diploids, (4) many different loci may be capable of suppressing ory1 mutants, and (5) suppressors of ory1-1 efficiently suppressed an independently isolated allele, ory1-2. Taken together the ory1, cor1, and suppressor mutations identify a number of interacting loci involved in essential cellular processes which are specifically susceptible to antimicrotubule agents. PMID:2569432

  9. Medical Conditions and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Durant, Tonji M.; Swahn, Monica H.

    2002-01-01

    This population-based, case-control study examined physical illness as a risk factor for suicidal behavior. Case patients were more likely than controls to report having any serious medical conditions. Results suggest that young men with medical conditions are at increased risk for nearly lethal suicide attempts. (Contains 33 references and 3

  10. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  11. Pleiotropic phenotypes of a Yersinia enterocolitica flhD mutant include reduced lethality in a chicken embryo model

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Megan K; Carr, Nathan J; Iyer, Jyoti G; Horne, Shelley M; Gibbs, Penelope S; Prüß, Birgit M

    2008-01-01

    Background The Yersinia enterocolitica flagellar master regulator FlhD/FlhC affects the expression levels of non-flagellar genes, including 21 genes that are involved in central metabolism. The sigma factor of the flagellar system, FliA, has a negative effect on the expression levels of seven plasmid-encoded virulence genes in addition to its positive effect on the expression levels of eight of the flagellar operons. This study investigates the phenotypes of flhD and fliA mutants that result from the complex gene regulation. Results Phenotypes relating to central metabolism were investigated with Phenotype MicroArrays. Compared to the wild-type strain, isogenic flhD and fliA mutants exhibited increased growth on purines and reduced growth on N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and D-mannose, when used as a sole carbon source. Both mutants grew more poorly on pyrimidines and L-histidine as sole nitrogen source. Several intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycle, as well as several dipeptides, provided differential growth conditions for the two mutants. Gene expression was determined for selected genes and correlated with the observed phenotypes. Phenotypes relating to virulence were determined with the chicken embryo lethality assay. The assay that was previously established for Escherichia coli strains was modified for Y. enterocolitica. The flhD mutant caused reduced chicken embryo lethality when compared to wild-type bacteria. In contrast, the fliA mutant caused wild-type lethality. This indicates that the virulence phenotype of the flhD mutant might be due to genes that are regulated by FlhD/FlhC but not FliA, such as those that encode the flagellar type III secretion system. Conclusion Phenotypes of flhD and fliA mutants are related to central metabolism and virulence and correlate with gene regulation. PMID:18215272

  12. Postnatal lethality and abnormal development of foregut and spleen in Ndrg4 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xianghu; Li, Jing; Baldwin, H Scott

    2016-02-12

    NDRG4 is a member of the NDRG family (N-myc downstream-regulated gene), which is highly expressed in brain and heart. Previous studies showed that Ndrg1-deficient mice exhibited a progressive demyelinating disorder of peripheral nerves and Ndrg4-deficient mice had spatial learning deficits and vulnerabilities to cerebral ischemia. Here, we report generation of Ndrg4 mutant alleles that exhibit several development defects different from those previously reported. Our homozygous mice showed growth retardation and postnatal lethality. Spleen and thymuses of Ndrg4(-/-) mice are considerably reduced in size from 3 weeks of age. Histological analysis revealed abnormal hyperkeratosis in the squamous foregut and abnormal loss of erythrocytes in the spleen of Ndrg4(-/-) mice. In addition, we observed an abnormal hind limb clasping phenotype upon tail suspension suggesting neurological abnormalities. Consistent to these abnormalities, Ndrg4 is expressed in smooth muscle cells of the stomach, macrophages of the spleen and neurons. Availability of the conditional allele for Ndrg4 should facilitate further detailed analyses of the potential roles of Ndrg4 in gut development, nervous system and immune system. PMID:26801554

  13. CDK1 Is a Synthetic Lethal Target for KRAS Mutant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Cabral, Sara; Brough, Rachel; Konde, Asha; Aarts, Marieke; Campbell, James; Marinari, Eliana; Riffell, Jenna; Bardelli, Alberto; Torrance, Christopher; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Activating KRAS mutations are found in approximately 20% of human cancers but no RAS-directed therapies are currently available. Here we describe a novel, robust, KRAS synthetic lethal interaction with the cyclin dependent kinase, CDK1. This was discovered using parallel siRNA screens in KRAS mutant and wild type colorectal isogenic tumour cells and subsequently validated in a genetically diverse panel of 26 colorectal and pancreatic tumour cell models. This established that the KRAS/CDK1 synthetic lethality applies in tumour cells with either amino acid position 12 (p.G12V, pG12D, p.G12S) or amino acid position 13 (p.G13D) KRAS mutations and can also be replicated in vivo in a xenograft model using a small molecule CDK1 inhibitor. Mechanistically, CDK1 inhibition caused a reduction in the S-phase fraction of KRAS mutant cells, an effect also characterised by modulation of Rb, a master control of the G1/S checkpoint. Taken together, these observations suggest that the KRAS/CDK1 interaction is a robust synthetic lethal effect worthy of further investigation. PMID:26881434

  14. Conditional lethality strains for the biological control of Anastrepha species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pro-apoptotic cell death genes are promising candidates for biologically-based autocidal control of pest insects as demonstrated by tetracycline (tet)-suppressible systems for conditional embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Cc). However, for medfly...

  15. Strategies for Molecularly Enhanced Chemotherapy to Achieve Synthetic Lethality in Endometrial Tumors with Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangbing; Dizon, Don S.; Yang, Shujie; Wang, Xinjun; Zhu, Danlin; Thiel, Kristina W.; Leslie, Kimberly K.

    2013-01-01

    Serous uterine endometrial carcinomas are aggressive type II cancers with poor outcomes for which new treatment strategies are urgently needed, in particular, strategies that augment sensitivity to established chemotherapy regimens. The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is dysregulated in more than 90% of serous tumors, altering master regulators of the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint in unique and predictable ways and desensitizing cells to chemotherapy. We hypothesized that synthetic lethality can be achieved in endometrial cancer cells with mutant p53 by combining paclitaxel with agents to overcome G2/M arrest and induce mitotic catastrophe. The combination of BIBF1120, an investigational VEGFR, PDGFR, and FGFR multityrosine kinase inhibitor with established anti-angiogenic activity, with paclitaxel abrogated the G2/M checkpoint in p53-null endometrial cancer cells via modulation of G2/M checkpoint regulators followed by induction of mitotic cell death. In endometrial cancer cells harboring an oncogenic gain-of-function p53 mutation, synthetic lethality was created by combining paclitaxel with BIBF1120 and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, which serves to destabilize mutant p53. These cells were also sensitive to an inhibitor of the G2/M kinase Wee1 in combination with paclitaxel. These findings reveal that, in addition to antiangiogenic activity, the angiokinase inhibitor BIBF1120 can be used to restore sensitivity to paclitaxel and induce mitotic cell death in endometrial cancer cells with non-functional p53. These preclinical data serve as a critical platform for the creative design of future clinical trials utilizing molecularly enhanced chemotherapy to achieve synthetic lethality based on the mutational landscape. PMID:24381593

  16. Histone acetylation and gene expression analysis of sex lethal mutants in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, U; Pal-Bhadra, M; Birchler, J A

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of sex determination mechanisms is often accompanied by reduction in dosage of genes on a whole chromosome. Under these circumstances, negatively acting regulatory genes would tend to double the expression of the genome, which produces compensation of the single-sex chromosome and increases autosomal gene expression. Previous work has suggested that to reduce the autosomal expression to the female level, these dosage effects are modified by a chromatin complex specific to males, which sequesters a histone acetylase to the X. The reduced autosomal histone 4 lysine 16 (H4Lys16) acetylation results in lowered autosomal expression, while the higher acetylation on the X is mitigated by the male-specific lethal complex, preventing overexpression. In this report, we examine how mutations in the principal sex determination gene, Sex lethal (Sxl), impact the H4 acetylation and gene expression on both the X and autosomes. When Sxl expression is missing in females, we find that the sequestration occurs concordantly with reductions in autosomal H4Lys16 acetylation and gene expression on the whole. When Sxl is ectopically expressed in Sxl(M) mutant males, the sequestration is disrupted, leading to an increase in autosomal H4Lys16 acetylation and overall gene expression. In both cases we find relatively little effect upon X chromosomal gene expression. PMID:10835396

  17. Dysfunctional conformational dynamics of protein kinase A induced by a lethal mutant of phospholamban hinder phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonggul; Masterson, Larry R.; Cembran, Alessandro; Verardi, Raffaello; Shi, Lei; Gao, Jiali; Taylor, Susan S.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between kinases and substrates is crucial for the formation of catalytically committed complexes that enable phosphoryl transfer. However, a clear understanding on how substrates modulate kinase structural dynamics to control catalytic efficiency is still missing. Here, we used solution NMR spectroscopy to study the conformational dynamics of two complexes of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A with WT and R14 deletion phospholamban, a lethal human mutant linked to familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Phospholamban is a central regulator of heart muscle contractility, and its phosphorylation by protein kinase A constitutes a primary response to ?-adrenergic stimulation. We found that the single deletion of arginine in phospholambans recognition sequence for the kinase reduces its binding affinity and dramatically reduces phosphorylation kinetics. Structurally, the mutant prevents the enzyme from adopting conformations and motions committed for catalysis, with concomitant reduction in catalytic efficiency. Overall, these results underscore the importance of a well-tuned structural and dynamic interplay between the kinase and its substrates to achieve physiological phosphorylation levels for proper Ca2+ signaling and normal cardiac function. PMID:25775607

  18. Responses of radiation-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to lethal effects of bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Moore, C W

    1978-08-01

    Haploid and diploid strains of yeast containing genes conferring radiation-sensitivity were studied under growing and nongrowing experimental conditions for their relative sensitivities to growth-inhibitory effects of bleomycin (BM). The rad1, rad2, rad3, rad4, rad5 (and allelic rev2), rad7, rad10, rad11, rad 12, rad14, rad15, rad16 and rev3 strains exhibited responses similar to normal (Rad+) yeast strains. It is concluded from these findings that the excision-repair function deficient in several of these mutant strains is not important for repair of bleomycin-induced damages in yeast. The sensitive strains contained rad6, rad9, rad18, rad22, rad50, rad51, rad52, rad53, rad54, rad55, rad56, rad57 and rs1. Strains bearing rad8 or rad19 could not be classified unambiguously. With one exception, all rad mutants found very sensitive to BM were sensitive to X-rays, suggesting that some aspect of the repair of BM- and X-ray-induced damages in yeast may be similar. Sensitivities to BM and radiation co-segregated in pedigrees following meiosis, and several BM-resistant revertants isolated from two rad6 mutant strains sensitive to BM, X-rays and UV were cross-resistant to all three agents. These results confirm that the rad mutants were responsible for the cross-sensitivities in the original strains. PMID:80746

  19. Genetic characterization of the Drosophila jaguar322 mutant reveals that complete myosin VI loss of function is not lethal.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Julie K; Miller, Kathryn G

    2008-05-01

    Myosin VI is an actin-based motor that has been implicated in many cellular processes. Studies in vertebrates have demonstrated that animals lacking this ubiquitously expressed myosin are viable. However in Drosophila, myosin VI loss of function has been thought to be lethal. We show here that complete loss of myosin VI is not lethal in flies and that the previously reported lethality of the null mutation (jar322) is most likely due to deletion of a neighboring gene. Maternally provided myosin VI does not account for the survival of myosin VI null animals. Mutant animals are recovered at a lower than expected Mendelian frequency, suggesting that myosin VI participates in processes which contribute to normal development, but its participation is not essential. PMID:18493084

  20. Synthetic lethality in ATM-deficient RAD50-mutant tumors underlie outlier response to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Iyer, Gopa; Hohl, Marcel; Asthana, Saurabh; Inagaki, Akiko; Schultz, Nikolaus; Hanrahan, Aphrothiti J.; Scott, Sasinya N.; Brannon, A. Rose; McDermott, Gregory C.; Pirun, Mono; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Kim, Philip; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Schwartz, Gary K.; Reuter, Victor; Bochner, Bernard H.; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Berger, Michael F.; Petrini, John H.J.; Solit, David B.; Taylor, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic solid tumors are almost invariably fatal. Patients with disseminated small-cell cancers have a particularly unfavorable prognosis with most succumbing to their disease within two years. Here, we report on the genetic and functional analysis of an outlier curative response of a patient with metastatic small cell cancer to combined checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) inhibition and DNA damaging chemotherapy. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a clonal hemizygous mutation in the Mre11 complex gene RAD50 that attenuated ATM signaling which in the context of Chk1 inhibition contributed, via synthetic lethality, to extreme sensitivity to irinotecan. As Mre11 mutations occur in a diversity of human tumors, the results suggest a tumor-specific combination therapy strategy whereby checkpoint inhibition in combination with DNA damaging chemotherapy is synthetically lethal in tumor but not normal cells with somatic mutations that impair Mre11 complex function. PMID:24934408

  1. Potentially lethal damage repair is due to the difference of DNA double-strand break repair under immediate and delayed plating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberg-Schwager, M.; Frankenberg, D.; Harbich, R.

    1987-08-01

    Cells plated immediately after irradiation on nutrient agar (immediate plating) exhibit a lower survival than cells which are kept under nongrowth conditions before plating (delayed plating). The difference between the survival curves obtained after immediate plating and delayed plating is considered to exhibit the cell's capacity to repair potentially lethal damage. In yeast evidence has been presented previously for the DNA double-strand break (DSB) as the molecular lesion involved in the repair of potentially lethal damage observed at the cellular level. Radiation-induced DSB are repaired in cells plated on nutrient agar, i.e., under growth conditions, as well as in cells kept under nongrowth conditions. In this paper DSB repair under growth and nongrowth conditions is studied with the help of the yeast mutant rad54-3 which is temperature conditional for DSB repair. It is shown that the extent of repair of potentially lethal damage can be varied by shifting the relative fractions of repair of DSB under growth conditions versus nongrowth conditions. Repair of DSB in cells plated on nutrient agar is promoted when glucose is substituted by Na-succinate as an energy source. As a result the immediate plating survival curve approaches the delayed plating survival curve, thus reducing the operationally defined repair of potentially lethal damage. We show that this reduced potentially lethal damage repair is caused, however, by a higher amount of DSB repair in cells immediately plated on succinate agar as compared to glucose agar.

  2. Characterization of Synthetic-Lethal Mutants Reveals a Role for the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor Cdc24p in Vacuole Function and Na(+) Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    White, W. H.; Johnson, D. I.

    1997-01-01

    Cdc24p is the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for the Cdc42p GTPase, which controls cell polarity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify new genes that may affect cell polarity, we characterized six UV-induced csl (CDC24 synthetic-lethal) mutants that exhibited synthetic-lethality with cdc24-4(ts) at 23. Five mutants were not complemented by plasmid-borne CDC42, RSR1, BUD5, BEM1, BEM2, BEM3 or CLA4 genes, which are known to play a role in cell polarity. The csl3 mutant displayed phenotypes similar to those observed with calcium-sensitive, Pet(-) vma mutants defective in vacuole function. CSL5 was allelic to VMA5, the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit C, and one third of csl5 cdc24-4(ts) cells were elongated or had misshapen buds. A cdc24-4(ts) ?vma5::LEU2 double mutant did not exhibit synthetic lethality, suggesting that the csl5/vma5 cdc24-4(ts) synthetic-lethality was not simply due to altered vacuole function. The cdc24-4(ts) mutant, like ?vma5::LEU2 and csl3 mutants, was sensitive to high levels of Ca(2+) as well as Na(+) in the growth media, which did not appear to be a result of a fragile cell wall because the phenotypes were not remedied by 1 M sorbitol. Our results indicated that Cdc24p was required in one V-ATPase mutant and another mutant affecting vacuole morphology, and also implicated Cdc24p in Na(+) tolerance. PMID:9286667

  3. Characteristics of Plant Essential Genes Allow for within- and between-Species Prediction of Lethal Mutant Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, John P; Seddon, Alexander E; Moghe, Gaurav D; Simenc, Matthew C; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2015-08-01

    Essential genes represent critical cellular components whose disruption results in lethality. Characteristics shared among essential genes have been uncovered in fungal and metazoan model systems. However, features associated with plant essential genes are largely unknown and the full set of essential genes remains to be discovered in any plant species. Here, we show that essential genes in Arabidopsis thaliana have distinct features useful for constructing within- and cross-species prediction models. Essential genes in A. thaliana are often single copy or derived from older duplications, highly and broadly expressed, slow evolving, and highly connected within molecular networks compared with genes with nonlethal mutant phenotypes. These gene features allowed the application of machine learning methods that predicted known lethal genes as well as an additional 1970 likely essential genes without documented phenotypes. Prediction models from A. thaliana could also be applied to predict Oryza sativa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae essential genes. Importantly, successful predictions drew upon many features, while any single feature was not sufficient. Our findings show that essential genes can be distinguished from genes with nonlethal phenotypes using features that are similar across kingdoms and indicate the possibility for translational application of our approach to species without extensive functional genomic and phenomic resources. PMID:26286535

  4. Characteristics of Plant Essential Genes Allow for within- and between-Species Prediction of Lethal Mutant Phenotypes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, John P.; Seddon, Alexander E.; Moghe, Gaurav D.; Simenc, Matthew C.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2015-01-01

    Essential genes represent critical cellular components whose disruption results in lethality. Characteristics shared among essential genes have been uncovered in fungal and metazoan model systems. However, features associated with plant essential genes are largely unknown and the full set of essential genes remains to be discovered in any plant species. Here, we show that essential genes in Arabidopsis thaliana have distinct features useful for constructing within- and cross-species prediction models. Essential genes in A. thaliana are often single copy or derived from older duplications, highly and broadly expressed, slow evolving, and highly connected within molecular networks compared with genes with nonlethal mutant phenotypes. These gene features allowed the application of machine learning methods that predicted known lethal genes as well as an additional 1970 likely essential genes without documented phenotypes. Prediction models from A. thaliana could also be applied to predict Oryza sativa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae essential genes. Importantly, successful predictions drew upon many features, while any single feature was not sufficient. Our findings show that essential genes can be distinguished from genes with nonlethal phenotypes using features that are similar across kingdoms and indicate the possibility for translational application of our approach to species without extensive functional genomic and phenomic resources. PMID:26286535

  5. Natural and glucosyl flavonoids inhibit poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and induce synthetic lethality in BRCA mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    MAEDA, JUNKO; ROYBAL, ERICA J.; BRENTS, COLLEEN A.; UESAKA, MITSURU; AIZAWA, YASUSHI; KATO, TAKAMITSU A.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have been proven to represent superior clinical agents targeting DNA repair mechanisms in cancer therapy. We investigated PARP inhibitory effects of the natural and synthetic flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, monoglucosyl rutin and maltooligosyl rutin) and tested the synthetic lethality in BRCA2 mutated cells. In vitro ELISA assay suggested that the flavonoids have inhibitory effects on PARP activity, but glucosyl modifications reduced the inhibitory effect. Cytotoxicity tests of Chinese hamster cells defective in BRCA2 gene (V-C8) and its parental V79 cells showed BRCA2-dependent synthetic lethality when treated with the flavonoids. BRCA2 mutated cells were three times more sensitive to the flavonoids than the wild-type and gene complemented cells. Reduced toxicity was observed in a glucosyl modification-dependent manner. The present study provides support for the clinical use of new treatment drugs, and is the beginning of the potential application of flavonoids in cancer prevention and the periodic consumption of appropriate flavonoids to reduce cancer risk in individuals carrying a mutant allele of the BRCA2 gene. PMID:24317580

  6. Transgenic expression of the N525S-tuberin variant in Tsc2 mutant (Eker) rats causes dominant embryonic lethality.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Riichi; Ueda, Masatsugu; Ishioka, Chikashi; Hino, Okio

    2014-01-01

    The Tsc2 product, tuberin, negatively regulates the mTOR pathway. We have exploited the Eker (Tsc2-mutant) rat system to analyse various Tsc2 mutations. Here, we focus on the N525S-Tsc2 variant (NSM), which is known to cause distinct symptoms in patients even though normal suppression of mTOR is observed. Unexpectedly, we were repeatedly unable to generate viable rats carrying the NSM transgene. Genotypic analysis revealed that most of the embryos carrying the transgene died around embryonic day after 14.5-similar to the stage of lethality observed for Eker homozygotes. Thus, the NSM transgene appeared to have a dominant lethal effect in our rat model. Further, no significant differences were observed for various signal transduction molecules in transiently expressed NSM cells compared to WT. These results indicate that a non-mTOR pathway, critical for embryogenesis, is being regulated by tuberin, providing a link between tuberin expression and the severity of Tsc2 mutation-related pathogenesis. PMID:25088526

  7. The Structural Variation Is Associated with the Embryonic Lethality of a Novel Red Egg Mutant Fuyin-lre of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiongyan; Zhao, Qiaoling; Yang, Weike; Zhu, Shuifen; Wu, Fang; He, Rongfan; Dong, Zhanpeng; Huang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori presents several types of egg color mutations, all of which have been extensively discussed in sericulture. While the red egg mutation has been previously observed, lethal red-egg mutants have not been reported. In the present work, the red egg mutant Fuyin-lre (Fuyin-lethal red egg) was discovered from the Fuyin germplasm resource of B. mori. This mutant features red-colored eggs and embryonic lethality. Genetic analysis showed that Fuyin-lre follows recessive inheritance, with the red egg gene re governing the egg color, and the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre may be caused by mutations of other genes closely linked to re. Digital gene expression (DGE) was employed to compare the transcription profiles of Fuyin and Fuyin-lre eggs after 24 and 48 h of incubation. A total of 48 differentially expressed genes followed the same expression patterns in both groups at both time points (FDR < 0.01 and log 2 Ratio ? 1). Further analyses indicated that 8 out of the 48 genes (including re) were closely linked to re. These 8 genes were highly expressed in wild-type Fuyin and the red egg mutant re but showed nearly absent expression in Fuyin-lre. Sequencing of the re gene confirmed that the re gene itself does not induce embryonic lethality, and structure analysis showed that the structural variation of the region where the 8 genes were located may be associated with the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre. The present work provides a good foundation for future studies on the mechanism of embryonic lethality and embryonic development in Fuyin-lre. PMID:26030868

  8. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  9. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiological synergy during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Henrie, Melinda S; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Ménissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C; Chen, David J

    2003-02-01

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70- and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-/Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice. PMID:12531386

  10. Effects of metallothionein on zinc metabolism in lethal-milk mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The lethal-milk mice (C57BL/6J-Im) exhibit various pleiotropic effects, including a congenital otolith defect, production of zinc-deficient milk, and clinical signs of a systemic Zn deficiency by one year of age. The clinical signs include alopecia, dermatitis, and skin lesions. The systemic zinc deficiency may be due to increased levels of metallothionein (MT) in the intestine and/or liver of Im mice. The untreated Im mice contain twice as much intestinal MT as do C57BL/6J-(+/sup im//+ /sup Im/) (B6) controls. This was determined by a sulfhydryl assay, by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method, and by the /sup 65/Zn-binding assay. Various concentrations of Cd or Zn were added to the drinking water three days before assaying for MT. Compared to B6 mice, the Im mice exhibited more MT in their liver by the /sup 65/Zn-MT binding assay (3-fold) and by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method (18-fold). The effects of the two zinc treatments did not differ significantly between Im and B6 mice. The retention and excretion of /sup 65/Zn (administered intraperitoneally) were determined over a 14-day period, but the results did not different between the Im and B6 mice. The increased concentrations of MT within the Im mice was not significantly different for the intestine and liver. Based on these data and other studies, the Im mice may exhibit alterations in zinc homeostasis due to some deregulation of MT metabolism, including the inner ear of the fetus, the lactating mammary gland, and the intestine and liver of adults by one year of age.

  11. Cancer susceptibility and embryonic lethality in Mob1a/1b double-mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Miki; Hamada, Koichi; Kawahara, Kohichi; Sasaki, Masato; Noguchi, Fumihito; Chiba, Shuhei; Mizuno, Kensaku; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Dong, Youyi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Morikawa, Takumi; Hikasa, Hiroki; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan; Yabuta, Norikazu; Nojima, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Hata, Yutaka; Nishina, Hiroshi; Mimori, Koshi; Mori, Masaki; Sasaki, Takehiko; Mak, Tak W.; Nakano, Toru; Itami, Satoshi; Suzuki, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Mps one binder 1a (MOB1A) and MOB1B are key components of the Hippo signaling pathway and are mutated or inactivated in many human cancers. Here we show that intact Mob1a or Mob1b is essential for murine embryogenesis and that loss of the remaining WT Mob1 allele in Mob1a?/?1btr/+ or Mob1a?/+1btr/tr mice results in tumor development. Because most of these cancers resembled trichilemmal carcinomas, we generated double-mutant mice bearing tamoxifen-inducible, keratinocyte-specific homozygous-null mutations of Mob1a and Mob1b (kDKO mice). kDKO mice showed hyperplastic keratinocyte progenitors and defective keratinocyte terminal differentiation and soon died of malnutrition. kDKO keratinocytes exhibited hyperproliferation, apoptotic resistance, impaired contact inhibition, enhanced progenitor self renewal, and increased centrosomes. Examination of Hippo pathway signaling in kDKO keratinocytes revealed that loss of Mob1a/b altered the activities of the downstream Hippo mediators LATS and YAP1. Similarly, YAP1 was activated in some human trichilemmal carcinomas, and some of these also exhibited MOB1A/1B inactivation. Our results clearly demonstrate that MOB1A and MOB1B have overlapping functions in skin homeostasis, and exert their roles as tumor suppressors by regulating downstream elements of the Hippo pathway. PMID:23143302

  12. Vaccination with plasmid DNA encoding a mutant toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 ameliorates toxin-induced lethal shock in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mao-Hui; Cui, Jing-Chun; Nakane, Akio; Hu, Dong-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), a superantigenic toxin produced by Staphylococcus (S.) aureus, is a major cause of septic shock and toxic shock syndrome. To investigate whether vaccination with a plasmid DNA encoding a non-toxic mutant TSST-1 (mTSST-1) can protect mice against wild-type TSST-1-induced lethal shock, the mice were intranasally immunized with the plasmid DNA (named pcDNA-mTSST-1) plus a mucosal adjuvant, a non-toxic mutant labile toxin (mLT). After the immunization, the mice were challenged with TSST-1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The survival rate of mice immunized with pcDNA-mTSST-1 plus mLT was higher than that of the control mice immunized with PBS alone, mLT alone, pcDNA-mTSST-1 alone, or a parent plasmid plus mLT. The titers of interferon-? (IFN-?) in the sera of mice immunized with pcDNA-mTSST-1 plus mLT were significantly lower than those of the mLT control mice. Immunization with pcDNA-mTSST-1 plus mLT increased the serum levels of TSST-1-specific antibodies, especially immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG2a subclasses. Furthermore, the sera obtained from mice immunized with pcDNA-mTSST-1 plus mLT significantly inhibited the TSST-1-induced secretion of IFN-? and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) in murine spleen cells in vitro. These results indicate that immunization with pcDNA-mTSST-1 plus mLT provides protection against the lethal toxic shock of mice induced by wild-type TSST-1. The protective effect could be due to TSST-1-specific neutralizing antibodies as well as the inhibition of IFN-? and TNF-? secretions. Since TSST-1 is commonly released by invasive S. aureus, the pcDNA-mTSST-1 should be useful in preventing toxin-induced shock resulting from S. aureus infection. PMID:23985881

  13. Lung-cancer chemoprevention by induction of synthetic lethality in mutant KRAS premalignant cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaoyi; Ren, Xiaoyang; Wang, Lai; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Xiangwei

    2011-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States, with a low 5-year survival rate despite improved treatment strategies. These data underscore the great need for effective chemoprevention of this cancer. Mutations and activation of KRAS occur frequently in, and are thought to be a primary driver of the development of, non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) of the adenocarcinoma subtype. In this study, we developed a new approach for the chemoprevention of NSCLC involving specific targeting of apoptosis in mutant KRAS cells. This approach is based on a synthetic lethal interaction among TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), the second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase Smac/DIABLO (Smac), and KRAS. Mutational activation of KRAS modulated the expression of TRAIL receptors by upregulating death receptors and downregulating decoy receptors. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS repressed cellular FADD-like interleukin 1β-converting enzyme (FLICE)-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) expression through activation of Erk/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated activation of c-Myc. Smac overcame KRAS-induced cell-survival signaling by antagonizing X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Therefore, the combination of TRAIL and a small molecule mimic of Smac induced apoptosis specifically in mutant KRAS cells without harming normal cells. We further showed that short-term, intermittent in vivo treatment with TRAIL and Smac mimic induced apoptosis in tumor cells and reduced tumor burden in a murine model of KRAS-induced lung cancer. These results reflect the potential benefit of a selective therapeutic approach for the chemoprevention of NSCLC. PMID:21543344

  14. Mutual correction of faulty PCNA subunits in temperature-sensitive lethal mus209 mutants of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, D S; Wiegand, U K; Norman, D G; Glover, D M

    2000-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) functions in DNA replication as a processivity factor for polymerases delta and epsilon, and in multiple DNA repair processes. We describe two temperature-sensitive lethal alleles (mus209(B1) and mus209(2735)) of the Drosophila PCNA gene that, at temperatures permissive for growth, result in hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, suppression of position-effect variegation, and female sterility in which ovaries are underdeveloped and do not produce eggs. We show by mosaic analysis that the sterility of mus209(B1) is partly due to a failure of germ-line cells to proliferate. Strikingly, mus209(B1) and mus209(2735) interact to restore partial fertility to heteroallelic females, revealing additional roles for PCNA in ovarian development, meiotic recombination, and embryogenesis. We further show that, although mus209(B1) and mus209(2735) homozygotes are each defective in repair of transposase-induced DNA double-strand breaks in somatic cells, this defect is substantially reversed in the heteroallelic mutant genotype. These novel mutations map to adjacent sites on the three-dimensional structure of PCNA, which was unexpected in the context of this observed interallelic complementation. These mutations, as well as four others we describe, reveal new relationships between the structure and function of PCNA. PMID:10747065

  15. When a Fly Has to Fly to Reproduce: Selection against Conditional Recessive Lethals in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Andrea D.; Yampolsky, Lev Y.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experimental model suitable for demonstrating allele frequency change in Drosophila melanogaster populations caused by selection against an easily scorable conditional lethal, namely recessive flightless alleles such as apterous and vestigial. Homozygotes for these alleles are excluded from reproduction because the food source used…

  16. When a Fly Has to Fly to Reproduce: Selection against Conditional Recessive Lethals in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Andrea D.; Yampolsky, Lev Y.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experimental model suitable for demonstrating allele frequency change in Drosophila melanogaster populations caused by selection against an easily scorable conditional lethal, namely recessive flightless alleles such as apterous and vestigial. Homozygotes for these alleles are excluded from reproduction because the food source used

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis contributes to a skeletal dysplasia resembling platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type, in a novel Col2a1 mutant mouse line.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Ichimura, Satoki; Sasaki, Kuniaki; Masuya, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Ikegawa, Shiro; Furuichi, Tatsuya

    2015-12-01

    In humans, mutations in the COL2A1 gene encoding the ?1(II) chain of type II collagen, create many clinical phenotypes collectively termed type II collagenopathies. However, the mechanisms generating this diversity remain to be determined. Here we identified a novel Col2a1 mutant mouse line by screening a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutant mouse library. This mutant possessed a p.Tyr1391Ser missense mutation in the C-propeptide coding region, and this mutation was located in positions corresponding to the human COL2A1 mutation responsible for platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type (PLSD-T). As expected, p.Tyr1391Ser homozygotes exhibited lethal skeletal dysplasias resembling PLSD-T, including extremely short limbs and severe dysplasia of the spine and pelvis. The secretion of the mutant proteins into the extracellular space was disrupted, accompanied by an abnormally expanded endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the up-regulation of ER stress-related genes in chondrocytes. Chondrocyte apoptosis was severely induced in the growth plate of the homozygotes. These findings strongly suggest that ER stress-mediated apoptosis caused by the accumulated mutant proteins in ER contributes to skeletal dysplasia in Co12a1 mutant mice and PLSD-T patients. PMID:26545783

  18. sigE facilitates the adaptation of Bordetella bronchiseptica to stress conditions and lethal infection in immunocompromised mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cell envelope of a bacterial pathogen can be damaged by harsh conditions in the environment outside a host and by immune factors during infection. Cell envelope stress responses preserve the integrity of this essential compartment and are often required for virulence. Bordetella species are important respiratory pathogens that possess a large number of putative transcription factors. However, no cell envelope stress responses have been described in these species. Among the putative Bordetella transcription factors are a number of genes belonging to the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) group of alternative sigma factors, some of which are known to mediate cell envelope stress responses in other bacteria. Here we investigate the role of one such gene, sigE, in stress survival and pathogenesis of Bordetella bronchiseptica. Results We demonstrate that sigE encodes a functional sigma factor that mediates a cell envelope stress response. Mutants of B. bronchiseptica strain RB50 lacking sigE are more sensitive to high temperature, ethanol, and perturbation of the envelope by SDS-EDTA and certain β-lactam antibiotics. Using a series of immunocompromised mice deficient in different components of the innate and adaptive immune responses, we show that SigE plays an important role in evading the innate immune response during lethal infections of mice lacking B cells and T cells. SigE is not required, however, for colonization of the respiratory tract of immunocompetent mice. The sigE mutant is more efficiently phagocytosed and killed by peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) than RB50, and exhibits decreased cytotoxicity toward macrophages. These altered interactions with phagocytes could contribute to the defects observed during lethal infection. Conclusions Much of the work on transcriptional regulation during infection in B. bronchiseptica has focused on the BvgAS two-component system. This study reveals that the SigE regulon also mediates a discrete subset of functions associated with virulence. SigE is the first cell envelope stress-sensing system to be described in the bordetellae. In addition to its role during lethal infection of mice deficient in adaptive immunity, our results indicate that SigE is likely to be important for survival in the face of stresses encountered in the environment between hosts. PMID:22897969

  19. NADH Dehydrogenase Defects Confer Isoniazid Resistance and Conditional Lethality in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Miesel, Lynn; Weisbrod, Torin R.; Marcinkeviciene, Jovita A.; Bittman, Robert; Jacobs, William R.

    1998-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is a highly effective drug used in the treatment and prophylaxis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Resistance to INH in clinical isolates has been correlated with mutations in the inhA, katG, and ahpC genes. In this report, we describe a new mechanism for INH resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Mutations that reduce NADH dehydrogenase activity (Ndh; type II) cause multiple phenotypes, including (i) coresistance to INH and a related drug, ethionamide; (ii) thermosensitive lethality; and (iii) auxotrophy. These phenotypes are corrected by expression of one of two enzymes: NADH dehydrogenase and the NADH-dependent malate dehydrogenase of the M. tuberculosis complex. The genetic data presented here indicate that defects in NADH oxidation cause all of the mutant traits and that an increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio confers INH resistance. PMID:9573199

  20. Conditional inactivation of TGF-? type II receptor in smooth muscle cells and epicardium causes lethal aortic and cardiac defects.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Dominique; Hneino, Mohammad; Bouazza, Lamia; Parlakian, Ara; Sasaki, Takako; Bricca, Giampiero; Li, Jacques Yuan

    2010-12-01

    To understand the role of TGF-? signaling in cardiovascular development, we generated mice with conditional deletion of the TGF-? type II receptor (T?RII) gene (Tgfbr2) in cells expressing the smooth muscle cell-specific protein SM22?. The SM22? promoter was active in tissues involved in cardiovascular development: vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), epicardium and myocardium. All SM22-Cre(+/-)/Tgfbr2 (flox/flox) embryos died during the last third of gestation. About half the mutant embryos exhibited heart defects (ventricular myocardium hypoplasia and septal defects). All mutant embryos displayed profound vascular abnormalities in the descending thoracic aorta (irregular outline and thickness, occasional aneurysms and elastic fiber disarray). Restriction of these defects to the descending thoracic aorta occurred despite similar levels of Tgfbr2 invalidation in the other portions of the aorta, the ductus arteriosus and the pulmonary trunk. Immunocytochemistry identified impairment of VSMC differentiation in the coronary vessels and the descending thoracic aorta as crucial for the defects. Ventricular myocardial hypoplasia, when present, was associated to impaired ?-SMA differentiation of the epicardium-derived coronary VSMCs. Tgfbr2 deletion in the VSMCs of the descending thoracic aorta diminished the number of ?-SMA-positive VSMC progenitors in the media at E11.5 and drastically decreased tropoelastin (from E11.5) and fibulin-5 (from E.12.5) synthesis and/or deposition. Defective elastogenesis observed in all mutant embryos and the resulting dilatation and probable rupture of the descending thoracic aorta might explain the late embryonic lethality. To conclude, during mouse development, TGF-? plays an irreplaceable role on the differentiation of the VSMCs in the coronary vessels and the descending thoracic aorta. PMID:20213136

  1. Synthetic Lethal Therapy for KRAS Mutant Non-small-cell Lung Carcinoma with Nanoparticle-mediated CDK4 siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cheng-Qiong; Xiong, Meng-Hua; Liu, Yang; Shen, Song; Du, Xiao-Jiao; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Dou, Shuang; Zhang, Pei-Zhuo; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The KRAS mutation is present in ~20% of lung cancers and has not yet been effectively targeted for therapy. This mutation is associated with a poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) and confers resistance to standard anticancer treatment drugs, including epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we exploited a new therapeutic strategy based on the synthetic lethal interaction between cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) downregulation and the KRAS mutation to deliver micellar nanoparticles (MNPs) containing small interfering RNA targeting CDK4 (MNPsiCDK4) for treatment in NSCLCs harboring the oncogenic KRAS mutation. Following MNPsiCDK4 administration, CDK4 expression was decreased, accompanied by inhibited cell proliferation, specifically in KRAS mutant NSCLCs. However, this intervention was harmless to normal KRAS wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Moreover, systemic delivery of MNPsiCDK4 significantly inhibited tumor growth in an A549 NSCLC xenograft murine model, with depressed expression of CDK4 and mutational KRAS status, suggesting the therapeutic promise of MNPsiCDK4 delivery in KRAS mutant NSCLCs via a synthetic lethal interaction between KRAS and CDK4. PMID:24496383

  2. Enhancing the stability and ecological safety of mass-reared transgenic strains for field release by redundant conditional lethality systems.

    PubMed

    Handler, Alfred M

    2016-04-01

    The genetic manipulation of agriculturally important insects now allows the development of genetic sexing and male sterility systems for more highly efficient biologically-based population control programs, most notably the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), for both plant and animal insect pests. Tetracycline-suppressible (Tet-off) conditional lethal systems may function together so that transgenic strains will be viable and fertile on a tetracycline-containing diet, but female-lethal and male sterile in tetracycline-free conditions. This would allow their most efficacious use in a unified system for sterile male-only production for SIT. A critical consideration for the field release of such transgenic insect strains, however, is a determination of the frequency and genetic basis of lethality revertant survival. This will provide knowledge essential to evaluating the genetic stability of the lethality system, its environmental safety, and provide the basis for modifications ensuring optimal efficacy. For Tet-off lethal survival determinations, development of large-scale screening protocols should also allow the testing of these modifications, and test the ability of other conditional lethal systems to fully suppress propagation of rare Tet-off survivors. If a dominant temperature sensitive (DTS) pupal lethality system proves efficient for secondary lethality in Drosophila, it may provide the safeguard needed to support the release of sexing/sterility strains, and potentially, the release of unisex lethality strains as a form of genetic male sterility. Should the DTS Prosβ2(1) mutation prove effective for redundant lethality, its high level of structural and functional conservation should allow host-specific cognates to be created for a wide range of insect species. PMID:26097098

  3. Identification of Novel Temperature-sensitive Lethal Alleles in Essential ?-Tubulin and Nonessential ?2-Tubulin Genes as Fission Yeast Polarity Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Pippa; Hirata, Dai; Childs, Dylan; Vardy, Leah; Toda, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    We have screened for temperature-sensitive (ts) fission yeast mutants with altered polarity (alp115). Genetic analysis indicates that alp2 is allelic to atb2 (one of two ?-tubulin genes) and alp12 to nda3 (the single ?-tubulin gene). atb2+ is nonessential, and the ts atb2 mutations we have isolated are dominant as expected. We sequenced two alleles of ts atb2 and one allele of ts nda3. In the ts atb2 mutants, the mutated residues (G246D and C356Y) are found at the longitudinal interface between ?/?-heterodimers, whereas in ts nda3 the mutated residue (Y422H) is situated in the domain located on the outer surface of the microtubule. The ts nda3 mutant is highly sensitive to altered gene dosage of atb2+; overexpression of atb2+ lowers the restrictive temperature, and, conversely, deletion rescues ts. Phenotypic analysis shows that contrary to undergoing mitotic arrest with high viability via the spindle assembly checkpoint as expected, ts nda3 mutants execute cytokinesis and septation and lose viability. Therefore, it appears that the ts nda3 mutant becomes temperature lethal because of irreversible progression through the cell cycle in the absence of activating the spindle assembly checkpoint pathway. PMID:9658169

  4. Lethal, potentially lethal lesion model

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1983-07-01

    A theoretical framework to describe the formation of lethal mutations by radiation is presented. Lesions that are repaired (and misrepaired) in each type of experiment described (delayed plating and split dose) are assumed to be the same. In this model the same (potentially lethal) lesions cause both sublethal and potentially lethal damage. Potentially lethal damage is defined as damage which may be modified by alterations in postirradiation conditions. Sublethal damage is cellular damage whose accumulation may lead to lethality. A crucial consideration in the expression of the damage is the kind of medium in which the cells are placed during the repair period. Fresh or growth medium (F-medium) is assumed to cause fixation of damage after about 3 hours, while no fixation (only misrepair) occurs in conditioned medium (C-medium).

  5. Study of radiosensitive Drosophila lines. XI. Induction of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations in females of the mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsova, E.R.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have studied the frequency of occurrence of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) after treatment of the females with ..gamma..-rays as a function of the dose (from 5 to 20 Gy) and oogenesis stage. They have shown that within the dose range used the oocytes of the 14th and 7th development stage are more sensitive in females of the mutant line than in those of the control. They detected significant differences in the frequency of occurrence of RSLLM between the 14th and 7th stages of development of oocytes for both Drosophila lines investigated.

  6. Random mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe SRP RNA: lethal and conditional lesions cluster in presumptive protein binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, X; Selinger, D; Althoff, S; Chiang, A; Hamilton, D; Ma, M; Wise, J A

    1992-01-01

    Signal recognition particle (SRP), a ribonucleoprotein composed of six polypeptides and one RNA subunit, serves as an adaptor between the cytoplasmic protein synthetic machinery and the translocation apparatus of the endoplasmic reticulum. To begin constructing a functional map of the 7SL RNA component of SRP, we extensively mutagenized the Schizosaccharomyces pombe SRP7 gene. Phenotypes are reported for fifty-two mutant alleles derived from random point mutagenesis, seven alleles created by site-directed mutagenesis to introduce restriction sites into the SRP7 gene, nine alleles designed to pinpoint conditional lesions, and three alleles with extra nucleotides inserted at position 84. Our data indicate that virtually all single nucleotide changes as well as many multiple substitutions in this highly structured RNA are phenotypically silent. Six lethal alleles and eleven which result in sensitivity to the combination of high temperature and elevated osmotic strength were identified. These mutations cluster in conserved regions which, in the mammalian RNA, are protected from nucleolytic agents by SRP proteins. The effects of mutations in the presumptive binding site for a fission yeast SRP 9/14 homolog indicate that both the identity of a conserved residue and the secondary structure within which it is embedded are functionally important. The phenotypes of mutations in Domain IV suggest particular residues as base-specific contacts for the fission yeast SRP54 protein. A single allele which confers temperature-sensitivity in the absence of osmotic perturbants was identified in this study; the growth properties of the mutant strain suggest that the encoded RNA is somewhat defective even at the permissive temperature, and is most likely unable to correctly assemble with SRP proteins at the nonpermissive temperature. PMID:1315954

  7. Embryo-lethal phenotypes in early abp1 mutants are due to disruption of the neighboring BSM gene

    PubMed Central

    Michalko, Jaroslav; Dravecká, Marta; Bollenbach, Tobias; Friml, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein1 (ABP1) has been identified based on its ability to bind auxin with high affinity and studied for a long time as a prime candidate for the extracellular auxin receptor responsible for mediating in particular the fast non-transcriptional auxin responses. However, the contradiction between the embryo-lethal phenotypes of the originally described Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional knock-out alleles ( abp1-1 and abp1-1s) and the wild type-like phenotypes of other recently described loss-of-function alleles ( abp1-c1 and abp1-TD1) questions the biological importance of ABP1 and relevance of the previous genetic studies. Here we show that there is no hidden copy of the ABP1 gene in the Arabidopsis genome but the embryo-lethal phenotypes of abp1-1 and abp1-1s alleles are very similar to the knock-out phenotypes of the neighboring gene, BELAYA SMERT ( BSM). Furthermore, the allelic complementation test between bsm and abp1 alleles shows that the embryo-lethality in the abp1-1 and abp1-1s alleles is caused by the off-target disruption of the BSM locus by the T-DNA insertions. This clarifies the controversy of different phenotypes among published abp1 knock-out alleles and asks for reflections on the developmental role of ABP1. PMID:26629335

  8. Embryo-lethal phenotypes in early abp1 mutants are due to disruption of the neighboring BSM gene.

    PubMed

    Michalko, Jaroslav; Draveck, Marta; Bollenbach, Tobias; Friml, Ji?

    2015-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein1 (ABP1) has been identified based on its ability to bind auxin with high affinity and studied for a long time as a prime candidate for the extracellular auxin receptor responsible for mediating in particular the fast non-transcriptional auxin responses. However, the contradiction between the embryo-lethal phenotypes of the originally described Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional knock-out alleles ( abp1-1 and abp1-1s) and the wild type-like phenotypes of other recently described loss-of-function alleles ( abp1-c1 and abp1-TD1) questions the biological importance of ABP1 and relevance of the previous genetic studies. Here we show that there is no hidden copy of the ABP1 gene in the Arabidopsis genome but the embryo-lethal phenotypes of abp1-1 and abp1-1s alleles are very similar to the knock-out phenotypes of the neighboring gene, BELAYA SMERT ( BSM). Furthermore, the allelic complementation test between bsm and abp1 alleles shows that the embryo-lethality in the abp1-1 and abp1-1s alleles is caused by the off-target disruption of the BSM locus by the T-DNA insertions. This clarifies the controversy of different phenotypes among published abp1 knock-out alleles and asks for reflections on the developmental role of ABP1. PMID:26629335

  9. Mitochondrial degeneration and not apoptosis is the primary cause of embryonic lethality in ceramide transfer protein mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Rao, Raghavendra Pralhada; Kosakowska-Cholody, Teresa; Masood, M. Athar; Southon, Eileen; Zhang, Helin; Berthet, Cyril; Nagashim, Kunio; Veenstra, Timothy K.; Tessarollo, Lino; Acharya, Usha; Acharya, Jairaj K.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramide transfer protein (CERT) functions in the transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. In this study, we show that CERT is an essential gene for mouse development and embryonic survival and, quite strikingly, is critical for mitochondrial integrity. CERT mutant embryos accumulate ceramide in the ER but also mislocalize ceramide to the mitochondria, compromising their function. Cells in mutant embryos show abnormal dilation of the ER and degenerating mitochondria. These subcellular changes manifest as heart defects and cause severely compromised cardiac function and embryonic death around embryonic day 11.5. In spite of ceramide accumulation, CERT mutant mice do not die as a result of enhanced apoptosis. Instead, cell proliferation is impaired, and expression levels of cell cycleassociated proteins are altered. Individual cells survive, perhaps because cell survival mechanisms are activated. Thus, global compromise of ER and mitochondrial integrity caused by ceramide accumulation in CERT mutant mice primarily affects organogenesis rather than causing cell death via apoptotic pathways. PMID:19139267

  10. We want what’s best for our baby: Prenatal Parenting of Babies with Lethal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Arsenault, Denise; Krowchuk, Heidi; Hall, Wendasha Jenkins; Denney-Koelsch, Erin

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on qualitative research into the experience of couples who chose to continue their pregnancies after receiving a lethal fetal diagnosis, and to embrace the parenting of their baby in the shortened time they have. This analysis of interview data is part of a larger research project describing parents’ experiences of continuing pregnancy with a known lethal fetal diagnosis (LFD). PMID:26594107

  11. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  12. Use of a conditionally lethal gene in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to select for double recombinants and to entrap insertion sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yuping; Wolk, C.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Use of the sacB gene provides a simple, effective, positive selection for double recombinants in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, a filamentous cyanobacterium. This gene, which encodes the secretory levansucrase of Bacillus subtilis, was inserted into the vector portion of a suicide plasmid bearing a mutant version of a chromosomal gene. Cells of colonies in which such a plasmid had integrated into the Anabaena chromosome through single recombination were plated on solid medium containing 5% sucrose. Under this condition, the presence of the sacB gene is lethal. A small fraction of the cells from initially sucrose-sensitive colonies became sucrose resistant; the majority of these sucrose-resistant derivatives had undergone a second recombinational event in which the sacB-containing vector had been lost and the wild-type form of the chromosomal gene had been replaced by the mutant form. By the use of this technique, they mutated two selected genes in the chromosome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The conditionally lethal nature of the sacB gene was also used to detect insertion sequences from this Anabaena strain. Sucrose-resistant colonies derived from cells bearing a sacB-containing autonomously replicating plasmid were analyzed. Five different, presumed insertion sequences were found to have inserted into the sacB gene of the plasmids in these colonies. One of them, denoted IS892, was characterized by physical mapping. It is 1.7 kilobases in size and is present in at least five copies in the genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

  13. Conditional embryonic lethality to improve the sterile insect technique in Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schetelig, Marc F; Caceres, Carlos; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Franz, Gerald; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2009-01-01

    Background The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an environment-friendly method used in area-wide pest management of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae). Ionizing radiation used to generate reproductive sterility in the mass-reared populations before release leads to reduction of competitiveness. Results Here, we present a first alternative reproductive sterility system for medfly based on transgenic embryonic lethality. This system is dependent on newly isolated medfly promoter/enhancer elements of cellularization-specifically-expressed genes. These elements act differently in expression strength and their ability to drive lethal effector gene activation. Moreover, position effects strongly influence the efficiency of the system. Out of 60 combinations of driver and effector construct integrations, several lines resulted in larval and pupal lethality with one line showing complete embryonic lethality. This line was highly competitive to wildtype medfly in laboratory and field cage tests. Conclusion The high competitiveness of the transgenic lines and the achieved 100% embryonic lethality causing reproductive sterility without the need of irradiation can improve the efficacy of operational medfly SIT programs. PMID:19173707

  14. [Characterization of attenuated Salmonella C500 strain with a delta asd mutant and use as an Asd+ balanced-lethal host-vector system].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhanqin; Xu, Yindi; Wu, Bin; Cheng, Xiangchao; Li, Yinju; Tang, Xibiao; Zhang, Chunjie; Chen, Huanchun

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis strain C500 is a live, attenuated vaccine that has been used in China for over 40 years to prevent piglet paratyphoid. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis C500 strain with a delta asd mutant as an effective live vaccine vector by the Asd+ balanced-lethal host-vector system. Here, we compared the characteristics of S. enterica serovar Choleraesuis delta asdC500 strain with the parent C500 strain, including phenotype, growth rate, virulence, safety, and expression for heterologous antigen. The mean generation times of delta asdC500 mutant, the vector control delta asdC500 (pYA3493), and the parent avirulent C500 vaccine strain in Luria broth were 30.7, 28.1, and 27.9 min, respectively. The fermentation patterns of theses three strains on different carbohydrates, and the levels of production of H2S, were similar. The O and H antigens of delta asdC500 mutant, delta asdC500 (pYA3493) and delta asdC500 (pYA-F1P2) were 6,7:C:1,5, identical to the parent strain C500. By the method of Reed and Muench, groups of mice were challenged by the intraperitoneal route with different amounts of delta asdC500 (pYA3493) or the parent C500 strain, and the virulence of delta asdC500 (pYA3493) with LD50 of 1.1 x 10(7) CFU was a little lower than C500 with LD50 of 4.4 x 10(6) CFU. All piglets inoculated with delta asdC500 (pYA3493) or C500 survived, and no signs of disease were observed during the entire experimental period. No major differences were found in these two groups. In addition, the recombinant pYA-F1P2 plasmid was very stable in the recombinant delta asdC500 (pYA-F1P2) strain, which expressed secretorily a large amount of the recombinant filamentous hemagglutinin type I domain and pertactin region 2 domain antigen (rF1P2) of Bordetella bronchiseptica. In this study, we have shown that the delta asdC500 mutant had a series of biological characteristics similar to the parent vaccine strain C500. Furthermore, the strain could express secretorily a large amount of heterologous antigen. It is likely that this Salmonella expression and delivery system could be easily adapted to develop multivalent recombinant Salmonella vaccines against infectious agents using the Asd+ balanced-lethal host-vector system. PMID:19441223

  15. How killed enterobacterial cultures can activate living organisms to resist lethal agents or conditions.

    PubMed

    Rowbury, Robin J

    2003-01-01

    A major aim in many areas of microbiology is to ensure sterility, and even where this is impossible, to reduce the number of viable organisms occurring in particular environments to an absolute minimum. This applies in the aquatic environment, where e.g. water treatment must ensure as complete absence of viable microbes as possible. It is also crucial in food processing and production; many food constituents contain appreciable numbers of viable organisms, even potential pathogens, and the number must be greatly reduced and in many situations, the presence of viable organisms totally abolished. Cleaning of food production components and surfaces must also kill associated microbes. In domestic, hospital and commercial situations, similar disinfection is critical. Ultimately, the aim is to ensure, if possible, sterility, with the assurance that microbial problems cannot occur if organisms are absent. Additionally, however, it has been implicitly assumed that killed organisms and even killed cultures cannot (except in minor and trivial ways) influence the behaviour of living organisms that later enter the environment. The work reviewed here challenges that view and in fact disproves it. The findings described show that killed enterobacterial cultures, which prior to killing had phenotypically gained the ability to resist potentially lethal stresses, can pass on such ability to living organisms that later enter their environment i.e. that such killed cultures can convey a baleful legacy to living ones. This phenomenon is so widespread that it is clear that it has significance for enterobacterial survival in natural waters, in foods and in food production, in the domestic, commercial and hospital situation, and in the animal and human body. In fact, in this last area, the likely effect of killed cultures appears to be of appreciable public health importance. Here, the ability of appropriate killed cultures to transfer tolerance to acidity, alkalinity and thermal stress is described, as well as their ability to pass on sensitisation to acid and alkali. Other work reviewed suggests that killed cultures can almost certainly transfer the ability to tolerate hydrogen peroxide, ultraviolet irradiation and metal ions. The serious implications of this phenomenon are further emphasised by the fact that numerous killing methods produce cultures effective in tolerance response transfer. All the evidence suggests that it is extracellular components (extracellular sensing components, ESCs, and extracellular induction components, EICs), in the killed cultures which are involved in stress response transfer, and that the actual stress response induction process depends on interaction of living organisms with EICs from the killed cultures. It is of note that ESCs and EICs survive in killed cultures because of their extreme resistance to irreversible inactivation by lethal levels of stressing agents and conditions. This is in contrast to the fact that EC activation, namely the conversion of ESC to EIC occurs on exposure to very low levels of stressors. Not only is this the case, but in fact high levels of stressors (e.g. those that kill organisms) generally fail to convert ESC to EIC. PMID:15079995

  16. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  17. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  18. Burkholderia cenocepacia conditional growth mutant library created by random promoter replacement of essential genes

    PubMed Central

    Bloodworth, Ruhi A M; Gislason, April S; Cardona, Silvia T

    2013-01-01

    Identification of essential genes by construction of conditional knockouts with inducible promoters allows the identification of essential genes and creation of conditional growth (CG) mutants that are then available as genetic tools for further studies. We used large-scale transposon delivery of the rhamnose-inducible promoter, PrhaB followed by robotic screening of rhamnose-dependent growth to construct a genomic library of 106 Burkholderia cenocepacia CG mutants. Transposon insertions were found where PrhaB was in the same orientation of widely conserved, well-characterized essential genes as well as genes with no previous records of essentiality in other microorganisms. Using previously reported global gene-expression analyses, we demonstrate that PrhaB can achieve the wide dynamic range of expression levels required for essential genes when the promoter is delivered randomly and mutants with rhamnose-dependent growth are selected. We also show specific detection of the target of an antibiotic, novobiocin, by enhanced sensitivity of the corresponding CG mutant (PrhaB controlling gyrB expression) within the library. Modulation of gene expression to achieve 30–60% of wild-type growth created conditions for specific hypersensitivity demonstrating the value of the CG mutant library for chemogenomic experiments. In summary, CG mutants can be obtained on a large scale by random delivery of a tightly regulated inducible promoter into the bacterial chromosome followed by a simple screening for the CG phenotype, without previous information on gene essentiality. PMID:23389959

  19. Lethal body residues for pentachlorophenol in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) under varying conditions of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Fisher, S W; Hwang, H; Atanasoff, M; Landrum, P F

    1999-07-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) toxicity was measured in the zebra mussel under varying conditions of pH (6.5, 7.5, or 8.5) and temperature (10, 17, or 25 degrees C). Toxicity decreased significantly with increasing pH at all temperatures. At a given pH level, toxicity increased significantly with increasing temperature. PCP was most toxic at pH 6.5, 25 degrees C and least toxic at pH 8.5, 10 degrees C. Toxicokinetic parameters were determined at trace PCP concentrations under each combination of pH and temperature. Increasing temperature generally increased the PCP uptake clearance (ku) although elimination rate constants (kd) were unaffected. The effect of pH on toxicokinetic parameters was inconsistent but ku tended to decrease as pH and ionization of PCP increased. Lethal body residues (LR50s), estimated from kinetic parameters determined at trace PCP concentrations and the LC50 values, varied by a factor of 122 as a function of environmental conditions while LC50s varied by a factor of 381. LR50s were also estimated from the measured PCP tissue concentrations and varied by a factor of 8 across conditions. Calculated LR50s were always higher than measured LR50s, determined under identical conditions, by at least a factor of five. However, when LR50 values were recalculated using ku values measured at the LC25 concentration, the resulting adjusted LR50s varied only by a factor of 2.5 across the range of conditions studied and were more consistent with measured LR50 values. Thus, variance in the PCP concentration required to produce toxicity is reduced when LR50s are used in place of LC50s. Further, the method by which lethal residues (LR50 values) are determined can significantly affect the results and their interpretation. PMID:10381305

  20. Mutant of herpes simplex virus type 2 with temperature-sensitive lesions affecting virion thermostability and DNase activity: identification of the lethal mutation and physical mapping of the nuc-lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Chartrand, P; Timbury, M C; Hay, J; Moss, H

    1979-01-01

    We had previously shown that a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of herpes simplex virus type 2 strain HG52, ts13, induced a heat-labile DNase activity in infected cells (B. Francke, H. Moss, M. C. Timbury, and J. Hay, J. Virol. 26:209-213, 1978). Earlier work indicated that the mutant also possessed temperature-sensitive infectivity (I. W. Halliburton and M. C. Timbury, J. Gen. Virol. 30:207-221, 1976). In this study temperature-stable revertants of ts13 have been isolated; examination of them revealed that ts13 is a double mutant, with genetically distinct temperature-sensitive lesions affecting nuclease activity and particle stability. The lethal mutation, in the cell system studied, is the latter. Revertants, which all maintain the nuclease lesion, grew well at a high temperature. Physical mapping of the nuclease lesion placed it between 0.12 and 0.21 (fractional length) on the virus genome, quite distant from the lethal mutation at 0.64 to 0.70. PMID:232166

  1. Studies on radiosensitive lines of Drosophila. IX. Analysis of fertility and frequency of dominant lethal mutations in the gamma-irradiated females of the mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsova, E.R.; Sharygin, V.I.; Khromykh, Yu.M.

    1986-03-01

    Fertility and frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM) induced by gamma rays in females at the age of 0-5 h and 5-7 days were studied in the radiosensitive mutant rad(2)201/sup G1/ of Drosophila. It has been found that the oocytes of mutant lines are more radiosensitive as compared to those of the wild type flies when compared on the basis of DLM frequency obtained through the entire maturation period. The early oocytes of stages 2-7, i.e., at the stages corresponding to the recombination-defective properties of mutation rad(2)201/sup g1/ are the most sensitive. It has also been demonstrated that the gamma-ray doses exceeding 10 Gy cause a strong sterilizing effect in the mutant females as a result of destruction and resorption of the egg chamber, irradiated at the stages of previtellogenic growth of oocytes. In the radiosensitive mutant females, the sensitivity of the oocytes for DLM induction does not correlate with the sensitivity of the ovarian follicles toward the resorbing effect of gamma rays. The possible involvement of the mutant locus in the genetic processes in different specialized cells of the sexual pathway in Drosophila is discussed.

  2. Swimming Behaviour and Otolith Characteristics of wildtype and mutant Zebrafish (AIE) under diminished Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigele, J.; Anken, R.; Hilbig, R.

    During microgravity humans often suffer from sensorimotor disorders e g motion sickness a kinetosis Using fish as vertebrate model systems we could previously provide ample evidence that the individually different susceptibility to such disorders is based on an individually differently pronounced asymmetric mineralisation calcification of inner ear stones otoliths In the course of a preliminary study we subjected mutant zebrafish Danio rerio due to malformation of the inner ear - see below - this mutant was termed Asymmetric Inner Ear AIE to diminished gravity conditions during parabolic aircraft flight PF As compared to wildtype WT animals the mutants showed a pronounced kinetotic behaviour The gross-morphology of the inner ears of AIE and WT animals strikingly differed In WT specimens the saccular otoliths were located at the periphery of the inner ear whereas the utricular stones were positioned mediad as it is usually the case in teleosts in most AIE animals dissected however the respective otoliths were positioned in an opposite arrangement Moreover the mutants sported transparent otoliths whereas the otoliths of WT specimens had an opaque appearance This finding clearly indicates that mutant otoliths differed from wildtype ones in their lattice structure i e the calcium carbonate polymorph and thus the compostion of the proteinacious matrix which is a template for calcium carbonate deposition In the course of the present study the PF experiment is scheduled to be carried out in March 2006 we intend to statistically verify

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Amish lethal microcephaly

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Amish lethal microcephaly On this page: Description Genetic changes ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed July 2013 What is Amish lethal microcephaly? Amish lethal microcephaly is a disorder ...

