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Sample records for conditioned reflexes

  1. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    PubMed

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology. PMID:11618531

  2. Associative Mechanosensory Conditioning of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giurfa, Martin; Malun, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    The present work introduces a form of associative mechanosensory conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) in honeybees. In our paradigm, harnessed honeybees learn the elemental association between mechanosensory, antennal stimulation and a reward of sucrose solution delivered to the proboscis. Thereafter, bees extend their proboscis to

  3. Associative Mechanosensory Conditioning of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giurfa, Martin; Malun, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    The present work introduces a form of associative mechanosensory conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) in honeybees. In our paradigm, harnessed honeybees learn the elemental association between mechanosensory, antennal stimulation and a reward of sucrose solution delivered to the proboscis. Thereafter, bees extend their proboscis to…

  4. Modulation of defensive reflex conditioning in snails by serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Andrianov, Vyatcheslav V.; Bogodvid, Tatiana K.; Deryabina, Irina B.; Golovchenko, Aleksandra N.; Muranova, Lyudmila N.; Tagirova, Roza R.; Vinarskaya, Aliya K.; Gainutdinov, Khalil L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning in snails.Daily injection of 5-hydroxytryptophan before a training session in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by the “neurotoxic” analog of serotonin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, restored the ability of snails to learn.After injection of the “neurotoxic” analogs of serotonin 5,6- and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine as well as serotonin, depolarization of the membrane and decrease of the threshold potential of premotor interneurons was observed. We studied the role of serotonin in the mechanisms of learning in terrestrial snails. To produce a serotonin deficit, the “neurotoxic” analogs of serotonin, 5,6- or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6/5,7-DHT) were used. Injection of 5,6/5,7-DHT was found to disrupt defensive reflex conditioning. Within 2 weeks of neurotoxin application, the ability to learn had recovered. Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning and daily injections of 5-HTP in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by 5,7-DHT restored the snail's ability to learn. We discovered that injections of the neurotoxins 5,6/5,7-DHT as well as serotonin, caused a decrease in the resting and threshold potentials of the premotor interneurons LPa3 and RPa3. PMID:26557063

  5. Modulation of defensive reflex conditioning in snails by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, Vyatcheslav V; Bogodvid, Tatiana K; Deryabina, Irina B; Golovchenko, Aleksandra N; Muranova, Lyudmila N; Tagirova, Roza R; Vinarskaya, Aliya K; Gainutdinov, Khalil L

    2015-01-01

    Highlights Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning in snails.Daily injection of 5-hydroxytryptophan before a training session in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by the "neurotoxic" analog of serotonin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, restored the ability of snails to learn.After injection of the "neurotoxic" analogs of serotonin 5,6- and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine as well as serotonin, depolarization of the membrane and decrease of the threshold potential of premotor interneurons was observed. We studied the role of serotonin in the mechanisms of learning in terrestrial snails. To produce a serotonin deficit, the "neurotoxic" analogs of serotonin, 5,6- or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6/5,7-DHT) were used. Injection of 5,6/5,7-DHT was found to disrupt defensive reflex conditioning. Within 2 weeks of neurotoxin application, the ability to learn had recovered. Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning and daily injections of 5-HTP in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by 5,7-DHT restored the snail's ability to learn. We discovered that injections of the neurotoxins 5,6/5,7-DHT as well as serotonin, caused a decrease in the resting and threshold potentials of the premotor interneurons LPa3 and RPa3. PMID:26557063

  6. The second modern condition? Compressed modernity as internalized reflexive cosmopolitization.

    PubMed

    Kyung-Sup, Chang

    2010-09-01

    Compressed modernity is a civilizational condition in which economic, political, social and/or cultural changes occur in an extremely condensed manner in respect to both time and space, and in which the dynamic coexistence of mutually disparate historical and social elements leads to the construction and reconstruction of a highly complex and fluid social system. During what Beck considers the second modern stage of humanity, every society reflexively internalizes cosmopolitanized risks. Societies (or their civilizational conditions) are thereby being internalized into each other, making compressed modernity a universal feature of contemporary societies. This paper theoretically discusses compressed modernity as nationally ramified from reflexive cosmopolitization, and, then, comparatively illustrates varying instances of compressed modernity in advanced capitalist societies, un(der)developed capitalist societies, and system transition societies. In lieu of a conclusion, I point out the declining status of national societies as the dominant unit of (compressed) modernity and the interactive acceleration of compressed modernity among different levels of human life ranging from individuals to the global community. PMID:20840427

  7. Induced specific immunological unresponsiveness & conditioned behavioral reflexes, in functional isomorphism-meditation and conditioned specific unresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Freed, S

    1989-02-01

    Detailed functional isomorphism had been observed (Freed, 1984) between induced (conditioned) immunogenicity and classical conditioned defensive reflexes, possibly as evolutionary adaptation against danger at micro and macro levels respectively. Similarly, functional isomorphism is postulated between conditioned specific tolerogenicity of the immunotolerance system and behavioral reflexes. Isomorphism requires that sensory signals elaborated with intrinsic (unconditioned) behavioral tolerogens as carriers do not subsequently combine classically with unconditioned aversive stimuli and evoke conditioned defensive responses. Unconditioned behavioral tolerogenic carriers were identified with behavioral (physiological) activities of Oriental meditation. Confirmation of conditioned behavioral tolerogenicity appeared in the unresponsiveness of Yogi mediators to sensory stimuli as reflected in unchanged alpha rhythms of their encephalograms. Conditioned behavioral specific unresponsiveness maintains the "quiet" of meditation and mediates the experience of Zen mediators, namely, sharpened, clearer perceptions and unresponsiveness to aversive components of current conditioned signals ordinarily reactivating residues of affect. Conditioned behavioral specific unresponsiveness has survival value. PMID:2656566

  8. Visual conditioning of the sting extension reflex in harnessed honeybees.

    PubMed

    Mota, Theo; Roussel, Edith; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Giurfa, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Visual performances of honeybees have been extensively studied using free-flying individuals trained to choose visual stimuli paired with sucrose reward. By contrast, harnessed bees in the laboratory were not thought to be capable of learning a Pavlovian association between a visual stimulus (CS) and sucrose reward (US). For reasons as yet unknown, harnessed bees only learn visual cues in association with sucrose if their antennae are ablated. However, slow acquisition and low retention performances are obtained in this case. Here, we established a novel visual conditioning protocol, which allows studying visual learning and memory in intact harnessed bees in the laboratory. This protocol consists of conditioning the sting extension reflex (SER) by pairing a visual stimulus (CS+) with an electric shock punishment (US), and a different visual stimulus (CS-) with the absence of shock. Bees with intact antennae learned the discrimination between CS+ and CS- by using chromatic cues, achromatic cues or both. Antennae ablation was not only unnecessary for learning to occur but it even impaired visual SER conditioning because of a concomitant reduction of responsiveness to the electric shock. We thus established the first visual conditioning protocol on harnessed honeybees that does not require injuring the experimental subjects. This novel experimental approach opens new doors for accessing the neural correlates of visual learning and memory in honeybees. PMID:21993786

  9. [Influence of transcranial electromagnetic brain stimulation on development of conditioned reflex in rats].

    PubMed

    Samoilov, V O; Shadrin, E B; Filippova, E B; Katsnelson, Ya; Backhoff, H; Eventov, M

    2015-01-01

    The influence of transcranial electromagnetic stimulation on the development of an active avoidance reflex with painful reinforcement in laboratory rats is investigated. It is shown, that an exposure of the rats' brain to electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter range ((? = 5,6 and 7,1 mm), modulated as a series of low-frequency pulses, leads to a suppression of the development of the conditioned avoidance reflex occurred in 50% of cases. In other 25% of cases irradiation leads to inhibition of reflex development. Transcranial electromagnetic stimulation after intraperitoneal injection of the blocking agent of serotonergic receptors (kitryl) has no influence on reflex development. Electromagnetic brain stimulation does not influence reflex retention in the case when it has been acquired. Based on the data obtained it is assumed that transcranial electromagnetic stimulation promotes the development of serotonin, exerting an inhibiting effect on the formation of temporal bindings of the studied conditioned reflex. PMID:26016036

  10. Ablation of the inferior olive prevents H-reflex down-conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang Yang; Wang, Yu; Chen, Yi; Chen, Lu; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the role of the inferior olive (IO) in acquisition of the spinal cord plasticity that underlies H-reflex down-conditioning, a simple motor skill. The IO was chemically ablated before a 50-day exposure to an operant conditioning protocol that rewarded a smaller soleus H-reflex. In normal rats, down-conditioning succeeds (i.e., H-reflex size decreases at least 20%) in 80% of animals. Down-conditioning failed in every IO-ablated rat (P< 0.001 vs. normal rats). IO ablation itself had no long-term effect on H-reflex size. These results indicate that the IO is essential for acquisition of a down-conditioned H-reflex. With previous data, they support the hypothesis that IO and cortical inputs to cerebellum enable the cerebellum to guide sensorimotor cortex plasticity that produces and maintains the spinal cord plasticity that underlies the down-conditioned H-reflex. They help to further define H-reflex conditioning as a model for understanding motor learning and as a new approach to enhancing functional recovery after trauma or disease. PMID:26792888

  11. Locomotor impact of beneficial or nonbeneficial H-reflex conditioning after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Chen, Lu; Liu, Rongliang; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xiang Yang; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2014-03-01

    When new motor learning changes neurons and synapses in the spinal cord, it may affect previously learned behaviors that depend on the same spinal neurons and synapses. To explore these effects, we used operant conditioning to strengthen or weaken the right soleus H-reflex pathway in rats in which a right spinal cord contusion had impaired locomotion. When up-conditioning increased the H-reflex, locomotion improved. Steps became longer, and step-cycle asymmetry (i.e., limping) disappeared. In contrast, when down-conditioning decreased the H-reflex, locomotion did not worsen. Steps did not become shorter, and asymmetry did not increase. Electromyographic and kinematic analyses explained how H-reflex increase improved locomotion and why H-reflex decrease did not further impair it. Although the impact of up-conditioning or down-conditioning on the H-reflex pathway was still present during locomotion, only up-conditioning affected the soleus locomotor burst. Additionally, compensatory plasticity apparently prevented the weaker H-reflex pathway caused by down-conditioning from weakening the locomotor burst and further impairing locomotion. The results support the hypothesis that the state of the spinal cord is a "negotiated equilibrium" that serves all the behaviors that depend on it. When new learning changes the spinal cord, old behaviors undergo concurrent relearning that preserves or improves their key features. Thus, if an old behavior has been impaired by trauma or disease, spinal reflex conditioning, by changing a specific pathway and triggering a new negotiation, may enable recovery beyond that achieved simply by practicing the old behavior. Spinal reflex conditioning protocols might complement other neurorehabilitation methods and enhance recovery. PMID:24371288

  12. [Characteristics of the interaction of image and conditioned reflex memory during the ontogeny of chimpanzees].

    PubMed

    Firsov, L A; Bogacheva, I N; Kuz'min, S K

    1984-01-01

    Interaction of a stable conditioned reflex and trace visual image of a natural alimentary stimulus was studied in two groups of chimpanzee youngs. A. higher stability of visual imaginative memory was observed in animals of the elder group. PMID:6475294

  13. Kinetic and frequency-domain properties of reflex and conditioned eyelid responses in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Gruart, A; Schreurs, B G; del Toro, E D; Delgado-García, J M

    2000-02-01

    Eyelid position and the electromyographic activity of the orbicularis oculi muscle were recorded unilaterally in rabbits during reflex and conditioned blinks. Air-puff-evoked blinks consisted of a fast downward phase followed sometimes by successive downward sags. The reopening phase had a much longer duration and slower peak velocity. Onset latency, maximum amplitude, peak velocity, and rise time of reflex blinks depended on the intensity and duration of the air puff-evoking stimulus. A flashlight focused on the eye also evoked reflex blinks, but not flashes of light, or tones. Both delayed and trace classical conditioning paradigms were used. For delayed conditioning, animals were presented with a 350-ms, 90-dB, 600-Hz tone, as conditioned stimulus (CS). For trace conditioning, animals were presented with a 10-ms, 1-k/cm(2) air puff, as CS. The unconditioned stimulus (US) consisted of a 100-ms, 3-k/cm(2) air puff. The stimulus interval between CS and US onsets was 250 ms. Conditioned responses (CRs) to tones were composed of downward sags that increased in number through the successive conditioning sessions. The onset latency of the CR decreased across conditioning at the same time as its maximum amplitude and its peak velocity increased, but the time-to-peak of the CR remained unaltered. The topography of CRs evoked by short, weak air puffs as the CS showed three different components: the alpha response to the CS, the CR, and the reflex response to the US. Through conditioning, CRs showed a decrease in onset latency, and an increase in maximum amplitude and peak velocity. The time-to-peak of the CR remained unchanged. A power spectrum analysis of reflex and conditioned blink acceleration profiles showed a significant approximately 8-Hz oscillation within a broadband of frequencies between 4 and 15 Hz. Nose and mandible movements presented power spectrum profiles different from those characterizing reflex and conditioned blinks. It is concluded that eyelid reflex responses in the rabbit present significant differences from CRs in their profiles and metric properties, suggesting different neural origins, but that a common approximately 8-Hz neural oscillator underlies lid motor performance. According to available data, the frequency of this putative oscillator seems to be related to the species size. PMID:10669498

  14. Ultrasonographic examination of the oesophageal groove reflex in young calves under various feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    The oesophageal groove reflex was examined in 6 milk-fed Holstein Friesian calves once weekly during the first 17 weeks of life. Additionally, the effect of different feeding methods (bucket, different nipple positions and openings), different milk temperatures (20, 30, 39, 45°C) and milk replacer concentrations (100, 125, 150 grams/litre of water) on oesophageal groove closure was investigated. The reticulum and abomasum were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0-MHz convex transducer before, during and after feeding, and the oesophageal groove reflex was considered to be functional when milk was seen entering the abomasum during feeding. The reflex was consistently induced throughout the study period in all calves at all examinations and under all experimental conditions. However, it should not be assumed that feeding technique can be neglected in unweaned calves because suboptimal feeding management has been linked to various digestive disorders. PMID:26753366

  15. The Simplest Motor Skill: Mechanisms and Applications of Reflex Operant Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aiko K.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Operant conditioning protocols can gradually change spinal reflexes, which are the simplest behaviors. This article summarizes the evidence supporting two propositions: that these protocols provide excellent models for defining the substrates of learning; and that they can induce and guide plasticity to help restore skills such as locomotion that have been impaired by spinal cord injury or other disorders. PMID:24508738

  16. Operant conditioning of the soleus H-reflex does not induce long-term changes in the gastrocnemius H-reflexes and does not disturb normal locomotion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    In normal animals, operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or the H-reflex has lesser effects on synergist muscle reflexes. In rats and people with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), soleus H-reflex operant conditioning can improve locomotion. We studied in normal humans the impact of soleus H-reflex down-conditioning on medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) H-reflexes and on locomotion. Subjects completed 6 baseline and 30 conditioning sessions. During conditioning trials, the subject was encouraged to decrease soleus H-reflex size with the aid of visual feedback. Every sixth session, MG and LG H-reflexes were measured. Locomotion was assessed before and after conditioning. In successfully conditioned subjects, the soleus H-reflex decreased 27.2%. This was the sum of within-session (task dependent) adaptation (13.2%) and across-session (long term) change (14%). The MG H-reflex decreased 14.5%, due mainly to task-dependent adaptation (13.4%). The LG H-reflex showed no task-dependent adaptation or long-term change. No consistent changes were detected across subjects in locomotor H-reflexes, EMG activity, joint angles, or step symmetry. Thus, in normal humans, soleus H-reflex down-conditioning does not induce long-term changes in MG/LG H-reflexes and does not change locomotion. In these subjects, task-dependent adaptation of the soleus H-reflex is greater than it is in people with SCI, whereas long-term change is less. This difference from results in people with SCI is consistent with the fact that long-term change is beneficial in people with SCI, since it improves locomotion. In contrast, in normal subjects, long-term change is not beneficial and may necessitate compensatory plasticity to preserve satisfactory locomotion. PMID:24944216

  17. Conditioning effect in single human motoneurones: a new method using the unitary H reflex.

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, M; Yanagawa, S; Morita, H; Hashimoto, T

    1994-01-01

    1. A new method for the study of spinal reflexes using single motor units is described. 2. The excitability of a motoneurone is assessed as the 'critical firing stimulus' (CFS), which is the difference between the test stimulus intensity needed to reach the threshold for the lowest threshold Ia fibres and the intensity which evokes firing of a motor unit with the probability of 50% (FP50%). The intensity with FP50% is obtained by modulating stimulator output. When the motor unit is fired by a stimulus, the next intensity is decreased, and vice versa. The Ia threshold is defined as the threshold for homonymous monosynaptic peaks in PSTHs during contraction of the muscle examined. 3. A conditioning effect is represented as a change in CFS, the extent being expressed as a percentage of the unconditioned CFS. 4. Effects obtained by conditioning stimulation with the new and conventional H reflex methods are compared. The sensitivities are almost the same and the extents of the effects have highly correlated linear relations for the two methods. 5. The advantages of the new method are (1) that it shows reflex activities on a single motoneurone, (2) that it is applicable both to muscles at rest and during contraction, and (3) that it quantifies conditioning effects as percentages of the size of test Ia EPSPs. PMID:7738838

  18. The Cerebellum in Maintenance of a Motor Skill: A Hierarchy of Brain and Spinal Cord Plasticity Underlies H-Reflex Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2006-01-01

    Operant conditioning of the H-reflex, the electrical analog of the spinal stretch reflex, is a simple model of skill acquisition and involves plasticity in the spinal cord. Previous work showed that the cerebellum is essential for down-conditioning the H-reflex. This study asks whether the cerebellum is also essential for maintaining…

  19. [The effect of bemitil on conditioned-reflex memory in normal rats and under stress exposures].

    PubMed

    Pragina, L L; Tushmalova, N A; Inozemtsev, A N; Smirnov, A V

    1999-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of the actoprotector bemitil on the conditional-reflex memory of rats and its functional disorder by disturbance of the cause-effect (abatement of the avoidance reaction) or space relations. Intraperitoneal injections of 1.8 mg/kg of bemitil were given daily 30 min before the experiment. The training of animals improved authentically from experiment to experiment. Thus, the drug, possesses the nootropic properties. Exposure to stressogenic factors of various depth demonstrated the stress-protective effect of bemitil. PMID:10513327

  20. Light conditions affect the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Yamany, Nabil A.

    2008-12-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, effects of asymmetrical light conditions on the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) were tested for the developmental period between stage 47 and 49. For comparison, the rVOR was tested in dim- and high-symmetrical light environments. Test parameters were the rVOR gain and rVOR amplitude. Under all light conditions, the rVOR increased from tadpole stage 47 to 49. For all stages, the asymmetrical light field induced the strongest response, the dim light field the weakest one. The response for the left and right eye was identical, even if the tadpoles were tested under asymmetrical light conditions. The experiments can be considered as hints (1) for an age-dependent light sensitivity of vestibular neurons, and (2) for the existence of control systems for coordinated eye movements that has its origin in the proprioceptors of the extraocular eye muscles.

  1. Adaptation of the macular vestibuloocular reflex to altered gravitational conditions in a fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, E.; Sebastian, C.

    Young fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) were exposed to microgravity (μg) for 9 to 10 days, or to hypergravity (hg) for 9 days. For several weeks after termination of μg and hg, the roll-induced static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) was recorded. In stage 11/12-fish, the rVOR amplitude (angle between the maximal up and down movement of an eye during a complete 360° lateral roll) of μg-animals increased significantly by 25% compared to 1g-controls during the first post-flight week but decreased to the control level during the second post-flight week. Microgravity had no effect in stage 14/16 fish on the rVOR amplitude. After 3g-exposure, the rVOR amplitude was significantly reduced for both groups compared to their 1g-controls. Readaptation to 1g-condition was completed during the second post-3g week. We postulate a critical period during which the development of the macular vestibuloocular reflex depends on gravitational input, and which is limited by the first appearence of the rVOR. At this period of early development, exposure to microgravity sensitizes the vestibular system while hypergravity desensitizes it.

  2. Enhanced D1 and D2 Inhibitions Induced by Low-Frequency Trains of Conditioning Stimuli: Differential Effects on H- and T-Reflexes and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mezzarane, Rinaldo André; Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Chaud, Vitor Martins; Elias, Leonardo Abdala; Kohn, André Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Mechanically evoked reflexes have been postulated to be less sensitive to presynaptic inhibition (PSI) than the H-reflex. This has implications on investigations of spinal cord neurophysiology that are based on the T-reflex. Preceding studies have shown an enhanced effect of PSI on the H-reflex when a train of ~10 conditioning stimuli at 1 Hz was applied to the nerve of the antagonist muscle. The main questions to be addressed in the present study are if indeed T-reflexes are less sensitive to PSI and whether (and to what extent and by what possible mechanisms) the effect of low frequency conditioning, found previously for the H-reflex, can be reproduced on T-reflexes from the soleus muscle. We explored two different conditioning-to-test (C-T) intervals: 15 and 100 ms (corresponding to D1 and D2 inhibitions, respectively). Test stimuli consisted of either electrical pulses applied to the posterior tibial nerve to elicit H-reflexes or mechanical percussion to the Achilles tendon to elicit T-reflexes. The 1 Hz train of conditioning electrical stimuli delivered to the common peroneal nerve induced a stronger effect of PSI as compared to a single conditioning pulse, for both reflexes (T and H), regardless of C-T-intervals. Moreover, the conditioning train of pulses (with respect to a single conditioning pulse) was proportionally more effective for T-reflexes as compared to H-reflexes (irrespective of the C-T interval), which might be associated with the differential contingent of Ia afferents activated by mechanical and electrical test stimuli. A conceivable explanation for the enhanced PSI effect in response to a train of stimuli is the occurrence of homosynaptic depression at synapses on inhibitory interneurons interposed within the PSI pathway. The present results add to the discussion of the sensitivity of the stretch reflex pathway to PSI and its functional role. PMID:25807195

  3. Amplification of interlimb reflexes evoked by stimulating the hand simultaneously with conditioning from the foot during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Widespread interlimb reflexes evoked in leg muscles by cutaneous stimulation of the hand are phase-modulated and behaviorally relevant to produce functional changes in ankle trajectory during walking. These reflexes are complementary to the segmental responses evoked by stimulation at the ankle. Despite differences in the expression of reflex amplitude based upon site of nerve stimulation, there are some common features as well, suggesting the possibility of shared interneuronal pathways. Currently little is known about integration or shared reflex systems from interlimb cutaneous networks during human locomotion. Here we investigated convergent reflex effects following cutaneous stimulation of the hand and foot during arm and leg cycling (AL) by using spatial facilitation. Participants performed AL cycling and static activation of the target muscle knee extensor vastus lateralis (VL) in 3 different randomly ordered nerve stimulation conditions: 1) superficial radial nerve (SR; input from hand); 2) superficial peroneal nerve (SP; input from foot); and, 3) combined stimulation (SR + SP). Stimuli were applied around the onset of rhythmic EMG bursts in VL corresponding to the onset of the power or leg extension phase. Results During AL cycling, small inhibitory (~80 ms) and large facilitatory reflexes (~100 ~ 150 ms) were seen in VL. The amplitudes of the facilitatory responses with SR + SP stimulation were significantly larger than those for SP or SR stimulation alone. The facilitation was also significantly larger than the simple mathematical summation of amplitudes from SP and SR trials. This indicates extra facilitation beyond what would be accounted for by serial neuronal processing and was not observed during static activation. Conclusions We conclude that AL cycling activates shared interneurons in convergent reflex pathways from cutaneous inputs innervating the hand and leg. This enhanced activity has functional implications for corrective responses during locomotion and for translation to rehabilitation after neurotrauma. PMID:23497331

  4. Moro reflex

    MedlinePlus

    Startle response; Startle reflex; Embrace reflex ... Your baby's doctor will check for this reflex right after birth and during well-child visits. To see the Moro reflex, the child will be placed face up on a soft, ...

  5. EVIDENCE FOR THE INVOLVEMENT OF ASSOCIATIVE CONDITIONING IN REFLEX MODIFICATION OF THE ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE WITH GAPS IN BACKGROUND NOISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The experiments reported here were designed to determine the role of associative conditioning in reflex modification of the acoustic startle response using gaps in background noise. xperiments were conducted with independent, naive groups of adult Long Evans hooded rats tested us...

  6. Functional asymmetry of the frontal cortex and lateral hypothalamus of cats during an operant food-related conditioned reflex.

    PubMed

    Vanetsian, G L; Pavlova, I V

    2004-09-01

    The extent of correlation and the latency of evoked potentials to sound, recorded bilaterally in the frontal cortex and lateral hypothalamus of cats, were studied at different stages of the acquisition of an operant food-related reflex and during sudden transfer to 30% food reinforcement. High correlation coefficients between the evoked responses of the cortex and hypothalamus with left-sided dominance were seen in conditions of high levels of food motivation at the beginning of each experiment and in conditions of the high-probability appearance of the acquired conditioned reflex throughout the rest of the experiment. Comparison of the peak latencies of the early positive (P55-80) components of evoked potentials on the right and left sides showed that shorter latent periods were seen in the cortex on the left side at all behavioral stages, while this occurred (on the left side) in the hypothalamus only when the conditioned reflex was unfixed, while after fixation of the reflex and provision of 30% reinforcement, shorter latent periods were seen on the right side. It is concluded that the high level of left-sided correlation of evoked potentials in the hypothalamus was associated with the motivational and motor components of purposive behavior and was not associated with the emotional tension of the animals provoked by the disruption of the food reinforcement stereotype. PMID:15526426

  7. Repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to sensitisation in subsequent avoidance behaviour and induces fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autonomous reflexes enable animals to respond quickly to potential threats, prevent injury and mediate fight or flight responses. Intense acoustic stimuli with sudden onsets elicit a startle reflex while stimuli of similar intensity but with longer rise times only cause a cardiac defence response. In laboratory settings, habituation appears to affect all of these reflexes so that the response amplitude generally decreases with repeated exposure to the stimulus. The startle reflex has become a model system for the study of the neural basis of simple learning processes and emotional processing and is often used as a diagnostic tool in medical applications. However, previous studies did not allow animals to avoid the stimulus and the evolutionary function and long-term behavioural consequences of repeated startling remain speculative. In this study we investigate the follow-up behaviour associated with the startle reflex in wild-captured animals using an experimental setup that allows individuals to exhibit avoidance behaviour. Results We present evidence that repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to rapid and pronounced sensitisation of sustained spatial avoidance behaviour in grey seals (Halichoerus grypus). Animals developed rapid flight responses, left the exposure pool and showed clear signs of fear conditioning. Once sensitised, seals even avoided a known food source that was close to the sound source. In contrast, animals exposed to non-startling (long rise time) stimuli of the same maximum sound pressure habituated and flight responses waned or were absent from the beginning. The startle threshold of grey seals expressed in units of sensation levels was comparable to thresholds reported for other mammals (93 dB). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the acoustic startle reflex plays a crucial role in mediating flight responses and strongly influences the motivational state of an animal beyond a short-term muscular response by mediating long-term avoidance. The reflex is therefore not only a measure of emotional state but also influences emotional processing. The biological function of the startle reflex is most likely associated with mediating rapid flight responses. The data indicate that repeated startling by anthropogenic noise sources might have severe effects on long-term behaviour. Future, studies are needed to investigate whether such effects can be associated with reduced individual fitness or even longevity of individuals. PMID:21489285

  8. Impaired acquisition of classically conditioned fear-potentiated startle reflexes in humans with focal bilateral basolateral amygdala damage.

    PubMed

    Klumpers, Floris; Morgan, Barak; Terburg, David; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2015-09-01

    Based on studies in rodents, the basolateral amygdala (BLA) is considered a key site for experience-dependent neural plasticity underlying the acquisition of conditioned fear responses. In humans, very few studies exist of subjects with selective amygdala lesions and those studies have only implicated the amygdala more broadly leaving the role of amygdala sub-regions underexplored. We tested a rare sample of subjects (N = 4) with unprecedented focal bilateral BLA lesions due to a genetic condition called Urbach-Wiethe disease. In a classical delay fear conditioning experiment, these subjects showed impaired acquisition of conditioned fear relative to a group of matched control subjects (N = 10) as measured by fear-potentiation of the defensive eye-blink startle reflex. After the experiment, the BLA-damaged cases showed normal declarative memory of the conditioned association. Our findings provide new evidence that the human BLA is essential to drive fast classically conditioned defensive reflexes. PMID:25552573

  9. [Principle of least action, physiology of vision, and conditioned reflexes theory].

    PubMed

    Shelepin, Iu E; Krasil'nikov, N N

    2003-06-01

    The variation principles such as principle of least action by Maupertuis (1740) and Fermat principle (1660) are fundamental for physics. They permit to establish a property by which the actual state is differing from all possible states of the system. The variation approach permits to establish equation of motion and equilibrium of a material system on the basis of one common rule which reduces to the search of the function extremes, describes this property of the system. So for the optical systems, crucial is the time and not the length of the way. According to Fermat principles, the light "choosen" from all possible ways connects two dots in the way which needs the least time. Generality of the variation principles guarantees success of their use in brain function investigations. Between different attempts to apply the variation principles to psychology and linguistics, the Zipf principle of least effort must be distinguished. Zipf (1949) demonstrated that languages and some artificial codes satisfied the least principle. For the brain physiology, classical conditioned reflex theory is the ideal area of variation principles application. According to this approach, conditioning leads to finding the extreme during fixation of the temporal link. In vision, physiological investigations are difficult because the signal has many dimensions. For example, during perception of spatial properties of surrounding world, in vision is realized minimization (reduction) of spatial-frequency spectrum of the scene. The receptive fields provide optimal accumulation of the signal. In ontogenesis, signal--noise ratio becomes optimal as receptive fields minimized the internal noise spectrum. According to the theory of match filtration, in the visual system recognition is carryied out by minimal differences between the image description in the visual system and storage in the human memory template of that image. The variation principles help to discover the physical property of phenomenon. The law discovered for mechanical system may be translated to quantum level. In physiology, variation principles permit us to connect information approach with concrete physiological mechanisms of pattern recognition and conditioned reflex. PMID:12966710

  10. Aversive Learning in Honeybees Revealed by the Olfactory Conditioning of the Sting Extension Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Vergoz, Vanina; Roussel, Edith; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Giurfa, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Invertebrates have contributed greatly to our understanding of associative learning because they allow learning protocols to be combined with experimental access to the nervous system. The honeybee Apis mellifera constitutes a standard model for the study of appetitive learning and memory since it was shown, almost a century ago, that bees learn to associate different sensory cues with a reward of sugar solution. However, up to now, no study has explored aversive learning in bees in such a way that simultaneous access to its neural bases is granted. Using odorants paired with electric shocks, we conditioned the sting extension reflex, which is exhibited by harnessed bees when subjected to a noxious stimulation. We show that this response can be conditioned so that bees learn to extend their sting in response to the odorant previously punished. Bees also learn to extend the proboscis to one odorant paired with sugar solution and the sting to a different odorant paired with electric shock, thus showing that they can master both appetitive and aversive associations simultaneously. Responding to the appropriate odorant with the appropriate response is possible because two different biogenic amines, octopamine and dopamine subserve appetitive and aversive reinforcement, respectively. While octopamine has been previously shown to substitute for appetitive reinforcement, we demonstrate that blocking of dopaminergic, but not octopaminergic, receptors suppresses aversive learning. Therefore, aversive learning in honeybees can now be accessed both at the behavioral and neural levels, thus opening new research avenues for understanding basic mechanisms of learning and memory. PMID:17372627

  11. Cough reflex testing with inhaled capsaicin and TRPV1 activation in asthma and comorbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Couto, M; de Diego, A; Perpiñi, M; Delgado, L; Moreira, A

    2013-01-01

    A high parasympathetic tone leading to bronchoconstriction and neurogenic inflammation is thought to have a major role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is the hub of almost all neuronal inflammatory signaling pathways. A critical determinant of neurogenic inflammation, TRPV1 functions as a sensor for detecting irritants in the lung by transmitting noxious stimuli to the central nervous system and inducing the release of a variety of proinflammatory neuropeptides at the peripheral terminals. Challenge with inhaled capsaicin, an exogenous agonist of TRPV1, has been used to measure the sensitivity of the cough reflex. However, inhalation of capsaicin is also associated with parasympathetic bronchoconstriction, mucus hypersecretion, vasodilatation, and the sensation of dyspnea. Therefore, inhaled capsaicin challenge is expected to have other potential applications in asthma and comorbid conditions, such as rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease, both of which produce cough. Capsaicin challenge has established itself as a useful objective method for evaluating airway hypersensitivity; however, it is potentially valuable in many other situations, which will be reviewed in this paper. PMID:24260973

  12. [The Interaction of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex, Ventral Hippocampus and Basolateral Amygdala in the Course of Performance of Conditioned Avoidance Reflex].

    PubMed

    Serkov, A N; Serkova, V V; Maiorov, V I

    2015-01-01

    The interaction (synchronization) of activity of the medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and basolateral amygdala have been studied in the course of performance of conditioned avoidance reflex. The pre-stimulus expectation period was characterized by low-frequency delta-activity (1-4 Hz) with the source (according to criteria of Granger causality) in the prefrontal cortex and also by synchronized theta-rhythm (6-8 Hz) in the hippocampus. The performance of conditioned avoidance reflex was characterized by generation of high-frequency synchronized theta-rhythm (8-11 Hz) simultaneously with delta-activity elimination. The phase of delta- (theta-) activity modulates the envelope of gamma-rhythm (~30-120 Hz) in each of the structures. The elaboration and strengthening of conditioned reflex leads to concurrent theta power and synchronization growth in relation to reflex performance, but not during the prestimulus expectation period. PMID:26080601

  13. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala blocks classical conditioning but not conditioning-specific reflex modification of rabbit heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Burhans, Lauren B.; Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) conditioning in rabbits is a widely used model of classical conditioning of autonomic responding that is noted for being similar to the development of conditioned heart rate slowing (bradycardia) in humans. We have shown previously that in addition to HR changes to a tone conditioned stimulus (CS), the HR reflex itself can undergo associative change called conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) that manifests when tested in the absence of the CS. Because CRM resembles the conditioned bradycardic response to the CS, we sought to determine if HR conditioning and CRM share a common neural substrate. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical part of the pathway through which conditioned bradycardia is established. To test whether the CeA is also involved in the acquisition and/or expression of CRM, we inactivated the CeA with muscimol during HR conditioning or CRM testing. CeA inactivation blocked HR conditioning without completely preventing CRM acquisition or expression. These results suggest that the CeA may therefore only play a modulatory role in CRM. Theories on the biological significance of conditioned bradycardia suggest that it may represent a state of hypervigilance that facilitates the detection of new and changing contingencies in the environment. We relate these ideas to our results and discuss how they may be relevant to the hypersensitivity observed in fear conditioning disorders like post-traumatic stress. PMID:23266790

  14. Fear conditioning facilitates rats gap detection measured by prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Dan; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2005-04-01

    A low-intensity acoustic event presented shortly before an intense startling sound can inhibit the acoustic startle reflex. This phenomenon is called prepulse inhibition (PPI), and is widely used as a model of sensorimotor gating in both humans and animals. Particularly, it has been used for evaluating the aging effect on the mouse's ability to detect a silent gap in otherwise continuous sounds. The present study extended this model to the emotional modulation of gap detection. The results show that a silent gap embedded in each of the two broadband noise sounds (55 dB SPL), which were delivered by two spatially separated loudspeakers, could inhibit the startle reflex that was induced by a loud sound presented from the third loudspeaker 50 ms after the gap. The inhibitory effect largely depended on the duration of the gap, with the mean duration threshold around 11 ms across 18 rats tested. Pairing the gap with foot shock in a temporally specific manner, but not in a temporally random manner, significantly reduced the duration threshold. Thus this study established a new animal behavioral model both for studying auditory temporal processing and for studying auditory signal-detection plasticity induced by emotional learning.

  15. Effect of electrical water bath stunning on physical reflexes of broilers: evaluation of stunning efficacy under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Girasole, M; Marrone, R; Anastasio, A; Chianese, Antonio; Mercogliano, R; Cortesi, M L

    2016-05-01

    The effects of different amounts and frequencies of stunning sine wave alternating current were investigated under field conditions. Seven hundred and fifty broilers were stunned in an electrical water bath with an average root mean square (RMS) current of 150, 200, and 250 mA and frequencies of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1,200 Hz. The occurrence of corneal reflex, spontaneous eye blinking, and a positive response to a painful stimulus were monitored and recorded immediately after the stunning and at 20 s post-stun. Statistical analysis showed that the electrical stunning frequency (P= 0.0004), the stunning RMS current (P< 0.0001) and the interaction between stunning frequency and stunning current (P<0.0001) had a significant effect on the occurrence of animals experiencing an abolition of corneal reflex at 20 s post-stun.At a current of 150 mA, the probability of a successful stun was over 90% at 200 Hz, approximately 40% at 400 Hz, and below 5% for frequencies greater than 600 Hz. So, stunning at frequencies greater than 600 Hz cannot be recommended when a RMS current of 150 mA is applied. The maximum probability of a successful stun was obtained for a current level of 200 mA at 400 Hz and for a current level of 250 mA at 400 and 600 Hz, whereas the stunning treatments at 1,200 Hz provided the lowest probability of a successful stun. Assessment of spontaneous eye blinking and responses to comb pinching confirmed the indications coming from the analysis of corneal reflex. PMID:26957628

  16. [Forming of the visual cognitive structures in the monkey conditioned-reflex behaviour: the dependence on the sensory information].

    PubMed

    Dudkin, K N; Chueva, I V

    2008-01-01

    In monkeys, changes in size and shape of figures led to a significant decrease of correct solutions in training and a considerable increase of refusals from solution of tasks as well as the time of their motor response. The invariance of differentiation in this case was achieved after additional training. The data obtained show that, based on the stimulus sensory processing in conditioned-reflex training, in the long-term memory some differentiating signs are formed: the cognitive structures (the functional neurophysiological mechanisms) maintaining the classification of visual images. With these structures, temporary conditioned connection will be established. Their formation will be determined by the type of sensory information and provided for by existence in the long-term memory of separate subsystems for spatial as well as non-spatial information. PMID:18383735

  17. Phase-dependent reversal of the crossed conditioning effect on the soleus Hoffmann reflex from cutaneous afferents during walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Futatsubashi, Genki; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Yukari; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that non-noxious electrical stimulation of the cutaneous nerve innervating the contralateral foot modified the excitability of the Hoffmann (H-) reflex in the soleus muscle (SOL) in a task-dependent manner during standing and walking in humans. To date, however, it remains unclear how the crossed conditioning effect on the SOL H-reflex from the contralateral foot is modified during the various phases of walking. We sought to answer this question in the present study. The SOL H-reflex was evoked in healthy volunteers by an electrical test stimulation (TS) of the right (ipsilateral) posterior tibial nerve at five different phases during treadmill walking (4 km/h). A non-noxious electrical stimulation was delivered to the superficial peroneal nerve of the left (contralateral) ankle ~100 ms before the TS as a conditioning stimulation (CS). This CS significantly suppressed the H-reflex amplitude during the early stance phase, whereas the same CS significantly facilitated the H-reflex amplitude during the late stance phase. The CS alone did not produce detectable changes in the full-wave rectified electromyogram of the SOL. This result indicates that presynaptic mechanisms driven by the activation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents in the contralateral foot play a role in regulating the transmission between the Ia terminal and motoneurons in a phase-dependent manner. The modulation pattern of the crossed conditioning effect on the SOL H-reflex may be functionally relevant for the left-right coordination of leg movements during bipedal walking. PMID:26573576

  18. Fear conditioning of SCR but not the startle reflex requires conscious discrimination of threat and safety

    PubMed Central

    Sevenster, Dieuwke; Beckers, Tom; Kindt, Merel

    2014-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence as to whether awareness is required for conditioning of the skin conductance response (SCR). Recently, Schultz and Helmstetter (2010) reported SCR conditioning in contingency unaware participants by using difficult to discriminate stimuli. These findings are in stark contrast with other observations in human fear conditioning research, showing that SCR predominantly reflects contingency learning. Therefore, we repeated the study by Schultz and Helmstetter and additionally measured conditioning of the startle response, which seems to be less sensitive to declarative knowledge than SCR. While we solely observed SCR conditioning in participants who reported awareness of the contingencies (n = 16) and not in the unaware participants (n = 18), we observed startle conditioning irrespective of awareness. We conclude that SCR but not startle conditioning depends on conscious discriminative fear learning. PMID:24616672

  19. Honey bees (Apis mellifera) as explosives detectors: exploring proboscis extension reflex conditioned response to trinitrotolulene (TNT)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-mccabe, Kirsten J; Wingo, Robert M; Haarmann, Timothy K

    2008-01-01

    We examined honey bee's associative learning response to conditioning with trinitrotolulene (TNT) vapor concentrations generated at three temperatures and their ability to be reconditioned after a 24 h period. We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension (PER) in honey bees using TNT vapors as the conditioned stimulus and sucrose as the unconditioned stimulus. We conducted fifteen experimental trials with an explosives vapor generator set at 43 C, 25 C and 5 C, producing three concentrations of explosives (1070 ppt, 57 ppt, and 11 ppt). Our objective was to test the honey bee's ability to exhibit a conditioned response to TNT vapors at all three concentrations by comparing the mean percentage of honey bees successfully exhibiting a conditioned response within each temperature group. Furthermore, we conducted eight experimental trials to test the honey bee's ability to retain their ability to exhibit a conditioned response to TNT after 24h period by comparing the mean percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response TNT on the first day compared to the percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response to TNT on the second day. Results indicate that there was no significant difference between the mean percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response to TNT vapors between three temperature groups. There was a significant difference between the percentage of honey bees exhibiting conditioned response on the first day of training compared to the percentage of honey bees exhibiting conditioned response 24 h after training. Our experimental results indicate that honey bees can be trained to exhibit a conditioned response to a range of TNT concentrations via PER However, it appears that the honey bee's ability to retain the conditioned response to TNT vapors after 24h significantly decreases.

  20. Discrimination learning and reversal of the conditioned eyeblink reflex in a rodent model of autism.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Mark E; Peloso, Elizabeth; Brown, Kevin L; Rodier, Patricia

    2007-01-10

    Offspring of rats exposed to valproic acid (VPA) on gestational day (GD) 12 have been advocated as a rodent model of autism because they show neuron loss in brainstem nuclei and the cerebellum resembling that seen in human autistic cases . Studies of autistic children have reported alterations in acquisition of classical eyeblink conditioning and in reversal of instrumental discrimination learning . Acquisition of discriminative eyeblink conditioning depends on known brainstem-cerebellar circuitry whereas reversal depends on interactions of this circuitry with the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In order to explore behavioral parallels of the VPA rodent model with human autism, the present study exposed pregnant Long-Evans rats to 600 mg/kg VPA on GD12 and tested their offspring from Postnatal Day (PND26-31) on discriminative eyeblink conditioning and reversal. VPA rats showed faster eyeblink conditioning, consistent with studies in autistic children . This suggests that previously reported parallels between human autism and the VPA rodent model with respect to injury to brainstem-cerebellar circuitry are accompanied by behavioral parallels when a conditioning task engaging this circuitry is used. VPA rats also showed impaired reversal learning, but this likely reflected "carry-over" of enhanced conditioning during acquisition rather than a reversal learning deficit like that seen in human autism. Further studies of eyeblink conditioning in human autism and in various animal models may help to identify the etiology of this developmental disorder. PMID:17137645

  1. Discrimination Learning and Reversal of the Conditioned Eyeblink Reflex in a Rodent Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Mark E.; Peloso, Elizabeth; Brown, Kevin L.; Rodier, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Offspring of rats exposed to valproic acid (VPA) on Gestational Day (GD) 12 have been advocated as a rodent model of autism because they show neuron loss in brainstem nuclei and the cerebellum resembling that seen in human autistic cases [20, 37]. Studies of autistic children have reported alterations in acquisition of classical eyeblink conditioning [40] and in reversal of instrumental discrimination learning [9]. Acquisition of discriminative eyeblink conditioning depends on known brainstem-cerebellar circuitry whereas reversal depends on interactions of this circuitry with the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In order to explore behavioral parallels of the VPA rodent model with human autism, the present study exposed pregnant Long-Evans rats to 600 mg/kg VPA on GD12 [cf. 37] and tested their offspring from PND26-31 on discriminative eyeblink conditioning and reversal. VPA rats showed faster eyeblink conditioning, consistent with studies in autistic children [40]. This suggests that previously reported parallels between human autism and the VPA rodent model with respect to injury to brainstem-cerebellar circuitry [37] are accompanied by behavioral parallels when a conditioning task engaging this circuitry is used. VPA rats also showed impaired reversal learning, but this likely reflected “carry-over” of enhanced conditioning during acquisition rather than a reversal learning deficit like that seen in human autism. Further studies of eyeblink conditioning in human autism and in various animal models may help to identify the etiology of this developmental disorder. PMID:17137645

  2. [?-, ?-Modulation of the Ventral Tegmental Area Fast-Gamma Activity in the Course of Performance of Conditioned Avoidance Reflex in Rat].

    PubMed

    Serkov, A N; Maiorov, V I

    2015-01-01

    The prestimulus expectation period of conditioned avoidance reflex features synchronized ?-rhythm (1-4 Hz) in the medial prefrontal cortex and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and synchronized ?-rhythm (6-8 Hz) in the above-mentioned structures and the hippocampus. According to "Granger causality" ?- and ?-rhythms flow (are predictors) in the direction from the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus to the VTA. Performance of conditioned avoidance reflex was marked by ?-rhythm elimination simultaneously with generation of high-frequency (8-11 Hz) synchronized ?-rhythm. ?-rhythm was shifted from the pre- to poststimulus period and prefrontal cortex--VTA ?-synchrony was eliminated in the cases of mistaken reaction withdrawal, Pavlovian fear conditioning scheme, conditioned signal presentation in the safe chamber part. The phase of ?-, ?-rhythm modulates the amplitude of VTA fast (70-160 Hz) ?-activity envelope, VTA/cortex and VTA/hippocampus ?-phase synchronization and phase lag indexes, and frequency of simultaneously recorded VTA neuronal activity. PMID:26281234

  3. Formation of cognitive structures in conditioned-reflex behavior in monkeys: Relationship with type of visual information.

    PubMed

    Dudkin, K N; Chueva, I V

    2009-02-01

    The characteristics of learning processes and long-term memory (LTM) were studied in rhesus macaques discriminating visual stimuli (geometrical figures of different shapes, sizes, and orientations, and with different spatial relationships between image components). Trained monkeys were tested for the ability to perform invariant recognition after stimulus transformation, i.e., changes in size, shape, number of objects, and spatial relationships. Analysis of behavioral characteristics (correct solutions, refusals to decide, motor response times) revealed differences associated with the type of visual information. When monkeys discriminated between black and white geometrical figures of different shapes and orientations, as well as black-and-white figures with different shapes or orientations, the learning time was short and transformation of the stimuli had no effect on correct solutions: there was complete transfer of learning. When monkeys discriminated figures of different sizes or complex images with different spatial relationships, the learning time was significantly greater. Changes in the size and shape of figures led to significant reductions in correct solutions and significant increases in refusals to solve the task and in motor reaction times. Invariance of discrimination in this case appeared after additional training. The results obtained here showed that in conditioned reflex learning, the sensory processing of stimuli has the result that discriminatory features are formed in LTM, i.e., cognitive structures (functional neurophysiological mechanisms), these supporting the classification of visual images. The temporal conditioned link of the executive reaction is established with these. Their formation is determined by the type of sensory information and the existence in LTM of separate subsystems for spatial and non-spatial information. PMID:19140004

  4. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  5. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove the finger causes the grip to tighten. Newborn infants have strong grasps and can almost be lifted ... the baby have? At what age did each infant reflex disappear? What other symptoms are also present (for example, decreased alertness or seizures)?

  6. Effects of activation of D1 dopamine receptors on extinction of a conditioned passive avoidance reflex and amnesia in aggressive and submissive mice.

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I

    2006-07-01

    The studies reported here demonstrate the relationship between the effect of activation of D1 dopamine receptors on the reproduction of a conditioned passive avoidance reflex during extinction and amnesia and the aggressive and submissive behavioral stereotypes. During extinction, the D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 at a dose of 5 mg/kg given before acquisition of the conditioned reflex and on test day 12 suppressed the reproduction of the conditioned skill in aggressive mice and improved reproduction in submissive mice. The effects of activation of D1 receptors were also opposite relative to the stereotype in amnesia. In aggressive mice, SKF 38393 significantly decreased the resistance to amnesia characteristic of these animals; in submissive mice, SKF 38393 weakened the amnestic effects of the delay in the "dangerous" sector and restored memory traces. The possible mechanisms of the selectivity of the actions of D1 receptors in mice with alternative behavioral stereotypes in retaining memory traces related to aversive stimulation during extinction and amnesia are discussed. PMID:16783522

  7. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  8. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  9. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  10. [Comparison of the effect of sidnocarb and other psychostimulants on discrimination and prediction processes in performing conditioned food-procuring reflexes].