  4. Thiamine Deficiency in Self-Induced Refeeding Syndrome, an Undetected and Potentially Lethal Condition

    PubMed Central

    Hershkowitz, Einat; Reshef, Alon; Munich, Olga; Yosefi, Bracha; Markel, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Rapid restoration of nutrients and electrolytes after prolonged starvation could result in a life threatening condition characterized by sensory and neurological dysfunction and severe metabolic imbalance that has been designated as refeeding syndrome. Its diagnosis is frequently missed resulting in severe complications and even death. We describe a 25-years-old female patient with mental disorders and severe malnutrition who developed severe clinical manifestations and biochemical abnormalities characteristic of the refeeding syndrome, after restarting oral feeding on her own. Schizophrenia was later diagnosed. Increased awareness of this condition and its complications is necessary to prevent its detrimental complications. PMID:25614745

  5. Physiological and genetic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin biosynthesis mutants under chronic adverse environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanin production is a characteristic response of flowering plants to unfavourable environmental conditions. The potential roles of flavonoids and anthocyanins in plant growth were investigated by growing Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin production mutants (transparent testa) under limiting nitrogen and high light conditions. Inability to produce kaempferol or subsequent intermediate compounds by some transparent testa lines was correlated with less biomass accumulation in mature plants compared with wild-type control plants under all growth conditions tested. However, under both limiting nitrogen and high light chronic stress conditions, mutant lines defective in later steps of the anthocyanin production pathway produced the same or more biomass than wild-type plants. No difference in senescence between transparent testa and wild-type plants was found using chlorophyll catabolism and SAG12 expression measurements, and no mutants were impaired in the ability to remobilize nutrients from the vegetative to reproductive tissues. Moreover, the absence of anthocyanin and/or upstream flavonoids does not affect the ability of plants to respond to limiting nitrogen by reducing photosynthetic capacity. These results support a role for kaempferol and quercetin accumulation in normal plant growth and development. Further, the absence of anthocyanins has no effect on plant growth under the chronic stress conditions tested. PMID:23162120

  6. The Live Attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Triple-Deletion Mutant ?apxIC ?apxIIC ?apxIV-ORF1 Strain, SLW05, Immunizes Pigs against Lethal Challenge with Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulin; Ou, Jiwen; Zhang, Minmin; Xu, Juan; Liu, Huazhen; Liu, Jinlin; Yuan, Fangyan; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae both belong to the family Pasteurellaceae and are major respiratory pathogens that cause large economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. We previously constructed an attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 live vaccine prototype, SLW05 (?apxIC ?apxIIC ?apxIV-ORF1), which is able to produce nontoxic but immunogenic ApxIA, ApxIIA, and ApxIVA. This triple-deletion mutant strain was shown to elicit protective immunity against virulent A. pleuropneumoniae. In the present study, we investigated whether immunization with SLW05 could also protect against lethal challenge with virulent H. parasuis SH0165 (serovar 5) or MD0322 (serovar 4). The SLW05 strain was found to elicit a strong humoral antibody response in pigs and to confer significant protection against challenge with a lethal dose of H. parasuis SH0165 or MD0322. IgG subtype analysis revealed that SLW05 induces a bias toward a Th1-type immune response and stimulates interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-?) production. Moreover, antisera from SLW05-vaccinated pigs efficiently inhibited both A. pleuropneumoniae and H. parasuis growth in a whole-blood assay. This is the first report that a live attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae vaccine with SLW05 can protect against lethal H. parasuis infection, which provides a novel approach for developing an attenuated H. parasuis vaccine. PMID:23220998

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ECF sigma factor sigC is required for lethality in mice and for the conditional expression of a defined gene set.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ronggai; Converse, Paul J; Ko, Chiew; Tyagi, Sandeep; Morrison, Norman E; Bishai, William R

    2004-04-01

    Bacterial alternative RNA polymerase sigma factors are key global adaptive response regulators with a likely role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis. We constructed a mutant lacking the sigma factor gene, sigC, by allelic exchange, in the virulent CDC1551 strain of M. tuberculosis and compared the resulting mutant with the isogenic wild-type strain and complemented mutant strain. In vitro, compared to the wild-type and complemented strains, the mutant was found to have similar ability to survive in both murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and activated J774 macrophages. In time-to-death experiments in the mouse model, the DeltasigC mutant was significantly attenuated, causing no death in infected mice whereas the wild-type and complemented strains caused 100% mortality within 235 days after aerosol infection with a median time to death of 170 days. Mouse organ bacterial burdens indicated that the mutant proliferated and persisted at the same level as the wild-type and complemented strains in lung tissue and was able to persist in mice without causing death for > 300 days. A complete genomic microarray study demonstrated that SigC modulates the expression of several key virulence-associated genes including hspX, senX3 and mtrA, encoding the alpha-crystallin homologue, a two-component sensor kinase and a two-component response regulator respectively. Altered expression of a subset of these genes was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Analysis of genes modulated by SigC also revealed a putative consensus DNA recognition sequence for SigC of SSSAAT-N(16-20)-CGTSSS (S = C or G). Promoter recognition for one of these genes was confirmed by in vitro transcription analysis after purification of recombinant SigC and reconstitution of an Esigma(C) RNA polymerase holoenzyme. These data indicate that the M. tuberculosis transcription factor SigC governs expression of an important M. tuberculosis regulon and is essential for lethality in mice, but is not required for bacterial survival in this species. These observations place the DeltasigC mutant in a class of M. tuberculosis mutants which persist in tissues but are attenuated in their ability to elicit lethal immunopathology. PMID:15049808

  8. Gene expression profiles in developing nephrons using Lim1 metanephric mesenchyme-specific conditional mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You-Tzung; Kobayashi, Akio; Kwan, Kin Ming; Johnson, Randy L; Behringer, Richard R

    2006-01-01

    Background Lim1 is a homeobox gene that is essential for nephrogenesis. During metanephric kidney development, Lim1 is expressed in the nephric duct, ureteric buds, and the induced metanephric mesenchyme. Conditional ablation of Lim1 in the metanephric mesenchyme blocks the formation of nephrons at the nephric vesicle stage, leading to the production of small, non-functional kidneys that lack nephrons. Methods In the present study, we used Affymetrix probe arrays to screen for nephron-specific genes by comparing the expression profiles of control and Lim1 conditional mutant kidneys. Kidneys from two developmental stages, embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) and 18.5 (E18.5), were examined. Results Comparison of E18.5 kidney expression profiles generated a list of 465 nephron-specific gene candidates that showed a more than 2-fold increase in their expression level in control kidney versus the Lim1 conditional mutant kidney. Computational analysis confirmed that this screen enriched for kidney-specific genes. Furthermore, at least twenty-eight of the top fifty (56%) candidates (or their vertebrate orthologs) were previously reported to have a nephron-specific expression pattern. Our analysis of E14.5 expression data yielded 41 candidate genes that are up-regulated in the control kidneys compared to the conditional mutants. Three of them are related to the Notch signaling pathway that is known to be important in cell fate determination and nephron patterning. Conclusion Therefore, we demonstrate that Lim1 conditional mutant kidneys serve as a novel tissue source for comprehensive expression studies and provide a means to identify nephron-specific genes. PMID:16464245

  9. Optimized Condition for Enhanced Soluble-Expression of Recombinant Mutant Anabaena Variabilis Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase

    PubMed Central

    Zarei Jaliani, Hossein; Farajnia, Safar; Safdari, Yaghoub; Mohammadi, Seyyed Abolghasem; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Talebi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Recently discovered Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase (AvPAL) proved to be a good candidate for enzyme replacement therapy of phenylketonuria. Outstanding stability properties of a mutant version of this enzyme, produced already in our laboratory, have led us to the idea of culture conditions optimization for soluble expression of this therapeutically valuable enzyme in E. coli. Methods: In the present study, the gene encoding mutant version of AvPAL was cloned into the pET28a expression vector. Different concentrations of IPTG, induction period, growth temperature, shaking speed, as well as different types of culture media were examined with respect to the amount of recombinant protein produced and specific activity of the enzyme. Results: Based upon our findings, maximum amount of active mutant enzyme was attained by addition of 0.5 mM IPTG at 150 rpm to the TB culture media. The yield of active enzyme at cluture tempreature of 25 C and induction period of 18 hour was the highest. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that the yield of mutant AvPAL production in E. coli can be affected mainly by culture temperature and inducer concentration. PMID:24754010

  10. Lethal and sublethal effects of low dissolved oxygen condition on two aquatic invertebrates, Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Irving, Elaine C; Liber, Karsten; Culp, Joseph M

    2004-06-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions occur frequently during sediment toxicity testing, with potentially adverse effects on test organisms. The present study addressed the current lack of good information regarding low DO thresholds for toxicity tests using two common test species, juvenile Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans larvae. Results indicated that H. azteca was less tolerant of hypoxia than C. tentans. The 10-d highest- and no-observed-effect concentrations (HOEC and NOEC, respectively) for H. azteca were 1.2 +/- 0.1 and 2.9 +/- 0.1 mg/L DO, respectively. The 10-d NOEC for C. tentans was 1.2 +/- 0.1 mg/L DO, the lowest test concentration. Mortality was the predominant response of H. azteca to low DO exposure, with changes in growth and positioning behavior only evident at lethal DO concentrations. Although exposure to 1.2 +/- 0.1 mg/L DO for 10 d did not affect C. tentans survival or growth, significant behavioral changes were evident at 2.0 +/- 0.1 mg/L DO or less. Overall, the present results indicate that the North American guidelines for low DO thresholds during 10-d toxicity tests seem reasonable for juvenile H. azteca. However, the Environment Canada Guideline (3.4 mg/L DO at 23 degrees C) may be considered to be conservative for 10-d toxicity testing with C. tentans if only short-term effects on survival and growth are considered. PMID:15376542

  11. Unlinked Noncomplementation: Isolation of New Conditional-Lethal Mutations in Each of the Tubulin Genes of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stearns, T.; Botstein, D.

    1988-01-01

    Mutations in genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that code for proteins that interact with ?-tubulin were sought by screening for unlinked mutations that fail to complement mutations in the single ?-tubulin-encoding gene (TUB2). Among the first three noncomplementing mutations examined, two are linked to TUB2 while one is unlinked. The unlinked mutation was shown to be a conditional-lethal allele of the major ?-tubulin-encoding gene (TUB1) and represents the first such mutation in that gene. The tub1-1 mutation itself causes a cold-sensitive cell-cycle arrest, and confers supersensitivity to the antimicrotubule drug benomyl. These phenotypes occur in the presence of a wild-type copy of the minor ?-tubulin-encoding gene, TUB3; the combination of tub1-1 and a tub3 null mutation is inviable in haploids. Through further application of this method, new mutations in TUB2 and TUB3 were isolated as unlinked noncomplementers of tub1-1. The noncomplementation between tub1 and tub2 mutations is gene specific and allele specific, suggesting that the phenotype is due to an interaction at the protein level. We conclude that isolation of unlinked noncomplementing mutations is likely to be a generally useful method for isolating mutations in interacting gene products. PMID:3294100

  12. Conditional Budding Yeast Mutants with Temperature-Sensitive and Auxin-Inducible Degrons for Screening of Suppressor Genes.

    PubMed

    Devrekanli, Asli; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-01-01

    The conditional control of protein expression is useful to characterize the function of proteins, especially of those that are essential for cell viability. Two degron-based systems, temperature-sensitive and auxin-inducible degrons, can be used to generate conditional mutants of budding yeast, simply by transforming appropriate cells with PCR-amplified DNA. We describe a protocol for the generation of temperature-sensitive and auxin-inducible degron mutants. We also show that a conditional mutant with few spontaneous revertants was generated by combining two degron systems for the Inn1 protein. Finally, we describe a suppressor screening method that uses the dual degron-Inn1 mutant to identify mutant proteins that suppress Inn1-K31A, which has a defect in cytokinesis. PMID:26519318

  13. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Garca-Caldern, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrzova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilkov, Mria; Prez-Delgado, Carmen M.; Vega, Jos M.; Eliov, Adriana; Rep?k, Miroslav; Mrquez, Antonio J.; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress. PMID:26442073

  14. Improved trehalose production from biodiesel waste using parent and osmotically sensitive mutant of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruhal, Rohit; Choudhury, Bijan

    2012-08-01

    Trehalose is an important nutraceutical of wide commercial interest in the food processing industry. Recently, crude glycerol was reported to be suitable for the production of trehalose using a food microbe, Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii, under static flask conditions. Similarly, enhanced trehalose yield was reported in an osmotically sensitive mutant of the same strain under anaerobic conditions. In the present study, an effort was made to achieve higher production of trehalose, propionic acid, and lactic acid using the parent and an osmotically sensitive mutant of P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii under aeration conditions. Under aeration conditions (200 rpm in shake flasks and 30 % air saturation in a batch reactor), biomass was increased and approximately 98 % of crude glycerol was consumed. In the parent strain, a trehalose titre of 361 mg/l was achieved, whereas in the mutant strain a trehalose titre of 1.3 g/l was produced in shake flask conditions (200 rpm). In the mutant strain, propionic and lactic acid yields of 0.53 and 0.21 g/g of substrate were also achieved with crude glycerol. Similarly, in controlled batch reactor culturing conditions a final trehalose titre of approximately 1.56 g/l was achieved with the mutant strain using crude glycerol as the substrate. Enhanced production of trehalose using P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii from waste under aeration conditions is reported here. Higher production of trehalose was not due to a higher yield of trehalose but to a higher final biomass concentration. PMID:22526328

  15. Development of Inducible Systems To Engineer Conditional Mutants of Essential Genes of Helicobacter pylori?

    PubMed Central

    Boneca, Ivo G.; Ecobichon, Chantal; Chaput, Catherine; Mathieu, Aurlie; Guadagnini, Stphanie; Prvost, Marie-Christine; Colland, Frdric; Labigne, Agns; de Reuse, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    The Escherichia coli-Helicobacter pylori shuttle vector pHeL2 was modified to introduce the inducible LacIq-pTac system of E. coli, in which the promoters were engineered to be under the control of H. pylori RNA polymerase. The amiE gene promoter of H. pylori was taken to constitutively express the LacIq repressor. Expression of the reporter gene lacZ was driven by either pTac (pILL2150) or a modified version of the ureI gene promoter in which one or two LacI-binding sites and/or mutated nucleotides between the ribosomal binding site and the ATG start codon (pILL2153 and pILL2157) were introduced. Promoter activity was evaluated by measuring ?-galactosidase activity. pILL2150 is a tightly regulated expression system suitable for the analysis of genes with low-level expression, while pILL2157 is well adapted for the controlled expression of genes encoding recombinant proteins in H. pylori. To exemplify the usefulness of these tools, we constructed conditional mutants of the putative essential pbp1 and ftsI genes encoding penicillin-binding proteins 1 and 3 of H. pylori, respectively. Both genes were cloned into pILL2150 and introduced in the parental H. pylori strain N6. The chromosomally harbored pbp1 and ftsI genes were then inactivated by replacing them with a nonpolar kanamycin cassette. Inactivation was strictly dependent upon addition of isopropyl-?-d-thiogalactopyranoside. Hence, we were able to construct the first conditional mutants of H. pylori. Finally, we demonstrated that following in vitro methylation of the recombinant plasmids, these could be introduced into a large variety of H. pylori isolates with different genetic backgrounds. PMID:18245237

  16. Conditionally lethal amber mutations in the dnaA region of the Escherichia coli chromosome that affect chromosome replication.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, M; Miki, T; Hiraga, S; Nagata, T; Yura, T

    1979-01-01

    Three amber mutations, dna-801, dna-803, and dna-806, were isolated by localized mutagenesis of the dnaA-oriC region of the chromosome from an Escherichia coli strain carrying temperature-sensitive amber suppressors. When the mutations were not suppressed at 42 degrees C, the cells did not grow and DNA synthesis was arrested. They were very closely linked to each other and to the dnaA46 mutation. The mutant phenotype of each strain was converted to the wild type by infecting the mutants with specialized transducing phase lambda i21 dnaA-2 but not with lambda i21 tna. Derivatives of lambda i21 dnaA-2, each of which carried the amber mutation dna-801 dna-803, or dna-806, converted the dnaA mutant phenotype to Dna+ but did not convert rhe amber mutants to the wild-type phenotype. E. coli uvrB cells were irradiated with ultraviolet light and infected with each of these phage strains. An analysis of proteins synthesized in the cells revealed that two proteins with molecular weights of 50,000 and 43,000 were specified by lambda i21 dnaA-2 but not by lambda i21 tna. When the ultraviolet-irradiated cells did not carry an amber suppressor, the derivative phage with the amber mutation invariably failed to produce the 43,000-dalton protein, but when the host cell carried supF (tyrT), the protein was produced. The 50,000-dalton protein was unaffected. Images PMID:160413

  17. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Importance of Translation Initiation Factors for Haloferax volcanii Applying Deletion and Conditional Depletion Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gbel, Katrin; Schmitt, Jessica; Schulz, Sebastian; Nther, Daniela J.; Soppa, Jrg

    2013-01-01

    Translation is an important step in gene expression. The initiation of translation is phylogenetically diverse, since currently five different initiation mechanisms are known. For bacteria the three initiation factors IF1 IF3 are described in contrast to archaea and eukaryotes, which contain a considerably higher number of initiation factor genes. As eukaryotes and archaea use a non-overlapping set of initiation mechanisms, orthologous proteins of both domains do not necessarily fulfill the same function. The genome of Haloferax volcanii contains 14 annotated genes that encode (subunits of) initiation factors. To gain a comprehensive overview of the importance of these genes, it was attempted to construct single gene deletion mutants of all genes. In 9 cases single deletion mutants were successfully constructed, showing that the respective genes are not essential. In contrast, the genes encoding initiation factors aIF1, aIF2?, aIF5A, aIF5B, and aIF6 were found to be essential. Factors aIF1A and aIF2? are encoded by two orthologous genes in H. volcanii. Attempts to generate double mutants failed in both cases, indicating that also these factors are essential. A translatome analysis of one of the single aIF2? deletion mutants revealed that the translational efficiency of the second ortholog was enhanced tenfold and thus the two proteins can replace one another. The phenotypes of the single deletion mutants also revealed that the two aIF1As and aIF2?s have redundant but not identical functions. Remarkably, the gene encoding aIF2?, a subunit of aIF2 involved in initiator tRNA binding, could be deleted. However, the mutant had a severe growth defect under all tested conditions. Conditional depletion mutants were generated for the five essential genes. The phenotypes of deletion mutants and conditional depletion mutants were compared to that of the wild-type under various conditions, and growth characteristics are discussed. PMID:24244275

  18. Conditioning protects C. elegans from lethal effects of enteropathogenic E. coli through activation of genes that regulate lifespan and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Anyanful, Akwasi; Easley, Kirk A.; Benian, Guy M.; Kalman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Caenorhabditis elegans exhibit avoidance behavior when presented with diverse bacterial pathogens. We hypothesized that exposure to pathogens might not only cause worms to move away but also simultaneously activate pathways that promote resistance to the pathogen. We show that brief exposure to the virulent or avirulent strains of the bacterial pathogen enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) conditions or immunizes C. elegans to survive a subsequent exposure that would otherwise prove lethal. Conditioning requires dopaminergic neurons. Conditioning also requires the p38 MAP Kinase pathway, which regulates innate immunity, and the insulin/IGFR pathway, which regulates lifespan. Our findings suggest that the molecular pathways that regulate innate immunity and lifespan and provide protection may, in nature, be regulated or conditioned by exposure to pathogens, and perhaps allow survival in noxious environments. PMID:19454349

  19. Suppression of neuroinflammation in forebrain-specific Cdk5 conditional knockout mice by PPARγ agonist improves neuronal loss and early lethality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is essential for brain development and function, and its deregulated expression is implicated in some of neurodegenerative diseases. We reported earlier that the forebrain-specific Cdk5 conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed an early lethality associated with neuroinflammation, increased expression of the neuronal tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), and neuronal migration defects. Methods In order to suppress neuroinflammation in the cKO mice, we first treated these mice with pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, and analyzed its effects on neuronal loss and longevity. In a second approach, to delineate the precise role of tPA in neuroinflammation in these mice, we generated Cdk5 cKO; tPA double knockout (dKO) mice. Results We found that pioglitazone treatment significantly reduced astrogliosis, microgliosis, neuronal loss and behavioral deficit in Cdk5 cKO mice. Interestingly, the dKO mice displayed a partial reversal in astrogliosis, but they still died at early age, suggesting that the increased expression of tPA in the cKO mice does not contribute significantly to the pathological process leading to neuroinflammation, neuronal loss and early lethality. Conclusion The suppression of neuroinflammation in Cdk5 cKO mice ameliorates gliosis and neuronal loss, thus suggesting the potential beneficial effects of the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone for the treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24495352

  20. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, Jos O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress. PMID:25582191

  1. The Activity of Nodules of the Supernodulating Mutant Mtsunn Is not Limited by Photosynthesis under Optimal Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants. PMID:24727372

  2. Fluctuation Analysis: The Probability Distribution of the Number of Mutants under Different Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, F. M.; Gordon, D. M.; Levin, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    In the 47 years since fluctuation analysis was introduced by Luria and Delbruck, it has been widely used to calculate mutation rates. Up to now, in spite of the importance of such calculations, the probability distribution of the number of mutants that will appear in a fluctuation experiment has been known only under the restrictive, and possibly unrealistic, assumptions: (1) that the mutation rate is exactly proportional to the growth rate and (2) that all mutants grow at a rate that is a constant multiple of the growth rate of the original cells. In this paper, we approach the distribution of the number of mutants from a new point of view that will enable researchers to calculate the distribution to be expected using assumptions that they believe to be closer to biological reality. The new idea is to classify mutations according to the number of observable mutants that derive from the mutation when the culture is selectively plated. This approach also simplifies the calculations in situations where two, or many, kinds of mutation may occur in a single culture. PMID:2307353

  3. Conditional lethal expression of the vaccinia virus L1R myristylated protein reveals a role in virion assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Ravanello, M P; Hruby, D E

    1994-01-01

    Within vaccinia virus-infected cells, the product of the L1R open reading frame is covalently modified by myristic acid at the penultimate NH2-terminal glycine residue. Previously we have shown that while the L1R protein is a constituent of both intracellular mature virus particles and extracellular enveloped virions which are released from the infected cell, it is associated exclusively with the primary membranes surrounding the virion core. Given this rather specific localization, it was of interest to study the potential role of this essential gene in virus replication and morphogenesis. To this end, we have constructed a recombinant vaccinia virus in which expression of the L1R gene can be transcriptionally repressed. Without the inducer isopropylthiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), synthesis of the L1R protein was blocked, resulting in a total inhibition of plaque formation. Velocity sedimentation of viral particles labeled in the presence of [3H]thymidine, grown in the absence of IPTG, revealed a substantial reduction in viral DNA incorporation into virions. Likewise, proteolysis of the major core proteins p4a, p4b, and p25K, believed to occur during the final stages of virion maturation, was severely impaired. In the absence of L1R expression, only immature virions could be detected by electron microscopy. Transient expression of a plasmid containing the full-length L1R gene driven by its own promoter was able to complement and rescue the defective phenotype. However, a plasmid bearing a mutation in the myristyl acceptor glycine residue was unable to biologically rescue the recombinant, and the protein was not detected in purified virions.trans complementation using a truncated, myristylated form of the L1R protein partially rescued the defective mutant. Collectively, these data suggest that myristic acid mediates essential interactions of the L1R protein with viral membranes and/or other virion components that lead to the productive assembly, maturation, and release of particles. Images PMID:8083978

  4. Characterization of a conditionally transformation-deficient mutant of Haemophilus influenzae that carries a mutation in the rec-1 gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; van Boxel, T; Venema, G

    1983-01-01

    A mutant of Haemophilus influenzae, designated HM5, carrying a mutation in the rec-1 gene region, is described. This mutant transformed approximately 100-fold less well than does the wild type, but approximately 100-fold better than rec1 mutants. The mutant was less sensitive to UV irradiation and less "reckless" than rec1 mutants. In contrast to rec1 lysogens, HP1c1 lysogens of the mutant were inducible, and during transformation, recombinant-type activity was formed to the same extent as in the wild type. Although the integration of donor DNA was complete, the integrated DNA was not replicated at 36 degrees C. Both the inhibition of replication of the donor-recipient DNA complex and the transformation deficiency could be suppressed when, after DNA entry, the cells were incubated under suboptimal conditions. The loss of colony formation after UV irradiation was suppressible by the same conditions. PMID:6401707

  5. Development of Synthetic Lethality Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy. PMID:24893124

  6. Enhancing the stability and ecological safety of mass-reared transgenic strains for field release by redundant conditional lethality systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in the genetic manipulation of agriculturally important insects now allows the development of genetic sexing and male sterility systems for more highly efficient biologically-based population control programs, most notably SIT, in fruit pests throughout the world. Potentially, these condit...

  7. RecA-dependent replication in the nrdA101(Ts) mutant of Escherichia coli under restrictive conditions.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Israel; Guarino, Estrella; Guzmn, Elena C

    2011-06-01

    Cells carrying the thermosensitive nrdA101 allele are able to replicate entire chromosomes at 42C when new DNA initiation events are inhibited. We investigated the role of the recombination enzymes on the progression of the DNA replication forks in the nrdA101 mutant at 42C in the presence of rifampin. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), we demonstrated that the replication forks stalled and reversed during the replication progression under this restrictive condition. DNA labeling and flow cytometry experiments supported this finding as the deleterious effects found in the RecB-deficient background were suppressed specifically by the absence of RuvABC; however, this did not occur in a RecG-deficient background. Furthermore, we show that the RecA protein is absolutely required for DNA replication in the nrdA101 mutant at restrictive temperature when the replication forks are reversed. The detrimental effect of the recA deletion is not related to the chromosomal degradation caused by the absence of RecA. The inhibition of DNA replication observed in the nrdA101 recA mutant at 42C in the presence of rifampin was reverted by the presence of the wild-type RecA protein expressed ectopically but only partially suppressed by the RecA protein with an S25P mutation [RecA(S25P)], deficient in the rescue of the stalled replication forks. We propose that RecA is required to maintain the integrity of the reversed forks in the nrdA101 mutant under certain restrictive conditions, supporting the relationship between DNA replication and recombination enzymes through the stabilization and repair of the stalled replication forks. PMID:21441507

  8. Conditions supporting repair of potentially lethal damage cause a significant reduction of ultraviolet light-induced division delay in synchronized and plateau-phase Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iliakis, G.; Nusse, M.

    1982-09-01

    Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) induced by uv light in synchronized and in plateau-phase cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells was studied by measuring cell survival. In particlar the influence of conditions supporting repair of PLD on growth kinetics was investigated. In synchronized G/sub 1/, S, or G/sub 2/ + M cells as well as in plateau-phase cells, uv light induced, almost exclusively, delay in the next S phase. A significant decrease of this delay was observed when the cells were incubated for 24 hr in balanced salt solution. Repair of PLD after uv irradiation was found to occur in plateau-phase cells and in cells in different phases of the cell cycle provided that after irradiation these were kept under conditions inhibiting cell multiplication (incubation in balanced salt solution or in conditioned medium). The repair time constant t/sub 50/ was significantly higher than those found for X irradiation (5-10 hr compared to 2 hr), and repair was not significantly inhibited by either 20 ..mu..g/ml cycloheximide or 2 mM caffeine in 24 hr.

  9. Conditional poliovirus mutants made by random deletion mutagenesis of infectious cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, K; Nelsen, B

    1990-01-01

    Small deletions were introduced into DNA plasmids bearing cDNA copies of Mahoney type 1 poliovirus RNA. The procedure used was similar to that of P. Hearing and T. Shenk (J. Mol. Biol. 167:809-822, 1983), with modifications designed to introduce only one lesion randomly into each DNA molecule. Methods to map small deletions in either large DNA or RNA molecules were employed. Two poliovirus mutants, VP1-101 and VP1-102, were selected from mutagenized populations on the basis of their host range phenotype, showing a large reduction in the relative numbers of plaques on CV1 and HeLa cells compared with wild-type virus. The deletions borne by the mutant genomes were mapped to the region encoding the amino terminus of VP1. That these lesions were responsible for the mutant phenotypes was substantiated by reintroduction of the sequenced lesions into a wild-type poliovirus cDNA by deoxyoligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The deletion of nucleotides encoding amino acids 8 and 9 of VP1 was responsible for the VP1-101 phenotype; the VP1-102 defect was caused by the deletion of the sequences encoding the first four amino acids of VP1. The peptide sequence at the VP1-VP3 proteolytic cleavage site was altered from glutamine-glycine to glutamine-methionine in VP1-102; this apparently did not alter the proteolytic cleavage pattern. The biochemical defects resulting from these mutations are discussed in the accompanying report. Images PMID:2152811

  10. Elemental Concentrations in the Seed of Mutants and Natural Variants of Arabidopsis thaliana Grown under Varying Soil Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Stephen C.; Akmakjian, Garo; Sladek, Chris; Mendoza-Cozatl, David; Morrissey, Joe B.; Saini, Nick; Mittler, Ron; Baxter, Ivan; Salt, David E.; Ward, John M.; Schroeder, Julian I.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of mineral nutrients in seeds are critical to both the life cycle of plants as well as human nutrition. These concentrations are strongly influenced by soil conditions, as shown here by quantifying the concentration of 14 elements in seeds from Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under four different soil conditions: standard, or modified with NaCl, heavy metals, or alkali. Each of the modified soils resulted in a unique change to the seed ionome (the mineral nutrient content of the seeds). To help identify the genetic networks regulating the seed ionome, changes in elemental concentrations were evaluated using mutants corresponding to 760 genes as well as 10 naturally occurring accessions. The frequency of ionomic phenotypes supports an estimate that as much as 11% of the A. thaliana genome encodes proteins of functional relevance to ion homeostasis in seeds. A subset of mutants were analyzed with two independent alleles, providing five examples of genes important for regulation of the seed ionome: SOS2, ABH1, CCC, At3g14280 and CNGC2. In a comparison of nine different accessions to a Col-0 reference, eight accessions were observed to have reproducible differences in elemental concentrations, seven of which were dependent on specific soil conditions. These results indicate that the A. thaliana seed ionome is distinct from the vegetative ionome, and that elemental analysis is a sensitive approach to identify genes controlling ion homeostasis, including those that regulate gene expression, phospho-regulation, and ion transport. PMID:23671651

  11. Conditional deletion of beta1 integrins in the intestinal epithelium causes a loss of Hedgehog expression, intestinal hyperplasia, and early postnatal lethality.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert G; Li, Xiufen; Gray, Phillip D; Kuang, Jinqiu; Clayton, Frederic; Samowitz, Wade S; Madison, Blair B; Gumucio, Deborah L; Kuwada, Scott K

    2006-11-01

    Conditional deletion of beta1 integrins in the intestinal epithelium, unlike in epidermal and mammary epithelia, of mice does not result in decreased cell adhesion and proliferation, but instead causes a profound increase in epithelial proliferation with dysplasia and polypoid structures. The increased epithelial proliferation inhibited epithelial differentiation that caused severe malnutrition and early postnatal lethality. The striking similarities between beta1 integrin-deleted mice and neonatal mice with defective Hedgehog signaling led to the discovery that Hedgehog expression was markedly reduced in the former mice. beta1 integrins were found to drive the expression of Hedgehogs in intestinal epithelial cells in an HNF-3beta (Foxa2)-dependent fashion. The expression of Tcf-4, a transcription factor known to be required for intestinal epithelial stem cell proliferation, was increased and mislocalized in the intestinal epithelia of the beta1 integrin-deleted mice and in newborn mice treated with the Hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine. This study shows that beta1 integrins are key regulators of proliferation and homeostasis in the intestine and achieve this not through anchorage-dependent effects but by generating Hh expression and signaling. PMID:17088430

  12. Mutant characterization and in vivo conditional repression identify aromatic amino acid biosynthesis to be essential for Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Anna; Hamer, Stefanie N; Amich, Jorge; Binder, Jasmin; Krappmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of the saprobe Aspergillus fumigatus strictly depends on nutrient acquisition during infection, as fungal growth determines colonisation and invasion of a susceptible host. Primary metabolism has to be considered as a valid target for antimycotic therapy, based on the fact that several fungal anabolic pathways are not conserved in higher eukaryotes. To test whether fungal proliferation during invasive aspergillosis relies on endogenous biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, defined auxotrophic mutants of A. fumigatus were generated and assessed for their infectious capacities in neutropenic mice and found to be strongly attenuated in virulence. Moreover, essentiality of the complete biosynthetic pathway could be demonstrated, corroborated by conditional gene expression in infected animals and inhibitor studies. This brief report not only validates the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathway of A. fumigatus to be a promising antifungal target but furthermore demonstrates feasibility of conditional gene expression in a murine infection model of aspergillosis. PMID:26605426

  13. iAID: an improved auxin-inducible degron system for the construction of a 'tight' conditional mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiji; Miyazawa-Onami, Mayumi; Iida, Tetsushi; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Isolation of a 'tight' conditional mutant of a gene of interest is an effective way of studying the functions of essential genes. Strategies that use ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation to eliminate the product of a gene of interest, such as heat-inducible degron (td) and auxin-inducible degron (AID), are powerful methods for constructing conditional mutants. However, these methods do not work with some genes. Here, we describe an improved AID system (iAID) for isolating tight conditional mutants in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this method, transcriptional repression by the 'Tet-OFF' promoter is combined with proteolytic elimination of the target protein by the AID system. To provide examples, we describe the construction of tight mutants of the replication factors Dpb11 and Mcm10, dpb11-iAID, and mcm10-iAID. Because Dpb11 and Mcm10 are required for the initiation of DNA replication, their tight mutants are unable to enter S phase. This is the case for dpb11-iAID and mcm10-iAID cells after the addition of tetracycline and auxin. Both the 'Tet-OFF' promoter and the AID system have been shown to work in model eukaryotes other than budding yeast. Therefore, the iAID system is not only useful in budding yeast, but also can be applied to other model systems to isolate tight conditional mutants. PMID:26081484

  14. Strategies to construct null and conditional null Trypanosoma brucei mutants using Cre-recombinase and loxP.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Sook; Li, Zhen; Boothroyd, Catharine; Cross, George A M

    2013-09-01

    We describe two gene-knockout (KO) strategies in Trypanosoma brucei using Cre recombinase and loxP sites. Due to the limited number of selection markers for T. brucei, it has been difficult to generate a mutant with two genes knocked out and impractical to simultaneously knockout more than two genes, deterring detailed studies of important cellular mechanisms. The first KO strategy described can overcome the marker problem by allowing continuous re-use of drug-resistance markers. The same KO vector can be used to make a conditional KO system, when a gene of interest is essential for cell viability. As a gene of interest is removed from its original chromosomal locus by the induction of Cre recombinase, deletion is complete and instantaneous. This makes it easier to identify primary effects rather than having secondary effects obscuring phenotypic assessment, as is often the case with RNAi silencing. PMID:23954366

  15. Physiology and Ultrastructure of an Oxygen-resistant Chlorella Mutant under Heterotrophic Conditions 1

    PubMed Central

    Pulich, Warren M.; Ward, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    The oxygen-resistant strain of Chlorella sorokiniana (Shihira and Krauss), distinguished by its ability to grow autotrophically under high partial pressures of oxygen, was studied and partially characterized in heterotrophic culture. Ultrastructural analysis of glucose-grown oxygen-resistant strain and wild type cells reveals that osmiophilic deposits (possibly polyphosphate) are present only in wild type, while oxygen-resistant strain apparently contains increased amounts of starch and endoplasmic reticulum. Of major physiological significance are the observations that: (a) oxygen-resistant strain requires 6 to 8 days to completely adapt to dark, heterotrophic conditions, whereas wild type acclimates in 1 day; (b) oxygen-resistant strain is resistant to high oxygen tension only when grown on glucose, but not on acetate; and (c) the respiratory rate, but not the photosynthetic rate, of heterotrophic oxygen-resistant strain is abnormal compared to wild type. Images PMID:16658326

  16. Mutants lacking individual ribosomal proteins as a tool to investigate ribosomal properties.

    PubMed

    Dabbs, E R

    1991-06-01

    We have isolated and characterized mutants which lack one or two of sixteen of the proteins of the Escherichia coli ribosome. The mutation responsible in each case mapped close to, and probably in, the corresponding gene. A conditional lethal phenotype and a variable degree of impairment in growth was observed. The missing protein was readily restored to the organelle if E coli or other eubacterial ribosomal proteins were added to a suspension of the mutant particles. The mutants have been used to investigate the role of individual proteins in ribosome function and assembly. They have also aided in the topographic pinpointing of proteins on the surface of the organelle. PMID:1837238

  17. The conditional connexin43G138R mouse mutant represents a new model of hereditary oculodentodigital dysplasia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Sasse, Philipp; Schrickel, Jan W.; Watkins, Marcus; Kim, Jung-Sun; Rackauskas, Mindaugas; Troatz, Clemens; Ghanem, Alexander; Tiemann, Klaus; Degen, Joachim; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.; Civitelli, Roberto; Lewalter, Thorsten; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Willecke, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a dominant negatively inherited disorder with variable but characteristic anomalies of the fingers and toes, eyes, face and teeth, which are caused by mutations in the connexin 43 (Cx43) gene. All mutations analyzed so far have a negative influence on the conductance through gap junctional channels and hemichannels, as well as trafficking of Cx43 protein in transfected cells. In this study, we inserted the human Cx43G138R point mutation into the mouse Cx43 gene and generated mice conditionally expressing this mutation. All ODDD phenotypic manifestations observed in humans, including syndactyly and enamel hypoplasia as well as craniofacial, bone and heart anomalies, were also observed with significant penetrance in Cx43G138R mice. When this mutation was specifically expressed in cardiomyocytes, characteristic alterations in the electrocardiogram and spontaneous arrhythmias were recorded. In vitro studies with Cx43G138R-expressing cells revealed loss of the Cx43 P2 phosphorylation state, which was also absent in the mutated hearts. This loss has previously been associated with gap junctional dysfunction and increased cellular ATP release. The Cx43G138R mutated mice show significantly increased arrhythmogeneity ex vivo in Langendorff experiments with explanted hearts and in vivo in particular under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that the increased activity of ATP-releasing channels in Cx43G138R mutated cardiomyocytes may further reduce the already decreased gap junctional communication and thus aggravate arrhythmogenesis in the mouse mutant. PMID:18003637

  18. Strong morphological defects in conditional Arabidopsis abp1 knock-down mutants generated in absence of functional ABP1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) is one of the most studied proteins in plants. Since decades ago, it has been the prime receptor candidate for the plant hormone auxin with a plethora of described functions in auxin signaling and development. The developmental importance of ABP1 has recently been questioned by identification of Arabidopsis thaliana abp1 knock-out alleles that show no obvious phenotypes under normal growth conditions. In this study, we examined the contradiction between the normal growth and development of the abp1 knock-outs and the strong morphological defects observed in three different ethanol-inducible abp1 knock-down mutants ( abp1-AS, SS12K, SS12S). By analyzing segregating populations of abp1 knock-out vs. abp1 knock-down crosses we show that the strong morphological defects that were believed to be the result of conditional down-regulation of ABP1 can be reproduced also in the absence of the functional ABP1 protein. This data suggests that the phenotypes in  abp1 knock-down lines are due to the off-target effects and asks for further reflections on the biological function of ABP1 or alternative explanations for the missing phenotypic defects in the abp1 loss-of-function alleles. PMID:26925228

  19. The conditional connexin43G138R mouse mutant represents a new model of hereditary oculodentodigital dysplasia in humans.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Sasse, Philipp; Schrickel, Jan W; Watkins, Marcus; Kim, Jung-Sun; Rackauskas, Mindaugas; Troatz, Clemens; Ghanem, Alexander; Tiemann, Klaus; Degen, Joachim; Bukauskas, Feliksas F; Civitelli, Roberto; Lewalter, Thorsten; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Willecke, Klaus

    2008-02-15

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a dominant negatively inherited disorder with variable but characteristic anomalies of the fingers and toes, eyes, face and teeth, which are caused by mutations in the connexin 43 (Cx43) gene. All mutations analyzed so far have a negative influence on the conductance through gap junctional channels and hemichannels, as well as trafficking of Cx43 protein in transfected cells. In this study, we inserted the human Cx43G138R point mutation into the mouse Cx43 gene and generated mice conditionally expressing this mutation. All ODDD phenotypic manifestations observed in humans, including syndactyly and enamel hypoplasia as well as craniofacial, bone and heart anomalies, were also observed with significant penetrance in Cx43G138R mice. When this mutation was specifically expressed in cardiomyocytes, characteristic alterations in the electrocardiogram and spontaneous arrhythmias were recorded. In vitro studies with Cx43G138R-expressing cells revealed loss of the Cx43 P2 phosphorylation state, which was also absent in the mutated hearts. This loss has previously been associated with gap junctional dysfunction and increased cellular ATP release. The Cx43G138R mutated mice show significantly increased arrhythmogeneity ex vivo in Langendorff experiments with explanted hearts and in vivo in particular under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that the increased activity of ATP-releasing channels in Cx43G138R mutated cardiomyocytes may further reduce the already decreased gap junctional communication and thus aggravate arrhythmogenesis in the mouse mutant. PMID:18003637

  20. Condition stabilization for Aspergillus niger FCBP-198 and its hyperactive mutants to yield high titres of alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Sobiya; Bajwa, Rukhsana; Shafique, Shazia

    2010-01-01

    A number of substrates were tested for the cultivation of microorganisms to produce a host of enzymes. The effect of different substrates (wheat and rice straw, sugar cane waste, wood waste), incubation temperatures (20-40 degrees C), initial pH levels (3.5-9.0), incubation periods (0-72 hours) and nitrogen sources (ammonium sulfate, urea, peptone, yeast extract, sodium nitrate) on growth and alpha-amylase activity was studied for the native and mutant strains. Maximum enzyme activity was observed at 1.5% wheat straw for Aspergillus niger FCBP-198 and An-Ch-4.7 and at 2% wheat straw for An-UV-5.6, with sodium nitrate as a principle nitrogen source. The optimum temperature for maximum enzyme activity was 30 degrees C for the parental strain, while An-UV-5.6 and An-Ch-4.7 thrived well at 32.5 degrees C. The best conditions of pH and incubation duration were 4.5 and 48 hours, respectively, for all the strains. Mass production under preoptimized growth conditions demonstrated the suitability of wheat straw for swift mycelial colonization and viability. PMID:20734811

  1. LT(R192G), a non-toxic mutant of the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli, elicits enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses associated with protection against lethal oral challenge with Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Chong, C; Friberg, M; Clements, J D

    1998-04-01

    In the current study we examined the ability of a novel mucosal adjuvant, LT(R192G), to enhance the humoral and cellular immune responses against killed Salmonella spp. and to affect protection against lethal oral challenge with wild-type organisms. Mice orally immunized with killed S. dublin in conjunction with LT(R192G) were protected against lethal oral challenge and had higher IFN-gamma, IL-2 and IgG responses than did mice orally immunized with killed S. dublin alone which were not protected. This study demonstrates that the function of LT(R192G) in protection against typhoid-like disease is to upregulate/enhance the Th1 arm of the immune response against killed organisms. When used as a mucosal adjuvant, LT(R192G) enables the use of killed bacteria or viruses as vaccines by enhancing the overall humoral and cellular host immune response to these organisms, especially the Th1 arm of the immune response. These findings have significant implications for vaccine development and further support the potential of LT(R192G) to function as a safe, effective adjuvant for mucosally administered vaccines. PMID:9562694

  2. Simultaneous Gain and Loss of Functions Caused by a Single Amino Acid Substitution in the ? Subunit of Escherichia Coli RNA Polymerase: Suppression of Nusa and Rho Mutations and Conditional Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Sparkowski, J.; Das, A.

    1992-01-01

    Transcript elongation and termination in Escherichia coli is modulated, in part, by the nusA gene product, an acidic protein that interacts not only with RNA polymerase itself but also with ancillary factors, namely the host termination protein Rho and phage ? antitermination protein, N. The E. coli nusA1 mutant fails to support ? development due to a specific defect in N-mediated antitermination. Certain rifampicin-resistant (rif(R)) variants of the nusA1 host support ? growth. We report here the isolation and pleiotropic properties of one such rif(R) mutant, ts8, resulting from a single amino acid substitution mutation in rpoB, the structural gene for polymerase ? subunit. ts8 is a recessive lethal mutation that blocks cell growth at 42. Pulse-labeling and analysis of newly synthesized proteins indicate that the mutant cell is proficient in RNA synthesis at high temperature. Apparently, ts8 causes a loss of some specialized function of RNA polymerase without a gross defect in general transcription activities. ts8 is an allele-specific suppressor of nusA1. It does not suppress nusAsal, nusB5 and nusE71 mutations nor does it bypass the requirement for a functional N gene and the nut site for antitermination and ? growth. A mutation in the N gene, punA1, that restores ? growth in the nusA1 mutant host but not in the nusAsal host, compensates for the nusAsal allele in the ts8 mutant. This combined effect of two allele-specific suppressors suggests that they enhance some aspect of polymerase-NusA-N interaction and function. ts8 suppresses the rho15 mutation, but not the rho112 mutation, indicating that it might render RNA polymerase susceptible to the action of a defective Rho protein. Marker rescue analysis has localized ts8 to a 910-bp internal segment of rpoB that encodes the Rif domain. By amplification, cloning and sequencing of this segment of the mutant chromosome we have determined that ts8 contains Phe in place of Ser522, caused by a C to T transition. By gene conversion, we have established that the simultaneous gain and loss of three functions of polymerase is caused by this single amino acid substitution. Clearly, a site in the ? subunit critical for the functioning of both termination and antitermination factors is altered by ts8. The alteration, we imagine, might make this site on polymerase receptive to some factors but repulsive to others. PMID:1551568

  3. Construction of phage mutants.

    PubMed

    Villafane, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have established that the most abundant life form, that of phages, has had major influence on the biosphere, bacterial evolution, bacterial genome, and lateral gene transmission. Importantly the phages have served and continue to serve as valuable model systems. Such studies have led to a renewed interest and activity in the study of phages and their genomes. In order to determine the details of the involvement of phages in these important processes and activities, it is critical to assign specific functions to the phage gene products. The initial functional and gene assignments can be made by general mutagenesis of the phage genomes and of these specific gene products. A very informative mutagenic protocol that has found renewed interest is that using hydroxylamine. This mutagenic protocol has been used to obtain gene mutations involved in the lysogenic cycle of the Salmonella enterica serovar Anatum var. 15+ phage epsilon34 (hereafter phage epsilon34) and to isolate conditional lethal mutants of phage epsilon34. A similar protocol using plasmid is also described. A plate complementation method is presented to determine quickly the number of genes which are present in the population of mutations isolated from hydroxylamine mutagenesis. PMID:19066824

  4. Establishment of permanent chimerism in a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mouse mutant with hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.; Doermer, P.

    1987-12-01

    Pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell function was investigated in the homozygous muscle type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-A) mutant mouse using bone marrow transplantation experiments. Hemopoietic tissues of LDH-A mutants showed a marked decreased in enzyme activity that was associated with severe hemolytic anemia. This condition proved to be transplantable into wild type mice (+/+) through total body irradiation (TBI) at a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy followed by engraftment of mutant bone marrow cells. Since the mutants are extremely radiosensitive (lethal dose50/30 4.4 Gy vs 7.3 Gy in +/+ mice), 8.0-Gy TBI followed by injection of even high numbers of normal bone marrow cells did not prevent death within 5-6 days. After a nonlethal dose of 4.0 Gy and grafting of normal bone marrow cells, a transient chimerism showing peripheral blood characteristics of the wild type was produced that returned to the mutant condition within 12 weeks. The transfusion of wild type red blood cells prior to and following 8.0-Gy TBI and reconstitution with wild type bone marrow cells prevented the early death of the mutants and permanent chimerism was achieved. The chimeras showed all hematological parameters of wild type mice, and radiosensitivity returned to normal. It is concluded that the mutant pluripotent stem cells are functionally comparable to normal stem cells, emphasizing the significance of this mouse model for studies of stem cell regulation.

  5. Complementation of the embryo-lethal T-DNA insertion mutant of AUXIN-BINDING-PROTEIN 1 (ABP1) with abp1 point mutated versions reveals crosstalk of ABP1 and phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Effendi, Yunus; Ferro, Noel; Labusch, Corinna; Geisler, Markus; Scherer, Günther F E

    2015-01-01

    The function of the extracytoplasmic AUXIN-BINDING-PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is largely enigmatic. We complemented a homozygous T-DNA insertion null mutant of ABP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana Wassilewskia with three mutated and one wild-type (wt) ABP1 cDNA, all tagged C-terminally with a strepII-FLAG tag upstream the KDEL signal. Based on in silico modelling, the abp1 mutants were predicted to have altered geometries of the auxin binding pocket and calculated auxin binding energies lower than the wt. Phenotypes linked to auxin transport were compromised in these three complemented abp1 mutants. Red light effects, such as elongation of hypocotyls in constant red (R) and far-red (FR) light, in white light supplemented by FR light simulating shade, and inhibition of gravitropism by R or FR, were all compromised in the complemented lines. Using auxin- or light-induced expression of marker genes, we showed that auxin-induced expression was delayed already after 10 min, and light-induced expression within 60 min, even though TIR1/AFB or phyB are thought to act as receptors relevant for gene expression regulation. The expression of marker genes in seedlings responding to both auxin and shade showed that for both stimuli regulation of marker gene expression was altered after 10-20 min in the wild type and phyB mutant. The rapidity of expression responses provides a framework for the mechanics of functional interaction of ABP1 and phyB to trigger interwoven signalling pathways. PMID:25392478

  6. Production of infectious RNA transcripts from Sindbis virus cDNA clones: mapping of lethal mutations, rescue of a temperature-sensitive marker, and in vitro mutagenesis to generate defined mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, C M; Levis, R; Strauss, J H; Huang, H V

    1987-01-01

    We constructed full-length cDNA clones of Sindbis virus that can be transcribed in vitro by SP6 RNA polymerase to produce infectious genome-length transcripts. Viruses produced from in vitro transcripts are identical to Sindbis virus and show strain-specific phenotypes reflecting the source of RNA used for cDNA synthesis. The cDNA clones were used to confirm the mapping of the causal mutation of ts2 to the capsid protein. A general strategy for mapping Sindbis virus mutations is described and was used to identify two lethal mutations in an original full-length construct which did not produce infectious transcripts. An XbaI linker was inserted in the cDNA clone near the transcriptional start of the subgenomic mRNA; the resulting virus retains the XbaI recognition sequence, thus providing formal evidence that viruses are derived from in vitro transcripts of cDNA clones. The potential applications of the cDNA clones are discussed. Images PMID:3479621

  7. Protection from genital herpes disease, seroconversion and latent infection in a non-lethal murine genital infection model by immunization with an HSV-2 replication-defective mutant virus.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Fernando M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-15

    Viral vaccines have traditionally protected against disease, but for viruses that establish latent infection, it is desirable for the vaccine to reduce infection to reduce latent infection and reactivation. While seroconversion has been used in clinical trials of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccines to measure protection from infection, this has not been modeled in animal infection systems. To measure the ability of a genital herpes vaccine candidate to protect against various aspects of infection, we established a non-lethal murine model of genital HSV-2 infection, an ELISA assay to measure antibodies specific for infected cell protein 8 (ICP8), and a very sensitive qPCR assay. Using these assays, we observed that immunization with HSV-2 dl5-29 virus reduced disease, viral shedding, seroconversion, and latent infection by the HSV-2 challenge virus. Therefore, it may be feasible to obtain protection against genital disease, seroconversion and latent infection by immunization, even if sterilizing immunity is not achieved. PMID:26609935

  8. A Survey of New Temperature-Sensitive, Embryonic-Lethal Mutations in C. elegans: 24 Alleles of Thirteen Genes

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Sean M.; Garner, Aleena R.; Hamill, Danielle R.; Osterberg, Valerie R.; Lyczak, Rebecca; Madison, Erin E.; Nguyen, Michael H.; Sandberg, Nathan A.; Sedghi, Noushin; Willis, John H.; Yochem, John; Johnson, Eric A.; Bowerman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    To study essential maternal gene requirements in the early C. elegans embryo, we have screened for temperature-sensitive, embryonic lethal mutations in an effort to bypass essential zygotic requirements for such genes during larval and adult germline development. With conditional alleles, multiple essential requirements can be examined by shifting at different times from the permissive temperature of 15C to the restrictive temperature of 26C. Here we describe 24 conditional mutations that affect 13 different loci and report the identity of the gene mutations responsible for the conditional lethality in 22 of the mutants. All but four are mis-sense mutations, with two mutations affecting splice sites, another creating an in-frame deletion, and one creating a premature stop codon. Almost all of the mis-sense mutations affect residues conserved in orthologs, and thus may be useful for engineering conditional mutations in other organisms. We find that 62% of the mutants display additional phenotypes when shifted to the restrictive temperature as L1 larvae, in addition to causing embryonic lethality after L4 upshifts. Remarkably, we also found that 13 out of the 24 mutations appear to be fast-acting, making them particularly useful for careful dissection of multiple essential requirements. Our findings highlight the value of C. elegans for identifying useful temperature-sensitive mutations in essential genes, and provide new insights into the requirements for some of the affected loci. PMID:21390299

  9. A survey of new temperature-sensitive, embryonic-lethal mutations in C. elegans: 24 alleles of thirteen genes.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    O'Rourke SM; Carter C; Carter L; Christensen SN; Jones MP; Nash B; Price MH; Turnbull DW; Garner AR; Hamill DR; Osterberg VR; Lyczak R; Madison EE; Nguyen MH; Sandberg NA; Sedghi N; Willis JH; Yochem J; Johnson EA; Bowerman B

    2011-01-01

    To study essential maternal gene requirements in the early C. elegans embryo, we have screened for temperature-sensitive, embryonic lethal mutations in an effort to bypass essential zygotic requirements for such genes during larval and adult germline development. With conditional alleles, multiple essential requirements can be examined by shifting at different times from the permissive temperature of 15C to the restrictive temperature of 26C. Here we describe 24 conditional mutations that affect 13 different loci and report the identity of the gene mutations responsible for the conditional lethality in 22 of the mutants. All but four are mis-sense mutations, with two mutations affecting splice sites, another creating an in-frame deletion, and one creating a premature stop codon. Almost all of the mis-sense mutations affect residues conserved in orthologs, and thus may be useful for engineering conditional mutations in other organisms. We find that 62% of the mutants display additional phenotypes when shifted to the restrictive temperature as L1 larvae, in addition to causing embryonic lethality after L4 upshifts. Remarkably, we also found that 13 out of the 24 mutations appear to be fast-acting, making them particularly useful for careful dissection of multiple essential requirements. Our findings highlight the value of C. elegans for identifying useful temperature-sensitive mutations in essential genes, and provide new insights into the requirements for some of the affected loci.

  10. Analysis of influenza virus hemagglutinin receptor binding mutants with limited receptor recognition properties and conditional replication characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Konrad C; Galloway, Summer E; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Talekar, Ganesh R; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Steinhauer, David A

    2011-12-01

    To examine the range of selective processes that potentially operate when poorly binding influenza viruses adapt to replicate more efficiently in alternative environments, we passaged a virus containing an attenuating mutation in the hemagglutinin (HA) receptor binding site in mice and characterized the resulting mutants with respect to the structural locations of mutations selected, the replication phenotypes of the viruses, and their binding properties on glycan microarrays. The initial attenuated virus had a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation at HA1 position 98 (Y98F), located in the receptor binding pocket, but viruses that were selected contained second-site pseudoreversion mutations in various structural locations that revealed a range of molecular mechanisms for modulating receptor binding that go beyond the scope that is generally mapped using receptor specificity mutants. A comparison of virus titers in the mouse respiratory tract versus MDCK cells in culture showed that the mutants displayed distinctive replication properties depending on the system, but all were less attenuated in mice than the Y98F virus. An analysis of receptor binding properties confirmed that the initial Y98F virus bound poorly to several different species of erythrocytes, while all mutants reacquired various degrees of hemagglutination activity. Interestingly, both the Y98F virus and pseudoreversion mutants were shown to bind very inefficiently to standard glycan microarrays containing an abundance of binding substrates for most influenza viruses that have been characterized to date, provided by the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. The viruses were also examined on a recently developed microarray containing glycans terminating in sialic acid derivatives, and limited binding to a potentially interesting subset of glycans was revealed. The results are discussed with respect to mechanisms for HA-mediated receptor binding, as well as regarding the species of molecules that may act as receptors for influenza virus on host cell surfaces. PMID:21917953

  11. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli creB and arcA mutants reveals shared control of carbon catabolism under microaerobic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Nikel, Pablo I; Zhu, Jiangfeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Méndez, Beatriz S; Bennett, George N

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli has several elaborate sensing mechanisms for response to availability of oxygen and other electron acceptors, as well as the carbon source in the surrounding environment. Among them, the CreBC and ArcAB two-component signal transduction systems are responsible for regulation of carbon source utilization and redox control in response to oxygen availability, respectively. We assessed the role of CreBC and ArcAB in regulating the central carbon metabolism of E. coli under microaerobic conditions by means of (13)C-labeling experiments in chemostat cultures of a wild-type strain, DeltacreB and DeltaarcA single mutants, and a DeltacreB DeltaarcA double mutant. Continuous cultures were conducted at D = 0.1 h(-1) under carbon-limited conditions with restricted oxygen supply. Although all experimental strains metabolized glucose mainly through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, mutant strains had significantly lower fluxes in both the oxidative and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathways. Significant differences were also found at the pyruvate branching point. Both pyruvate-formate lyase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex contributed to acetyl-coenzyme A synthesis from pyruvate, and their activity seemed to be modulated by both ArcAB and CreBC. Strains carrying the creB deletion showed a higher biomass yield on glucose compared to the wild-type strain and its DeltaarcA derivative, which also correlated with higher fluxes from building blocks to biomass. Glyoxylate shunt and lactate dehydrogenase were active mainly in the DeltaarcA strain. Finally, it was observed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions operated in a rather cyclic fashion under our experimental conditions, with reduced activity in the mutant strains. PMID:19561129

  12. A Mutant Chaperonin That Is Functional at Lower Temperatures Enables Hyperthermophilic Archaea To Grow under Cold-Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Le; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermococcus kodakarensis grows optimally at 85C and possesses two chaperonins, cold-inducible CpkA and heat-inducible CpkB, which are involved in adaptation to low and high temperatures, respectively. The two chaperonins share a high sequence identity (77%), except in their C-terminal regions. CpkA, which contains tandem repeats of a GGM motif, shows its highest ATPase activity at 60C to 70C, whereas CpkB shows its highest activity at temperatures higher than 90C. To clarify the effects of changes in ATPase activity on chaperonin function at lower temperatures, various CpkA variants were constructed by introducing single point mutations into the C-terminal region. A CpkA variant in which Glu530 was replaced with Gly (CpkA-E530G) showed increased ATPase activity, with its highest activity at 50C. The efficacy of the CpkA variants against denatured indole-3-glycerol-phosphate synthase of T. kodakarensis (TrpCTk), which is a CpkA target, was then examined in vitro. CpkA-E530G was more effective than wild-type CpkA at facilitating the refolding of chemically unfolded TrpCTk at 50C. The effect of cpkA-E530G on cell growth was then examined by introducing cpkA-E530G into the genome of T. kodakarensis KU216 (pyrF). The mutant strain, DA4 (pyrF cpkA-E530G), grew as well as the parental KU216 strain at 60C. In contrast, DA4 grew more vigorously than KU216 at 50C. These results suggested that the CpkA-E530G mutation prevented cold denaturation of proteins under cold-stress conditions, thereby enabling cells to grow in cooler environments. Thus, a single base pair substitution in a chaperonin gene allows cells to grow vigorously in a new environment. IMPORTANCE Thermococcus kodakarensis possesses two group II chaperonins, cold-inducible CpkA and heat-inducible CpkB, which are involved in adaptation to low and high temperatures, respectively. CpkA might act as an adaptive allele to adapt to cooler environments. In this study, we compared the last 20 amino acids within the C termini of the chaperonins and found a clear correlation between the CpkA-type chaperonin gene copy number and growth temperature. Furthermore, we introduced single mutations into the CpkA C-terminal region to clarify its role in cold adaptation, and we showed that a single base substitution allowed the organism to adapt to a lower temperature. The present data suggest that hyperthermophiles have evolved by obtaining mutations in chaperonins that allow them to adapt to a colder environment. PMID:26013483

  13. Impact of acid adaptation on attachment of Listeria monocytogenes to stainless steel during long-term incubation under low or moderate temperature conditions and on subsequent recalcitrance of attached cells to lethal acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Nychas, George-John

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possible impact of acid adaptation of Listeria monocytogenes cells on their attachment to stainless steel (SS) during long-term incubation under either low or moderate temperature conditions and on the subsequent recalcitrance of attached cells to lethal acid treatments. Initially, nonadapted or acid-adapted stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were used to inoculate (ca. 10? CFU/ml) brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth in test tubes containing vertically placed SS coupons. Incubation was carried out at either 5 or 30 C for up to 15 days, under static conditions. On the 5th, 10th and 15th days of incubation, attached cells were subjected to lethal acid treatments by exposing them, for either 6 or 60 min, to pH 2, adjusted with either hydrochloric or lactic acid. Following the acid treatments, remaining viable cells were detached (through strong vortexing with glass beads) and enumerated by agar plating, and also indirectly quantified by conductance measurements via their metabolic activity. Results obtained from both quantification techniques, employed here in parallel, revealed that although the numbers of attached cells for nonadapted and acid-adapted ones were similar, the latter were found to present significantly (p<0.05) increased recalcitrance to all the acid treatments for both incubation temperatures and all sampling days. In addition and regardless of acid adaptation, when long (60 min) acid treatments were applied, conductance measurements revealed that the weak organic lactic acid exhibited significantly (p<0.05) stronger antilisterial activity compared to the strong inorganic hydrochloric acid (at the same pH value of 2). To conclude, present results show that acid adaptation of L. monocytogenes cells during their planktonic growth is conserved even after 15 days of incubation under both low and moderate temperature conditions, and results in the increased recalcitrance of their sessile population to otherwise lethal acid treatments. This "stress hardening" should be severely taken into account when acidic decontamination interventions are used to kill attached to equipment surfaces cells of this important pathogenic bacterium. PMID:24296256

  14. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  15. Tasers Less than Lethal!

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Abiram; Theivacumar, Nada S; Souka, Hesham M

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of potentially lethal injury associated with the use of Taser. A 42-year-old man was stopped by police for potential detention. He held a large carving knife over his epigasrium threatening to stab himself.With a view to achieving immobilisation, a Taser gun was used. On activation of the Taser, the subject suffered a 7-cm wide and 10-cm deep stab injury to the upper abdomen. In this case, activation of the Taser resulted in the contraction of skeletal muscles, flexors more intensely than extensors, resulting in the stab injury. PMID:19416583

  16. The lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-11-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage light gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilized traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. The design of these traction motors, vacuum interrupters and pulse transformers are detailed.

  17. Strategy for enhanced transgenic strain development for embryonic conditionnal lethality in Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here the first reproductive sterility system for the tephritid pest, Anastrepha suspensa, is presented, based on lethality primarily in embryos heterozygous for a lethal conditional transgene combination. The tetracycline-suppressible system uses the cellularization-specific A. suspensa serendipity...