    PubMed

    Belozertsev, Iu A; Fomin, S N

    1978-01-01

    In an Y-shaped maze a differentiation of the positive and negative reflex signals given at random in a ratio of 50 to 50 per cent and an active selection of one of two feeding troughs, reinforced at varying frequency (0.1--0.9), were determined. Sydnocarb (10--20 mg/kg) had no influence on the realization of the food-procurement response, but improved the discrimination of the signals. Only small doses of amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg), caffein (20 mg/kg) and acephen (10 mg/kg) also improved the response to conditioned signals. Sydnocarb reduced the number of runs to a rarely reinforced feeding trough and, at the same time, stimulated an active choice of the latter. Amphetamine largely facilitated an active choice of the runs direction. Caffein displayed a tendency to reduce the number of wrong approaches. Acephen hampered an active choice of compartments in the Y-maze without impairing the ability to distinguish the frequency of the feeding troughs reinforcement. PMID:342271

  11. Comparison of the sensitivity of prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and operant conditioning in an auditory intensity difference limen paradigm.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Derik; Klump, Georg M

    2015-03-01

    Reward-based operant conditioning (OC) procedures and reflex-based prepulse inhibition (PPI) procedures are used in mouse psychoacoustics. Therefore it is important to know whether both procedures provide comparable results for perceptual measurements. Here we evaluate the sensitivity of the C57BL/6N mouse in both procedures by testing the same individuals in the same Intensity Difference Limen (IDL) task. Level increments of a 10 kHz tone were presented in a train of 10 kHz reference tones. Objective analysis based on signal-detection theory was applied to compare the results of OC and PPI procedures. In both procedures the sensitivity increased with level increment. In agreement with the near miss to Weber's law, sensitivity increased with sound level of the reference stimuli. The sensitivity observed in the OC procedure was considerably larger than the sensitivity in the PPI procedure. Applying a sensitivity of 1.0 as the threshold criterion, mean IDLs in the OC procedure were 5.0, 4.0 and 3.5 dB at reference levels of 30, 50 and 75 dB SPL respectively. In the PPI procedure, mean IDLs of 18.9 and 17.0 dB at reference levels of 50 and 75 dB SPL respectively were observed. Due to the low sensitivity, IDLs could not be determined in the PPI procedure at a reference level of 30 dB SPL. Possible causes for the low sensitivity in the PPI procedure are discussed. These results challenge the idea that both procedures can be used as simple substitutes of one another and the experimenter must be aware of the limitations of the respective procedure. PMID:25580004

  12. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Abstract?Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However, the presence of voluntary movement significantly impairs reflex perception. We suggest that perceptual separation between voluntary and reflex movement is poor at best. Our results imply that the brain has no clear marker for perceptually separating voluntary and involuntary movement. Attribution of body movement to voluntary or involuntary motor commands is surprisingly poor when both are present. PMID:24060990

  13. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However, the presence of voluntary movement significantly impairs reflex perception. We suggest that perceptual separation between voluntary and reflex movement is poor at best. Our results imply that the brain has no clear marker for perceptually separating voluntary and involuntary movement. Attribution of body movement to voluntary or involuntary motor commands is surprisingly poor when both are present. PMID:24060990

  14. What is a reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Truog, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in diagnosing disorders of consciousness, and specifically in determining whether consciousness has been lost or retained, poses challenging scientific and ethical questions. Recent neuroimaging-based tests for consciousness have cast doubt on the reliability of behavioral criteria in assessing states of consciousness and generate new questions about the assumptions used in formulating coherent diagnostic criteria. The reflex, a foundational diagnostic tool, offers unique insight into these disorders; behaviors produced by unconscious patients are thought to be purely reflexive, whereas those produced by conscious patients can be volitional. Further investigation, however, reveals that reflexes cannot be reliably distinguished from conscious behaviors on the basis of any generalizable empirical characteristics. Ambiguity between reflexive and conscious behaviors undermines the capacity of the reflex to distinguish between disorders of consciousness and has implications for how these disorders should be conceptualized in future diagnostic criteria. PMID:26085602

  15. Investigation to predict patellar tendon reflex using motion analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Tham, L K; Osman, N A Abu; Lim, K S; Pingguan-Murphy, B; Abas, W A B Wan; Zain, N Mohd

    2011-05-01

    The investigation of patellar tendon reflex involves development of a reflex hammer holder, kinematic data collection and analysis of patellar reflex responses using motion analysis techniques. The main aim of this research is to explore alternative means of assessing reflexes as a part of routine clinical diagnosis. The motion analysis system was applied to provide quantitative data which is a more objective measure of the patellar tendon reflex. Kinematic data was collected from 28 males and 22 females whilst subjected to a knee jerk test. Further analysis of kinematic data was performed to predict relationships which might affect the patellar tendon reflex. All subjects were seated on a high stool with their legs hanging freely within the capture volume of the motion analysis system. Knee jerk tests were applied to all subjects, on both sides of the leg, by eliciting hypo, hyper, and normal reflexes. An additional reinforcement technique called the Jendrassik manoeuvre was also performed under the same conditions to elicit a normal patellar tendon reflex. The comparison of reflex response between genders showed that female subjects generally had a greater response compared to males. However, the difference in reflex response between the left leg and the right leg was not significant. Tapping strength to elicit a hyper-reflex produced greater knee-jerk compared to the normal clinical tapping strength. All results were in agreement with clinical findings and results found by some early researchers. PMID:21146440

  16. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary degeneration of the retina or after the subsidence of severe retinitis or retino-choroiditis. A mirror reflex from the layer of pigmented epithelium or from the external limiting membrane is sometimes recognizable in normal eyes, especially in the brunette fundus. In such, it forms the background to a striking picture of the fine circumfoveal vessels. Pathological reflexes from the level of the pigmented epithelium or of the external limiting membrane are also observed, and these often present a granular, frosted or crystalline appearance. They may indicate a senile change, or result from trauma or from retino-choroidal degeneraion. Somewhat similar reflexes may sometimes be present as small frosted patches anterior to the retinal vessels. Linear sinuous, whether appearing in annular form, as straight needles, as broader single sinuous lines, as the tapering, branched double reflexes of Vogt, or in association with traction or pressure folds, in the retina, are probably always pathological. By the use of selected light of long and short wave lengths, it can be shown that intraretinal or true retinal folds may exist with or without the surface reflexes which indicate a corresponding folding of the internal limiting membrane. On the other hand, superficial linear reflexes of various types may occur without evidence of retinal folding. Annular reflexes usually accompany a rounded elevation of the retina due to tumour, hæmorrhage or exudate, but may indicate the presence of rounded depressions; traction folds occur where there is choroido-retinal scarring, or in association with macular hole or cystic degeneraion at the macula; pressure folds in cases of orbital cyst, abscess or neoplasm; and the other linear reflexes in association with papillo-retinal œdema, for example, in retrobulbar neuritis, in hypertensive neuro-retinitis, in contusio bulbi and in anterior uveitis. Punctate reflexes, other than Gunn's dots, are also pathological. They may occur as one variety of “fragmented” surface reflexes, or as evidence of the presence of some highly refractile substance, such as cholesterin or calcium carbonate, in a retinal exudate or other lesion. It is characteristic of the pathological reflexes that they come and go and change their character according to the progress of the pathological condition. The linear reflexes in particular may change from one from to another, and may be finally transformed into surface reflexes of physiological character. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26 PMID:19992307

  17. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  18. Novel flexible Reflex displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montbach, Erica; Davis, Donald J.; Khan, Asad; Schneider, Tod; Marhefka, Duane; Pishnyak, Oleg; Ernst, Todd; Miller, Nick; Doane, J. WIlliam

    2009-02-01

    We report on unique flexible ReflexTM displays based on bistable, reflective, cholesteric liquid crystal display technology. Reflex displays are attractive for numerous applications because of the low power consumption and paper like reflective color. As the possible applications grow for flexible, reflective displays the new methods to manufacture these displays, such as web processing, also become important. We will report on several unique display types such as a pressure induced writing display and a switchable color electronic skin display. In addition, the current status of traditional Reflex displays will be discussed.

  19. Anatomy and neuro-pathophysiology of the cough reflex arc.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Mario; Polverino, Francesca; Fasolino, Marco; Andò, Filippo; Alfieri, Antonio; De Blasio, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Coughing is an important defensive reflex that occurs through the stimulation of a complex reflex arc. It accounts for a significant number of consultations both at the level of general practitioner and of respiratory specialists. In this review we first analyze the cough reflex under normal conditions; then we analyze the anatomy and the neuro-pathophysiology of the cough reflex arc. The aim of this review is to provide the anatomic and pathophysiologic elements of evaluation of the complex and multiple etiologies of cough. PMID:22958367

  20. Anatomy and neuro-pathophysiology of the cough reflex arc

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Coughing is an important defensive reflex that occurs through the stimulation of a complex reflex arc. It accounts for a significant number of consultations both at the level of general practitioner and of respiratory specialists. In this review we first analyze the cough reflex under normal conditions; then we analyze the anatomy and the neuro-pathophysiology of the cough reflex arc. The aim of this review is to provide the anatomic and pathophysiologic elements of evaluation of the complex and multiple etiologies of cough. PMID:22958367

  1. Human flexor reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Bhagwan T.; Young, Robert R.

    1971-01-01

    One type of flexor reflex, that recorded from the tibialis anterior muscle in response to electrical stimulation of the sole of the foot, was studied in normal subjects and patients with several neurological disorders. Normally this reflex consists of two components, the second of which is related to the actual withdrawal. The first component, normally of lower threshold, is difficult to evoke in patients with chronic spinal cord or discrete cerebral lesions, whereas it has an unusually low threshold and is very clearly seen in those with Parkinson's disease. In patients with spinal cord disease, the exaggerated flexor reflexes are seen at long latencies after relatively small stimuli. During the early phase of recovery from spinal transection, both components may be seen and are, therefore, spinal in origin. Studies of patients with the sensory neuropathy of Friedreich's ataxia suggest that the afferent fibres responsible for these flexor reflexes are the small myelinated fibres. Recovery curves demonstrate very long-lasting changes in flexor reflex excitability in normal subjects and patients with `spasticity' from spinal lesions. This differs in patients with `spasticity' from lesions rostral to the brain-stem. Examples in man of such physiological phenomena as reciprocal inhibition, local sign, habituation, temporal and spatial summation are discussed. Images PMID:5122389

  2. Model simulation studies to clarify the effect on saccadic eye movements of initial condition velocities set by the Vestibular Ocular Reflex (VOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, M. H.; Winters, J. M.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Voluntary active head rotations produced vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements (VOR) with the subject viewing a fixation target. When this target jumped, the size of the refixation saccades were a function of the ongoing initial velocity of the eye. Saccades made against the VOR were larger in magnitude. Simulation of a reciprocally innervated model eye movement provided results comparable to the experimental data. Most of the experimental effect appeared to be due to linear summation for saccades of 5 and 10 degree magnitude. For small saccades of 2.5 degrees, peripheral nonlinear interaction of state variables in the neuromuscular plant also played a role as proven by comparable behavior in the simulated model with known controller signals.

  3. Eponyms in cardiopulmonary reflexes.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Mattia; Huber, Lars C

    2013-08-01

    Heart rate, blood pressure, and vascular tone, as well as ventilator drive, respiratory rate, and breathing pattern, are, at least in part, under the control of specific reflexes. These reflexes are mediated by a complex network of baroreceptors and chemoreceptors in the arterial system of the carotids, aorta, and left heart, including receptors in the left atrium, the ventricle, and the coronary arteries; irritants in the upper airways and stretch receptors in the lower airways; juxtacapillary-located nonmyelinated fibers in the alveoli and in the bronchial arterial system; and muscle spindles that evoke changes in the membrane potential upon alteration of sarcolemmal tension. Some of these reflexes, usually named after the first individual to describe them, have spread as eponyms into propaedeutic education and clinical work. Because these euphonic eponyms are enigmatic to most clinicians today, this article is intended to provide a short overview of these reflexes, including the historical context of their describers. As evidenced by their clinical implications, the eponyms discussed are revealed to be more than curiosities taught during undergraduate medical education. PMID:24027790

  4. Reflexivity in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was…

  5. The facilitatory and depressive effects of iontophoretically applied acetylcholine on different components of neuron responses in the motor cortex of the cat during performance of a conditioned paw positioning reflex.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, B V; Maiorov, V I; Moskvitin, A A

    1999-01-01

    Iontophoretic application of acetylcholine to neurons in the motor cortex of cats during performance of a conditioned reflex consisting of placing the paw on a support increased neuron excitability and facilitated "extrinsic" connections, resulting in increases in primary responses to electrical stimulation of the parietal region of the cortex, and which was independent of the first effect of suppression, which was seen only in relation to the long-latency components of the response. The functional significance of the differently directed effects of acetylcholine application is indicated by the statistically significant changes in motor reaction times seen in some experiments, which were in the same direction as changes in neuronal responses in the same experiments. PMID:10493539

  6. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change. PMID:26434655

  7. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects. PMID:26721248

  8. Corporeal reflexivity and autism.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Elinor

    2015-06-01

    Ethnographic video recordings of high functioning children with autism or Aspergers Syndrome in everyday social encounters evidence their first person perspectives. High quality visual and audio data allow detailed analysis of children's bodies and talk as loci of reflexivity. Corporeal reflexivity involves displays of awareness of one's body as an experiencing subject and a physical object accessible to the gaze of others. Gaze, demeanor, actions, and sotto voce commentaries on unfolding situations indicate a range of moment-by-moment reflexive responses to social situations. Autism is associated with neurologically based motor problems (e.g. delayed action-goal coordination, clumsiness) and highly repetitive movements to self-soothe. These behaviors can provoke derision among classmates at school. Focusing on a 9-year-old girl's encounters with peers on the playground, this study documents precisely how autistic children can become enmeshed as unwitting objects of stigma and how they reflect upon their social rejection as it transpires. Children with autism spectrum disorders in laboratory settings manifest diminished understandings of social emotions such as embarrassment, as part of a more general impairment in social perspective-taking. Video ethnography, however, takes us further, into discovering autistic children's subjective sense of vulnerability to the gaze of classmates. PMID:25939529

  9. The Effects of Attention on the Trigeminal Blink Reflex.

    PubMed

    Schicatano, Edward J

    2016-04-01

    During top-down processing, higher cognitive processes modulate lower sensory processing. The present experiment tested the effects of directed attention on trigeminal reflex blinks in humans (n = 8). In separate sessions, participants either attended to blink-eliciting stimuli or were given no attentional instructions during stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve. Attention to blink-eliciting stimuli significantly increased reflex blink amplitude and duration and shortened blink latency compared with the no attention condition. These results suggested that higher processes such as attention can modify the trigeminal blink reflex circuit. PMID:27166326

  10. The effect of motor imagery on gain modulation of the spinal reflex.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, T; Kaneko, F

    2011-02-01

    Motor imagery is well known to have a facilitatory effect on the corticospinal tract, but conflicting opinions have arisen concerning its effect on spinal reflex excitability. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of motor imagery on gain modulation of the spinal reflex by focusing on the physiological differences between the H-reflex and the stretch reflex. In experiment 1, there were three conditions: rest, motor imagery of ankle dorsiflexion (MI-DF), and motor imagery of ankle plantarflexion (MI-PF). The subjects were instructed to imagine 100% maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MI-100) in each direction of movement. To examine the effects of the imagined effort level on spinal reflex excitability, the subjects also imagined 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MI-50) in experiment 2. The soleus H-reflex and the stretch reflex amplitude and background EMG (bEMG) activity were measured. There were no significant differences in bEMG activity between the H-reflex and stretch reflex measurements. In experiment 1, although the H-reflex amplitude did not change significantly among the three conditions, the stretch reflex amplitude increased significantly under the MI-DF and MI-PF conditions compared to the rest condition. In addition, the stretch reflex amplitude under the MI-100 condition was significantly larger than that under the MI-50 condition in experiment 2. These results indicate that motor imagery has a selective facilitatory effect on stretch reflex pathways. Furthermore, this excitability change may occur in untargeted antagonist muscles as well as targeted agonist muscles and may depend on the imagined effort level. PMID:21094636

  11. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  12. Reflexive Planning for Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Margaret A.; Kemp, Candace L.; French, Susan; Gafni, Amiram; Joshi, Anju; Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; Davies, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Informed by Giddens' (1991) concept of "reflexive life" planning and the notion of later life as a time of increasing social and financial risk, this research explores the idea of "reflexive planning for later life". We utilize a conceptual model that incorporates three types of planning for later life: public protection, self-insurance, and…

  13. Brain lesions affect penile reflexes.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, E P; Arjomand, J; Breedlove, S M

    1993-03-01

    Electrolytic lesions of several potential brain afferents to the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) affect the display of penile reflexes. Ablation of the median and pontine raphe areas significantly potentiates the expression of cups and flips. Animals with a bilateral lesion of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus have a shorter latency to the first erection but otherwise display normal reflex behavior. Although bilateral destruction of the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN) completely eliminated penile reflex activity, it also caused significant motor impairment thus clouding conclusions concerning the normal role of the LVN in penile reflex behavior. These and other results support the hypothesis that these brain regions which project to the SNB region normally modulate spinal reflex behavior of the rat penis. PMID:8440513

  14. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  15. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated. PMID:6577558

  16. [Phenomenological model of changes in evoked potentials of the sensomotor area of the large cerebral hemispheres during processing of conditioned reflexes].

    PubMed

    Chuprun, B E; Serdiuchenko, V M

    1999-01-01

    A phemenological model of variations in evoked potentials during conditioning is proposed. The model consists of four linear differentional equations. Variations in a wide range of only one parameter of the system of differential equations correspond to all variations in evoked potentials. A variation of this parameter in the presence of constant disturbances at the system input gives rise to the appearance of a constant or increasing signal at the output of the system, which is characteristic for the expectancy wave. PMID:10544829

  17. [Reflexes, instincts, emotions and passions].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alberto Portera

    2008-01-01

    In animals of the same species, the reflexes, having evolved similarly, in a few milliseconds, automatically activate the corresponding reflex arch and without the intervention of the animal generate the adequate response: medullary, mesencephalic or trans-hemispheric. These neurophysiological functions have allowed the animals to be free from predators and increasy their longevity and, as a consequence, the appearance of numerous species during millions of years. A further step in the reflexes evolution, the instincts emerged and their activity, a result of neuro-hormonal functions, stimulates the male's sexual appetite when the females are receptive for their copulation and fecundation. PMID:18924359

  18. Hoffmann reflex in idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Czernicki, Krzysztof; Dobosiewicz, Krystyna; Jedrzejewska, Anna; Durmala, Jacek

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine the dependence of selected Hoffmann reflex parameters on type, progression and morphology of idiopathic scoliosis (IS). Data collected from 129 girls with IS (59 progressive and 70 non-progressive cases) aged 7-16 years and 24 healthy subjects were analysed. H-reflex index (IH) and H/M amplitude index (IH/M) were calculated. Progressive left lumbar scoliosis expressed a significant decrease of IH values and a distinct tendency to IH/M depletion compared to non-progressives and controls. Progressive right thoracic scoliosis expressed marked tendency to IH decrease compared to nonprogressive scoliosis. No significant differences in H-reflex parameters were observed between the convex and concave side of the curvature or between types of scoliosis. H-reflex analysis in idiopathic scoliosis supports the hypothesis of a primary neurological disorder in progressive IS. PMID:17108418

  19. Jaw stretch reflexes in children.

    PubMed

    Finan, Donald S; Smith, Anne

    2005-07-01

    The substantial morphological transformations that occur during human development present the nervous system with a considerable challenge in terms of motor control. Variability of skilled motor performance is a hallmark of a developing system. In adults, the jaw stretch reflex contributes to the functional stability of the jaw. We have investigated the response properties of the jaw stretch reflex in two groups of young children and a group of young adults. Response latencies increased with development, and all age groups produced stimulus-magnitude-dependent increases in reflex gain and resulting biting force. Reflex gain was largest for the older children (9-10 years), yet net increases in resulting biting force were comparable across age groups. These data and earlier experiments suggest that oral sensorimotor pathways mature throughout childhood in concert with the continued acquisition of complex motor skills. PMID:15981018

  20. The Relationship between MOC Reflex and Masked Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Garinis, Angela; Werner, Lynne; Abdala, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Otoacoustic emission (OAE) amplitude can be reduced by acoustic stimulation. This effect is produced by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex. Past studies have shown that the MOC reflex is related to listening in noise and attention. In the present study, the relationship between strength of the contralateral MOC reflex and masked threshold was investigated in 19 adults. Detection thresholds were determined for a 1000-Hz, 300-ms tone presented simultaneously with one repetition of a 300-ms masker in an ongoing train of 300-ms masker bursts at 600-ms intervals. Three masking conditions were tested: 1) broadband noise 2) a fixed-frequency 4-tone complex masker and 3) a random-frequency 4-tone complex masker. Broadband noise was expected to produce energetic masking and the tonal maskers were expected to produce informational masking in some listeners. DPOAEs were recorded at fine frequency interval from 500 to 4000 Hz, with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation. MOC reflex strength was estimated as a reduction in baseline level and a shift in frequency of DPOAE fine-structure maxima near 1000-Hz. MOC reflex and psychophysical testing were completed in separate sessions. Individuals with poorer thresholds in broadband noise and in random-frequency maskers were found to have stronger MOC reflexes. PMID:21878379

  1. The Hoffmann Reflex: Methodologic Considerations and Applications for Use in Sports Medicine and Athletic Training Research

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Hoffman, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the proper methods used to elicit the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) and to present different situations in which this tool can be used in sports medicine research. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE and SPORT Discus from 1960 to 2004 using the key words Hoffmann reflex, H-reflex, and methodology. The remaining citations were collected from references of similar papers. Data Synthesis: Numerous authors have used the H-reflex as a tool to examine neurologic conditions. However, few have used the H-reflex to examine neuromuscular impairments after sport injuries. Several studies were available describing the appropriate methods to elicit the H-reflex and examining the reliability of this measurement in different muscles. Conclusions/Recommendations: The H-reflex is a valuable tool to evaluate neurologic function in various populations. However, because of the sensitivity of this measurement to extraneous factors, care must be taken when eliciting the H-reflex. We discuss recommendations on how to elicit the H-reflex and how to appropriately present methods in a manuscript. PMID:16558683

  2. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  3. Reliability of the Achilles tendon tap reflex evoked during stance using a pendulum hammer.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Bent, Leah R

    2016-01-01

    The tendon tap reflex (T-reflex) is often evoked in relaxed muscles to assess spinal reflex circuitry. Factors contributing to reflex excitability are modulated to accommodate specific postural demands. Thus, there is a need to be able to assess this reflex in a state where spinal reflex circuitry is engaged in maintaining posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pendulum hammer could provide controlled stimuli to the Achilles tendon and evoke reliable muscle responses during normal stance. A second aim was to establish appropriate stimulus parameters for experimental use. Fifteen healthy young adults stood on a forceplate while taps were applied to the Achilles tendon under conditions in which postural sway was constrained (by providing centre of pressure feedback) or unconstrained (no feedback) from an invariant release angle (50°). Twelve participants repeated this testing approximately six months later. Within one experimental session, tap force and T-reflex amplitude were found to be reliable regardless of whether postural sway was constrained (tap force ICC=0.982; T-reflex ICC=0.979) or unconstrained (tap force ICC=0.968; T-reflex ICC=0.964). T-reflex amplitude was also reliable between experimental sessions (constrained ICC=0.894; unconstrained ICC=0.890). When a T-reflex recruitment curve was constructed, optimal mid-range responses were observed using a 50° release angle. These results demonstrate that reliable Achilles T-reflexes can be evoked in standing participants without the need to constrain posture. The pendulum hammer provides a simple method to allow researchers and clinicians to gather information about reflex circuitry in a state where it is involved in postural control. PMID:26454702

  4. [The oculocardiac reflex in blepharoplasties].

    PubMed

    Rippmann, V; Scholz, T; Hellmann, S; Amini, P; Spilker, G

    2008-08-01

    The oculocardiac reflex (OCR) is a well-known phenomenon in ophthalmic surgery, but is rarely described in aesthetic blepharoplasty surgery. It was first mentioned in 1908 by Ascher and Dagnini. Since then, ophthalmologists and anaesthesiologists have regarded the onset of the oculocardiac reflex as a significant intraoperative problem, which is undermined by several case reports that describe dysrhythmias which have haved caused morbidity and death. Per definition the OCR is caused by ocular manipulation and involves intraoperative bradycardia by a change of 20 beats/minute compared to the preoperative heart rate or any dysrhythmia during the manipulation via a trigeminal-vagal-mediated reflex arc. Having operated on a 48-year-old, healthy woman in our clinic, who underwent a cardiac arrest during the blepharoplasty procedure, followed by a successful resuscitation, we investigated the onset of the OCR in our blepharoplasty patients within the last 3 years. The onset of the OCR was noted in 22 of 110 (20 %) blepharoplasty patients, mainly affecting younger, low-weighted patients operated under local anaesthesia. Awareness and treatment of this potentially life-threatening oculocardiac reflex are necessary. In most cases the onset of the reflex may be avoided by a gentle operation technique and by refraining from severe traction to the muscle or fat pad. The best treatment of a profound bradycardia caused by the OCR is to release tension to the muscle or fat pad in order to permit the heart rate to return to normal. Intraoperative monitoring is of utmost importance. PMID:18716987

  5. Simultaneous characterizations of reflex and nonreflex dynamic and static changes in spastic hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sun G.; Ren, Yupeng; Liu, Lin; Roth, Elliot J.; Rymer, W. Zev

    2013-01-01

    This study characterizes tonic and phasic stretch reflex and stiffness and viscosity changes associated with spastic hemiparesis. Perturbations were applied to the ankle of 27 hemiparetic and 36 healthy subjects under relaxed or active contracting conditions. A nonlinear delay differential equation model characterized phasic and tonic stretch reflex gains, elastic stiffness, and viscous damping. Tendon reflex was characterized with reflex gain and threshold. Reflexively, tonic reflex gain was increased in spastic ankles at rest (P < 0.038) and was not regulated with muscle contraction, indicating impaired tonic stretch reflex. Phasic-reflex gain in spastic plantar flexors was higher and increased faster with plantar flexor contraction (P < 0.012) than controls (P < 0.023) and higher in dorsi-flexors at lower torques (P < 0.038), primarily because of its increase at rest (P = 0.045), indicating exaggerated phasic stretch reflex especially in more spastic plantar flexors, which showed higher phasic stretch reflex gain than dorsi-flexors (P < 0.032). Spasticity was associated with increased tendon reflex gain (P = 0.002) and decreased threshold (P < 0.001). Mechanically, stiffness in spastic ankles was higher than that in controls across plantar flexion/dorsi-flexion torque levels (P < 0.032), and the more spastic plantar flexors were stiffer than dorsi-flexors at comparable torques (P < 0.031). Increased stiffness in spastic ankles was mainly due to passive stiffness increase (P < 0.001), indicating increased connective tissues/shortened fascicles. Viscous damping in spastic ankles was increased across the plantar flexion torque levels and at lower dorsi-flexion torques, reflecting increased passive viscous damping (P = 0.033). The more spastic plantar flexors showed higher viscous damping than dorsi-flexors at comparable torque levels (P < 0.047). Simultaneous characterizations of reflex and nonreflex changes in spastic hemiparesis may help to evaluate and treat them more effectively. PMID:23636726

  6. Avian reflex and electroencephalogram responses in different states of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Dale A; Auckburally, Adam; Flaherty, Derek; Sandilands, Victoria; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2014-06-22

    Defining states of clinical consciousness in animals is important in veterinary anaesthesia and in studies of euthanasia and welfare assessment at slaughter. The aim of this study was to validate readily observable reflex responses in relation to different conscious states, as confirmed by EEG analysis, in two species of birds under laboratory conditions (35-week-old layer hens (n=12) and 11-week-old turkeys (n=10)). We evaluated clinical reflexes and characterised electroencephalograph (EEG) activity (as a measure of brain function) using spectral analyses in four different clinical states of consciousness: conscious (fully awake), semi-conscious (sedated), unconscious-optimal (general anaesthesia), unconscious-sub optimal (deep hypnotic state), as well as assessment immediately following euthanasia. Jaw or neck muscle tone was the most reliable reflex measure distinguishing between conscious and unconscious states. Pupillary reflex was consistently observed until respiratory arrest. Nictitating membrane reflex persisted for a short time (<1 min) after respiratory arrest and brain death (isoelectric EEG). The results confirm that the nictitating membrane reflex is a conservative measure of death in poultry. Using spectral analyses of the EEG waveforms it was possible to readily distinguish between the different states of clinical consciousness. In all cases, when birds progressed from a conscious to unconscious state; total spectral power (PTOT) significantly increased, whereas median (F50) and spectral edge (F95) frequencies significantly decreased. This study demonstrates that EEG analysis can differentiate between clinical states (and loss of brain function at death) in birds and provides a unique integration of reflex responses and EEG activity. PMID:24878315

  7. Asthma as an axon reflex.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J

    1986-02-01

    In asthma, damage to airway epithelium, possibly caused by eosinophil products, exposes C-fibre afferent nerve endings. Stimulation of these endings by inflammatory mediators such as bradykinin may result in an axon (local) reflex with antidromic conduction down afferent nerve collaterals and release of sensory neuropeptides such as substance P, neurokinin A, and calcitonin gene-related peptide. These peptides are potent inducers of airway smooth muscle contraction, bronchial oedema, extravasation of plasma, mucus hypersecretion, and possibly inflammatory cell infiltration and secretion. Thus, axon reflexes could account for at least some of the pathophysiology of asthma and this concept might lead to new strategies for treatment. PMID:2418322

  8. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  9. Tonic vibration reflexes and background force level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, James R.; Dizio, Paul; Fisk, John

    1992-01-01

    On earth, the functional stretch reflex is an important component in the maintenance of posture and muscle tone. In parabolic flight experiments, it is evaluated whether the functional stretch reflex, as reflected in the tonic vibration reflex, adjusts appropriately for changes in background gravitoinertial force level. Virtually immediate alterations of appropriate sign occurred.

  10. Effect of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on the spinal reflex apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarotskiy, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    In view of the fact that the convergence effect of vestibular impulsation may both stimulate and inhibit intra and intersystemic coordination of physiological processes, an attempt was made to define the physiological effect on the spinal reflex apparatus of the convergence of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on a model of the unconditioned motor reflex as a mechanism of the common final pathway conditioning the formation and realization of a focused beneficial result of human motor activities. More than 100 persons subjected to rolling effect and angular acceleration during complexly coordinated muscular loading were divided according to typical variants of the functional structure of the patella reflex in an experiment requiring 30 rapid counterclockwise head revolutions at 2/sec with synchronous recording of a 20 item series of patella reflex acts. A knee jerk coefficient was used in calculations. In 85 percent of the cases 2 patellar reflexograms show typical braking and release of knee reflex and 1 shows an extreme local variant. The diagnostic and prognostic value of these tests is suggested for determining adaptive possibilities of functional systems in respect to acceleration and proprioceptive stimuli.

  11. Measurement of patellar and ankle tendon reflexes in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Struys, M A; Jonkman, E J; Strijers, R L

    1997-01-01

    In order to acquire normal values, patellar and ankle tendon reflexes were measured bilateral in 51 healthy subjects. The reflexes were mechanically evoked with a hand-held hammer which was connected to the trigger input of a two-channel EMG system. For each reflex simultaneous registration took place from surface electrodes on two different locations. The dependence of the latency on body length and age is described as well as the left-right difference and the intra-individual variability. Using similar measurement conditions significantly longer latencies were found than those published earlier. The importance of well defined placement of the electrodes when comparing acquired latencies with normal values is shown. PMID:9063657

  12. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing. PMID:23791780

  13. Reflexivity in PHIR: let's have a reflexive talk!

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Parent, André-Anne

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, a group of researchers who gathered in the context of the Population Health Intervention Research Initiative for Canada (PHIRIC) agreed upon the need to define a specific set of competencies for population health intervention research (PHIR). Following this event, a consultative process allowed the definition of six domains of core competencies in PHIR, which were released for the first time last summer. In this comment, we would like to respond to this set of competencies and, more specifically, to the "reflective researcher" domain of the competencies. We believe that propositions in this domain are rooted in a narrow and oversimplified definition of reflexivity. Furthermore, we are concerned that disseminating such propositions is not only misleading but could also encourage a false practice of reflexivity, impeding the evolution of the PHIR field and its capacity to improve population health. In order to illustrate our point, we build on commonly accepted definitions of reflexivity to critically examine the initial propositions of the group and suggest new ones. As researchers in the population health intervention field, we believe that a more accurate definition of what is a reflective researcher is crucial in order to foster the continuous development of the field and its capacity to improve population health. PMID:25165844

  14. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  15. Effect of mental imagery of a motor task on the Hoffmann reflex.

    PubMed

    Hale, B S; Raglin, J S; Koceja, D M

    2003-06-16

    Research has found that mental imagery of a motor task may influence the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex). However, this work has not examined the potential influence of background EMG (BEMG) on the H-reflex. In this study 23 adult participants (M=23.3 years, S.D.=3.2) were instructed to mentally image plantar flexion of the right foot at four intensities: 40, 60, 80 and 100% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) after completing practice trials of actual contractions at these intensities. Dependent measures were the BEMG activity and the peak-to-peak amplitude of the H-reflex. On each trial the peak-to-peak amplitude of the soleus H-reflex was measured in the right leg and averaged, BEMG (40 ms bin) was measured in the soleus and tibialis anterior of both legs. Following trials of plantar flexion at the target intensities participants completed 5 imagery trials at each intensity and 15 trials while performing this motor task. Five resting control trials were administered prior to and following the completion of all test trials. Administration of test trials was randomized within conditions. A main effect (P<0.05) for trial blocks was observed for H-reflex amplitude but not BEMG. The H-reflex increased linearly throughout testing, suggesting that the H-reflex was modified by the practice of imagery rather than the intensity of the imagined task. PMID:12798268

  16. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  17. Authentic role of ATP signaling in micturition reflex

    PubMed Central

    Takezawa, Kentaro; Kondo, Makoto; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Norichika; Soda, Tetsuji; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Matsumoto-Miyai, Kazumasa; Ishida, Yusuke; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Ogawa, Osamu; Nonomura, Norio; Shimada, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a signaling molecule that regulates cellular processes. Based on previous studies of bladder function over the past decade, bladder ATP signaling was thought to have an essential role in the normal micturition reflex. In this study, we performed detailed analyses of bladder function in purinergic receptor-deficient mice using the automated voided stain on paper method and video-urodynamics. Unexpectedly, a lack of P2X2 or P2X3 receptors did not affect bladder function under normal physiological conditions, indicating that bladder ATP signaling is not essential for normal micturition reflex. In contrast, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced markedly high levels of ATP release from the urothelium. In addition, LPS-induced rapid bladder hyperactivity was attenuated in P2X2−/− and P2X3−/− mice. Contrary to the previous interpretation, our present findings indicate that bladder ATP signaling has a fundamental role in the micturition reflex, especially in bladder dysfunction, under pathological conditions. Therefore, the bladder ATP signaling pathway might be a highly promising therapeutic target for functional bladder disorders. This study newly defines an authentic role for bladder ATP signaling in the micturition reflex. PMID:26795755

  18. Authentic role of ATP signaling in micturition reflex.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Kentaro; Kondo, Makoto; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Norichika; Soda, Tetsuji; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Matsumoto-Miyai, Kazumasa; Ishida, Yusuke; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Ogawa, Osamu; Nonomura, Norio; Shimada, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a signaling molecule that regulates cellular processes. Based on previous studies of bladder function over the past decade, bladder ATP signaling was thought to have an essential role in the normal micturition reflex. In this study, we performed detailed analyses of bladder function in purinergic receptor-deficient mice using the automated voided stain on paper method and video-urodynamics. Unexpectedly, a lack of P2X2 or P2X3 receptors did not affect bladder function under normal physiological conditions, indicating that bladder ATP signaling is not essential for normal micturition reflex. In contrast, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced markedly high levels of ATP release from the urothelium. In addition, LPS-induced rapid bladder hyperactivity was attenuated in P2X2(-/-) and P2X3(-/-) mice. Contrary to the previous interpretation, our present findings indicate that bladder ATP signaling has a fundamental role in the micturition reflex, especially in bladder dysfunction, under pathological conditions. Therefore, the bladder ATP signaling pathway might be a highly promising therapeutic target for functional bladder disorders. This study newly defines an authentic role for bladder ATP signaling in the micturition reflex. PMID:26795755

  19. Mental simulation of an action modulates the excitability of spinal reflex pathways in man.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, M; Decety, J; Jeannerod, M; Requin, J

    1997-03-01

    The question of whether mental simulation of an action has an effect on the spinal reflex circuits was examined in normal humans. Subjects were instructed either to exert or to mentally simulate a strong or a weak pressure on a pedal with the left or the right foot. Changes in the H- and T-reflexes activated by electrical and mechanical stimuli were measured on both legs during motor performance as well as during mental simulation of the same task. Asynchronous EMG activity of the soleus muscles was simultaneously recorded. Reflex excitability increased during performance of the pressure. It was larger when the H-reflex was triggered in the muscle involved in the task as compared to the contralateral side. Because actual performance modified the tension of the tendon and the location of the stimulus, ipsilateral changes of T-reflex amplitude could not be evaluated. Mental simulation of foot pressure in this condition resulted in a large increase of spinal reflex excitability, which was only slightly weaker than the reflex facilitation associated with the actual performance. Changes in T-reflex amplitude, but not in H-reflex amplitude, depended upon the lateralization and force of the simulated pressure, being larger in the leg involved in the simulation than in the contralateral leg, and larger for a strong than for a weak simulated movement. EMG activity was found to be weakly increased during mental imagery. This increase was significantly, although slightly, modulated by the lateralization and intensity of the imagined movement. However, no correlation was found across subjects between reflex amplitude and the amplitude of EMG activity. PMID:9088558

  20. Development of the Stretch Reflex in the Newborn: Reciprocal Excitation and Reflex Irradiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Barbara M.; Gottlieb, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    When tendon jerk reflexes were tested in seven newborns from one- to three-days old, stretch reflex responses in all major muscle groups of the lower limb were elicited. This "irradiation of reflexes" is a normal phenomenon in newborns, with the pathway becoming suppressed during normal maturation. In individuals with cerebral palsy, however, the…

  1. The Dynamics of the Stapedial Acoustic Reflex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Sherrin Mary

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis aims to separate the neural and muscular components of the stapedial acoustic reflex, both anatomically and physiologically. It aims to present an hypothesis to account for the differences between ipsilateral and contralateral reflex characteristics which have so far been unexplained, and achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the reflex dynamics. A technique enabling faithful reproduction of the time course of the reflex is used throughout the experimental work. The technique measures tympanic membrane displacement as a result of reflex stapedius muscle contraction. The recorded response can be directly related to the mechanics of the middle ear and stapedius muscle contraction. Some development of the technique is undertaken by the author. A model of the reflex neural arc and stapedius muscle dynamics is evolved that is based upon a second order system. The model is unique in that it includes a latency in the ipsilateral negative feedback loop. Oscillations commonly observed on reflex responses are seen to be produced because of the inclusion of a latency in the feedback loop. The model demonstrates and explains the complex relationships between neural and muscle dynamic parameters observed in the experimental work. This more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between the stapedius dynamics and the neural arc of the reflex would not usually have been possible using human subjects, coupled with a non-invasive measurement technique. Evidence from the experimental work revealed the ipsilateral reflex to have, on average, a 5 dB lower threshold than the contralateral reflex. The oscillatory charcteristics, and the steady state response, of the contralateral reflex are also seen to be significantly different from those of the ipsilateral reflex. An hypothesis to account for the experimental observations is proposed. It is propounded that chemical neurotransmitters, and their effect upon the contralateral reflex arc from the site of the superior olivary complex to the motoneurones innervating the stapedius, account for the difference between the contralateral and ipsilateral reflex thresholds and dynamic characteristics. In the past two years the measurement technique used for the experimental work has developed from an audiological to a neurological diagnostic tool. This has enabled the results from the study to be applied in the field for valuable biomechanical and neurological explanations of the reflex response. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  2. Reflex transmission to lumbar ?-motoneurones in the mouse similar and different to those in the cat.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Eike D; Kalezic, Ivana; Dibaj, Payam; Steffens, Heinz

    2013-07-01

    Investigation and interpretation of defective motor circuitries in transgenic mice required further basic results from wild-type mice. Therefore, we investigated the lumbar motor reflex pattern in anaesthetised mice using intracellular motoneuronal recording and monosynaptic reflex testing. Thresholds and latencies in mice were similar to those in cats: thresholds for monosynaptic (group I) EPSPs were slightly above 1T (T=threshold for the lowest threshold fibres), around 1.5T for group II EPSPs and above 10T for group III EPSPs; group I EPSPs were maximal with a stimulus strength around 2T, group II EPSPs were maximal with 5-8T; latencies to the group I incoming volley were below 1ms for monosynaptic group I EPSPs, around 3ms for polysynaptic group II EPSPs and above 4ms for polysynaptic group III EPSPs. In contrast to reflex actions in the cat, monosynaptic gastrocnemius-soleus reflexes were facilitated by conditioning stimulation of the peroneal, sural and tibial nerves, i.e. by a variety of different, probably flexor reflex afferents. This facilitation persisted after high lumbar spinalisation indicating an independency to supraspinal influences. Nociceptive muscle afferents facilitated the peroneal monosynaptic reflex while nociceptive cutaneous afferents from the foot sole inhibited the ipsilateral but facilitated the contralateral peroneal reflex. PMID:23562791

  3. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced. PMID:9060012

  4. Creating a Complex Schedule with "REFLEX."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kren, George M.; Christakes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses "REFLEX," a software package for scheduling. Explores the program's applications in preparing a departmental class schedule. Explains that "REFLEX" includes a filter function and some attributes of a spreadsheet but lacks the ability to interact with other databases. Concludes that the program can make scheduling easier and more…

  5. [Non-reflex activity of the CNS].

    PubMed

    Brozek, G

    1995-06-01

    Recent studies of biological rhythms have modified Sherrington's concept of nervous system as exclusively reflexive to include the fact that some neural activity is also endogenously rhythmic. Reflexes are undoubtedly the most important components of animal's and human behavior. But are reflexes the basic units of all complex movements and acts? Rhythmical movements such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as licking, mastication, and the peristaltic propulsion of nutrients and waste are examples of acts controlled by intrinsic oscillators, so called central pattern generators. Information from the periphery is, however, essential for controlling the extent and rate of movements. Between reflex and non-reflex activity it is possible to place complex species-specific responses called by ethologists fixed-action patterns. Recent investigators have shown that many complex sequences of behavior like speech or piano playing are determined by an internal plan, rather than being generated by a "chain" of reflexes. Non-reflexive activity appears earlier in ontogeny, and is probably phylogenetically older than reflexes. PMID:8665596

  6. On the role of galanin in mediating spinal flexor reflex excitability in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, I S; Grass, S; Xu, X J; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    1998-08-01

    The effects of exogenous and endogenous galanin on spinal flexor reflex excitability was evaluated in rats one to eight days after the induction of inflammation by subcutaneous injection of carrageenan into the sural nerve innervation area. In normal rats, electrical stimulation of C-fibres in the sural nerve elicited a brisk reflex discharge. Conditioning stimulation of C-fibres (1/s) generated a gradual increase in reflex magnitude (wind-up), which was followed by a period of reflex hyperexcitability. Intrathecal galanin dose-dependently blocked reflex hyperexcitability induced by C-fibre conditioning stimulation whereas i.t. M-35, a high-affinity galanin receptor antagonist, moderately potentiated this effect. At one to three days after the injection of carrageenen, when inflammation was at its peak, the magnitude of the reflex was significantly increased and discharge duration became prolonged. However, wind-up and reflex hyperexcitability were significantly reduced. Furthermore, reduced reflex excitability during conditioning stimulation ("wind-down") and depression of the reflex were sometimes present, which are rarely observed in normal rats. Intrathecal galanin reduced hyperexcitability during inflammation, although its potency was weaker than in normals. However, the galanin receptor antagonist M-35 strongly enhanced wind-up and reflex hyperexcitability, similarly as in normal rats. The baseline flexor reflex, wind-up and C-fibre conditioning stimulation-induced facilitation were normalized four to eight days after carrageenan injection when signs of inflammation were diminishing. Interestingly, intrathecal galanin and M-35 failed to influence spinal excitability. The results suggest a complex functional plasticity in the role of endogenous galanin in mediating spinal excitability during inflammation. There appears to be an enhanced endogenous inhibitory control by galanin on C-afferent input during the peak of inflammation, which may explain the relative ineffectiveness of exogenous galanin. During the recovery phase there may be a reduction in galanin receptors, which may impair the action of endogenous and exogenous galanin. These results further support the notion that galanin is an endogenous inhibitory peptide in nociception. PMID:9639276

  7. Modulation of physiological reflexes by pain: role of the locus coeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Szabadi, Elemer

    2012-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) is activated by noxious stimuli, and this activation leads to inhibition of perceived pain. As two physiological reflexes, the acoustic startle reflex and the pupillary light reflex, are sensitive to noxious stimuli, this review considers evidence that this sensitivity, at least to some extent, is mediated by the LC. The acoustic startle reflex, contraction of a large body of skeletal muscles in response to a sudden loud acoustic stimulus, can be enhanced by both directly (“sensitization”) and indirectly (“fear conditioning”) applied noxious stimuli. Fear-conditioning involves the association of a noxious (unconditioned) stimulus with a neutral (conditioned) stimulus (e.g., light), leading to the ability of the conditioned stimulus to evoke the “pain response”. The enhancement of the startle response by conditioned fear (“fear-potentiated startle”) involves the activation of the amygdala. The LC may also be involved in both sensitization and fear potentiation: pain signals activate the LC both directly and indirectly via the amygdala, which results in enhanced motoneurone activity, leading to an enhanced muscular response. Pupil diameter is under dual sympathetic/parasympathetic control, the sympathetic (noradrenergic) output dilating, and the parasympathetic (cholinergic) output constricting the pupil. The light reflex (constriction of the pupil in response to a light stimulus) operates via the parasympathetic output. The LC exerts a dual influence on pupillary control: it contributes to the sympathetic outflow and attenuates the parasympathetic output by inhibiting the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, the preganglionic cholinergic nucleus in the light reflex pathway. Noxious stimulation results in pupil dilation (“reflex dilation”), without any change in the light reflex response, consistent with sympathetic activation via the LC. Conditioned fear, on the other hand, results in the attenuation of the light reflex response (“fear-inhibited light reflex”), consistent with the inhibition of the parasympathetic light reflex via the LC. It is suggested that directly applied pain and fear-conditioning may affect different populations of autonomic neurones in the LC, directly applied pain activating sympathetic and fear-conditioning parasympathetic premotor neurones. PMID:23087627

  8. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  9. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Duysens, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement. PMID:25392164

  10. TETANUS TOXIN REDUCES LOCAL AND DESCENDING REGULATION OF THE H-REFLEX

    PubMed Central

    MATTHEWS, CHRISTOPHER C.; FISHMAN, PAUL S.; WITTENBERG, GEORGE F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Skeletal muscles that are under the influence of tetanus toxin show an exaggerated reflex response to stretch. We examined which changes in the stretch reflex may underlie the exaggerated response. Methods H-reflexes were obtained from the tibialis anterior (TA) and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles in rats 7 days after intramuscular injection of tetanus toxin into the TA. Results We found effects of the toxin on the threshold, amplitude, and duration of H-waves from the TA. The toxin inhibited rate-dependent depression in the FDB between the stimulation frequencies of 0.5–50 HZ and when a conditioning magnetic stimulus applied to the brain preceded a test electrical stimulus delivered to the plantar nerve. Conclusions Tetanus toxin increased the amplitude of the H-wave and reduced the normal depression of H-wave amplitude that is associated with closely timed stimuli, two phenomena that could contribute to hyperactivity of the stretch reflex. PMID:24772492

  11. The oculocardiac reflex in blepharoplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Matarasso, A

    1989-02-01

    The oculocardiac reflex (OCR), a previously undescribed phenomenon in aesthetic blepharoplasty surgery, involves intraoperative bradycardia exceeding 10 percent of the preoperative heart rate or any dysrhythmia during ocular manipulation. It is a trigeminal-vagal-mediated reflex arc. The oculocardiac reflex was noted to occur in 25 of 100 patients (25 percent) undergoing blepharoplasty. A data sheet designed and distributed for use in the operating room identified a reflex-prone patient (RPP) as a young, anxious female, with a cardiac history, operated on under light anesthesia with aggressive fat pad resection. The oculocardiac reflex was more likely to occur in a reflex-prone patient during traction on the medial fat pads and in the left eye. Despite anticipating the fatigue phenomenon in those patients who exhibited a profound bradycardia (35 to 40 beats per minute), it was necessary to release traction in order to permit the heart rate to return to normal. Awareness and treatment of this potentially life-threatening oculocardiac reflex are necessary. Careful patient surveillance and monitoring are mandatory. PMID:2911623

  12. Abnormal oculocardiac reflex in two patients with Marcus Gunn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Maitree; Baduni, Neha; Jain, Aruna; Sanwal, Manoj Kumar; Vajifdar, Homay

    2011-07-01

    Marcus Gunn phenomenon is seen in 4 to 6% of congenital ptosis patients. We report two cases of abnormal oculocardiac reflex during ptosis correction surgery. Marcus Gunn syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance. It is believed to be a neural misdirection syndrome in which fibres of the motor division of the trigeminal nerve are congenitally misdirected into the superior pterygoid and the levator muscles. Anesthetic considerations include taking a detailed history about any previous anaesthetic exposure and any reaction to it as this syndrome has a high probability of being associated with malignant hyperthermia. It is also postulated that an atypical oculocardiac reflex might be initiated in these patients as seen in our patients, so precautions must be taken for its prevention and early detection. PMID:21897519

  13. Abnormal oculocardiac reflex in two patients with Marcus Gunn syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Maitree; Baduni, Neha; Jain, Aruna; Sanwal, Manoj Kumar; Vajifdar, Homay

    2011-01-01

    Marcus Gunn phenomenon is seen in 4 to 6% of congenital ptosis patients. We report two cases of abnormal oculocardiac reflex during ptosis correction surgery. Marcus Gunn syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance. It is believed to be a neural misdirection syndrome in which fibres of the motor division of the trigeminal nerve are congenitally misdirected into the superior pterygoid and the levator muscles. Anesthetic considerations include taking a detailed history about any previous anaesthetic exposure and any reaction to it as this syndrome has a high probability of being associated with malignant hyperthermia. It is also postulated that an atypical oculocardiac reflex might be initiated in these patients as seen in our patients, so precautions must be taken for its prevention and early detection. PMID:21897519

  14. [Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shuhui; Zhao, Ke

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) is progressing for the latest 100 years. From the discovery of its important role in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease to all aspects of its development, reflex pathways, neural regulation and physiological functions, there have been more in-depth explorations. It is now recognized that a number of other diseases also have a more specific performance of RAIR. It has become an important and indispensable part to anorectal manometry. Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex is reviewed in this article. PMID:26704013

  15. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  16. Reversal of Motor Learning in the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in the Absence of Visual Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marlene R.; Meissner, Geoffrey W.; Schafer, Robert J.; Raymond, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    Motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and eyeblink conditioning use similar neural circuitry, and they may use similar cellular plasticity mechanisms. Classically conditioned eyeblink responses undergo extinction after prolonged exposure to the conditioned stimulus in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus. We investigated the…

  17. Effect of naloxone on tooth pulp-evoked jaw-opening reflex in the barbiturate-anaesthetized cat.

    PubMed

    Huopaniemi, T; Pertovaara, A; Jyväsjärvi, E; Carlson, S

    1988-11-01

    The threshold of the tooth pulp-evoked jaw-opening reflex was uninfluenced by administration of 0.5 or 5.0 mg kg-1, i.v. naloxone, a specific opioid antagonist, in the barbiturate-anaesthetized cat. Furthermore, facilitatory or inhibitory interactions between two successive tooth pulp-evoked jaw reflex responses were not influenced by naloxone. It is concluded that naloxone-sensitive opioid receptor-mediated mechanisms do not contribute to the modulation of tooth pulp-evoked reflexes by conditioning dental stimuli. Also they do not exert a tonic inhibition on the sensory or motor part of the tooth pulp-driven reflexes. Experiments performed for comparison showed that the non-nociceptive polysynaptic reflex discharge in the flexo-motor neurons of the limb was not influenced by naloxone either. PMID:2852448

  18. Demonstrating the Stretch Reflex: A Mechanical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batavia, Mitchell; McDonough, Andrew L.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the concept of stretch reflexes to students using a mechanical model. The model provides a dynamic multisensory experience using movement, light, and sound. Describes the construction design. (SAH)

  19. Stretch reflex oscillations and essential tremor.

    PubMed Central

    Elble, R J; Higgins, C; Moody, C J

    1987-01-01

    Using a computer-controlled torque motor and manipulandum, 50 ms torque pulses and 70 second trains of binary pseudorandom torque disturbances were applied to the wrists of 10 adult controls and 22 patients with essential tremor in order to study the interaction between mechanically-induced stretch-reflex oscillations and essential tremor. These two oscillations were separated by applying inertial and spring loads to the wrist. There was no evidence of increased or unstable stretch-reflex activity in the essential tremor patients, and stretch-reflex latencies did not correlate with the frequency of essential tremor. Essential tremor and mechanically-induced stretch-reflex oscillations are separate phenomena capable of complex interaction. PMID:3612149