  18. Endothelial cell specification in the somite is compromised in Pax3-positive progenitors of Foxc1/2 conditional mutants, with loss of forelimb myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mayeuf-Louchart, Alicia; Montarras, Didier; Bodin, Catherine; Kume, Tsutomu; Vincent, Stéphane D; Buckingham, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    Pax3 and Foxc2 have been shown genetically to mutually repress each other in the mouse somite. Perturbation of this balance in multipotent cells of the dermomyotome influences cell fate; upregulation of Foxc2 favours a vascular fate, whereas higher levels of Pax3 lead to myogenesis. Foxc1 has overlapping functions with Foxc2. In Foxc1/2 double-mutant embryos, somitogenesis is severely affected, precluding analysis of somite derivatives. We have adopted a conditional approach whereby mutations in Foxc1 and Foxc2 genes were targeted to Pax3-expressing cells. Inclusion of a conditional reporter allele in the crosses made it possible to follow cells that had expressed Pax3. At the forelimb level, endothelial and myogenic cells migrate from adjacent somites into the limb bud. This population of endothelial cells is compromised in the double mutant, whereas excessive production of myogenic cells is observed in the trunk. However, strikingly, myogenic progenitors fail to enter the limbs, leading to the absence of skeletal muscle. Pax3-positive migratory myogenic progenitors, marked by expression of Lbx1, are specified in the somite at forelimb level, but endothelial progenitors are absent. The myogenic progenitors do not die, but differentiate prematurely adjacent to the somite. We conclude that the small proportion of somite-derived endothelial cells in the limb is required for the migration of myogenic limb progenitors. PMID:26839363

  19. Dynamics of Mitochondrial RNA-Binding Protein Complex in Trypanosoma brucei and Its Petite Mutant under Optimized Immobilization Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenqiu; Kaltenbrunner, Sabine; imkov, Eva; Stan?k, David

    2014-01-01

    There are a variety of complex metabolic processes ongoing simultaneously in the single, large mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei. Understanding the organellar environment and dynamics of mitochondrial proteins requires quantitative measurement in vivo. In this study, we have validated a method for immobilizing both procyclic stage (PS) and bloodstream stage (BS) T. brucei brucei with a high level of cell viability over several hours and verified its suitability for undertaking fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), with mitochondrion-targeted yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Next, we used this method for comparative analysis of the translational diffusion of mitochondrial RNA-binding protein 1 (MRP1) in the BS and in T. b. evansi. The latter flagellate is like petite mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae because it lacks organelle-encoded nucleic acids. FRAP measurement of YFP-tagged MRP1 in both cell lines illuminated from a new perspective how the absence or presence of RNA affects proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism. This work represents the first attempt to examine this process in live trypanosomes. PMID:25063375

  20. Exome sequencing for gene discovery in lethal fetal disorders--harnessing the value of extreme phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Filges, Isabel; Friedman, Jan M

    2015-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of Mendelian disorders, and many novel genes have been discovered to cause disease phenotypes when mutant. At the same time, next-generation sequencing approaches have enabled non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA in maternal blood. However, little attention has been paid to using whole exome and genome sequencing strategies for gene identification in fetal disorders that are lethal in utero, because they can appear to be sporadic and Mendelian inheritance may be missed. We present challenges and advantages of applying next-generation sequencing approaches to gene discovery in fetal malformation phenotypes and review recent successful discovery approaches. We discuss the implication and significance of recessive inheritance and cross-species phenotyping in fetal lethal conditions. Whole exome sequencing can be used in individual families with undiagnosed lethal congenital anomaly syndromes to discover causal mutations, provided that prior to data analysis, the fetal phenotype can be correlated to a particular developmental pathway in embryogenesis. Cross-species phenotyping allows providing further evidence for causality of discovered variants in genes involved in those extremely rare phenotypes and will increase our knowledge about normal and abnormal human developmental processes. Ultimately, families will benefit from the option of early prenatal diagnosis. PMID:25046514

  1. Physiological and biochemical responses of fruit exocarp of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutants to natural photo-oxidative conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina A; Andrews, Preston K; Davies, Neal M

    2006-01-01

    Photo-oxidative stress was imposed under natural solar radiation on exposed and shaded sections of detached fruit of immature green tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller = Solanum lycopersicum L.) mutants (anthocyanin absent, beta-carotene, Delta, and high pigment-1) and their nearly isogenic parents ('Ailsa Craig' and 'Rutgers'). After 5 h exposure to high solar irradiance, either with or without ultraviolet (UV) radiation, surface colour changes, pigment composition, photosynthetic efficiency, antioxidant metabolites and enzyme activities, and selected flavonoids and antioxidant proteins in exocarp tissue were evaluated. The imposed photo-oxidative stress reproduced the symptoms observed on attached fruit. Both high temperature and solar irradiance caused fruit surface discoloration with faster degradation of chlorophyll (Chl) than carotenoids (Car), leading to an increase in the Car/Chl ratio. Surface bleaching was mostly caused by visible light, whereas elevated temperatures were mostly responsible for the inactivation of photosynthesis, measured as decreased F(v)/F(m). Ascorbate, glutathione, and total soluble protein concentrations decreased in the exocarp as the duration of exposure increased. Specific activities of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, dehydroascorbate reductase, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase increased with exposure, suggesting that these proteins were conserved during the imposed stress. GR protein expression remained stable during the imposed stress, whereas, MDHAR protein expression increased. Quercetin and kaempferol concentrations increased rapidly upon exposure, but not to UV radiation, suggesting rapid photo-protection in response to visible light; however, naringenin synthesis was not induced. The apparent increased tolerance of hp-1 fruit is discussed. PMID:16698820

  2. Lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92% of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1 MA to 1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  3. Alterations in peptidoglycan chemical composition associated with rod-to-sphere transition in a conditional mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, R; Canepari, P; Satta, G

    1979-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae Mir M7 is a spontaneous parentless morphology mutant which grows as cocci at pH 7 and as rods at pH 5.8. This strain has been characterized as defective in lateral wall formation (at pH7). Data suggest that the cell wall is mainly made up of poles of the rods (G. Satta, R. Fontana, P. Canepari, and G. Botta, J. Bacteriol. 137:727--734, 1979). In this work the isolation and the biochemical properties of the peptidoglycan of both Mir M7 rods and cocci and a nonconditional rod-shaped Mir M7 revertant (strain Mir A12) are described. The peptidoglycan of Mir M7 (both rods and cocci) and Mir A12 strains carried covalently bound proteins which could be easily removed by pronase treatment in Mir M7 rods and Mir A12 cells, but not in Mir M7 round cells. However, when the sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble residues of Mir M7 cocci were pretreated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), pronase digestion removed the covalently bound proteins, and pure peptidoglycan was obtained. EDTA treatment of the rigid layer of Mir M7 cocci removed amounts of Mg2+ and Ca2+, which were 10- and 50-fold higher, respectively, than the amount liberated from the rigid layer of Mir M7 rods and Mir A12 cells. Amino acid composition was qualitatively similar in both strains, but Mir M7 cocci contained a higher amount of alanine and glucosamine. Mir M7 cocci contained approximately 50% less peptidoglycan than rods. Under electron microscopy, the rigid layer of the Mir M7 rods and Mir A12 cells appeared to be rod-shaped and their shape remained unchanged after EDTA and pronase treatment. On the contrary, the Mir M7 cocci rigid layer appeared to be round, and after EDTA treatment it collapsed and lost any definite morphology. In spite of these alterations, the peptidoglycan of Mir M7 cocci still appeared able to determine the shape of the cell and protect it from osmotic shock and mechanical damages. The accumluation of divalent cations appeared necessary for the peptidoglycan to acquire sufficient rigidity for shape determination and cell protection. We concluded that the coccal shape in Mir M7 cells is not due to loss of cell wall rigidity but is a consequence of the formation of a round peptidoglycan molecule. The possibility that the alterations found in the Mir M7 cocci rigid layer may reflect natural differences in the biochemical composition of the septa and lateral wall of normally shaped bacteria is discussed. Images PMID:113382

  4. B-cell proliferation and induction of early G1-regulating proteins by Epstein-Barr virus mutants conditional for EBNA2.

    PubMed Central

    Kempkes, B; Spitkovsky, D; Jansen-Drr, P; Ellwart, J W; Kremmer, E; Delecluse, H J; Rottenberger, C; Bornkamm, G W; Hammerschmidt, W

    1995-01-01

    Infection of primary B-lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) leads to growth transformation of these B-cells in vitro. EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), one of the first genes expressed after EBV infection of B-cells, is a transcriptional activator of viral and cellular genes and is essential for the transforming potential of the virus. We generated conditional EBV mutants by expressing EBNA2 as chimeric fusion protein with the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor on the genetic background of the virus. Growth transformation of primary normal B-cells by mutant virus resulted in estrogen-dependent lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing the chimeric EBNA2 protein. In the absence of estrogen about half of the cells enter a quiescent non-proliferative state whereas the others die by apoptosis. EBNA2 is thus required not only for initiation but also for maintenance of transformation. Growth arrest occurred at G1 and G2 stages of the cell cycle, indicating that functional EBNA2 is required at different restriction points of the cell cycle. Growth arrest is reversible for G1/G0 cells as indicated by the sequential accumulation and modification of cell cycle regulating proteins. EBV induces the same cell cycle regulating proteins as polyclonal stimuli in primary B-cells. These data suggest that EBV is using a common pathway for B-cell activation bypassing the requirement for antigen, T-cell signals and growth factors. Images PMID:7828599

  5. Elemental concentrations in the seed of mutants and natural variants of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under varying soil conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentrations of mineral nutrients in seeds are critical to both the life cycle of plants as well as human nutrition. These concentrations are strongly influenced by soil conditions, as shown here by quantifying the concentration of 14 elements in seeds from Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown un...

  6. Severity of mutant phenotype in a series of chlorophyll-deficient wheat mutants depends on light intensity and the severity of the block in chlorophyll synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Falbel, T G; Meehl, J B; Staehelin, L A

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of a series of allelic chlorina mutants of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), which have partial blocks in chlorophyll (Chl) synthesis and, therefore, a limited Chl supply, reinforce the principle that Chl is required for the stable accumulation of Chl-binding proteins and that only reaction centers accumulate when the supply of Chl is severely limited. Depending on the rate of Chl accumulation (determined by the severity of the mutation) and on the rate of turnover of Chl and its precursors (determined by the environment in which the plant is grown), the mutants each reach an equilibrium of Chl synthesis and degradation. Together these mutants generate a spectrum of phenotypes. Under the harshest conditions (high illumination), plants with moderate blocks in Chl synthesis have membranes with very little Chl and Chl-proteins and membrane stacks resembling the thylakoids of the lethal xantha mutants of barely grown at low to medium light intensities (which have more severe blocks). In contrast, when grown under low-light conditions the same plants with moderate blocks have thylakoids resembling those of the wild type. The wide range of phenotypes of Chl b-deficient mutants has historically produced more confusion than enlightenment, but incomparable growth conditions can now explain the discrepancies reported in the literature. PMID:8883392

  7. Gene Expressing and sRNA Sequencing Show That Gene Differentiation Associates with a Yellow Acer palmatum Mutant Leaf in Different Light Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shun; Li, Qian-Zhong; Rong, Li-Ping; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Acer palmatum Thunb., like other maples, is a widely ornamental-use small woody tree for leaf shapes and colors. Interestingly, we found a yellow-leaves mutant “Jingling Huangfeng” turned to green when grown in shade or low-density light condition. In order to study the potential mechanism, we performed high-throughput sequencing and obtained 1,082 DEGs in leaves grown in different light conditions that result in A. palmatum significant morphological and physiological changes. A total of 989 DEGs were annotated and clustered, of which many DEGs were found associating with the photosynthesis activity and pigment synthesis. The expression of CHS and FDR gene was higher while the expression of FLS gene was lower in full-sunlight condition; this may cause more colorful substance like chalcone and anthocyanin that were produced in full-light condition, thus turning the foliage to yellow. Moreover, this is the first available miRNA collection which contains 67 miRNAs of A. palmatum, including 46 conserved miRNAs and 21 novel miRNAs. To get better understanding of which pathways these miRNAs involved, 102 Unigenes were found to be potential targets of them. These results will provide valuable genetic resources for further study on the molecular mechanisms of Acer palmatum leaf coloration. PMID:26788511

  8. Molecular attenuation of vaccinia virus: mutant generation and animal characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M S; Roos, J M; McGuigan, L C; Smith, K A; Cormier, N; Cohen, L K; Roberts, B E; Payne, L G

    1992-01-01

    These studies demonstrated that the inbred BALB/c mouse strain can be optimized for the assessment of vaccinia virus virulence, growth, and spread from the site of inoculation and immune protection from a lethal vaccinia virus challenge. The studies established that manipulation of the vaccinia virus genome generated mutants exhibiting a wide range of attenuated phenotypes. The nine NYCBH vaccinia virus mutants had intracranial 50% lethal doses that ranged from 2 to greater than 7 log10 units. The decreased neurovirulence was due to decreased replication in brain tissue. Three mutants had a decreased ability to disseminate to the lungs, brains, livers, and spleens of mice after intranasal infection. One mutant had a decreased transmission from mice infected by tail scarification to naive cage mates. Although the mutants, with one exception, grew to wild-type titers in cell culture, they showed a growth potential on the scarified skin of mice that was dramatically different from that of the wild-type virus. Consequently, all of the mutants had significantly compromised immunogenicities at low virus immunization doses compared with that of the wild-type virus. Conversely, at high immunization doses most mutants could induce an immune response similar to that of the wild-type virus. Three Wyeth vaccine strain mutants were also studied. Whereas the thymidine kinase, ribonucleotide reductase, and hemagglutinin mutants had a reduced virulence (50% lethal dose), only the thymidine kinase mutant retained its immunogenicity. PMID:1560521

  9. Mice Lacking Ras-GRF1 Show Contextual Fear Conditioning but not Spatial Memory Impairments: Convergent Evidence from Two Independently Generated Mouse Mutant Lines

    PubMed Central

    d’Isa, Raffaele; Clapcote, Steven J.; Voikar, Vootele; Wolfer, David P.; Giese, Karl Peter; Brambilla, Riccardo; Fasano, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Ras-GRF1 is a neuronal specific guanine exchange factor that, once activated by both ionotropic and metabotropic neurotransmitter receptors, can stimulate Ras proteins, leading to long-term phosphorylation of downstream signaling. The two available reports on the behavior of two independently generated Ras-GRF1 deficient mouse lines provide contrasting evidence on the role of Ras-GRF1 in spatial memory and contextual fear conditioning. These discrepancies may be due to the distinct alterations introduced in the mouse genome by gene targeting in the two lines that could differentially affect expression of nearby genes located in the imprinted region containing the Ras-grf1 locus. In order to determine the real contribution of Ras-GRF1 to spatial memory we compared in Morris Water Maze learning Brambilla’s mice with a third mouse line (GENA53) in which a non-sense mutation was introduced in the Ras-GRF1 coding region without additional changes in the genome and we found that memory in this task is normal. Also, we measured both contextual and cued fear conditioning, which were previously reported to be affected in Brambilla’s mice, and we confirmed that contextual learning but not cued conditioning is impaired in both mouse lines. In addition, we also tested both lines for the first time in conditioned place aversion in the Intellicage, an ecological and remotely controlled behavioral test, and we observed normal learning. Finally, based on previous reports of other mutant lines suggesting that Ras-GRF1 may control body weight, we also measured this non-cognitive phenotype and we confirmed that both Ras-GRF1 deficient mutants are smaller than their control littermates. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Ras-GRF1 has no unique role in spatial memory while its function in contextual fear conditioning is likely to be due not only to its involvement in amygdala functions but possibly to some distinct hippocampal connections specific to contextual learning. PMID:22164138

  10. Cortical Efferents Lacking Mutant huntingtin Improve Striatal Neuronal Activity and Behavior in a Conditional Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Snchez, Ana Mara; Burroughs, Courtney L.; Cavaliere, Stephen; Barton, Scott J.; Chen, Shirley; Yang, X. William

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal electrophysiological activity in the striatum, which receives dense innervation from the cerebral cortex, is believed to set the stage for the behavioral phenotype observed in Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative condition caused by mutation of the huntingtin (mhtt) protein. However, cortical involvement is far from clear. To determine whether abnormal striatal processing can be explained by mhtt alone (cell-autonomous model) or by mhtt in the corticostriatal projection cellcell interaction model, we used BACHD/Emx1Cre (BE) mice, a conditional HD model in which full-length mhtt is genetically reduced in cortical output neurons, including those that project to the striatum. Animals were assessed beginning at 20 weeks of age for at least the next 40 weeks, a range over which presymptomatic BACHD mice become symptomatic. Both open-field and nest-building behavior deteriorated progressively in BACHD mice relative to both BE and wild-type (WT) mice. Neuronal activity patterns in the dorsal striatum, which receives input from the primary motor cortex (M1), followed a similar age progression because BACHD activity changed more rapidly than either BE or WT mice. However, in the M1, BE neuronal activity differed significantly from both WT and BACHD. Although abnormal cortical activity in BE mice likely reflects input from mhtt-expressing afferents, including cortical interneurons, improvements in BE striatal activity and behavior suggest a critical role for mhtt in cortical output neurons in shaping the onset and progression of striatal dysfunction. PMID:25762686

  11. A glutathione reductase mutant of yeast accumulates high levels of oxidized glutathione and requires thioredoxin for growth.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, E G

    1996-01-01

    A glutathione reductase null mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was isolated in a synthetic lethal genetic screen for mutations which confer a requirement for thioredoxin. Yeast mutants that lack glutathione reductase (glr1 delta) accumulate high levels of oxidized glutathione and have a twofold increase in total glutathione. The disulfide form of glutathione increases 200-fold and represents 63% of the total glutathione in a glr1 delta mutant compared with only 6% in wild type. High levels of oxidized glutathione are also observed in a trx1 delta, trx2 delta double mutant (22% of total), in a glr1 delta, trx1 delta double mutant (71% of total), and in a glr1 delta, trx2 delta double mutant (69% of total). Despite the exceptionally high ratio of oxidized/reduced glutathione, the glr1 delta mutant grows with a normal cell cycle. However, either one of the two thioredoxins is essential for growth. Cells lacking both thioredoxins and glutathione reductase are not viable under aerobic conditions and grow poorly anaerobically. In addition, the glr1 delta mutant shows increased sensitivity to the thiol oxidant diamide. The sensitivity to diamide was suppressed by deletion of the TRX2 gene. The genetic analysis of thioredoxin and glutathione reductase in yeast runs counter to previous studies in Escherichia coli and for the first time links thioredoxin with the redox state of glutathione in vivo. Images PMID:8930901

  12. A Conditional Mouse Mutant in the Tumor Suppressor SdhD Gene Unveils a Link between p21WAF1/Cip1 Induction and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Milln-Ucls, frica; Daz-Castro, Blanca; Garca-Flores, Paula; Bez, Alicia; Prez-Simn, Jos Antonio; Lpez-Barneo, Jos; Piruat, Jos I.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial complex II (MCII; succinate dehydrogenase, Sdh) genes cause familiar pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma tumors. Several mechanisms have been proposed to account for Sdh-mutation-induced tumorigenesis, the most accepted of which is based on the constitutive expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1? (Hif1?) at normal oxygen tension, a theory referred to as pseudo-hypoxic drive. Other molecular processes, such as oxidative stress, apoptosis, or chromatin remodeling have been also proposed to play a causative role. Nevertheless, the actual contribution of each of these mechanisms has not been definitively established. Moreover, the biological factors that determine the tissue-specificity of these tumors have not been identified. In this work, we made use of the inducible SDHD-ESR mouse, a conditional mutant in the SdhD gene, which encodes the small subunit of MCII, and that acts as a tumor suppressor gene in humans. The analysis of the Hif1? pathway in SDHD-ESR tissues and in two newly derived cell lines after complete SdhD loss -a requirement for hereditary paraganglioma type-1 tumor formation in humans- partially recapitulated the pseudo-hypoxic response and rendered inconsistent results. Therefore, we performed microarray analysis of adrenal medulla and kidney in order to identify other early gene expression changes elicited by SdhD deletion. Our results revealed that each mutant tissue displayed different variations in their gene expression profiles affecting to different biological processes. However, we found that the Cdkn1a gene was up-regulated in both tissues. This gene encodes the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/Cip1, a factor implicated in cell cycle, senescence, and cancer. The two SDHD-ESR cell lines also showed accumulation of this protein. This new and unprecedented evidence for a link between SdhD dysfunction and p21WAF1/Cip1 will open new avenues for the study of the mechanisms that cause tumors in Sdh mutants. Finally, we discuss the actual role of Hif1? in tumorigenesis. PMID:24465590

  13. Chloroplast Reactions of Photosynthetic Mutants in Zea mays1

    PubMed Central

    Miles, C. D.; Daniel, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Three seedling lethal mutants of Zea mays with impaired photosynthesis are described. These recessive mutants were selected on the basis of high chlorophyll fluorescence. They have normal chlorophyll pigmentation but are unable to fix CO2 fully. Evidence is presented from fluorescence characteristics of isolated chloroplasts that both photosystem I and II mutants were isolated. Using conventional measures of photosynthetic electron transport, we suggest that the photosystem I mutant has limited ability to reduce NADP. The other two mutants are clearly blocked in photosystem II, one possibly lacking the primary electron acceptor. Images PMID:16658748

  14. Genetic Characterization and High Efficiency Photosynthesis of an Aurea Mutant of Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Keiichiro; Schmid, Georg H.; Straub, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    A new tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) aurea mutant was isolated from the progeny of a selfed variegated tobacco plant. The new mutant is termed Su/su var. Aurea. If the mutant is selfed, the seeds obtained give rise to four types of plants: green seedlings which correspond to the wild type; yellow-green seedlings which correspond to the earlier described Su/su; yellow seedlings which correspond to the new tobacco aurea mutant Su/su var. Aurea; and white lethal seedlings. The frequency ratio of the four phenotypes is 1:1:1:1. It appears that the mutation is due to two independent nuclear factors, su and aur, both of which have to be present in a heterozygous conditions, Su/su Aur/aur, to give rise to the new aurea phenotype. The aurea mutant Su/su var. Aurea has a reduced photosynthetic unit size which is approximately one-eighth of the wild type. Despite its chlorophyll deficiency, the plant grows well and exhibits maximal photosynthetic rates on a chlorophyll basis which are at least seven times higher than those of the green wild type provided the temperature and the light intensities are high enough. In contrast to the earlier described Su/su, the new mutant does not exhibit more photorespiration than the wild type. It appears that the factor aur causes either repression of photorespiration or an increase in the number of functioning photosynthetic units. Images PMID:16660027

  15. Metabolic regulation of Escherichia coli and its phoB and phoR genes knockout mutants under phosphate and nitrogen limitations as well as at acidic condition

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The phosphorus compounds serve as major building blocks of many biomolecules, and have important roles in signal transduction. The phosphate is involved in many biochemical reactions by the transfer of phosphoryl groups. All living cells sophisticatedly regulate the phosphate uptake, and survive even under phosphate-limiting condition, and thus phosphate metabolism is closely related to the diverse metabolism including energy and central carbon metabolism. In particular, phosphorylation may play important roles in the metabolic regulation at acidic condition and nitrogen limiting condition, which typically appears at the late growth phase in the batch culture. Moreover, phosphate starvation is a relatively inexpensive means of gene induction in practice, and the phoA promoter has been used for overexpression of heterologous genes. A better understanding of phosphate regulation would allow for optimization of such processes. Results The effect of phosphate (P) concentration on the metabolism in Escherichia coli was investigated in terms of fermentation characteristics and gene transcript levels for the aerobic continuous culture at the dilution rate of 0.2 h-1. The result indicates that the specific glucose consumption rate and the specific acetate production rate significantly increased, while the cell concentration decreased at low P concentration (10% of the M9 medium). The increase in the specific glucose uptake rate may be due to ATP demand caused by limited ATP production under P-limitation. The lower cell concentration was also caused by less ATP production. The less ATP production by H+-ATPase may have caused less cytochrome reaction affecting in quinone pool, and caused up-regulation of ArcA/B, which repressed TCA cycle genes and caused more acetate production. In the case of phoB mutant (and also phoR mutant), the fermentation characteristics were less affected by P-limitation as compared to the wild type where the PhoB regulated genes were down-regulated, while phoR and phoU changed little. The phoR gene knockout caused phoB gene to be down-regulated as well as PhoB regulated genes, while phoU and phoM changed little. The effect of pH together with lower P concentration on the metabolic regulation was also investigated. In accordance with up-regulation of arcA gene expression, the expressions of the TCA cycle genes such as sdhC and mdh were down-regulated at acidic condition. The gene expression of rpoS was up-regulated, and the expression of gadA was up-regulated at pH 6.0. In accordance with this, PhoB regulated genes were up-regulated in the wild type under P-rich and P-limited conditions at pH 6.0 as compared to those at pH 7.0. Moreover, the effect of nitrogen limitation on the metabolic regulation was investigated, where the result indicates that phoB gene was up-regulated, and PhoB regulated genes were also up-regulated under N-limitation, as well as nitrogen-regulated genes. Conclusion The present result shows the complicated nature of the metabolic regulation for the fermentation characteristics upon phosphate limitation, acidic condition, and nitrogen limitation based on the transcript levels of selected genes. The result implies that the regulations under phosphate limitation, acidic condition, and nitrogen limitation, which occur typically at the late growth phase of the batch culture, are interconnected through RpoS and RpoD together with Pho genes. PMID:21599905

  16. Drosophila Embryonic Cell-Cycle Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Park, Eugenia A.; Royzman, Irena; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly all cell division mutants in Drosophila were recovered in late larval/pupal lethal screens, with less than 10 embryonic lethal mutants identified, because larval development occurs without a requirement for cell division. Only cells in the nervous system and the imaginal cells that generate the adult body divide during larval stages, with larval tissues growing by increasing ploidy rather than cell number. Thus, most mutants perturbing mitosis or the cell cycle do not manifest a phenotype until the adult body differentiates in late larval and pupal stages. To identify cell-cycle components whose maternal pools are depleted in embryogenesis or that have specific functions in embryogenesis, we screened for mutants defective in cell division during embryogenesis. Five new alleles of Cyclin E were recovered, ranging from a missense mutation that is viable to stop codons causing embryonic lethality. These permitted us to investigate the requirements for Cyclin E function in neuroblast cell fate determination, a role previously shown for a null Cyclin E allele. The mutations causing truncation of the protein affect cell fate of the NB6-4 neuroblast, whereas the weak missense mutation has no effect. We identified mutations in the pavarotti (pav) and tumbleweed (tum) genes needed for cytokinesis by a phenotype of large and multinucleate cells in the embryonic epidermis and nervous system. Other mutations affecting the centromere protein CAL1 and the kinetochore protein Spc105R caused mitotic defects in the nervous system. PMID:23979936

  17. Drosophila embryonic cell-cycle mutants.

    PubMed

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Park, Eugenia A; Royzman, Irena; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2013-10-01

    Nearly all cell division mutants in Drosophila were recovered in late larval/pupal lethal screens, with less than 10 embryonic lethal mutants identified, because larval development occurs without a requirement for cell division. Only cells in the nervous system and the imaginal cells that generate the adult body divide during larval stages, with larval tissues growing by increasing ploidy rather than cell number. Thus, most mutants perturbing mitosis or the cell cycle do not manifest a phenotype until the adult body differentiates in late larval and pupal stages. To identify cell-cycle components whose maternal pools are depleted in embryogenesis or that have specific functions in embryogenesis, we screened for mutants defective in cell division during embryogenesis. Five new alleles of Cyclin E were recovered, ranging from a missense mutation that is viable to stop codons causing embryonic lethality. These permitted us to investigate the requirements for Cyclin E function in neuroblast cell fate determination, a role previously shown for a null Cyclin E allele. The mutations causing truncation of the protein affect cell fate of the NB6-4 neuroblast, whereas the weak missense mutation has no effect. We identified mutations in the pavarotti (pav) and tumbleweed (tum) genes needed for cytokinesis by a phenotype of large and multinucleate cells in the embryonic epidermis and nervous system. Other mutations affecting the centromere protein CAL1 and the kinetochore protein Spc105R caused mitotic defects in the nervous system. PMID:23979936

  18. Potentially lethal complications of tracheostomy: autopsy considerations.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Gilbert, John D

    2011-12-01

    Tracheostomy is widely used to facilitate respiration by protecting the airways. It may be performed to relieve upper airway obstruction from congenital stenoses or from acquired conditions such as foreign body impaction, swelling from neck trauma or anaphylaxis, benign or malignant tumors, and infection. Tracheostomy may also be performed in individuals with respiratory impairment who require suctioning for accumulated mucoid secretions and in those with obstructive sleep apnea. Review of autopsy files and the literature was undertaken to demonstrate the range of lethal circumstances that may involve tracheostomy. Unexpected death may result from incorrect positioning of an endotracheal tube with failure of oxygenation, tracheal perforation with pneumothorax, mucus plugging, accidental extubation, and hemorrhage from tracheovascular fistulas. Lethal tracheovascular fistulas usually involve the innominate artery and result from mural perforation by the tip of a tracheostomy tube, mural necrosis from a high-pressure cuff, prolonged intubation, radiotherapy, and low tracheal incisions. Increased movement of tubes in patients with impaired consciousness and excessive head movements may also increase the chances of hemorrhage, as may infiltrating tumors. Given the wide range of potential fatal mechanisms that may be found in such cases, careful autopsy evaluation and dissection will be required to demonstrate the exact nature and site of the lethal lesion in individuals who underwent tracheostomy and die unexpectedly. PMID:21817868

  19. Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems. PMID:24867061

  20. Structural basis for a lethal mutation in U6 RNA.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Allmann, Anne M; Van Doren, Steven R; Butcher, Samuel E

    2003-02-18

    U6 RNA is essential for nuclear pre-mRNA splicing and has been implicated directly in catalysis of intron removal. The U80G mutation at the essential magnesium binding site of the U6 3' intramolecular stem-loop region (ISL) is lethal in yeast. To further understand the structure and function of the U6 ISL, we have investigated the structural basis for the lethal U80G mutation by NMR and optical spectroscopy. The NMR structure reveals that the U80G mutation causes a structural rearrangement within the ISL resulting in the formation of a new Watson-Crick base pair (C67 x G80), and disrupts a protonated C67 x A79 wobble pair that forms in the wild-type structure. Despite the structural change, the accessibility of the metal binding site is unperturbed, and cadmium titration produces similar phosphorus chemical shift changes for both the U80G mutant and wild-type RNAs. The thermodynamic stability of the U80G mutant is significantly increased (Delta Delta G(fold) = -3.6 +/- 1.9 kcal/mol), consistent with formation of the Watson-Crick pair. Our structural and thermodynamic data, in combination with previous genetic data, suggest that the lethal basis for the U80G mutation is stem-loop hyperstabilization. This hyperstabilization may prevent the U6 ISL melting and rearrangement necessary for association with U4. PMID:12578359

  1. Arabidopsis genes essential for seedling viability: isolation of insertional mutants and molecular cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Budziszewski, G J; Lewis, S P; Glover, L W; Reineke, J; Jones, G; Ziemnik, L S; Lonowski, J; Nyfeler, B; Aux, G; Zhou, Q; McElver, J; Patton, D A; Martienssen, R; Grossniklaus, U; Ma, H; Law, M; Levin, J Z

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a large-scale genetic screen to identify genes with a seedling-lethal mutant phenotype. From screening approximately 38,000 insertional mutant lines, we identified >500 seedling-lethal mutants, completed cosegregation analysis of the insertion and the lethal phenotype for >200 mutants, molecularly characterized 54 mutants, and provided a detailed description for 22 of them. Most of the seedling-lethal mutants seem to affect chloroplast function because they display altered pigmentation and affect genes encoding proteins predicted to have chloroplast localization. Although a high level of functional redundancy in Arabidopsis might be expected because 65% of genes are members of gene families, we found that 41% of the essential genes found in this study are members of Arabidopsis gene families. In addition, we isolated several interesting classes of mutants and genes. We found three mutants in the recently discovered nonmevalonate isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway and mutants disrupting genes similar to Tic40 and tatC, which are likely to be involved in chloroplast protein translocation. Finally, we directly compared T-DNA and Ac/Ds transposon mutagenesis methods in Arabidopsis on a genome scale. In each population, we found only about one-third of the insertion mutations cosegregated with a mutant phenotype. PMID:11779813

  2. Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 2−/− Mutant Mice are Protected against Fatty Liver under High-fat, High-carbohydrate Dietary and de Novo Lipogenic Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi; Wu, Hongmei; Gu, Ziwei; Bressler, Rubin; Wakil, Salih J.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic fat accumulation resulting from increased de novo fatty acid synthesis leads to hepatic steatosis and hepatic insulin resistance. We have shown previously that acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (Acc2−/−) mutant mice, when fed a high-fat (HF) or high-fat, high-carbohydrate (HFHC) diet, are protected against diet-induced obesity and maintained whole body and hepatic insulin sensitivity. To determine the effect of an ACC2 deletion on hepatic fat metabolism, we studied the regulation of the enzymes involved in the lipogenic pathway under Western HFHC dietary and de novo lipogenic conditions. After completing the HFHC regimen, Acc2−/− mutant mice were found to have lower body weight, smaller epididymal fat pads, lower blood levels of nonesterified fatty acids and triglycerides, and higher hepatic cholesterol than wild-type mice. Significant up-regulation of lipogenic enzymes and an elevation in hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) protein were found in Acc2−/− mutant mice under de novo lipogenic conditions. The increase in lipogenic enzyme levels was accompanied by up-regulation of the transcription factors, sterol regulatory element-binding proteins 1 and 2, and carbohydrate response element-binding protein. In contrast, hepatic levels of the PPAR-γ and PPAR-α proteins were significantly lower in the Acc2−/− mutant mice fed an HFHC diet. When compared with wild-type mice fed the same diet, Acc2−/− mutant mice exhibited a similar level of AKT but with a significant increase in pAKT. Hence, deleting ACC2 ameliorates the metabolic syndrome and protects against fatty liver despite increased de novo lipogenesis and dietary conditions known to induce obesity and diabetes. PMID:22362781

  3. Analysis of mRNA decay and rRNA processing in Escherichia coli multiple mutants carrying a deletion in RNase III.

    PubMed Central

    Babitzke, P; Granger, L; Olszewski, J; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    RNase III is an endonuclease involved in processing both rRNA and certain mRNAs. To help determine whether RNase III (rnc) is required for general mRNA turnover in Escherichia coli, we have created a deletion-insertion mutation (delta rnc-38) in the structural gene. In addition, a series of multiple mutant strains containing deficiencies in RNase II (rnb-500), polynucleotide phosphorylase (pnp-7 or pnp-200), RNase E (rne-1 or rne-3071), and RNase III (delta rnc-38) were constructed. The delta rnc-38 single mutant was viable and led to the accumulation of 30S rRNA precursors, as has been previously observed with the rnc-105 allele (P. Gegenheimer, N. Watson, and D. Apirion, J. Biol. Chem. 252:3064-3073, 1977). In the multiple mutant strains, the presence of the delta rnc-38 allele resulted in the more rapid decay of pulse-labeled RNA but did not suppress conditional lethality, suggesting that the lethality associated with altered mRNA turnover may be due to the stabilization of specific mRNAs. In addition, these results indicate that RNase III is probably not required for general mRNA decay. Of particular interest was the observation that the delta rnc-38 rne-1 double mutant did not accumulate 30S rRNA precursors at 30 degrees C, while the delta rnc-38 rne-3071 double mutant did. Possible explanations of these results are discussed. Images PMID:8416898

  4. A synthetic lethal screen identifies SLK1, a novel protein kinase homolog implicated in yeast cell morphogenesis and cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, C; Gehrung, S; Snyder, M

    1992-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPA2 protein localizes at sites involved in polarized cell growth in budding cells and mating cells. spa2 mutants have defects in projection formation during mating but are healthy during vegetative growth. A synthetic lethal screen was devised to identify mutants that require the SPA2 gene for vegetative growth. One mutant, called slk-1 (for synthetic lethal kinase), has been characterized extensively. The SLK1 gene has been cloned, and sequence analysis predicts that the SLK1 protein is 1,478 amino acid residues in length. Approximately 300 amino acids at the carboxy terminus exhibit sequence similarity with the catalytic domains of protein kinases. Disruption mutations have been constructed in the SLK1 gene. slk1 null mutants cannot grow at 37 degrees C, but many cells can grow at 30, 24, and 17 degrees C. Dead slk1 mutant cells usually have aberrant cell morphologies, and many cells are very small, approximately one-half the diameter of wild-type cells. Surviving slk1 cells also exhibit morphogenic defects; these cells are impaired in their ability to form projections upon exposure to mating pheromones. During vegetative growth, a higher fraction of slk1 cells are unbudded compared with wild-type cells, and under nutrient limiting conditions, slk1 cells exhibit defects in cell cycle arrest. The different slk1 mutant defects are partially rescued by an extra copy of the SSD1/SRK1 gene. SSD1/SRK1 has been independently isolated as a suppressor of mutations in genes involved in growth control, sit4, pde2, bcy1, and ins1 (A. Sutton, D. Immanuel, and K.T. Arnat, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:2133-2148, 1991; R.B. Wilson, A.A. Brenner, T.B. White, M.J. Engler, J.P. Gaughran, and K. Tatchell, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:3369-3373, 1991). These data suggest that SLK1 plays a role in both cell morphogenesis and the control of cell growth. We speculate that SLK1 may be a regulatory link for these two cellular processes. Images PMID:1545797

  5. Characterization of cottonseed nutrients composition in near isogenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) mutant lines for fuzzless seed trait under well-watered and water stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton mutant near isogenic lines (NILs) for fuzzless seed trait has been used to investigate cell biology, genetic, and molecular processes of fiber initiation, development, fiber yield and quality. However, there is no information available on the effect of fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrie...

  6. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  7. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels. PMID:26732534

  8. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels. PMID:26732534

  9. Phosphate Homeostasis in Conditions of Phosphate Proficiency and Limitation in the Wild Type and the phoP Mutant of Streptomyces lividans

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Magali; Holland, Ian Barry; Virolle, Marie-Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate, as a constituent of the high energy molecules, ATP/GTP and polyphosphate, plays a crucial role in most of the metabolic processes of living organisms. Therefore, the adaptation to low Pi availability is a major challenge for bacteria. In Streptomyces, this adaptation is tightly controlled by the two component PhoR/PhoP system. In this study, the free intracellular Pi, ATP, ADP and polyP content of the wild type and the phoP mutant strain of S. lividans TK24 were analyzed at discrete time points throughout growth in Pi replete and limited media. PolyP length and content was shown to be directly related to the Pi content of the growth medium. In Pi repletion, ATP and high molecular weight (HMW) polyP contents were higher in the phoP mutant than in the WT strain. This supports the recently proposed repressive effect of PhoP on oxidative phosphorylation. High oxidative phosphorylation activity might also have a direct or indirect positive impact on HMW polyP synthesis. In Pi sufficiency as in Pi limitation, the degradation of these polymers was shown to be clearly delayed in the phoP mutant, indicating PhoP dependent expression of the enzymes involved in this degradation. The efficient storage of Pi as polyphosphate and/or its inefficient degradation in Pi in the phoP mutant resulted in low levels of free Pi and ATP that are likely to be, at least in part, responsible for the very poor growth of this mutant in Pi limitation. Furthermore, short polyP was shown to be present outside the cell, tightly bound to the mycelium via electrostatic interactions involving divalent cations. Less short polyP was found to be associated with the mycelium of the phoP mutant than with that of the WT strain, indicating that generation and externalization of these short polyP molecules was directly or indirectly dependent on PhoP. PMID:25978423

  10. Identification of lethal cluster of genes in the yeast transcription network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, K.; Jeong, H.; Kahng, B.

    2006-05-01

    Identification of essential or lethal genes would be one of the ultimate goals in drug designs. Here we introduce an in silico method to select the cluster with a high population of lethal genes, called lethal cluster, through microarray assay. We construct a gene transcription network based on the microarray expression level. Links are added one by one in the descending order of the Pearson correlation coefficients between two genes. As the link density p increases, two meaningful link densities pm and ps are observed. At pm, which is smaller than the percolation threshold, the number of disconnected clusters is maximum, and the lethal genes are highly concentrated in a certain cluster that needs to be identified. Thus the deletion of all genes in that cluster could efficiently lead to a lethal inviable mutant. This lethal cluster can be identified by an in silico method. As p increases further beyond the percolation threshold, the power law behavior in the degree distribution of a giant cluster appears at ps. We measure the degree of each gene at ps. With the information pertaining to the degrees of each gene at ps, we return to the point pm and calculate the mean degree of genes of each cluster. We find that the lethal cluster has the largest mean degree.

  11. Escherichia coli mutants with defects in the biosynthesis of 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thio-uridine or 1-methylguanosine in their tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bjrk, G R; Kjellin-Strby, K

    1978-01-01

    Two tRNA methyltransferase mutants, isolated as described in the accompanying paper (G.R. Bjrk and K. Kjellin-Strby, J. Bacteriol. 133:499-207, 1978), are biochemicaaly and genetically characterized. tRNA from mutant IB13 lacks 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thio-uridine in vivo due to a permanently nonfunctional methyltransferase. Thus tRNA from this mutant is a specific substrate for the corresponding tRNA methyltransferase in vitro. In spite of this defect in tRNA, such a mutant is viable. Mutant IB11 is conditionally defective in the biosynthesis of 1-methylguanosine in tRNA due to a temperature-sensitive tRNA (1-methyl-guanosine) methyltransferase. In mutant cells grown at a high temperature, the level of 1-methylguanosine in bulk tRNA is 20% of that of the wild type, demonstrating that in this mutant an 80% deficiency of 1-methylguanosine in tRNA is not lethal. Genetically these two distinct lesions, trmC2, causing 5=methylaminomethyl-2-thio-uridine deficiency, and trmD1, giving a temperature-sensitive tRNA (1-methylguanosine)methyltransferase, are both located between 50 and 61 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Images PMID:342495

  12. Tityus serrulatus venom--A lethal cocktail.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Longhim, Heloisa Tavoni; Cremonez, Caroline Marroni; Oliveira, Guilherme Honda; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-15

    Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is the main scorpion species of medical importance in Brazil. Ts venom is composed of several compounds such as mucus, inorganic salts, lipids, amines, nucleotides, enzymes, kallikrein inhibitor, natriuretic peptide, proteins with high molecular mass, peptides, free amino acids and neurotoxins. Neurotoxins are considered the most responsible for the envenoming syndrome due to their pharmacological action on ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels. The major goal of this review is to present important advances in Ts envenoming research, correlating both the crude Ts venom and isolated toxins with alterations observed in all human systems. The most remarkable event lies in the Ts induced massive releasing of neurotransmitters influencing, directly or indirectly, the entire body. Ts venom proved to extremely affect nervous and muscular systems, to modulate the immune system, to induce cardiac disorders, to cause pulmonary edema, to decrease urinary flow and to alter endocrine, exocrine, reproductive, integumentary, skeletal and digestive functions. Therefore, Ts venom possesses toxins affecting all anatomic systems, making it a lethal cocktail. However, its low lethality may be due to the low venom mass injected, to the different venom compositions, the body characteristics and health conditions of the victim and the local of Ts sting. Furthermore, we also described the different treatments employed during envenoming cases. In particular, throughout the review, an effort will be made to provide information from an extensive documented studies concerning Ts venom in vitro, in animals and in humans (a total of 151 references). PMID:26522893

  13. Lethal Effects of Low and "Null" Activity Alleles of 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Glenn C.; Lucchesi, John C.

    1975-01-01

    EMS-induced "null" and low activity alleles for 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were characterized with respect to enzymatic activity, relative viability, fertility, and the effective lethal phase. It was determined that flies hemizygous and homozygous for the low activity allele, Pgd-, possessed a depressed developmental rate, diminished viability, and loss of female fertility. Heterozygotes for Pgd- and a deficiency for Pgd+ were lethal. The "null" activity allele demonstrated a lethal phenotype in both the hemizygous and homozygous condition. The effective lethal phase for the "null" allele occurs during late embryonic development (2022 hr). PMID:805081

  14. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  15. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and

  16. A Specific Structural Requirement for Ergosterol in Long-chain Fatty Acid Synthesis Mutants Important for Maintaining Raft Domains in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenkolb, Marlis; Zenzmaier, Christoph; Leitner, Erich; Schneiter, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Fungal sphingolipids contain ceramide with a very-long-chain fatty acid (C26). To investigate the physiological significance of the C26-substitution on this lipid, we performed a screen for mutants that are synthetically lethal with ELO3. Elo3p is a component of the ER-associated fatty acid elongase and is required for the final elongation cycle to produce C26 from C22/C24 fatty acids. elo3Δ mutant cells thus contain C22/C24- instead of the natural C26-substituted ceramide. We now report that under these conditions, an otherwise nonessential, but also fungal-specific, structural modification of the major sterol of yeast, ergosterol, becomes essential, because mutations in ELO3 are synthetically lethal with mutations in ERG6. Erg6p catalyzes the methylation of carbon atom 24 in the aliphatic side chain of sterol. The lethality of an elo3Δ erg6Δ double mutant is rescued by supplementation with ergosterol but not with cholesterol, indicating a vital structural requirement for the ergosterol-specific methyl group. To characterize this structural requirement in more detail, we generated a strain that is temperature sensitive for the function of Erg6p in an elo3Δ mutant background. Examination of raft association of the GPI-anchored Gas1p and plasma membrane ATPase, Pma1p, in the conditional elo3Δ erg6ts double mutant, revealed a specific defect of the mutant to maintain raft association of preexisting Pma1p. Interestingly, in an elo3Δ mutant at 37°C, newly synthesized Pma1p failed to enter raft domains early in the biosynthetic pathway, and upon arrival at the plasma membrane was rerouted to the vacuole for degradation. These observations indicate that the C26 fatty acid substitution on lipids is important for establishing raft association of Pma1p and stabilizing the protein at the cell surface. Analysis of raft lipids in the conditional mutant strain revealed a selective enrichment of ergosterol in detergent-resistant membrane domains, indicating that specific structural determinants on both sterols and sphingolipids are required for their association into raft domains. PMID:12475962

  17. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  18. Mitotic chromosome transmission fidelity mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Spencer, F; Gerring, S L; Connelly, C; Hieter, P

    1990-02-01

    We have isolated 136 independent mutations in haploid yeast strains that exhibit decreased chromosome transmission fidelity in mitosis. Eighty-five percent of the mutations are recessive and 15% are partially dominant. Complementation analysis between MATa and MAT alpha isolates identifies 11 chromosome transmission fidelity (CTF) complementation groups, the largest of which is identical to CHL1. For 49 independent mutations, no corresponding allele has been recovered in the opposite mating type. The initial screen monitored the stability of a centromere-linked color marker on a nonessential yeast chromosome fragment; the mitotic inheritance of natural yeast chromosome III is also affected by the ctf mutations. Of the 136 isolates identified, seven were inviable at 37 degrees and five were inviable at 11 degrees. In all cases tested, these temperature conditional lethalities cosegregated with the chromosome instability phenotype. Five additional complementation groups (ctf12 through ctf16) have been defined by complementation analysis of the mutations causing inviability at 37 degrees. Twenty-three of the 136 isolates exhibited growth defects at concentrations of benomyl permissive for the parent strain, and nine appeared to be tolerant of inhibitory levels of benomyl. All of the mutant strains showed normal sensitivity to ultraviolet and gamma-irradiation. Further characterization of these mutant strains will describe the functions of gene products crucial to the successful execution of processes required for aspects of the chromosome cycle that are important for chromosome transmission fidelity in mitosis. PMID:2407610

  19. Synthetic lethal interaction of the mitochondrial phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin biosynthetic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vishal M; Thompson, Morgan N; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2005-10-21

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria contain enzymes required for synthesis of the phospholipids cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), which are enriched in mitochondrial membranes. Previous studies indicated that PE may compensate for the lack of CL, and vice versa. These data suggest that PE and CL have overlapping functions and that the absence of both lipids may be lethal. To address this hypothesis, we determined whether the crd1delta mutant, which lacks CL, was viable in genetic backgrounds in which PE synthesis was genetically blocked. Deletion of the mitochondrial PE pathway gene PSD1 was synthetically lethal with the crd1delta mutant, whereas deletion of the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum pathway genes PSD2 and DPL1 did not result in synthetic lethality. A 20-fold reduction in phosphatidylcholine did not affect the growth of crd1delta cells. Supplementation with ethanolamine, which led to increased PE synthesis, or with propanolamine, which led to synthesis of the novel phospholipid phosphatidylpropanolamine, failed to rescue the synthetic lethality of the crd1delta psd1delta cells. These results suggest that mitochondrial biosynthesis of PE is essential for the viability of yeast mutants lacking CL. PMID:16036913

  20. D-2-hydroxyglutarate produced by mutant IDH1 perturbs collagen maturation and basement membrane function

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Knobbe, Christiane B.; Itsumi, Momoe; Elia, Andrew J.; Harris, Isaac S.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Cairns, Rob A.; McCracken, Susan; Wakeham, Andrew; Haight, Jillian; Ten, Annick You; Snow, Bryan; Ueda, Takeshi; Inoue, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ko, Myunggon; Rao, Anjana; Yen, Katharine E.; Su, Shinsan M.; Mak, Tak Wah

    2012-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) R132 mutations occur in glioma, but their physiological significance is unknown. Here we describe the generation and characterization of brain-specific Idh1 R132H conditional knock-in (KI) mice. Idh1 mutation results in hemorrhage and perinatal lethality. Surprisingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are attenuated in Idh1-KI brain cells despite an apparent increase in the NADP+/NADPH ratio. Idh1-KI cells also show high levels of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG) that are associated with inhibited prolyl-hydroxylation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (Hif1α) and up-regulated Hif1α target gene transcription. Intriguingly, D2HG also blocks prolyl-hydroxylation of collagen, causing a defect in collagen protein maturation. An endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response induced by the accumulation of immature collagens may account for the embryonic lethality of these mutants. Importantly, D2HG-mediated impairment of collagen maturation also led to basement membrane (BM) aberrations that could play a part in glioma progression. Our study presents strong in vivo evidence that the D2HG produced by the mutant Idh1 enzyme is responsible for the above effects. PMID:22925884

  1. Compartmentalized self-replication under fast PCR cycling conditions yields Taq DNA polymerase mutants with increased DNA-binding affinity and blood resistance

    PubMed Central

    Arezi, Bahram; McKinney, Nancy; Hansen, Connie; Cayouette, Michelle; Fox, Jeffrey; Chen, Keith; Lapira, Jennifer; Hamilton, Sarah; Hogrefe, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Faster-cycling PCR formulations, protocols, and instruments have been developed to address the need for increased throughput and shorter turn-around times for PCR-based assays. Although run times can be cut by up to 50%, shorter cycle times have been correlated with lower detection sensitivity and increased variability. To address these concerns, we applied Compartmentalized Self Replication (CSR) to evolve faster-cycling mutants of Taq DNA polymerase. After five rounds of selection using progressively shorter PCR extension times, individual mutations identified in the fastest-cycling clones were randomly combined using ligation-based multi-site mutagenesis. The best-performing combinatorial mutants exhibit 35- to 90-fold higher affinity (lower Kd) for primed template and a moderate (2-fold) increase in extension rate compared to wild-type Taq. Further characterization revealed that CSR-selected mutations provide increased resistance to inhibitors, and most notably, enable direct amplification from up to 65% whole blood. We discuss the contribution of individual mutations to fast-cycling and blood-resistant phenotypes. PMID:25177317

  2. Compartmentalized self-replication under fast PCR cycling conditions yields Taq DNA polymerase mutants with increased DNA-binding affinity and blood resistance.

    PubMed

    Arezi, Bahram; McKinney, Nancy; Hansen, Connie; Cayouette, Michelle; Fox, Jeffrey; Chen, Keith; Lapira, Jennifer; Hamilton, Sarah; Hogrefe, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Faster-cycling PCR formulations, protocols, and instruments have been developed to address the need for increased throughput and shorter turn-around times for PCR-based assays. Although run times can be cut by up to 50%, shorter cycle times have been correlated with lower detection sensitivity and increased variability. To address these concerns, we applied Compartmentalized Self Replication (CSR) to evolve faster-cycling mutants of Taq DNA polymerase. After five rounds of selection using progressively shorter PCR extension times, individual mutations identified in the fastest-cycling clones were randomly combined using ligation-based multi-site mutagenesis. The best-performing combinatorial mutants exhibit 35- to 90-fold higher affinity (lower Kd ) for primed template and a moderate (2-fold) increase in extension rate compared to wild-type Taq. Further characterization revealed that CSR-selected mutations provide increased resistance to inhibitors, and most notably, enable direct amplification from up to 65% whole blood. We discuss the contribution of individual mutations to fast-cycling and blood-resistant phenotypes. PMID:25177317

  3. Aequorin mutants with increased thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaoge; Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Ensor, Mark; Daunert, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescent labels can be especially useful for in vivo and live animal studies due to the negligible bioluminescence background in cells and most animals, and the non-toxicity of bioluminescent reporter systems. Significant thermal stability of bioluminescent labels is essential, however, due to the longitudinal nature and physiological temperature conditions of many bioluminescent based studies. To improve the thermostability of the bioluminescent protein aequorin we employed random and rational mutagenesis strategies to create two thermostable double mutants, S32T/E156V and M36I/E146K, and a particularly thermostable quadruple mutant, S32T/E156V/Q168R/L170I. The double aequorin mutants, S32T/E156V and M36I/E146K, retained 4 and 2.75 times more of their initial bioluminescence activity than wild type aequorin during thermostability studies at 37 C. Moreover, the quadruple aequorin mutant, S32T/E156V/Q168R/L170I, exhibited more thermostability at a variety of temperatures than either double mutant alone, producing the most thermostable aequorin mutant identified thus far. PMID:25084737

  4. The Identification of Zebrafish Mutants Showing Alterations in Senescence-Associated Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Junzo; Koshimizu, Eriko; Qi, Jie; Nanjappa, Purushothama; Imamura, Shintaro; Islam, Asiful; Neuberg, Donna; Amsterdam, Adam; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    There is an interesting overlap of function in a wide range of organisms between genes that modulate the stress responses and those that regulate aging phenotypes and, in some cases, lifespan. We have therefore screened mutagenized zebrafish embryos for the altered expression of a stress biomarker, senescence-associated ?-galactosidase (SA-?-gal) in our current study. We validated the use of embryonic SA-?-gal production as a screening tool by analyzing a collection of retrovirus-insertional mutants. From a pool of 306 such mutants, we identified 11 candidates that showed higher embryonic SA-?-gal activity, two of which were selected for further study. One of these mutants is null for a homologue of Drosophila spinster, a gene known to regulate lifespan in flies, whereas the other harbors a mutation in a homologue of the human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (terf2) gene, which plays roles in telomere protection and telomere-length regulation. Although the homozygous spinster and terf2 mutants are embryonic lethal, heterozygous adult fish are viable and show an accelerated appearance of aging symptoms including lipofuscin accumulation, which is another biomarker, and shorter lifespan. We next used the same SA-?-gal assay to screen chemically mutagenized zebrafish, each of which was heterozygous for lesions in multiple genes, under the sensitizing conditions of oxidative stress. We obtained eight additional mutants from this screen that, when bred to homozygosity, showed enhanced SA-?-gal activity even in the absence of stress, and further displayed embryonic neural and muscular degenerative phenotypes. Adult fish that are heterozygous for these mutations also showed the premature expression of aging biomarkers and the accelerated onset of aging phenotypes. Our current strategy of mutant screening for a senescence-associated biomarker in zebrafish embryos may thus prove to be a useful new tool for the genetic dissection of vertebrate stress response and senescence mechanisms. PMID:18704191

  5. Urate-null rosy mutants of Drosophila melanogaster are hypersensitive to oxygen stress.

    PubMed Central

    Hilliker, A J; Duyf, B; Evans, D; Phillips, J P

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that uric acid is an important scavenger of deleterious oxygen radicals in biological systems [Ames, B. N., Cathcart, R., Schwiers, E. & Hochstein, P. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 6858-6852]. We report here an in vivo investigation of the oxygen defense role of uric acid through an analysis of mutants of the rosy (ry) gene of Drosophila melanogaster. The ry gene is the structural gene for the molybdoenzyme, xanthine dehydrogenase; xanthine dehydrogenase-null ry mutants are therefore unable to synthesize urate. The rationale of our approach was to measure the response of urate-null ry mutants to extraordinary oxygen stress as imposed by exposure to radical-generating agents and as conferred by a genetic defect in superoxide dismutase, an established oxygen defense function. We show that urate-null mutants of the ry locus are hypersensitive to paraquat, ionizing radiation, and hyperoxia. Furthermore, compound mutants doubly deficient for uric acid and Cu/Zn-containing superoxide dismutase are synthetic lethals, which are unable to complete metamorphosis under normal growth conditions. These experiments demonstrate unambiguously the importance of urate in oxygen defense in vivo and support our earlier proposal that the molybdoenzyme genetic system plays a critical role in oxygen defense in Drosophila. They also form the basis for our proposal that metamorphosis in Drosophila imposes a crisis of oxygen stress on the developing imago against which uric acid plays an important organ-specific defense. Finally, the results provide a basis for understanding the syndrome of phenotypes, including the hallmark dull brown eye color, which characterizes mutants of this classic genetic system of Drosophila. Images PMID:1316606

  6. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed

    Downward, Julian

    2015-04-15

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacologic approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be "undruggable." This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS-mutant but not wild-type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS-mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a reevaluation of the approaches taken. On the basis of experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS-mutant cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1802-9. 2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878361

  7. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed Central

    Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacological approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be undruggable. This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS mutant but not wild type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a re-evaluation of the approaches taken. Based on experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS mutant cancers. PMID:25878361

  8. Early events of lethal action by tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Raulston, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The immediate activities of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin, were investigated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The influence of carbon growth substate and the antibiotic exposure environment in the magnitude of activity were examined. Lethality by 8 {mu}g/ml tobramycin occurred rapidly (1 to 3 minutes). The release of specific cellular components into the supernatant was associated with lethality. This material was initially detected as an increase in UV-absorbance. Magnesium in the reaction mixture provided protection against lethality and leakage, but did not reverse lethal damage after a 3 minute tobramycin treatment. Also, uptake of {sup 3}H-tobramycin was reduced in the presence of magnesium. Cells grown with glucose as a carbon source were more susceptible than organic acid grown cells as was the rapidity and amount of cell damage. Analyses of the leakage material revealed a 2-fold increase of protein in the supernatant after a 1-3 minute treatment which paralleled lethality. A prominent 29 kDa protein was observed by SDS-PAGE in the released material, which has been identified as the periplasmic enzyme, {beta}-lactamase. The immediate activities of tobramycin did not involve (i) release of overall cell protein, (ii) massive loss of total pool amino acids, (iii) cell lysis, (iv) inhibition of proline uptake, (v) release of lipopolysaccharide, or (vi) leakage of ATP. Electron microscopy showed no apparent damage after a 3 minute exposure. 40% inhibition of protein synthesis had occurred by 3 minutes of exposure, while release of UV-absorbing material and lethality were detectable after only 1 minute. Resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa did not leak under the same experimental conditions, but one of two susceptible strains examined did show increased UV-absorbance following treatment.

  9. P-Lacw Insertional Mutagenesis on the Second Chromosome of Drosophila Melanogaster: Isolation of Lethals with Different Overgrowth Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Torok, T.; Tick, G.; Alvarado, M.; Kiss, I.

    1993-01-01

    A single P-element insertional mutagenesis experiment was carried out for the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster using the P-lacW transposon. Out of 15,475 insertions on the second chromosome, 2,308 lethal and 403 semilethal mutants (altogether 2,711) were recovered. After eliminating clusters, 72% of the mutants represent independent insertions. Some of the mutants with larval, prepupal or pupal lethal phases have a prolonged larval period and show gradual overgrowth of the imaginal discs, brain and/or the hematopoietic organs (lymph glands). In this paper, 16 overgrowth mutants are described. As revealed by in situ hybridization, none of the mutations corresponds to any of the previously known overgrowth mutations on the second chromosome. PMID:8224829

  10. The Yeast Med1 Mutant Undergoes Both Meiotic Homolog Nondisjunction and Precocious Separation of Sister Chromatids

    PubMed Central

    Rockmill, B.; Roeder, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    A mutant at the yeast MED1 locus was isolated in a screen for sporulation-proficient, meiotic-lethal mutants. Synaptonemal complex formation in the med1 mutant is apparently normal and med1 strains undergo meiotic crossing over at approximately 50% of the wild-type level. The med1 mutant undergoes homolog nondisjunction at meiosis I, presumably as a consequence of the decrease in crossing over. In addition, the mutant undergoes precocious separation of sister chromatids, resulting in chromosome missegregation at both meiotic divisions. We suggest that the med1 mutation perturbs chromosome structure, leading to a reduction in recombination and a defect in sister chromatid cohesion. PMID:8138177

  11. Conditional Expression of Parkinson disease-related Mutant α-synuclein in the Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons causes Progressive Neurodegeneration and Degradation of Transcription Factor Nuclear Receptor Related 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xian; Parisiadou, Loukia; Sgobio, Carmelo; Liu, Guoxiang; Yu, Jia; Sun, Lixin; Shim, Hoon; Gu, Xing-Long; Luo, Jing; Long, Cai-Xia; Ding, Jinhui; Mateo, Yolanda; Sullivan, Patricia H.; Wu, Ling-Gang; Goldstein, David S.; Lovinger, David; Cai, Huaibin

    2012-01-01

    α-synuclein(α-syn) plays a prominent role in the degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in Parkinson disease (PD). However, only a few studies on α-syn have been carried out in the mDA neurons in vivo, which may be attributed to a lack of α-syn transgenic mice that develop PD-like severe degeneration of mDA neurons. To gain mechanistic insights into the α-syn-induced mDA neurodegeneration, we generated a new line of tetracycline-regulated inducible transgenic mice that overexpressed the PD-related α-syn A53T missense mutation in the mDA neurons. Here we show that the mutant mice developed profound motor disabilities and robust mDA neurodegeneration, resembling some key motor and pathological phenotypes of PD. We further systematically examined the subcellular abnormalities appeared in the mDA neurons of mutant mice, and observed a profound decrease of dopamine release, the fragmentation of Golgi apparatus, and impairments of autophagy/lysosome degradation pathways in these neurons. To further understand the specific molecular events leading to the α-syn-dependent degeneration of mDA neurons, we found that over-expression of α-syn promoted a proteasome-dependent degradation of nuclear receptor related 1 protein (Nurr1); while inhibition of Nurr1 degradation ameliorated the α-syn-induced loss of mDA neurons. Given that Nurr1 plays an essential role in maintaining the normal function and survival of mDA neurons, our studies suggest that the α-syn-mediated suppression of Nurr1 protein expression may contribute to the preferential vulnerability of mDA neurons in the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:22764233

  12. The Maternally Expressed WRKY Transcription Factor TTG2 Controls Lethality in Interploidy Crosses of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Dilkes, Brian P; Spielman, Melissa; Weizbauer, Renate; Watson, Brian; Burkart-Waco, Diana; Scott, Rod J; Comai, Luca

    2008-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying lethality of F1 hybrids between diverged parents are one target of speciation research. Crosses between diploid and tetraploid individuals of the same genotype can result in F1 lethality, and this dosage-sensitive incompatibility plays a role in polyploid speciation. We have identified variation in F1 lethality in interploidy crosses of Arabidopsis thaliana and determined the genetic architecture of the maternally expressed variation via QTL mapping. A single large-effect QTL, DR. STRANGELOVE 1 (DSL1), was identified as well as two QTL with epistatic relationships to DSL1. DSL1 affects the rate of postzygotic lethality via expression in the maternal sporophyte. Fine mapping placed DSL1 in an interval encoding the maternal effect transcription factor TTG2. Maternal parents carrying loss-of-function mutations in TTG2 suppressed the F1 lethality caused by paternal excess interploidy crosses. The frequency of cellularization in the endosperm was similarly affected by both natural variation and ttg2 loss-of-function mutants. The simple genetic basis of the natural variation and effects of single-gene mutations suggests that F1 lethality in polyploids could evolve rapidly. Furthermore, the role of the sporophytically active TTG2 gene in interploidy crosses indicates that the developmental programming of the mother regulates the viability of interploidy hybrid offspring. PMID:19071961

  13. Acute and sub-lethal response to mercury in Arctic and boreal calanoid copepods.

    PubMed

    Overjordet, Ida Beathe; Altin, Dag; Berg, Torunn; Jenssen, Bjrn Munro; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Hansen, Bjrn Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Acute lethal toxicity, expressed as LC50 values, is a widely used parameter in risk assessment of chemicals, and has been proposed as a tool to assess differences in species sensitivities to chemicals between climatic regions. Arctic Calanus glacialis and boreal Calanus finmarchicus were exposed to mercury (Hg(2+)) under natural environmental conditions including sea temperatures of 2 and 10C, respectively. Acute lethal toxicity (96 h LC50) and sub-lethal molecular response (GST expression; in this article gene expression is used as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression is also regulated, e.g., at translation and protein stability level) were studied. The acute lethal toxicity was monitored for 96 h using seven different Hg concentrations. The sub-lethal experiment was set up on the basis of nominal LC50 values for each species using concentrations equivalent to 50, 5 and 0.5% of their 96 h LC50 value. No significant differences were found in acute lethal toxicity between the two species. The sub-lethal molecular response revealed large differences both in response time and the fold induction of GST, where the Arctic species responded both faster and with higher mRNA levels of GST after 48 h exposure. Under the natural exposure conditions applied in the present study, the Arctic species C. glacialis may potentially be more susceptible to mercury exposure on the sub-lethal level. PMID:25036619

  14. Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide

  15. Hypopigmentation and Maternal-Zygotic Embryonic Lethality Caused by a Hypomorphic Mbtps1 Mutation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rutschmann, Sophie; Crozat, Karine; Li, Xiaohong; Du, Xin; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Shigeoka, Alana A.; Brandl, Katharina; Popkin, Daniel L.; McKay, Dianne B.; Xia, Yu; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Beutler, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The site 1 protease, encoded by Mbtps1, mediates the initial cleavage of site 2 protease substrates, including sterol regulatory element binding proteins and CREB/ATF transcription factors. We demonstrate that a hypomorphic mutation of Mbtps1 called woodrat (wrt) caused hypocholesterolemia, as well as progressive hypopigmentation of the coat, that appears to be mechanistically unrelated. Hypopigmentation was rescued by transgenic expression of wild-type Mbtps1, and reciprocal grafting studies showed that normal pigmentation depended upon both cell-intrinsic or paracrine factors, as well as factors that act systemically, both of which are lacking in wrt homozygotes. Mbtps1 exhibited a maternal-zygotic effect characterized by fully penetrant embryonic lethality of maternal-zygotic wrt mutant offspring and partial embryonic lethality (~40%) of zygotic wrt mutant offspring. Mbtps1 is one of two maternal-zygotic effect genes identified in mammals to date. It functions nonredundantly in pigmentation and embryogenesis. PMID:22540041

  16. Hypopigmentation and maternal-zygotic embryonic lethality caused by a hypomorphic mbtps1 mutation in mice.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Sophie; Crozat, Karine; Li, Xiaohong; Du, Xin; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Shigeoka, Alana A; Brandl, Katharina; Popkin, Daniel L; McKay, Dianne B; Xia, Yu; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Beutler, Bruce

    2012-04-01

    The site 1 protease, encoded by Mbtps1, mediates the initial cleavage of site 2 protease substrates, including sterol regulatory element binding proteins and CREB/ATF transcription factors. We demonstrate that a hypomorphic mutation of Mbtps1 called woodrat (wrt) caused hypocholesterolemia, as well as progressive hypopigmentation of the coat, that appears to be mechanistically unrelated. Hypopigmentation was rescued by transgenic expression of wild-type Mbtps1, and reciprocal grafting studies showed that normal pigmentation depended upon both cell-intrinsic or paracrine factors, as well as factors that act systemically, both of which are lacking in wrt homozygotes. Mbtps1 exhibited a maternal-zygotic effect characterized by fully penetrant embryonic lethality of maternal-zygotic wrt mutant offspring and partial embryonic lethality (~40%) of zygotic wrt mutant offspring. Mbtps1 is one of two maternal-zygotic effect genes identified in mammals to date. It functions nonredundantly in pigmentation and embryogenesis. PMID:22540041

  17. Construction of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and analysis of their growth under stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that is difficult to eliminate since it can survive under multiple stress conditions such as low pH and low temperature. Understanding its survival under stress conditions is important to control this pathogen in food. ABC transporters have been shown...

  18. Lethal and Amanitin-Resistance Mutations in the Caenorhabditis Elegans Ama-1 and Ama-2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, T. M.; Bullerjahn, AME.; Riddle, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans resistant to ?-amanitin have been isolated at a frequency of about 1.6 X 10(-6) after EMS mutagenesis of the wild-type strain, N2. Four new dominant resistance mutations have been studied genetically. Three are alleles of a previously identified gene, ama-1 IV, encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The fourth mutation defines a new gene, ama-2 V. Unlike the ama-1 alleles, the ama-2 mutation exhibits a recessive-lethal phenotype. Growth and reproduction of N2 was inhibited at a concentration of 10 ?g/ml amanitin, whereas ama-2/+ animals were inhibited at 100 ?g/ml, and 800 ?g/ml was required to inhibit growth of ama-1/+ larvae. We have also determined that two reference strains used for genetic mapping, dpy-11(e224)V and sma-1(e30)V, are at least four-fold more sensitive to amanitin that the wild-type strain. Using an amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) or ama-1(m322) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. The frequency of EMS-induced lethal ama-1 mutations is approximately 1.7 X 10(-3), 1000-fold higher than the frequency of amanitin-resistance alleles. Nine of the lethal alleles are apparent null mutations, and they exhibit L1-lethal phenotypes at both 20 and 25. Six alleles result in partial loss of RNA polymerase II function as determined by their sterile phenotypes at 20. All but one of these latter mutations exhibit a more severe phenotype at 25C. We have also selected seven EMS-induced revertants of three different ama-1 lethals. These revertants restore dominant resistance to amanitin. The selection for revertants also produced eight new dominant amanitin resistance alleles on the balancer chromosome, nT1. PMID:3197954

  19. Lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millson, Charles E.; Wilson, Michael; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Mlkvy, Peter; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a large number of gastroduodenal disorders. Clearance of the bacteria has been shown to benefit patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and certain rare types of gastric tumors. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are the mainstay of current treatment strategies but side-effects, poor compliance, and drug resistance limit their usefulness. We sensitized H. pylori with toluidine blue, haematoporphyrin derivative, aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine, methylene blue or protoporphyrin IX prior to exposure to low-power laser light from either a gallium aluminum arsenide laser or a helium neon gas laser. All 5 sensitizers caused reductions of greater than 1000-fold in the number of viable bacteria. Light alone had no effect and only HpD caused a significant decrease in bacterial numbers without laser light. Next, we sensitized H. mustelae on explanted ferret gastric mucosa (ex vivo) with the same sensitizers and exposed them to light from a copper vapor pumped dye laser tuned appropriately. MB caused significant reductions in bacterial counts. Successful lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter pylori both in vitro and ex vivo raises the possibility of a local method for eradicating the bacteria, especially as the bacteria are only found in those parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are accessible to the endoscope.

  20. Cardiac-Specific Activation of IKK2 Leads to Defects in Heart Development and Embryonic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Katja; Boettger, Thomas; Illing, Annett; Kostin, Sawa; Walther, Paul; Braun, Thomas; Wirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-?B has been associated with a range of pathological conditions of the heart, mainly based on its function as a master regulator of inflammation and pro-survival factor. Here, we addressed the question what effects activation of NF-?B can have during murine heart development. We expressed a constitutively active (CA) mutant of IKK2, the kinase activating canonical NF-?B signaling, specifically in cardiomyocytes under the control of the ?-myosin heavy chain promoter. Expression of IKK2-CA resulted in embryonic lethality around E13. Embryos showed defects in compact zone formation and the contractile apparatus, and overall were characterized by widespread inflammation with infiltration of myeloid cells. Gene expression analysis suggested an interferon type I signature, with increased expression of interferon regulatory factors. While apoptosis of cardiomyocytes was only increased at later stages, their proliferation was decreased early on, providing an explanation for the disturbed compact zone formation. Mechanistically, this could be explained by activation of the JAK/STAT axis and increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. A rescue experiment with an I?B? superrepressor demonstrated that the phenotype was dependent on NF-?B. We conclude that activation of NF-?B is detrimental during normal heart development due to excessive activation of pro-inflammatory pathways. PMID:26539991

  1. Construction of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame Deletions in the phosphotransferase transport system (PTS) and analysis of their growth under stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that is difficult to eliminate due to its ability to survive under different stress conditions such as low pH and high salt. To better control this pathogen in food, it is important to understand its survival mechanisms under these stress ...

  2. Isolation and characterization of a low phytic acid rice mutant reveals a mutation in the rice orthologue of maize mik.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a forward genetics approach, we isolated two independent low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants, N15-186 and N15-375. Both mutants are caused by single gene, recessive non-lethal mutations which result in approximately 75% (N15-186) and 43% (N15-375) reductions in seed phytic acid (inositol hexaki...

  3. Effect of temperature and heating rate on apparent lethal concentrations of pyrolysis products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Solis, A. N.; Marcussen, W. H.; Furst, A.

    1976-01-01

    The apparent lethal concentrations for 50 percent of the test animals of the pyrolysis products from twelve polymeric materials were studied as a function of temperature and heating rate. The materials were polyethylene, nylon 6, ABS, polycarbonate, polyether sulfone, polyaryl sulfone, wool fabric, aromatic polyamide fabric, polychloroprene foam, polyvinyl fluoride film, Douglas fir, and red oak. The apparent lethal concentration values of most materials vary significantly with temperature and heating rate. The apparent lethal concentration values, based on weight of sample charged, appears to effectively integrate the thermophysical, thermochemical, and physiological responses from a known quantity of material under specified imposed conditions.

  4. Lethal Factor, but Not Edema Factor, Is Required to Cause Fatal Anthrax in Cynomolgus Macaques after Pulmonary Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutt, Julie A.; Lovchik, Julie A.; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L.; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F.; Lyons, C. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factorand protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factorand protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology invivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of antiprotective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores. PMID:25285720

  5. Reaming experiments for the lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, D.; Stanley, P.

    1988-01-01

    Various reaming techniques were tried for use on the barrel of the Lethality Test System railgun. This report covers the successes and failures of the reamers and the techniques that were tried. 5 figs.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of β-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (fabG) Mutants of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chiou-Yan; Cronan, John E.

    2004-01-01

    FabG, β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase, performs the NADPH-dependent reduction of β-ketoacyl-ACP substrates to β-hydroxyacyl-ACP products, the first reductive step in the elongation cycle of fatty acid biosynthesis. We report the first documented fabG mutants and their characterization. By chemical mutagenesis followed by a tritium suicide procedure, we obtained three conditionally lethal temperature-sensitive fabG mutants. The Escherichia coli [fabG (Ts)] mutant contains two point mutations: A154T and E233K. The β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase activity of this mutant was extremely thermolabile, and the rate of fatty acid synthesis measured in vivo was inhibited upon shift to the nonpermissive temperature. Moreover, synthesis of the acyl-ACP intermediates of the pathway was inhibited upon shift of mutant cultures to the nonpermissive temperature, indicating blockage of the synthetic cycle. Similar results were observed for in vitro fatty acid synthesis. Complementation analysis revealed that only the E233K mutation was required to give the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. In the two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium fabG(Ts) mutants one strain had a single point mutation, S224F, whereas the second strain contained two mutations (M125I and A223T). All of the altered residues of the FabG mutant proteins are located on or near the twofold axes of symmetry at the dimer interfaces in this homotetrameric protein, suggesting that the quaternary structures of the mutant FabG proteins may be disrupted at the nonpermissive temperature. PMID:14996818

  7. Gene essentiality and synthetic lethality in haploid human cells.

    PubMed

    Blomen, Vincent A; Mjek, Peter; Jae, Lucas T; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Staring, Jacqueline; Sacco, Roberto; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Olk, Nadine; Stukalov, Alexey; Marceau, Caleb; Janssen, Hans; Carette, Jan E; Bennett, Keiryn L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-11-27

    Although the genes essential for life have been identified in less complex model organisms, their elucidation in human cells has been hindered by technical barriers. We used extensive mutagenesis in haploid human cells to identify approximately 2000 genes required for optimal fitness under culture conditions. To study the principles of genetic interactions in human cells, we created a synthetic lethality network focused on the secretory pathway based exclusively on mutations. This revealed a genetic cross-talk governing Golgi homeostasis, an additional subunit of the human oligosaccharyltransferase complex, and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase ? adaptor hijacked by viruses. The synthetic lethality map parallels observations made in yeast and projects a route forward to reveal genetic networks in diverse aspects of human cell biology. PMID:26472760

  8. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  9. Mutant of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides Unable to Grow Aerobically1

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, T.; Sistrom, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    We isolated a mutant of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides that grows normally under photosynthetic conditions but is unable to grow exponentially under aerobic conditions. Photosynthetically grown cultures of the mutant increase in mass and cell number for about 10 hr after transfer to aerobic conditions. During this time, no heme pigments are synthesized and the Q(O2) declines. In the mutant, synthesis of heme pigments is obligatorily coupled to synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll. PMID:5557591

  10. Effects of fuzzless cottonseed phenotype on cottonseed nutrient composition in near isogenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) mutant lines under well-watered and water stress conditions1

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Turley, Rickie B.

    2013-01-01

    There is no information available on the effect of fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrient composition (minerals, N, S, protein, and oil) under drought stress. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrients using five sets of near-isogenic lines (NILs). Each set consists of two lines that share the same genetic background, but differ in seed fuzziness (fuzzy, F; fuzzless, N). The near isogenic lines will enable us to compare the effect of the trait without confounding the genotypic background effects. We hypothesized that since the fuzzless trait involved in fiber initiation development, and was reported to be involved in biochemical, molecular, and genetic processes, this trait may also alter cottonseed nutrient composition. Results showed that NIL sets accumulated different levels of minerals in seeds and leaves, and the fuzzless trait (N) in most of the lines altered seed and leaf mineral accumulations when compared with fuzzy lines (F) or the control line. For example, K, P, Mg, Cu, and Na concentrations in seeds were higher in MD N and STV N than in their equivalent MD F and STV F lines. Leaf concentrations of Ca, K, Mg, S, B, Cu, and Fe in MD N lines were higher than MD F line. Lower levels of nutrients in seeds and leaves were observed under water stress conditions, especially Ca, Mg, N, and B in seeds.Generally and with few exceptions, seed protein was higher in fuzzy lines than in fuzzless lines; however, seed oil was higher in fuzzless lines than in fuzzy lines. Our research demonstrated that fuzzless trait altered the composition and level of nutrients in seed and leaves in well watered and water stressed plants. Differences in protein and oil between fuzzy and fuzzless seeds may indicate alteration in nitrogen and carbon fixation and metabolism. The differential accumulation of seed nutrients in this germplasm could be used by cotton breeders to select for higher cottonseed quality. PMID:24416037

  11. Mitotic chromosome transmission fidelity mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, F.; Gerring, S.L.; Connelly, C.; Hieter, P. )

    1990-02-01

    The authors have isolated 136 independent EMS-induced mutations in haploid yeast strains that exhibit decreased chromosome transmission fidelity in mitosis. Eight-five percent of the mutations are recessive and 15% are partially dominant. Complementation analysis between MATa and MAT{alpha} isolates identifies 11 chromosome transmission fidelity (CTF) complementation groups, the largest of which is identical to CHL1. For 49 independent mutations, no corresponding allele has been recovered in the opposite mating type. The initial screen monitored the stability of a centromere-linked color marker on a nonessential yeast chromosome fragment; the mitotic inheritance of natural yeast chromosome III is also affected by the ctf mutations. Of the 136 isolates identified, seven were inviable at 37{degree} and five were inviable at 11{degree}. In all cases tested, these temperature conditional lethalities cosegregated with the chromosome instability phenotype. Five additional complementation groups (ctf12 through ctf16) have been defined by complementation analysis of the mutations causing inviability at 37{degree}. All of the mutant strains showed normal sensitivity to ultraviolet and {gamma}-irradiation.

  12. Crystallographic studies of the Anthrax lethal toxin. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The lethal form of Anthrax results from the inhalation of anthrax spores. Death is primarily due to the effects of the lethal toxin (Protective Antigen (PA) + Lethal Factor) from the causative agent, Bacillus anthracis. All the Anthrax vaccines currently in use or under development contain or produce PA, the major antigenic component of anthrax toxin, and there is a clear need for an improved vaccine for human use. In the previous report we described the first atomic resolution structure of PA, revealing that the molecule is composed largely of beta-sheets organized into four domains. This information can be used in the design. of recombinant PA vaccines. In this report we describe additional features of the full-length PA molecule derived from further crystallographic refinement and careful examination of the structure. We compare two crystal forms of PA grown at different pH values and discuss the functional implications. A complete definition of the function of each domain must await the crystal structure of the PA63 heptamer. We have grown crystals of the heptamer under both detergent and detergent-free conditions, and made substantial progress towards the crystal structure. The mechanism of anthrax intoxication in the light of our results is reviewed.

  13. Adaptive acid tolerance response in Listeria monocytogenes: isolation of an acid-tolerant mutant which demonstrates increased virulence.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, B; Gahan, C G; Hill, C

    1996-01-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to tolerate low-pH environments is of particular importance because the pathogen encounters such environments in vivo, both during passage through the stomach and within the macrophage phagosome. In our study, L. monocytogenes was shown to exhibit a significant adaptive acid tolerance response following a 1-h exposure to mild acid (pH 5.5), which is capable of protecting cells from severe acid stress (pH 3.5). Susceptibility to pH 3.5 acid is growth phase dependent. Stationary-phase Listeria cultures are naturally resistant to the challenge pH (pH 3.5), while exponential-phase cultures require adaptation at pH 5.5 to induce acid tolerance. Adaptation requires protein synthesis, since treatment with chloramphenicol prevents the development of acid tolerance. Induction of the acid tolerance response also protects L. monocytogenes against the effect of other environmental stresses. Acid-adapted cells demonstrate increased tolerance toward thermal stress, osmotic stress, crystal violet, and ethanol. Following prolonged exposure of L. monocytogenes to pH 3.5, we isolated mutants which constitutively demonstrate increased acid tolerance at all stages of the growth cycle. These mutants do not display full acid tolerance, but their resistance to low pH can be further increased following adaptation to mild-acid conditions. The mutants demonstrated increased lethality for mice relative to that of the wild type when inoculated by the intraperitoneal route. When administered as lower inocula, the mutants reached higher levels in the spleens of infected mice than did the wild type. The data suggest that low-pH conditions may have the potential to select for L. monocytogenes mutants with increased natural acid tolerance and increased virulence. PMID:8633868

  14. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  15. Lethality of Sortase Depletion in Actinomyces oris Caused by Excessive Membrane Accumulation of a Surface Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chenggang; Huang, I-Hsiu; Chang, Chungyu; Reardon-Robinson, Melissa Elizabeth; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2014-01-01

    Sortase, a cysteine-transpeptidase conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, anchors on the cell wall many surface proteins that facilitate bacterial pathogenesis and fitness. Genetic disruption of the housekeeping sortase in several Gram-positive pathogens reported thus far attenuates virulence, but not bacterial growth. Paradoxically, we discovered that depletion of the housekeeping sortase SrtA was lethal for Actinomyces oris; yet, all of its predicted cell wall-anchored protein substrates (AcaA-N) were individually dispensable for cell viability. Using Tn5-transposon mutagenesis to identify factors that upend lethality of srtA deletion, we uncovered a set of genetic suppressors harboring transposon insertions within genes of a locus encoding AcaC and a LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP)-like protein. AcaC was shown to be highly glycosylated and dependent on LCP for its glycosylation. Upon SrtA depletion, the glycosylated form of AcaC, hereby renamed GspA, was accumulated in the membrane. Overexpression of GspA in a mutant lacking gspA and srtA was lethal; conversely, cells overexpressing a GspA mutant missing a membrane-localization domain were viable. The results reveal a unique glycosylation pathway in A. oris that is coupled to cell wall anchoring catalyzed by sortase SrtA. Significantly, this novel phenomenon of glyco-stress provides convenient cell-based assays for developing a new class of inhibitors against Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25230351

  16. Lethality of sortase depletion in Actinomyces oris caused by excessive membrane accumulation of a surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenggang; Huang, I-Hsiu; Chang, Chungyu; Reardon-Robinson, Melissa Elizabeth; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2014-12-01

    Sortase, a cysteine-transpeptidase conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, anchors on the cell wall many surface proteins that facilitate bacterial pathogenesis and fitness. Genetic disruption of the housekeeping sortase in several Gram-positive pathogens reported thus far attenuates virulence, but not bacterial growth. Paradoxically, we discovered that depletion of the housekeeping sortase SrtA was lethal for Actinomyces oris; yet, all of its predicted cell wall-anchored protein substrates (AcaA-N) were individually dispensable for cell viability. Using Tn5-transposon mutagenesis to identify factors that upend lethality of srtA deletion, we uncovered a set of genetic suppressors harbouring transposon insertions within genes of a locus encoding AcaC and a LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP)-like protein. AcaC was shown to be highly glycosylated and dependent on LCP for its glycosylation. Upon SrtA depletion, the glycosylated form of AcaC, hereby renamed GspA, was accumulated in the membrane. Overexpression of GspA in a mutant lacking gspA and srtA was lethal; conversely, cells overexpressing a GspA mutant missing a membrane-localization domain were viable. The results reveal a unique glycosylation pathway in A. oris that is coupled to cell wall anchoring catalysed by sortase SrtA. Significantly, this novel phenomenon of glyco-stress provides convenient cell-based assays for developing a new class of inhibitors against Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25230351

  17. Lethal Injection for Execution: Chemical Asphyxiation?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmers, Teresa A; Sheldon, Jonathan; Lubarsky, David A; López-Muñoz, Francisco; Waterman, Linda; Weisman, Richard; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2007-01-01

    Background Lethal injection for execution was conceived as a comparatively humane alternative to electrocution or cyanide gas. The current protocols are based on one improvised by a medical examiner and an anesthesiologist in Oklahoma and are practiced on an ad hoc basis at the discretion of prison personnel. Each drug used, the ultrashort-acting barbiturate thiopental, the neuromuscular blocker pancuronium bromide, and the electrolyte potassium chloride, was expected to be lethal alone, while the combination was intended to produce anesthesia then death due to respiratory and cardiac arrest. We sought to determine whether the current drug regimen results in death in the manner intended. Methods and Findings We analyzed data from two US states that release information on executions, North Carolina and California, as well as the published clinical, laboratory, and veterinary animal experience. Execution outcomes from North Carolina and California together with interspecies dosage scaling of thiopental effects suggest that in the current practice of lethal injection, thiopental might not be fatal and might be insufficient to induce surgical anesthesia for the duration of the execution. Furthermore, evidence from North Carolina, California, and Virginia indicates that potassium chloride in lethal injection does not reliably induce cardiac arrest. Conclusions We were able to analyze only a limited number of executions. However, our findings suggest that current lethal injection protocols may not reliably effect death through the mechanisms intended, indicating a failure of design and implementation. If thiopental and potassium chloride fail to cause anesthesia and cardiac arrest, potentially aware inmates could die through pancuronium-induced asphyxiation. Thus the conventional view of lethal injection leading to an invariably peaceful and painless death is questionable. PMID:17455994

  18. Live deaths online: internet suicide and lethality.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carolina A

    2012-01-01

    The Internet provides an infinite platform for the portrayal of lethal events. Beyond mere display, however, it dispenses information, allows for participation and sharing of content, and constitutes a virtual interactive forum. The Internet may ultimately shape society's approach to perceiving and dealing with death. Thus, psychiatrists may wish to be aware of these matters so that they may be considered in assessments and clinical care. In this article, the author attempts to identify key online locations where lethality is portrayed and how it may affect the individual patient and practitioner and the population at large. PMID:23233475

  19. Appearance of recessive lethal mutations in derivatives of an unstable X{sup Z} chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchenko, N.N.; Koryakov, D.E.; Zakharov, I.K.

    1995-09-01

    An X{sup Z} chromosome isolated from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster is characterized by spontaneous mutability of the genes yellow, white, and singed and the appearance of chromosomal rearrangements. In mutant lines derived from the line carrying the X{sup Z} chromosome that had one, two, or three unstable vision mutations (markers), the rate of appearance of sex-linked lethal mutations was analyzed. This rate was shown to increase with an increase in the number of markers in a line. This phenomenon, termed {open_quotes}marker induction,{close_quotes} might explain the phenotypic homogeneity of natural Drosophila populations. Spontaneous lethal mutations were mapped, and their nonrandom distribution along the X{sup Z} chromosome was shown. Along with common {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} sites of lethal mutations, the derivatives of the X{sup Z} chromosomes had their own specific sites for lethal mutations. In some cases, the appearance of lethal mutations was accompanied by the formation of inversions in the X{sup Z} chromosome. The lethal destabilization of the X{sup Z} derivatives, caused by selection for accumulation of visible mutations, is associated with an increase in the number of hot spots for nuclear mutations. Presumably, these hot spots are hot sites for the transposition of mobile genetic elements. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Raymond C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry. PMID:16129826

  1. Deadly Lessons: Understanding Lethal School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark H., Ed.; Petrie, Carol V., Ed.; Braga, Anthony A., Ed.; McLaughlin, Brenda L., Ed.

    This collection of papers is the outcome of the National Academies' effort to glean information from six different case studies of student-perpetrated school shootings. Part 1, "Case Studies of Lethal School Violence," includes: "The Copycat Factor: Mental Illness, Guns, and the Shooting Incident at Heritage High School, Rockdale County, Georgia"

  2. DAISY: picking synthetic lethals from cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Colm J; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2014-09-01

    A better understanding of genetic interactions in cancer might help identify new therapeutic approaches that exploit the concept of synthetic lethality. Ruppin and colleagues have developed a new computational method, DAISY, that predicts such interactions and potentially facilitates the delineation and validation of comprehensive genetic interaction networks. PMID:25203319

  3. Alpha-lactalbumin unfolding is not sufficient to cause apoptosis, but is required for the conversion to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    PubMed

    Svensson, Malin; Fast, Jonas; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Dringer, Caroline; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brooks, Charles L; Berliner, Lawrence; Linse, Sara; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-12-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a complex of human alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid (C18:1:9 cis) that kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism. Previous studies have shown that a conformational change is required to form HAMLET from alpha-lactalbumin, and that a partially unfolded conformation is maintained in the HAMLET complex. This study examined if unfolding of alpha-lactalbumin is sufficient to induce cell death. We used the bovine alpha-lactalbumin Ca(2+) site mutant D87A, which is unable to bind Ca(2+), and thus remains partially unfolded regardless of solvent conditions. The D87A mutant protein was found to be inactive in the apoptosis assay, but could readily be converted to a HAMLET-like complex in the presence of oleic acid. BAMLET (bovine alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) and D87A-BAMLET complexes were both able to kill tumor cells. This activity was independent of the Ca(2+)site, as HAMLET maintained a high affinity for Ca(2+) but D87A-BAMLET was active with no Ca(2+) bound. We conclude that partial unfolding of alpha-lactalbumin is necessary but not sufficient to trigger cell death, and that the activity of HAMLET is defined both by the protein and the lipid cofactor. Furthermore, a functional Ca(2+)-binding site is not required for conversion of alpha-lactalbumin to the active complex or to cause cell death. This suggests that the lipid cofactor stabilizes the altered fold without interfering with the Ca(2+)site. PMID:14627739

  4. ?-Lactalbumin unfolding is not sufficient to cause apoptosis, but is required for the conversion to HAMLET (human ?-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells)

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Malin; Fast, Jonas; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Dringer, Caroline; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brooks, Charles L.; Berliner, Lawrence; Linse, Sara; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-01-01

    HAMLET (human ?-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a complex of human ?-lactalbumin and oleic acid (C18:1:9 cis) that kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism. Previous studies have shown that a conformational change is required to form HAMLET from ?-lactalbumin, and that a partially unfolded conformation is maintained in the HAMLET complex. This study examined if unfolding of ?-lactalbumin is sufficient to induce cell death. We used the bovine ?-lactalbumin Ca2+ site mutant D87A, which is unable to bind Ca2+, and thus remains partially unfolded regardless of solvent conditions. The D87A mutant protein was found to be inactive in the apoptosis assay, but could readily be converted to a HAMLET-like complex in the presence of oleic acid. BAMLET (bovine ?-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) and D87A-BAMLET complexes were both able to kill tumor cells. This activity was independent of the Ca2+site, as HAMLET maintained a high affinity for Ca2+ but D87A-BAMLET was active with no Ca2+ bound. We conclude that partial unfolding of ?-lactalbumin is necessary but not sufficient to trigger cell death, and that the activity of HAMLET is defined both by the protein and the lipid cofactor. Furthermore, a functional Ca2+-binding site is not required for conversion of ?-lactalbumin to the active complex or to cause cell death. This suggests that the lipid cofactor stabilizes the altered fold without interfering with the Ca2+site. PMID:14627739

  5. Differential expression of the lethal gene Luteus-Pa in cacao of the Parinari series.

    PubMed

    Rehem, B C; Almeida, A-A F; Figueiredo, G S F; Gesteira, A S; Santos, S C; Corrêa, R X; Yamada, M M; Valle, R R

    2016-01-01

    The recessive lethal character Luteus-Pa is found in cacao (Theobroma cacao) genotypes of the Parinari series (Pa) and is characterized by expression of leaf chlorosis and seedling death. Several genotypes of the Pa series are bearers of the gene responsible for the expression of the Luteus-Pa character, which can be used as a tool for determining relationships between genotypes of this group. To evaluate this phenomenon, we analyzed the differential expression of genes between mutant seedlings and wild-type hybrid Pa 30 x 169 seedlings, with the aim of elucidating the possible lethal mechanisms of the homozygous recessive character Luteus-Pa. Plant material was harvested from leaves of wild and mutant seedlings at different periods to construct a subtractive library and perform quantitative analysis using real-time PCR. The 649 sequences obtained from the subtractive library had an average length of 500 bp, forming 409 contigs. The probable proteins encoded were grouped into 10 functional categories. Data from ESTs identified genes associated with Rubisco, peroxidases, and other proteins and enzymes related to carbon assimilation, respiration, and photosystem 2. Mutant seedlings were characterized by synthesizing defective PsbO and PsbA proteins, which were overexpressed from 15 to 20 days after seedling emergence. PMID:26910005

  6. Contribution of Lethal Toxin and Edema Toxin to the Pathogenesis of Anthrax Meningitis ?

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Celia M.; Sheen, Tamsin R.; Renken, Christian W.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Doran, Kelly S.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium that causes anthrax disease in humans and animals. Systemic infection is characterized by septicemia, toxemia, and meningitis, the main neurological complication associated with high mortality. We have shown previously that B. anthracis Sterne is capable of blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration, establishing the classic signs of meningitis, and that infection is dependent on the expression of both major anthrax toxins, lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET). Here we further investigate the contribution of the individual toxins to BBB disruption using isogenic toxin mutants deficient in lethal factor, ?LF, and edema factor, ?EF. Acute infection with B. anthracis Sterne and the ?LF mutant resulted in disruption of human brain microvascular endothelial cell (hBMEC) monolayer integrity and tight junction protein zona occludens-1, while the result for cells infected with the ?EF mutant was similar to that for the noninfected control. A significant decrease in bacterial invasion of BBB endothelium in vitro was observed during infection with the ?LF strain, suggesting a prominent role for LT in promoting BBB interaction. Further, treatment of hBMECs with purified LT or chemicals that mimic LT action on host signaling pathways rescued the hypoinvasive phenotype of the ?LF mutant and resulted in increased bacterial uptake. We also observed that toxin expression reduced bacterial intracellular survival by inducing the bulk degradative autophagy pathway in host cells. Finally, in a murine model of anthrax meningitis, mice infected with the ?LF mutant exhibited no mortality, brain bacterial load, or evidence of meningitis compared to mice infected with the parental or ?EF strains. PMID:21518787

  7. Selection for Early Meiotic Mutants in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, A. P.; Bowdish, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, only a/? cells can enter meiosis; a and ? cells cannot. Because a/? cells are typically diploid and a and ? cells are typically haploid, this cell type restriction ensures that only diploid cells enter meiosis. Entry into meiosis is accompanied by an increase in expression of the IME1 gene; the IME1 product (IME1) then activates IME2 and other meiotic genes. We have found that IME1 expression is toxic to starved haploid cells, presumably because IME1 directs them into meiosis. IME1 toxicity is greater in rad52 mutants, in which meiotic recombination causes lethal damage. Suppressors of IME1 toxicity include recessive mutations in two genes, RIM11 and RIM16 (Regulator of Inducer of Meiosis), that are required for IME1 to activate IME2 expression. RIM11 maps near CIN4 on chromosome XIII. PMID:1592244

  8. Thermoconditional modulation of the pleiotropic sensitivity phenotype by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PRP19 mutant allele pso4-1

    PubMed Central

    Revers, L. F.; Cardone, J. M.; Bonatto, D.; Saffi, J.; Grey, M.; Feldmann, H.; Brendel, M.; Henriques, J. A. P.

    2002-01-01

    The conditionally-lethal pso4-1 mutant allele of the spliceosomal-associated PRP19 gene allowed us to study this gene’s influence on pre-mRNA processing, DNA repair and sporulation. Phenotypes related to intron-containing genes were correlated to temperature. Splicing reporter systems and RT–PCR showed splicing efficiency in pso4-1 to be inversely correlated to growth temperature. A single amino acid substitution, replacing leucine with serine, was identified within the N-terminal region of the pso4-1 allele and was shown to affect the interacting properties of Pso4-1p. Amongst 24 interacting clones isolated in a two-hybrid screening, seven could be identified as parts of the RAD2, RLF2 and DBR1 genes. RAD2 encodes an endonuclease indispensable for nucleotide excision repair (NER), RLF2 encodes the major subunit of the chromatin assembly factor I, whose deletion results in sensitivity to UVC radiation, while DBR1 encodes the lariat RNA splicing debranching enzyme, which degrades intron lariat structures during splicing. Characterization of mutagen-sensitive phenotypes of rad2Δ, rlf2Δ and pso4-1 single and double mutant strains showed enhanced sensitivity for the rad2Δ pso4-1 and rlf2Δ pso4-1 double mutants, suggesting a functional interference of these proteins in DNA repair processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:12434004

  9. Novel features of the ISC machinery revealed by characterization of Escherichia coli mutants that survive without iron-sulfur clusters.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoyuki; Kanazawa, Miaki; Tonosaki, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Nao; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Takahashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Biological assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters is mediated by complex systems consisting of multiple proteins. Escherichia coli possesses two distinct systems called the ISC and SUF machineries encoded by iscSUA-hscBA-fdx-iscX and sufABCDSE respectively. Deletion of both pathways results in absence of the biosynthetic apparatus for Fe-S clusters, and consequent lethality, which has hampered detailed genetic studies. Here we report that modification of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway can offset the indispensability of the Fe-S cluster biosynthetic systems and show that the resulting Δisc Δsuf double mutants can grow without detectable Fe-S cluster-containing proteins. We also constructed a series of mutants in which each isc gene was disrupted in the deletion background of sufABCDSE. Phenotypic analysis of the mutants revealed that Fdx, an essential electron-transfer Fe-S protein in the ISC machinery, is dispensable under anaerobic conditions, which is similar to the situation with IscA. Furthermore, we found that several suppressor mutations in IscU, an Fe-S scaffold protein responsible for the de novo Fe-S cluster assembly, could bypass the essential role of the chaperone system HscA and HscB. These findings pave the way toward a detailed molecular analysis to understand the mechanisms involved in Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. PMID:26560204

  10. Carbon monoxide and lethal arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, J.P.; Schwartz, P.J.; Vanoli, E.; Stramba-Badiale, M.; De Ferrari, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of acute exposure to carbon monoxide on ventricular arrhythmias was studied in a previously described chronically maintained animal model of sudden cardiac death. In 60 percent of dogs with a healed anterior myocardial infarction, the combination of mild exercise and acute myocardial ischemia induces ventricular fibrillation. The events in this model are highly reproducible, thus allowing study by internal control analysis. Dogs that develop ventricular fibrillation during the test of exercise and acute myocardial ischemia are considered at high risk for sudden death and are defined as 'susceptible'; dogs that survive the test without a fatal arrhythmia are considered at low risk for sudden death and are defined as 'resistant.' In the current study, the effects of carboxyhemoglobin levels ranging from 5 to 15 percent were tested in resistant and susceptible dogs. A trend toward higher heart rates was observed at all levels of carboxyhemoglobin, although significant differences were observed only with 15 percent carboxyhemoglobin. This trend was observed at rest and during exercise in both resistant and susceptible dogs. In resistant animals, in which acute myocardial ischemia is typically associated with bradycardia even under the control condition, this reflex response occurred earlier and was augmented after exposure to carbon monoxide. This effect may depend on the increased hypoxic challenge caused by carbon monoxide, and thus on an augmentation of the neural reflex activation or a sensitization of the sinus node to acetylcholine induced by hypoxia. In both resistant and susceptible dogs, carbon monoxide exposure induced a worsening of ventricular arrhythmias in a minority of cases. This worsening was not reproducible in subsequent trials. These data indicate that acute exposure to carbon monoxide is seldom arrhythmogenic in dogs that have survived myocardial infarction. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Deletion of peptide amidation enzymatic activity leads to edema and embryonic lethality in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk, Traci A; Ning, Yun; Hsu, Ming-Sing; Peng, Bonnie; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A; Pintar, John E

    2005-11-15

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) catalyzes the COOH-terminal amidation of peptide hormones. We previously had found high expression of PAM in several regions of the developing rodent. To determine the function of PAM during mouse embryogenesis, we produced a null mutant of the PAM gene. Homozygous mutants die in utero between e14.5 and e15.5 with severe edema that is likely due to cardiovascular deficits. These defects include thinning of the aorta and carotid arteries and are very similar to those of the recently characterized adrenomedullin (AM) gene KO despite the presence of elevated immunoreactive AM in PAM KO embryos. No peptide amidation activity was detected in PAM mutant embryos, and there was no moderation of the AM-like phenotype that could be expected if any alternative peptide amidation mechanism exists in the mouse. Despite the proposed contribution of amidated peptides to neuronal cell proliferation, no alteration in neuroblast proliferation was observed in homozygous mutant embryos prior to lethality. Mice heterozygous for the mutant PAM allele develop normally and express wildtype levels of several amidated peptides despite having one half the wildtype levels of PAM activity and PAM protein. Nonetheless, both an increase in adiposity and a mild glucose intolerance developed in aged (>10 months) heterozygous mice compared to littermate controls. Ablation of PAM thus demonstrates an essential function for this gene during mouse development, while alterations in PAM activity in the adult may underlie more subtle physiologic effects. PMID:16225857

  12. Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana atfer4-1, atfh and atfer4-1/atfh mutants uncovers frataxin and ferritin contributions to leaf ionome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Irene; Vigani, Gianpiero

    2015-09-01

    Ferritins are iron-storage proteins involved in the environmental and developmental control of the free iron pool within cells. Plant ferritins are targeted to mitochondria as well as to chloroplasts. AtFer4 is the Arabidopsis thaliana ferritin isoform that can be also targeted to mitochondria. Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein whose role is essential for plants; lack of AtFH frataxin causes early embryo-lethality in Arabidopsis. Because of that, the Arabidopsis atfh KO mutant is propagated in heterozygosis. For exploring the functional interaction between frataxin and ferritin, Arabidopsis double mutant atfer4-1/atfh was isolated and its physiological parameters were measured, as well as its ionome profile, together with those of both atfer4 and atfh single mutants, in different conditions of Fe supply. Impairment of both ferritin and frataxin did not lead to any effect on mitochondrial respiration. However, ionomics revealed that the content of macro- and microelements, occurring when the nutritional Fe supply changes, were altered in the mutants analysed. These results suggest that both ferritin and frataxin can contribute to the composition of the leaf ionome and also confirm ionomics as an excellent tool for detecting alterations in the plant's physiology. PMID:26042547

  13. Effect of vanillic acid on COQ6 mutants identified in patients with coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Doimo, Mara; Trevisson, Eva; Airik, Rannar; Bergdoll, Marc; Santos-Ocaa, Carlos; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Navas, Placido; Pierrel, Fabien; Salviati, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Human COQ6 encodes a monooxygenase which is responsible for the C5-hydroxylation of the quinone ring of coenzyme Q (CoQ). Mutations in COQ6 cause primary CoQ deficiency, a condition responsive to oral CoQ10 supplementation. Treatment is however still problematic given the poor bioavailability of CoQ10. We employed S. cerevisiae lacking the orthologous gene to characterize the two different human COQ6 isoforms and the mutations found in patients. COQ6 isoform a can partially complement the defective yeast, while isoform b, which lacks part of the FAD-binding domain, is inactive but partially stable, and could have a regulatory/inhibitory function in CoQ10 biosynthesis. Most mutations identified in patients, including the frameshift Q461fs478X mutation, retain residual enzymatic activity, and all patients carry at least one hypomorphic allele, confirming that the complete block of CoQ biosynthesis is lethal. These mutants are also partially stable and allow the assembly of the CoQ biosynthetic complex. In fact treatment with two hydroxylated analogues of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, namely, vanillic acid or 3-4-hydroxybenzoic acid, restored the respiratory growth of yeast ?coq6 cells expressing the mutant huCOQ6-isoa proteins. These compounds, and particularly vanillic acid, could therefore represent an interesting therapeutic option for COQ6 patients. PMID:24140869

  14. Lethal and potentially lethal lesions induced by radiation--a unified repair model.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B

    1986-05-01

    A model of radiation action is described which unifies several of the major existing concepts which have been applied to cell killing. Called the lethal and potentially lethal (LPL) model, it combines the ideas of lesion interaction, irreparable lesions caused by single tracks, linear lesion fixation, lesion repair via first-order kinetics, and binary misrepair. Two different kinds of lesions are hypothesized: irreparable (lethal) and repairable (potentially lethal) lesions. They are tentatively being identified with DNA double-strand breaks of different severity. Two processes compete for depletion of the potentially lethal lesions: correct repair following first-order kinetics, and misrepair following second-order kinetics. Fixation of these lesions can also occur. The model applies presently only to plateau (stationary)-phase cells. Radiobiological phenomena described include effects of low dose rate, high LET, and repair kinetics as measured with repair inhibitors such as hypertonic solution and beta-arabinofuranosyladenine (beta-araA). One consequence of the model is that repair of sublethal damage and the slow component of the repair of potentially lethal damage are two manifestations of the same repair process. Hypertonic treatment fixes a completely new class of lesions which normally repair correctly. Another consequence of the model is that the initial slope of the survival curve depends on the amount of time available for repair after irradiation. The "dose-rate factor" occurring in several linear-quadratic formulations is shown to emerge when appropriate low-dose and long-repair-time approximations are made. PMID:3704115

  15. Autotaxin Overexpression Causes Embryonic Lethality and Vascular Defects

    PubMed Central

    Yukiura, Hiroshi; Kano, Kuniyuki; Kise, Ryoji; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2015-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secretory protein, which converts lysophospholipids to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and is essential for embryonic vascular formation. ATX is abundantly detected in various biological fluids and its level is elevated in some pathophysiological conditions. However, the roles of elevated ATX levels remain to be elucidated. In this study, we generated conditional transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing ATX and examined the effects of excess LPA signalling. We found that ATX overexpression in the embryonic period caused severe vascular defects and was lethal around E9.5. ATX was conditionally overexpressed in the neonatal period using the Cre/loxP system, which resulted in a marked increase in the plasma LPA level. This resulted in retinal vascular defects including abnormal vascular plexus and increased vascular regression. Our findings indicate that the ATX level must be carefully regulated to ensure coordinated vascular formation PMID:25992708

  16. Lesion mimic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moeder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade a substantial number of lesion mimic mutants (LMM) have been isolated and a growing number of the genes have been cloned. It is now becoming clear that these mutants are valuable tools to dissect various aspects of programmed cell death (PCD) and pathogen resistance pathways in plants. Together with other forward genetics approaches LMMs shed light on the PCD machinery in plant cells and revealed important roles for sphingolipids, Ca2+ and chloroplast-derived porphyrin-metabolites during cell death development. PMID:19513227

  17. Unraveling the physiological complexities of antibiotic lethality.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Daniel J; Collins, James J; Walker, Graham C

    2015-01-01

    We face an impending crisis in our ability to treat infectious disease brought about by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and a decline in the development of new antibiotics. Urgent action is needed. This review focuses on a less well-understood aspect of antibiotic action: the complex metabolic events that occur subsequent to the interaction of antibiotics with their molecular targets and play roles in antibiotic lethality. Independent lines of evidence from studies of the action of bactericidal antibiotics on diverse bacteria collectively suggest that the initial interactions of drugs with their targets cannot fully account for the antibiotic lethality and that these interactions elicit the production of reactive oxidants including reactive oxygen species that contribute to bacterial cell death. Recent challenges to this concept are considered in the context of the broader literature of this emerging area of research. Possible ways that this new knowledge might be exploited to improve antibiotic therapy are also considered. PMID:25251995

  18. Efficient synthetic inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor

    PubMed Central

    Forino, Martino; Johnson, Sherida; Wong, Thiang Y.; Rozanov, Dmitri V.; Savinov, Alexei Y.; Li, Wei; Fattorusso, Roberto; Becattini, Barbara; Orry, Andrew J.; Jung, Dawoon; Abagyan, Ruben A.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Alibek, Ken; Liddington, Robert C.; Strongin, Alex Y.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a deadly disease for which there is currently no effective treatment. Bacillus anthracis lethal factor (LF) metalloproteinase is an integral component of the tripartite anthrax lethal toxin that is essential for the onset and progression of anthrax. We report here on a fragment-based approach that allowed us to develop inhibitors of LF. The small-molecule inhibitors we have designed, synthesized, and tested are highly potent and selective against LF in both in vitro tests and cell-based assays. These inhibitors do not affect the prototype human metalloproteinases that are structurally similar to LF. Initial in vivo evaluation of postexposure efficacy of our inhibitors combined with antibiotic ciprofloxican against B. anthracis resulted in significant protection. Our data strongly indicate that the scaffold of inhibitors we have identified is the foundation for the development of novel, safe, and effective emergency therapy of postexposure inhalation anthrax. PMID:15983377

  19. Mice Expressing Mutant Trpv4 Recapitulate the Human TRPV4 Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuqing; Lee, Brendan; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations in TRPV4 are known to cause a spectrum of skeletal dysplasias ranging from autosomal dominant brachyolmia to lethal metatropic dysplasia. To develop an animal model of these disorders, we created transgenic mice expressing either wild-type or mutant TRPV4. Mice transgenic for wild-type Trpv4 showed no morphological changes at embryonic day 16.5, but did have a delay in bone mineralization. Overexpression of a mutant TRPV4 caused a lethal skeletal dysplasia that phenocopied many abnormalities associated with metatropic dysplasia in humans, including dumbbell-shaped long bones, a small ribcage, abnormalities in the autopod, and abnormal ossification in the vertebrae. The difference in phenotype between embryos transgenic for wild-type or mutant Trpv4 demonstrates that an increased amount of wild-type protein can be tolerated and that an activating mutation of this protein is required to produce a skeletal dysplasia phenotype. PMID:24644033

  20. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  1. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    PubMed

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Prez, Ana; Pablos, Adrin; Martnez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gmez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermdez de Castro, Jos Mara; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  2. Rehabilitating mutant GCase.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Jennifer N; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2014-08-14

    Gaucher's disease is a hereditary deficiency of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) that is most commonly treated by enzyme replacement therapy. In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Tan and colleagues search for alternative ways to rehabilitate mutant GCase by understanding how it interacts with the proteostasis network. PMID:25126987

  3. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  4. Phenotypic disruption to orofacial movement topography in conditional mutants with generalized CamKIIa/Cre D1Tox versus striatal-specific DARPP-32/Cre D1Tox ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Katsunori; Kim, Hyun Ah; Kinsella, Anthony; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Schtz, Gnter; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Lawrence, Andrew J; Waddington, John L; Drago, John

    2011-09-01

    Orofacial movements were quantified in (a) DARPP-32/Cre D1Tox mutants, having progressive loss of D1 dopamine receptor expressing striatal medium spiny neurons and (b) CamKIIa/Cre D1Tox mutants, having progressive, generalized loss of forebrain D1 receptor expressing cells. Horizontal jaw movements and tongue protrusions were reduced in DARPP-32/Cre but not in CamKIIa/Cre mutants; head and vibrissae movements were increased in DARPP-32/Cre but decreased in CamKIIa/Cre mutants. In drug challenge studies, tongue protrusions were increased in CamKIIa/Cre mutants following vehicle, suggesting a stress-related phenotype. These findings indicate that mice with progressive loss of striatal-specific D1 receptor expressing cells have an orofacial phenotype that may be modulated by the loss of extrastriatal D1 receptor expressing cells. As progressive loss of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells is a hallmark feature of Huntington's disease (HD), these findings may inform the functional role of loss of this cell population in the overall pathobiology of HD. PMID:21308794

  5. Chemically Induced Conditional Rescue of the Reduced Epidermal Fluorescence8 Mutant of Arabidopsis Reveals Rapid Restoration of Growth and Selective Turnover of Secondary Metabolite Pools1[C][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Im; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Chapple, Clint; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of diverse and important secondary metabolites including lignin and flavonoids. The reduced epidermal fluorescence8 (ref8) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is defective in a lignin biosynthetic enzyme p-coumaroyl shikimate 3′-hydroxylase (C3′H), exhibits severe dwarfism and sterility. To better understand the impact of perturbation of phenylpropanoid metabolism on plant growth, we generated a chemically inducible C3′H expression construct and transformed it into the ref8 mutant. Application of dexamethasone to these plants greatly alleviates the dwarfism and sterility and substantially reverses the biochemical phenotypes of ref8 plants, including the reduction of lignin content and hyperaccumulation of flavonoids and p-coumarate esters. Induction of C3′H expression at different developmental stages has distinct impacts on plant growth. Although early induction effectively restored the elongation of primary inflorescence stem, application to 7-week-old plants enabled them to produce new rosette inflorescence stems. Examination of hypocotyls of these plants revealed normal vasculature in the newly formed secondary xylem, presumably restoring water transport in the mutant. The ref8 mutant accumulates higher levels of salicylic acid than the wild type, but depletion of this compound in ref8 did not relieve the mutant’s growth defects, suggesting that the hyperaccumulation of salicylic acid is unlikely to be responsible for dwarfism in this mutant. PMID:24381065

  6. Functional Genomics Reveals the Induction of Inflammatory Response and Metalloproteinase Gene Expression during Lethal Ebola Virus Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Cilloniz, Cristian; Ebihara, Hideki; Ni, Chester; Neumann, Gabriele; Korth, Marcus J.; Kelly, Sara M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Ebola virus is the etiologic agent of a lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with mortality rates of up to 90%. Previous studies with Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV), mouse-adapted virus (MA-ZEBOV), and mutant viruses (ZEBOV-NPma, ZEBOV-VP24ma, and ZEBOV-NP/VP24ma) allowed us to identify the mutations in viral protein 24 (VP24) and nucleoprotein (NP) responsible for acquisition of high virulence in mice. To elucidate specific molecular signatures associated with lethality, we compared global gene expression profiles in spleen samples from mice infected with these viruses and performed an extensive functional analysis. Our analysis showed that the lethal viruses (MA-ZEBOV and ZEBOV-NP/VP24ma) elicited a strong expression of genes 72 h after infection. In addition, we found that although the host transcriptional response to ZEBOV-VP24ma was nearly the same as that to ZEBOV-NP/VP24ma, the contribution of a mutation in the NP gene was required for a lethal phenotype. Further analysis indicated that one of the most relevant biological functions differentially regulated by the lethal viruses was the inflammatory response, as was the induction of specific metalloproteinases, which were present in our newly identify functional network that was associated with Ebola virus lethality. Our results suggest that this dysregulated proinflammatory response increased the severity of disease. Consequently, the newly discovered molecular signature could be used as the starting point for the development of new drugs and therapeutics. To our knowledge, this is the first study that clearly defines unique molecular signatures associated with Ebola virus lethality. PMID:21734050

  7. Functional genomics reveals the induction of inflammatory response and metalloproteinase gene expression during lethal Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cilloniz, Cristian; Ebihara, Hideki; Ni, Chester; Neumann, Gabriele; Korth, Marcus J; Kelly, Sara M; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G

    2011-09-01

    Ebola virus is the etiologic agent of a lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with mortality rates of up to 90%. Previous studies with Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV), mouse-adapted virus (MA-ZEBOV), and mutant viruses (ZEBOV-NP(ma), ZEBOV-VP24(ma), and ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma)) allowed us to identify the mutations in viral protein 24 (VP24) and nucleoprotein (NP) responsible for acquisition of high virulence in mice. To elucidate specific molecular signatures associated with lethality, we compared global gene expression profiles in spleen samples from mice infected with these viruses and performed an extensive functional analysis. Our analysis showed that the lethal viruses (MA-ZEBOV and ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma)) elicited a strong expression of genes 72 h after infection. In addition, we found that although the host transcriptional response to ZEBOV-VP24(ma) was nearly the same as that to ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma), the contribution of a mutation in the NP gene was required for a lethal phenotype. Further analysis indicated that one of the most relevant biological functions differentially regulated by the lethal viruses was the inflammatory response, as was the induction of specific metalloproteinases, which were present in our newly identify functional network that was associated with Ebola virus lethality. Our results suggest that this dysregulated proinflammatory response increased the severity of disease. Consequently, the newly discovered molecular signature could be used as the starting point for the development of new drugs and therapeutics. To our knowledge, this is the first study that clearly defines unique molecular signatures associated with Ebola virus lethality. PMID:21734050

  8. [Parental effects of conditional mutations and their explanations].

    PubMed

    Chadov, B F; Fedorova, N B; Chadova, E V

    2013-02-01

    A study of the properties of conditional dominant and recessive lethals in Drosophila melanogaster has demonstrated parental effects in the inheritance and manifestation of these mutations. Maternal and paternal effects are present when conditional mutations interact with (1) one another, (2) the Y chromosome, or (3) chromosomal rearrangements, as well as (4) when the visual expression of a conditional mutation is inherited or (5) during the formation ofmorphoses (monstrosities) in mutant offspring. The maternal and paternal effects do not exclude one another: the same mutation can display both patterns. The characters manifesting themselves at late developmental stages (morphoses) are inherited according to a parental effect pattern. A general concept of the parental effect is proposed and its types are classified. PMID:23668081

  9. Superior triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless mutants of Scenedesmus obliquus: (I) mutant generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising platform for producing neutral lipids, to be used in the application for biofuels or commodities in the feed and food industry. A very promising candidate is the oleaginous green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, because it accumulates up to 45% w/w triacylglycerol (TAG) under nitrogen starvation. Under these conditions, starch is accumulated as well. Starch can amount up to 38% w/w under nitrogen starvation, which is a substantial part of the total carbon captured. When aiming for optimized TAG production, blocking the formation of starch could potentially increase carbon allocation towards TAG. In an attempt to increase TAG content, productivity and yield, starchless mutants of this high potential strain were generated using UV mutagenesis. Previous studies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that blocking the starch synthesis yields higher TAG contents, although these TAG contents do not surpass those of oleaginous microalgae yet. So far no starchless mutants in oleaginous green microalgae have been isolated that result in higher TAG productivities. Results Five starchless mutants have been isolated successfully from over 3,500 mutants. The effect of the mutation on biomass and total fatty acid (TFA) and TAG productivity under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions was studied. All five starchless mutants showed a decreased or completely absent starch content. In parallel, an increased TAG accumulation rate was observed for the starchless mutants and no substantial decrease in biomass productivity was perceived. The most promising mutant showed an increase in TFA productivity of 41% at 4days after nitrogen depletion, reached a TAG content of 49.4% (% of dry weight) and had no substantial change in biomass productivity compared to the wild type. Conclusions The improved S. obliquus TAG production strains are the first starchless mutants in an oleaginous green microalga that show enhanced TAG content under photoautotrophic conditions. These results can pave the way towards a more feasible microalgae-driven TAG production platform. PMID:24920957

  10. Rapid Antibiotic Resistance Evolution of GASP Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Kim, Hyunsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The GASP phenotype in bacteria is due to a mutation which enables the bacteria to grow under high stress conditions where other bacteria stop growing. We probe using our Death Galaxy microenvironment how rapidly the GASP mutant can evolve resistance to mutagenic antibiotics compared to wild-type bacteria, and explore the genomic landscape changes due to the evolution of resistance.

  11. Mutation Induced Extinction in Finite Populations: Lethal Mutagenesis and Lethal Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, C. Scott; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2012-01-01

    Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate semi-conservatively, e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U), and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathogens by increasing their mutation rate. Previous theoretical models of lethal mutagenesis assume infinite population size (N). However, in addition to high U, small N can accelerate extinction by strengthening genetic drift and relaxing selection. Here, we examine how the time until extinction depends jointly on N and U. We first analytically compute the mean time until extinction (?) in a simplistic model where all mutations are either lethal or neutral. The solution motivates the definition of two distinct regimes: a survival phase and an extinction phase, which differ dramatically in both how ? scales with N and in the coefficient of variation in time until extinction. Next, we perform stochastic population-genetics simulations on a realistic fitness landscape that both (i) features an epistatic distribution of fitness effects that agrees with experimental data on viruses and (ii) is based on the biophysics of protein folding. More specifically, we assume that mutations inflict fitness penalties proportional to the extent that they unfold proteins. We find that decreasing N can cause phase transition-like behavior from survival to extinction, which motivates the concept of lethal isolation. Furthermore, we find that lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation interact synergistically, which may have clinical implications for treating infections. Broadly, we conclude that stably folded proteins are only possible in ecological settings that support sufficiently large populations. PMID:22876168

  12. Characterization of Lethal Zygosis Associated with Conjugation in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Skurray, Ronald A.; Reeves, Peter

    1973-01-01

    When F? cells are mixed with an excess of Hfr cells there is a lethal event which results in a decrease in the number of F? survivors. We have described and discussed the parameters affecting this phenomenon of lethal zygosis, and these include the cultural conditions of both donor and recipient cells prior to mixing and the use of aeration throughout the period of the experiment. The absence of lethal zygosis with filtrates and supernatant fluids from donors suggests a dependence on direct cell-cell contact as found in conjugation. The phenomenon, which is normally observed in liquid media, also occurs on solid media, and use of these two methods has allowed examination of strains of different mating types. Whereas most Hfr strains capable of producing normal yields of recombinants showed killing activity, no F+ and only one F? donor produced lethal zygosis. Only F? strains were sensitive to this phenomenon. The relationship between lethal zygosis and the various stages of conjugation is discussed. Images PMID:4567141

  13. Essential Plasticity and Redundancy of Metabolism Unveiled by Synthetic Lethality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We unravel how functional plasticity and redundancy are essential mechanisms underlying the ability to survive of metabolic networks. We perform an exhaustive computational screening of synthetic lethal reaction pairs in Escherichia coli in a minimal medium and we find that synthetic lethal pairs divide in two different groups depending on whether the synthetic lethal interaction works as a backup or as a parallel use mechanism, the first corresponding to essential plasticity and the second to essential redundancy. In E. coli, the analysis of pathways entanglement through essential redundancy supports the view that synthetic lethality affects preferentially a single function or pathway. In contrast, essential plasticity, the dominant class, tends to be inter-pathway but strongly localized and unveils Cell Envelope Biosynthesis as an essential backup for Membrane Lipid Metabolism. When comparing E. coli and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, we find that the metabolic networks of the two organisms exhibit a large difference in the relative importance of plasticity and redundancy which is consistent with the conjecture that plasticity is a sophisticated mechanism that requires a complex organization. Finally, coessential reaction pairs are explored in different environmental conditions to uncover the interplay between the two mechanisms. We find that synthetic lethal interactions and their classification in plasticity and redundancy are basically insensitive to medium composition, and are highly conserved even when the environment is enriched with nonessential compounds or overconstrained to decrease maximum biomass formation. PMID:24854166

  14. Activation of Toxin-Antitoxin System Toxins Suppresses Lethality Caused by the Loss of σE in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Daimon, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT σE, an alternative σ factor that governs a major signaling pathway in envelope stress responses in Gram-negative bacteria, is essential for growth of Escherichia coli not only under stressful conditions, such as elevated temperature, but also under normal laboratory conditions. A mutational inactivation of the hicB gene has been reported to suppress the lethality caused by the loss of σE. hicB encodes the antitoxin of the HicA-HicB toxin-antitoxin (TA) system; overexpression of the HicA toxin, which exhibits mRNA interferase activity, causes cleavage of mRNAs and an arrest of cell growth, while simultaneous expression of HicB neutralizes the toxic effects of overproduced HicA. To date, however, how the loss of HicB rescues the cell lethality in the absence of σE and, more specifically, whether HicA is involved in this process remain unknown. Here we showed that simultaneous disruption of hicA abolished suppression of the σE essentiality in the absence of hicB, while ectopic expression of wild-type HicA, but not that of its mutant forms without mRNA interferase activity, restored the suppression. Furthermore, HicA and two other mRNA interferase toxins, HigB and YafQ, suppressed the σE essentiality even in the presence of chromosomally encoded cognate antitoxins when these toxins were overexpressed individually. Interestingly, when the growth media were supplemented with low levels of antibiotics that are known to activate toxins, E. coli cells with no suppressor mutations grew independently of σE. Taken together, our results indicate that the activation of TA system toxins can suppress the σE essentiality and affect the extracytoplasmic stress responses. IMPORTANCE σE is an alternative σ factor involved in extracytoplasmic stress responses. Unlike other alternative σ factors, σE is indispensable for the survival of E. coli even under unstressed conditions, although the exact reason for its essentiality remains unknown. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are widely distributed in prokaryotes and are composed of two adjacent genes, encoding a toxin that exerts harmful effects on the toxin-producing bacterium itself and an antitoxin that neutralizes the cognate toxin. Curiously, it is known that inactivation of an antitoxin rescues the σE essentiality, suggesting a connection between TA systems and σE function. We demonstrate here that toxin activation is necessary for this rescue and suggest the possible involvement of TA systems in extracytoplasmic stress responses. PMID:25917909

  15. Activation loop phosphorylation regulates B-Raf invivo and transformation by B-Raf mutants.

    PubMed

    Khler, Martin; Rring, Michael; Schorch, Bjrn; Heilmann, Katharina; Stickel, Natalie; Fiala, Gina J; Schmitt, Lisa C; Braun, Sandra; Ehrenfeld, Sophia; Uhl, Franziska M; Kaltenbacher, Thorsten; Weinberg, Florian; Herzog, Sebastian; Zeiser, Robert; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Jumaa, Hassan; Brummer, Tilman

    2016-01-18

    Despite being mutated in cancer and RASopathies, the role of the activation segment (AS) has not been addressed for B-Raf signaling invivo. Here, we generated a conditional knock-in mouse allowing the expression of the B-Raf(AVKA) mutant in which the AS phosphoacceptor sites T599 and S602 are replaced by alanine residues. Surprisingly, despite producing a kinase-impaired protein, the Braf(AVKA) allele does not phenocopy the lethality of Braf-knockout or paradoxically acting knock-in alleles. However, Braf(AVKA) mice display abnormalities in the hematopoietic system, a distinct facial morphology, reduced ERK pathway activity in the brain, and an abnormal gait. This phenotype suggests that maximum B-Raf activity is required for the proper development, function, and maintenance of certain cell populations. By establishing conditional murine embryonic fibroblast cultures, we further show that MEK/ERK phosphorylation and the immediate early gene response toward growth factors are impaired in the presence of B-Raf(AVKA). Importantly, alanine substitution of T599/S602 impairs the transformation potential of oncogenic non-V600E B-Raf mutants and a fusion protein, suggesting that blocking their phosphorylation could represent an alternative strategy to ATP-competitive inhibitors. PMID:26657898

  16. Lethal infection thresholds of Paenibacillus larvae for honeybee drone and worker larvae (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Behrens, Dieter; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2010-10-01

    We compared the mortality of honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone and worker larvae from a single queen under controlled in vitro conditions following infection with Paenibacillus larvae, a bacterium causing the brood disease American Foulbrood (AFB). We also determined absolute P. larvae cell numbers and lethal titres in deceased individuals of both sexes up to 8 days post infection using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results show that in drones the onset of infection induced mortality is delayed by 1 day, the cumulative mortality is reduced by 10% and P. larvae cell numbers are higher than in worker larvae. Since differences in bacterial cell titres between sexes can be explained by differences in body size, larval size appears to be a key parameter for a lethal threshold in AFB tolerance. Both means and variances for lethal thresholds are similar for drone and worker larvae suggesting that drone resistance phenotypes resemble those of related workers. PMID:20545737

  17. Lethal mobilization of DDT by cowbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Velzen, A.C.; Stiles, W.B.; Stickel, L.F.