  20. Short-term locomotor adaptation to a robotic ankle exoskeleton does not alter soleus Hoffmann reflex amplitude

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To improve design of robotic lower limb exoskeletons for gait rehabilitation, it is critical to identify neural mechanisms that govern locomotor adaptation to robotic assistance. Previously, we demonstrated soleus muscle recruitment decreased by ~35% when walking with a pneumatically-powered ankle exoskeleton providing plantar flexor torque under soleus proportional myoelectric control. Since a substantial portion of soleus activation during walking results from the stretch reflex, increased reflex inhibition is one potential mechanism for reducing soleus recruitment when walking with exoskeleton assistance. This is clinically relevant because many neurologically impaired populations have hyperactive stretch reflexes and training to reduce the reflexes could lead to substantial improvements in their motor ability. The purpose of this study was to quantify soleus Hoffmann (H-) reflex responses during powered versus unpowered walking. Methods We tested soleus H-reflex responses in neurologically intact subjects (n=8) that had trained walking with the soleus controlled robotic ankle exoskeleton. Soleus H-reflex was tested at the mid and late stance while subjects walked with the exoskeleton on the treadmill at 1.25 m/s, first without power (first unpowered), then with power (powered), and finally without power again (second unpowered). We also collected joint kinematics and electromyography. Results When the robotic plantar flexor torque was provided, subjects walked with lower soleus electromyographic (EMG) activation (27-48%) and had concomitant reductions in H-reflex amplitude (12-24%) compared to the first unpowered condition. The H-reflex amplitude in proportion to the background soleus EMG during powered walking was not significantly different from the two unpowered conditions. Conclusion These findings suggest that the nervous system does not inhibit the soleus H-reflex in response to short-term adaption to exoskeleton assistance. Future studies should determine if the findings also apply to long-term adaption to the exoskeleton. PMID:20659331

  1. Brainstem and spinal reflex studies in patients with primary progressive freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Kızıltan, Meral E; Gunduz, Aysegul; Kızıltan, Gunes; Tekeoğlu, Anıl; Sohtaoğlu, Melis

    2014-08-15

    Our aim was to investigate the extent and pattern of involved pathways using brainstem and spinal reflexes by comparing primary progressive freezing of gait (PPFOG) progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) with FOG. Seven patients with PPFOG and age and sex matched seven PSP patients and 16 healthy subjects were included in the study. All subjects underwent blink reflex (BR), trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR), auditory startle reflex (ASR) and long latency flexor reflex (LLFR) investigations under the same conditions. All three groups had normal BR latencies. ASR probability was lowest in the PSP group and was highest in PPFOG (p=0.005). The presence rate of TCR was lowest in PSP and it was highest in PPFOG (p=0.007 for SC and p=0.023 for SCM). The presence rate and amplitude of LLFR (R II) were decreased in the PSP group (p=0.010 and p=0.031, respectively) whereas it was in a continuous pattern in some of PPFOG patients. ASR, TCR and LLFR were all inhibited in PSP and we suggest that suppression of all three reflexes is probably related to degeneration of brainstem reticular formation and basal ganglia connections. However, interestingly, in PPFOG, excitabilities of ASR and TCR circuits are increased suggesting loss of pathways mediating suprasegmental control. PMID:24867166

  2. Next generation control system for reflexive aerostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddux, Michael R.; Meents, Elizabeth P.; Barnell, Thomas J.; Cable, Kristin M.; Hemmelgarn, Christopher; Margraf, Thomas W.; Havens, Ernie

    2010-04-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) has developed and demonstrated a composite structural solution called reflexive composites for aerospace applications featuring CRG's healable shape memory polymer (SMP) matrix. In reflexive composites, an integrated structural health monitoring (SHM) system autonomously monitors the structural health of composite aerospace structures, while integrated intelligent controls monitor data from the SHM system to characterize damage and initiate healing when damage is detected. Development of next generation intelligent controls for reflexive composites were initiated for the purpose of integrating prognostic health monitoring capabilities into the reflexive composite structural solution. Initial efforts involved data generation through physical inspections and mechanical testing. Compression after impact (CAI) testing was conducted on composite-reinforced shape memory polymer samples to induce damage and investigate the effectiveness of matrix healing on mechanical performance. Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques were employed to observe and characterize material damage. Restoration of mechanical performance was demonstrated through healing, while NDE data showed location and size of damage and verified mitigation of damage post-healing. Data generated was used in the development of next generation reflexive controls software. Data output from the intelligent controls could serve as input to Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems and Integrated Resilient Aircraft Controls (IRAC). Reflexive composite technology has the ability to reduce maintenance required on composite structures through healing, offering potential to significantly extend service life of aerospace vehicles and reduce operating and lifecycle costs.

  3. Gadolinium attenuates exercise pressor reflex in cats.

    PubMed

    Hayes, S G; Kaufman, M P

    2001-05-01

    The exercise pressor reflex, which arises from the contraction-induced stimulation of group III and IV muscle afferents, is widely believed to be evoked by metabolic stimuli signaling a mismatch between blood/oxygen demand and supply in the working muscles. Nevertheless, mechanical stimuli may also play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex. To determine this role, we examined the effect of gadolinium, which blocks mechanosensitive channels, on the exercise pressor reflex in both decerebrate and alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats. We found that gadolinium (10 mM; 1 ml) injected into the femoral artery significantly attenuated the reflex pressor responses to static contraction of the triceps surae muscles and to stretch of the calcaneal (Achilles) tendon. In contrast, gadolinium had no effect on the reflex pressor response to femoral arterial injection of capsaicin (5 microg). In addition, gadolinium significantly attenuated the responses of group III muscle afferents, many of which are mechanically sensitive, to both static contraction and to tendon stretch. Gadolinium, however, had no effect on the responses of group IV muscle afferents, many of which are metabolically sensitive, to either static contraction or to capsaicin injection. We conclude that mechanical stimuli arising in contracting skeletal muscles contribute to the elicitation of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:11299217

  4. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  5. Protective Role of Aerodigestive Reflexes Against Aspiration: Study on Subjects With Impaired and Preserved Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    DUA, KULWINDER; SURAPANENI, SRI NAVEEN; KURIBAYASHI, SHIKO; HAFEEZULLAH, MOHAMMED; SHAKER, REZA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Direct evidence to support the airway protective function of aerodigestive reflexes triggered by pharyngeal stimulation was previously demonstrated by abolishing these reflexes by topical pharyngeal anesthesia in normal subjects. Studies have also shown that these reflexes deteriorate in cigarette smokers. Aim of this study was to determine the influence of defective pharyngeal aerodigestive reflexes on airway protection in cigarette smokers. METHODS Pharyngoglottal Closure reflex; PGCR, Pharyngo-UES Contractile reflex; PUCR, and Reflexive Pharyngeal Swallow; RPS were studied in 15 healthy non-smokers (24.2 ± 3.3 SD y, 7 males) and 15 healthy chronic smokers (27.3 ± 8.1, 7 males). To elicit these reflexes and to evaluate aspiration, colored water was perfused into the hypopharynx at the rate of 1 mL/min. Maximum volume of water that can safely dwell in the hypopharynx before spilling into the larynx (Hypopharyngeal Safe Volume; HPSV) and the threshold volume to elicit PGCR, PUCR, and RPS were determined in smokers and results compared with non-smokers. RESULTS At baseline, RPS was elicited in all non-smokers (100%) and in only 3 of 15 smokers (20%; P < .001). None of the non-smokers showed evidence of laryngeal spillage of water, whereas 12 of 15 smokers with absent RPS had laryngeal spillage. Pharyngeal anesthesia abolished RPS reflex in all non-smokers resulting in laryngeal spillage. The HPSV was 0.61 ± 0.06 mL and 0.76 ± 0.06 mL in non-smokers and smokers respectively (P = .1). CONCLUSIONS Deteriorated reflexive pharyngeal swallow in chronic cigarette smokers predispose them to risks of aspiration and similarly, abolishing this reflex in non-smokers also results in laryngeal spillage. These observations directly demonstrate the airway protective function of RPS. PMID:21420407

  6. Whole-body vibration-induced muscular reflex: Is it a stretch-induced reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Cidem, Muharrem; Sebik, Oguz; Yilmaz, Gizem; Karamehmetoglu, Safak Sahir; Kara, Sadik; Karacan, Ilhan; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole-body vibration (WBV) can induce reflex responses in muscles. A number of studies have reported that the physiological mechanisms underlying this type of reflex activity can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test whether the WBV-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) can be explained as a stretch-induced reflex. [Subjects and Methods] The present study assessed 20 healthy males using surface electrodes placed on their right soleus muscle. The latency of the tendon reflex (T-reflex) as a stretch-induced reflex was compared with the reflex latency of the WBV-IMR. In addition, simulations were performed at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 Hz to determine the stretch frequency of the muscle during WBV. [Results] WBV-IMR latency (40.5 ± 0.8 ms; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.0–41.9 ms) was significantly longer than T-reflex latency (34.6 ± 0.5 ms; 95% CI: 33.6–35.5 ms) and the mean difference was 6.2 ms (95% CI of the difference: 4.7–7.7 ms). The simulations performed in the present study demonstrated that the frequency of the stretch signal would be twice the frequency of the vibration. [Conclusion] These findings do not support the notion that WBV-IMR can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. PMID:26310784

  7. Long-term depression-like plasticity of the blink reflex for the treatment of blepharospasm

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, G.; Shamim, E.A.; Lin, P.T.; Kranz, G.S.; Hallett, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Our previous work showed a beneficial therapeutic effect on blepharospasm using slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation which produces a long-term depression-like effect. High-frequency supraorbital electrical stimulation, asynchronous with the R2 component of the blink reflex, can also induce long-term depression-like effects on the blink reflex circuit in healthy subjects. Patients with blepharospasm have reduced inhibition of their blink recovery curves; therefore, a long-term depression-like intervention might normalize the blink reflex recovery and have a favorable therapeutic effect. Methods This is a randomized, sham-controlled, observer-blinded prospective study. In 14 blepharospasm patients, we evaluated the effects of high-frequency supraorbital stimulation on three separate treatment days. We applied 28 trains of 9 stimuli, 400 Hertz, either BEFORE or AFTER the R2 or used SHAM stimulation. The primary outcome was the blink rate, number of spasms rated by a blinded physician and patient rating before, immediately after and 1 hour after stimulation while resting, reading, and talking; secondary outcome was the blink reflex recovery. Results Stimulation-BEFORE and stimulation-AFTER the R2 both showed a similar improvement as SHAM-stimulation in physician rating, but patients felt significantly better with the BEFORE condition. Improvement in recovery of the blink reflex was seen only in the BEFORE condition. Clinical symptoms differed in the three baseline conditions (resting, reading, talking). Conclusions Stimulation BEFORE R2 increased inhibition in trigeminal blink reflex circuits in blepharospasm toward normal values and produced subjective but not objective improvement. Inhibition of the blink reflex pathway by itself appeared to be insufficient for a useful therapeutic effect. PMID:23401198

  8. Variability in Hoffmann and tendon reflexes in healthy male subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, E.; Do, S.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a time dependent decrease in amplitude of H- and T-reflexes during Zero-G exposure and subsequently an increase in the amplitude of the H-reflex 2-4 hours after return to a 1-G environment. These alterations have been attributed to the adaptation of the human neurosensory system to gravity. The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) is an acknowledged method to determine the integrity of the monosynaptic reflex arc. However deep tendon reflexes (DTR's or T-reflexes), elicited by striking the tendon also utilize the entire reflex arc. The objective of this study was to compare the variability in latency and amplitude of the two reflexes in healthy subjects. Methods: Nine healthy male subjects, 27-43 years in age, 161-175 cm in height plus 60-86 Kg in weight, underwent weekly testing for four weeks with a Dan-Tec EMG counterpoint EMG system. Subjects were studied prone and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left soleus muscles. The H-reflex was obtained by stimulating the tibial nerve in the politeal fossa with a 0.2 msec square wave pulse delivered at 2 Hz until the maximum H-reflex was obtained. The T-reflex was invoked by tapping the achilles tendon with a self triggering reflex hammer connected to the EMG system. The latencies and amplitudes for the H- and T-reflexes were measured. Results: These data indicate that the amplitudes of these reflexes varied considerably. However, latencies to invoked responses were consistent. The latency of the T-reflex was approximately 3-5 msec longer than the H-reflex. Conclusion: The T-reflex is easily obtained, requires less time, and is more comfortable to perform. Qualitative data can be obtained by deploying self triggering, force plated reflex hammers both in the 1-G and Zero-G environment.

  9. The trigeminocardiac reflex – a comparison with the diving reflex in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Schaller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) has previously been described in the literature as a reflexive response of bradycardia, hypotension, and gastric hypermotility seen upon mechanical stimulation in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. The diving reflex (DR) in humans is characterized by breath-holding, slowing of the heart rate, reduction of limb blood flow and a gradual rise in the mean arterial blood pressure. Although the two reflexes share many similarities, their relationship and especially their functional purpose in humans have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present review, we have tried to integrate and elaborate these two phenomena into a unified physiological concept. Assuming that the TCR and the DR are closely linked functionally and phylogenetically, we have also highlighted the significance of these reflexes in humans. PMID:25995761

  10. Stretch reflex gain in cat triceps surae muscles with compliant loads

    PubMed Central

    Serres, Sophie J De; Bennett, David J; Stein, Richard B

    2002-01-01

    The triceps surae (TS) stretch reflex was measured in decerebrate cats during crossed extensor stimulation (tonic contractions) and after spinalization during rhythmic locomotor activity. The TS reflex force in response to a short pulse stretch measured during tonic contractions at low level of background activity was greater than when more background activity was present at the time of application of stretch. In contrast, the reflex force measured during rhythmic contractions was very small at low level of background force (flexion phase) and increased at moderate and high levels of background activity (extension phase). Thus, even in reduced preparations, a task modulation of the stretch reflex occurs. Throughout the experimental procedure, the torque motor used to stretch the muscles behaved like a spring of a preset compliance (from isometric to very compliant). A reflex model was used to simulate the responses obtained experimentally. The gain of the stretch reflex loop was estimated for each load condition and both behavioural tasks. The reflex loop gain was significantly larger as the compliance of the external load increased for both tonic and rhythmic contractions, although to a lesser extent in the phasically activated muscles. During rhythmic locomotor contractions the gain was less than 1, assuring stability of the system. In contrast, during tonic contractions against a compliant load the gain exceeded 1, consistent with the instability (oscillations, clonus) seen at times under these load conditions. However, the high gain and instability was only transient, since repeated stretch reduced the gain. Thus, non-linearities in the system assured vigorous responses at the onset of perturbations, but then weaker responses to ongoing perturbations to reduce the chance of feedback instability (clonus). PMID:12482905

  11. Visual modulation of proprioceptive reflexes during movement

    PubMed Central

    Mutha, Pratik K.; Boulinguez, Philippe; Sainburg, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that feedback circuits such as reflexes can be tuned by setting their gains prior to movement onset during both posture and movement tasks. However, such a control strategy requires that perturbation contingencies be predicted during movement planning and that task goals remain fixed. Here we test the hypothesis that feedforward regulation of reflex circuits also occurs during the course of movement in response to changes in task goals. Participants reached to a visual target that was occasionally jumped on movement initiation, thus changing task goals. Reflex responses were elicited through a mechanical perturbation on the same trial, 100 milliseconds after the target jump. Impedance to the perturbation was tuned to the direction of the preceding jump: reflex responses increased or decreased depending on whether the perturbation opposed or was consistent with the target jump. This modulation, although sensitive to the direction of the jump, was insensitive to jump amplitude, as tested in a follow-up experiment. Our findings thus suggest that modulation of reflex circuits occurs online, and is sensitive to changes in visual target information. In addition, our results suggest a two-level model for visuo-motor control that reflects hierarchical neural organization. PMID:18926800

  12. Modulation of human vestibular reflexes with increased postural threat.

    PubMed

    Horslen, Brian C; Dakin, Christopher J; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G

    2014-08-15

    Anxiety and arousal have been shown to facilitate human vestibulo-ocular reflexes, presumably through direct neural connections between the vestibular nuclei and emotional processing areas of the brain. However, the effects of anxiety, fear and arousal on balance-relevant vestibular reflexes are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to manipulate standing height to determine whether anxiety and fear can modulate the direct relationship between vestibular signals and balance reflexes during stance. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS; 2-25 Hz) was used to evoke ground reaction forces (GRF) while subjects stood in both LOW and HIGH surface height conditions. Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate the SVS-GRF relationship, in terms of coupling (coherence and cumulant density) and gain, in the medio-lateral (ML) and antero-posterior (AP) directions. The short- and medium-latency cumulant density peaks were both significantly increased in the ML and AP directions when standing in HIGH, compared to LOW, conditions. Likewise, coherence was statistically greater between 4.3 Hz and 6.7 Hz in the ML, and between 5.5 and 17.7 Hz in the AP direction. When standing in the HIGH condition, the gain of the SVS-GRF relationship was increased 81% in the ML direction, and 231% in the AP direction. The significant increases in coupling and gain observed in both experiments demonstrate that vestibular-evoked balance responses are augmented in states of height-induced postural threat. These data support the possibility that fear or anxiety-mediated changes to balance control are affected by altered central processing of vestibular information. PMID:24973412

  13. Modulation of human vestibular reflexes with increased postural threat

    PubMed Central

    Horslen, Brian C; Dakin, Christopher J; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and arousal have been shown to facilitate human vestibulo-ocular reflexes, presumably through direct neural connections between the vestibular nuclei and emotional processing areas of the brain. However, the effects of anxiety, fear and arousal on balance-relevant vestibular reflexes are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to manipulate standing height to determine whether anxiety and fear can modulate the direct relationship between vestibular signals and balance reflexes during stance. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS; 2–25 Hz) was used to evoke ground reaction forces (GRF) while subjects stood in both LOW and HIGH surface height conditions. Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate the SVS–GRF relationship, in terms of coupling (coherence and cumulant density) and gain, in the medio-lateral (ML) and antero-posterior (AP) directions. The short- and medium-latency cumulant density peaks were both significantly increased in the ML and AP directions when standing in HIGH, compared to LOW, conditions. Likewise, coherence was statistically greater between 4.3 Hz and 6.7 Hz in the ML, and between 5.5 and 17.7 Hz in the AP direction. When standing in the HIGH condition, the gain of the SVS–GRF relationship was increased 81% in the ML direction, and 231% in the AP direction. The significant increases in coupling and gain observed in both experiments demonstrate that vestibular-evoked balance responses are augmented in states of height-induced postural threat. These data support the possibility that fear or anxiety-mediated changes to balance control are affected by altered central processing of vestibular information. PMID:24973412

  14. Studies of the vestibulo-ocular reflex on STS 4, 5 and 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Pool, Sam L.; Moore, Thomas P.; Uri, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) may be altered by weightlessness. Since this reflex plays a large role in visual stabilization, it was important to document any changes caused by space flight. This is a report on findings on STS-4 through 6 and is part of a larger study of neurosensory adaptation done on STS-4 through 8. Voluntary horizontal head oscillations at 1/3 Hz with amplitude of 30 deg right and left of center were recorded by a potentiometer and compared to eye position recorded by electroculography under the following conditions: eyes open, head fixed, tracking horizontal targets switched 0, 15, and 30 degrees right and left (optokinetic reflex - OKR - and calibration); eyes open and fixed on static external target with oscillation, (vestibulo ocular reflex, eyes closed - VOR EC); eyes open and wearing opaque goggles with target fixed in imagination (vestibulo-ocular reflex, eyes shaded - VOR ES); and eyes open and fixed on a head synchronized target with head oscillation (VOR suppression). No significant changes were found in voluntary head oscillation frequency or amplitude in those with (n=5), and without (n=3), space motion sickness (SMS), with phase of flight or test condition. Variations in head oscillation were too small to have produced detectable changes in test results.

  15. Retrieval interference in reflexive processing: experimental evidence from Mandarin, and computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Lena A.; Engelmann, Felix; Vasishth, Shravan

    2015-01-01

    We conducted two eye-tracking experiments investigating the processing of the Mandarin reflexive ziji in order to tease apart structurally constrained accounts from standard cue-based accounts of memory retrieval. In both experiments, we tested whether structurally inaccessible distractors that fulfill the animacy requirement of ziji influence processing times at the reflexive. In Experiment 1, we manipulated animacy of the antecedent and a structurally inaccessible distractor intervening between the antecedent and the reflexive. In conditions where the accessible antecedent mismatched the animacy cue, we found inhibitory interference whereas in antecedent-match conditions, no effect of the distractor was observed. In Experiment 2, we tested only antecedent-match configurations and manipulated locality of the reflexive-antecedent binding (Mandarin allows non-local binding). Participants were asked to hold three distractors (animate vs. inanimate nouns) in memory while reading the target sentence. We found slower reading times when animate distractors were held in memory (inhibitory interference). Moreover, we replicated the locality effect reported in previous studies. These results are incompatible with structure-based accounts. However, the cue-based ACT-R model of Lewis and Vasishth (2005) cannot explain the observed pattern either. We therefore extend the original ACT-R model and show how this model not only explains the data presented in this article, but is also able to account for previously unexplained patterns in the literature on reflexive processing. PMID:26074829

  16. The oculocardiac reflex in strabismus surgery.

    PubMed

    Milot, J A; Jacob, J L; Blanc, V F; Hardy, J F

    1983-12-01

    During strabismus surgery on 81 extraocular muscles in 49 children the cardiac response to calibrated traction on each of the muscles operated on was studied through the use of a microdisplacement transducer and the tachometer of a cardiac monitor. There was no significant difference in the frequency of induction of the oculocardiac reflex between the medial rectus and the other muscles or between the two eyes. However, quick traction provoked a reflex in 87% of instances, whereas progressive traction did so in only 51% of instances, a significant difference (p less than 0.05). Thus, because the oculocardiac reflex is frequent during strabismus surgery, cardiac monitoring during the operation and minimal, gentle manipulation of the extraocular muscles are important. PMID:6671149

  17. Effect of inversion and ankle bracing on peroneus longus Hoffmann reflex.

    PubMed

    Sefton, J M; Hicks-Little, C A; Koceja, D M; Cordova, M L

    2007-10-01

    This study examined peroneus longus (PL) Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) during sudden inversion perturbation of the ankle/foot complex under an ankle brace and non-brace condition. Ten healthy subjects volunteered. H-reflexes were tested on the up-sloping portion of the recruitment curve, utilizing a control trial M-wave above motor threshold to maintain consistency between subjects and conditions. The PL H/maximum M-wave (M(max)) ratio was established using the PL H-reflex and PL M(max) peak-to-peak measures. The mean ratio across five trials for each subject under each ankle brace (brace, no brace) and surface (flat, inversion) conditions was utilized for analysis. The 1 x 4 repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for treatment condition (P<0.0001). The PL H/M(max) ratio significantly increased during sudden inversion-no ankle brace condition compared with the flat surface no-ankle brace condition (P=0.04). Application of an ankle brace had no effect on PL H/M(max) ratio during inversion (P=0.78). During this study PL H/M(max) ratios increased during an inversion perturbation in healthy ankles. This is believed to occur due to heightened sensorimotor demand placed on the nervous system during this motion. Moreover, application of an ankle brace during inversion does not appear to affect PL H/M(max) ratio. PMID:17076833

  18. Effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes: evidence for increased muscle spindle sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Horslen, Brian C; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Inglis, J Timothy; Chua, Romeo; Carpenter, Mark G

    2013-08-01

    Standing balance is often threatened in everyday life. These threats typically involve scenarios in which either the likelihood or the consequence of falling is higher than normal. When cats are placed in these scenarios they respond by increasing the sensitivity of muscle spindles imbedded in the leg muscles, presumably to increase balance-relevant afferent information available to the nervous system. At present, it is unknown whether humans also respond to such postural threats by altering muscle spindle sensitivity. Here we present two studies that probed the effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes. In study 1 we manipulated the threat associated with an increased consequence of a fall by having subjects stand at the edge of an elevated surface (3.2 m). In study 2 we manipulated the threat by increasing the likelihood of a fall by occasionally tilting the support surface on which subjects stood. In both scenarios we used Hoffmann (H) and tendon stretch (T) reflexes to probe the spinal stretch reflex circuit of the soleus muscle. We observed increased T-reflex amplitudes and unchanged H-reflex amplitudes in both threat scenarios. These results suggest that the synaptic state of the spinal stretch reflex is unaffected by postural threat and that therefore the muscle spindles activated in the T-reflexes must be more sensitive in the threatening conditions. We propose that this increase in sensitivity may function to satisfy the conflicting needs to restrict movement with threat, while maintaining a certain amount of sensory information related to postural control. PMID:23719208

  19. Rhythmic arm cycling modulates Hoffmann reflex excitability differentially in the ankle flexor and extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Dragert, Katie; Zehr, E Paul

    2009-02-01

    Rhythmic arm movement significantly suppresses H-reflex amplitude in the soleus (SOL) muscle. This is evidence of neural linkages between the arms and legs which can be exploited during locomotion and have been ascribed to the descending effects of CPGs for arm cycling. However, the generalizability of the effects of arm movement on reflex excitability within the lower leg musculature has not been confirmed, as findings have been limited solely to the ankle extensor group. Here we tested the hypothesis that rhythmic arm movement similarly modulates H-reflex amplitude in both the ankle flexors and extensors by observing responses in the SOL and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. SOL and TA H-reflex recruitment curves were recorded bilaterally during control and 1Hz arm cycling conditions. Our results showed significant suppression in H-reflex amplitude (H(max)) in the SOL muscle in both the dominant and non-dominant legs during arm movement. However, results also revealed an unpredicted bidirectional (i.e. either suppression or facilitation) modulation of TA reflex amplitude that was not present in the SOL muscle. These findings suggest a differential regulation of ankle flexor and extensor H-reflex responses during rhythmic arm movement. This may be the result of differences in CPG output to the flexors and extensors during rhythmic movement, as well as increased involvement of cortical drive to the flexors relative to the extensors during rhythmic movement. These findings may be pertinent to future investigation of rehabilitative therapies that involve facilitative modulation of ankle flexor motor responses. PMID:19028550

  20. A Prototype Analysis of Spanish Indeterminate Reflexive Constructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turley, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of the Spanish indeterminate reflexive construction, the impersonal reflexive, finds that prototype theory allows this subjectless Spanish construction to be included within the category of generally subject-bearing indeterminates in Romance languages. (MSE)