    1972-01-01

    This study is an experimental demonstration of lethal mobilization of DDT by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) and the effects of food deprivation on the distribution and loss of DDT, DDD, and DDE. The principal experimental group consisted of 20 birds fed a dietary dosage of 100 ppm of DDT for 13 days. After 2 days of full rations of untreated food, they were subjected to food restriction. Food was reduced to 43 percent of normal. Seven of the 20 birds died within 4 days. No birds died in the three control groups, treated as follows: ( 1 ) 20 birds fed 100 ppm DDT for 13 days and full rations of untreated food thereafter, (2) 20 birds fed only untreated food but subjected to food restriction, and (3) 20 birds fed full rations of untreated food throughout. In a pilot study, birds were fed 100, 200, or 300 ppm of DDT and subjected to two periods of food restriction, the first of these immediately after dosage ceased and the second 4 months later. DDT-dosed birds from all dosage levels died in each period of food restriction. Before the weight loss that accompanied food restriction, the brains of DDT-dosed birds had concentrations of DDT and DDD that were far below the lethal range. Concentrations increased rapidly to lethal levels. In these birds, DDT in carcasses decreased while DDD increased. DDT-dosed birds that died during food restriction lost 16 percent of their total body burden of DDT + DDD + DDE, 21 percent of their weight, and 81 percent of their fat. The DDT-dosed birds that were subjected to food restriction but survived lost a significantly greater proportion of their body burden of residues than similarly dosed birds not subjected to weight loss. Brain levels of DDT and DDD in birds that died during food restriction soon after dosage did not differ significantly from brain levels of birds that died in a period of food restriction 4 months after dosage. Concentrations of DDE were significantly higher in the latter group, although they were lower than concentrations considered to be lethal. In contrast, carcass levels of DDT and DDD were significantly lower, and DDE was only slightly higher, in the birds that died in the second period of food restriction. It is concluded that stored DDT residues present a hazard to birds, which utilize stored fat during periods of stress due to reproduction, cold weather, disease, injury, limited food supply, or migration.

  18. Growth and development of maize that contains mutant tubulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Wick

    2004-07-23

    Mutant maize plants containing a Mu transposon disrupting one of the five beta tubulin genes of interest were followed for several generations and hybridized with each other to produce plants containing disruptions in both copies of a single gene or disruption of more than one tubulin gene. Seedlings of some of these plants were grown under chilling conditions for a few weeks. After DOE funding ended, plants have been assessed to see whether mutant are more or less tolerant to chilling. Other mutant plants will be assessed for their male and female fertility relative to non-mutant siblings or other close relatives.

  19. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Melloni N.; Dunning, Jonathan P; Wiley, Ronald G; Chesler, Elissa J; Johnson, Dabney K; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  20. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  1. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  2. Proton Gradient Regulation 5-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow under ATP- or Redox-Limited Conditions: A Study of ΔATPase pgr5 and ΔrbcL pgr5 Mutants in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Xenie; Steinbeck, Janina; Dent, Rachel M.; Takahashi, Hiroko; Richaud, Pierre; Ozawa, Shin-Ichiro; Houille-Vernes, Laura; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Rappaport, Fabrice; Grossman, Arthur R.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Hippler, Michael; Alric, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii proton gradient regulation5 (Crpgr5) mutant shows phenotypic and functional traits similar to mutants in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog, Atpgr5, providing strong evidence for conservation of PGR5-mediated cyclic electron flow (CEF). Comparing the Crpgr5 mutant with the wild type, we discriminate two pathways for CEF and determine their maximum electron flow rates. The PGR5/proton gradient regulation-like1 (PGRL1) ferredoxin (Fd) pathway, involved in recycling excess reductant to increase ATP synthesis, may be controlled by extreme photosystem I acceptor side limitation or ATP depletion. Here, we show that PGR5/PGRL1-Fd CEF functions in accordance with an ATP/redox control model. In the absence of Rubisco and PGR5, a sustained electron flow is maintained with molecular oxygen instead of carbon dioxide serving as the terminal electron acceptor. When photosynthetic control is decreased, compensatory alternative pathways can take the full load of linear electron flow. In the case of the ATP synthase pgr5 double mutant, a decrease in photosensitivity is observed compared with the single ATPase-less mutant that we assign to a decreased proton motive force. Altogether, our results suggest that PGR5/PGRL1-Fd CEF is most required under conditions when Fd becomes overreduced and photosystem I is subjected to photoinhibition. CEF is not a valve; it only recycles electrons, but in doing so, it generates a proton motive force that controls the rate of photosynthesis. The conditions where the PGR5 pathway is most required may vary in photosynthetic organisms like C. reinhardtii from anoxia to high light to limitations imposed at the level of carbon dioxide fixation. PMID:24623849

  3. Rapid Mapping of Conditional and Auxotrophic Mutations in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Low, Brooks

    1973-01-01

    The approximate genetic map locations of auxotrophic and conditional lethal mutations of Escherichia coli can be rapidly determined with replica plating techniques. A set of patches of 15 streptomycin-sensitive (StrS) Hfr strains with points of origin distributed around the map is replica plated onto a recombinant-selective plate with a lawn of StrR cells which carry an unmapped mutation. The map interval defined by the Hfr points of origin which are closest to the mutant locus is seen by the presence or absence of heavy patches of recombinants produced by transfer of early wild-type genes from the Hfrs. An alternative method is to replicate patches of different mutant strains (100 per plate) onto Hfr lawns; in this case more than 1,000 different mutants can be mapped in a single experiment in a few days. In this way, many types of mutations with similar phenotypes can be grouped as to approximate location on the genetic map. For ordering mutations within groups, the same replica plating methods can be used to cross F-prime derivatives of mutants with other mutants of the same group. Relative merits of these and other mapping methods of E. coli are discussed. Images PMID:4570607

  4. DA virus mutant H101 has altered CNS pathogenesis and causes immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Matthew F; Libbey, Jane E; Doty, Daniel J; Fujinami, Robert S

    2014-12-15

    Viruses use various mechanisms to evade clearance by the host. Investigating how a few changes in the genome of a non-lethal virus can lead to altered disease, from survivable to immunosuppression/death, would provide valuable information into viral pathogenesis. The Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus causes an asymptomatic infection or acute encephalitis followed by viral clearance. A mutant, H101, carries several alterations in the viral genome. H101 infection causes profound immunosuppression and death. Thus, a virus that is normally cleared by its natural host can become lethal due to just a few changes in the viral genome. PMID:25468274

  5. DA virus mutant H101 has altered CNS pathogenesis and causes immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Cusick, Matthew F.; Libbey, Jane E.; Doty, Daniel J.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses use various mechanisms to evade clearance by the host. Investigating how a few changes in the genome of a non-lethal virus can lead to altered disease, from survivable to immunosuppression/death, would provide valuable information into viral pathogenesis. The Daniels strain of Theilers murine encephalomyelitis virus causes an asymptomatic infection or acute encephalitis followed by viral clearance. A mutant, H101, carries several alterations in the viral genome. H101 infection causes profound immunosuppression and death. Thus, a virus that is normally cleared by its natural host can become lethal due to just a few changes in the viral genome. PMID:25468274

  6. Genome delivery and ion channel properties are altered in VP4 mutants of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Danthi, Pranav; Tosteson, Magdalena; Li, Qi-Han; Chow, Marie

    2003-05-01

    During entry into host cells, poliovirus undergoes a receptor-mediated conformational transition to form 135S particles with irreversible exposure of VP4 capsid sequences and VP1 N termini. To understand the role of VP4 during virus entry, the fate of VP4 during infection by site-specific mutants at threonine-28 of VP4 (4028T) was compared with that of the parental Mahoney type 1 virus. Three virus mutants were studied: the entry-defective, nonviable mutant 4028T.G and the viable mutants 4028T.S and 4028T.V, in which residue threonine-28 was changed to glycine, serine, and valine, respectively. We show that mutant and wild-type (WT) VP4 proteins are localized to cellular membranes after the 135S conformational transition. Both WT and viable 4028T mutant particles interact with lipid bilayers to form ion channels, whereas the entry-defective 4028T.G particles do not. In addition, the electrical properties of the channels induced by the mutant viruses are different from each other and from those of WT Mahoney and Sabin type 3 viruses. Finally, uncoating and/or cytoplasmic delivery of the viral genome is altered in the 4028T mutants: the 4028T.G lethal mutant does not release its genome into the cytoplasm, and genome delivery is slower during infection by mutant 4028T.V 135S particles than by mutant 4028T.S or WT 135S particles. The distinctive electrical characteristics of the different 4028T mutant channels indicate that VP4 sequences might form part of the channel structure. The different entry phenotypes of these VP4 mutants suggest that the ion channels may be related to VP4's role during genome uncoating and/or delivery. PMID:12692228

  7. Genome Delivery and Ion Channel Properties Are Altered in VP4 Mutants of Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Danthi, Pranav; Tosteson, Magdalena; Li, Qi-han; Chow, Marie

    2003-01-01

    During entry into host cells, poliovirus undergoes a receptor-mediated conformational transition to form 135S particles with irreversible exposure of VP4 capsid sequences and VP1 N termini. To understand the role of VP4 during virus entry, the fate of VP4 during infection by site-specific mutants at threonine-28 of VP4 (4028T) was compared with that of the parental Mahoney type 1 virus. Three virus mutants were studied: the entry-defective, nonviable mutant 4028T.G and the viable mutants 4028T.S and 4028T.V, in which residue threonine-28 was changed to glycine, serine, and valine, respectively. We show that mutant and wild-type (WT) VP4 proteins are localized to cellular membranes after the 135S conformational transition. Both WT and viable 4028T mutant particles interact with lipid bilayers to form ion channels, whereas the entry-defective 4028T.G particles do not. In addition, the electrical properties of the channels induced by the mutant viruses are different from each other and from those of WT Mahoney and Sabin type 3 viruses. Finally, uncoating and/or cytoplasmic delivery of the viral genome is altered in the 4028T mutants: the 4028T.G lethal mutant does not release its genome into the cytoplasm, and genome delivery is slower during infection by mutant 4028T.V 135S particles than by mutant 4028T.S or WT 135S particles. The distinctive electrical characteristics of the different 4028T mutant channels indicate that VP4 sequences might form part of the channel structure. The different entry phenotypes of these VP4 mutants suggest that the ion channels may be related to VP4's role during genome uncoating and/or delivery. PMID:12692228

  8. Dominant lethal mutagenicity study on hair dyes.

    PubMed

    Burnett, C; Loehr, R; Corbett, J

    1977-01-01

    A dominant lethal mutagenicity study was performed in rats with the following chemicals that may be used to dye hair: 2-nitro-p-phenylenediamine, 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine, m-phenylenediamine, o-phenylenediamine, p-phenylenediamine, p-toluenediamine, 2,4-diaminoanisole, 2,5-diaminoanisole, 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, 2-amino-5-nitrophenol, and 4-amino-2-nitrophenol. The compounds were administered intraperitoneally three times weekly for 8 weeks to groups of 20 sexually mature Charles River CD male rats at a dose of 20 mg/kg. This amount of dye is an enormous exaggeration of the human exposure from brief montly topical application of a hair color product containing 2 g (40 mg/kg) or less total dye. There was no evidence of an increase in postimplantation fetal loss which could indicate a dominant lethal effect. Included are data on the acute toxicity of the dyes by various routes of administration in different vehicles. PMID:846013

  9. Enhancing CHK1 inhibitor lethality in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2012-04-01

    The present studies were initiated to determine whether inhibitors of MEK1/2 or SRC signaling, respectively, enhance CHK1 inhibitor lethality in primary human glioblastoma cells. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (CI-1040 (PD184352); AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01, AZD7762) to kill multiple primary human glioma cell isolates that have a diverse set of genetic alterations typically found in the disease. Inhibition of SRC family proteins also enhanced CHK1 inhibitor lethality. Combined treatment of glioma cells with (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitors enhanced radiosensitivity. Combined (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitor treatment led to dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6 ribosomal protein, whereas the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was increased. MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated cell death was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspases 3 and 7 as well as the caspase substrate (PARP). We also observed activation of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 effector proteins BAK and BAX and reduced levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family protein BCL-XL. Overexpression of BCL-XL alleviated but did not completely abolish MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor cytotoxicity in GBM cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-MEK pathway have the potential to interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill glioma cells. PMID:22313687

  10. Lethal domestic violence in eastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, M G; Spence, P R; Spence, R L

    2000-01-01

    Strategies for preventing domestic violence can be tailored to a particular geographic or socioeconomic area if the patterns of domestic violence in the area are known. National statistics, although widely available, may not be applicable to a specific region. We reviewed homicide deaths in Eastern North Carolina between 1978 and 1999 to identify patterns in this rural area. Approximately 20% of the homicide deaths in eastern North Carolina are caused by intimate partners. Women accounted for 53% of the victims in 1976, similar to national figures but not rising to 72% as seen nationally in 1998. Latinos are an increasing presence in the area, but had only one recorded episode of lethal violence against an intimate partner. Gunshots accounted for most of the deaths (59% in men, 72% in women). Knowledge of such patterns can assist in selecting prevention strategies for this particular area. Over the last 25 years increasing attention has been devoted to domestic violence (DV), initially defined as abuse committed against a spouse, former spouse, fiance, boy- or girlfriend, or cohabitant. As time has passed, the definition has been broadened to include other family members--elders, children, and siblings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now uses the term "intimate partner violence" for intentional emotional or physical abuse inflicted by a spouse, ex-spouse, a present or former boy- or girlfriend, or date. For the purposes of this paper, we consider DV interchangeable with intimate partner violence. There has been a national concern that abusive events are under-reported. The National Crime Victimization Survey, an anonymous household survey, indicated nearly 1 million incidents of non-lethal intimate partner violence per year between 1992 and 1996. The number decreased from 1.1 million in 1993 to 840,000 in 1996. Attempts to validate such data for a given geographic area often require subjects to violate anonymity--this may account for lower reports of violence. A recent national report from the Justice Department found a decline in both lethal and non-lethal DV. The number of men murdered by wives or girlfriends "plunged 60% from 1976 through 1998". FBI data on homicides showed that "intimate partners committed fewer murders each year during 1996, 1997, and 1998 than in any other year since 1976". Nationally, intimate partners caused 3000 deaths in 1976, 1590 (53%) in women; in 1998, they caused 1830 deaths, 1320 (73%) in women. But fatal cases of DV are only the tip of the iceberg, and may pertain only to a particular geographic area. We undertook the present study to assess the prevalence of lethal domestic violence in the 29 counties of eastern North Carolina (ENC) that make up the catchment area for the University Health Systems of Eastern Carolina (UHSEC). UHSEC includes the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University (BSM-ECU; previously known as East Carolina University-SOM) and Pitt County Memorial Hospital. PMID:11008460

  11. Altered cytoskeletal organization characterized lethal but not surviving Brtl+/- mice: insight on phenotypic variability in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Gagliardi, Assunta; Maruelli, Silvia; Besio, Roberta; Landi, Claudia; Gioia, Roberta; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Khoury, Basma M; Coucke, Paul J; Symoens, Sofie; Marini, Joan C; Rossi, Antonio; Bini, Luca; Forlino, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone disease with dominant and recessive transmission. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes ranging from very mild to lethal in the perinatal period. The intra- and inter-familiar OI phenotypic variability in the presence of an identical molecular defect is still puzzling to the research field. We used the OI murine model Brtl(+/-) to investigate the molecular basis of OI phenotypic variability. Brtl(+/-) resembles classical dominant OI and shows either a moderately severe or a lethal outcome associated with the same Gly349Cys substitution in the ?1 chain of type I collagen. A systems biology approach was used. We took advantage of proteomic pathway analysis to functionally link proteins differentially expressed in bone and skin of Brtl(+/-) mice with different outcomes to define possible phenotype modulators. The skin/bone and bone/skin hybrid networks highlighted three focal proteins: vimentin, stathmin and cofilin-1, belonging to or involved in cytoskeletal organization. Abnormal cytoskeleton was indeed demonstrated by immunohistochemistry to occur only in tissues from Brtl(+/-) lethal mice. The aberrant cytoskeleton affected osteoblast proliferation, collagen deposition, integrin and TGF-? signaling with impairment of bone structural properties. Finally, aberrant cytoskeletal assembly was detected in fibroblasts obtained from lethal, but not from non-lethal, OI patients carrying an identical glycine substitution. Our data demonstrated that compromised cytoskeletal assembly impaired both cell signaling and cellular trafficking in mutant lethal mice, altering bone properties. These results point to the cytoskeleton as a phenotypic modulator and potential novel target for OI treatment. PMID:26264579

  12. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J.; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster. PMID:26684454

  13. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster. PMID:26684454

  14. Asthma and risk of lethal prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Platz, Elizabeth A; Drake, Charles G; Wilson, Kathryn M; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Kenfield, Stacey A; Mucci, Lorelei A; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C; Camargo, Carlos A; Giovannucci, Edward

    2015-08-15

    Inflammation, and more generally, the immune response are thought to influence the development of prostate cancer. To determine the components of the immune response that are potentially contributory, we prospectively evaluated the association of immune-mediated conditions, asthma and hayfever, with lethal prostate cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We included 47,880 men aged 40-75 years with no prior cancer diagnosis. On the baseline questionnaire in 1986, the men reported diagnoses of asthma and hayfever and year of onset. On the follow-up questionnaires, they reported new asthma and prostate cancer diagnoses. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relative risks (RRs). In total, 9.2% reported ever having been diagnosed with asthma. In all, 25.3% reported a hayfever diagnosis at baseline. During 995,176 person-years of follow-up by 2012, we confirmed 798 lethal prostate cancer cases (diagnosed with distant metastases, progressed to distant metastasis or died of prostate cancer [N = 625]). Ever having a diagnosis of asthma was inversely associated with risk of lethal (RR = 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]?= 0.51-1.00) and fatal (RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.42-0.96) disease. Hayfever with onset in the distant past was possibly weakly positively associated with risk of lethal (RR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.92-1.33) and fatal (RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.91-1.37) disease. Men who were ever diagnosed with asthma were less likely to develop lethal and fatal prostate cancer. Our findings may lead to testable hypotheses about specific immune profiles in the etiology of lethal prostate cancer. PMID:25648070

  15. Isolation of antibiotic-resistant and antimetabolite-resistant mutants of Frankia strains EuI1c and Cc1.17.

    PubMed

    Myers, Anna K; Tisa, Louis S

    2004-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant and antimetabolite-resistant mutants of the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacterium Frankia were isolated to provide strains with genetic backgrounds amenable to genetic analysis. The lethal and mutagenic effects of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and UV light on four Frankia strains were investigated. UV irradiation or EMS treatment of strain EuI1c cells resulted in the formation of two different colony types: rough and smooth. The smooth colonies were conditional sporulation mutants. In the case of EMS-induced cells of strain Cc1.17, resistance to lincomycin, ampicillin, and 5-fluorouracil occurred at a frequency of 1 x 10(-5), 1 x 10(-5), and 4 x 10(-5), respectively. The lincomycin-resistant mutants produced a yellow-tan pigment that was released into the growth medium. Resistance to tetracycline and lincomycin with EMS-induced cells of strain EuI1c occurred at a frequency of 3.2 x 10(-3) and 4.7 x 10(-4), respectively. These strains will be useful for the development of genetic methods for Frankia. PMID:15213750

  16. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, C Z; Yee, J; Mitchell, D L; Britt, A B

    1997-07-01

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyes cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosphila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system. PMID:9750104

  17. Gene Annotation and Drug Target Discovery in Candida albicans with a Tagged Transposon Mutant Collection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Julia; Fung, Eula; Schlecht, Ulrich; Davis, Ronald W.; Giaever, Guri; St. Onge, Robert P.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Nislow, Corey

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen, causing infections that can be lethal in immunocompromised patients. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for C. albicans, it lacks C. albicans' diverse morphogenic forms and is primarily non-pathogenic. Comprehensive genetic analyses that have been instrumental for determining gene function in S. cerevisiae are hampered in C. albicans, due in part to limited resources to systematically assay phenotypes of loss-of-function alleles. Here, we constructed and screened a library of 3633 tagged heterozygous transposon disruption mutants, using them in a competitive growth assay to examine nutrient- and drug-dependent haploinsufficiency. We identified 269 genes that were haploinsufficient in four growth conditions, the majority of which were condition-specific. These screens identified two new genes necessary for filamentous growth as well as ten genes that function in essential processes. We also screened 57 chemically diverse compounds that more potently inhibited growth of C. albicans versus S. cerevisiae. For four of these compounds, we examined the genetic basis of this differential inhibition. Notably, Sec7p was identified as the target of brefeldin A in C. albicans screens, while S. cerevisiae screens with this compound failed to identify this target. We also uncovered a new C. albicans-specific target, Tfp1p, for the synthetic compound 0136-0228. These results highlight the value of haploinsufficiency screens directly in this pathogen for gene annotation and drug target identification. PMID:20949076

  18. Alleged lethal sorcery in East Timor.

    PubMed

    Pollanen, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of cultural and social perspectives exists on the concept of sudden and unexpected death. In countries, without a formal system of death investigation, sudden death is shrouded in mysticism often based on traditional belief systems. This cultural perspective on sudden death is often at variance with medical and forensic concepts and may include explanations such as sorcery, magic, and voodoo. In this case report, the postmortem findings in an alleged victim of lethal 'black magic', known as ema halo by the indigenous people of East Timor, is described. The alleged victim died suddenly in front of witnesses. At autopsy, marked dilation of a bicuspid aortic valve with annuloaortic ectasia and a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm was found after exhumation of the body. The findings mitigated the local belief in witchcraft and established a natural manner of death. PMID:14687768

  19. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  20. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hajek, Ann E

    2010-04-23

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies. PMID:19923138

  1. Saturation germ line mutagenesis of the murine t region including a lethal allele at the quaking locus.

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A; King, T R; Dove, W F

    1988-01-01

    The proximal region of mouse chromosome 17 contains many genes affecting embryonic development, germ cell differentiation, and the immune system. Although the study of natural variation, including t haplotypes, has yielded some information about the function of these genes, spontaneous variants often exhibit manifold genetic effects and are generally not carried on inbred backgrounds. To clearly connect phenotypes with the actions of individual genes, mutants in which genes are altered singly are needed. Therefore, we used a highly efficient point mutagen, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, in combination with classical breeding schemes to induce and identify recessive lethal mutations in the t region. Of 350 mutagenized gametes examined, at least 10 independent recessive embryonic lethal mutations have been identified; an additional two are perinatal lethals. A spontaneous brachyury mutation, TWis, arose on a genetic background that permits high-resolution mapping of the induced recessive mutations against cloned DNA sequences from the t region. One lethal mutation is an allele at the quaking locus. The multiple alleles of quaking and the feasibility of high-resolution mapping permit investigation of the pleiotropic action of this locus in mammalian development. Images PMID:3422415

  2. A genetic screen for zygotic embryonic lethal mutations affecting cuticular morphology in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis.

    PubMed Central

    Pultz, M A; Zimmerman, K K; Alto, N M; Kaeberlein, M; Lange, S K; Pitt, J N; Reeves, N L; Zehrung, D L

    2000-01-01

    We have screened for zygotic embryonic lethal mutations affecting cuticular morphology in Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera; Chalcidoidea). Our broad goal was to investigate the use of Nasonia for genetically surveying conservation and change in regulatory gene systems, as a means to understand the diversity of developmental strategies that have arisen during the course of evolution. Specifically, we aim to compare anteroposterior patterning gene functions in two long germ band insects, Nasonia and Drosophila. In Nasonia, unfertilized eggs develop as haploid males while fertilized eggs develop as diploid females, so the entire genome can be screened for recessive zygotic mutations by examining the progeny of F1 females. We describe 74 of >100 lines with embryonic cuticular mutant phenotypes, including representatives of coordinate, gap, pair-rule, segment polarity, homeotic, and Polycomb group functions, as well as mutants with novel phenotypes not directly comparable to those of known Drosophila genes. We conclude that Nasonia is a tractable experimental organism for comparative developmental genetic study. The mutants isolated here have begun to outline the extent of conservation and change in the genetic programs controlling embryonic patterning in Nasonia and Drosophila. PMID:10866651

  3. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    PubMed

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Smith, Luke D; Cooper, Timothy F; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1) TSS (25 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1) TSS (83 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  4. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l?1 TSS (25 mg cm?2 day?1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l?1 TSS (83 mg cm?2 day?1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  5. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H. (Pasadena, CA); Shao, Zhixin (Penzberg, DE); Zhao, Huimin (San Diego, CA); Giver, Lorraine J. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  6. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 defined mutants as live-attenuated vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Araceli E.; Mann, Barbara J.; Qin, Aiping; Cunningham, Aimee L.; Cole, Leah E.; Grassel, Christen; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Levine, Myron M.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the etiological agent of tularemia and a Tier 1 select agent, has been previously weaponized and remains a high priority for vaccine development. Ft tularensis (type A) and Ft holarctica (type B) cause most human disease. We selected six attenuating genes from the live vaccine strain (LVS; type B), F. novicida and other intracellular bacteria: FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742, FTT1019c (guaA), FTT1043 (mip) and FTT1317c (guaB) and created unmarked deletion mutants of each in the highly human virulent Ft strain Schu S4 (Type A) background. FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742 and FTT1043 Schu S4 mutants were not attenuated for virulence in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, Schu S4 gua mutants were unable to replicate in murine macrophages and were attenuated in vivo, with an i.n. LD50 > 105 CFU in C57BL/6 mice. However, the gua mutants failed to protect mice against lethal challenge with WT Schu S4, despite demonstrating partial protection in rabbits in a previous study. These results contrast with the highly protective capacity of LVS gua mutants against a lethal LVS challenge in mice, and underscore differences between these strains and the animal models in which they are evaluated, and therefore have important implications for vaccine development. PMID:25986219

  7. Synthetic lethal screening in the mammalian central nervous system identifies Gpx6 as a modulator of Huntingtons disease

    PubMed Central

    Shema, Reut; Kulicke, Ruth; Cowley, Glenn S.; Stein, Rachael; Root, David E.; Heiman, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Huntingtons disease, the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by a dramatic loss of deep-layer cortical and striatal neurons, as well as morbidity in midlife. Human genetic studies led to the identification of the causative gene, huntingtin. Recent genomic advances have also led to the identification of hundreds of potential interacting partners for huntingtin protein and many hypotheses as to the molecular mechanisms whereby mutant huntingtin leads to cellular dysfunction and death. However, the multitude of possible interacting partners and cellular pathways affected by mutant huntingtin has complicated efforts to understand the etiology of this disease, and to date no curative therapeutic exists. To address the general problem of identifying the disease-phenotype contributing genes from a large number of correlative studies, here we develop a synthetic lethal screening methodology for the mammalian central nervous system, called SLIC, for synthetic lethal in the central nervous system. Applying SLIC to the study of Huntingtons disease, we identify the age-regulated glutathione peroxidase 6 (Gpx6) gene as a modulator of mutant huntingtin toxicity and show that overexpression of Gpx6 can dramatically alleviate both behavioral and molecular phenotypes associated with a mouse model of Huntingtons disease. SLIC can, in principle, be used in the study of any neurodegenerative disease for which a mouse model exists, promising to reveal modulators of neurodegenerative disease in an unbiased fashion, akin to screens in simpler model organisms. PMID:25535386

  8. Synthetic lethal screening in the mammalian central nervous system identifies Gpx6 as a modulator of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Shema, Reut; Kulicke, Ruth; Cowley, Glenn S; Stein, Rachael; Root, David E; Heiman, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease, the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by a dramatic loss of deep-layer cortical and striatal neurons, as well as morbidity in midlife. Human genetic studies led to the identification of the causative gene, huntingtin. Recent genomic advances have also led to the identification of hundreds of potential interacting partners for huntingtin protein and many hypotheses as to the molecular mechanisms whereby mutant huntingtin leads to cellular dysfunction and death. However, the multitude of possible interacting partners and cellular pathways affected by mutant huntingtin has complicated efforts to understand the etiology of this disease, and to date no curative therapeutic exists. To address the general problem of identifying the disease-phenotype contributing genes from a large number of correlative studies, here we develop a synthetic lethal screening methodology for the mammalian central nervous system, called SLIC, for synthetic lethal in the central nervous system. Applying SLIC to the study of Huntington's disease, we identify the age-regulated glutathione peroxidase 6 (Gpx6) gene as a modulator of mutant huntingtin toxicity and show that overexpression of Gpx6 can dramatically alleviate both behavioral and molecular phenotypes associated with a mouse model of Huntington's disease. SLIC can, in principle, be used in the study of any neurodegenerative disease for which a mouse model exists, promising to reveal modulators of neurodegenerative disease in an unbiased fashion, akin to screens in simpler model organisms. PMID:25535386

  9. Leafy Cotyledon Mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, D. W.; Franzmann, L. H.; Nickle, T. C.; Yeung, E. C.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously described a homeotic leafy cotyledon (lec) mutant of Arabidopsis that exhibits striking defects in embryonic maturation and produces viviparous embryos with cotyledons that are partially transformed into leaves. In this study, we present further details on the developmental anatomy of mutant embryos, characterize their response to abscisic acid (ABA) in culture, describe other mutants with related phenotypes, and summarize studies with double mutants. Our results indicate that immature embryos precociously enter a germination pathway after the torpedo stage of development and then acquire characteristics normally restricted to vegetative parts of the plant. In contrast to other viviparous mutants of maize (vp1) and Arabidopsis (abi3) that produce ABA-insensitive embryos, immature lec embryos are sensitive to ABA in culture. ABA is therefore necessary but not sufficient for embryonic maturation in Arabidopsis. Three other mutants that produce trichomes on cotyledons following precocious germination in culture are described. One mutant is allelic to lec1, another is a fusca mutant (fus3), and the third defines a new locus (lec2). Mutant embryos differ in morphology, desiccation tolerance, pattern of anthocyanin accumulation, presence of storage materials, size and frequency of trichomes on cotyledons, and timing of precocious germination in culture. The leafy cotyledon phenotype has therefore allowed the identification of an important network of regulatory genes with overlapping functions during embryonic maturation in Arabidopsis. PMID:12244265

  10. Mutations in KIAA0586 Cause Lethal Ciliopathies Ranging from a Hydrolethalus Phenotype to Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alby, Caroline; Piquand, Kevin; Huber, Cline; Megarban, Andr; Ichkou, Amale; Legendre, Marine; Pelluard, Fanny; Encha-Ravazi, Ferecht; Abi-Tayeh, Georges; Bessires, Bettina; ElChehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Laurent, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Sztriha, Lszl; Zombor, Melinda; Szab, Hajnalka; Failler, Marion; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Bole, Christine; Nitschk, Patrick; Nizon, Mathilde; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Clerget-Darpoux, Franoise; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vekemans, Michel; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valrie; Atti-Bitach, Tania; Thomas, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    KIAA0586, the human ortholog of chicken TALPID3, is a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary ciliogenesis. Its disruption in animal models causes defects attributed to abnormal hedgehog signaling; these defects include polydactyly and abnormal dorsoventral patterning of the neural tube. Here, we report homozygous mutations of KIAA0586 in four families affected by lethal ciliopathies ranging from a hydrolethalus phenotype to short-rib polydactyly. We show defective ciliogenesis, as well as abnormal response to SHH-signaling activation in cells derived from affected individuals, consistent with a role of KIAA0586 in primary cilia biogenesis. Whereas centriolar maturation seemed unaffected in mutant cells, we observed an abnormal extended pattern of CEP290, a centriolar satellite protein previously associated with ciliopathies. Our data show the crucial role of KIAA0586 in human primary ciliogenesis and subsequent abnormal hedgehog signaling through abnormal GLI3 processing. Our results thus establish that KIAA0586 mutations cause lethal ciliopathies. PMID:26166481

  11. Mutations in KIAA0586 Cause Lethal Ciliopathies Ranging from a Hydrolethalus Phenotype to Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alby, Caroline; Piquand, Kevin; Huber, Cline; Megarban, Andr; Ichkou, Amale; Legendre, Marine; Pelluard, Fanny; Encha-Ravazi, Ferecht; Abi-Tayeh, Georges; Bessires, Bettina; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Laurent, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Sztriha, Lszl; Zombor, Melinda; Szab, Hajnalka; Failler, Marion; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Bole, Christine; Nitschk, Patrick; Nizon, Mathilde; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Clerget-Darpoux, Franoise; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vekemans, Michel; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valrie; Atti-Bitach, Tania; Thomas, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    KIAA0586, the human ortholog of chicken TALPID3, is a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary ciliogenesis. Its disruption in animal models causes defects attributed to abnormal hedgehog signaling; these defects include polydactyly and abnormal dorsoventral patterning of the neural tube. Here, we report homozygous mutations of KIAA0586 in four families affected by lethal ciliopathies ranging from a hydrolethalus phenotype to short-rib polydactyly. We show defective ciliogenesis, as well as abnormal response to SHH-signaling activation in cells derived from affected individuals, consistent with a role of KIAA0586 in primary cilia biogenesis. Whereas centriolar maturation seemed unaffected in mutant cells, we observed an abnormal extended pattern of CEP290, a centriolar satellite protein previously associated with ciliopathies. Our data show the crucial role of KIAA0586 in human primary ciliogenesis and subsequent abnormal hedgehog signaling through abnormal GLI3 processing. Our results thus establish that KIAA0586 mutations cause lethal ciliopathies. PMID:26166481

  12. Conditional Deletion of Indian Hedgehog in Limb Mesenchyme Results in Complete Loss of Growth Plate Formation but Allows Mature Osteoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Amano, Katsuhiko; Densmore, Michael J; Lanske, Beate

    2015-12-01

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is widely recognized as an essential factor for proper skeletal development. Previous in vivo studies using mutant Ihh mouse models were limited by perinatal lethality or carried out after a growth plate formed. Thus the important role of Ihh in mesenchymal cell differentiation has not been investigated. In this study, we established Prx1-Cre;Ihh(fl/fl) mice to ablate Ihh specifically in limb mesenchyme to allow us to observe the phenotype continuously from prenatal development to 3 weeks of age. Mutant mice displayed severe limb abnormalities characterized by complete lack of secondary ossification center and growth plate, indicating an essential role for Ihh in the development of these structures. Interestingly, we discovered that osteoblast differentiation and bone formation could occur in conditions of deficient Ihh. This is a novel finding that has not been observed because of the early lethality of previous Ihh mutants. Mature osteoblasts expressing osteocalcin could be detected in the center of mutant bones at postnatal day 10 (P10). Osteoclasts and blood vessel formation were also present, suggesting active bone remodeling. Histomorphometric analyses show a significant increase in osteoclast number with no major changes in bone formation rate at 3 weeks of age. Mutant long bones in the limbs were deformed, with cortices comprised of irregular woven bone. Also, there was a marked decrease in gene expression of osteoblastic and osteocytic markers. Moreover, mutant long bones displayed bone dysplasia in which we observed increased osteoclast activity and partially reduced osteoblastic and osteocytic differentiation that lead ultimately to loss of bone structures at 3 weeks of age. In summary, our data show for the first time, the presence of mature osteoblasts in long bones of the limbs despite the complete loss of growth plate formation due to Ihh deficiency. These data indicate an important function for Ihh in regulating limb mesenchymal cell differentiation. 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26094741

  13. The Influence of Geographic Mobility on Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Mercy, James A.; Lee, Roberta K.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Swann, Alan C.; Bayer, Timothy; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts with 153 cases and 513 controls. Results indicate that moving in the past year is positively associated with a nearly lethal suicide attempt, as are specific characteristics of the move. Findings confirm and extend prior research by demonstrating a relationship

  14. Sub-lethal glyphosate exposure alters flowering phenology and causes transient male-sterility in Brassica spp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Herbicide resistance in weedy plant populations can develop through different mechanisms such as gene flow of herbicide resistance transgenes from crop species into compatible weedy species or by natural evolution of herbicide resistance or tolerance following selection pressure. Results from our previous studies suggest that sub-lethal levels of the herbicide glyphosate can alter the pattern of gene flow between glyphosate resistant Canola, Brassica napus, and glyphosate sensitive varieties of B. napus and B. rapa. The objectives of this study were to examine the phenological and developmental changes that occur in Brassica crop and weed species following sub-lethal doses of the herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate. We examined several vegetative and reproductive traits of potted plants under greenhouse conditions, treated with sub-lethal herbicide sprays. Results Our results indicate that exposure of Brassica spp. to a sub-lethal dose of glyphosate results in altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. Flowering of all sensitive species was significantly delayed and reproductive function, specifically male fertility, was suppressed. Higher dosage levels typically contributed to an increase in the magnitude of phenotypic changes. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Brassica spp. plants that are exposed to sub-lethal doses of glyphosate could be subject to very different pollination patterns and an altered pattern of gene flow that would result from changes in the overlap of flowering phenology between species. Implications include the potential for increased glyphosate resistance evolution and spread in weedy communities exposed to sub-lethal glyphosate. PMID:24655547

  15. Identification of mouse mutant cells exhibiting the plastic mutant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Masatake; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Sakagami, Mari; Yamada, Yuji

    2010-08-01

    The initial processes involved in radiation carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We isolated mouse mutant cells exhibiting plasticity in their mutation phenotypes. These mutant cells were originally isolated from an irradiated cell population as 6-thioguanine resistant (6TGR) mutants that were deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt, E.C.2.4.2.8) activity at the frequency of approximately 6.2 x 10(-5). Approximately 10% of 6TGR cells showed plasticity in their mutant phenotypes and reverted to HAT-resistant (HATR), which is Hprt-proficient, wild type phenotype. Eventually we identified the plastic mutants in the un-irradiated wild type cell population as well and found that ionizing irradiation enhanced the frequency of the plastic mutation approximately 24 times. Treatment with 5-aza-cytidine did not affect the plasticity of mutant phenotypes identified in this study, suggesting that DNA methylation was not involved in the plastic changes of the mutant phenotypes. The plastic mutant phenotype identified in our study is a new type of genomic instability induced by ionizing irradiation, and it is likely to be involved in one of the primary changes that occur in the process of radiation carcinogenesis, and may explain one element of carcinogenesis, which is composed of multi-stages. PMID:20811140

  16. A requirement for recombinational repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is caused by DNA replication defects of mec1 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, B J; Holm, C

    1999-01-01

    To examine the role of the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway in compensating for DNA replication defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we performed a genetic screen to identify mutants that require Rad52p for viability. We isolated 10 mec1 mutations that display synthetic lethality with rad52. These mutations (designated mec1-srf for synthetic lethality with rad-fifty-two) simultaneously cause two types of phenotypes: defects in the checkpoint function of Mec1p and defects in the essential function of Mec1p. Velocity sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients revealed that mec1-srf mutants accumulate small single-stranded DNA synthesis intermediates, suggesting that Mec1p is required for the normal progression of DNA synthesis. sml1 suppressor mutations suppress both the accumulation of DNA synthesis intermediates and the requirement for Rad52p in mec1-srf mutants, but they do not suppress the checkpoint defect in mec1-srf mutants. Thus, it appears to be the DNA replication defects in mec1-srf mutants that cause the requirement for Rad52p. By using hydroxyurea to introduce similar DNA replication defects, we found that single-stranded DNA breaks frequently lead to double-stranded DNA breaks that are not rapidly repaired in rad52 mutants. Taken together, these data suggest that the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway is required to prevent or repair double-stranded DNA breaks caused by defective DNA replication in mec1-srf mutants. PMID:10511542

  17. Reanalysis of parabiosis of obesity mutants in the age of leptin.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wenwen; Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Lee, Jonah; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2015-07-21

    In this study we set out to explain the differing effects of parabiosis with genetically diabetic (db) mice versus administration of recombinant leptin. Parabiosis of db mutant, which overexpress leptin, to wildtype (WT) or genetically obese (ob) mice has been reported to cause death by starvation, whereas leptin infusions do not produce lethality at any dose or mode of delivery tested. Leptin is not posttranslationally modified other than a single disulphide bond, raising the possibility that it might require additional factor(s) to exert the maximal appetite-suppressing effect. We reconfirmed the lethal effect of parabiosis of db mutant on WT mice and further showed that this lethality could not be rescued by administration of ghrelin or growth hormone. We then initiated a biochemical fractionation of a high-molecular-weight leptin complex from human plasma and identified clusterin as a major component of this leptin-containing complex. However, in contrast to previous reports, we failed to observe a leptin-potentiating effect of either exogenous or endogenous clusterin, and parabiosis of db clusterin(-/-) double-mutant to WT mice still caused lethality. Intriguingly, in parabiotic pairs of two WT mice, leptin infusion into one of the mice led to an enhanced starvation response during calorie restriction as evidenced by increased plasma ghrelin and growth-hormone levels. Moreover, leptin treatment resulted in death of the parabiotic pairs. These data suggest that the appetite suppression in WT mice after parabiosis to db mutants is the result of induced hyperleptinemia combined with the stress or other aspect(s) of the parabiosis procedure. PMID:26150485

  18. Reanalysis of parabiosis of obesity mutants in the age of leptin

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wenwen; Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Lee, Jonah; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we set out to explain the differing effects of parabiosis with genetically diabetic (db) mice versus administration of recombinant leptin. Parabiosis of db mutant, which overexpress leptin, to wildtype (WT) or genetically obese (ob) mice has been reported to cause death by starvation, whereas leptin infusions do not produce lethality at any dose or mode of delivery tested. Leptin is not posttranslationally modified other than a single disulphide bond, raising the possibility that it might require additional factor(s) to exert the maximal appetite-suppressing effect. We reconfirmed the lethal effect of parabiosis of db mutant on WT mice and further showed that this lethality could not be rescued by administration of ghrelin or growth hormone. We then initiated a biochemical fractionation of a high-molecular-weight leptin complex from human plasma and identified clusterin as a major component of this leptin-containing complex. However, in contrast to previous reports, we failed to observe a leptin-potentiating effect of either exogenous or endogenous clusterin, and parabiosis of db clusterin?/? double-mutant to WT mice still caused lethality. Intriguingly, in parabiotic pairs of two WT mice, leptin infusion into one of the mice led to an enhanced starvation response during calorie restriction as evidenced by increased plasma ghrelin and growth-hormone levels. Moreover, leptin treatment resulted in death of the parabiotic pairs. These data suggest that the appetite suppression in WT mice after parabiosis to db mutants is the result of induced hyperleptinemia combined with the stress or other aspect(s) of the parabiosis procedure. PMID:26150485

  19. EXAMINING LETHALITY RISK FOR RODENT STUDIES OF PRIMARY BLAST LUNG INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, William Brad; Hall, Christina; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Lavik, Erin; VandeVord, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    While protective measures have been taken to mitigate injury to the thorax during a blast exposure, primary blast lung injury (PBLI) is still evident in mounted/in vehicle cases during military conflicts. Moreover, civilians, who are unprotected from blast exposure, can be severely harmed by terrorist attacks that use improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Since the lungs are the most susceptible organ due to their air-filled nature, PBLI is one of the most serious injuries seen in civilian blast cases. Determining lethality threshold for rodent studies is crucial to guide experimental designs centered on therapies for survival after PBLI or mechanistic understanding of the injury itself. Using an Advanced Blast Simulator, unprotected rats were exposed to a whole body blast to induce PBLI. The one-hour survival rate was assessed to determine operating conditions for a 50% lethality rate. Macroscopic and histological analysis of lung was conducted using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results demonstrated lethality risk trends based on static blast overpressure (BOP) for rodent models, which may help standardized animal studies and contribute to scaling to the human level. The need for a standardized method of producing PBLI is pressing and establishing standard curves, such as a lethality risk curve for lung blasts, is crucial for this condensing of BOP methods. PMID:25405409

  20. Examining lethality risk for rodent studies of primary blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, William Brad; Hall, Christina; Siva Sai Suijith Sajja, Venkata; Lavik, Erink; VandeVord, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    While protective measures have been taken to mitigate injury to the thorax during a blast exposure, primary blast lung injury (PBLI) is still evident in mounted/in vehicle cases during military conflicts. Moreover, civilians, who are unprotected from blast exposure, can be severely harmed by terrorist attacks that use improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Since the lungs are the most susceptible organ due to their air-filled nature, PBLI is one of the most serious injuries seen in civilian blast cases. Determining lethality threshold for rodent studies is crucial to guide experimental designs centered on therapies for survival after PBLI or mechanistic understanding of the injury itself. Using an Advanced Blast Simulator, unprotected rats were exposed to a whole body blast to induce PBLI. The one-hour survival rate was assessed to determine operating conditions for a 50% lethality rate. Macroscopic and histological analysis of lung was conducted using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results demonstrated lethality risk trends based on static blast overpressure (BOP) for rodent models, which may help standardized animal studies and contribute to scaling to the human level. The need for a standardized method of producing PBLI is pressing and establishing standard curves, such as a lethality risk curve for lung blasts, is crucial for this condensing of BOP methods. PMID:25405409

  1. Differential regulation and synthetic lethality of exclusive RB1 and CDKN2A mutations in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayoung; Song, Mee; Kim, Somin; Seo, Yujeong; Kim, Yonghwan; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2016-01-01

    Genetic alterations in lung cancer are distinctly represented in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Mutation of the RB1 and CDKN2A genes, which are tightly associated with cell cycle regulation, is exclusive to SCLC and NSCLC cells, respectively. Through the systematic analysis of transcriptome and proteome datasets for 318 cancer cell lines, we characterized differential gene expression and protein regulation in RB1-mutant SCLC and CDKN2A-mutant NSCLC. Many of the genes and proteins associated with RB1-mutant SCLC cell lines belong to functional categories of gene expression and transcription, whereas those associated with CDKN2A-mutant NSCLC cell lines were enriched in gene sets of the extracellular matrix and focal adhesion. These results indicate that the loss of RB1 and CDKN2A function induces distinctively different signaling cascades in SCLC and NSCLC cells. In addition, knockdown of the RB1 gene in CKDN2A-mutant cell lines (and vice versa) synergistically inhibits cancer cell proliferation. The present study on the exclusive role of RB1 and CDKN2A mutations in lung cancer subtypes demonstrates a synthetic lethal strategy for cancer regulation. PMID:26647789

  2. Purification and in vitro complementation of mutant histidinol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S Y; Grubmeyer, C T

    1987-01-01

    The biochemistry of interallelic complementation within the Salmonella typhimurium hisD gene was investigated by in vitro protein complementation of mutant histidinol dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.23). Double-mutant strains were constructed containing the hisO1242 (constitutive overproducer) attenuator mutation and selected hisDa or hisDb mutations. Extracts from such hisDa986 and hisDb1799 mutant cells failed to show histidinol dehydrogenase activity but complemented to produce active enzyme. Inactive mutant histidinol dehydrogenases were purified from each of the two mutants by ion-exchange chromatography. Complementation by the purified mutant proteins required the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol and MnCl2, and protein-protein titrations indicated that heterodimers were strongly preferred in mixtures of the complementary mutant enzymes. Neither mutant protein showed negative complementation with wild-type enzyme. The Vmax for hybrid histidinol dehydrogenase was 11% of that for native enzyme, with only minor changes in Km values for substrate or coenzyme. Both purified mutant proteins failed to catalyze NAD-NADH exchange reactions reflective of the first catalytic step of the two-step reaction. The inactive enzymes bound 54Mn2+ weakly or not at all in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, in contrast to wild-type enzyme which bound 54Mn2+ to 0.6 sites per monomer under the same conditions. The mutant proteins, like wild-type histidinol dehydrogenase, behaved as dimers on analytical gel filtration chromatography, but dissociated to form monomers in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. This effect of 2-mercaptoethanol was prevented by low levels of MnCl2. It thus appears that mutant histidinol dehydrogenase molecules bind metal ion poorly. The complementation procedure may allow for formation of a functional Mn2+-binding site, perhaps at the subunit interface. Images PMID:3305475

  3. Distinct regions of NLRP1B are required to respond to anthrax lethal toxin and metabolic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Neiman-Zenevich, Jana; Liao, Kuo-Chieh; Mogridge, Jeremy

    2014-09-01

    Pattern recognition receptors monitor for signs of infection or cellular dysfunction and respond to these events by initiating an immune response. NLRP1B is a receptor that upon activation recruits multiple copies of procaspase-1, which promotes cytokine processing and a proinflammatory form of cell death termed pyroptosis. NLRP1B detects anthrax lethal toxin when the toxin cleaves an amino-terminal fragment from the protein. In addition, NLRP1B is activated when cells are deprived of glucose or treated with metabolic inhibitors, but the mechanism by which the resulting reduction in cytosolic ATP is sensed by NLRP1B is unknown. Here, we addressed whether these two activating signals of NLRP1B converge on a common sensing system. We show that an NLRP1B mutant lacking the amino-terminal region exhibits some spontaneous activity and fails to be further activated by lethal toxin. This mutant was still activated in cells depleted of ATP, however, indicating that the amino-terminal region is not the sole sensing domain of NLRP1B. Mutagenesis of the leucine-rich repeat domain of NLRP1B provided evidence that this domain is involved in autoinhibition of the receptor, but none of the mutants tested was specifically defective at sensing activating signals. Comparison of two alleles of NLRP1B that differed in their response to metabolic inhibitors, but not to lethal toxin, led to the finding that a repeated sequence in the function to find domain (FIIND) that arose from exon duplication facilitated detection of ATP depletion. These results suggest that distinct regions of NLRP1B detect activating signals. PMID:24935976

  4. Characterization of dominant-negative mutants of the DEAH-box splicing factors Prp22 and Prp16.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Susanne; Hotz, Hans-Rudolf; Schwer, Beate

    2002-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Prp22 and Prp16 are RNA-dependent ATPases required for pre-mRNA splicing. Both proteins are members of the DEXH-box family of nucleic acid-dependent NTPases. Prior mutational analysis of Prp22 and Prp16 identified residues within conserved motifs I (GXGKT), II (DEAH), and VI (QRXGRXGR) that are required for their biological activity. Nonfunctional Prp22 and Prp16 mutants exerted a dominant negative effect on cell growth. Here we show that overexpression of lethal Prp22 mutants leads to accumulation of unspliced pre-mRNAs and excised introns in vivo. The biochemical basis for the lethality and inhibition of splicing in vivo was determined by purifying and characterizing recombinant mutant proteins. The lethal Prp22 mutants D603A and E604A in motif II and Q804A and R808A in motif VI were defective for ATP hydrolysis and mRNA release from the spliceosome, but were active in promoting step 2 transesterification. Lethal Prp16 mutants G378A and K379A in motif I; D473A and E474A in motif II; and Q685A, G688A, R689A, and R692A in motif VI were defective for ATP hydrolysis and step 2 transesterification chemistry. The ATPase-defective mutants of Prp16 and Prp22 bound to spliceosomes in vitro and blocked the function of the respective wild-type proteins in trans. Comparing the mutational effects in Prp16 and Prp22 highlights common as well as distinct structural requirements for the ATP-dependent steps in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:11856747

  5. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; de Bono, Johann S.; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. PMID:25232177

  6. Lethal body burdens of polar narcotics: Chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, A.P. van; Punte, S.S.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to measure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) the lethal body burden (LBB) of three chlorophenols that are known as polar narcotic chemicals. The LBBs of the chlorophenols were compared to LBBs of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to consider if the two classes of narcotic chemicals differ on a body burden level. The LBB of the most acidic chlorophenol was measured at two different levels of pH exposure to determine the influence of the degree of ionization on the magnitude of the LBB. Both n-octanol/water partition coefficients and n-hexane/water partition coefficients of the chlorophenols were determined at different pH levels to consider the influence of ionization on the partition coefficient and to determine the importance of a polar group in the organic phase on the partitioning behavior. Partitioning to n-octanol and n-hexane was used as input in a model to simulate the equilibrium partitioning between hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic and target and nontarget compartments in the fish.

  7. VEGF induces cardiovascular malformation and embryonic lethality.

    PubMed Central

    Feucht, M.; Christ, B.; Wilting, J.

    1997-01-01

    The essential function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in embryonic angiogenesis has clearly been documented in murine embryos with targeted deletions of either VEGF or its receptors. The effects of VEGF in the organogenetic phase of development have not been studied to date. Therefore, we applied 0.7 to 0.9 microgram of VEGF via methylcellulose carriers into the midbrain or onto the right forelimb of 4.5-day-old quail embryos. Another group of embryos was treated with 1 microgram of platelet-derived growth factor and controls were carried out using carriers without any growth factor. VEGF-induced cardiovascular malformations resulted in embryonic lethality. The venous area of the vasculature was dilated in almost all organs. The heart was most seriously affected and showed typical characteristics of insufficiency. VEGF strongly increased endocardial cell proliferation and obviously induced impairment of the growth rates of myocardium and endocardium. The myocardium of the ventricles was extremely thin, and septation defects were observed. As a result of the disturbed outflow, the atria were extremely dilated and thin-walled. The morphology of the hearts was reminiscent of that observed in congenital malformations such as Uhl's and Osler's syndromes. Our results show that expression of VEGF has to be tightly controlled during development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9358767

  8. SCID mouse model for lethal Q fever.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Masako; Naganawa, Takashi; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Masegi, Toshiaki; Hirai, Katsuya

    2003-08-01

    Q fever, a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, has many manifestations in humans. Endocarditis is the most serious complication of Q fever. Animal models are limited to acute pulmonary or hepatic disease and reproductive disorders. An appropriate experimental animal model for Q fever endocarditis does not yet exist. In this study, severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice infected with C. burnetii showed persistent clinical symptoms and died, whereas immunocompetent mice similarly infected became asymptomatic and survived. The SCID mice examined in this study had severe chronic lesions in their primary organs: the heart, lung, spleen, liver, and kidney. The heart lesions of the SCID mice were similar to those in humans with chronic Q fever endocarditis: they had focal calcification and expanded macrophages containing C. burnetii. The 50% lethal dose of C. burnetii in SCID mice was at least 10(8) times less than that in immunocompetent mice. The SCID mouse is highly susceptible to C. burnetii, and the immunodeficiency of the host enhances the severity of Q fever. This animal model could provide a new tool for the study of chronic Q fever and Q fever in immunodeficient hosts. PMID:12874353

  9. Lethal methemoglobinemia and automobile exhaust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Vevelstad, Merete; Morild, Inge

    2009-05-30

    Inhalation of automobile exhaust gas often leads to death by CO intoxication. In some cases the measured carbon monoxide hemoglobin saturation level (COHb) is considerably below what is considered to be lethal. The death in such cases has been attributed to a combination of a high CO2 and a low O2 tension. In a recent case the deceased was found dead in a car equipped with a catalytic converter, with a hose leading exhaust from the engine to the interior of the car. Analysis revealed a moderately elevated COHb and a high methemoglobin saturation level (MetHb) in peripheral blood. No ethanol, narcotics or drugs were detected. Reports mentioning MetHb or methemoglobinemia in post-mortem cases are surprisingly scarce, and very few have related exhaust gas deaths to methemoglobinemia. High-degree methemoglobinemia causes serious tissue hypoxia leading to unconsciousness, arrhythmia and death. The existing literature in this field and the knowledge that exhaust fumes contain nitrogen oxide gases (NOx) that by inhalation and absorption can result in severe methemoglobinemia, led us to postulate that this death could possibly be attributed to a combination of methemoglobinemia and a moderately high COHb concentration. PMID:19261402

  10. Structure of the lethal phage pinhole

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ting; Savva, Christos G.; Fleming, Karen G.; Struck, Douglas K.; Young, Ry

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps the simplest of biological timing systems, bacteriophage holins accumulate during the phage morphogenesis period and then trigger to permeabilize the cytoplasmic membrane with lethal holes; thus, terminating the infection cycle. Canonical holins form very large holes that allow nonspecific release of fully-folded proteins, but a recently discovered class of holins, the pinholins, make much smaller holes, or pinholes, that serve only to depolarize the membrane. Here, we interrogate the structure of the prototype pinholin by negative-stain transmission electron-microscopy, cysteine-accessibility, and chemical cross-linking, as well as by computational approaches. Together, the results suggest that the pinholin forms symmetric heptameric structures with the hydrophilic surface of one transmembrane domain lining the surface of a central channel ≈15 Å in diameter. The structural model also suggests a rationale for the prehole state of the pinholin, the persistence of which defines the duration of the viral latent period, and for the sensitivity of the holin timing system to the energized state of the membrane. PMID:19861547

  11. Zebrafish Mutants calamity and catastrophe Define Critical Pathways of Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Developmental Copper Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Erik C.; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Nutrient availability is an important environmental variable during development that has significant effects on the metabolism, health, and viability of an organism. To understand these interactions for the nutrient copper, we used a chemical genetic screen for zebrafish mutants sensitive to developmental copper deficiency. In this screen, we isolated two mutants that define subtleties of copper metabolism. The first contains a viable hypomorphic allele of atp7a and results in a loss of pigmentation when exposed to mild nutritional copper deficiency. This mutant displays incompletely penetrant skeletal defects affected by developmental copper availability. The second carries an inactivating mutation in the vacuolar ATPase that causes punctate melanocytes and embryonic lethality. This mutant, catastrophe, is sensitive to copper deprivation revealing overlap between ion metabolic pathways. Together, the two mutants illustrate the utility of chemical genetic screens in zebrafish to elucidate the interaction of nutrient availability and genetic polymorphisms in cellular metabolism. PMID:19008952

  12. Ethical language and decision-making for prenatally diagnosed lethal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Dominic; de Crespigny, Lachlan; Xafis, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Summary In clinical practice, and in the medical literature, severe congenital malformations such as trisomy 18, anencephaly, and renal agenesis are frequently referred to as ‘lethal’ or as ‘incompatible with life’. However, there is no agreement about a definition of lethal malformations, nor which conditions should be included in this category. Review of outcomes for malformations commonly designated ‘lethal’ reveals that prolonged survival is possible, even if rare. This article analyses the concept of lethal malformations and compares it to the problematic concept of ‘futility’. We recommend avoiding the term ‘lethal’ and suggest that counseling should focus on salient prognostic features instead. For conditions with a high chance of early death or profound impairment in survivors despite treatment, perinatal and neonatal palliative care would be ethical. However, active obstetric and neonatal management, if desired, may also sometimes be appropriate. PMID:25200733

  13. Bacillus anthracis cell wall produces injurious inflammation but paradoxically decreases the lethality of anthrax lethal toxin in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xizhong; Su, Junwu; Li, Yan; Shiloach, Joseph; Solomon, Steven; Kaufman, Jeanne B.; Mani, Haresh; Fitz, Yvonne; Weng, Jia; Altaweel, Laith; Besch, Virginia; Eichacker, Peter Q.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The in vivo inflammatory effects of the Bacillus anthracis cell wall are unknown. We therefore investigated these effects in rats and, for comparison, those of known inflammatory stimulants, Staphylococcus aureus cell wall or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Method and Results SpragueDawley rats (n = 103) were challenged with increasing B. anthracis cell wall doses (10, 20, 40, 80, or 160 mg/kg) or diluent (control) as a bolus or 24-h infusion. The three highest bolus doses were lethal (2064% lethality rates) as were the two highest infused doses (13% with each). Comparisons among lethal or nonlethal doses on other measured parameters were not significantly different, and these were combined for analysis. Over the 24 h after challenge initiation with lethal bolus or infusion, compared to controls, ten inflammatory cytokines and NO levels were increased and circulating neutrophils and platelets decreased (P ? 0.05). Changes with lethal doses were greater than changes with nonlethal doses (P ? 0.01). Lethal bolus or infusion doses produced hypotension or hypoxemia, respectively (P ? 0.05). The effects with B. anthracis cell wall were similar to those of S. aureus cell wall or LPS. However, paradoxically administration of B. anthracis cell wall or LPS decreased the lethality of concurrently administered B. anthracis lethal toxin (P < 0.0001 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion B. anthracis cell wall has the potential to produce inflammatory injury during anthrax infection clinically. However, understanding why cell wall or LPS paradoxically reduced lethality with lethal toxin may help understand this toxins pathogenic effects. PMID:19756496

  14. Selective targeting of KRAS-Mutant cells by miR-126 through repression of multiple genes essential for the survival of KRAS-Mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Toshifumi; Jones, Matthew F.; Subramanian, Murugan; Li, Xiao Ling; Ou, Oliver; Zhu, Yuelin; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M.; Hussain, S. Perwez; Gaedcke, Jochen; Ried, Thomas; Luo, Ji; Caplen, Natasha J.; Lal, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of hundreds of genes. However, identifying the critical targets within a miRNA-regulated gene network is challenging. One approach is to identify miRNAs that exert a context-dependent effect, followed by expression profiling to determine how specific targets contribute to this selective effect. In this study, we performed miRNA mimic screens in isogenic KRAS-Wild-type (WT) and KRAS-Mutant colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines to identify miRNAs selectively targeting KRAS-Mutant cells. One of the miRNAs we identified as a selective inhibitor of the survival of multiple KRAS-Mutant CRC lines was miR-126. In KRAS-Mutant cells, miR-126 over-expression increased the G1 compartment, inhibited clonogenicity and tumorigenicity, while exerting no effect on KRAS-WT cells. Unexpectedly, the miR-126-regulated transcriptome of KRAS-WT and KRAS-Mutant cells showed no significant differences. However, by analyzing the overlap between miR-126 targets with the synthetic lethal genes identified by RNAi in KRAS-Mutant cells, we identified and validated a subset of miR-126-regulated genes selectively required for the survival and clonogenicity of KRAS-Mutant cells. Our strategy therefore identified critical target genes within the miR-126-regulated gene network. We propose that the selective effect of miR-126 on KRAS-Mutant cells could be utilized for the development of targeted therapy for KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25245095

  15. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  16. Regulation of photosynthetic GAPDH dissected by mutants.

    PubMed

    Sparla, Francesca; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Wedel, Norbert; Scheibe, Renate; Pupillo, Paolo; Trost, Paolo

    2005-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of higher plants catalyzes an NADPH-consuming reaction, which is part of the Calvin cycle. This reaction is regulated by light via thioredoxins and metabolites, while a minor NADH-dependent activity is constant and constitutive. The major native isozyme is formed by A- and B-subunits in stoichiometric ratio (A2B2, A8B8), but tetramers of recombinant B-subunits (GapB) display similar regulatory features to A2B2-GAPDH. The C-terminal extension (CTE) of B-subunits is essential for thioredoxin-mediated regulation and NAD-induced aggregation to partially inactive oligomers (A8B8, B8). Deletion mutant B(minCTE) is redox insensitive and invariably tetrameric, and chimeric mutant A(plusCTE) acquired redox sensitivity and capacity to aggregate to very large oligomers in presence of NAD. Redox regulation principally affects the turnover number, without significantly changing the affinity for either 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate or NADPH. Mutant R77A of GapB, B(R77A), is down-regulated and mimics the behavior of oxidized GapB under any redox condition, whereas mutant B(E362Q) is constantly up-regulated, resembling reduced GapB. Despite their redox insensitivity, both B(R77A) and B(E362Q) mutants are notably prone to aggregate in presence of NAD. Based on structural data and current functional analysis, a model of GAPDH redox regulation is presented. Formation of a disulfide in the CTE induces a conformational change of the GAPDH with repositioning of the terminal amino acid Glu-362 in the proximity of Arg-77. The latter residue is thus distracted from binding the 2'-phosphate of NADP, with the final effect that the enzyme relaxes to a conformation leading to a slower NADPH-dependent catalytic activity. PMID:16055685

  17. Dominant-lethal mutation and heritable translocation tests in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    The spontaneous occurrence of chromosome breakage-related genetic anomalies in humans is estimated to be 0.24%, not including spontaneous abortions. More balanced reciprocal translocations are being discovered among mentally handicapped individuals. Chromosome breakage can result in chromosome loss, which often leads to embryonic lethality and occassionally to viable aneuploids, or to viable reciprocal translocations and inversions. In mice, transmitted chromosome breakage effects may be measured by using dominant-lethal mutations, heritable translocations, heritable inversions, sex-chromosome loss, and chromosome breakage and rearrangement scored cytologically in early embryos. The dominant-lethal mutation and the heritable translocation tests are the most widely used tests. The heritable translocation procedure described here applies only to the induction of translocations in male germ cells. The use of treated females in the dominant-lethal test has its drawback too. When the fertility of treated female is reduced or when embryonic lethality is observed, it is difficult to ascertain whether these effects are attributable to true genetic damage or to physiological imbalances in the treated females. Therefore the dominant-lethal test as it is used in practical testing has almost exclusively employed the treatment of males. This is not to say that treatment of females has no advantages whatsoever. On the contrary, there is a good example of a case whereby dominant-lethal effects of the test compound was unequivocably demonstrated in treated females but not in treated males.

  18. Identification and characterization of tomato mutants affected in the Rx-mediated resistance to PVX isolates.

    PubMed

    Sturbois, Bndicte; Dubrana-Ourabah, Marie-Pierre; Gombert, Julie; Lasseur, Bertrand; Macquet, Audrey; Faure, Chantal; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Baurs, Isabelle; Candresse, Thierry

    2012-03-01

    Five tomato mutants affected in the Rx-mediated resistance against Potato virus X (PVX) were identified by screening a mutagenized population derived from a transgenic, Rx1-expressing 'Micro-Tom' line. Contrary to their parental line, they failed to develop lethal systemic necrosis upon infection with the virulent PVX-KH2 isolate. Sequence analysis and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments indicated that the mutants are not affected in the Rx1 transgene or in the Hsp90, RanGap1 and RanGap2, Rar1 and Sgt1 genes. Inoculation with the PVX-CP4 avirulent isolate demonstrated that the Rx1 resistance was still effective in the mutants. In contrast, the virulent PVX-KH2 isolate accumulation was readily detectable in all mutants, which could further be separated in two groups depending on their ability to restrict the accumulation of PVX-RR, a mutant affected at two key positions for Rx1 elicitor activity. Finally, transient expression of the viral capsid protein elicitor indicated that the various mutants have retained the ability to mount an Rx1-mediated hypersensitive response. Taken together, the results obtained are consistent with a modification of the specificity or intensity of the Rx1-mediated response. The five Micro-Tom mutants should provide very valuable resources for the identification of novel tomato genes affecting the functioning of the Rx gene. PMID:22088194

  19. Germline Transformation Using a Prune Cdna Rescues Prune/Killer of Prune Lethality and the Prune Eye Color Phenotype in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, L.; Shearn, A.

    1996-01-01

    Null mutations in the prune gene of Drosophila melanogaster result in prune eye color due to reductions in red pigment accumulation. When one copy of the awd(Killer of prune) mutant gene is present in a prune background, the animals die. The cause of prune/Killer of prune lethality remains unknown. The genomic region characterized for the prune locus is transcriptionally active and complex, with multiple and overlapping transcripts. Despite the transcriptional complexity of the genomic region of prune, accumulated evidence suggests that the prune locus is small and consists of a single transcription unit, since every prune allele to date exhibits both prune eye color and prune/Killer of prune lethality. A functional prune product from a single, full-length cDNA was identified in this study that can rescue both the eye phenotype and prune/Killer of prune lethality. The DNA sequences of several mutant prune alleles along with Western blot analysis of mutant proteins provide convincing evidence that prune mutations are nulls, and that the cDNA identified in this study encodes the only product of the prune locus. PMID:8978047

  20. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  1. Peri-implantation lethality in mice carrying megabase-scale deletion on 5qc3.3 is caused by Exoc1 null mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Seiya; Takami, Kohei; Daitoku, Yoko; Tanimoto, Yoko; Dinh, Tra Thi Huong; Mizuno-Iijima, Saori; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We found a novel spontaneous mouse mutant with depigmentation in the ventral body, which we called White Spotting (WS) mouse. Genetic investigation revealed deletion of a?>?1.2-Mb genomic region containing nine genes (Kit, Kdr, Srd5a3, Tmeme165, Clock, Pdcl2, Nmu, Exoc1, and Cep135). We designated this mutant allele KitWS. Interestingly, homozygous mutants (KitWS/WS) showed a peri-implantation lethal phenotype. Expression analyses of these nine genes in blastocysts suggested that Exoc1 was a prime candidate for this phenotype. We produced Exoc1 knockout mice, and the same peri-implantation lethal phenotype was seen in Exoc1?/? embryos. In addition, the polygenic effect without Exoc1 was investigated in genome-edited KitWE mice carrying the Mb-scale deletion induced by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As KitWE/WE embryos did not exhibit the abnormal phenotype, which was seen in KitWS/WS. We concluded that peri-implantation lethality in KitWS/WS was caused by a monogenic defect of Exoc1. PMID:26346620

  2. Bloomsbury report on mouse embryo phenotyping: recommendations from the IMPC workshop on embryonic lethal screening.

    PubMed

    Adams, David; Baldock, Richard; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Copp, Andrew J; Dickinson, Mary; Greene, Nicholas D E; Henkelman, Mark; Justice, Monica; Mohun, Timothy; Murray, Stephen A; Pauws, Erwin; Raess, Michael; Rossant, Janet; Weaver, Tom; West, David

    2013-05-01

    Identifying genes that are important for embryo development is a crucial first step towards understanding their many functions in driving the ordered growth, differentiation and organogenesis of embryos. It can also shed light on the origins of developmental disease and congenital abnormalities. Current international efforts to examine gene function in the mouse provide a unique opportunity to pinpoint genes that are involved in embryogenesis, owing to the emergence of embryonic lethal knockout mutants. Through internationally coordinated efforts, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) has generated a public resource of mouse knockout strains and, in April 2012, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC), supported by the EU InfraCoMP programme, convened a workshop to discuss developing a phenotyping pipeline for the investigation of embryonic lethal knockout lines. This workshop brought together over 100 scientists, from 13 countries, who are working in the academic and commercial research sectors, including experts and opinion leaders in the fields of embryology, animal imaging, data capture, quality control and annotation, high-throughput mouse production, phenotyping, and reporter gene analysis. This article summarises the outcome of the workshop, including (1) the vital scientific importance of phenotyping embryonic lethal mouse strains for basic and translational research; (2) a common framework to harmonise international efforts within this context; (3) the types of phenotyping that are likely to be most appropriate for systematic use, with a focus on 3D embryo imaging; (4) the importance of centralising data in a standardised form to facilitate data mining; and (5) the development of online tools to allow open access to and dissemination of the phenotyping data. PMID:23519032

  3. Single-step purification of recombinant anthrax lethal factor from periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Hou; Tsai, Mei-Fang; Chung, Chia-Pei; Chen, Po-Kong; Hu, Hsin-I; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Lin, Hung-Chi; Sun, Der-Shan

    2006-11-10

    Lethal toxin (LT) that composed by protective antigen and lethal factor (LF) is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. The treatments of LT in animals could reproduce most manifestations of B. anthracis infections that greatly improves our knowledge in LT-mediated pathogenesis and facilitates anthrax-related researches without having to directly contact the hazardous bacterium B. anthracis. The recombinant protein of LF (rLF), however, still lacks a simple purification method. Herein, we developed single-step nickel affinity purification of rLF with yield up to 3mg/l. By fusion to the leader sequence of outer membrane protein OmpA, rLF could easily be purified from the periplasm of Escherichia coli. To investigate whether the rLT is functional in our system, both wild type rLF and the catalytic mutant rLF that contains a single amino acid substitution at zinc-binding site (LF(E687A)), were subjected to macrophage cytotoxicity analysis. Our data showed that the rLT is fully functional, while the LF(E687A) fail to induce cell death of tested macrophage cells. These findings suggested that the purification protocol herein is a user-friendly method that allows researchers to obtain the functional rLF by single-step purification. PMID:16797097

  4. Piebald lethal (sl) acts early to disrupt the development of neural crest-derived melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Pavan, W J; Tilghman, S M

    1994-07-19

    Mice homozygous for the piebald lethal (sl) mutation have a predominantly white coat due to the absence of neural crest-derived melanocytes in the hair follicles. To investigate the time in embryonic development when the s1 gene affects the melanocyte lineage, we compared the distribution of melanocyte precursors in wild-type and mutant embryos, using an antibody specific for tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2). TRP-2 positive cells were first observed adjacent to the anterior cardinal vein in 10.5-day postcoitem wild-type embryos. From 11.5 to 13.5 days postcoitem, there was a nonuniform distribution of TRP-2 positive cells along the anterior-posterior axis, with the highest density of cells in the head and tail regions. Along the dorsal-ventral axis, the cells were restricted to positions lateral, but never dorsal, to the neural tube. In homozygous sl/sl embryos TRP-2 staining was restricted to the non-neural crest-derived melanocytes of the pigmented retinal epithelium and the telencephalon. Few positive cells were seen in areas that will form neural crest-derived melanocytes in the inner ear, skin, hair follicles, leg musculature, or heart. We conclude that the piebald lethal mutation acts prior to the onset of TRP-2 expression to disrupt the development of neural crest-derived melanocytes. The non-uniform distribution of melanoblasts in wild-type mice suggests that piebald acts stochastically to affect melanocyte development. PMID:8041763

  5. ZBTB42 mutation defines a novel lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS6)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nisha; Smith, Laura L.; Faqeih, Eissa; Mohamed, Jawahir; Gupta, Vandana A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) is a lethal autosomal recessive form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). LCCS is genetically heterogeneous with mutations in five genes identified to date, all with a role in the innervation or contractile apparatus of skeletal muscles. In a consanguineous Saudi family with multiple stillbirths presenting with LCCS, we excluded linkage to all known LCCS loci and combined autozygome analysis and whole-exome sequencing to identify a novel homozygous variant in ZBTB42, which had been shown to be enriched in skeletal muscles, especially at the neuromuscular junction. Knockdown experiments of zbtb42 in zebrafish consistently resulted in grossly abnormal skeletal muscle development and myofibrillar disorganization at the microscopic level. This severe muscular phenotype is successfully rescued with overexpression of the human wild-type ZBTB42 gene, but not with the mutant form of ZBTB42 that models the human missense change. Our data assign a novel muscular developmental phenotype to ZBTB42 in vertebrates and establish a new LCCS6 type caused by ZBTB42 mutation. PMID:25055871

  6. Human cathepsin L rescues the neurodegeneration and lethality incathepsin B/L double deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sevenich, Lisa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2006-01-09

    Cathepsin B (CTSB) and cathepsin L (CTSL) are two widelyexpressed cysteine proteases thought to predominantly reside withinlysosomes. Functional analysis of CTSL in humans is complicated by theexistence of two CTSL-like homologues (CTSL and CTSL2), in contrast tomice which contain only one CTSL enzyme. Thus transgenic expression ofhuman CTSL in CTSL deficient mice provides an opportunity to study the invivo functions of this human protease without interference by its highlyrelated homologue. While mice with single gene deficiencies for murineCTSB or CTSL survive without apparent neuromuscular impairment, murineCTSB/CTSL double deficient mice display degeneration of cerebellarPurkinje cells and neurons of the cerebral cortex, resulting in severehypotrophy, motility defects, and lethality during their third to fourthweek of life. Here we show that expression of human CTSL through agenomic transgene results in widespread expression of human CTSL in themouse which is capable of rescuing the lethality found in CTSB/CTSLdouble-deficient animals. Human CTSL is expressed in the brain of thesecompound mutants predominantly in neurons of the cerebral cortex and inPurkinje cells of the cerebellum, where it appears to prevent neuronalcell death.

  7. ZBTB42 mutation defines a novel lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS6).

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha; Smith, Laura L; Faqeih, Eissa; Mohamed, Jawahir; Gupta, Vandana A; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-12-15

    Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) is a lethal autosomal recessive form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). LCCS is genetically heterogeneous with mutations in five genes identified to date, all with a role in the innervation or contractile apparatus of skeletal muscles. In a consanguineous Saudi family with multiple stillbirths presenting with LCCS, we excluded linkage to all known LCCS loci and combined autozygome analysis and whole-exome sequencing to identify a novel homozygous variant in ZBTB42, which had been shown to be enriched in skeletal muscles, especially at the neuromuscular junction. Knockdown experiments of zbtb42 in zebrafish consistently resulted in grossly abnormal skeletal muscle development and myofibrillar disorganization at the microscopic level. This severe muscular phenotype is successfully rescued with overexpression of the human wild-type ZBTB42 gene, but not with the mutant form of ZBTB42 that models the human missense change. Our data assign a novel muscular developmental phenotype to ZBTB42 in vertebrates and establish a new LCCS6 type caused by ZBTB42 mutation. PMID:25055871

  8. Creation of chimeric mutant axolotls: a model to study early embryonic heart development in Mexican axolotls.

    PubMed

    Lemanski, L F; Meng, F; Lemanski, S L; Dawson, N; Zhang, C; Foster, D; Li, Q; Nakatsugawa, M; Zajdel, R W; Dube, D K; Huang, X

    2001-05-01

    The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) provides an excellent model for studying heart development since it carries a cardiac lethal mutation in gene c that results in failure of contraction of mutant embryonic myocardium. In cardiac mutant axolotls (c/c) the hearts do not beat, apparently because of an absence of organized myofibrils. To date, there has been no way to analyze the genotypes of embryos from heterozygous spawnings (+/c x +/c) until stage 35 when the normal (+/c or +/+) embryos first begin to have beating hearts; mutant (c/c) embryos fail to develop normal heartbeats. In the present study, we created chimeric axolotls by using microsurgical techniques. The general approach was to transect tailbud embryos and join the anterior and posterior halves of two different individuals. The chimeric axolotl is composed of a normal head and heart region (+/+), permitting survival and a mutant body containing mutant gonads (c/c) that permits the production of c/c mutant offspring: 100% c/c offspring were obtained by mating c/c chimeras (c/c x c/c). The mutant phenotypes were confirmed by the absence of beating hearts and death at stage 41 in 100% of the embryos. Examination of the mutant hearts with electron microscopy and comfocal microscopy after immunofluorescent staining for tropomyosin showed identical images to those described previously in naturally-occurring c/c mutant axolotls (i.e., lacking organized sarcomeric myofibrils). These "c/c chimeric" axolotls provide a useful and unique way to investigate early embryonic heart development in cardiac mutant Mexican axolotls. PMID:11411308

  9. Sirenomelia Phenotype in Bmp7;Shh Compound Mutants: A Novel Experimental Model for Studies of Caudal Body Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Allepuz, Carlos; Gonzlez-Lamuo, Domingo; Ros, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Sirenomelia is a severe congenital malformation of the lower body characterized by the fusion of the legs into a single lower limb. This striking external phenotype consistently associates severe visceral abnormalities, most commonly of the kidneys, intestine, and genitalia that generally make the condition lethal. Although the causes of sirenomelia remain unknown, clinical studies have yielded two major hypotheses: i) a primary defect in the generation of caudal mesoderm, ii) a primary vascular defect that leaves the caudal part of the embryo hypoperfused. Interestingly, Sirenomelia has been shown to have a genetic basis in mice, and although it has been considered a sporadic condition in humans, recently some possible familial cases have been reported. Here, we report that the removal of one or both functional alleles of Shh from the Bmp7-null background leads to a sirenomelia phenotype that faithfully replicates the constellation of external and internal malformations, typical of the human condition. These mutants represent an invaluable model in which we have analyzed the pathogenesis of sirenomelia. We show that the signaling defect predominantly impacts the morphogenesis of the hindgut and the development of the caudal end of the dorsal aortas. The deficient formation of ventral midline structures, including the interlimb mesoderm caudal to the umbilicus, leads to the approximation and merging of the hindlimb fields. Our study provides new insights for the understanding of the mechanisms resulting in caudal body malformations, including sirenomelia. PMID:23028704

  10. DNA supercoiling in gyrase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Steck, T R; Pruss, G J; Manes, S H; Burg, L; Drlica, K

    1984-01-01

    Nucleoids isolated from Escherichia coli strains carrying temperature-sensitive gyrA or gyrB mutations were examined by sedimentation in ethidium bromide-containing sucrose density gradients. A shift to restrictive temperature resulted in nucleoid DNA relaxation in all of the mutant strains. Three of these mutants exhibited reversible nucleoid relaxation: when cultures incubated at restrictive temperature were cooled to 0 degree C over a 4- to 5-min period, supercoiling returned to levels observed with cells grown at permissive temperature. Incubation of these three mutants at restrictive temperature also caused nucleoid sedimentation rates to increase by about 50%. PMID:6327603

  11. Morphological characterization and molecular mapping of an irradiation-induced Speckled mutant in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tan, D; Tong, X-L; Hu, H; Wu, S-Y; Li, C-L; Xiong, G; Xiang, Z-H; Dai, F-Y; Lu, C

    2016-04-01

    Speckled (Spc), an X-ray-induced lethal mutant of Bombyx mori, exhibits a mosaic dark-brown-spotted larval epidermis in both sexes and egg-laying problems only in females. Here, we report the morphological characterization and molecular mapping of the Spc mutant. Morphological investigations revealed that the epidermal ultrastructure of the small, dark-brown spots was more dense than that of the white regions in both Spc/+ mutants and wild type, and that the lethality of the Spc/Spc mutants occurred during early embryogenesis. Furthermore, the ovarioles and ovipositor were disconnected in approximately 85.5% of Spc/+ females, a further 2.5% had a connection between the ovarioles and ovipositor that was too narrow to lay eggs. The remaining females showed a normal connection similar to that of the wild type. We successfully narrowed down the location of the Spc mutation to a region on chromosome 4 that was ∼1041 kb long. Gene-prediction analysis identified 25 candidate genes in this region. Chromosome structure analysis indicated that a ∼305 kb deletion was included in the mapping region. Temporal and spatial reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis showed that several genes in the mapped region are associated with the Spc mutant. Although the genes responsible for the Spc mutation were not definitively identified, our results further the current understanding of the complex mechanism underlying the multiple morphological defects in Spc mutants. PMID:26661290

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patients and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, ... many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary . See also Understanding Medical Terminology . References (3 links) ...

  13. Fitness Analyses of All Possible Point-Mutants for Regions of Genes in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hietpas, Ryan; Roscoe, Benjamin; Jiang, Li; Bolon, Daniel N. A.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing can accurately measure the relative abundance of hundreds of mutants in a single bulk competition experiment, which can give a direct readout of the fitness of each mutant. Here, we describe a protocol that we previously developed and optimized to measure the fitness effects of all possible individual codon substitutions for 10 amino acid regions of essential genes in yeast. Starting with a conditional strain (i.e., a temperature sensitive strain), we describe how to efficiently generate plasmid libraries of point mutants that can then be transformed to generate libraries of yeast. The yeast libraries are competed under conditions that select for mutant function. Deep sequencing analyses are used to determine the relative fitness of all mutants. This approach is faster and cheaper per mutant compared to analyzing individually isolated mutants. The protocol can be performed in ~4 weeks and many 10 amino acid regions can be analyzed in parallel. PMID:22722372

  14. Lethal Injection as a Component of a Therapeutics Toxicology Module

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To create and implement a required module that addresses both the clinical and ethical issues surrounding the use of lethal injection as a means of capital punishment. Design. As a component of a pharmacotherapeutics module in toxicology, pharmacy students were introduced to ethical and clinical considerations and controversies with the use of drugs as a means of capital punishment. Basic information was provided on the history of capital punishment and the origins of lethal injection. Pharmacotherapeutic limitations and challenges were presented in the context of clinical and ethical dilemmas. Assessment. Instructed material was assessed using block course examinations that had both objective and subjective components. Students were asked to synthesize information by both purposing a lethal injection reversal protocol and by acting as consults in the fictional design of more effective lethal injection protocols. Students provided formative and summative evaluations of the instruction through regular student liaison meetings and summative course evaluations. Conclusion. Lethal injection as a means of capital punishment in the United States is a controversial and ethically challenging topic on which pharmacists may be consulted and therefore should be knowledgeable about. Students positively evaluated this lethal injection module, which covered multiple clinical and ethical issues. PMID:21931455

  15. Mice With an Anterior Cleft of the Palate Survive Neonatal Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuping; Wei, Na; Yu, Xueyan; Jiang, Yiping; Fei, Jian; Chen, YiPing

    2009-01-01

    Many genes are known to function in a region-specific manner in the developing secondary palate. We have previously shown that Shox2-deficient embryos die at mid-gestation stage and develop an anterior clefting phenotype. Here, we show that mice carrying a conditional inactivation of Shox2 in the palatal mesenchyme survive the embryonic and neonatal lethality, but develop a wasting syndrome. Phenotypic analyses indicate a delayed closure of the secondary palate at the anterior end, leading to a failed fusion of the primary and secondary palates. Consistent with a role proposed for Shox2 in skeletogenesis, Shox2 inactivation causes a significantly reduced bone formation in the hard palate, probably due to a down-regulation of Runx2 and Osterix. We conclude that the secondary palatal shelves are capable of fusion with each other, but fail to fuse with the primary palate in a developmentally delayed manner. Mice carrying an anterior cleft can survive neonatal lethality. PMID:18393307

  16. Tetrahymena mutants with short telomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S; Sheng, H; Niu, L; Henderson, E

    1998-01-01

    Telomere length is dynamic in many organisms. Genetic screens that identify mutants with altered telomere lengths are essential if we are to understand how telomere length is regulated in vivo. In Tetrahymena thermophila, telomeres become long at 30 degrees, and growth rate slows. A slow-growing culture with long telomeres is often overgrown by a variant cell type with short telomeres and a rapid-doubling rate. Here we show that this variant cell type with short telomeres is in fact a mutant with a genetic defect in telomere length regulation. One of these telomere growth inhibited forever (tgi) mutants was heterozygous for a telomerase RNA mutation, and this mutant telomerase RNA caused telomere shortening when overexpressed in wild-type cells. Several other tgi mutants were also likely to be heterozygous at their mutant loci, since they reverted to wild type when selective pressure for short telomeres was removed. These results illustrate that telomere length can regulate growth rate in Tetrahymena and that this phenomenon can be exploited to identify genes involved in telomere length regulation. PMID:9755196

  17. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  18. Characterization of fig operon mutants of Francisella novicida U112.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Katalin; Liu, Wei; Huntley, Jason F; Norgard, Michael V; Hansen, Eric J

    2008-08-01

    Francisella species secrete a polycarboxylate siderophore that resembles rhizoferrin to acquire ferric iron. Several of the Francisella siderophore synthesis genes are contained in a Fur-regulated operon (designated fig or fsl) comprised of at least seven ORFs including fur. Reverse transcriptase-PCR showed transcriptional linkage between figD and figE and between figE and figF. Mutations were constructed in four of these ORFs (figB, figC, figD, and figE) in Francisella novicida U112. All four of these new mutants and a F. novicida figA mutant grew at rates comparable to that of wild type under iron-replete conditions but growth of all five mutants was stunted in iron-limiting media. When ferric rhizoferrin was added to the iron-limited media, growth of the figA, figB, figC, and figD mutants was restored to levels similar to those obtained in iron-replete media. However, this exogenously added siderophore could not rescue the figE mutant. When Chrome Azurol S assays were used to measure siderophore production, the figA, figB, and figC mutants were markedly deficient in their ability to synthesize siderophore whereas the figD and figE mutants produced siderophore at levels equivalent to the wild-type parent strain. PMID:18564336

  19. Developmental cell interactions of Myxococcus xanthus: analysis of mutants.

    PubMed Central

    LaRossa, R; Kuner, J; Hagen, D; Manoil, C; Kaiser, D

    1983-01-01

    A set of developmental mutants have been examined that behave as if defective in cellular interactions necessary for the formation of myxospores during fruiting body development. Sporulation is rescued in these mutants if they are mixed with wild-type cells. Complementation experiments with whole cells divide the mutants into four groups (A, B, C, and D). Mutants of group A appear to be less responsive to starvation, a condition that normally initiates development. Mutants of group D respond to starvation but fail to synthesize myxobacterial hemagglutinin, a protein normally synthesized midway in development. Mutants of groups B and C respond to starvation and synthesize hemagglutinin, but they can be distinguished genetically. Group C mutations all map in a single cluster near insertion omega 1519 of transposon Tn5, which is distant from group B mutations. Thus, each group represents a different defect in development. All of the mutants are induced to sporulate by glycerol. Therefore, we argue that sporulation during fruiting body development depends on several prior interactions between cells. Images PMID:6402495

  20. Conditional knockout mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chu-Xia

    2014-12-01

    In 2007, three scientists, Drs. Mario R. Capecchi, Martin J. Evans, and Oliver Smithies, received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their contributions of introducing specific gene modifications into mice. This technology, commonly referred to as gene targeting or knockout, has proven to be a powerful means for precisely manipulating the mammalian genome and has generated great impacts on virtually all phases of mammalian biology and basic biomedical research. Of note, germline mutations of many genes, especially tumor suppressors, often result in lethality during embryonic development or at developmental stages before tumor formation. This obstacle has been effectively overcome by the use of conditional knockout technology in conjunction with Cre-LoxP- or Flp-Frt-mediated temporal and/or spatial systems to generate genetic switches for precise DNA recombination. Currently, numerous conditional knockout mouse models have been successfully generated and applied in studying tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. This review summarizes some conditional mutant mouse models that are widely used in cancer research and our understanding of the possible mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. PMID:25447286

  1. Virulence and vaccine potential of phoP mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Galán, J E; Curtiss, R

    1989-06-01

    We have constructed Salmonella typhimurium phoP mutants and found them to be avirulent and able to induce a protective immune response. BALB/c mice survived challenge with phoP derivatives of the highly virulent S. typhimurium strains SR-11 and SL1344 when inoculated intraperitoneally and per oral with doses equivalent to 10(4) 50% lethal doses (LD50) of the parent virulent strains. The avirulent mutants were able to establish an infection of the Peyer's patches of orally infected animals for up to 10 days after inoculation but were very inefficient at reaching the spleens. Despite the low level of infectivity of these mutants, immunized animals developed a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to Salmonella antigens and resisted challenge with up to 10(4) LD50 of the virulent parent strain 30 days after immunization. PMID:2671582

  2. Ectopic Noggin in a Population of Nfatc1 Lineage Endocardial Progenitors Induces Embryonic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Paige; Simmons, Olga; Wang, Jian; Hoang, Chinh Q.; Conway, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The initial heart is composed of a myocardial tube lined by endocardial cells. The TGF? superfamily is known to play an important role, as BMPs from the myocardium signal to the overlying endocardium to create an environment for EMT. Subsequently, BMP and TGF? signaling pathways synergize to form primitive valves and regulate myocardial growth. In this study, we investigated the requirement of BMP activity by transgenic over-expression of extracellular BMP antagonist Noggin. Using Nfatc1Cre to drive lineage-restricted Noggin within the endocardium, we show that ectopic Noggin arrests cardiac development in E10.5-11 embryos, resulting in small hearts which beat poorly and die by E12.5. This is coupled with hypoplastic endocardial cushions, reduced trabeculation and fewer mature contractile fibrils in mutant hearts. Moreover, Nfatc1Cre-mediated diphtheria toxin fragment-A expression in the endocardium resulted in genetic ablation and a more severe phenotype with lethality at E11 and abnormal linear hearts. Molecular analysis demonstrated that endocardial Noggin resulted in a specific alteration of TGF?/BMP-mediated signal transduction, in that, both Endoglin and ALK1 were downregulated in mutant endocardium. Combined, these results demonstrate the cell-autonomous requirement of the endocardial lineage and function of unaltered BMP levels in facilitating endothelium-cardiomyocyte cross-talk and promoting endocardial cushion formation. PMID:26090377

  3. A functional cancer genomics screen identifies a druggable synthetic lethal interaction between MSH3 and PRKDC.

    PubMed

    Dietlein, Felix; Thelen, Lisa; Jokic, Mladen; Jachimowicz, Ron D; Ivan, Laura; Knittel, Gero; Leeser, Uschi; van Oers, Johanna; Edelmann, Winfried; Heukamp, Lukas C; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2014-05-01

    Here, we use a large-scale cell line-based approach to identify cancer cell-specific mutations that are associated with DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) dependence. For this purpose, we profiled the mutational landscape across 1,319 cancer-associated genes of 67 distinct cell lines and identified numerous genes involved in homologous recombination-mediated DNA repair, including BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PAXIP, and RAD50, as being associated with non-oncogene addiction to DNA-PKcs. Mutations in the mismatch repair gene MSH3, which have been reported to occur recurrently in numerous human cancer entities, emerged as the most significant predictors of DNA-PKcs addiction. Concordantly, DNA-PKcs inhibition robustly induced apoptosis in MSH3-mutant cell lines in vitro and displayed remarkable single-agent efficacy against MSH3-mutant tumors in vivo. Thus, we here identify a therapeutically actionable synthetic lethal interaction between MSH3 and the non-homologous end joining kinase DNA-PKcs. Our observations recommend DNA-PKcs inhibition as a therapeutic concept for the treatment of human cancers displaying homologous recombination defects. PMID:24556366

  4. Synthetic lethal analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans posterior embryonic patterning genes identifies conserved genetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, L Ryan; Wen, Joanne C; Hill, Andrew A; Slonim, Donna K; Brown, Eugene L; Hunter, Craig P

    2005-01-01

    Phenotypic robustness is evidenced when single-gene mutations do not result in an obvious phenotype. It has been suggested that such phenotypic stability results from 'buffering' activities of homologous genes as well as non-homologous genes acting in parallel pathways. One approach to characterizing mechanisms of phenotypic robustness is to identify genetic interactions, specifically, double mutants where buffering is compromised. To identify interactions among genes implicated in posterior patterning of the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo, we measured synthetic lethality following RNA interference of 22 genes in 15 mutant strains. A pair of homologous T-box transcription factors (tbx-8 and tbx-9) is found to interact in both C. elegans and C. briggsae, indicating that their compensatory function is conserved. Furthermore, a muscle module is defined by transitive interactions between the MyoD homolog hlh-1, another basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, hnd-1, and the MADS-box transcription factor unc-120. Genetic interactions within a homologous set of genes involved in vertebrate myogenesis indicate broad conservation of the muscle module and suggest that other genetic modules identified in C. elegans will be conserved. PMID:15892873

  5. Statins synergistically potentiate 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) lethality in human leukemia and myeloma cells by disrupting Ras farnesylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yun; Khanna, Payal; Chen, Shuang; Pei, Xin-Yan; Dent, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between UCN-01 and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (ie, statins) have been examined in human leukemia and myeloma cells. Exposure of U937 and U266 cells to minimally toxic concentrations of UCN-01 and various statins (eg, lovastatin, simvastatin, or fluvastatin) dramatically increased mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase activation, and apoptosis. Comparable effects were observed in other leukemia and myeloma cell lines as well as in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts but not in normal hematopoietic cells. Potentiation of UCN-01 lethality by lovastatin was associated with disruption of Ras prenylation and activation. These events were significantly attenuated by farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) but not by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), implicating perturbations in farnesylation rather than geranylgeranylation in synergistic interactions. Coexposure to statins and UCN-01 resulted in inactivation of ERK1/2 and Akt, accompanied by JNK activation. U266 cells ectopically expressing JNK1-APF, a dominant negative JNK1 mutant, displayed significantly reduced susceptibility to lovastatin/UCN-01–mediated lethality. Moreover, transfection of U266 cells with constitutively activated H-Ras (Q61L) attenuated ERK1/2 inactivation and dramatically diminished the lethality of this regimen. Collectively, these findings indicate that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors act through a Ras farnesylation-associated mechanism to induce signaling perturbations, particularly prevention of Ras and ERK1/2 activation, in UCN-01–treated cells, resulting in the synergistic induction of cell death. PMID:17264303

  6. Analysis of spontaneous suppressor mutants from the photomixotrophically grown pmgA-disrupted mutant in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshiki; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Takako; Sonoike, Kintake; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Hihara, Yukako

    2015-12-01

    The pmgA-disrupted (?pmgA) mutant in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 suffers severe growth inhibition under photomixotrophic conditions. In order to elucidate the key factors enabling the cells to grow under photomixotrophic conditions, we isolated spontaneous suppressor mutants from the ?pmgA mutant derived from a single colony. When the ?pmgA mutant was spread on a BG11 agar plate supplemented with glucose, colonies of suppressor mutants appeared after the bleaching of the background cells. We identified the mutation site of these suppressor mutants and found that 11 mutants out of 13 had a mutation in genes related to the type 1 NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complex. Among them, eight mutants had mutations within the ndhF3 (sll1732) gene: R32stop, W62stop, V147I, G266V, G354W, G586C, and deletion of 7bp within the coding region. One mutant had one base insertion in the putative -10 box of the ndhC (slr1279) gene, leading to the decrease in the transcripts of the ndhCKJ operon. Two mutants had one base insertion and deletion in the coding region of cupA (sll1734), which is co-transcribed with ndhF3 and ndhD3 and comprises together a form of NDH-1 complex (NDH-1MS complex) involved in inducible high-affinity CO2 uptake. The results indicate that the loss of the activity of this complex effectively rescues the ?pmgA mutant under photomixotrophic condition with 1% CO2. However, little difference among WT and mutants was observed in the activities ascribed to the NDH-1MS complex, i.e., CO2 uptake and cyclic electron transport. This may suggest that the NDH-1MS complex has the third, currently unknown function under photomixotrophic conditions. PMID:25869635

  7. A molecular model for the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the mouse lethal yellow (A{sup y}) mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E.J.; Klebig, M.L.; Stubbs, L.J.; Russell, L.B.; Woychik, R.P.; Bultman, S.J. |; Vugt, M.J. van |

    1994-03-29

    Lethal yellow (A{sup y}) is a mutation at the mouse agouti locus in chromosome 2 that causes a number of dominant pleiotropic effects, including a completely yellow coat color, obesity, an insulin-resistant type II diabetic condition, and an increased propensity to develop a variety of spontaneous and induced tumors. Additionally, homozygosity for A{sup y} results in preimplantation lethality, which terminates development by the blastocyst stage. The A{sup y} mutation is the result of a 170-kb deletion that removes all but the promoter and noncoding first exon of another gene called Raly, which lies in the same transcriptional orientation as agouti and maps 280 kb proximal to the 3{prime} end of the agouti gene. The authors present a model for the structure of the A{sub y} allele that can explain the dominant pleiotropic effects associated with this mutation, as well as the recessive lethality, which is unrelated to the agouti gene.

  8. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of faecal deltamethrin residues on dung-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Mann, C M; Barnes, S; Offer, B; Wall, R

    2015-06-01

    Endectocides administered to livestock to facilitate pest and parasite control may be excreted in the faeces at concentrations that are toxic to coprophagous insects, including species of ecological importance. Although much research has focused on the effects of macrocyclic lactones, relatively less attention has been given to any similar impacts of the widely used pyrethroid insecticides. Here, the effects of faecal residues of the pyrethroid deltamethrin after application to Holstein-Friesian cattle in a proprietary pour-on formulation are examined. Freshly dropped dung was collected 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after treatment and from an untreated control group. In laboratory bioasssays, female Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) blow flies matured significantly smaller egg batches and had a lower percentage of eggs hatch after feeding on dung collected for up to 5 days after treatment, compared with flies feeding on dung from untreated cattle. In the field, artificial dung pats were constructed from the collected dung and left on pastureland for 7 days before being retrieved and searched for insects. Significantly more adult Diptera emerged from the faeces of untreated cattle than from the dung of treated cattle collected on days 1 and 3 after treatment. Adult Coleoptera were found in lower numbers in the dung of treated animals compared with control dung, suggesting a repellent effect. The results indicate that deltamethrin residues in cattle faeces have a range of lethal and sub-lethal effects on dung-feeding insects for up to a week after treatment, but that the precise duration and nature of toxicity varies depending on the sensitivity of the insect in question. PMID:25594879

  9. Connexin mutant embryonic stem cells and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Kiyomasa; Shibata, Yosaburo; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2014-11-26

    Intercellular communication via gap junctions allows cells within multicellular organisms to share small molecules. The effect of such interactions has been elucidated using mouse gene knockout strategies. Although several mutations in human gap junction-encoding connexin (Cx) have been described, Cx mutants in mice do not always recapitulate the human disease. Among the 20 mouse Cxs, Cx26, Cx43, and Cx45 play roles in early cardiac or placental development, and disruption of the genes results in lethality that hampers further analyses. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that lack Cx43 or Cx45 have made analysis feasible in both in vitro differentiated cell cultures and in vivo chimeric tissues. The success of mouse ESCs studies is leading to the use of induced pluripotent stem cells to learn more about the pathogenesis of human Cx diseases. This review summarizes the current status of mouse Cx disruption models and ESC differentiation studies, and discusses their implication for understanding human Cx diseases. PMID:25426253

  10. Calreticulin mutants in mice induce an MPL-dependent thrombocytosis with frequent progression to myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marty, Caroline; Pecquet, Christian; Nivarthi, Harini; El-Khoury, Mira; Chachoua, Ilyas; Tulliez, Micheline; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Raslova, Hana; Kralovics, Robert; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William

    2016-03-10

    Frameshift mutations in the calreticulin (CALR) gene are seen in about 30% of essential thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis patients. To address the contribution of the CALR mutants to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms, we engrafted lethally irradiated recipient mice with bone marrow cells transduced with retroviruses expressing these mutants. In contrast to wild-type CALR, CALRdel52 (type I) and, to a lesser extent, CALRins5 (type II) induced thrombocytosis due to a megakaryocyte (MK) hyperplasia. Disease was transplantable into secondary recipients. After 6 months, CALRdel52-, in contrast to rare CALRins5-, transduced mice developed a myelofibrosis associated with a splenomegaly and a marked osteosclerosis. Monitoring of virus-transduced populations indicated that CALRdel52 leads to expansion at earlier stages of hematopoiesis than CALRins5. However, both mutants still specifically amplified the MK lineage and platelet production. Moreover, a mutant deleted of the entire exon 9 (CALRdelex9) did not induce a disease, suggesting that the oncogenic property of CALR mutants was related to the new C-terminus peptide. To understand how the CALR mutants target the MK lineage, we used a cell-line model and demonstrated that the CALR mutants, but not CALRdelex9, specifically activate the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (MPL) to induce constitutive activation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5/3/1. We confirmed in c-mpl- and tpo-deficient mice that expression of Mpl, but not of Tpo, was essential for the CALR mutants to induce thrombocytosis in vivo, although Tpo contributes to disease penetrance. Thus, CALR mutants are sufficient to induce thrombocytosis through MPL activation. PMID:26608331

  11. Engineering a functional blue-wavelength-shifted rhodopsin mutant.

    PubMed

    Janz, J M; Farrens, D L

    2001-06-19

    We report an effort to engineer a functional, maximally blue-wavelength-shifted version of rhodopsin. Toward this goal, we first constructed and assayed a number of previously described mutations in the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, G90S, E122D, A292S, and A295S. Of these mutants, we found that only mutants E122D and A292S were like the wild type (WT). In contrast, mutant G90S exhibited a perturbed photobleaching spectrum, and mutant A295S exhibited decreased ability to activate transducin. We also identified and characterized a new blue-wavelength-shifting mutation (at site T118), a residue conserved in most opsin proteins. Interestingly, although residue T118 contacts the critically important C9-methyl group of the retinal chromophore, the T118A mutant exhibited no significant perturbation other than the blue-wavelength shift. In analyzing these mutants, we found that although several mutants exhibited different rates of retinal release, the activation energies of the retinal release were all approximately 20 kcal/mol, almost identical to the value found for WT rhodopsin. These latter results support the theory that chemical hydrolysis of the Schiff base is the rate-limiting step of the retinal release pathway. A combination of the functional blue-wavelength-shifting mutations was then used to generate a triple mutant (T118A/E122D/A292S) which exhibited a large blue-wavelength shift (absorption lambda(max) = 453 nm) while exhibiting minimal functional perturbation. Mutant T118A/E122D/A292S thus offers the possibility of a rhodopsin protein that can be worked with and studied using more ambient lighting conditions, and facilitates further study by fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:11401569

  12. Targeting the mTOR Complex by Everolimus in NRAS Mutant Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Samaras, Panagiotis; Lang, Silvia; Scharl, Michael; Aguzzi, Adriano; Oldrige, Derek A.; Maris, John M.; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains lethal in about 50% of patients despite multimodal treatment. Recent attempts to identify molecular targets for specific therapies have shown that Neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) is significantly mutated in a small number of patients. However, few inhibitors for the potential treatment for NRAS mutant neuroblastoma have been investigated so far. In this in-vitro study, we show that MEK inhibitors AZD6244, MEK162 and PD0325901 block cell growth in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma cell lines but not in NRAS wild-type cell lines. Several studies show that mutant NRAS leads to PI3K pathway activation and combined inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR effectively block cell growth. However, we observed the combination of MEK inhibitors with PI3K or AKT inhibitors did not show synergestic effects on cell growth. Thus, we tested single mTOR inhibitors Everolimus and AZD8055. Interestingly, Everolimus and AZD8055 alone were sufficient to block cell growth in NRAS mutant cell lines but not in wild-type cell lines. We found that Everolimus alone induced apoptosis in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma. Furthermore, the combination of mTOR and MEK inhibitors resulted in synergistic growth inhibition. Taken together, our results show that NRAS mutant neuroblastoma can be targeted by clinically available Everolimus alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors which could impact future clinical studies. PMID:26821351

  13. Characterization and mapping of novel chlorophyll deficient mutant genes in durum wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Jia, Jizeng; Xia, Chuan; Liu, Xu; Kong, Xiuying

    2013-01-01

    The yellow-green leaf mutant has a non-lethal chlorophyll-deficient mutation that can be exploited in photosynthesis and plant development research. A novel yellow-green mutant derived from Triticum durum var. Cappelli displays a yellow-green leaf color from the seedling stage to the mature stage. Examination of the mutant chloroplasts with transmission electron microscopy revealed that the shape of chloroplast changed, grana stacks in the stroma were highly variable in size and disorganized. The pigment content, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll and carotene, was decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the chla/chlb ratio of the mutants was increased in comparison with the normal green leaves. We also found a reduction in the photosynthetic rate, fluorescence kinetic parameters and yield-related agronomic traits of the mutant. A genetic analysis revealed that two nuclear recessive genes controlled the expression of this trait. The genes were designated ygld1 and ygld2. Two molecular markers co-segregated with these genes. ygld 1 co-segregated with the SSR marker wmc110 on chromosome 5AL and ygld 2 co-segregated with the SSR marker wmc28 on chromosome 5BL. These results will contribute to the gene cloning and the understanding of the mechanisms underlying chlorophyll metabolism and chloroplast development in wheat. PMID:23853511

  14. Targeting the mTOR Complex by Everolimus in NRAS Mutant Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Samaras, Panagiotis; Lang, Silvia; Scharl, Michael; Aguzzi, Adriano; Oldrige, Derek A; Maris, John M; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains lethal in about 50% of patients despite multimodal treatment. Recent attempts to identify molecular targets for specific therapies have shown that Neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) is significantly mutated in a small number of patients. However, few inhibitors for the potential treatment for NRAS mutant neuroblastoma have been investigated so far. In this in-vitro study, we show that MEK inhibitors AZD6244, MEK162 and PD0325901 block cell growth in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma cell lines but not in NRAS wild-type cell lines. Several studies show that mutant NRAS leads to PI3K pathway activation and combined inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR effectively block cell growth. However, we observed the combination of MEK inhibitors with PI3K or AKT inhibitors did not show synergestic effects on cell growth. Thus, we tested single mTOR inhibitors Everolimus and AZD8055. Interestingly, Everolimus and AZD8055 alone were sufficient to block cell growth in NRAS mutant cell lines but not in wild-type cell lines. We found that Everolimus alone induced apoptosis in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma. Furthermore, the combination of mTOR and MEK inhibitors resulted in synergistic growth inhibition. Taken together, our results show that NRAS mutant neuroblastoma can be targeted by clinically available Everolimus alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors which could impact future clinical studies. PMID:26821351

  15. Characterization of Streptomyces scabies mutants deficient in melanin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Beausjour, Julie; Beaulieu, Carole

    2004-09-01

    Streptomyces scabies, a causal agent of common scab, produces both melanin and a secondary metabolite called thaxtomin A. To establish a possible relation between melanin and thaxtomin A production in S. scabies, we carried out N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) mutagenesis and isolated 11 melanin-negative mutants of S. scabies EF-35. These mutants were characterized for thaxtomin A production, pathogenicity, sporulation, and stress resistance. Nine of these mutants showed a significant reduction in thaxtomin A production when compared with the wild strain. However, only a few mutants exhibited a reduced level of virulence or a loss in their ability to induce common scab symptoms on potato tubers. Other pleiotrophic effects, such as higher sensitivity to heavy metals and incapacity to sporulate under certain stress conditions, were also associated with a deficiency in melanin production. PMID:15644924

  16. Transposon insertions causing constitutive sex-lethal activity in Drosophila melanogaster affect Sxl sex-specific transcript splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Berstein, M.; Cline, T.W. |; Lersch, R.A.; Subrahmanyan, L.

    1995-02-01

    Sex-lethal (Sxl) gene products induce female development in Drosophila melanogaster and suppress the transcriptional hyperactivation of X-linked genes responsible for male X-chromosome dosage compensation. Control of Sxl functioning by the dose of X-chromosomes normally ensures that the female-specific functions of this developmental switch gene are only expressed in diplo-X individuals. Although the immediate effect of X-chromosome dose is on Sxl transcription, during most of the life cycle {open_quotes}on{close_quotes} vs. {open_quotes}off{close_quotes} reflects alternative Sxl RNA splicing, with the female (productive) splicing mode maintained by a positive feedback activity of SXL protein on Sxl pre-mRNA splicing. {open_quotes}Male-lethal{close_quotes} (Sxl{sup M}) gain-of-function alleles subvert Sxl control by X-chromosome dose, allowing female Sxl functions to be expressed independent of the positive regulators upstream of Sxl. As a consequence, Sxl{sup M} haplo-X animals (chromosomal males) die because of improper dosage compensation, and Sxl{sup m} chromosomal females survive the otherwise lethal effects of mutations in upstream positive regulators. Transcript analysis of double-mutant male-viable Sxl{sup M} derivatives in which the Sxl{sup M} insertion is cis to loss-of-function mutations, combined with other results reported here, indicates that the constitutive character of these Sxl{sup M} alleles is a consequence of an alteration of the structure of the pre-mRNA that allow some level of female splicing to occur even in the absence of functional SXL protein. Surprisingly, however, most of the constitutive character of Sxl{sup M} alleles appears to depend on the mutant alleles` responsiveness, perhaps greater than wild-type, to the autoregulatory splicing activity of the wild-type SXL proteins they produce. 47 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. 76 FR 6054 - Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... proposed on June 25, 2008 (73 FR 39584), regarding the use of ] chemical agents and other less-than-lethal... of Prisons 28 CFR Part 552 RIN 1120-AB46 Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation AGENCY: Bureau of... its proposed regulation on the use of chemical agents and other non-lethal (less-than-lethal) force...

  18. Inhibition of citric acid accumulation by manganese ions in Aspergillus niger mutants with reduced citrate control of phosphofructokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Schreferl, G.; Kubicek, C.P.; Roehr, M.

    1986-03-01

    Mutant strains of Aspergillus niger with reduced citrate control of carbohydrate catabolism (cic mutants) grow faster than the parent strain on media containing 5% (wt/vol) citrate. The mutants tolerated a higher intracellular citrate concentration than the parent strain. One mutant (cic-7/3) contained phosphofructokinase activity significantly less sensitive towards citrate than the enzyme from the parent strain. When this mutant was grown under citrate accumulating conditions, acidogenesis was far less sensitive to inhibition by Mn/sup 2 +/ than in the parent strain. Some of the cic mutants also showed altered citrate inhibition of NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

  19. Fitness of Transgenic Mosquito Aedes aegypti Males Carrying a Dominant Lethal Genetic System

    PubMed Central

    Massonnet-Bruneel, Blandine; Corre-Catelin, Nicole; Lacroix, Renaud; Lees, Rosemary S.; Hoang, Kim Phuc; Nimmo, Derric; Alphey, Luke; Reiter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    OX513A is a transgenic strain of Aedes aegypti engineered to carry a dominant, non-sex-specific, late-acting lethal genetic system that is repressed in the presence of tetracycline. It was designed for use in a sterile-insect (SIT) pest control system called RIDL® (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal gene) by which transgenic males are released in the field to mate with wild females; in the absence of tetracycline, the progeny from such matings will not survive. We investigated the mating fitness of OX513A in the laboratory. Male OX513A were as effective as Rockefeller (ROCK) males at inducing refractoriness to further mating in wild type females and there was no reduction in their ability to inseminate multiple females. They had a lower mating success but yielded more progeny than the wild-type comparator strain (ROCK) when one male of each strain was caged with a ROCK female. Mating success and fertility of groups of 10 males—with different ratios of RIDL to ROCK—competing for five ROCK females was similar, but the median longevity of RIDL males was somewhat (18%) lower. We conclude that the fitness under laboratory conditions of OX513A males carrying a tetracycline repressible lethal gene is comparable to that of males of the wild-type comparator strain. PMID:23690948

  20. Lethal and sublethal effects of fenpropathrin on the biological performance of Scolothrips longicornis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    PubMed

    Pakyari, Hajar; Enkegaard, Annie

    2013-12-01

    Determination of negative nontarget effects of pesticides on beneficial organisms by measuring only lethal effects is likely to underestimate effects of sublethal doses. In this study, the sublethal effects of fenpropathrin on the predatory thrips Scolothrips longicornis Priesner (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) fed on Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) were evaluated under laboratory conditions. The estimated values of LC50 for female and male predators were 6.53 and 5.47 microg a.i./ml, respectively. Exposure to low-lethal concentrations (LC10, LC20, and LC30) of fenpropathrin significantly affected the biological characteristics of treated females of S. longicornis, the most noticeable effects being a shortening of female life span by > 70% accompanied by large reductions in oviposition period and fecundity. The offspring of females treated with low-lethal concentrations of fenpropathrin likewise had significantly reduced longevity, oviposition period, and fecundity, although not to the same extent as experienced by their mothers. Their juvenile development time was, however, not affected. These effects on the offspring were reflected in reduced rates of population increase and increased doubling times. PMID:24498736

  1. Overexpression of dilp2 causes nutrient-dependent semi-lethality in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Muramatsu, Keigo; Funakoshi, Masabumi; Tsuda, Manabu; Aigaki, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) plays an important role as a systemic regulator of metabolism in multicellular organisms. Hyperinsulinemia, a high level of blood insulin, is often associated with impaired physiological conditions such as hypoglycemia, insulin resistance, and diabetes. However, due to the complex pathophysiology of hyperinsulinemia, the causative role of excess insulin/IGF signaling has remained elusive. To investigate the biological effects of a high level of insulin in metabolic homeostasis and physiology, we generated flies overexpressing Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2), which has the highest potential of promoting tissue growth among the Ilp genes in Drosophila. In this model, a UAS-Dilp2 transgene was overexpressed under control of sd-Gal4 that drives expression predominantly in developing imaginal wing discs. Overexpression of Dilp2 caused semi-lethality, which was partially suppressed by mutations in the insulin receptor (InR) or Akt1, suggesting that dilp2-induced semi-lethality is mediated by the PI3K/Akt1 signaling. We found that dilp2-overexpressing flies exhibited intensive autophagy in fat body cells. Interestingly, the dilp2-induced autophagy as well as the semi-lethality was partially rescued by increasing the protein content relative to glucose in the media. Our results suggest that excess insulin/IGF signaling impairs the physiology of animals, which can be ameliorated by controlling the nutritional balance between proteins and carbohydrates, at least in flies. PMID:24795642

  2. Characterization and protective properties of attenuated mutants of Salmonella choleraesuis.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, S M; Bosecker, B A; Curtiss, R

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed crp::Tn10 and cya::Tn10 Salmonella choleraesuis mutants and their fusaric acid-resistant derivatives with deletions (delta) of the Tn10 and adjacent DNA sequences and found them to be avirulent and able to induce protection against a wild-type challenge in 8-week-old BALB/c mice. Mice survived infection with the crp and cya mutants at doses of more than 7 x 10(3) times the oral (p.o.) 50% lethal dose (LD50) and more than 8 x 10(2) times the intraperitoneal LD50 of the wild-type S. choleraesuis parent. Mice vaccinated with attenuated strains were protected against challenge with more than 1.6 x 10(4) times the p.o. LD50 and more than 80 times the intraperitoneal LD50 of the wild-type virulent S. choleraesuis parent. One deletion mutation isolated in the crp region extends to an adjacent gene(s) that was shown to be associated with avirulence. This gene or operon has been designated cdt (colonization of deep tissues). A delta (crp-cdt)19 strain, when complemented with the wild-type crp gene and promoter on a pBR-derived plasmid, had p.o. LD50 values 10(3) times higher than those for the wild type. A delta cya delta (crp-cdt)19 double mutant was less virulent than and afforded more complete protection against a challenge with the wild-type strain than a delta crp-11 delta cya double mutant or the individual cya, crp, or crp+/cdt mutants. The deletion derivatives exhibited reduced invasion of CHO cells in vitro, and the numbers of the mutants recovered from mouse tissues were less than that of the parent strain. These studies suggest that one or more of the genes involved in cell attachment to and/or invasion of S. choleraesuis may be under catabolite repression. In addition, we describe a new deletion of a gene(s) located in the crp region between cysG and argD that is associated with virulence in S. choleraesuis. Images PMID:1398999

  3. CONSTRUCTION OF IN-FRAME, NON-POLAR, LKTA MUTANTS OF MANNHEIMIA HAEMOLYTICA USING A NEW TEMPERATURE CONDITIONAL PLASMID AND EFFICACY AS MODIFIED-LIVE MUCOSAL VACCINE CANDIDATES (ORAL PRESENT., INTL. PASTEURELLACEAE CONF.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 1.2 kb temperature-conditional plasmid origin of replication based on that of the 4.2 kb ampicillin-resistance plasmid of Mannheimia haemolytica was produced using a hydroxylamine mutagenesis technique. The origin was coupled to a kanamycin-resistance cassette based on that of Tn903 and a 1.0 kb ...

  4. D-2-hydroxyglutarate metabolism is linked to photorespiration in the shm1-1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Engqvist, M K M; Jansen, E E W; Weber, A P M; Jakobs, C; Maurino, V G

    2013-07-01

    The Arabidopsis mutant shm1-1 is defective in mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 activity and displays a lethal photorespiratory phenotype at ambient CO2 concentration but grows normally at high CO2 . After transferring high CO2 -grown shm1-1 plants to ambient CO2 , the younger leaves remain photosynthetically active while developed leaves display increased yellowing and decreased FV /FM values. Metabolite analysis of plants transferred from high CO2 to ambient air indicates a massive light-dependent (photorespiratory) accumulation of glycine, 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) and D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). Amino acid markers of senescence accumulated in ambient air in wild-type and shm1-1 plants maintained in darkness and also build up in shm1-1 in the light. This, together with an enhanced transcription of the senescence marker SAG12 in shm1-1, suggests the initiation of senescence in shm1-1 under photorespiratory conditions. Mitochondrial D-2HG dehydrogenase (D-2HGDH) converts D-2HG into 2OG. In vitro studies indicate that 2OG exerts competitive inhibition on D-2HGDH with a Ki of 1.96 mm. 2OG is therefore a suitable candidate as inhibitor of the in vivo D-2HGDH activity, as 2OG is produced and accumulates in mitochondria. Inhibition of the D-2HGDH by 2OG is likely a mechanism by which D-2HG accumulates in shm1-1, however it cannot be ruled out that D-2HG may also accumulate due to an active senescence programme that is initiated in these plants after transfer to photorespiratory conditions. Thus, a novel interaction of the photorespiratory pathway with cellular processes involving D-2HG has been identified. PMID:23551974

  5. Lethal combat and sex ratio evolution in a parasitoid wasp

    PubMed Central

    Innocent, Tabitha M.; Savage, Joanna; West, Stuart A.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Sex allocation theory provides excellent opportunities for testing how behavior and life histories are adjusted in response to environmental variation. One of the most successful areas from this respect is Hamiltons local mate competition theory. As predicted by theory, a large number of animal species have been shown to adjust their offspring sex ratios (proportion male) conditionally, laying less female-biased sex ratios as the number of females that lay eggs on a patch increases. However, recent studies have shown that this predicted pattern is not followed by 2 parasitoid species in the genus Melittobia, which always produce extremely female-biased sex ratios. A possible explanation for this is that males fight fatally and that males produced by the first female to lay eggs on a patch have a competitive advantage over later emerging males. This scenario would negate the advantage of later females producing a less female-biased sex ratio. Here we examine fatal fighting and sex ratio evolution in another species, Melittobia acasta. We show that females of this species also fail to adjust their offspring sex ratio in response to the number of females laying eggs on a patch. We then show that although earlier emerging males do have an advantage in winning fights, this advantage 1) can be reduced by an interaction with body size, with larger males more likely to win fights and 2) only holds for a brief period around the time at which the younger males emerge from their pupae. This suggests that lethal male combat cannot fully explain the lack of sex ratio shift observed in Melittobia species. We discuss alternative explanations. PMID:24273326

  6. Characterization of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-associated NMNAT1 Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yo; Margolin, Zachary; Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2015-07-10

    Leber congenital amaurosis 9 (LCA9) is an autosomal recessive retinal degeneration condition caused by mutations in the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1. This condition leads to early blindness but no other consistent deficits have been reported in patients with NMNAT1 mutations despite its central role in metabolism and ubiquitous expression. To study how these mutations affect NMNAT1 function and ultimately lead to the retinal degeneration phenotype, we performed detailed analysis of LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants, including the expression, nuclear localization, enzymatic activity, secondary structure, oligomerization, and promotion of axonal and cellular integrity in response to injury. In many assays, most mutants produced results similar to wild type NMNAT1. Indeed, NAD(+) synthetic activity is unlikely to be a primary mechanism underlying retinal degeneration as most LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants had normal enzymatic activity. In contrast, the secondary structure of many NMNAT1 mutants was relatively less stable as they lost enzymatic activity after heat shock, whereas wild type NMNAT1 retains significant activity after this stress. These results suggest that LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants are more vulnerable to stressful conditions that lead to protein unfolding, a potential contributor to the retinal degeneration observed in this syndrome. PMID:26018082

  7. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mat-Jan, F.; Alam, K.Y.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion.

  8. Towards an Informative Mutant Phenotype for Every Bacterial Gene

    PubMed Central

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjun; Leon, Dacia

    2014-01-01

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, in Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness. PMID:25112473

  9. Crossover Suppressors and Balanced Recessive Lethals in CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Robert K.

    1978-01-01

    Two dominant suppressors of crossing over have been identified following X-ray treatment of the small nematode C. elegans. They suppress crossing over in linkage group II (LGII) about 100-fold and 50-fold and are both tightly linked to LGII markers. One, called C1, segregates independently of all other linkage groups and is homozygous fertile. The other is a translocation involving LGII and X. The translocation also suppresses crossing over along the right half of X and is homozygous lethal. C1 has been used as a balancer of LGII recessive lethal and sterile mutations induced by EMS. The frequencies of occurrence of lethals and steriles were approximately equal. Fourteen mutations were assigned to complementation groups and mapped. They tended to map in the same region where LGII visibles are clustered. PMID:631558

  10. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  11. Reactive oxygen species and the bacterial response to lethal stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xilin; Drlica, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria are killed by a variety of lethal stressors, some of which promote a cascade of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Perturbations expected to alter ROS accumulation affect the lethal action of diverse antibacterials, leading to the hypothesis that killing by these agents can involve ROS-mediated self-destruction. Recent challenges to the hypothesis are considered, particularly with respect to complexities in assays that distinguish primary damage from the cellular response to that damage. Also considered are bifunctional factors that are protective at low stress levels but destructive at high levels. These considerations, plus new data, support an involvement of ROS in the lethal action of some antimicrobials and raise important questions concerning consumption of antioxidant dietary supplements during antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25078317

  12. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light. PMID:25488603

  13. The Effects of Anthrax Lethal Toxin on Host Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Tao; Auth, Roger D.; Frucht, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The pathological actions of anthrax toxin require the activities of its edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF) enzyme components, which gain intracellular access via its receptor-binding component, protective antigen (PA). LF is a metalloproteinase with specificity for selected mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs), but its activity is not directly lethal to many types of primary and transformed cells in vitro. Nevertheless, in vivo treatment of several animal species with the combination of LF and PA (termed lethal toxin or LT) leads to morbidity and mortality, suggesting that LT-dependent toxicity is mediated by cellular interactions between host cells. Decades of research have revealed that a central hallmark of this toxicity is the disruption of key cellular barriers required to maintain homeostasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the effects of LT on barrier function, highlighting recent progress in establishing the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:22069727

  14. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentilin, Lorena; Baj, Gabriele; Giraudi, Pablo; Bellarosa, Cristina; Giacca, Mauro; Tiribelli, Claudio; Muro, Andrs F

    2012-03-01

    Crigler-Najjar type I (CNI) syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) deficiency. The disease is lethal due to bilirubin-induced neurological damage unless phototherapy is applied from birth. However, treatment becomes less effective during growth, and liver transplantation is required. To investigate the pathophysiology of the disease and therapeutic approaches in mice, we generated a mouse model by introducing a premature stop codon in the UGT1a1 gene, which results in an inactive enzyme. Homozygous mutant mice developed severe jaundice soon after birth and died within 11 d, showing significant cerebellar alterations. To rescue neonatal lethality, newborns were injected with a single dose of adeno-associated viral vector 9 (AAV9) expressing the human UGT1A1. Gene therapy treatment completely rescued all AAV-treated mutant mice, accompanied by lower plasma bilirubin levels and normal brain histology and motor coordination. Our mouse model of CNI reproduces genetic and phenotypic features of the human disease. We have shown, for the first time, the full recovery of the lethal effects of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. We believe that, besides gene-addition-based therapies, our mice could represent a very useful model to develop and test novel technologies based on gene correction by homologous recombination. PMID:22094718

  15. Enhanced fear expression in Spir-1 actin organizer mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Pleiser, Sandra; Banchaabouchi, Mumna Al; Samol-Wolf, Annette; Farley, Dominika; Welz, Tobias; Wellbourne-Wood, Joel; Gehring, Isabell; Linkner, Jrn; Faix, Jan; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Dietrich, Susanne; Kerkhoff, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Spir proteins nucleate actin filaments at vesicle membranes and facilitate intracellular transport processes. The mammalian genome encodes two Spir proteins, namely Spir-1 and Spir-2. While the mouse spir-2 gene has a rather broad expression pattern, high levels of spir-1 expression are restricted to the nervous system, oocytes, and testis. Spir-1 mutant mice generated by a gene trap method have been employed to address Spir-1 function during mouse development and in adult mouse tissues, with a specific emphasis on viability, reproduction, and the nervous system. The gene trap cassette disrupts Spir-1 expression between the N-terminal KIND domain and the WH2 domain cluster. Spir-1 mutant mice are viable and were born in a Mendelian ratio. In accordance with the redundant function of Spir-1 and Spir-2 in oocyte maturation, spir-1 mutant mice are fertile. The overall brain anatomy of spir-1 mutant mice is not altered and visual and motor functions of the mice remain normal. Microscopic analysis shows a slight reduction in the number of dendritic spines on cortical neurons. Detailed behavioral studies of the spir-1 mutant mice, however, unveiled a very specific and highly significant phenotype in terms of fear learning in male mice. In contextual and cued fear conditioning experiments the male spir-1 mutant mice display increased fear memory when compared to their control littermates. Our data point toward a particular function of the vesicle associated Spir-1 actin organizer in neuronal circuits determining fear behavior. PMID:24345451

  16. Mutants of Chlamydomonas with Aberrant Responses to Sulfur Deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J. P.; Yildiz, F.; Grossman, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    In the absence of sulfur, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, increases its rate of sulfate import and synthesizes several periplasmic proteins, including an arylsulfatase (Ars). These changes appear to help cells acclimate to a sulfur-deficient environment. The elevated rate of sulfate import results from an increase in the capacity and affinity of the transport system for sulfate. The synthesis of Ars, a periplasmic enzyme that cleaves sulfate from aromatic compounds, enables cells to use these molecules as a source of sulfur when free sulfate is not available. To characterize the ways in which C. reinhardtii perceives changes in the sulfur status of the environment and regulates its responses to these changes, we mutagenized cells and isolated strains exhibiting aberrant accumulation of Ars activity. These mutants were characterized for Ars activity, ars mRNA accumulation, periplasmic protein accumulation, and sulfate transport activity when grown in both sulfur-sufficient and sulfur-deficient conditions. All of the mutants exhibited pleiotropic effects with respect to several of these responses. Strains harboring double mutant combinations were constructed and characterized for Ars activity and ars mRNA accumulation. From the mutant phenotypes, we inferred that both positive and negative regulatory elements were involved in the acclimation process. Both the epistatic relationships among the mutations and the effects of the lesions on the responses of C. reinhardtii to sulfur limitation distinguished these mutants from similar mutants in Neurospora crassa. PMID:12244220

  17. Identification of ascorbic acid-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, P L; Saracco, S A; Norris, S R; Last, R L

    2000-01-01

    Vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid) is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant present at millimolar concentrations in plants. This small molecule has roles in the reduction of prosthetic metal ions, cell wall expansion, cell division, and in the detoxification of reactive oxygen generated by photosynthesis and adverse environmental conditions. However, unlike in animals, the biosynthesis of ascorbic acid (AsA) in plants is only beginning to be unraveled. The previously described AsA-deficient Arabidopsis mutant vtc1 (vitamin c-1) was recently shown to have a defect in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase, providing strong evidence for the recently proposed role of GDP-mannose in AsA biosynthesis. To genetically define other AsA biosynthetic loci, we have used a novel AsA assay to isolate four vtc mutants that define three additional VTC loci. We have also isolated a second mutant allele of VTC1. The four loci represented by the vtc mutant collection have been genetically characterized and mapped onto the Arabidopsis genome. The vtc mutants have differing ozone sensitivities. In addition, two of the mutants, vtc2-1 and vtc2-2, have unusually low levels of AsA in the leaf tissue of mature plants. PMID:10655235

  18. Hydrocarbon assimilation and biosurfactant production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A K; Kppeli, O; Fiechter, A; Reiser, J

    1991-01-01

    We isolated transposon Tn5-GM-induced mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG201 that were unable to grow in minimal media containing hexadecane as a carbon source. Some of these mutants lacked extracellular rhamnolipids, as shown by measuring the surface and interfacial tensions of the cell culture supernatants. Furthermore, the concentrated culture media of the mutant strains were tested for the presence of rhamnolipids by thin-layer chromatography and for rhamnolipid activities, including hemolysis and growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis. Mutant 65E12 was unable to produce extracellular rhamnolipids under any of the conditions tested, lacked the capacity to take up 14C-labeled hexadecane, and did not grow in media containing individual alkanes with chain lengths ranging from C12 to C19. However, growth on these alkanes and uptake of [14C]hexadecane were restored when small amounts of purified rhamnolipids were added to the cultures. Mutant 59C7 was unable to grow in media containing hexadecane, nor was it able to take up [14C]hexadecane. The addition of small amounts of rhamnolipids restored growth on alkanes and [14C]hexadecane uptake. In glucose-containing media, however, mutant 59C7 produced rhamnolipids at levels about twice as high as those of the wild-type strain. These results show that rhamnolipids play a major role in hexadecane uptake and utilization by P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:1648079

  19. Rag1?/? Mutant Zebrafish Demonstrate Specific Protection following Bacterial Re-Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Claudia; Petrie-Hanson, Lora

    2012-01-01

    Background Recombination activation gene 1 deficient (rag1?/?) mutant zebrafish have a reduced lymphocyte-like cell population that lacks functional B and T lymphocytes of the acquired immune system, but includes Natural Killer (NK)-like cells and Non-specific cytotoxic cells (NCC) of the innate immune system. The innate immune system is thought to lack the adaptive characteristics of an acquired immune system that provide enhanced protection to a second exposure of the same pathogen. It has been shown that NK cells have the ability to mediate adaptive immunity to chemical haptens and cytomegalovirus in murine models. In this study we evaluated the ability of rag1?/? mutant zebrafish to mount a protective response to the facultative intracellular fish bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri. Methodology/Principal Findings Following secondary challenge with a lethal dose of homologous bacteria 4 and 8 weeks after a primary vaccination, rag1?/? mutant zebrafish demonstrated protective immunity. Heterologous bacterial exposures did not provide protection. Adoptive leukocyte transfers from previously exposed mutants conferred protective immunity to nave mutants when exposed to homologous bacteria. Conclusions/Significance Our findings show that a component of the innate immune system mounted a response that provided significantly increased survival when rag1?/? mutant zebrafish were re-exposed to the same bacteria. Further, adoptive cell transfers demonstrated that kidney interstitial leukocytes from previously exposed rag1?/? mutant zebrafish transferred this protective immunity. This is the first report of any rag1?/? mutant vertebrate mounting a protective secondary immune response to a bacterial pathogen, and demonstrates that a type of zebrafish innate immune cell can mediate adaptive immunity in the absence of T and B cells. PMID:22970222

  20. Degeneration of pontine mossy fibres during cerebellar development in weaver mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Miwako; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Miyakawa, Yukie; Ichikawa, Tomio; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Kumanishi, Toshiro; Yano, Ryoji

    2002-08-01

    In weaver mutant mice, substitution of an amino acid residue in the pore region of GIRK2, a subtype of the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channel, changes the properties of the homomeric channel to produce a lethal depolarized state in cerebellar granule cells and dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Degeneration of these types of neurons causes strong ataxia and Parkinsonian phenomena in the mutant mice, respectively. On the other hand, the mutant gene is also expressed in various other brain regions, in which the mutant may have effects on neuronal survival. Among these regions, we focused on the pontine nuclei, the origin of the pontocerebellar mossy fibres, projecting mainly into the central region of the cerebellar cortex. The results of histological analysis showed that by P9 the number of neurons in the nuclei was reduced in the mutant to about one half and by P18 to one third of those in the wild type, whereas until P7 the number were about the same in wild-type and weaver mutant mice. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the nuclei showed a marked reduction in volume and shape of the mutant nuclei, correlating well with the decrease in neuronal number. In addition, DiI (a lipophilic tracer dye) tracing experiments revealed retraction of pontocerebellar mossy fibres from the cerebellar cortex after P5. From these results, we conclude that projecting neurons in the pontine nuclei, as well as cerebellar granule cells and dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra, strongly degenerate in weaver mutant mice, resulting in elimination of pontocerebellar mossy fibres during cerebellar development. PMID:12270032

  1. Lethal toxicity of cadmium to Cyprinus carpio and Tilapia aurea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    There have been several studies of the lethal toxicity of cadmium to freshwater fishes, but further information is required on a number of points. For example, the shallow slope which is characteristic of the cadmium toxicity curve makes interspecific comparisons difficult. There also is a paucity of information on cadmium toxicity to non-Salmonid European species. As part of a study of the water quality requirements of cultured fish species in the Mediterranean, the authors report on the lethal toxicity of cadmium to two such species, the common carp Cyprinus carpio, and Tilapia aurea, for which little information has previously been reported.