  1. Long-term depression-like plasticity of the blink reflex for the treatment of blepharospasm.

    PubMed

    Kranz, Gottfried; Shamim, Ejaz A; Lin, Peter T; Kranz, George S; Hallett, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Our previous work showed a beneficial therapeutic effect on blepharospasm using slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, which produces a long-term depression (LTD)-like effect. High-frequency supraorbital electrical stimulation, asynchronous with the R2 component of the blink reflex, can also induce LTD-like effects on the blink reflex circuit in healthy subjects. Patients with blepharospasm have reduced inhibition of their blink recovery curves; therefore, a LTD-like intervention might normalize the blink reflex recovery (BRR) and have a favorable therapeutic effect. This is a randomized, sham-controlled, observer-blinded prospective study. In 14 blepharospasm patients, we evaluated the effects of high-frequency supraorbital stimulation on three separate treatment days. We applied 28 trains of nine stimuli, 400 Hz, either before or after the R2 or used sham stimulation. The primary outcome was the blink rate, number of spasms rated by a blinded physician and patient rating before, immediately after and 1 hour after stimulation while resting, reading, and talking; secondary outcome was the BRR. Stimulation "before" and "after" the R2 both showed a similar improvement as sham stimulation in physician rating, but patients felt significantly better with the before condition. Improvement in recovery of the blink reflex was noted only in the before condition. Clinical symptoms differed in the three baseline conditions (resting, reading, and talking). Stimulation before R2 increased inhibition in trigeminal blink reflex circuits in blepharospasm toward normal values and produced subjective, but not objective, improvement. Inhibition of the blink reflex pathway by itself appeared to be insufficient for a useful therapeutic effect. PMID:23401198

  2. Evaluating the Reflexive Practices in a Learning Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Andreina; Galuppo, Laura; Gilardi, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Reflexivity is a primary requirement for professional work. Our aim was to describe a methodology suitable for detecting the development of reflexive practice through the analysis of 59 Master's degree students' journals. We explore the use and changes of reflexive practice in relation to the settings and activities of the course using analysis of…

  3. Snout and Visual Rooting Reflexes in Infantile Autism. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minderaa, Ruud B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The authors conducted extensive neurological evaluations of 42 autistic individuals and were surprised to discover a consistently positive snout reflex in most of them. Difficulties with assessing the reflex are noted. The authors then reassessed the Ss for a series of primitive reflexes which are interpreted as signs of diffuse cortical brain…

  4. On Reflection: Is Reflexivity Necessarily Beneficial in Intercultural Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how the concept of reflexivity is used in intercultural education. Reflexivity is often presented as a key learning goal in acquiring intercultural competence (ICC). Yet, reflexivity can be defined in different ways, and take different forms across time and space, depending on the concepts of selfhood that prevail and how…

  5. Vagal gustatory reflex circuits for intraoral food sorting behavior in the goldfish Cellular organization and neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Takanori; Ogura, Tatsuya; Finger, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The sense of taste is crucial in an animal’s determination as to what is edible and what is not. This gustatory function is especially important in goldfish who utilize a sophisticated oropharyngeal sorting mechanism to separate food from substrate material. The computational aspects of this detection are carried out by the medullary vagal lobe which is a large, laminated structure combining elements of both the gustatory nucleus of the solitary tract and the nucleus ambiguus. The sensory layers of the vagal lobe are coupled to the motor layers via a simple reflex arc. Details of this reflex circuit were investigated with histology and calcium imaging. Biocytin injections into the motor layer labeled vagal reflex interneurons which have radially-directed dendrites ramifying within the layers of primary afferent terminals. Axons of reflex interneurons extend radially inward to terminate onto both vagal motoneurons and small, GABAergic interneurons in the motor layer. Functional imaging shows increases in intracellular Ca++ of vagal motoneurons following electrical stimulation in the sensory layer. These responses were suppressed under Ca++-free conditions and by interruption of the axons bridging between the sensory and motor layers. Pharmacological experiments showed that glutamate acting via (±)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-ethylisoxazole-4-propioinc acid (AMPA)/kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors mediates neurotransmission between reflex interneurons and vagal motoneurons. Thus the vagal gustatory portion of the viscerosensory complex is linked to branchiomotor neurons of the pharynx via a glutamatergic interneuronal system. PMID:19598285

  6. Resolution of hypothyroidism after correction of somatovisceral reflex dysfunction by refusion of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Murray R

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis is a rare initial presentation of new-onset hypothyroidism. The author describes the case of a 29-year-old woman who presented with psychosis caused by hypothyroidism, or myxedema madness. Although the patient's psychosis resolved after standard monotherapy using levothyroxine sodium, her hypothyroidism persisted. Imaging of the patient's cervical spine showed that previous C5-C6 and C6-C7 fusions had failed. The failed fusions were corrected, and the patient's hypothyroidism resolved, suggesting that the somatovisceral reflex was the cause of the patient's hypothyroidism. Although somatovisceral reflex dysfunctions are rare, physicians should consider them as potential underlying causes of their patients' presenting medical conditions. PMID:25550492

  7. Reconceptualizing rigour: the case for reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Koch, T; Harrington, A

    1998-10-01

    This paper is a critical review of recent discussions of rigour in nursing research. We will argue that 'borrowing' evaluation criteria from one paradigm of inquiry and applying them to another is problematic. We attempt to map the 'rigour' field and add a dimension to the existing debate about rigour and qualitative research through inclusion of reflexivity guided by philosophical hermeneutics. We describe reflexivity and appeal to writers to incorporate a reflexive account into their research product by signposting to readers 'what is going on' while researching. We contend that researchers bring to the research product, data generated, a range of literature, a positioning of this literature, a positioning of oneself, and moral socio-political contexts. We suggest that reflexive research is characterized by ongoing self-critique and self-appraisal and that the research product can be given shape by the politics of location and positioning. We emphasize that in the creation of a text (the research product) it is desirable that the researcher be a skilled writer. Finally we claim that if the research product is well signposted, the readers will be able to travel easily through the worlds of the participants and makers of the text (the researchers) and decide for themselves whether the text is believable or plausible (our terms for rigour). PMID:9829678

  8. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  9. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  10. Plasma quiescence in a reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jerde, L.; Friedman, S.; Carr, W.; Seidl, M.

    1980-02-01

    A thermionic cathode reflex discharge and the plasma it produces are studied. It is found that extremely quiescent plasmas can be produced when the electron-loss rate due to classical diffusion is equal to the ion-loss rate. Particle and power balances for the quiescent plasma are obtained, and the average electron energy loss per ion produced is determined.

  11. Reflex Anuria After Renal Tumor Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kervancioglu, Selim Sirikci, Akif; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    We report a case of reflex anuria after transarterial embolization of a renal tumor. Anuria developed immediately after embolization and resolved 74 hr following the procedure. We postulate that reflux anuria in our case was related to mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, or both, as these are stimulated by the occluded blood vessels, ischemia, and edema of the normal renal tissue of an embolized kidney.

  12. Doing Reflexivity: Moments of Unbecoming and Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Alison; Allan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers an account of a reflexive "trip" undertaken by a professional doctoral student and her supervisor. It presents a series of vignettes which offer an account of unbecomings and becomings encountered by the student. Making use of a dialogic approach in which the supervisor responds to the student, we suggest this method of…

  13. Dilemmas and Deliberations in Reflexive Ethnographic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janean Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces insights into the challenges and dilemmas experienced whilst researching students' interpretations and understandings of the Behaviour Management in Schools policy in Western Australia. Journal records, supported by student transcripts, are woven together in a reflexive ethnographic journey--from the beginning phase of…

  14. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance

  15. Reflexive Learning: Stages towards Wisdom with Dreyfus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The Dreyfus (2001) account of seven stages of learning is considered in the context of the Dreyfus (1980s) account of five stages of skill development. The two new stages, Mastery and Practical Wisdom, make more explicit certain themes implicit in the five-stage account. In this way Dreyfus (2001) encourages a more reflexive approach. The themes…

  16. Interindividual variability of central delay changes in the soleus H reflex pathway.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, M; Reni, L; Favale, E

    1992-01-01

    Central delay (CD) changes in the soleus H reflex pathway, as demonstrated by variations in the time interval between afferent (P1) and efferent (P2) neurographic volleys underlying the reflex response, were assessed in a group of normal subjects, both during the steady state and after homosynaptic spatial summation of afferent impulses. The maximal range of CD changes, regardless of whether "spontaneous" or provoked, showed significant interindividual differences whose size was positively related to the Hmax/Mmax ratio, provided that the extension of the subliminal fringe was suitably normalized. Comparatively similar variations in amplitude of the reflex motoneuronal discharge under different experimental conditions can be associated with different CD changes. Indeed, "spontaneous" CD fluctuations occurring during the steady state were consistently greater than CD reductions provoked by spatial summation, the gap size being negatively related to the Hmax/Mmax ratio. PMID:1310157

  17. [Facilitation and depression, under the influence of the iontophoretic application of acetylcholine, of the different components of the neuronal reactions in the cat motor cortex during the performance of a conditioned reflex of placing the paw on a lever].

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, B V; Maĭorov, V I; Moskvitin, A A

    1998-01-01

    The iontophoretic application of acetylcholine onto the motor cortex of cats during the execution of conditioned placing reaction caused an increase in neuronal excitability and facilitation of "extrinsic" connections (manifested as an enhancement of primary responses to electrical stimulation of the parietal cortex) and independent effect of suppression, which could be seen only in the response components with longer latency. The functional significance of these oppositely directed effects of acetylcholine application is corroborated by statistically significant changes in the motor response latency of the same directions as the changes in neuronal responses. Such a correlation was observed in a number of experiments. PMID:9583169

  18. Voluntary and involuntary ventilation do not alter the human inspiratory muscle loading reflex.

    PubMed

    Murray, N P S; McKenzie, D K; Gandevia, S C; Butler, J E

    2010-07-01

    The reflex mechanism of the short-latency inhibitory reflex to transient loading of human inspiratory muscles is unresolved. Muscle afferents mediate this reflex, but they may act via pontomedullary inspiratory centers, other bulbar networks, or spinal circuits. We hypothesized that altered chemical drive to breathe would alter the initial inhibitory reflex if the neural pathways involve inspiratory medullary centers. Inspiration was transiently loaded in 11 subjects during spontaneous hypercapnic hyperpnea and matched voluntary hyperventilation. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally from scalene muscles with surface electrodes. The latencies of the initial inhibitory response (IR) onset (32 +/- 0.7 and 38 +/- 1 ms for spontaneous and voluntary conditions respectively, P < 0.001) and subsequent excitatory response (ER) onset (80 +/- 2.9 and 78 +/- 2.6 ms, respectively, P = 0.46) and the normalized sizes of IR (65 +/- 2 and 67 +/- 3%, respectively, P = 0.50) and ER (51 +/- 8 and 69 +/- 6%, respectively, P = 0.005) were measured. Mean end-tidal Pco(2) was 43 +/- 1.5 Torr with dead space ventilation and was 14 +/- 0.6 Torr with matched voluntary hyperventilation (P < 0.001). A mean minute volume >30 liters was achieved in both conditions. The absence of significant difference in the size of the IR suggested that the IR reflex arc does not transit the brain stem inspiratory centers and that the reflex may be integrated at a spinal level. In voluntary hyperventilation, an initial excitation occurred more frequently and, consequently, the IR onset latency was significantly longer. The size of the later ER was also greater during voluntary hyperventilation, which is consistent with it being mediated via longer, presumably cortical, pathways, which are influenced by voluntary drive. PMID:20395542

  19. Neonatal suck reflex pattern does not predict apnea.

    PubMed

    Richards, S D; Ritchie, S; Hobbs, G R; Mandich, M; Sheth, R D

    1999-09-01

    Respiration and suck are gestational age-dependent reflexes modulated in the brain stem. To determine if the suck reflex pattern could be used to predict apnea, the relationship between the two was examined in 28 neonates. The suck reflex was quantified with respect to burst-pause rhythm, amplitude of negative suck pressure, and synchrony of the negative-positive pressure. Apneas were counted 5 days prior to and following measurement of the suck reflex pattern. Increasing gestational age correlated with a lower frequency of apnea (P < .01) and higher suck scores (P < .01). A mature suck reflex pattern, however, failed to predict the occurrence of apnea. PMID:10488908

  20. Modulation of the initial light reflex during affective picture viewing.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Robert R; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    An initial reflexive constriction of the pupil to stimulation-the light reflex-is primarily modulated by brightness, but is attenuated when participants are under threat of shock (i.e., fear-inhibited light reflex). The present study assessed whether the light reflex is similarly attenuated when viewing emotional pictures. Pupil diameter was recorded while participants viewed erotic, violent, and neutral scenes that were matched in brightness; scrambled versions identical in brightness were also presented as an additional control. Compared to viewing neutral scenes, the light reflex was reliably modulated by hedonic content, with significant attenuation both when viewing unpleasant as well as pleasant pictures. No differences in the light reflex were found among scrambled versions. Thus, emotional modulation of the initial light reflex is not confined to a context of fear and is not indicative of brightness differences when viewing pictures of natural scenes. PMID:24849784

  1. Modulation of the initial light reflex during affective picture viewing

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Robert R.; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    An initial reflexive constriction of the pupil to stimulation – the light reflex – is primarily modulated by brightness, but is attenuated when participants are under threat of shock (e.g. "fear-inhibited light reflex").The present study assessed whether the light reflex is similarly attenuated when viewing emotional pictures. Participants viewed erotic, violent, and neutral scenes that were matched in brightness; as an additional control, scrambled versions identical in brightness were also presented. Compared to viewing neutral scenes, the light reflex was reliably modulated by hedonic content, with significant attenuation both when viewing unpleasant, as well as pleasant, pictures. No differences in the light reflex were found among scrambled versions. Modulation of the initial light reflex is therefore not confined to a context of fear, and also is not indicative of differences in brightness when viewing pictures of natural scenes. PMID:24849784

  2. Yaw sensory rearrangement alters pitch vestibulo-ocular reflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropoulos, A. E.; Wall, C. 3rd; Oman, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten male subjects underwent two types of adaptation paradigm designed either to enhance or to attenuate the gain of the canal-ocular reflex (COR), before undergoing otolith-ocular reflex (OOR) testing with constant velocity, earth horizontal axis and pitch rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stimulus that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity or phase and was designed to produce short-term changes in the COR. Preadaptation and postadaptation OOR tests occurred at a constant velocity of 60 degrees/sec in the dark and produced a modulation component of the slow phase velocity with a frequency of 0.16 Hz due to otolithic stimulation by the sinusoidally changing gravity vector. Of the seven subjects who showed enhancement of the COR gain, six also showed enhancement of the OOR modulation component. Of the seven subjects who showed attenuation of the COR gain, five also showed attenuation of the OOR modulation component. The probability that these two cross-axis adaptation effects would occur by chance is less than 0.02. This suggests that visual-vestibular conditioning of the yaw axis COR also induced changes in the pitch axis OOR. We thus postulate that the central nervous system pathways that process horizontal canal yaw stimuli have elements in common with those processing otolithic stimuli about the pitch axis.

  3. Hoffmann reflex is increased after 14 days of daily repeated Achilles tendon vibration for the soleus but not for the gastrocnemii muscles.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Pérot, Chantal

    2012-02-01

    In a previous study, Achilles tendon vibrations were enough to improve the triceps surae (TS) activation capacities and also to slightly increase TS Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) obtained by summing up soleus (Sol) and gastrocnemii (GM and GL) EMGs. The purpose of the present study was to analyze separately Sol and GM or GL reflexes to account for different effects of the vibrations on the reflex excitability of the slow soleus and of the gastrocnemii muscles. A control group (n = 13) and a vibration group (n = 16) were tested in pre-test and post-test conditions. The Achilles tendon vibration program consisted of 1 h of daily vibration (frequency: 50 Hz) applied during 14 days. Maximal Sol, GM and GL H-reflexes, and M-waves were recorded, and their H(max)/M(max) ratios gave the index of reflex excitability. After the vibration protocol, only Sol H(max)/M(max) was enhanced (p < 0.001). The enhanced Sol reflex excitability after vibration is in favor of a decrease in the pre-synaptic inhibition due to the repeated vibrations and the high solicitation of the reflex pathway. Those results of a short period of vibration applied at rest may be limited to the soleus because of its high density in muscle spindles and slow motor units, both structures being very sensitive to vibrations. PMID:22148919

  4. Effects of exercise pressor reflex activation on carotid baroreflex function during exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, K. M.; Fadel, P. J.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Smith, S. A.; Querry, R. G.; Raven, P. B.; Secher, N. H.

    2001-01-01

    1. This investigation was designed to determine the contribution of the exercise pressor reflex to the resetting of the carotid baroreflex during exercise. 2. Ten subjects performed 3.5 min of static one-legged exercise (20 % maximal voluntary contraction) and 7 min dynamic cycling (20 % maximal oxygen uptake) under two conditions: control (no intervention) and with the application of medical anti-shock (MAS) trousers inflated to 100 mmHg (to activate the exercise pressor reflex). Carotid baroreflex function was determined at rest and during exercise using a rapid neck pressure/neck suction technique. 3. During exercise, the application of MAS trousers (MAS condition) increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma noradrenaline concentration (dynamic exercise only) and perceived exertion (dynamic exercise only) when compared to control (P < 0.05). No effect of the MAS condition was evident at rest. The MAS condition had no effect on heart rate (HR), plasma lactate and adrenaline concentrations or oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise. The carotid baroreflex stimulus-response curve was reset upward on the response arm and rightward to a higher operating pressure by control exercise without alterations in gain. Activation of the exercise pressor reflex by MAS trousers further reset carotid baroreflex control of MAP, as indicated by the upward and rightward relocation of the curve. However, carotid baroreflex control of HR was only shifted rightward to higher operating pressures by MAS trousers. The sensitivity of the carotid baroreflex was unaltered by exercise pressor reflex activation. 4. These findings suggest that during dynamic and static exercise the exercise pressor reflex is capable of actively resetting carotid baroreflex control of mean arterial pressure; however, it would appear only to modulate carotid baroreflex control of heart rate.

  5. Respiratory reflexes in the anesthetized miniature swine.

    PubMed

    Adams, L; Schneider, D A; Schertel, E R; Strong, E B; Green, J F

    1987-12-01

    To assess the suitability of the miniature swine for studies of the control of breathing we evaluated the response of these animals to commonly used respiratory stimuli. Hanford miniature pigs were anesthetized with alpha chloralose and allowed to breathe spontaneously. Rapid lung inflations induced a prolonged expiratory pause proportional to load. Mechanical stimulation of the upper airways induced coughing. Central venous injections of C-fiber stimulants produced bradycardia, hypotension with apnea and/or rapid shallow breathing. CO2 rebreathing increased ventilation primarily through an increase in tidal volume; inspiratory time was not changed. Bilateral vagotomy caused a slower, deeper pattern of breathing, and significantly attenuated the ventilatory response to CO2; all other reflexes were abolished by vagotomy. Cooling the vagus nerves caused reversible blockade of the cough, inflation and C-fiber mediated reflexes in that order. We conclude that the pig can serve as a useful animal in which to study the control of breathing. PMID:3120264

  6. Extremal Transitions from Nested Reflexive Polytopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, Karl

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we look at the question of when an inclusion of reflexive polytopes determines a torically-defined extremal transition between smooth Calabi-Yau hypersurface families. We show this is always possible in dimensions two and three. However, in dimensions four and higher, obstructions can occur. This leads to a smooth projective family of Calabi-Yau threefolds that is birational to one of Batyrev's hypersurface families, but topologically distinct from all such families.

  7. The effect of distraction strategies on pain perception and the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex).

    PubMed

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Kreusch, Annette; Albers, Christoph; Sommer, Jens; Marziniak, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Distraction from pain reduces pain perception, and imaging studies have suggested that this may at least partially be mediated by activation of descending pain inhibitory systems. Here, we used the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) to directly quantify the effects of different distraction strategies on basal spinal nociception and its temporal summation. Twenty-seven healthy subjects participated in 3 distraction tasks (mental imagery, listening to preferred music, spatial discrimination of brush stimuli) and, in a fourth task, concentrated on the painful stimulus. Results show that all 3 distraction tasks reduced pain perception, but only the brush task also reduced the RIII reflex. The concentration-on-pain task increased both pain perception and the RIII reflex. The extent of temporal summation of pain perception and the extent of temporal summation of the RIII reflex were not affected by any of the tasks. These results suggest that some, but not all, forms of pain reduction by distraction rely on descending pain inhibition. In addition, pain reduction by distraction seems to preferentially affect mechanisms of basal nociceptive transmission, not of temporal summation. PMID:21925793

  8. Acceleration dependence and task-specific modulation of short- and medium-latency reflexes in the ankle extensors

    PubMed Central

    Finley, James M; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Perreault, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Involuntary responses to muscle stretch are often composed of a short-latency reflex (SLR) and more variable responses at longer latencies such as the medium-latency (MLR) and long-latency stretch reflex (LLR). Although longer latency reflexes are enhanced in the upper limb during stabilization of external loads, it remains unknown if they have a similar role in the lower limb. This uncertainty results in part from the inconsistency with which longer latency reflexes have been observed in the lower limb. A review of the literature suggests that studies that only observe SLRs have used perturbations with large accelerations, possibly causing a synchronization of motoneuron refractory periods or an activation of force-dependent inhibition. We therefore hypothesized that the amplitude of longer latency reflexes would vary with perturbation acceleration. We further hypothesized that if longer latency reflexes were elicited, they would increase in amplitude during control of an unstable load, as has been observed in the upper limb. These hypotheses were tested at the ankle while subjects performed a torque or position control task. SLR and MLR reflex components were elicited by ankle flexion perturbations with a fixed peak velocity and variable acceleration. Both reflex components initially scaled with acceleration, however, while the SLR continued to increase at high accelerations, the MLR weakened. At accelerations that reliably elicited MLRs, both the SLR and MLR were reduced during control of the unstable load. These findings clarify the conditions required to elicit MLRs in the ankle extensors and provide additional evidence that rapid feedback pathways are downregulated when stability is compromised in the lower limb. PMID:24303134

  9. Tendon-reflex testing in chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kuruoglu, H R; Oh, S J

    1994-02-01

    We studied the tendon reflex (T-reflex) in 26 patients with acquired chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy (CDN), including 22 with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). In 7 patients reflexes were brisk or normal on clinical testing. The height adjusted T-reflex was abnormal in 25 (96%) cases, including 6 of 7 patients with brisk or normal reflexes on clinical testing. Mean latency (P < 0.01) and duration (P < 0.05) of the ankle and patellar tendon reflexes were significantly prolonged in the CIDP patients when compared to the controls. Mean latency in the CIDP patients was 152% of normal means. In 7 CIDP patients, the T-reflex latencies were prolonged beyond 150% of normal means. Thus, the T-reflex test is abnormal in a majority of patients with CDN, even in the presence of well-preserved clinical reflexes, and the T-reflex latency is a useful indicator of the presence of a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy in some patients. PMID:8114782

  10. Influence of Age on Patellar Tendon Reflex Response

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Annapoorna; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Tham, Lai Kuan; Lim, Kheng Seang; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Background A clinical parameter commonly used to assess the neurological status of an individual is the tendon reflex response. However, the clinical method of evaluation often leads to subjective conclusions that may differ between examiners. Moreover, attempts to quantify the reflex response, especially in older age groups, have produced inconsistent results. This study aims to examine the influence of age on the magnitude of the patellar tendon reflex response. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted using the motion analysis technique with the reflex responses measured in terms of knee angles. Forty healthy subjects were selected and categorized into three different age groups. Patellar reflexes were elicited from both the left and right patellar tendons of each subject at three different tapping angles and using the Jendrassik maneuver. The findings suggested that age has a significant effect on the magnitude of the reflex response. An angle of 45° may be the ideal tapping angle at which the reflex can be elicited to detect age-related differences in reflex response. The reflex responses were also not influenced by gender and were observed to be fairly symmetrical. Conclusions/Significance Neurologically normal individuals will experience an age-dependent decline in patellar reflex response. PMID:24260483

  11. Basic Gravitational Reflexes in the Larval Frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine how a primitive vertebrate, the bullfrog tadpole, is able to sense and process gravitational stimuli. Because of the phylogenetic similarities of the vestibular systems in all vertebrates, the understanding of the gravitational reflexes in this relatively simple vertebrate should elucidate a skeletal framework on a elementary level, upon which the more elaborate reflexes of higher vertebrates may be constructed. The purpose of this study was to understand how the nervous system of the larval amphibian processes gravitational information. This study involved predominantly electrophysiological investigations of the isolated, alert (forebrain removed) bullfrog tadpole head. The focus of these experiments is threefold: (1) to understand from whole extraocular nerve recordings the signals sent to the eye following static gravitational tilt of the head; (2) to localize neuronal centers responsible for generating these signals through reversible pharmacological ablation of these centers; and (3) to record intracellularly from neurons within these centers in order to determine the single neuron's role in the overall processing of the center. This study has provided information on the mechanisms by which a primitive vertebrate processes gravitational reflexes.

  12. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses (NSBRI Neurovestibular Project 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark; Goldberg, Jefim; Minor, Lloyd B.; Paloski, William H.; Young, Laurence R.; Zee, David S.

    1999-01-01

    Impairment of gaze and head stabilization reflexes can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force (gif) environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive capabilities of these mechanisms. We wish to determine to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others, and to what extent gravity serves as a context cue for inhibiting such transfer. We use the general approach of adapting a response (saccades, vestibuloocular reflex: VOR, or vestibulocollic reflex: VCR) to a particular change in gain or phase in one gif condition, adapting to a different gain or phase in a second gif condition, and then seeing if gif itself - the context cue - can recall the previously-learned adapted responses. Previous evidence indicates that unless there is specific training to induce context-specificity, reflex adaptation is sequential rather than simultaneous. Various experiments in this project investigate the behavioral properties, neurophysiological basis, and anatomical substrate of context-specific learning, using otolith (gravity) signals as a context cue. In the following, we outline the methods for all experiments in this project, and provide details and results on selected experiments.