  2. Effective Lethal Mutagenesis of Influenza Virus by Three Nucleoside Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and low mutational tolerance of many RNA viruses. This approach uses mutagenic drugs to increase viral mutation rates and burden viral populations with mutations that reduce the number of infectious progeny. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis as a strategy against influenza virus using three nucleoside analogs, ribavirin, 5-azacytidine, and 5-fluorouracil. All three drugs were active against a panel of seasonal H3N2 and laboratory-adapted H1N1 strains. We found that each drug increased the frequency of mutations in influenza virus populations and decreased the virus' specific infectivity, indicating a mutagenic mode of action. We were able to drive viral populations to extinction by passaging influenza virus in the presence of each drug, indicating that complete lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus populations can be achieved when a sufficient mutational burden is applied. Population-wide resistance to these mutagenic agents did not arise after serial passage of influenza virus populations in sublethal concentrations of drug. Sequencing of these drug-passaged viral populations revealed genome-wide accumulation of mutations at low frequency. The replicative capacity of drug-passaged populations was reduced at higher multiplicities of infection, suggesting the presence of defective interfering particles and a possible barrier to the evolution of resistance. Together, our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be a particularly effective therapeutic approach with a high genetic barrier to resistance for influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is an RNA virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality during annual epidemics. Novel therapies for RNA viruses are needed due to the ease with which these viruses evolve resistance to existing therapeutics. Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and the low mutational tolerance of most RNA viruses. It is thought to possess a higher barrier to resistance than conventional antiviral strategies. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis against influenza virus using three different drugs. We showed that influenza virus was sensitive to lethal mutagenesis by demonstrating that all three drugs induced mutations and led to an increase in the generation of defective viral particles. We also found that it may be difficult for resistance to these drugs to arise at a population-wide level. Our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be an attractive anti-influenza strategy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25589650

  3. Approaches to Identifying Synthetic Lethal Interactions in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jordan M.; Nguyen, Quy H.; Singh, Manpreet; Razorenova, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting synthetic lethal interactions is a promising new therapeutic approach to exploit specific changes that occur within cancer cells. Multiple approaches to investigate these interactions have been developed and successfully implemented, including chemical, siRNA, shRNA, and CRISPR library screens. Genome-wide computational approaches, such as DAISY, also have been successful in predicting synthetic lethal interactions from both cancer cell lines and patient samples. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages that need to be considered depending on the cancer type and its molecular alterations. This review discusses these approaches and examines case studies that highlight their use. PMID:26029013

  4. Approaches to identifying synthetic lethal interactions in cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jordan M; Nguyen, Quy H; Singh, Manpreet; Razorenova, Olga V

    2015-06-01

    Targeting synthetic lethal interactions is a promising new therapeutic approach to exploit specific changes that occur within cancer cells. Multiple approaches to investigate these interactions have been developed and successfully implemented, including chemical, siRNA, shRNA, and CRISPR library screens. Genome-wide computational approaches, such as DAISY, also have been successful in predicting synthetic lethal interactions from both cancer cell lines and patient samples. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages that need to be considered depending on the cancer type and its molecular alterations. This review discusses these approaches and examines case studies that highlight their use. PMID:26029013

  5. Flowering of Arabidopsis cop1 mutants in darkness.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Mayu; Komeda, Yoshibumi

    2004-04-01

    To elucidate the role of the COP1 gene in flowering, we analyzed flowering of cop1 mutant lines in darkness. When grown in the presence of 1% (w/v) sucrose, the cop1-6 mutant flowered in darkness, but cop1-1 and cop1-4 did not. However, cop1-1 and cop1-4 flowered in darkness when grown in the presence of 5% (w/v) sucrose. Therefore, the COP1 gene represses not only photomorphogenesis in seedlings but also flowering in darkness. Comparison of mRNAs levels of floral identity genes in cop1-6 and wild-type plants grown in darkness revealed increased mRNA levels of genes that act downstream of CO and reduced FLC mRNA level in cop1-6. Double mutants of cop1-6 and each of the late-flowering mutations cry2-1, gi-2, co-1, and ld-1 flowered in darkness. All of the double mutants except cry2-1 cop1-6 flowered later than cop1-6, demonstrating that cop1-6 is epistatic to cry2-1 for early flowering. The ld-1 cop1-6 double mutant flowered much earlier than the ld-1 mutant. The delay in flowering in the double mutants was not strongly influenced by the light conditions, whereas that of the gi-2 cop1-6 double mutant was reduced in darkness. PMID:15111714

  6. Functional complementation of Drosophila itpr mutants by rat Itpr1.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sumita; Hasan, Gaiti

    2012-09-01

    The Drosophila inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) and mammalian type-1 IP(3)Rs have 57-60% sequence similarity and share major domain homology with each other. Mutants in the single Drosophila IP(3)R gene, itpr, and Itpr1 knockout mice both exhibit lethality and defects in motor coordination. Here the authors show that the rat type-1 IP(3)R, which is the major neuronal isoform, when expressed in the pan-neuronal domain in Drosophila, functionally complements Drosophila IP(3)R function at cellular and systemic levels. It rescues the established neuronal phenotypes of itpr mutants in Drosophila, including wing posture, flight, electrophysiological correlates of flight maintenance, and intracellular calcium dynamics. This is the first in vivo demonstration of functional homology between a mammalian and fly IP(3)R. This study also paves the way for cellular and molecular analyses of the spinocerebellar ataxias in Drosophila, since SCA15/16 is known to be caused by heterozygosity of human ITPR1. PMID:22817477

  7. Viability of rep recA Mutants Depends on Their Capacity To Cope with Spontaneous Oxidative Damage and on the DnaK Chaperone Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bredche, Marie-Florence; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Michel, Bndicte

    2001-01-01

    Replication arrests due to the lack or the inhibition of replicative helicases are processed by recombination proteins. Consequently, cells deficient in the Rep helicase, in which replication pauses are frequent, require the RecBCD recombination complex for growth. rep recA mutants are viable and display no growth defect at 37 or 42C. The putative role of chaperone proteins in rep and rep recA mutants was investigated by testing the effects of dnaK mutations. dnaK756 and dnaK306 mutations, which allow growth of otherwise wild-type Escherichia coli cells at 40C, are lethal in rep recA mutants at this temperature. Furthermore, they affect the growth of rep mutants, and to a lesser extent, that of recA mutants. We conclude that both rep and recA mutants require DnaK for optimal growth, leading to low viability of the triple (rep recA dnaK) mutant. rep recA mutant cells form colonies at low efficiency when grown to exponential phase at 30C. Although the plating defect is not observed at a high temperature, it is not suppressed by overexpression of heat shock proteins at 30C. The plating defect of rep recA mutant cells is suppressed by the presence of catalase in the plates. The cryosensitivity of rep recA mutants therefore results from an increased sensitivity to oxidative damage upon propagation at low temperatures. PMID:11244053

  8. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate. PMID:26519470

  9. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate. PMID:26519470

  10. Complementation Analysis of Methyl Methane-Sulfonate-Induced Recessive Lethal Mutations in the Zeste-White Region of the X Chromosome of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C. P.; Lim, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    Recessive lethal mutations in the 3A1 to 3C2 region of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster were detected in 113 of 33,544 sperm treated by feeding 5 mM methyl methanesulfonate in 1% sucrose for 22 hours. Seven of the 113 lethals were sterile, leaving 106 for analysis by complementation tests. With only one exception, these mutants were found to have lesions restricted to single loci. One of these single-site mutations was in gt, 2 in tko, 18 in zw-1, 12 in zw-8, 6 in zw-4, 3 in zw-10, 3 in zw-13, 21 in zw-2, 7 in zw-3, 5 in zw-6, 6 in zw-12, 1 in zw-7, 12 in zw-5, 5 in zw-11, and 3 in zw-9, One of the lethals, m69, was non-complementary to two adjacent loci, zw-2 and zw-3, possibly indicating a deletion encompassing two loci. The results confirm that there are at least 15 recessive lethal loci in the region and are consistent with the hypothesis of Lim and Snyder (1968 and 1974) that inability of monofunctional alkylating chemicals to induce deletion-associated mutations is a characteristic of the compounds. PMID:166020

  11. Identification of synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibition and microtubule-destabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Hugle, M; Belz, K; Fulda, S

    2015-12-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is frequently overexpressed in cancer, which correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, we investigated PLK1 as therapeutic target using rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) as a model. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs in preclinical RMS models and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of this synergism. PLK1 inhibitors (i.e., BI 2536 and BI 6727) synergistically induce apoptosis together with microtubule-destabilizing drugs (i.e., vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) and vinorelbine (VNR)) in several RMS cell lines (combination index <0.9) including a patient-derived primary RMS culture. Importantly, PLK1 inhibitors and VCR cooperate to significantly suppress RMS growth in two in vivo models, including a mouse xenograft model, without causing additive toxicity. In addition, no toxicity was observed in non-malignant fibroblast or myoblast cultures. Mechanistically, BI 2536/VCR co-treatment triggers mitotic arrest, which initiates mitochondrial apoptosis by inactivation of antiapoptotic BCL-2 family proteins, followed by BAX/BAK activation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of caspase-dependent or caspase-independent effector pathways. This conclusion is supported by data showing that BI 2536/VCR-induced apoptosis is significantly inhibited by preventing cells to enter mitosis, by overexpression of BCL-2 or a non-degradable MCL-1 mutant, by BAK knockdown, ROS scavengers, caspase inhibition or endonuclease G silencing. This identification of a novel synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs has important implications for developing PLK1 inhibitor-based combination treatments. PMID:26024389

  12. Vitellogenin Receptor Mutation Leads to the Oogenesis Mutant Phenotype “scanty vitellin” of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yan-Xia; Luo, Juan; Katsuma, Susumu; Yang, Cong-Wen; Banno, Yutaka; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Shimada, Toru; Xia, Qing-You

    2013-01-01

    In insects, the vitellogenin receptor (VgR) mediates the uptake of vitellogenin (Vg) from the hemolymph by developing oocytes. The oogenesis mutant scanty vitellin (vit) of Bombyx mori (Bm) lacks vitellin and 30-kDa proteins, but B. mori egg-specific protein and BmVg are normal. The vit eggs are white and smaller compared with the pale yellow eggs of the wild type and are embryonic lethal. This study found that a mutation in the B. mori VgR gene (BmVgR) is responsible for the vit phenotype. We cloned the cDNA sequences encoding WT and vit BmVgR. The functional domains of BmVgR are similar to those of other low-density lipoprotein receptors. When compared with the wild type, a 235-bp genomic sequence in vit BmVgR is substituted for a 7-bp sequence. This mutation has resulted in a 50-amino acid deletion in the third Class B region of the first epidermal growth factor (EGF1) domain. BmVgR is expressed specifically in oocytes, and the transcriptional level is changed dramatically and consistently with maturation of oocytes during the previtellogenic periods. Linkage analysis confirmed that BmVgR is mutated in the vit mutant. The coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed that mutated BmVgR is able to bind BmVg but that BmVg cannot be dissociated under acidic conditions. The WT phenotype determined by RNA interference was similar to that of the vit phenotype for nutritional deficiency, such as BmVg and 30-kDa proteins. These results showed that BmVgR has an important role in transporting proteins for egg formation and embryonic development in B. mori. PMID:23515308

  13. Germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa that responds to siderophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlang, G.; Williams, N. P.

    1977-01-01

    A conditionally germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa has been found to be partially curable by ferricrocin and other siderophores. The mutant conidia rapidly lose their membrane-bound siderophores when suspended in buffer or growth media. Germination is consequently delayed unless large numbers of conidia are present (positive population effect). This indicates that the mutant has a membrane defect involving the siderophore attachment site.

  14. Fission yeast mutants that alleviate transcriptional silencing in centromeric flanking repeats and disrupt chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Ekwall, K; Cranston, G; Allshire, R C

    1999-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes are transcriptionally silenced when placed within centromeres, within or close to the silent mating-type loci or adjacent to telomeres. Factors required to maintain mating-type silencing also affect centromeric silencing and chromosome segregation. We isolated mutations that alleviate repression of marker genes in the inverted repeats flanking the central core of centromere I. Mutations csp1 to 13 (centromere: suppressor of position effect) defined 12 loci. Ten of the csp mutants have no effect on mat2/3 or telomere silencing. All csp mutants allow some expression of genes in the centromeric flanking repeat, but expression in the central core is undetectable. Consistent with defective centromere structure and function, chromosome loss rates are elevated in all csp mutants. Mutants csp1 to 6 are temperature-sensitive lethal and csp3 and csp6 cells are defective in mitosis at 36 degrees. csp7 to 13 display a high incidence of lagging chromosomes on late anaphase spindles. Thus, by screening for mutations that disrupt silencing in the flanking region of a fission yeast centromere a novel collection of mutants affecting centromere architecture and chromosome segregation has been isolated. PMID:10545449

  15. Mutant KRAS as a critical determinant of the therapeutic response of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Knickelbein, Kyle; Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the KRAS oncogene represent one of the most prevalent genetic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC), the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. In addition to their well-characterized function in driving tumor progression, KRAS mutations have been recognized as a critical determinant of the therapeutic response of CRC. Recent studies demonstrate that KRAS-mutant tumors are intrinsically insensitive to clinically-used epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting antibodies, including cetuximab and panitumumab. Acquired resistance to the anti-EGFR therapy was found to be associated with enrichment of KRAS-mutant tumor cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of mutant-KRAS-mediated therapeutic resistance has remained unclear. Despite intensive efforts, directly targeting mutant KRAS has been largely unsuccessful. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the biological function of KRAS mutations in determining the therapeutic response of CRC, highlighting several recently developed agents and strategies for targeting mutant KRAS, such as synthetic lethal interactions. PMID:25815366

  16. MutMap+: genetic mapping and mutant identification without crossing in rice.

    PubMed

    Fekih, Rym; Takagi, Hiroki; Tamiru, Muluneh; Abe, Akira; Natsume, Satoshi; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Sharma, Shailendra; Sharma, Shiveta; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Hideo; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Mitsuoka, Chikako; Utsushi, Hiroe; Uemura, Aiko; Kanzaki, Eiko; Kosugi, Shunichi; Yoshida, Kentaro; Cano, Liliana; Kamoun, Sophien; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have enabled researchers and breeders to rapidly associate phenotypic variation to genome sequence differences. We recently took advantage of next-generation sequencing technology to develop MutMap, a method that allows rapid identification of causal nucleotide changes of rice mutants by whole genome resequencing of pooled DNA of mutant F2 progeny derived from crosses made between candidate mutants and the parental line. Here we describe MutMap+, a versatile extension of MutMap, that identifies causal mutations by comparing SNP frequencies of bulked DNA of mutant and wild-type progeny of M3 generation derived from selfing of an M2 heterozygous individual. Notably, MutMap+ does not necessitate artificial crossing between mutants and the wild-type parental line. This method is therefore suitable for identifying mutations that cause early development lethality, sterility, or generally hamper crossing. Furthermore, MutMap+ is potentially useful for gene isolation in crops that are recalcitrant to artificial crosses. PMID:23874658

  17. Altered xanthophyll compositions adversely affect chlorophyll accumulation and nonphotochemical quenching in Arabidopsis mutants.

    PubMed

    Pogson, B J; Niyogi, K K; Bjrkman, O; DellaPenna, D

    1998-10-27

    Collectively, the xanthophyll class of carotenoids perform a variety of critical roles in light harvesting antenna assembly and function. The xanthophyll composition of higher plant photosystems (lutein, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin) is remarkably conserved, suggesting important functional roles for each. We have taken a molecular genetic approach in Arabidopsis toward defining the respective roles of individual xanthophylls in vivo by using a series of mutant lines that selectively eliminate and substitute a range of xanthophylls. The mutations, lut1 and lut2 (lut = lutein deficient), disrupt lutein biosynthesis. In lut2, lutein is replaced mainly by a stoichiometric increase in violaxanthin and antheraxanthin. A third mutant, aba1, accumulates normal levels of lutein and substitutes zeaxanthin for violaxanthin and neoxanthin. The lut2aba1 double mutant completely lacks lutein, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin and instead accumulates zeaxanthin. All mutants were viable in soil and had chlorophyll a/b ratios ranging from 2.9 to 3.5 and near wild-type rates of photosynthesis. However, mutants accumulating zeaxanthin exhibited a delayed greening virescent phenotype, which was most severe and often lethal when zeaxanthin was the only xanthophyll present. Chlorophyll fluorescence quenching kinetics indicated that both zeaxanthin and lutein contribute to nonphotochemical quenching; specifically, lutein contributes, directly or indirectly, to the rapid rise of nonphotochemical quenching. The results suggest that the normal complement of xanthophylls, while not essential, is required for optimal assembly and function of the light harvesting antenna in higher plants. PMID:9789087

  18. Conserved role of unc-79 in ethanol responses in lightweight mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Speca, David J; Chihara, Daisuke; Ashique, Amir M; Bowers, M Scott; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T; Lee, Jungsoo; Rabbee, Nusrat; Speed, Terence P; Gularte, Rodrigo J; Chitwood, James; Medrano, Juan F; Liao, Mark; Sonner, James M; Eger, Edmond I; Peterson, Andrew S; McIntire, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    The mechanisms by which ethanol and inhaled anesthetics influence the nervous system are poorly understood. Here we describe the positional cloning and characterization of a new mouse mutation isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) forward mutagenesis screen for animals with enhanced locomotor activity. This allele, Lightweight (Lwt), disrupts the homolog of the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) unc-79 gene. While Lwt/Lwt homozygotes are perinatal lethal, Lightweight heterozygotes are dramatically hypersensitive to acute ethanol exposure. Experiments in C. elegans demonstrate a conserved hypersensitivity to ethanol in unc-79 mutants and extend this observation to the related unc-80 mutant and nca-1;nca-2 double mutants. Lightweight heterozygotes also exhibit an altered response to the anesthetic isoflurane, reminiscent of unc-79 invertebrate mutant phenotypes. Consistent with our initial mapping results, Lightweight heterozygotes are mildly hyperactive when exposed to a novel environment and are smaller than wild-type animals. In addition, Lightweight heterozygotes exhibit increased food consumption yet have a leaner body composition. Interestingly, Lightweight heterozygotes voluntarily consume more ethanol than wild-type littermates. The acute hypersensitivity to and increased voluntary consumption of ethanol observed in Lightweight heterozygous mice in combination with the observed hypersensitivity to ethanol in C. elegans unc-79, unc-80, and nca-1;nca-2 double mutants suggests a novel conserved pathway that might influence alcohol-related behaviors in humans. PMID:20714347

  19. Out-crossing between 'Bacon' pollinizers and adjacent 'Hass' avocado and the identification of two new avocado lethal mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill) has an unusual flowering mechanism, diurnally synchronous protogynous dichogamy, which promotes cross pollination among avocado genotypes. In commercial groves, which usually contain pollinizer rows adjacent to the more desirable commercial cultivars, the rate of out-...

  20. Science or slaughter: need for lethal sampling of sharks.

    PubMed

    Heupel, M R; Simpfendorfer, C A

    2010-10-01

    General consensus among scientists, commercial interests, and the public regarding the status of shark populations is leading to an increasing need for the scientific community to provide information to help guide effective management and conservation actions. Experience from other marine vertebrate taxa suggests that public, political, and media pressures will play an increasingly important part in setting research, management, and conservation priorities. We examined the potential implications of nonscientific influences on shark research. In particular, we considered whether lethal research sampling of sharks is justified. Although lethal sampling comes at a cost to a population, especially for threatened species, the conservation benefits from well-designed studies provide essential data that cannot be collected currently in any other way. Methods that enable nonlethal collection of life-history data on sharks are being developed (e.g., use of blood samples to detect maturity), but in the near future they will not provide widespread or significant benefits. Development of these techniques needs to continue, as does the way in which scientists coordinate their use of material collected during lethal sampling. For almost half of the known shark species there are insufficient data to determine their population status; thus, there is an ongoing need for further collection of scientific data to ensure all shark populations have a future. Shark populations will benefit most when decisions about the use of lethal sampling are made on the basis of scientific evidence that is free from individual, political, public, and media pressures. PMID:20337690

  1. The Prevalence, Lethality and Intent of Suicide Attempts among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Judy A.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    Although suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents in the United States, little is known about the prevalence or characteristics of suicide attempts among adolescents. Data from 1,710 adolescents attending 9 high schools in 5 communities were examined to determine the prevalence of suicide attempts and the lethality and intent…

  2. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Anthrax Lethal Factor Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John D.; Khan, Atiyya R.; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Peet, Norton P.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the preparation of new small molecule inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Our starting point was the symmetrical, bis-quinolinyl compound 1 (NSC 12155). Optimization of one half of this molecule led to new LF inhibitors that were desymmetrized to afford more drug-like compounds. PMID:24290062

  3. Help-Seeking Behavior Prior to Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Lauren Seymour; Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo

    2002-01-01

    The association between help-seeking and nearly lethal suicide attempts was evaluated using data from a population-based, case-control study. Measures of help-seeking included type of consultant contacted, and whether suicide was discussed. Findings suggest efforts to better understand the role of help-seeking in suicide prevention deserves

  4. The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative positioning serves as a barometer of…

  5. An overview of the future of non-lethal weapons.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J B

    2001-01-01

    During the past decade, vast changes have occurred in the geopolitical landscape and the nature of the types of conflicts in which technologically developed countries have been involved. While the threat of conventional war remains, forces have been more frequently deployed in situations that require great restraint. Adversaries are often likely to be elusive and commingled with noncombatants. There has been some shift in public opinion away from tolerance of collateral casualties. Therefore there is a need to be able to apply force while limiting casualties. Non-lethal weapons provide part of the solution. Among the changes that will influence the future have been studies by the US and NATO concerning the use of non-lethal weapons, coincidental with increased funding for their development and testing. New concepts and policies have recently been formalized. Surprisingly, the most strident objections to the implementation of non-lethal weapons have come from organizations that are ostensibly designed to protect non-combatants. These arguments are specious and, while technically and academically challenging, actually serve to foster an environment that will result in the deaths of many more innocent civilians. They misconstrue technology with human intent. The reasons for use of force will not abate. Alternatives to bombs, missiles, tanks and artillery must therefore be found. Non-lethal weapons are not a panacea but do offer the best hope of minimizing casualties while allowing nations or alliances the means to use force in protection of national or regional interests. PMID:11578037

  6. The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative positioning serves as a barometer of

  7. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  8. High-throughput simultaneous screen and counterscreen identifies homoharringtonine as synthetic lethal with von Hippel-Lindau loss in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Nicholas C.; Pavía-Jiménez, Andrea; Tcheuyap, Vanina T.; Alexander, Shane; Vishwanath, Mridula; Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin; Williams, Noelle S.; Kapur, Payal; Posner, Bruce; McKay, Renée M.; Brugarolas, James

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 85% of primary renal neoplasms, and is rarely curable when metastatic. Approximately 70% of RCCs are clear-cell type (ccRCC), and in >80% the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene is mutated or silenced. We developed a novel, high-content, screening strategy for the identification of small molecules that are synthetic lethal with genes mutated in cancer. In this strategy, the screen and counterscreen are conducted simultaneously by differentially labeling mutant and reconstituted isogenic tumor cell line pairs with different fluorochromes and using a highly sensitive high-throughput imaging-based platform. This approach minimizes confounding factors from sequential screening, and more accurately replicates the in vivo cancer setting where cancer cells are adjacent to normal cells. A screen of ~12,800 small molecules identified homoharringtonine (HHT), an FDA-approved drug for treating chronic myeloid leukemia, as a VHL-synthetic lethal agent in ccRCC. HHT induced apoptosis in VHL-mutant, but not VHL-reconstituted, ccRCC cells, and inhibited tumor growth in 30% of VHL-mutant patient-derived ccRCC tumorgraft lines tested. Building on a novel screening strategy and utilizing a validated RCC tumorgraft model recapitulating the genetics and drug responsiveness of human RCC, these studies identify HHT as a potential therapeutic agent for a subset of VHL-deficient ccRCCs. PMID:26219258

  9. A toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 mutant that defines a functional site critical for T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, C M; Blanco, L R; Bonventre, P F; Choi, E

    1995-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), a superantigen produced by Staphylococcus aureus, is a causative agent of toxic shock syndrome (TSS). This superantigen is a potent stimulator of T cells and macrophages/monocytes, resulting in the release of cytokines that are implicated in the pathogenesis of TSS. This study characterizes a mutant TSST-1, derived by site-directed mutagenesis, that has an alanine substitution at histidine 135 (mutant 135). This single-amino-acid change results in a mutant toxin that has lost mitogenic activity for T cells. In contrast to wild-type TSST-1, this mutant does not induce T cells to express interleukin-2, gamma interferon, or tumor necrosis factor beta (TNF-beta). The inability of mutant 135 to activate T cells is not due to a lack of binding to the class II major histocompatibility complex receptor. In addition, the mutant TSST-1 does not induce expression of TNF-alpha, which plays a role in the development of lethal shock. The lack of TNF-alpha induction by mutant 135 is likely due to its inability to activate T cells. These data suggest that the mutation at histidine 135 in TSST-1 affects toxin interactions with the T-cell receptor rather than the class II major histocompatibility complex receptor. PMID:7768593

  10. Determination of Lethality Rate Constants and D-Values for Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) Spores Exposed to Dry Heat from 115C to 170C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, M. J.; Schubert, W. W.; Beaudet, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    Dry heat microbial reduction is the NASA-approved sterilization method to reduce the microbial bioburden on spaceflight hardware for missions with planetary protection requirements. The method involves heating the spaceflight hardware to temperatures between 104C and 125C for up to 50 hours, while controlling the humidity to very low values. Collection of lethality data at temperatures above 125C and with ambient (uncontrolled) humidity conditions would establish whether any microbial reduction credit can be offered to the flight project for processes that occur at temperatures greater than 125C. The goal of this research is to determine the survival rates of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) spores subjected to temperatures higher than 125C under both dry (controlled) and room ambient humidity (36 66% relative humidity) conditions. Spores were deposited inside thin, stainless steel thermal spore exposure vessels (TSEVs) and heated under ambient or controlled humidity conditions from 115C to 170C. After the exposures, the TSEVs were cooled rapidly, and the spores were recovered and plated. Survivor ratios, lethality rate constants, and D-values were calculated at each temperature. At 115C and 125C, the controlled humidity lethality rate constant was faster than th:e ambient humidity lethality rate constant. At 135C, the ambient and controlled humidity lethality rate constants were statistically identical. At 150C and 170C, the ambient humidity lethality rate constant was slightly faster than the controlled humidity lethality rate constant. These results provide evidence for possibly modifying the NASA dry heat microbial reduction specification.

  11. Empirical Complexities in the Genetic Foundations of Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this biasmutagenesis of virionsbut find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it. PMID:23934886

  12. Empirical complexities in the genetic foundations of lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bull, James J; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J

    2013-10-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias-mutagenesis of virions-but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it. PMID:23934886

  13. A Multivariate Model of Stakeholder Preference for Lethal Cat Management

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Dara M.; Jacobson, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n = 1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI = 0.94, RMSEA = 0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management. PMID:24736744

  14. The Generation and Genetic Analysis of Suppressors of Lethal Mutations in the Caenorhabditis Elegans Rol-3(v) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Barbazuk, W. B.; Johnsen, R. C.; Baillie, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans rol-3(e754) mutation is a member of a general glass of mutations affecting gross morphology, presumably through disruption of the nematode cuticle. Adult worms homozygous for rol-3(e754) exhibit rotation about their long axis associated with a left-hand twisted cuticle, musculature, gut and ventral nerve cord. Our laboratory previously isolated 12 recessive lethal alleles of rol-3. All these lethal alleles cause an arrest in development at either early or mid-larval stages, suggesting that the rol-3 gene product performs an essential developmental function. Furthermore, through the use of the heterochronic mutants lin-14 and lin-29, we have established that the expression of rol-3(e754)'s adult specific visible function is not dependent on the presence of an adult cuticle. In an attempt to understand rol-3's developmental role we sought to identify other genes whose products interact with that of rol-3. Toward this end, we generated eight EMS induced and two gamma irradiation-induced recessive suppressors of the temperature sensitive (ts) mid-larval lethal phenotype of rol-3(s1040ts). These suppressors define two complementation groups srl-1 II and srl-2 III; and, while they suppress the rol-3(s1040) lethality, they do not suppress the adult specific visible rolling phenotype. Furthermore, there is a complex genetic interaction between srl-2 and srl-1 such that srl-2(s2506) fails to complement all srl alleles tested. These results suggest that srl-1 and srl-2 may share a common function and, thus, possibly constitute members of the same gene family. Mutations in both srl-1 and srl-2 produce no obvious hermaphrodite phenotypes in the absence of rol-3(s1040ts); however, males homozygous for either srl-1 or srl-2 display aberrant tail morphology. We present evidence suggesting that the members of srl-2 are not allele specific with respect to their suppression of rol-3 lethality, and that rol-3 may act in some way to influence proper posterior morphogenesis. Finally, based on our genetic analysis of rol-3 and the srl mutations, we present a model whereby the wild-type products of the srl loci act in a concerted manner to negatively regulate the rol-3 gene. PMID:8138151

  15. Proton suicide: general method for direct selection of sugar transport- and fermentation-defective mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, J.W.; Clark, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    A positive selection procedure was devised for bacterial mutants incapable of producing acid from sugars by fermentation. The method relied on the production of elemental bromine from a mixture of bromide and bromate under acidic conditions. When wild-type Escherichia coli cells were plated on media containing a fermentable sugar and an equimolar mixture of bromide and bromate, most of the cells were killed but a variety of mutants unable to produce acid from the sugar survived. Among these mutants were those defective in (i) sugar uptake, (ii) the glycolytic pathway, and (iii) the excretion. There were also novel mutants with some presumed regulatory defects affecting fermentation.

  16. Mammary tumors in mice conditionally mutant for Brca1 exhibit gross genomic instability and centrosome amplification yet display a recurring distribution of genomic imbalances that is similar to human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Zo; Montagna, Cristina; Xu, Xiaoling; Howard, Tamara; Gadina, Massimo; Brodie, Steven G; Deng, Chu-Xia; Ried, Thomas

    2002-08-01

    BRCA1 mutation carriers have an increased susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. Excision of exon 11 of Brca1 in the mouse, using a conditional knockout (Cre-loxP) approach, results in mammary tumor formation after long latency. To characterize the genomic instability observed in these tumors, to establish a comparative map of chromosomal imbalances and to contribute to the validation of this mouse model of breast cancer, we have characterized chromosomal imbalances and aberrations using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and spectral karyotyping (SKY). We found that all tumors exhibit chromosome instability as evidenced by structural chromosomal aberrations and aneuploidy, yet they display a pattern of chromosomal gain and loss that is similar to the pattern in human breast carcinomas. Of note, nine of 15 tumors exhibited a gain of distal chromosome 11, a region that is orthologous to human chromosome 17q11-qter, the mapping position of Erbb2. However, our analysis suggests that genes distal to Erbb2 are the main targets of amplification. Four of the tumors also exhibited a copy number loss of proximal chromosome 11 (11A-B), a region orthologous to human 17p. In eight of the tumors we observed whole or partial gain of chromosome 15 centering on 15D2-D3 (orthologous to human chromosome 8q24), the map location of the c-Myc gene, and six of the tumors exhibited copy number loss of whole or partial chromosome 14, including 14D3, the map location of Rb1. We conclude that despite the tremendous shuffling of chromosomes during the course of mammalian evolution, the pattern of genomic imbalances is conserved between BRCA1-associated mammary gland tumors in mice and humans. Western blot analysis showed that while p53 is absent or mutated in some tumors, at least two tumors revealed wild-type protein, suggesting that other genetic events may lead to tumorigenesis. Similar to BRCA1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the tumor cells contained supernumerary functional centrosomes with intact centrioles whose presence results in multipolar mitoses and aneuploidy. PMID:12140760

  17. Complete blockage of the mevalonate pathway results in male gametophyte lethality

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Nakagawa, Shoko; Kamide, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Keiko; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Hashinokuchi, Hiromi; Kiuchi, Reiko; Saito, Kazuki; Muranaka, Toshiya; Nagata, Noriko

    2009-01-01

    Plants have two isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidic 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Since the discovery of the MEP pathway, possible metabolic cross-talk between these pathways has prompted intense research. Although many studies have shown the existence of such cross-talk using feeding experiments, it remains to be determined if native cross-talk, rather than exogenously applied metabolites, can compensate for complete blockage of the MVA pathway. Previously, Arabidopsis mutants for HMG1 and HMG2 encoding HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) were isolated. Although it was shown that HMGR1 is a functional HMGR, the enzyme activity of HMGR2 has not been confirmed. It is demonstrated here that HMG2 encodes a functional reductase with similar activity to HMGR1, using enzyme assays and complementation experiments. To estimate the contribution of native cross-talk, an attempt was made to block the MVA pathway by making double mutants lacking both HMG1 and HMG2, but no double homozygotes were detected in the progeny of self-pollinated HMG1/hmg1 hmg2/hmg2 plants. hmg1 hmg2 male gametophytes appeared to be lethal based on crossing experiments, and microscopy indicated that ?50% of the microspores from the HMG1/hmg1 hmg2/hmg2 plant appeared shrunken and exhibited poorly defined endoplasmic reticulum membranes. In situ hybridization showed that HMG1 transcripts were expressed in both the tapetum and microspores, while HMG2 mRNA appeared only in microspores. It is concluded that native cross-talk from the plastid cannot compensate for complete blockage of the MVA pathway, at least during male gametophyte development, because either HMG1 or HMG2 is required for male gametophyte development. PMID:19363204

  18. Influence of sub-lethal stresses on the survival of lactic acid bacteria after spray-drying in orange juice.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J; Borges, S; Teixeira, P

    2015-12-01

    The demand for new functional non-dairy based products makes the production of a probiotic orange juice powder an encouraging challenge. However, during drying process and storage, loss of viability of the dried probiotic cultures can occur, since the cells are exposed to various stresses. The influence of sub-lethal conditions of temperature, acidic pH and hydrogen peroxide on the viability of Pediococcus acidilactici HA-6111-2 and Lactobacillus plantarum 299v during spray drying in orange juice and subsequent storage under different conditions was investigated. At the end of storage, the survival of both microorganisms through simulated gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) conditions was also determined. The viability of cells previously exposed to each stress was not affected by the drying process. However, during 180 days of storage at room temperature, unlike P. acidilactici HA-6111-2, survival of L. plantarum 299v was enhanced by prior exposure to sub-lethal conditions. Previous exposure to sub-lethal stresses of each microorganism did not improve their viability after passage through simulated GIT. Nevertheless, as cellular inactivation during 180 days of storage was low, both microorganisms were present in numbers of ca. 10(7) cfu/mL at the end of GIT. This is an indication that both bacteria are good candidates for use in the development of an orange juice powder with functional characteristics. PMID:26338119

  19. STUDIES ON A NONDORMANT SUNFLOWER MUTANT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An unexpected sunflower mutant resulting from an interspecific cross of the wild perennial Helianthus divaricatus with cultivated HA 89 was identified. In this mutant, dormancy is not induced in the developing embryo. Instead, developing seeds of the mutant sunflower begin to germinate in the head a...

  20. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  1. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind

  2. Hydrocarbon assimilation and biosurfactant production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.K.; Fiechter, A.; Reiser, J. ); Kaeppeli, O. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors isolated transposon Tn5-GM-induced mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG201 that were unable to grow in minimal media containing hexadecane as a carbon source. Some of these mutants lacked extracellular rhamnolipids, as shown by measuring the surface and interfacial tensions of the cell culture supernatants. Furthermore, the concentrated culture media of the mutant strains were tested for the presence of rhamnolipids by thin-layer chromatography and for rhamnolipid activities, including hemolysis and growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis. Mutant 65E12 was unable to produce extracellular rhamnolipids under any of the inhibition of Bacillus subtilis. Mutant 65E12 was unable to produce extracellular rhamnolipids under any of the conditions tested, lacked the capacity to take up {sup 14}C-labeled hexadecane, and did not grow in media containing individual alkanes with chain lengths ranging from C{sub 12} to C{sub 19}. However, growth on these alkanes and uptake of ({sup 14}C)hexadecane were restored when small amounts of purified rhamnolipids were added to the cultures. Mutant 59C7 was unable to grow in media containing hexadecane, nor was it able to take up ({sup 14}C)hexadecane uptake. The addition of small amounts of rhamnolipids restored on alkanes and ({sup 14}C)hexadecane uptake. In glucose-containing media, however, mutant 59C7 produced rhamnolipids at levels about twice as high as those of the wild-type strain. These results show that rhamnolipids play a major role in hexadecane uptake and utilization by P.aeruginosa.

  3. Arabidopsis mutants define downstream branches in the phototransduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, H M; Altschmied, L; Chory, J

    1994-02-01

    Light regulates the development of Arabidopsis seedlings in a variety of ways, including inhibition of hypocotyl growth and promotion of leaf development, chloroplast differentiation, and light-responsive gene expression. Mutations that uncouple most or all of these responses from light control have been described, for example, det1, det2, and cop1. To identify regulatory components that define downstream branches in the light-regulated signal transduction pathway, mutants specifically affected in only one light-regulated response were isolated. A screen was designed to isolate mutants that overexpressed the CAB (photosystem II type I chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins) genes in the dark, by use of transgenic line containing a T-DNA construct with two CAB3 promoter-reporter fusions. Eight mutants that showed aberrant expression of both CAB3 promoters were isolated and were designated doc mutants (for dark overepression of CAB). All of the mutants have normal etiolated morphology in the dark. Genetic and phenotypic analyses indicate that most of the mutations are recessive and define at least three loci (doc1, doc2, doc3). Unlike det1 and det2 mutants, which affect the expression of CAB and RBCS (the small subunit of RuBP carboxylase) to approximately the same extent, all three doc mutations are much more specific in derepressing the expression of CAB. The phenotypes of doc mutants suggest that morphological changes can be genetically separated from changes in CAB gene expression. Moreover, the regulation of CAB gene expression can be separated further from the regulation of RBCS gene expression. Epistasis studies suggest that DOC1 and DET3 act downstream from DET1 on two separate branches in the phototransduction pathway. In contrast, DOC2 appears to act on a distinct pathway from DET1. Mutations in doc1, doc2, or doc3 also impair plant growth under short-day conditions. PMID:8314087

  4. Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Min; Bernat, Gabor; Singh, Abhay K.; Mi, Hualing; Rogner, Matthias; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-09-10

    A mutant ( 5) of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 constructed by inactivating five inorganic carbon sequestration systems did not take up CO2 or HCO3 and was unable to grow in air with or without glucose. The 4 mutant in which BicA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3 uptake and grew under these conditions but more slowly than the wild-type strain. The 5 mutant required 1.7% CO2 to attain half the maximal growth rate. Electron transport activity of the mutants was strongly inhibited under high light intensities, with the 5 mutant more susceptible to high light than the 4 mutant. The results implicated the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy.

  5. Candida albicans mutant construction and characterization of selected virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Motaung, T E; Albertyn, J; Pohl, C H; Khler, Gerwald

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is a diploid, polymorphic yeast, associated with humans, where it mostly causes no harm. However, under certain conditions it can cause infections ranging from superficial to life threatening. This ability to become pathogenic is often linked to the immune status of the host as well as the expression of certain virulence factors by the yeast. Due to the importance of C. albicans as a pathogen, determination of the molecular mechanisms that allow this yeast to cause disease is important. These studies rely on the ability of researchers to create deletion mutants of specific genes in order to study their function. This article provides a critical review of the important techniques used to create deletion mutants in C. albicans and highlights how these deletion mutants can be used to determine the role of genes in the expression of virulence factors in vitro. PMID:26073905

  6. 77 FR 6548 - Notice of Availability of Ballistic Survivability, Lethality and Vulnerability Analyses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Notice of Availability of Ballistic Survivability, Lethality and Vulnerability... Laboratory's (ARL's), Survivability, Lethality Analysis Directorate (SLAD) is a leader in...

  7. Development of a non-lethal method for evaluating transcriptomic endpoints in Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus).

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Beckerton, Jean E; Mackenzie-Grieve, Jody; Stevenson, Mitchel R; Truelson, Robert L; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-07-01

    With increases in active mining and continued discharge associated with former mine operations, evaluating the health of watersheds in the Canadian Yukon Territory is warranted. Current environmental assessment approaches often employ guidelines established using sentinel species not relevant to Arctic monitoring programs. The present study focused on the successful development of a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay directed towards the indigenous Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) and examines the feasibility of using non-lethal sampling from the caudal fin as a means for evaluation of mRNA abundance profiles reflective of environmental conditions. In a proof of concept study performed blind, qPCR results from animals in an area with elevated water concentrations of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) and higher body burdens of Cd, Zn, and lead (Pb) were compared to a reference location in the Yukon Territory. Lower condition factor and a higher abundance of hepatic and caudal fin gene transcripts encoding the metallothionein isoforms (mta/mtb), in addition to elevated heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) and catalase (cat) mRNAs in liver, were observed in fish from the test site. The strong positive correlation between metal body burden and caudal fin mta/mtb mRNA abundance demonstrates a high potential for use of the Arctic grayling assay in non-lethal environmental monitoring programs. PMID:24780232

  8. Conditional control of gene function by an invertible gene trap in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Terri T.; Lu, Jianjun; Zhu, Meiying; Maddison, Lisette A.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Huskey, Lindsey; Ju, Bensheng; Hesselson, Daniel; Zhong, Tao P.; Page-McCaw, Patrick S.; Stainier, Didier Y.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2012-01-01

    Conditional mutations are essential for determining the stage- and tissue-specific functions of genes. Here we achieve conditional mutagenesis in zebrafish using FT1, a gene-trap cassette that can be stably inverted by both Cre and Flp recombinases. We demonstrate that intronic insertions in the gene-trapping orientation severely disrupt the expression of the host gene, whereas intronic insertions in the neutral orientation do not significantly affect host gene expression. Cre- and Flp-mediated recombination switches the orientation of the gene-trap cassette, permitting conditional rescue in one orientation and conditional knockout in the other. To illustrate the utility of this system we analyzed the functional consequence of intronic FT1 insertion in supv3l1, a gene encoding a mitochondrial RNA helicase. Global supv311 mutants have impaired mitochondrial function, embryonic lethality, and agenesis of the liver. Conditional rescue of supv311 expression in hepatocytes specifically corrected the liver defects. To test whether the liver function of supv311 is required for viability we used Flp-mediated recombination in the germline to generate a neutral allele at the locus. Subsequently, tissue-specific expression of Cre conditionally inactivated the targeted locus. Hepatocyte-specific inactivation of supv311 caused liver degeneration, growth retardation, and juvenile lethality, a phenotype that was less severe than the global disruption of supv311. Thus, supv311 is required in multiple tissues for organismal viability. Our mutagenesis approach is very efficient and could be used to generate conditional alleles throughout the zebrafish genome. Furthermore, because FT1 is based on the promiscuous Tol2 transposon, it should be applicable to many organisms. PMID:22908272

  9. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis of the white and Sex lethal loci in the invasive pest, Drosophila suzukii.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Scott, Maxwell J

    2016-01-22

    Drosophila suzukii (commonly called spotted wing Drosophila) is an invasive pest of soft-skinned fruit (e.g. blueberries, strawberries). A high quality reference genome sequence is available but functional genomic tools, such as used in Drosophila melanogaster, remain to be developed. In this study we have used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to introduce site-specific mutations in the D. suzukii white (w) and Sex lethal (Sxl) genes. Hemizygous males with w mutations develop white eyes and the mutant genes are transmissible to the next generation. Somatic mosaic females that carry mutations in the Sxl gene develop abnormal genitalia and reproductive tissue. The D. suzukii Sxl gene could be an excellent target for a Cas9-mediated gene drive to suppress populations of this highly destructive pest. PMID:26721433

  10. Anthrax lethal toxin paralyzes actin-based motility by blocking Hsp27 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    During, Russell L; Gibson, Bruce G; Li, Wei; Bishai, Ellen A; Sidhu, Gurjit S; Landry, Jacques; Southwick, Frederick S

    2007-05-01

    Inhalation of anthrax causes fatal bacteremia, indicating a meager host immune response. We previously showed that anthrax lethal toxin (LT) paralyzes neutrophils, a major component of innate immunity. Here, we have found that LT also inhibits actin-based motility of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. LT inhibition of actin assembly is mediated by blockade of Hsp27 phosphorylation, and can be reproduced by treating cells with the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor SB203580. Nonphosphorylated Hsp27 inhibits Listeria actin-based motility in cell extracts, and binds to and sequesters purified actin monomers. Phosphorylation of Hsp27 reverses these effects. RNA interference knockdown of Hsp27 blocks LT inhibition of Listeria actin-based motility. Rescue with wild-type Hsp27 accelerates Listeria speed in knockdown cells, whereas introduction of Hsp27 mutants incapable of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation causes slowing down. We propose that Hsp27 facilitates actin-based motility through a phosphorylation cycle that shuttles actin monomers to regions of new actin filament assembly. Our findings provide a previously unappreciated mechanism for LT virulence, and emphasize a central role for p38 MAP kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Hsp27 in actin-based motility and innate immunity. PMID:17446863

  11. Ion conductance of the stem of the anthrax toxin channel during lethal factor translocation.

    PubMed

    Schiffmiller, Aviva; Finkelstein, Alan

    2015-03-27

    The tripartite anthrax toxin consists of protective antigen, lethal factor (LF), and edema factor. PA63 (the 63-kDa, C-terminal part of protective antigen) forms heptameric channels in cell membranes that allow for the transport of LF and edema factor into the cytosol. These channels are mushroom shaped, with a ring of seven phenylalanine residues (known as the phenylalanine clamp) lining the junction between the cap and the stem. It is known that when LF is translocated through the channel, the phenylalanine clamp creates a seal that causes an essentially complete block of conduction. In order to examine ion conductance in the stem of the channel, we used Venus yellow fluorescent protein as a molecular stopper to trap LFN (the 30-kDa, 263-residue N-terminal segment of LF), as well as various truncated constructs of LFN, in mutant channels in which the phenylalanine clamp residues were mutated to alanines. Here we present evidence that ion movement occurs within the channel stem (but is stopped, of course, at the phenylalanine clamp) during protein translocation. Furthermore, we also propose that the lower region of the stem plays an important role in securing peptide chains during translocation. PMID:24996036

  12. Chemogenetic profiling identifies RAD17 as synthetically lethal with checkpoint kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, John Paul; Srivas, Rohith; Gross, Andrew; Li, Jianfeng; Jaehnig, Eric J; Sun, Su Ming; Bojorquez-Gomez, Ana; Licon, Katherine; Sivaganesh, Vignesh; Xu, Jia L; Klepper, Kristin; Yeerna, Huwate; Pekin, Daniel; Qiu, Chu Ping; van Attikum, Haico; Sobol, Robert W; Ideker, Trey

    2015-11-01

    Chemical inhibitors of the checkpoint kinases have shown promise in the treatment of cancer, yet their clinical utility may be limited by a lack of molecular biomarkers to identify specific patients most likely to respond to therapy. To this end, we screened 112 known tumor suppressor genes for synthetic lethal interactions with inhibitors of the CHEK1 and CHEK2 checkpoint kinases. We identified eight interactions, including the Replication Factor C (RFC)-related protein RAD17. Clonogenic assays in RAD17 knockdown cell lines identified a substantial shift in sensitivity to checkpoint kinase inhibition (3.5-fold) as compared to RAD17 wild-type. Additional evidence for this interaction was found in a large-scale functional shRNA screen of over 100 genotyped cancer cell lines, in which CHEK1/2 mutant cell lines were unexpectedly sensitive to RAD17 knockdown. This interaction was widely conserved, as we found that RAD17 interacts strongly with checkpoint kinases in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the setting of RAD17 knockdown, CHEK1/2 inhibition was found to be synergistic with inhibition of WEE1, another pharmacologically relevant checkpoint kinase. Accumulation of the DNA damage marker ?H2AX following chemical inhibition or transient knockdown of CHEK1, CHEK2 or WEE1 was magnified by knockdown of RAD17. Taken together, our data suggest that CHEK1 or WEE1 inhibitors are likely to have greater clinical efficacy in tumors with RAD17 loss-of-function. PMID:26437225

  13. Cis-by-Trans Regulatory Divergence Causes the Asymmetric Lethal Effects of an Ancestral Hybrid Incompatibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Shamoni; Barbash, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The Dobzhansky and Muller (D-M) model explains the evolution of hybrid incompatibility (HI) through the interaction between lineage-specific derived alleles at two or more loci. In agreement with the expectation that HI results from functional divergence, many protein-coding genes that contribute to incompatibilities between species show signatures of adaptive evolution, including Lhr, which encodes a heterochromatin protein whose amino acid sequence has diverged extensively between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans by natural selection. The lethality of D. melanogaster/D. simulans F1 hybrid sons is rescued by removing D. simulans Lhr, but not D. melanogaster Lhr, suggesting that the lethal effect results from adaptive evolution in the D. simulans lineage. It has been proposed that adaptive protein divergence in Lhr reflects antagonistic coevolution with species-specific heterochromatin sequences and that defects in LHR protein localization cause hybrid lethality. Here we present surprising results that are inconsistent with this coding-sequence-based model. Using Lhr transgenes expressed under native conditions, we find no evidence that LHR localization differs between D. melanogaster and D. simulans, nor do we find evidence that it mislocalizes in their interspecific hybrids. Rather, we demonstrate that Lhr orthologs are differentially expressed in the hybrid background, with the levels of D. simulans Lhr double that of D. melanogaster Lhr. We further show that this asymmetric expression is caused by cis-by-trans regulatory divergence of Lhr. Therefore, the non-equivalent hybrid lethal effects of Lhr orthologs can be explained by asymmetric expression of a molecular function that is shared by both orthologs and thus was presumably inherited from the ancestral allele of Lhr. We present a model whereby hybrid lethality occurs by the interaction between evolutionarily ancestral and derived alleles. PMID:22457639

  14. TTSS2-deficient hha mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium exhibits significant systemic attenuation in immunocompromised hosts

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Pati, Niladri Bhusan; Ray, Shilpa; Das, Susmita; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2014-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections are emerging as leading problem worldwide and the variations in host immune status append to the concern of NTS. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the causative agents of NTS infections and has been extensively studied. The inactivation of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) encoded type-III secretion system 2 (TTSS2) has been reported rendering the strain incapable for systemic dissemination to host sites and has also been proposed as live-attenuated vaccine. However, infections from TTSS2-deficient Salmonella have also been reported. In this study, mutant strain MT15 was developed by inactivation of the hemolysin expression modulating protein (hha) in TTSS2-deficient S. Typhimurium background. The MT15 strain showed significant level of attenuation in immune-deprived murine colitis model when tested in iNos−/−, IL10−/−, and CD40L−/− mice groups in C57BL/6 background. Further, the mutation in hha does not implicate any defect in bacterial colonization to the host gut. The long-term infection of developed mutant strain conferred protective immune responses to suitably immunized streptomycin pre-treated C57BL/6 mice. The immunization enhanced the CD4+ and CD8+ cell types involved in bacterial clearance. The serum IgG and luminal secretory IgA (sIgA) was also found to be elevated after the due course of infection. Additionally, the immunized C57BL/6 mice were protected from the subsequent lethal infection of Salmonella Typhimurium. Collectively, these findings implicate the involvement of hemolysin expression modulating protein (Hha) in establishment of bacterial infection. In light of the observed attenuation of the developed mutant strain, this study proposes the possible significance of SPI2-deficient hha mutant as an alternative live-attenuated vaccine strain for use against lethal Salmonella infections. PMID:24401482

  15. Identification of An Arsenic Tolerant Double Mutant With a Thiol-Mediated Component And Increased Arsenic Tolerance in PhyA Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, D.Y.; Lee, D.; Harris, H.; Raab, A.; Feldmann, J.; Meharg, A.; Kumabe, B.; Komives, E.A.; Schroeder, J.I.; /SLAC, SSRL /Sydney U. /Aberdeen U. /UC, San Diego

    2007-04-06

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  16. Intrinsic resistance to MEK inhibition in KRAS mutant lung and colon cancer through transcriptional induction of ERBB3.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chong; Hobor, Sebastijan; Bertotti, Andrea; Zecchin, Davide; Huang, Sidong; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Prahallad, Anirudh; Grernrum, Wipawadee; Tzani, Anna; Schlicker, Andreas; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Smit, Egbert F; Thunnissen, Erik; Halonen, Pasi; Lieftink, Cor; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Bardelli, Alberto; Trusolino, Livio; Bernards, Rene

    2014-04-10

    There are no effective therapies for the ~30% of human malignancies with mutant RAS oncogenes. Using a kinome-centered synthetic lethality screen, we find that suppression of the ERBB3 receptor tyrosine kinase sensitizes KRAS mutant lung and colon cancer cells to MEK inhibitors. We show that MEK inhibition results in MYC-dependent transcriptional upregulation of ERBB3, which is responsible for intrinsic drug resistance. Drugs targeting both EGFR and ERBB2, each capable of forming heterodimers with ERBB3, can reverse unresponsiveness to MEK inhibition by decreasing inhibitory phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins BAD and BIM. Moreover, ERBB3 protein level is a biomarker of response to combinatorial treatment. These data suggest a combination strategy for treating KRAS mutant colon and lung cancers and a way to identify the tumors that are most likely to benefit from such combinatorial treatment. PMID:24685132

  17. Evidence that mutant PfCRT facilitates the transmission to mosquitoes of chloroquine-treated Plasmodium gametocytes.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Andrea; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Sinnis, Photini; Coppens, Isabelle; Fidock, David A

    2011-01-15

    Resistance of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum to the antimalarial drug chloroquine has rapidly spread from several independent origins and is now widely prevalent throughout the majority of malaria-endemic areas. Field studies have suggested that chloroquine-resistant strains might be more infective to mosquito vectors. To test the hypothesis that the primary chloroquine resistance determinant, mutations in PfCRT, facilitates parasite transmission under drug pressure, we have introduced a mutant or wild-type pfcrt allele into the rodent model malarial parasite Plasmodium berghei. Our results show that mutant PfCRT from the chloroquine-resistant 7G8 strain has no effect on asexual blood stage chloroquine susceptibility in vivo or ex vivo but confers a significant selective advantage in competitive mosquito infections in the presence of this drug, by protecting immature gametocytes from its lethal action. Enhanced infectivity to mosquitoes may have been a key factor driving the worldwide spread of mutant pfcrt. PMID:21288823

  18. Evidence That Mutant PfCRT Facilitates the Transmission to Mosquitoes of Chloroquine-Treated Plasmodium Gametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Andrea; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Sinnis, Photini; Coppens, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Resistance of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum to the antimalarial drug chloroquine has rapidly spread from several independent origins and is now widely prevalent throughout the majority of malaria-endemic areas. Field studies have suggested that chloroquine-resistant strains might be more infective to mosquito vectors. To test the hypothesis that the primary chloroquine resistance determinant, mutations in PfCRT, facilitates parasite transmission under drug pressure, we have introduced a mutant or wild-type pfcrt allele into the rodent model malarial parasite Plasmodium berghei. Our results show that mutant PfCRT from the chloroquine-resistant 7G8 strain has no effect on asexual blood stage chloroquine susceptibility in vivo or ex vivo but confers a significant selective advantage in competitive mosquito infections in the presence of this drug, by protecting immature gametocytes from its lethal action. Enhanced infectivity to mosquitoes may have been a key factor driving the worldwide spread of mutant pfcrt. PMID:21288823

  19. Inactivating mutations in MFSD2A, required for omega-3 fatty acid transport in brain, cause a lethal microcephaly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Nguyen, Long N; Yang, Hongbo; Zaki, Maha S; Kara, Majdi; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Akizu, Naiara; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Rosti, Basak; Scott, Eric; Schroth, Jana; Copeland, Brett; Vaux, Keith K; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Quek, Debra Q Y; Wong, Bernice H; Tan, Bryan C; Wenk, Markus R; Gunel, Murat; Gabriel, Stacey; Chi, Neil C; Silver, David L; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-07-01

    Docosahexanoic acid (DHA) is the most abundant omega-3 fatty acid in brain, and, although it is considered essential, deficiency has not been linked to disease. Despite the large mass of DHA in phospholipids, the brain does not synthesize it. DHA is imported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) through the major facilitator superfamily domain-containing 2a (MFSD2A) protein. MFSD2A transports DHA as well as other fatty acids in the form of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). We identify two families displaying MFSD2A mutations in conserved residues. Affected individuals exhibited a lethal microcephaly syndrome linked to inadequate uptake of LPC lipids. The MFSD2A mutations impaired transport activity in a cell-based assay. Moreover, when expressed in mfsd2aa-morphant zebrafish, mutants failed to rescue microcephaly, BBB breakdown and lethality. Our results establish a link between transport of DHA and LPCs by MFSD2A and human brain growth and function, presenting the first evidence of monogenic disease related to transport of DHA in humans. PMID:26005868

  20. Inactivating Mutations in MFSD2A, Required for Omega-3 Fatty Acid Transport in Brain, Cause a Lethal Microcephaly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Nguyen, Long N.; Yang, Hongbo; Zaki, Maha S.; Kara, Majdi; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Akizu, Naiara; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Rosti, Basak; Scott, Eric; Schroth, Jana; Copeland, Brett; Vaux, Keith K.; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Quek, Debra Q.Y.; Wong, Bernice H.; Tan, Bryan C.; Wenk, Markus R.; Gunel, Murat; Gabriel, Stacey; Chi, Neil C.; Silver, David L.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexanoic acid (DHA) is the most abundant omega-3 fatty acid in brain, and although considered essential, deficiency has not been linked to disease1,2. Despite the large mass of DHA in phospholipids, the brain does not synthesize it. DHA is imported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) through the Major Facilitator Superfamily Domain 2a (Mfsd2a)3. Mfsd2a transports DHA as well as other fatty acids in the form of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). We identify two families displaying MFSD2A mutations in conserved residues. Patients exhibited a lethal microcephaly syndrome linked to inadequate uptake of LPC lipids. The MFSD2A mutations impaired transport activity in a cell-based assay. Moreover, when expressed in mfsd2aa zebrafish morphants, mutants failed to rescue microcephaly, BBB breakdown and lethality. Our results establish a link between transport of DHA and LPCs by MFSD2A and human brain growth and function, presenting the first evidence of monogenic disease related to transport of DHA in humans. PMID:26005868

  1. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  2. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  3. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... agents or non-lethal weapons. The Warden may authorize the use of chemical agents or non-lethal...

  4. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  5. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  6. To Laugh in the Face of Death: The Games That Lethal People Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, James A.; Powell, F. C.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 399 individuals completed a lethal behaviors scale and a measure of death anxiety, which were found to have no significant correlation. Predictors of lethalness included doing dangerous things for the fun of it and having ever driven a motorcycle. The most lethal individuals were young, male, and less educated. (Author/ABL)

  7. Lethal and Demographic Impact of Chlorpyrifos and Spinosad on the Ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, V; Saber, M; Rafiee-Dastjerdi, H; Kamita, S G

    2015-12-01

    The appropriate use of biological agents and chemical compounds is necessary to establish successful integrated pest management (IPM) programs. Thus, the off-target effects of pesticides on biological control agents are essential considerations of IPM. In this study, the effects of lethal and sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos and spinosad on the demographic parameters of Habrobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were assessed. Bioassays were carried out on immature and adult stages by using dipping and contact exposure of dry pesticide residue on an inert material, respectively. The lethal concentration (LC)50 values of chlorpyrifos and spinosad were 3.69 and 151.37 ppm, respectively, on the larval stage and 1.75 and 117.37 ppm, respectively, on adults. Hazard quotient (HQ) values for chlorpyrifos and spinosad were 400 and 2.2, respectively, on the larval stage and 857.14 and 2.84, respectively, on adults. A low lethal concentration (LC30) was used to assess the sublethal effects of both pesticides on the surviving females. In each treatment, 25 survivors were randomly selected and transferred into 6-cm Petri dishes. Adults were provided daily with last instars of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller) as a host until all of the females died. The number of eggs laid, percent of larvae hatched, longevity, and sex ratio were recorded. Stable population growth parameters were estimated by the Jackknife method. In control, chlorpyrifos, and spinosad treatments, the intrinsic rates of increase (r m) values were 0.23, 0.10, and 0.21, respectively. The results of this study suggest a relative compatibility between spinosad use and H. hebetor. Finally, further studies should be conducted under natural conditions to verify the compatibility of spinosad with H. hebetor in IPM programs. PMID:26280986

  8. Prevention of physostigmine-induced lethality by the opioid analgesic meptazinol in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Bottoncetti, A.; Galli, A.

    1987-01-01

    The prophylactic action of meptazinol against physostigmine- and neostigmine-induced lethality was evaluated in mice. Meptazinol proved to be effective against physostigmine (1 mg kg-1 i.p.), but not against neostigmine (0.5 mg kg-1 i.p.). The antagonism by meptazinol of physostigmine-induced poisoning was maximal when the drug was administered 15 min before physostigmine. Under these conditions the ED50 (95% confidence limits) of meptazinol was 24 (22.0-26.1) mg kg-1 s.c. A 30 mg kg-1 dose of the drug prevented lethality in 89% of the animals. The action of meptazinol was not antagonized by naloxone hydrochloride (2 mg kg-1 i.p.), injected 10 min before meptazinol. Pretreatment of mice with 30 mg kg-1 meptazinol 15 min before physostigmine (1 mg kg-1) poisoning increased brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity on average, from 8 to 31% of control values. The protection of cholinesterases against physostigmine- and neostigmine-induced inactivation was demonstrated in vitro directly on purified preparations of the enzymes using a dilution method. The ED50 values (95% confidence limits) for the protective effect of meptazinol of electric eel AChE against 1 and 3 microM physostigmine and 1 microM neostigmine were 2.6 (1.4-4.9), 9.5 (5-18) and 3 (1.6-5.7) microM, respectively, while for protection of horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) against the same inhibitors, the ED50 values were 12 (5.4-26.4), 42 (27-65.1) and 8 (3.6-17.6) microM, respectively. It is suggested that prevention of physostigmine-induced lethality by meptazinol is a consequence of its protective action on AChE in the central nervous system. PMID:3607358

  9. Autopsy observations in lethal short-rib polydactyly syndromes.

    PubMed

    Okiro, Patricia; Wainwright, Helen; Spranger, Jrgen; Beighton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The short rib-polydactyly syndromes are a heterogeneous group of lethal autosomal recessive disorders (SRP I-IV), which result from cellular ciliary dysfunction during embryogenesis. Diagnosis is conventionally based on radiographic imaging. Since 1976, postmortem investigations of 5 affected fetuses or stillbirths have been undertaken and the visceral abnormalities have been documented. These anomalies are discussed in the context of prenatal differential diagnosis and prognostication following imaging in pregnancy and at autopsy following miscarriage or stillbirth. PMID:25437139

  10. Rabbit Model for Superantigen-Mediated Lethal Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Kristi L; Rotschafer, Jessica H; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly significant cause of serious human infections in the USA. Many of these illnesses are mediated by interactions between the host immune system and staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs). Several of these severe staphylococcal infections are initiated in the lungs, making this an important site to study. Here, we describe the rabbit model for investigating the role of staphylococcal SAgs in pulmonary-associated lethal infection and intoxication. PMID:26676039

  11. Intact alternation performance in high lethality suicide attempters.

    PubMed

    Keilp, John G; Wyatt, Gwinne; Gorlyn, Marianne; Oquendo, Maria A; Burke, Ainsley K; John Mann, J

    2014-09-30

    Suicide attempters often perform poorly on tasks linked to ventral prefrontal cortical (VPFC) function. Object Alternation (OA) - a VPFC probe - has not been used in these studies. In this study, currently depressed medication-free past suicide attempters whose most severe attempt was of high (n=31) vs. low (n=64) lethality, 114 medication-free depressed non-attempters, and 86 non-patients completed a computerized OA task. Participants also completed comparison tasks assessing the discriminant validity of OA (Wisconsin Card Sort), its concurrent validity relative to tasks associated with past attempt status (computerized Stroop task, Buschke Selective Reminding Test), and its construct validity as a VPFC measure (Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling Task). Against expectations, high lethality suicide attempters - the majority of whom used non-violent methods in their attempts with some planning - outperformed other depressed groups on OA, with no group differences observed on Wisconsin Card Sort. Despite intact performance on OA, past attempters exhibited deficits on the Stroop and Buschke. OA performance was associated with performance on Go-No Go and Iowa Gambling, confirming that OA measures a similar construct. VPFC dysfunction may not be a characteristic of all suicide attempters, especially those who make more carefully planned, non-violent - though potentially lethal - attempts. PMID:24878299

  12. Skin penetration assessment of less lethal kinetic energy munitions.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia A; Stewart, Shelby J; Wilhelm, Marianne

    2005-11-01

    The development of less-lethal technologies has provided law enforcement personnel with an alternative to lethal force. Although the less lethal projectile was produced to engender non-penetrating wounds, case studies show that there have been a number of reported penetrating injuries ranging from minor to significant in morbidity. The objective of this study was to determine the energy per unit area required to penetrate various regions of the body. Eight unembalmed postmortem human specimens were procured for this testing. Each specimen sustained a maximum of 25 impacts consisting of shots to the anterior and posterior thorax, abdomen, and legs. A 12-gauge, fin-stabilized, rubber rocket round was used as the impactor for all of the conducted tests. The energy density required for 50% risk of penetration varied from 23.99 J/cm2 for the location on the anterior rib (p = 0.000) to 52.74 J/cm2 for the location on the posterior rib (p = 0.001). PMID:16382840

  13. Mutant strains of Tetrahymena thermophila defective in thymidine kinase activity: Biochemical and genetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, K.V.; Pearlman, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Three mutant strains, one conditional, of Tetrahymena thermophila were defective in thymidine phosphorylating activity in vivo and in thymidine kinase activity in vitro. Nucleoside phosphotransferase activity in mutant cell extracts approached wild-type levels, suggesting that thymidine kinase is responsible for most, if not all, thymidine phosphorylation in vivo. Thymidine kinase activity in extracts of the conditional mutant strain was deficient when the cells were grown or assayed or both at the permissive temperature, implying a structural enzyme defect. Analysis of the reaction products from in vitro assays with partially purified enzymes showed that phosphorylation by thymidine kinase and nucleoside phosphotransferase occurred at the 5' position. Genetic analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was recessive and that mutations in each of the three mutant strains did not complement, suggesting allelism.

  14. Synthetic lethal interactions for the development of cancer therapeutics: biological and methodological advancements.

    PubMed

    Mizuarai, Shinji; Kotani, Hidehito

    2010-12-01

    Synthetic lethal interaction is defined as a combination of two mutations that is lethal when present in the same cell; each individual mutation is non-lethal. Synthetic lethal interactions attract attention in cancer research fields since the discovery of synthetic lethal genes with either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) provides novel cancer therapeutic targets. Due to the selective lethal effect on cancer cells harboring specific genetic alterations, it is expected that targeting synthetic lethal genes would provide wider therapeutic windows compared with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. Here, we review the current status of the application of synthetic lethal screening in cancer research fields from biological and methodological viewpoints. Very recent studies seeking to identify synthetic lethal genes with K-RAS and p53, which are known to be the most frequently occurring oncogenes and TSGs, respectively, are introduced. Among the accumulating amount of research on synthetic lethal interactions, the synthetic lethality between BRCA1/2 and PARP1 inhibition has been clinically proven. Thus, both preclinical and clinical data showing a preferential anti-tumor effect on BRCA1/2 deficient tumors by a PARP1 inhibitor are the best examples of the synthetic lethal approach of cancer therapeutics. Finally, methodological progress regarding synthetic lethal screening, including barcode shRNA screening and in vivo synthetic lethal screening, is described. Given the fact that an increasing number of synthetic lethal genes for major cancerous genes have been validated in preclinical studies, this intriguing approach awaits clinical verification of preferential benefits for cancer patients with specific genetic alterations as a clear predictive factor for tumor response. PMID:20976469

  15. Mutants resistant to anti-microtubule herbicides map to a locus on the uni linkage group in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.W.; Ranum, L.P.W.; Silflow, C.D.; Lefebvre, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used genetic analysis to study the mode of action of two anti-microtubule herbicides, amiprophos-methyl (APM) and oryzaline (ORY). Over 200 resistant mutants were selected by growth on APM- or ORY-containing plates. The 21 independently isolated mutants examined in this study are 3- to 8-fold resistant to APM and are strongly cross-resistant to ORY and butamiphos, a close analog of APM. Two Mendelian genes, apm1 and apm2, are defined by linkage and complementation analysis. There are 20 alleles of apm1 and one temperature-sensitive lethal (33/sup 0/) allele of apm2. Mapping by two-factor crosses places apm1 6.5 cM centromere proximal to uni1 and within 4 cM of pf7 on the uni linkage group, a genetically circular linkage group comprising genes which affect flagellar assembly or function; apm2 maps near the centromere of linkage group VIII. Allele-specific synthetic lethality is observed in crosses between amp2 and alleles of apm1. Also, self crosses of apm2 are zygotic lethal, whereas crosses of nine apm1 alleles inter se result in normal germination and tetrad viability. The mutants are recessive to their wild-type alleles but doubly heterozygous diploids (apm1 +/+ apm2) made with apm2 and any of 15 apm1 alleles display partial intergenic noncomplementation, expressed as intermediate resistance. Diploids homozygous for mutant alleles of apm1 are 4-6-fold resistant to APM and ORY; diploids homozygous for apm2 are ts/sup -/ and 2-fold resistant to the herbicides. From the results described the authors suggest that the gene products of apm1 and apm2 may interact directly or function in the same structure or process.

  16. Intraguild relationships between sympatric predators exposed to lethal control: predator manipulation experiments.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Allen BL; Allen LR; Engeman RM; Leung LK

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Terrestrial top-predators are expected to regulate and stabilise food webs through their consumptive and non-consumptive effects on sympatric mesopredators and prey. The lethal control of top-predators has therefore been predicted to inhibit top-predator function, generate the release of mesopredators and indirectly harm native fauna through trophic cascade effects. Understanding the outcomes of lethal control on interactions within terrestrial predator guilds is important for zoologists, conservation biologists and wildlife managers. However, few studies have the capacity to test these predictions experimentally, and no such studies have previously been conducted on the eclectic suite of native and exotic, mammalian and reptilian taxa we simultaneously assess. We conducted a series of landscape-scale, multi-year, manipulative experiments at nine sites spanning five ecosystem types across the Australian continental rangelands to investigate the responses of mesopredators (red foxes, feral cats and goannas) to contemporary poison-baiting programs intended to control top-predators (dingoes) for livestock protection.RESULT: Short-term behavioural releases of mesopredators were not apparent, and in almost all cases, the three mesopredators we assessed were in similar or greater abundance in unbaited areas relative to baited areas, with mesopredator abundance trends typically either uncorrelated or positively correlated with top-predator abundance trends over time. The exotic mammals and native reptile we assessed responded similarly (poorly) to top-predator population manipulation. This is because poison baits were taken by multiple target and non-target predators and top-predator populations quickly recovered to pre-control levels, thus reducing the overall impact of baiting on top-predators and averting a trophic cascade.CONCLUSIONS: These results are in accord with other predator manipulation experiments conducted worldwide, and suggest that Australian populations of native prey fauna at lower trophic levels are unlikely to be negatively affected by contemporary dingo control practices through the release of mesopredators. We conclude that contemporary lethal control practices used on some top-predator populations do not produce the conditions required to generate positive responses from mesopredators. Functional relationships between sympatric terrestrial predators may not be altered by exposure to spatially and temporally sporadic application of non-selective lethal control.

  17. Intraguild relationships between sympatric predators exposed to lethal control: predator manipulation experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Terrestrial top-predators are expected to regulate and stabilise food webs through their consumptive and non-consumptive effects on sympatric mesopredators and prey. The lethal control of top-predators has therefore been predicted to inhibit top-predator function, generate the release of mesopredators and indirectly harm native fauna through trophic cascade effects. Understanding the outcomes of lethal control on interactions within terrestrial predator guilds is important for zoologists, conservation biologists and wildlife managers. However, few studies have the capacity to test these predictions experimentally, and no such studies have previously been conducted on the eclectic suite of native and exotic, mammalian and reptilian taxa we simultaneously assess. We conducted a series of landscape-scale, multi-year, manipulative experiments at nine sites spanning five ecosystem types across the Australian continental rangelands to investigate the responses of mesopredators (red foxes, feral cats and goannas) to contemporary poison-baiting programs intended to control top-predators (dingoes) for livestock protection. Result Short-term behavioural releases of mesopredators were not apparent, and in almost all cases, the three mesopredators we assessed were in similar or greater abundance in unbaited areas relative to baited areas, with mesopredator abundance trends typically either uncorrelated or positively correlated with top-predator abundance trends over time. The exotic mammals and native reptile we assessed responded similarly (poorly) to top-predator population manipulation. This is because poison baits were taken by multiple target and non-target predators and top-predator populations quickly recovered to pre-control levels, thus reducing the overall impact of baiting on top-predators and averting a trophic cascade. Conclusions These results are in accord with other predator manipulation experiments conducted worldwide, and suggest that Australian populations of native prey fauna at lower trophic levels are unlikely to be negatively affected by contemporary dingo control practices through the release of mesopredators. We conclude that contemporary lethal control practices used on some top-predator populations do not produce the conditions required to generate positive responses from mesopredators. Functional relationships between sympatric terrestrial predators may not be altered by exposure to spatially and temporally sporadic application of non-selective lethal control. PMID:23842144

  18. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjen; Leon, Dacia; Arkin, Adam P.; Skerker, Jeffrey M.

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, inmore » Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.« less

  19. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjen; Leon, Dacia; Arkin, Adam P.; Skerker, Jeffrey M.

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, in Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.

  20. Wild-Type Huntingtin Reduces the Cellular Toxicity of Mutant Huntingtin In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Blair R.; Guttman, Julian A.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Kimel, Gil H.; Singaraja, Roshni; Vogl, A. Wayne; Hayden, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) transgenic mice expressing normal (YAC18) and mutant (YAC46 or YAC72) human huntingtin (htt), in a developmental- and tissue-specific manner, that is identical to endogenous htt. YAC72 mice develop selective degeneration of medium spiny projection neurons in the lateral striatum, similar to what is observed in Huntington disease. Mutant human htt expressed by YAC transgenes can compensate for the absence of endogenous htt and can rescue the embryonic lethality that characterizes mice homozygous for targeted disruption of the endogenous Hdh gene (?/?). YAC72 mice lacking endogenous htt (YAC72 ?/?) manifest a novel phenotype characterized by infertility, testicular atrophy, aspermia, and massive apoptotic cell death in the testes. The testicular cell death in YAC72 ?/? mice can be markedly reduced by increasing endogenous htt levels. YAC72 mice with equivalent levels of both wild-type and mutant htt (YAC72 +/+) breed normally and have no evidence of increased testicular cell death. Similar findings are seen in YAC46 ?/? mice compared with YAC46 +/+ mice, in which wild-type htt can completely counteract the proapoptotic effects of mutant htt. YAC18 ?/? mice display no evidence of increased cellular apoptosis, even in the complete absence of endogenous htt, demonstrating that the massive cellular apoptosis observed in YAC46 ?/? mice and YAC72 ?/? mice is polyglutamine-mediated toxicity from the mutant transgene. These data provide the first direct in vivo evidence of a role for wild-type htt in decreasing the cellular toxicity of mutant htt. PMID:11133364

  1. Pathogenicity and Immunogenicity of a Mutant Strain of Listeria monocytogenes in the Chicken Infection Model?

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuelan; Tian, Debin; Jiao, Hongmei; Zhang, Chenju; Pan, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiaobo; Jiao, Xinan

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been exploited as a vaccine carrier based upon its ability to induce a strong cell-mediated immune response. At present, the safety of live, attenuated L. monocytogenes vaccines in patients is being studied in clinical trials. L. monocytogenes is also an attractive vaccine vector for use in poultry; however, the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of this organism in poultry remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of an actA- and plcB-deficient L. monocytogenes strain, yzuLM4?actA/plcB, and its wild-type parent strain, yzuLM4, in an avian infection model. The results showed that the wild-type strain could infect ISA brown chickens, causing serious tissue disruptions, including various degrees of degeneration, necrotic lesions, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver, spleen, heart, and kidney. However, the mutant strain showed reduced virulence in embryonated eggs compared with that of the parent strain (the 50% lethal dose [LD50] was 3 logs higher). The mutant strain also showed low virulence in chickens and was rapidly eliminated by the host. There were no obvious pathological changes in tissue sections, but the mutant strain still retained the ability to stimulate high levels of antibody against the protein listeriolysin O (LLO). Booster immunization with the mutant strain led to rapid bacterial clearance from the livers and spleens of chickens challenged by the intramuscular route or the oral route. Collectively, our data suggest that the wild-type serotype 1/2a L. monocytogenes strain can cause serious disease in chickens but the mutant strain with a deletion of the actA and plcB genes is less virulent but induces a strong immune response. This mutant strain of L. monocytogenes is therefore a promising candidate as a safe and effective vector for the delivery of heterologous antigens to prevent zoonosis and infectious disease in poultry. PMID:21228136

  2. Characterization of the secA gene of Streptomyces lividans encoding a protein translocase which complements and Escherichia coli mutant defective in the ATPase activity of SecA.

    PubMed

    Blanco, J; Coque, J J; Martín, J F

    1996-10-17

    The secA gene of Streptomyces lividans was cloned using as probe a 57-mer oligonucleotide based on conserved sequences of the Escherichia coli secA and the Bacillus subtilis div genes. It encodes a protein of 946 amino acids (aa) with a deduced M(r) of 106,079, with high similarity to all known SecA proteins. All the previously described conserved motifs of SecA proteins were conserved in the S. lividans protein. The secA gene of S. lividans restored sensitivity to sodium azide in E. coli SecA4 (AzR) a mutant with an azide-resistant (ATPase defective) SecA protein. However, it did not complement the temperature-sensitive mutation in E. coli MM52 (SecAts) (a conditional lethal mutant defective in protein translocation) allowing only poor growth at the nonpermissive temperature. secA homologous sequences were present in 11 different species of Streptomyces and Nocardia. PMID:8918233

  3. An allele of sequoia dominantly enhances a trio mutant phenotype to influence Drosophila larval behavior.

    PubMed

    Dean, Kathryn E; Fields, April; Geer, Marcus J; King, Eric C; Lynch, Brian T; Manohar, Rohan R; McCall, Julianne R; Palozola, Katherine C; Zhang, Yan; Liebl, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    The transition of Drosophila third instar larvae from feeding, photo-phobic foragers to non-feeding, photo-neutral wanderers is a classic behavioral switch that precedes pupariation. The neuronal network responsible for this behavior has recently begun to be defined. Previous genetic analyses have identified signaling components for food and light sensory inputs and neuropeptide hormonal outputs as being critical for the forager to wanderer transition. Trio is a Rho-Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor integrated into a variety of signaling networks including those governing axon pathfinding in early development. Sequoia is a pan-neuronally expressed zinc-finger transcription factor that governs dendrite and axon outgrowth. Using pre-pupal lethality as an endpoint, we have screened for dominant second-site enhancers of a weakly lethal trio mutant background. In these screens, an allele of sequoia has been identified. While these mutants have no obvious disruption of embryonic central nervous system architecture and survive to third instar larvae similar to controls, they retain forager behavior and thus fail to pupariate at high frequency. PMID:24376789

  4. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa

    PubMed Central

    Vuimo, Tatiana A.; Surov, Stepan S.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Korneeva, Vera A.; Vorobiev, Ivan I.; Orlova, Nadezhda A.; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in ‘global’ assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5–20 μM, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  5. Survival of Escherichia coli under lethal heat stress by L-form conversion

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Nadya; Slavchev, Georgi; Michailova, Lilia; Jourdanova, Mimi

    2010-01-01

    Transition of bacteria to cell wall deficient L-forms in response to stress factors has been assumed as a potential mechanism for survival of microbes under unfavorable conditions. In this article, we provide evidence of paradoxal survival through L-form conversion of E. coli high cell density population after lethal treatments (boiling or autoclaving). Light and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated conversion from classical rod to polymorphic L-form shape morphology and atypical growths of E. coli. Microcrystal formations observed at this stage were interpreted as being closely linked to the processes of L-form conversion and probably involved in the general phenomenon of protection against lethal environment. Identity of the morphologically modified L-forms as E. coli was verified by species specific DNA-based test. Our study might contribute to a better understanding of the L-form phenomenon and its importance for bacterial survival, as well as provoke reexamination of the traditional view of killing strategies against bacteria. PMID:20582223

  6. Severe HypoglycemiaInduced Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias Are Mediated by Sympathoadrenal Activation

    PubMed Central

    Reno, Candace M.; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Chen, Y. Stefanie; VanderWeele, Jennifer; Jethi, Krishan; Fisher, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    For people with insulin-treated diabetes, severe hypoglycemia can be lethal, though potential mechanisms involved are poorly understood. To investigate how severe hypoglycemia can be fatal, hyperinsulinemic, severe hypoglycemic (1015 mg/dL) clamps were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats with simultaneous electrocardiogram monitoring. With goals of reducing hypoglycemia-induced mortality, the hypotheses tested were that: 1) antecedent glycemic control impacts mortality associated with severe hypoglycemia; 2) with limitation of hypokalemia, potassium supplementation could limit hypoglycemia-associated deaths; 3) with prevention of central neuroglycopenia, brain glucose infusion could prevent hypoglycemia-associated arrhythmias and deaths; and 4) with limitation of sympathoadrenal activation, adrenergic blockers could prevent hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmic deaths. Severe hypoglycemiainduced mortality was noted to be worsened by diabetes, but recurrent antecedent hypoglycemia markedly improved the ability to survive an episode of severe hypoglycemia. Potassium supplementation tended to reduce mortality. Severe hypoglycemia caused numerous cardiac arrhythmias including premature ventricular contractions, tachycardia, and high-degree heart block. Intracerebroventricular glucose infusion reduced severe hypoglycemiainduced arrhythmias and overall mortality. ?-Adrenergic blockade markedly reduced cardiac arrhythmias and completely abrogated deaths due to severe hypoglycemia. Under conditions studied, sudden deaths caused by insulin-induced severe hypoglycemia were mediated by lethal cardiac arrhythmias triggered by brain neuroglycopenia and the marked sympathoadrenal response. PMID:23835337

  7. [Bladder tumor lethality. Results in the autonomous community of Rioja between 1975-1991].

    PubMed

    Fernández Fernández, A; Gil Fabra, J; Fernández Ruíz, M; Angulo Castellanos, M G; Blanco Martín, E; Otero Mauricio, G

    1998-01-01

    Between 1975-1991, a total of 557 cases of bladder carcinoma were identified in the Autonomous Community of La Rioja (CAR) which were followed up to December 1994. The overall lethality was 21.9%. 492 cases with 22.35% lethality were identified in males. In females, however, there was 65 cases with 18.46% lethality. The comparison of males and females lethality resulted in p = 0.525. Lethality between cases diagnosed within each 5-year period analyzed is: 1975-1981: 177 cases, lethality 23.72%. 1982-1986: 168 cases, lethality 30.95%. 1987-1991: 212 cases, lethality 13.20%. Between the first and the second 5-year periods, p = 0.132; between the first and third 5-year periods p = 0.007 and between the second and third 5-year periods p < 0.000. Bladder tumours accounts in CAR for a 22.35% lethality. Lethality is higher in males that in females but the difference is not statistically significant. In the last 5-year period assessed, 1987-1991, a reduction of lethality from bladder neoplasms has been documented. PMID:9807870

  8. Analysis of mutant quantity and quality in human-hamster hybrid AL and AL-179 cells exposed to 137Cs-gamma or HZE-Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldren, C.; Vannais, D.; Drabek, R.; Gustafson, D.; Kraemer, S.; Lenarczyk, M.; Kronenberg, A.; Hei, T.; Ueno, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We measured the number of mutants and the kinds of mutations induced by 137Cs-gamma and by HZE-Fe (56Fe [600 MeV/amu, LET = 190 KeV/micrometer) in standard AL human hamster hybrid cells and in a new variant hybrid, AL-179. We found that HZE-Fe was more mutagenic than 137Cs-gamma per unit dose (about 1.6 fold), but was slightly less mutagenic per mean lethal dose, DO, at both the S1 and hprt- loci of AL cells. On the other hand, HZE-Fe induced about nine fold more complex S1- mutants than 137Cs-gamma rays, 28% vs 3%. 137Cs-gamma rays induced about twice as many S1- mutants and hprt-mutants in AL-179 as in AL cells, and about nine times more of the former were complex, and potentially unstable kinds of mutations.

  9. Rhizobium japonicum mutant strains unable to grow chemoautotrophically with H2.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, R J

    1981-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strain SR grows chemoautotrophically on a mineral salts medium when incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow or that grow very poorly chemoautotrophically with H2 have been isolated from strain SR. The mutant isolation procedure involved mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate, penicillin selection under chemoautotrophic growth conditions, and plating of the survivors onto medium containing carbon. The resulting colonies were replica plated onto medium that did not contain carbon, and the plates were incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow under these conditions were chosen. Over 100 mutant strains with defects in chemoautotrophic metabolism were obtained. The phenotypes of the mutants fall into various classes. These include strains unable to oxidize H2 and strains deficient in CO2 uptake. Some of the mutant strains were capable of oxidizing H2 only when artificial electron acceptors were provided. Two mutant strains specifically lack activity of the key CO2-fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. Other mutant strains lack both H2-oxidizing ability and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity. PMID:6780521

  10. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) coupling codes for use with the vulnerability/lethality (VIL) taxonomy. Final report, June-October 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, M.H.

    1995-07-01

    Based on the vulnerability Lethality (V/L) taxonomy developed by the Ballistic Vulnerability Lethality Division (BVLD) of the Survivability Lethality Analysis Directorate (SLAD), a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) coupling V/L analysis taxonomy has been developed. A nuclear EMP threat to a military system can be divided into two levels: (1) coupling to a system level through a cable, antenna, or aperture; and (2) the component level. This report will focus on the initial condition, which includes threat definition and target description, as well as the mapping process from the initial condition to damaged components state. EMP coupling analysis at a system level is used to accomplish this. This report introduces the nature of EMP threat, interaction between the threat and target, and how the output of EMP coupling analysis at a system level becomes the input to the component level analysis. Many different tools (EMP coupling codes) will be discussed for the mapping process, which correponds to the physics of phenomenology. This EMP coupling V/L taxonomy and the models identified in this report will provide the tools necessary to conduct basic V/L analysis of EMP coupling.

  11. Lethal Mutations Flanking the 68c Glue Gene Cluster on Chromosome 3 of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Madeline A.; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    1986-01-01

    We have conducted a genetic analysis of the region flanking the 68C glue gene cluster in Drosophila melanogaster by isolating lethal and semilethal mutations uncovered by deficiencies which span this region. Three different mutagens were used: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), ethyl nitrosourea (ENU) and diepoxybutane (DEB). In the region from 68A3 to 68C11, 64 lethal, semilethal, and visible mutations were recovered. These include alleles of 13 new lethal complementation groups, as well as new alleles of rotated, low xanthine dehydrogenase, lethal(3)517 and lethal(3)B76. Six new visible mutations from within this region were recovered on the basis of their reduced viability; all proved to be semiviable alleles of lethal complementation groups. No significant differences were observed in the distributions of lethals recovered using the three different mutagens. Each lethal was mapped on the basis of complementation with overlapping deficiencies; mutations that mapped within the same interval were tested for complementation, and the relative order of the lethal groups within each interval was determined by recombination. The cytological distribution of genes within the 68A3-68C11 region is not uniform: the region from 68A2,3 to 68B1,3 (seven to ten polytene chromosome bands) contains at least 13 lethal complementation groups and the mutation low xanthine dehydrogenase; the adjoining region from 68B1,3 to 68C5,6 (six to nine bands) includes the 68C glue gene cluster, but no known lethal or visible complementation groups; and the interval from 68C5,6 to 68C10,11 (three to five bands) contains at least three lethal complementation groups and the visible mutation rotated. The developmental stage at which lethality is observed was determined for a representative allele from each lethal complementation group. PMID:3082712

  12. The lethality test used for estimating the potency of antivenoms against Bothrops asper snake venom: pathophysiological mechanisms, prophylactic analgesia, and a surrogate in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Chacn, Francisco; Oviedo, Andrea; Escalante, Teresa; Solano, Gabriela; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutirrez, Jos Mara

    2015-01-01

    The potency of antivenoms is assessed by analyzing the neutralization of venom-induced lethality, and is expressed as the Median Effective Dose (ED50). The present study was designed to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lethality induced by the venom of Bothrops asper, in the experimental conditions used for the evaluation of the neutralizing potency of antivenoms. Mice injected with 4 LD50s of venom by the intraperitoneal route died within ?25min with drastic alterations in the abdominal organs, characterized by hemorrhage, increment in plasma extravasation, and hemoconcentration, thus leading to hypovolemia and cardiovascular collapse. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) play a predominat role in lethality, as judged by partial inhibition by the chelating agent CaNa2EDTA. When venom was mixed with antivenom, there was a venom/antivenom ratio at which hemorrhage was significantly reduced, but mice died at later time intervals with evident hemoconcentration, indicating that other components in addition to SVMPs also contribute to plasma extravasation and lethality. Pretreatment with the analgesic tramadol did not affect the outcome of the neutralization test, thus suggesting that prophylactic (precautionary) analgesia can be introduced in this assay. Neutralization of lethality in mice correlated with neutralization of invitro coagulant activity in human plasma. PMID:25447772

  13. Yeast mutant defective in phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, M L; Klig, L S; Letts, V A; Loewy, B S; Henry, S A

    1983-02-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae opi3-3 mutant was shown to be defective in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine. The opi3-3 mutant was isolated on the basis of an inositol excretion phenotype and was not auxotrophic for choline. Inositol, but not choline, stimulated growth of the mutant. The opi3-3 mutation was recessive and was genetically linked to the ino4 locus. When grown in the absence of exogenous choline, the opi3-3 mutant had a phospholipid composition consisting of 2 to 3% phosphatidylcholine compared with 40 to 50% in wild-type strains. In addition, the mutant accumulated elevated amounts of two intermediates, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine. The incorporation of label from [methyl-14C]methionine into phosphatidylcholine was reduced 80 to 90% in the mutant compared with wild-type strains. However, label was recovered in the intermediates phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine. The mutant is believed to be defective in the third and possibly the second methylation reaction in the formation of phosphatidylcholine from phosphatidylethanolamine. The first methylation reaction appeared to be occurring at normal or even elevated levels. Based upon incorporation of choline into phosphatidylcholine, it is concluded that the opi3-3 mutant has no defect in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine from exogenous choline. Furthermore, phosphatidylcholine represents over 25% of the phospholipid composition of the mutant when it is grown in the presence of exogenous choline. PMID:6337128

  14. rfaP mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Helander, I M; Vaara, M; Sukupolvi, S; Rhen, M; Saarela, S; Zhringer, U; Mkel, P H

    1989-11-20

    Salmonella typhimurium rfaP mutants were isolated and characterised with respect to their sensitivity towards hydrophobic antibiotics and detergents, and their lipopolysaccharides were chemically analysed. The rfaP mutants were selected after diethylsulfate mutagenesis or as spontaneous mutants. The mutation in two independent mutants SH7770 (line LT2) and SH8551 (line TML) was mapped by cotransduction with cysE to the rfa locus. The mutants were sensitive to hydrophobic antibiotics (clindamycin, erythromycin and novobiocin) and detergents (benzalkoniumchloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate). Analysis of their lipopolysaccharides by chemical methods and by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that their saccharide portion was, to a large extent, of chemotype Rc with small proportions of material containing a more complete core oligosaccharide and O-specific chains. Only 2.5 mol phosphate/mol lipopolysaccharide was found whereas the phosphate content of the lipopolysaccharide of a galE mutant strain was 4.8 mol. Thus the rfaP mutant lipopolysaccharides lacked more than two phosphate residues. Assessment of the location of phosphate groups in rfaP lipopolysaccharides revealed the presence of at least 2 mol phosphate in lipid A, indicating that the core oligosaccharide was almost devoid of phosphate. The chemical, physiological and genetic data obtained for these mutants are in full agreement with those reported earlier for rfaP mutants of Salmonella minnesota. PMID:2686988

  15. Abnormal lignin in a loblolly pine mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, J.; MacKay, J.J.; Hatfield, R.D.

    1997-07-11

    Novel lignin is formed in a mutant loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) severely depleted in cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.195), which converts coniferaldehyde to coniferyl alcohol, the primary lignin precursor in pines. Dihydroconiferyl alcohol, a monomer not normally associated with the lignin biosynthetic pathway, is the major component of the mutant`s lignin, accounting for {approximately}30 percent (versus {approximately}3 percent in normal pine) of the units. The level of aldehydes, including new 2-methoxybenzaldehydes, is also increased. The mutant pines grew normally indicating that, even within a species, extensive variations in lignin composition need not disrupt the essential functions of lignin.

  16. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  17. High male: Female ratio of germ-line mutations: An alternative explanation for postulated gestational lethality in males in X-linked dominant disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.H.

    1996-06-01

    In this paper I suggest that a vastly higher rate of de novo mutations in males than in females would explain some, if not most, X-linked dominant disorders associated with a low incidence of affected males. It is the inclusion of the impact of a high ratio of male:female de novo germ-line mutations that makes this model new and unique. Specifically, it is concluded that, if an X-linked disorder results in a dominant phenotype with a significant reproductive disadvantage (genetic lethality), affected females will, in virtually all cases, arise from de novo germ-line mutations inherited from their fathers rather than from their mothers. Under this hypothesis, the absence of affected males is explained by the simple fact that sons do not inherit their X chromosome (normal or abnormal) from their fathers. Because females who are heterozygous for a dominant disorder will be clinically affected and will, in most cases, either be infertile or lack reproductive opportunities, the mutant gene will not be transmitted by them to the next generation (i.e., it will be a genetic lethal). This, not gestational lethality in males, may explain the absence of affected males in most, if not all, of the 13 known X-linked dominant diseases characterized by high ratios of affected female to male individuals. Evidence suggesting that this mechanism could explain the findings in the Rett syndrome is reviewed in detail. 34 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Uroporphyrin-accumulating mutant of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    S?s?rman, A; Chartrand, P; Proschek, R; Desrochers, M; Tardif, D; Lapointe, C

    1975-01-01

    An uroporphyrin III-accumulating mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 was isolated by neomycin. The mutant, designated SASQ85, was catalase deficient and formed dwarf colonies on usual media. Comparative extraction by cyclohexanone and ethyl acetate showed the superiority of the former for the extraction of the uroporphyrin accumulated by the mutant. Cell-free extracts of SASQ85 were able to convert 5-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen, but not to copro- or protoporphyrinogen. Under the same conditions cell-free extracts of the parent strain converted 5-aminolevulinic to uroporphyringen, coproporphyrinogen, and protoporphyrinogen. The conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen by cell-free extracts of the mutant was inhibited 98 and 95%, respectively, by p-chloromercuribenzoate and p-chloromercuriphenyl-sulfonate, indicating the presence of uroporphyrinogen synthetase activity in the extracts. Spontaneous transformation of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrin was not detectable under the experimental conditions used [4 h at 37 C in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-potassium phosphate buffer, pH 8.2]. The results indicate a deficient uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity of SASQ85 which is thus the first uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase-deficient mutant isolated in E. coli K-12. Mapping of the corresponding locus by P1-mediated transduction revealed the frequent joint transduction of hemE and thiA markers (frequency of co-transduction, 41 to 44%). The results of the genetic analysis suggest the gene order rif, hemE, thiA, metA; however, they do not totally exclude the gene order rif, thiA, hemE, metA. PMID:1104578

  19. The Mutational Landscape of Lethal Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Catherine S.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan R.; Cao, Xuhong; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Khan, Amjad P.; Quist, Michael J.; Jing, Xiaojun; Lonigro, Robert J.; Brenner, J. Chad; Asangani, Irfan A.; Ateeq, Bushra; Chun, Sang Y.; Siddiqui, Javed; Sam, Lee; Anstett, Matt; Mehra, Rohit; Prensner, John R.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Ryslik, Gregory A.; Vandin, Fabio; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Rhodes, Daniel R.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Tomlins, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the prostate cancer transcriptome and genome has identified chromosomal rearrangements and copy number gains/losses, including ETS gene fusions, PTEN loss and androgen receptor (AR) amplification, that drive prostate cancer development and progression to lethal, metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)1. As less is known about the role of mutations24, here we sequenced the exomes of 50 lethal, heavily-pretreated metastatic CRPCs obtained at rapid autopsy (including three different foci from the same patient) and 11 treatment nave, high-grade localized prostate cancers. We identified low overall mutation rates even in heavily treated CRPC (2.00/Mb) and confirmed the monoclonal origin of lethal CRPC. Integrating exome copy number analysis identified disruptions of CHD1, which define a subtype of ETS fusionnegative prostate cancer. Similarly, we demonstrate that ETS2, which is deleted in ~1/3 of CRPCs (commonly through TMPRSS2:ERG fusions), is also deregulated through mutation. Further, we identified recurrent mutations in multiple chromatin/histone modifying genes, including MLL2 (mutated in 8.6% of prostate cancers), and demonstrate interaction of the MLL complex with AR, which is required for AR-mediated signaling. We also identified novel recurrent mutations in the AR collaborating factor FOXA1, which is mutated in 5 of 147 (3.4%) prostate cancers (both untreated localized prostate cancer and CRPC), and showed that mutated FOXA1 represses androgen signaling and increases tumour growth. Proteins that physically interact with AR, such as the ERG gene fusion product, FOXA1, MLL2, UTX, and ASXL1 were found to be mutated in CRPC. In summary, we describe the mutational landscape of a heavily treated metastatic cancer, identify novel mechanisms of AR signaling deregulated in prostate cancer, and prioritize candidates for future study. PMID:22722839

  20. Filgrastim improves survival in lethally irradiated nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Farese, Ann M; Cohen, Melanie V; Katz, Barry P; Smith, Cassandra P; Gibbs, Allison; Cohen, Daniel M; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of individuals exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation is of paramount concern to health professionals and government agencies. We evaluated the efficacy of filgrastim to increase survival of nonhuman primates (NHP) exposed to an approximate mid-lethal dose (LD(50/60)) (7.50 Gy) of LINAC-derived photon radiation. Prior to total-body irradiation (TBI), nonhuman primates were randomized to either a control (n = 22) or filgrastim-treated (n = 24) cohorts. Filgrastim (10 ?g/kg/d) was administered beginning 1 day after TBI and continued daily until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was >1,000/?L for 3 consecutive days. All nonhuman primates received medical management as per protocol. The primary end point was all cause overall mortality over the 60 day in-life study. Secondary end points included mean survival time of decedents and all hematologic-related parameters. Filgrastim significantly (P < 0.004) reduced 60 day overall mortality [20.8% (5/24)] compared to the controls [59.1% (13/22)]. Filgrastim significantly decreased the duration of neutropenia, but did not affect the absolute neutrophil count nadir. Febrile neutropenia (ANC <500/?L and body temperature ? 103F) was experienced by 90.9% (20/22) of controls compared to 79.2% (19/24) of filgrastim-treated animals (P = 0.418). Survival was significantly increased by 38.3% over controls. Filgrastim, administered at this dose and schedule, effectively mitigated the lethality of the hematopoietic subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome. PMID:23210705

  1. Left ventricular function during lethal and sublethal endotoxemia in swine

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, R.D.; Nightingale, L.M.; Kish, P.; Weber, P.B.; Loegering, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    Previous studies suggested that after a median lethal dose (LD50) of endotoxin, cardiac contractility was depressed in nonsurviving dogs. The canine cardiovascular system is unlike humans in that dogs have a hepatic vein sphincter that is susceptible to adrenergic stimulation capable of raising hepatic and splanchnic venous pressures. The authors retested the hypothesis that lethality after endotoxin administration is associated with cardiac contractile depression in pigs, because of the hepatic circulation in this species is similar to that of humans. They compared cardiac mechanical function of pigs administered a high dose (250 g/kg) or a low dose (100 g/kg) endotoxin by use of the slope of the end-systolic pressure-diameter relationship (ESPDR) as well as other measurements of cardiac performance. In all the pigs administered a high dose, ESPDR demonstrated a marked, time-dependent depression whereas we observed no significant ESPDR changes after low endotoxin doses. The other cardiodynamic variables were uninterpretable, due to the significant changes in heart rate, end-diastolic diameter (preload), and aortic diastolic pressure (afterload). Plasma myocardia depressant factor activity accumulated in all endotoxin-administered animals, tending to be greater in the high-dose group. In this group, both subendocardial blood flow and global function were depressed, whereas pigs administered the low dose endotoxin demonstrated slight, but nonsignificant, increases in flow and function. These observations indicate that myocardial contractile depression is associated with a lethal outcome to high doses of endotoxin. Myocardial perfusion was measured using radiolabeled microspheres infused into the left atria.

  2. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y.; Siemann, Stefan

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  3. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Miriam S. N.; Cardoso, Renato D. R.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Crespigio, Jefferson; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; da Silva, Rosiane V.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2013-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) converts arachidonic acid into leukotrienes (LTs) and is involved in inflammation. At present, the participation of 5-LO in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and liver damage has not been addressed. 5-LO deficient (5-LO−/−) mice and background wild type mice were challenged with APAP (0.3–6 g/kg) or saline. The lethality, liver damage, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, LTB4, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. APAP induced a dose-dependent mortality, and the dose of 3 g/kg was selected for next experiments. APAP induced LTB4 production in the liver, the primary target organ in APAP toxicity. Histopathological analysis revealed that 5-LO−/− mice presented reduced APAP-induced liver necrosis and inflammation compared with WT mice. APAP-induced lethality, increase of plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, liver cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10), superoxide anion, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity, Nrf2 and gp91phox mRNA expression, and decrease of reduced glutathione and antioxidant capacity measured by 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate) assay were prevented in 5-LO−/− mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, 5-LO deficiency resulted in reduced mortality due to reduced liver inflammatory and oxidative damage, suggesting 5-LO is a promising target to reduce APAP-induced lethality and liver inflammatory/oxidative damage. PMID:24288682

  4. EXCALIBIR - A space experiment in orbital debris lethality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culp, Robert D.; Dickey, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    The study proposes a space experiment using extended Space Shuttle external tanks to test the impact of orbital debris. The External Tank Calibrated Impact Response test, EXCALIBIR, is a low-cost low-risk, high-payoff approach to investigating the threat to resident space objects posed by untrackable orbital debris, to provide lethality data to the kinetic energy weapons community, and to aid in the testing of space and missile interceptor technology. This experiment is a feasible use of existing assets - the external tank, observation and data collection facilities, launch facilities, and interceptor technology and tests planned for other programs.

  5. ELF fields and photooxidation yielding lethal effects on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Traitcheva, Nelly; Angelova, Plamena; Radeva, Maria; Berg, Hermann

    2003-02-01

    The lethal effect on human cancer cells was studied under three types of treatment: A) an ELF pulsed sinusoidal of 50 Hz electromagnetic field (PEMF) with amplitudes between 10 and 55 mT; B) the field and a cytostatic agent (actinomycin-C); and C) the field, the cytostatic agent, which has a photodynamic effect, and exposure to a halogen lamp. The results show a decreasing vitality of human K-562 and U-937 cancer cells in suspension with each additional treatment. Combination with other parameters as hyperthermia and/or hyperacidity could yield high killing rates by this noninvasive method. PMID:12524682

  6. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity

    PubMed Central

    Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  7. Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Lethal Entity.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sushma; Paldiwal, Ashutosh Abhimanyu; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir

    2015-10-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a rare disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three classic forms of CPT II deficiency have been described namely the lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form and the myopathic form. We present a three-day-old female child, admitted to us for lethargy, icterus, low sugars and convulsions. Persistent non ketotic hypoglycaemia, hyperammonemia, raised liver enzymes with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy led to the suspicion of fatty acid oxidation defect. Tandem mass spectrometry helped to clinch the diagnosis of CPT II Deficiency in the present case. PMID:26557586

  8. [Severe loxoscelism with lethal outcome. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Alcides; Gonzlez, Jorge; Callejas, Guillermo

    2005-02-01

    Loxoscelism, is caused by the bite of Loxosceles laeta spiders. It has two clinical forms: cutaneous loxoscelism (CL) and viscerocutaneous loxoscelism (VCL). VCL is characterized by hematuria, hemoglobinuria, jaundice, fever and sensorial involvement. In severe cases there is massive hemolysis and renal failure, with high lethality. We report a 71 year-old man, brought to the hospital five days after suffering a spider bite. The patient was admitted with a severe kidney failure, hemolysis, metabolic acidosis and clotting disorder. The patient was managed with adrenal steroids and dialisys but died five weeks after hospital admission. This particular patient consulted late and had multiple factors of poor prognosis. PMID:15824833

  9. Salt stress-induced production of reactive oxygen- and nitrogen species and cell death in the ethylene receptor mutant Never ripe and wild type tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Por, Pter; Kovcs, Judit; Borbly, Pter; Takcs, Zoltn; Szepesi, gnes; Tari, Irma

    2015-12-01

    The salt stress triggered by sublethal, 100mM and lethal, 250mM NaCl induced ethylene production as well as rapid accumulation of superoxide radical and H2O2 in the root tips of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Ailsa Craig) wild type and ethylene receptor mutant, Never ripe (Nr/Nr) plants. In the wild type plants superoxide accumulation confined to lethal salt concentration while H2O2 accumulated more efficiently under sublethal salt stress. However, in Nr roots the superoxide production was higher and unexpectedly, H2O2 level was lower than in the wild type under sublethal salt stress. Nitric oxide production increased significantly under sublethal and lethal salt stress in both genotypes especially in mutant plants, while peroxynitrite accumulated significantly under lethal salt stress. Thus, the nitro-oxidative stress may be stronger in Nr roots, which leads to the programmed death of tissues, characterized by the DNA and protein degradation and loss of cell viability under moderate salt stress. In Nr mutants the cell death was induced in the absence of ethylene perception. Although wild type roots could maintain their potassium content under moderate salt stress, K(+) level significantly declined leading to small K(+)/Na(+) ratio in Nr roots. Thus Nr mutants were more sensitive to salt stress than the wild type and the viability of root cells decreased significantly under moderate salt stress. These changes can be attributed to a stronger ionic stress due to the K(+) loss from the root tissues. PMID:26512971

  10. Xenopus mutant reveals necessity of rax for specifying the eye field which otherwise forms tissue with telencephalic and diencephalic character

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Marilyn; Hirsch, Nicolas; Cox, Amanda; Reeder, Rollin; Carruthers, Samantha; Hall, Amanda; Stemple, Derek L.; Grainger, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The retinal anterior homeobox (rax) gene encodes a transcription factor necessary for vertebrate eye development. rax transcription is initiated at the end of gastrulation in Xenopus, and is a key part of the regulatory network specifying anterior neural plate and retina. We describe here a Xenopus tropicalis rax mutant, the first mutant analyzed in detail from a reverse genetic screen. As in other vertebrates, this nonsense mutation results in eyeless animals, and is lethal peri-metamorphosis. Tissue normally fated to form retina in these mutants instead forms tissue with characteristics of diencephalon and telencephalon. This implies that a key role of rax, in addition to defining the eye field, is in preventing alternative forebrain identities. Our data highlight that brain and retina regions are not determined by the mid-gastrula stage but are by the neural plate stage. An RNA-Seq analysis and in situ hybridization assays for early gene expression in the mutant revealed that several key eye field transcription factors (e.g. pax6, lhx2 and six6) are not dependent on rax activity through neurulation. However, these analyses identified other genes either up- or down-regulated in mutant presumptive retinal tissue. Two neural patterning genes of particular interest that appear up-regulated in the rax mutant RNA-seq analysis are hesx1 and fezf2. These genes were not previously known to be regulated by rax. The normal function of rax is to partially repress their expression by an indirect mechanism in the presumptive retina region in wildtype embryos, thus accounting for the apparent up-regulation in the rax mutant. Knock-down experiments using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against hesx1 and fezf2 show that failure to repress these two genes contributes to transformation of presumptive retinal tissue into non-retinal forebrain identities in the rax mutant. PMID:25224223

  11. Mutant IDH is sufficient to initiate enchondromatosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Makoto; Sasaki, Masato; Cairns, Rob A.; Inoue, Satoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Li, Wanda Y.; Snow, Bryan E.; Jones, Lisa D.; Wei, Qingxia; Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J.; Nadesan, Puviindran; Rockel, Jason; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Weng, Angela; Gross, Stefan; Straley, Kimberly; Gliser, Camelia; Xu, Yingxia; Wunder, Jay; Mak, Tak W.; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Enchondromas are benign cartilage tumors and precursors to malignant chondrosarcomas. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in the majority of these tumor types. How these mutations cause enchondromas is unclear. Here, we identified the spectrum of IDH mutations in human enchondromas and chondrosarcomas and studied their effects in mice. A broad range of mutations was identified, including the previously unreported IDH1-R132Q mutation. These mutations harbored enzymatic activity to catalyze α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). Mice expressing Idh1-R132Q in one allele in cells expressing type 2 collagen showed a disordered growth plate, with persistence of type X-expressing chondrocytes. Chondrocyte cell cultures from these animals or controls showed that there was an increase in proliferation and expression of genes characteristic of hypertrophic chondrocytes with expression of Idh1-R132Q or 2HG treatment. Col2a1-Cre;Idh1-R132Q mutant knock-in mice (mutant allele expressed in chondrocytes) did not survive after the neonatal stage. Col2a1-Cre/ERT2;Idh1-R132 mutant conditional knock-in mice, in which Cre was induced by tamoxifen after weaning, developed multiple enchondroma-like lesions. Taken together, these data show that mutant IDH or d-2HG causes persistence of chondrocytes, giving rise to rests of growth-plate cells that persist in the bone as enchondromas. PMID:25730874

  12. Mutant IDH is sufficient to initiate enchondromatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Makoto; Sasaki, Masato; Cairns, Rob A; Inoue, Satoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Li, Wanda Y; Snow, Bryan E; Jones, Lisa D; Wei, Qingxia; Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J; Nadesan, Puviindran; Rockel, Jason; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Weng, Angela; Gross, Stefan; Straley, Kimberly; Gliser, Camelia; Xu, Yingxia; Wunder, Jay; Mak, Tak W; Alman, Benjamin A

    2015-03-01

    Enchondromas are benign cartilage tumors and precursors to malignant chondrosarcomas. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in the majority of these tumor types. How these mutations cause enchondromas is unclear. Here, we identified the spectrum of IDH mutations in human enchondromas and chondrosarcomas and studied their effects in mice. A broad range of mutations was identified, including the previously unreported IDH1-R132Q mutation. These mutations harbored enzymatic activity to catalyze α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). Mice expressing Idh1-R132Q in one allele in cells expressing type 2 collagen showed a disordered growth plate, with persistence of type X-expressing chondrocytes. Chondrocyte cell cultures from these animals or controls showed that there was an increase in proliferation and expression of genes characteristic of hypertrophic chondrocytes with expression of Idh1-R132Q or 2HG treatment. Col2a1-Cre;Idh1-R132Q mutant knock-in mice (mutant allele expressed in chondrocytes) did not survive after the neonatal stage. Col2a1-Cre/ERT2;Idh1-R132 mutant conditional knock-in mice, in which Cre was induced by tamoxifen after weaning, developed multiple enchondroma-like lesions. Taken together, these data show that mutant IDH or d-2HG causes persistence of chondrocytes, giving rise to rests of growth-plate cells that persist in the bone as enchondromas. PMID:25730874

  13. Simultaneous absence of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-mediated signaling is lethal in mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Minoru; Iaccarino, Ciro; Saiardi, Adolfo; Heidt, Valrie; Bozzi, Yuri; Picetti, Roberto; Vitale, Carmine; Westphal, Heiner; Drago, John; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2004-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) controls a wide variety of physiological functions in the central nervous system as well as in the neuroendocrine and gastrointestinal systems. DA signaling is mediated by five cloned receptors named D1-D5. Knockout mouse models for the five receptors have been generated, and, albeit impaired for some important DA-mediated functions, they are viable and can reproduce. D1 and D2 receptors are the most abundant and widely expressed DA receptors. Cooperative/synergistic effects mediated by these receptors have been suggested, in particular, in the control of motor behaviors. To analyze the extent of such interrelationship, we have generated double D1/D2 receptor mutants. Interestingly, in contrast to single knockouts, we found that concurrent ablation of the D1 and D2 receptors is lethal during the second or third week after birth. This dramatic phenotype is likely to be related to altered feeding behavior and dysfunction of the gastrointestinal system, especially because major anatomical changes were not identified in the brain. Similarly, in the absence of functional D1, heterozygous D2 mutants (D1r(-/-);D2r(+/-)) showed severe growth retardation and did not survive their postweaning period. The analysis of motor behavior in D1r/D2r compound mutants showed that loss of D2-mediated functions reduces motor abilities, whereas the effect of D1r ablation on locomotion strongly depends on the experimental paradigms used. These studies highlight the interrelationship between D1 and D2 receptor-mediated control of motor activity, food intake, and gastrointestinal functions, which has been elusive in the single-gene ablation studies. PMID:15272078

  14. In Trans Complementation of Lethal Factor Reveal Roles in Colonization and Dissemination in a Murine Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, David E.; Ya, Jason; Glomski, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal factor (LF) is a component of the B. anthracis exotoxin and critical for pathogenesis. The roles of LF in early anthrax pathogenesis, such as colonization and dissemination from the initial site of infection, are poorly understood. In mice models of infection, LF-deficient strains either have altered dissemination patterns or do not colonize, precluding analysis of the role of LF in colonization and dissemination from the portal of entry. Previous reports indicate rabbit and guinea pig models infected with LF-deficient strains have decreased virulence, yet the inability to use bioluminescent imaging techniques to track B. anthracis growth and dissemination in these hosts makes analysis of early pathogenesis challenging. In this study, the roles of LF early in infection were analyzed using bioluminescent signature tagged libraries of B. anthracis with varying ratios of LF-producing and LF-deficient clones. Populations where all clones produced LF and populations where only 40% of clones produce LF were equally virulent. The 40% LF-producing clones trans complimented the LF mutants and permitted them to colonize and disseminate. Decreases of the LF producing strains to 10% or 0.3% of the population led to increased host survival and decreased trans complementation of the LF mutants. A library with 10% LF producing clones could replicate and disseminate, but fewer clones disseminated and the mutant clones were less competitive than wild type. The inoculum with 0.3% LF producing clones could not colonize the host. This strongly suggests that between 10% and 0.3% of the population must produce LF in order to colonize. In total, these findings suggest that a threshold of LF must be produced in order for colonization and dissemination to occur in vivo. These observations suggest that LF has a major role in the early stages of colonization and dissemination. PMID:24763227

  15. NH(4)-Excreting Azospirillum brasilense Mutants Enhance the Nitrogen Supply of a Wheat Host.

    PubMed

    Christiansen-Weniger, C; Van Veen, J A

    1991-10-01

    Spontaneous ethylenediamine-resistant mutants of Azospirillum brasilense were selected on the basis of their excretion of NH(4). Two mutants exhibited no repression of their nitrogenase enzyme systems in the presence of high (20 mM) concentrations of NH(4). The nitrogenase activities of these mutants on nitrogen-free minimal medium were two to three times higher than the nitrogenase activity of the wild type. The mutants excreted substantial amounts of ammonia when they were grown either under oxygen-limiting conditions (1 kPa of O(2)) or aerobically on nitrate or glutamate. The mutants grew well on glutamate as a sole nitrogen source but only poorly on NH(4)Cl. Both mutants failed to incorporate [C]methylamine. We demonstrated that nitrite ammonification occurs in the mutants. Wild-type A. brasilense, as well as the mutants, became established in the rhizospheres of axenically grown wheat plants at levels of > 10 cells per g of root. The rhizosphere acetylene reduction activity was highest in the preparations containing the mutants. When plants were grown on a nitrogen-free nutritional medium, both mutants were responsible for significant increases in root and shoot dry matter compared with wild-type-treated plants or with noninoculated controls. Total plant nitrogen accumulation increased as well. When they were exposed to a N(2)-enriched atmosphere, both A. brasilense mutants incorporated significantly higher amounts of N inside root and shoot material than the wild type did. The results of our nitrogen balance and N enrichment studies indicated that NH(4)-excreting A. brasilense strains potentially support the nitrogen supply of the host plants. PMID:16348569

  16. NH4+-Excreting Azospirillum brasilense Mutants Enhance the Nitrogen Supply of a Wheat Host

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen-Weniger, C.; Van Veen, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Spontaneous ethylenediamine-resistant mutants of Azospirillum brasilense were selected on the basis of their excretion of NH4+. Two mutants exhibited no repression of their nitrogenase enzyme systems in the presence of high (20 mM) concentrations of NH4+. The nitrogenase activities of these mutants on nitrogen-free minimal medium were two to three times higher than the nitrogenase activity of the wild type. The mutants excreted substantial amounts of ammonia when they were grown either under oxygen-limiting conditions (1 kPa of O2) or aerobically on nitrate or glutamate. The mutants grew well on glutamate as a sole nitrogen source but only poorly on NH4Cl. Both mutants failed to incorporate [14C]methylamine. We demonstrated that nitrite ammonification occurs in the mutants. Wild-type A. brasilense, as well as the mutants, became established in the rhizospheres of axenically grown wheat plants at levels of > 107 cells per g of root. The rhizosphere acetylene reduction activity was highest in the preparations containing the mutants. When plants were grown on a nitrogen-free nutritional medium, both mutants were responsible for significant increases in root and shoot dry matter compared with wild-type-treated plants or with noninoculated controls. Total plant nitrogen accumulation increased as well. When they were exposed to a 15N2-enriched atmosphere, both A. brasilense mutants incorporated significantly higher amounts of 15N inside root and shoot material than the wild type did. The results of our nitrogen balance and 15N enrichment studies indicated that NH4+-excreting A. brasilense strains potentially support the nitrogen supply of the host plants. PMID:16348569

  17. The study of the influence of secondary biogenic radiation on genetic and physiological changes in plants grown from seeds kept for a long time under space flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, S.; Nechitailo, G.; Dmitrievskiy, I.

    Analysis of the biological investigations carried out at the Russian space stations showed that the combined action of low radiation doses and altered gravitation causes considerable genetic and physiological changes in plants grown from seeds kept for a long time under space flight conditions The results of the investigations with tomato plants produced from seeds staying for a long time at the MIR station are presented in the work The seeds of the flight samples had 26 8 germinating capacity whereas in the control it was 58 3 To reveal hidden changes undetectable with conventional methods the method of regeneration of conditionally lethal mutations under the action of secondary biogenic radiation developed by us previously was used On the basis of preliminarily studied bacteriophage T4B mutations obtained in experiments with accelerators in highland and space flight conditions an optimal dose of Cs137 gamma-radiation in the range from 1e-2 cGy to 1e-4 cGy was chosen which generates secondary biogenic radiation The germinating capacity of the tomato seeds exposed to secondary biogenic radiation was 4 times higher as compared to the initial one and made up 75 The generations of plants exposed to the biogenic influence had specific morphological mutations cotyledon-free and leafless stumps called by us hypocotel stumps Such mutants obtained from conventionally lethal seeds under the action of biogenic radiation have never been observed in the control and experimental variants There are data for 2000 tomato mutations including

  18. Radiation-induced cell lethality of samonella typhimurium ATCC 14028: Cooperative effect of hydroxyl radical and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.A.; Thayer, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    The lethality of {gamma}-radiation doses of 0.2 to 1.0 kGy for Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 was measured in the presence of air, N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O and with the hydroxyl radical scavengers formate and polyethylene glycol (PEG), M{sub r} 8,000. Saturation of cell suspensions with either N{sub 2}O or N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O (1:1, v/v) gas was expected to double the number of hydroxyl radicals (OH{center_dot}) and to produce an equivalent increase in lethality, but this did not occur. Adding 10% (v/v) O{sub 2} to either N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O gas produced approximately the same {gamma}-irradiation lethality for S. typhimurium as did air. Addition of hydroxyl radical scavengers, 40 mM formate and 1.5% (w/v) PEG, significantly reduced the lethality of {gamma} radiation for S. typhimurium in the presence of air but not in the presence of N{sub 2} or N{sub 2}O gases. Membrane-permeable formate provided slightly better protection than nonpermeable PEG. Cells of S. typhimurium grown under anaerobic conditions were more sensitive to radiation, and were less protected by hydroxyl radical scavengers, especially formate, than when cells grown under aerobic conditions were irradiated in the presence of oxygen. Hydroxyl radical scavengers provided no further protection during irradiation in the absence of oxygen. These results indicated that the increased radiation sensitivity of cells grown under anaerobic conditions may be related to superoxide radicals which could increase intercellular damage during irradiation in the presence of oxygen. However, endogenous superoxide dismutase and catalase activities did not protect cells from the radiation-induced lethality of S. typhimurium. Cytoplasmic extracts protected bacterial DNA in vitro in either the presence of absence of oxygen, and no radiation-induced lipid peroxidation of the cellular components was identified by measuring the levels of 2-thiobarbituric acid. 38 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A bacterial gene codA encoding cytosine deaminase is an effective conditional negative selectable marker in Glycine max

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Conditional negative selection is a powerful technique whereby the absence of a gene product allows survival in otherwise lethal conditions. In plants, the Escherichia coli gene codA has been employed as a negative selection marker. CodA is a conditionally lethal dominant gene encoding cy...

  20. Lethal Nipah virus infection induces rapid overexpression of CXCL10.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Guillaume, Vanessa; Sabine, Amlie; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Horvat, Branka

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a recently emerged zoonotic Paramyxovirus that causes regular outbreaks in East Asia with mortality rate exceeding 75%. Major cellular targets of NiV infection are endothelial cells and neurons. To better understand virus-host interaction, we analyzed the transcriptome profile of NiV infection in primary h