  13. A STUDY OF THE HERING-BREUER REFLEX.

    PubMed

    Moore, R L

    1927-10-31

    1. Cutting one vagus nerve, while recording the pulmonary ventilation of each lung separately, has no unique effect on the ventilation of the denervated lung. Both lungs respond to unilateral vagotomy by an equivalent slowing and deepening of respiratory movement. 2. When the bronchus to one lung is blocked the first effect is a slowing and deepening of the respiratory movements recorded by the opposite lung. As oxygen want develops these movements become rapid and shallow. 3. With a combination of these two conditions, i.e., when the bronchus to one lung is blocked and its vagus nerve is severed, the pulmonary ventilation recorded by the opposite lung exhibits the same changes as may result from unilateral vagotomy alone, unaccompanied by occlusion of the bronchus. 4. From these facts it may be concluded that the slowing and deepening of breathing which follows unilateral vagotomy does not depend for its occurrence upon the passage of air in and out of the bronchus of the lung whose vagus nerve has been sectioned. 5. The slowing of respirations after occlusion of the bronchus to one lung and section of the corresponding vagus nerve still occurs even though the phrenic nerve on the same side has been divided. This indicates that the slowing of respirations following unilateral vagotomy does not depend on the movements of the diaphragm on the side of vagal section. 6. When the pulmonary artery to one lung has been ligated and the vagus nerve on the same side cut, the response of the other lung is the same as has been described, namely, its respiratory movements become slower and deeper. This is taken as evidence that the results of unilateral vagotomy are not dependent upon an intact pulmonary circulation. 7. The general conclusions from these experiments are that the slowing and deepening of respirations following unilateral vagotomy do not depend upon: (a) Passage of air in and out of the trachea. (b) Expansion and collapse of the lung. (c) Existence of a normal pulmonary circulation in the vagotomized lung. (d) Normal fluctuations in alveolar carbon dioxide tension, (e) Contraction and relaxation of the diaphragm on the side of vagotomy. 8. The slowing and deepening of respirations, alluded to, may be presumed to indicate that a normal reflex (the Hering-Breuer reflex) has been interrupted. Since this interruption occurs in spite of all the conditions enumerated under Paragraph 7, we must conclude that none of these conditions is essential to the existence of this reflex. PMID:19869374

  14. Assessment of hyperactive reflexes in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dali; Guo, Xin; Yang, Chung-Yong; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (G tr), contraction rate (R c ), and reflex loop time delay (t d ). It was found that there are significant increases in G tr and R c and decrease in t d in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  15. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr), contraction rate (Rc), and reflex loop time delay (td). It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  16. The exercise pressor reflex and peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Audrey J.; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    The exercise pressor reflex contributes to increases in cardiovascular and ventilatory function during exercise. These reflexive increases are caused by both mechanical and metabolic stimulation of Group III and IV afferents with endings in contracting skeletal muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex. Recently, an animal model of PAD was established which allows further investigation of possible mechanisms involved in this augmented reflex. Earlier studies have identified ASIC3 channels, bradykinin receptors, P2X receptors, endoperoxide receptors, and thromboxane receptors as playing a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in healthy rats. This review focuses on recent studies using a rat model of PAD in order to determine possible mechanisms contributing to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex seen in patients with this disease. PMID:25458431

  17. Exteroceptive vibration-induced finger flexion reflex in man.

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, G; Hagbarth, K E; Torebjörk, E

    1978-01-01

    A tonic finger flexion reflex, induced by mechanical vibration (100 Hz) of the fingers, was studied in 20 healthy subjects. The outcome of nerve blocking experiments indicated that the reflex is mainly exteroceptive, distinct from the tonic vibration reflex of muscle spindle origin. Mechanoreceptors with fast conducting nerve fibres in the distal phalanx seem to constitute the major afferent source. We suggest that afferent signals from such receptors by a feedback mechanism can influence the motor performance of the exploring fingers. PMID:149183

  18. Gating of trigemino-facial reflex from low-threshold trigeminal and extratrigeminal cutaneous fibres in humans.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Scarpini, C

    1992-09-01

    Changes in the size of the test components (R1 and R2) of the trigemino-facial reflex were studied after electrical subliminal conditioning stimulation were applied to the trigeminal, median and sural nerves. After conditioning activation of the trigeminal nerve (below the reflex threshold), the early R1 reflex component showed phasic facilitation, peaking at about 50 ms of interstimulus delay, followed by a long-lasting inhibition recovering at 300-400 ms. The same conditioning stimulation resulted in a monotonic inhibition of the late R2, starting at 15-20 ms, with a maximum at 100-150 ms and lasting 300-400 ms. Intensity threshold for both the R1 and R2 changes ranged from 0.90 to 0.95 times the perception threshold. A similar longlasting inhibition of the R2 reflex response was also seen after conditioning stimulation applied to low-threshold cutaneous afferents of the median and sural nerves. The minimum effective conditioning-test interval was 25-30 ms and 40-45 ms respectively and lasted 600-700 ms. By contrast the early R1 reflex response exhibited a slight long-lasting facilitation with a time course similar to that of the R2 inhibition. The threshold intensity to obtain facilitation of the R1 and inhibition of the R2 test responses after conditioning volley in the median and sural nerves was similar and ranged from 0.9 to 1.2 times the perception threshold. These results demonstrate that low-threshold cutaneous afferents from trigeminal and limb nerves exert powerful control on trigeminal reflex pathways, probably via a common neural substrate. There is evidence that, in addition to any post-synaptic mechanism which might be operating, presynaptic control is a primary factor contributing to these changes. PMID:1328539

  19. The "where is it?" reflex: autoshaping the orienting response.

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, G

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this review is to compare two divergent lines of research on signal-centered behavior: the orienting reflex (OR) and autoshaping. A review of conditioning experiments in animals and humans suggests that the novelty hypothesis of the OR is no longer tenable. Only stimuli that represent biological "relevance" elicit ORs. A stimulus may be relevant a priori (i.e., unconditioned) or as a result of conditioning. Exposure to a conditioned stimulus (CS) that predicts a positive reinforcer causes the animal to orient to it throughout conditioning. Within the CS-US interval, the initial CS-directed orienting response is followed by US-directed tendencies. Experimental evidence is shown that the development and maintenance of the conditioned OR occur in a similar fashion both in response-independent (classical) and response-dependent (instrumental) paradigms. It is proposed that the conditioned OR and the signal-directed autoshaped response are identical. Signals predicting aversive events repel the subject from the source of the CS. It is suggested that the function of the CS is not only to signal the probability of US occurrence, but also to serve as a spatial cue to guide the animal in the environment. PMID:7097153

  20. Re-examination of the role of the human acoustic stapedius reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Dennis P.; Stuart, Andrew; Carpenter, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The ``rollover'' seen in the word recognition performance scores of patients with Bell's palsy (facial nerve paralysis) has historically been taken as an indicator of the role of the stapedius reflex in the protection from upward spread of masking. Bell's palsy, however, may be a polyneuropathy, so it is not clear that the poor word recognition performance at high levels is necessarily attributable specifically to impaired facial nerve function. The present article reports two new experiments that probe whether an isolated impairment of the stapedius reflex can produce rollover in word recognition performance-intensity functions. In experiment 1, performance-intensity functions for monosyllabic speech materials were obtained from ten normal listeners under two listening conditions: normal and low-frequency augmented to offset the effects of the stapedius reflex on the transmission of low-frequency vibrations to the cochlea. There was no effect of the spectral augmentation on word recognition for stimulus levels up to 107 dB SPL. In experiment 2, six patients who had undergone stapedectomy were tested for rollover using performance-intensity functions. None of the patients showed rollover in their performance-intensity functions, even at stimulus levels in excess of 100 dB HL. These data suggest that if the stapedius reflex has a role in protection from upward spread of masking, then this role is inconsequential for word recognition in quiet.

  1. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Stabilization of the eyes and head during body movements is important for maintaining balance and keeping the images of objects stationary on our retinas. Impairment of this ability can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. In the absence of a normal earth gravity field, the dynamics of head stabilization, and the interpretation of vestibular signals that sense gravity and linear acceleration, are subject to change. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive mechanisms that maintain these reflexive abilities. It is vitally important to determine human adaptive capabilities in such a circumstance, so that we can know to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others. Our work lays the foundation for understanding these capabilities, and for determining how we can aid the processes of adaptation and readaptation. An integrated set of experiments addresses this issue. We use the general approach of adapting some type of reflexive eye movement (saccades, the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR), the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR)), or the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR), to a particular change in gain or phase in one condition of gravitoiner-tial force, and adapting to a different gain or phase (or asking for no change) in a second gravitoinertial force condition, and then seeing if the gravitoinertial force itself - the context cue - can recall the previously learned adapted responses. The majority of the experiments in the laboratory use the direction of vertical gaze or the direction of gravity (head tilt) as the context cue. This allows us to study context-specificity in a ground-based setting. One set of experiments, to be performed in parabolic flight, specifically uses the magnitude of gravitoinertial force as a context cue. This is a much better analog of the situation encountered in space flight. Various experiments investigate the behavioral properties, neurophysiological basis, and anatomical substrate of context-specific learning mechanisms. We use otolith (gravity) signals as the contextual cue for switching between adapted states of the saccadic system, the angular and linear vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and the VCR. (By LVOR we mean the oculomotor response - horizontal, vertical, and torsional - to linear translation of the head and body.) We are studying the effect of context on adaptation of saccade gain, phase and gain of the AVOR and LVOR, on ocular counterrolling (OCR) in response to static head tilt, and on head/neck reflexes (VCR) in response to rotation in different orientations. Such research is particularly germane to potential problems of postural and oculomotor control upon exposure to different gravitational environments.

  2. Methodological Reflexivity: Towards Evolving Methodological Frameworks through Critical and Reflexive Deliberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Glenda

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author argues for a central and critical role for "reflexivity in research" with the aim of developing and strengthening not only everyone's understanding of what everyone does in environmental education research, but also how, and why everyone does it. In a narrative account of methodological issues that occurred within, and…

  3. Bourdieu's Reflexive Sociology and "Spaces of Points of View": Whose Reflexivity, Which Perspective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenway, Jane; McLeod, Julie

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers Bourdieu's concepts of perspectivism and reflexivity, looking particularly at how he develops arguments about these in his recent work, The Weight of the World (1999) and Pascalian Meditations (2000b). We explicate Bourdieu's distinctive purposes and deployment of these terms and approaches, and discuss how this compares with…

  4. Multi-MA reflex triode research.

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Riordan, John C.; Allen, Raymond J.; Goyer, John R.; Murphy, Donald P.; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef

    2010-08-01

    The Reflex Triode can efficiently produce and transmit medium energy (10-100 keV) x-rays. Perfect reflexing through thin converter can increase transmission of 10-100 keV x-rays. Gamble II experiment at 1 MV, 1 MA, 60 ns - maximum dose with 25 micron tantalum. Electron orbits depend on the foil thickness. Electron orbits from LSP used to calculate path length inside tantalum. A simple formula predicts the optimum foil thickness for reflexing converters. The I(V) characteristics of the diode can be understood using simple models. Critical current dominates high voltage triodes, bipolar current is more important at low voltage. Higher current (2.5 MA), lower voltage (250 kV) triodes are being tested on Saturn at Sandia. Small, precise, anode-cathode gaps enable low impedance operation. Sample Saturn results at 2.5 MA, 250 kV. Saturn dose rate could be about two times greater. Cylindrical triode may improve x-ray transmission. Cylindrical triode design will be tested at 1/2 scale on Gamble II. For higher current on Saturn, could use two cylindrical triodes in parallel. 3 triodes in parallel require positive polarity operation. 'Triodes in series' would improve matching low impedance triodes to generator. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Physics of reflex triodes from Gamble II experiments (1 MA, 1 MV) - (a) Converter thickness 1/20 of CSDA range optimizes x-ray dose; (b) Simple model based on electron orbits predicts optimum thickness from LSP/ITS calculations and experiment; (c) I(V) analysis: beam dynamics different between 1 MV and 250 kV; (2) Multi-MA triode experiments on Saturn (2.5 MA, 250 kV) - (a) Polarity inversion in vacuum, (b) No-convolute configuration, accurate gap settings, (c) About half of current produces useful x-rays, (d) Cylindrical triode one option to increase x-ray transmission; and (3) Potential to increase Saturn current toward 10 MA, maintaining voltage and outer diameter - (a) 2 (or 3) cylindrical triodes in parallel, (b) Triodes in series to improve matching, (c) These concepts will be tested first on Gamble II.

  5. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure. PMID:26500579

  6. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure. PMID:26500579

  7. Impaired H-Reflex Gain during Postural Loaded Locomotion in Individuals Post-Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing Nong; Brown, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Successful execution of upright locomotion requires coordinated interaction between controllers for locomotion and posture. Our earlier research supported this model in the non-impaired and found impaired interaction in the post-stroke nervous system during locomotion. In this study, we sought to examine the role of the Ia afferent spinal loop, via the H-reflex response, under postural influence during a locomotor task. We tested the hypothesis that the ability to increase stretch reflex gain in response to postural loads during locomotion would be reduced post-stroke. Methods Fifteen individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis and 13 non-impaired controls pedaled on a motorized cycle ergometer with specialized backboard support system under (1) seated supported, and (2) non-seated postural-loaded conditions, generating matched pedal force outputs of two levels. H-reflexes were elicited at 90°crank angle. Results We observed increased H-reflex gain with postural influence in non-impaired individuals, but a lack of increase in individuals post-stroke. Furthermore, we observed decreased H-reflex gain at higher postural loads in the stroke-impaired group. Conclusion These findings suggest an impaired Ia afferent pathway potentially underlies the defects in the interaction between postural and locomotor control post-stroke and may explain reduced ability of paretic limb support during locomotor weight-bearing in individuals post-stroke. Significance These results support the judicious use of bodyweight support training when first helping individuals post-stroke to regain locomotor pattern generation and weight-bearing capability. PMID:26629996

  8. Central and peripheral mechanisms underlying gastric distention inhibitory reflex responses in hypercapnic-acidotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, An-Fu; Longhurst, John C.

    2011-01-01

    We have observed that in chloralose-anesthetized animals, gastric distension (GD) typically increases blood pressure (BP) under normoxic normocapnic conditions. However, we recently noted repeatable decreases in BP and heart rate (HR) in hypercapnic-acidotic rats in response to GD. The neural pathways, central processing, and autonomic effector mechanisms involved in this cardiovascular reflex response are unknown. We hypothesized that GD-induced decrease in BP and HR reflex responses are mediated during both withdrawal of sympathetic tone and increased parasympathetic activity, involving the rostral (rVLM) and caudal ventrolateral medulla (cVLM) and the nucleus ambiguus (NA). Rats anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine or ?-chloralose were ventilated and monitored for HR and BP changes. The extent of cardiovascular inhibition was related to the extent of hypercapnia and acidosis. Repeated GD with both anesthetics induced consistent falls in BP and HR. The hemodynamic inhibitory response was reduced after blockade of the celiac ganglia or the intraabdominal vagal nerves with lidocaine, suggesting that the decreased BP and HR responses were mediated by both sympathetic and parasympathetic afferents. Blockade of the NA decreased the bradycardia response. Microinjection of kainic acid into the cVLM reduced the inhibitory BP response, whereas depolarization blockade of the rVLM decreased both BP and HR inhibitory responses. Blockade of GABAA receptors in the rVLM also reduced the BP and HR reflex responses. Atropine methyl bromide completely blocked the reflex bradycardia, and atenolol blocked the negative chronotropic response. Finally, ?1-adrenergic blockade with prazosin reversed the depressor. Thus, in the setting of hypercapnic-acidosis, a sympathoinhibitory cardiovascular response is mediated, in part, by splanchnic nerves and is processed through the rVLM and cVLM. Additionally, a vagal excitatory reflex, which involves the NA, facilitates the GD-induced decreases in BP and HR responses. Efferent chronotropic responses involve both increased parasympathetic and reduced sympathetic activity, whereas the decrease in BP is mediated by reduced ?-adrenergic tone. PMID:21217073

  9. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  10. A Movement Account of Long-Distance Reflexives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Rebecca Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines reflexive pronouns, such as Icelandic "sig" (Cf. Thrainsson 2007), which may be bound from outside of an infinitive clause (which I call MD "medium distance" binding) in addition to being bound locally. I propose that such reflexives are linked to their antecedents via sisterhood followed by movement: the…

  11. The proboscis extension reflex not elicited in Magachilid bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) will reflexively extend their proboscis in response to antennal stimulation with sucrose solution. For decades, the proboscis extension reflex (PER) of honey bees has been used as a tool to further the understanding of their cognitive processes, such as learning and m...

  12. Reflexive Management Learning: An Integrative Review and a Conceptual Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Richard J.; Cullen, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The scale and reach of the recent global financial has created a fresh wave of interest in exploring more sustainable forms of management. A central thrust behind this trend in the practice of management development and education has been the accentuation of reflexivity. There are many variations in how reflexivity is understood, and this article…

  13. Approaches to Reflexivity: Navigating Educational and Career Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Martin; Johnston, Brenda; Fuller, Alison

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a critical appraisal of approaches to reflexivity in sociology. It uses data from social network research to argue that Archer's approach to reflexivity provides a valuable lens with which to understand how people navigate their education and career pathways. The paper is also critical of Archer's methodology and typology of…

  14. Ethnic differences in the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR)

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M.; France, Christopher R.; Robinson, Michael E.; Logan, Henrietta L.; Geffken, Gary R.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2009-01-01

    A substantial body of literature suggests that the experience of both clinical and experimental pain differs among ethnic groups, with African Americans generally reporting greater sensitivity to chronic and experimentally induced pain when compared to non-Hispanic whites. However, no studies to date have examined nociceptive processes that may underlie these differences. The nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) is based on the measurement of stimulus-induced spinal reflexes. Prior research suggests that the NFR threshold, or RIII response, is highly correlated with subjective pain thresholds. The current study evaluated responses to the nociceptive flexion reflex in healthy young adults from two different ethnic groups: African Americans (n = 29) and non-Hispanic whites (n = 28). Perceptual responses (e.g., pain ratings) as well as physiological reflex responses (i.e., biceps femoris EMG) were assessed. Significant ethnic group differences were observed for NFR reflex threshold, with African Americans producing a reflex at lower stimulation intensities relative to non-Hispanic whites. Interestingly, verbal pain ratings at NFR threshold were not significantly different between the groups, suggesting that the lower stimulation intensities required to elicit a reflex in African–American versus non-Hispanic white participants were nonetheless perceived as similar. Psychological Involvement, Positive and Negative Mood, and Rumination were correlated with NFR threshold in a pattern that was consistent across both ethnic groups. These results extend previous research on ethnic differences in self-report measures of pain by demonstrating group differences in a nociceptive muscle reflex. PMID:17482362

  15. Reflexivity in Teams: A Review and New Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Udo; Otte, Kai-Philip; Schippers, Michaéla C; Steenfatt, Corinna

    2016-02-17

    Team reflexivity posits that the extent to which teams reflect upon and adapt their functioning is positively related to team performance. While remarkable progress has been made to provide evidence of this relationship, the underlying framework is missing elements of current theoretical streams for analyzing and describing teamwork, leaving the diversity of effects of team reflexivity often untouched. In this article, we present an update for this framework, by reviewing previous research on reflexivity, addressing gaps in the literature, and revising the original model by integrating feedback and dynamic team effectiveness frameworks for describing temporal developments of reflexivity. We furthermore propose a new dimensional structure for reflexivity, relying on prior work conceptualizing teams as information-processing systems that learn and advance through social-cognitive elements. Our model is therefore not only suitable for explaining the diverse set of relationships between team reflexivity on outcomes, but also provides valuable directions for viewing reflexivity as process that takes place during both transition and action phases of teamwork. We conclude with implications for managers, identify limitations, and propose an agenda for further research into this area. This article contributes an extended perspective relevant for further theory development and for effectively managing reflexivity in teams. PMID:26457836

  16. Role of stretch reflex in voluntary movements. [of human foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, G. L.; Agarwal, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The stretch reflex is often described as a spinal servomechanism, a device for assisting in the regulation of muscle length. Observation of the EMG response to mechanical interruption of voluntary movements fails to demonstrate a significant role for spinal reflexes at 40 msec latency. Two functional responses with latencies of 120 msec and 200 msec, implying supraspinal mediation, are observed.

  17. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting

  18. Iris Pigmentation and Fractionated Reaction and Reflex Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Bruce D.; And Others

    Behavioral measures, fractionated reaction and reflex times by means of electromyography, were used to determine if the eye color differences are found in the central or peripheral regions of the nervous system. The purpose of this research was to determine the truth of the hypothesis that dark-eyed individuals have faster reflex and reaction time…

  19. Hoffmann reflex in a rat bipedal walking model.

    PubMed

    Hosoido, Taisei; Goto, Megumi; Sano, Yukari; Mori, Futoshi; Nakajima, Katsumi; Morita, Fumio; Wada, Naomi

    2011-11-21

    The rat bipedal walking model (RBWM) refers to rats that acquired anatomical and functional characteristics for bipedal walking after the completion of a long-term motor training program. We recorded the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) of the forelimb and hindlimb in RBWM and control (not trained, normal) rats to evaluate the effects of bipedal walking on central nervous system (CNS) activity. The H-reflex recorded from the hindlimbs of the RBWM was significantly inhibited compared with that in the control. Furthermore, the inhibition of the H-reflex recorded from both forelimbs and hindlimbs by paired pulse stimulation tended to be enhanced in RBWM. These results indicate that bipedal walking or bipedal walking training cause functional changes in spinal reflex pathways in the CNS. PMID:22037504

  20. Intact Reflexive but Deficient Voluntary Social Orienting in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kirchgessner, Megan A.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Patel, Saumil S.; Sereno, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment in social interactions is a primary characteristic of people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although these individuals tend to orient less to naturalistic social cues than do typically developing (TD) individuals, laboratory experiments testing social orienting in ASD have been inconclusive, possibly because of a failure to fully isolate reflexive (stimulus-driven) and voluntary (goal-directed) social orienting processes. The purpose of the present study was to separately examine potential reflexive and/or voluntary social orienting differences in individuals with ASD relative to TD controls. Subjects (ages 7–14) with high-functioning ASD and a matched control group completed three gaze cueing tasks on an iPad in which individuals briefly saw a face with averted gaze followed by a target after a variable delay. Two tasks were 100% predictive with either all congruent (target appears in gaze direction) or all incongruent (target appears opposite from gaze direction) trials, respectively. Another task was non-predictive with these same trials (half congruent and half incongruent) intermixed randomly. Response times (RTs) to the target were used to calculate reflexive (incongruent condition RT—congruent condition RT) and voluntary (non-predictive condition RT—predictive condition RT) gaze cueing effects. Subjects also completed two additional non-social orienting tasks (ProPoint and AntiPoint). Subjects with ASD demonstrate intact reflexive but deficient voluntary gaze following. Similar results were found in a separate test of non-social orienting. This suggests problems with using social cues, but only in a goal-directed fashion, in our sample of high-functioning individuals with ASD. Such findings may not only explain inconclusive previous findings but more importantly be critical for understanding social dysfunctions in ASD and for developing future interventions. PMID:26648841

  1. The nociceptive withdrawal reflex does not adapt to joint position change and short-term motor practice

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Zachary A

    2013-01-01

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex is a protective mechanism to mediate interactions within a potentially dangerous environment. The reflex is formed by action-based sensory encoding during the early post-natal developmental period, and it is unknown if the protective motor function of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex in the human upper-limb is adaptable based on the configuration of the arm or if it can be modified by short-term practice of a similar or opposing motor action. In the present study, nociceptive withdrawal reflexes were evoked by a brief train of electrical stimuli applied to digit II, 1) in five different static arm positions and, 2) before and after motor practice that was opposite (EXT) or similar (FLEX) to the stereotyped withdrawal response, in 10 individuals. Withdrawal responses were quantified by the electromyography (EMG) reflex response in several upper limb muscles, and by the forces and moments recorded at the wrist. EMG onset latencies and response amplitudes were not significantly different across the arm positions or between the EXT and FLEX practice conditions, and the general direction of the withdrawal response was similar across arm positions. In addition, the force vectors were not different after practice in either the practice condition or between EXT and FLEX conditions. We conclude the withdrawal response is insensitive to changes in elbow or shoulder joint angles as well as remaining resistant to short-term adaptations from the practice of motor actions, resulting in a generalized limb withdrawal in each case. It is further hypothesized that the multisensory feedback is weighted differently in each arm position, but integrated to achieve a similar withdrawal response to safeguard against erroneous motor responses that could cause further harm. The results remain consistent with the concept that nociceptive withdrawal reflexes are shaped through long-term and not short-term action based sensory encoding. PMID:24555075

  2. Reflex receptive fields are enlarged in patients with musculoskeletal low back and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Biurrun Manresa, José A; Neziri, Alban Y; Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Andersen, Ole K

    2013-08-01

    Pain hypersensitivity has been consistently detected in chronic pain conditions, but the underlying mechanisms are difficult to investigate in humans and thus poorly understood. Patients with endometriosis pain display enlarged reflex receptive fields (RRF), providing a new perspective in the identification of possible mechanisms behind hypersensitivity states in humans. The primary hypothesis of this study was that RRF are enlarged in patients with musculoskeletal pain. Secondary study end points were subjective pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) thresholds after single and repeated (temporal summation) electrical stimulation. Forty chronic neck pain patients, 40 chronic low back pain patients, and 24 acute low back pain patients were tested. Electrical stimuli were applied to 10 sites on the sole of the foot to quantify the RRF, defined as the area of the foot from where a reflex was evoked. For the secondary end points, electrical stimuli were applied to the cutaneous innervation area of the sural nerve. All patient groups presented enlarged RRF areas compared to pain-free volunteers (P<.001). Moreover, they also displayed lower NWR and pain thresholds to single and repeated electrical stimulation (P<.001). These results demonstrate that musculoskeletal pain conditions are characterized by enlarged RRF, lowered NWR and pain thresholds, and facilitated temporal summation, most likely caused by widespread spinal hyperexcitability. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these pain conditions, and it supports the use of the RRF and NWR as objective biomarkers for pain hypersensitivity in clinical and experimental pain research. PMID:23707309

  3. REFLEX, a social-cognitive group treatment to improve insight in schizophrenia: study protocol of a multi-center RCT

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Insight is impaired in a majority of people with schizophrenia. Impaired insight is associated with poorer outcomes of the disorder. Based on existing literature, we developed a model that explains which processes may possibly play a role in impaired insight. This model was the starting point of the development of REFLEX: a brief psychosocial intervention to improve insight in schizophrenia. REFLEX is a 12-sessions group training, consisting of three modules of four sessions each. Modules in this intervention are: "coping with stigma", "you and your personal narrative", and "you in the present". Methods/Design REFLEX is currently evaluated in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Eight mental health institutions in the Netherlands participate in this evaluation. Patients are randomly assigned to either REFLEX or an active control condition, existing of cognitive remediation exercises in a group. In a subgroup of patients, fMRI scans are made before and after training in order to assess potential haemodynamic changes associated with the effects of the training. Discussion REFLEX is one of the few interventions aiming specifically to improving insight in schizophrenia and has potential value for improving insight. Targeting insight in schizophrenia is a complex task, that comes with several methodological issues. These issues are addressed in the discussion of this paper. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN50247539 PMID:21975132

  4. The effect of intranasal fluticasone propionate on the diving reflex in patients with non-eosinophilic non-allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Cook, J A; Hamilton, J W; Jones, A S

    1996-09-01

    The usual nasal response to head submersion in aquatic mammals is an increase in resistance to airflow, the so-called "diving reflex". Although less well-developed in humans, it is nevertheless present. It is likely to occur due to a relative increase of parasympathetic over sympathetic control of the nasal vasculature. Non-eosinophilic non-allergic rhinitis is thought to be due to a similar imbalance and we have attempted to establish whether the diving reflex is abnormal in this condition and whether intranasal fluticasone propionate for 6 weeks has any effect in modifying the nasal response. PMID:8938881

  5. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed rest period, with a return to baseline 3 to 5 days after bed rest, depending on the duration of bed rest. In addition, a relationship between CV and loss of muscle strength in the lower leg was observed post bed rest for most subjects. Immediately post-bed rest, most subjects showed decreased performance on SOTs, with the greater decrements on sway-referenced support and head movement conditions. Post-bed rest decrements were less than typically observed following spaceflight. Decrements in postural control and the stretch reflex can be primarily attributed to the unloading mechanisms this ground-based analog provides. The stretch reflex is a concise test measurement that can be obtained during the head-down phase of bed rest, as it does not interfere with the bed rest paradigm. This makes it an ideal tool that can detect, early on, whether a countermeasure is successful in preserving muscle function.

  6. Bremsstrahlung target optimization for reflex triodes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Mosher, D.; Commisso, R. J.

    2008-08-15

    The anode (tantalum) foil thickness in a reflex triode was varied from 2.5 to 250 {mu}m to maximize the dose from bremsstrahlung produced by a 1 MV, 1 MA, 100 ns electron beam. Experiments and computer simulations show that the dose is maximized for a foil thickness of about 25 {mu}m, 1/18th of the electron range computed from the continuous slowing down approximation. For foils thicker than optimum, self-absorption in the foil attenuates 10-100 keV photons, reducing the dose. For foils thinner than optimum, the dose decreases as a result of electron migration to large radius. A simple formula that predicts the optimum thickness as a function of the beam current and voltage is derived that should be applicable to a large range of experimental parameters.

  7. Focusing experiments with an inverse reflex tetrode

    SciTech Connect

    Pershing, D.E.; Golden, J.; Pasour, J.A.; Kapetanakos, C.A.

    1982-05-01

    The focusing properties of an Inverse Reflex Tetrode (IRT) used for ion beam generation have been investigated experimentally. Focusing is achieved by replacing the planar (0/sup 0/) electrodes of a standard IRT with moderately inwardly tapered electrodes (7.5, 10, and 15/sup 0/). The greatest degree of focusing is obtained with the 15/sup 0/ electrodes as determined by beam profile measurements using streak photography and nuclear activation techniques at various axial target positions. A scissoring effect is observed, due to temporal variations in generator voltage and current, that is manifested by an axial variation in the focal point with time. Calculations of proton trajectories confirm the experimental results and demonstrate the importance of self-fields within the A-K gap in determining the characteristics of an ion beam generated by an IRT.

  8. Potentiation by naloxone of pressor reflexes.

    PubMed Central

    Montastruc, J. L.; Montastruc, P.; Morales-Olivas, F.

    1981-01-01

    1 The effect of intravenous naloxone, and opiate antagonist, was studied on the pressor responses elicited by stimulation of afferent nerves (vagus and laryngeal superior nerves) in anaesthetized dogs. 2 Although naloxone (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) alone failed to modify basic blood pressure, the pressor responses induced by stimulation of either the vagus or laryngeal nerve were potentiated by naloxone. 3 Morphine (0.2 mg/kg i.v.) suppressed these two cardiovascular responses. These depressor effects of morphine were reversed by subsequent injection of naloxone (0.1 mg/kg i.v.). 4 The results suggest the involvement of endogenous opiate peptides in pressor reflexes elicited by stimulation of the afferent nerves. PMID:7272594

  9. Modeling of deep breath vasoconstriction reflex.

    PubMed

    Chalacheva, Patjanaporn; Khoo, Michael C K

    2015-08-01

    Deep breaths akin to sighs have been reported to cause peripheral vasoconstriction. Our previous simulation studies have shown that this phenomenon cannot be reproduced in existing circulatory control models without inclusion of a respiratory-vascular coupling mechanism. To better understand this "sigh-vasoconstriction reflex", we investigated the effect of spontaneous and passively induced sighs as well as spontaneous breathing on peripheral vasoconstriction during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep in human subjects. We found that both spontaneous and induced sighs caused vasoconstriction during wakefulness and sleep. The coupling between respiration and vasoconstriction is also present even in an absence of deep breaths. The coupling mechanism is largely linear with increased nonlinearity during induced sighs. Since peripheral vascular resistance modulation is known to be sympathetically mediated, investigation of this coupling could potentially allow us to assess sympathetic function through non-invasive measurements and simple interventions. PMID:26738099

  10. Vestibulospinal reflexes as a function of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Homick, J. L.; Anderson, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Data from previous manned space flights suggest that an exposure to microgravity produces significant alterations in vestibular, neuromuscular, and related sensory system functions. It is possible that the observed changes are a function of adaptation induced by altered otolith input. An experiment in Spacelab 1 was conducted with the aim to study this adaptation as it occurred in flight and after flight, and to relate the observed changes to mechanisms underlying space motion sickness. The concept was explored by making use of the anatomic pathway which links the otolith organs and spinal motoneurons. The overall sensitivity of the spinal motoneurons was tested by two related methods. One method involves the electrical excitation of neural tissue and the recording of vestibulospinal reflexes in conjunction with a brief linear acceleration. The second method is concerned with measurements of dynamic postural ataxia. Results suggest that more than a single time constant may be involved in man's ability to return to baseline values.

  11. Postural Effects on Pharyngeal Protective Reflex Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Atul; Trinder, John; Fogel, Robert; Stanchina, Michael; Patel, Sanjay R.; Schory, Karen; Kleverlaan, Darci; White, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives Pharyngeal muscle dilators are important in obstructive sleep apnea pathogenesis because the failure of protective reflexes involving these muscles yields pharyngeal collapse. Conflicting results exist in the literature regarding the responsiveness of these muscles during stable non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, variations in posture in previous studies may have influenced these findings. We hypothesized that tongue protruder muscles are maximally responsive to negative pressure pulses during supine sleep, when posterior tongue displacement yields pharyngeal occlusion. Design We studied all subjects in the supine and lateral postures during wakefulness and stable non-rapid eye movement sleep by measuring genioglossus and tensor palatini electromyograms during basal breathing and following negative pressure pulses. Setting Upper-airway physiology laboratory of Sleep Medicine Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Subjects/Participants 17 normal subjects. Measurements and Results We observed an increase in genioglossal responsiveness to negative pressure pulses in sleep as compared to wakefulness in supine subjects (3.9 percentage of maximum [%max] ± 1.1 vs 4.4 %max ± 1.0) but a decrease in the lateral decubitus position (4.1 %max ± 1.0 vs 1.5 %max ± 0.4), the interaction effect being significant. Despite this augmented reflex, collapsibility, as measured during negative pressure pulses, increased more while subjects were in the supine position as compared with the lateral decubitus position. While the interaction between wake-sleep state and position was also significant for the tensor palatini, the effect was weaker than for genioglossus, although, for tensor palatini, baseline activity was markedly reduced during non-rapid eye movement sleep as compared with wakefulness. Conclusions We conclude that body posture does have an important impact on genioglossal responsiveness to negative pressure pulses during non-rapid eye movement sleep. We speculate that this mechanism works to prevent pharyngeal occlusion when the upper airway is most vulnerable to collapse eg, during supine sleep. PMID:15532204

  12. The effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on vibratory-induced presynaptic inhibition of the soleus H reflex.

    PubMed

    Guzmn-Lpez, Jessica; Costa, Joo; Selvi, Aikaterini; Barraza, Gonzalo; Casanova-Molla, Jordi; Valls-Sol, Josep

    2012-08-01

    A single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulus (TMS) may induce contraction in many muscles of the body at the same time. This is specially the case when using the double-cone coil to obtain the motor evoked potentials in leg muscles. Even if intensity is kept below threshold for the soleus muscle, TMS induces facilitation of the soleus H reflex that is separated into two phases: the first, peaking at 10-20ms and the second, peaking at 70-90ms. We investigated the possibility that TMS-induced facilitation of the H reflex was related, at least in part, to the reafferentation volley reaching the alpha motoneuron after synchronized contraction of other muscles in the body. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of vibration on the TMS-induced facilitation of the soleus H reflex. As expected, vibration applied over the triceps tendon caused a significant reduction in H reflex amplitude: 42.46.4% of control values. When conditioned by TMS at intervals corresponding to the first phase, the H reflex was facilitated to the same extent in both conditions: with and without vibration. However, at intervals corresponding to the second facilitation phase, there was a significantly reduced facilitation with vibration. These differential effects of vibration on the two phases of the TMS-induced facilitation of the H reflex indicate a different mechanism for each facilitation phase. The first phase could result from direct corticospinal excitatory input, while the second phase might depend on inputs via Ia afferents from heteronymous muscles. PMID:22644238

  13. Emetic stimulation inhibits the swallowing reflex in decerebrate rats.

    PubMed

    Kurozumi, Chiharu; Yamagata, Ryuzo; Himi, Naoyuki; Koga, Tomoshige

    2008-06-01

    The effects of emetic stimulation on the swallowing reflex were investigated in decerebrated rats. Hypoxia, gastric distension and LiCl administration were used as emetic stimulations. The swallowing reflex was elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN, 20 Hz, 3-5 V, 0.3 ms duration) for 20 s. To examine the effect of hypoxia, nitrogen gas was inhaled under artificial ventilation. There were significantly fewer swallows during a decrease in PO(2) than under air ventilation (p<0.05). The number of swallows during 3-ml stomach distension was significantly lower than that before distension (p<0.05). Intravenous administration of LiCl (100 mg/kg) also significantly reduced the number of swallows (p<0.05). The combination of SLN stimulation and emetic stimuli occasionally produced burst activity of abdominal muscles, which might be associated with the gag reflex. Both the gag and swallowing reflexes are well known to be mediated by the nucleus of the solitary tract. The physiological roles of the gag reflex and the swallowing reflex are considered to be reciprocal. Taken together, these results suggest that emetic stimulation inhibits the swallowing pattern generator via the nucleus of the solitary tract, which in turn facilitates the gag reflex. PMID:18396466

  14. Presynaptic inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes in the lower limbs of subjects with upper motoneuron disease.

    PubMed Central

    Iles, J F; Roberts, R C

    1986-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle Ia afferents by group I afferents from the same and other muscles has been studied in the lower limbs of subjects with upper motoneuron lesions. The experiments utilised conditioning of soleus test monosynaptic reflexes during controlled voluntary contraction. The protocol was designed to isolate presynaptic inhibition from postsynaptic components. The relation between estimate of inhibition and test reflex amplitude was examined. The subjects showed less inhibition than controls at all levels of voluntary torque investigated (less than or equal 15 Nm). Two thirds had weak inhibition which did not show the decrease during muscle contraction characteristic of controls. The degree of difference from the normal situation correlated with severity of the clinical sign (weakness of voluntary ankle flexion). PMID:2943875

  15. Report on a membership audit of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Reflex Therapy (ACPIRT).

    PubMed

    Berry, Gunnel; Svarovska, Beth

    2014-08-01

    Reflex Therapy (RT), akin to reflexology, is a non-invasive physiotherapy modality approved by the UK Chartered Society of Physiotherapists. One hundred members of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Reflex Therapy (ACPIRT) participated in an audit to establish a baseline of practice. Findings indicate that experienced therapists use RT in conjunction with their professional skills to induce relaxation (95%) and reduce pain (86%) for patients with conditions including whiplash injury and chronic pain. According to 68% of respondents, RT is "very good," "good" or "as good as" orthodox physiotherapy practices. Requiring minimal equipment, RT may be as cost effective as orthodox physiotherapy with regards to duration and frequency of treatment. PMID:25129885

  16. Potential enhancement of warm x-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-07-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of war x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions. The calculation are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggest Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung which accompanies the warm x rays is a concern, then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately} 400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately} 5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  17. Potential enhancement of warm X-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.

    1995-08-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of warm x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions, for a Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) class accelerator. The calculations are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggested Jupiter diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung, which accompanies the warm x rays, is a concern then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately}400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately}5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  18. Effects of horizontal body casting on the baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, G. E.; Dickey, D. T.; Sandler, H.; Stone, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term horizontal body position on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate. Six male rhesus monkeys (6.2-9.4 kg) were given bolus injections of 4.0 microgram/kg, phenylephrine during each of the following conditions: awake, anesthetized (10 mg/kg ketamine HCl), and after beta-blockade (1 mg/kg propranolol HCl) before, 7, 14, and 28 days after being placed in a horizontal body cast. R-R interval vs. systolic arterial pressure was plotted, and the slope was determined by least-squares-fit linear regression. Baroreceptor slope was significantly reduced by 7 days of horizontal body position and remained attenuated throughout the 28-day restraint period both before and after beta-receptor blockade. These data are consistent with the thesis that prolonged exposure to a zero-gravity environment impairs autonomic reflex regulation of the cardiovascular system.

  19. Introversion and individual differences in middle ear acoustic reflex function.

    PubMed

    Bar-Haim, Yair

    2002-10-01

    A growing body of psychophysiological evidence points to the possibility that individual differences in early auditory processing may contribute to social withdrawal and introverted tendencies. The present study assessed the response characteristics of the acoustic reflex arc of introverted-withdrawn and extraverted-sociable individuals. Introverts displayed a greater incidence of abnormal middle ear acoustic reflexes and lower acoustic reflex amplitudes than extraverts. These findings were strongest for stimuli presented at a frequency of 2000 Hz. Results are discussed in light of the controversy concerning the anatomic loci (peripheral vs. central neuronal activity) of the individual differences between introverts and extraverts in early auditory processing. PMID:12374642

  20. Honey intoxication and the Bezold-Jarisch reflex.

    PubMed

    Eller, Philipp; Hochegger, Kathrin

    2010-10-01

    Food-poisonings with grayanotoxin-contaminated honey can induce atrioventricular blocks. Actually, grayanotoxin and similar neurotoxins like veratridine stimulate the unmyelinated afferent cardiac branches of the vagus nerve. Tonic inhibition of central vasomotor centres leads to a reduced sympathetic output and a reduced peripheral vascular resistance with bradycardia, continued hypotension, and peripheral vasodilation. This cardioinhibitory reflex is known as the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Recognition of the Bezold-Jarisch reflex is important, as there is no need for electric pacing, when atrioventricular blocks occur. The pharmacologically induced bradycardia and heart blocks do promptly disappear after injection of the antidote atropine. PMID:19176253

  1. Reversible abnormalities of the Hering Breuer reflex in acrylamide neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Satchell, P

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex was compared in anaesthetised rabbits before, during and after the induction of acrylamide neuropathy, and was measured as the tracheal pressure which produced 30 seconds of apnoea. After four weeks of acrylamide (400 mg/kg total dose) there was ataxia and the conduction velocity of hindlimb motor nerves was significantly reduced. At this time there was a marked and reproducible reduction in the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex. The ataxia resolved within a month of stopping acrylamide administration. Three months after the cessation of acrylamide the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex had increased significantly but had not returned to normal. PMID:2993526

  2. Effects of aging and levodopa on the laryngeal adductor reflex in rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Xu, Zengrui; Butler, Susan G.; Leng, Iris; Zhang, Tan; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an essential role in sensorimotor function, and declines with age. Previously, we found the laryngeal adductor reflex (LAR) was increased in excitation by a dopamine receptor antagonist. If this airway-protective reflex is similarly affected by aging, it will interfere with volitional control in older adults. The current study tested whether the LAR was affected by aging, and whether such deficits were reversed by levodopa administration in aging rats. We recorded thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle activity at rest and during elicitation of LAR responses by stimulation of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (iSLN) in 6-, 18- and 30-month-old rats under alpha-chloralose anesthesia. Using paired stimuli at different inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs), LAR central conditioning, resting muscle activity, and reflex latency and amplitudes were quantified. Numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) were measured using tyrosine hydroxylase staining. We found: (1) increased resting TA muscle activity and LAR amplitude occurred with fewer dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc in 18- and 30-month-old rats; (2) decreases in LAR latency and increases in amplitude correlated with reduced numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc; (3) test responses were greater at 1000 ms ISI in 18-month-old rats compared with 6-month-old rats; and (4) levodopa administration further increased response latency but did not alter muscle activity, response amplitude, or central conditioning. In conclusion, increases in laryngeal muscle activity levels and re-flex amplitudes accompanied age reductions in dopaminergic neurons but were not reversed with levodopa administration. PMID:22824541

  3. Inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes in the human lower limb.

    PubMed Central

    Iles, J F; Roberts, R C

    1987-01-01

    1. Presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle Ia afferents by afferents from the same and other muscles has been studied in the human lower limb. The experiments have utilized conditioning of test monosynaptic reflexes by vibration of both the test and other muscles. 2. The pattern of inhibition invariably includes autogenetic actions. 3. There are powerful effects from flexor to extensor Ia afferents. Actions from flexor to flexor, and from extensor to extensor, are weaker. Actions from extensors to flexors are very weak. 4. The strength of presynaptic inhibition from one muscle type to another weakens as the muscles considered become more anatomically distant. 5. The inhibition studied both by vibration and by electrical conditioning stimulation of nerves becomes weaker during voluntary isometric contraction of the test muscle. It is strongest at rest and during antagonist contraction. 6. Evidence is provided suggesting that descending control is the primary cause of this modulation of inhibition during contraction. 7. Stimulation of afferents in cutaneous nerves reduces group I presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. PMID:2958622

  4. Primitive Reflexes and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Developmental Origins of Classroom Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Myra; Houghton, Stephen; Chapman, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The present research studied the symptomatologic overlap of AD/HD behaviours and retention of four primitive reflexes (Moro, Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex [TLR], Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [ATNR], Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [STNR]) in 109 boys aged 7-10 years. Of these, 54 were diagnosed with AD/HD, 34 manifested sub-syndromal coordination,…

  5. Non-reflexive Logical Foundation for Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, N. C. A.; de Ronde, C.

    2014-12-01

    On the one hand, non-reflexive logics are logics in which the principle of identity does not hold in general. On the other hand, quantum mechanics has difficulties regarding the interpretation of `particles' and their identity, also known in the literature as `the problem of indistinguishable particles'. In this article, we will argue that non-reflexive logics can be a useful tool to account for such quantum indistinguishability. In particular, we will provide a particular non-reflexive logic that can help us to analyze and discuss this problem. From a more general physical perspective, we will also analyze the limits imposed by the orthodox quantum formalism to consider the existence of indistinguishable particles in the first place, and argue that non-reflexive logics can also help us to think beyond the limits of classical identity.

  6. Nasal Reflexes: Implications for Exercise, Breathing, and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James N.; Merck, Samantha J.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal patency, with both congestion and decongestion, is affected in a wide variety of reflexes. Stimuli that lead to nasal reflexes include exercise, alterations of body position, pressure, and temperature, neurological syndromes, and dentists. As anticipated, the vagal and trigeminal systems are closely integrated through nasobronchial and bronchonasal reflexes. However, perhaps of greater pathophysiological importance are the naso-hypopharyngea-laryngeal reflexes that become aggravated during sinusitis. None other than Sigmund Freud saw deeply beyond the facial adornment and recognized the deeper sexual tensions that can regulate nasal functions and psychoanalytical status. Wine, women and song are linked with airflow through the nose, the nose, that by any other name would still smell as sweetly. PMID:18417057

  7. Reflex epileptic mechanisms in ictogenesis and therapeutic consequences.

    PubMed

    Lin, Katia; Guaranha, Mirian; Wolf, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies of reflex epileptic mechanisms in human epilepsy using advanced methods of neurophysiology and functional neuroimaging have contributed much to elucidate pathophysiological processes of seizure generation. Whereas in lesional focal epilepsies reflex mechanisms usually relate directly to the anatomical focus, in system epilepsies they have helped to define which functional anatomical systems serving physiological function are recruited by the ictogenic mechanisms. Reflex epileptic seizures can often be prevented by avoidance or modification of triggers or by prophylactic benzodiazepine administration. Surgical options apply to focal cases. According to restricted experiences with pharmacotherapy, without controlled studies and little information on new AEDs, reflex seizures in system epilepsies appear to respond best to valproic acid and in focal epilepsies, to carbamazepine. PMID:26999567

  8. Critical Bandwidth and Sensitivity Prediction in the Acoustic Stapedial Reflex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Daniel M.; Sanders, Jay W.

    1976-01-01

    Critical bandwidth measurements and sensitivity prediction from the acoustic reflex test results were obtained on 20 adult normal-hearing and two groups of 10 adult hearing impaired Ss each representing mild-to-moderate and severe hearing loss. (Author)

  9. REFLEX MODIFICATION AND THE ASSESSMENT OF SENSORY DYSFUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In summary, reflex modification of the startle response is a technique that can provide rapid, objective, and quantitative assessments of sensorimotor function. dvantages of this technique involve the ability to test animals rapidly, test without prior training, test without util...

  10. Response characteristics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the response dynamics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex were studied during controlled rotations about an earth-horizontal axis. The results extended the frequency range to 2 Hz and identified the nonlinearity of the amplitude response.

  11. Spinal Reflexes During Postural Control Under Psychological Pressure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of psychological pressure on spinal reflex excitability. Thirteen participants performed a balancing task by standing on a balance disk with one foot. After six practice trials, they performed one nonpressure and one pressure trial involving a performance-contingent cash reward or punishment. Stress responses were successfully induced; state anxiety, mental effort, and heart rates all increased under pressure. Soleus Hoffmann reflex amplitude in the pressure trial was significantly smaller than in the nonpressure trial. This modification of spinal reflexes may be caused by presynaptic inhibition under the control of higher central nerve excitation under pressure. This change did not prevent 12 of the 13 participants from successfully completing the postural control task under pressure. These results suggest that Hoffmann reflex inhibition would contribute to optimal postural control under stressful situations. PMID:25587695

  12. Reconsidering reflexivity: introducing the case for intellectual entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Cutcliffe, John R

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author reconsiders reflexivity and attempts to examine some unresolved issues by drawing particular attention to the relationship between reflexivity and certain related phenomena/processes: the researcher's a priori knowledge, values, beliefs; empathy within qualitative research; the presence and influence of the researcher's tacit knowledge, and May's "magic" in method. Given the limitations of some reflexive activity identified in this article, the author introduces the case for greater intellectual entrepreneurship within the context of qualitative research. He suggests that excessive emphasis on reflexive activity might inhibit intellectual entrepreneurship. Wherein intellectual entrepreneurship implies a conscious and deliberate attempt on the part of academics to explore the world of ideas boldly; to take more risks in theory development and to move away from being timid researchers. PMID:12564268

  13. [Red reflex: prevention way to blindness in childhood].

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Adriana Sousa Carvalho; Cardoso, Maria Vera Lcia Moreira Leito; Lcio, Ingrid Martins Leite

    2007-01-01

    This study had as objective to investigate the result and the colour gradation of red reflex test in newborns (NB). It is a exploratory, quantitative study and the sample was 180 NB from maternity ward in Fortaleza-CE. From this, 156 showed result "no altered" and 24 "suspect". About the aspect of red reflex, 144 NB showed the same coloration in the two eyes, in 35 of this, the colour was red, in 33, orange reddish, in 46 orange colour, in 24 light yellow, in 6 yellow with whitish stains central. Of the suspect cases, the reflex was light yellow with whitish stains with lines. The nurse trained to accomplish the red reflex test can have important role at Neonatal Unit with actions about the prevention of ocular alterations in the childhood. PMID:18041554

  14. Nasocardiac reflex during aspiration and injection through a nasogastric tube: An infrequent occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Kaur, Jasleen; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Nasocardiac reflex is a relatively less discussed variant of trigeminovagal reflex where the afferent arc of the reflex is represented by any of the branches of the trigeminal nerves, and the efferent arc is via the vagus nerve. Elicitation of this reflex is commonly seen during surgical manipulation and is manifested as bradycardia or even asystole. We report a case where nasocardiac reflex was unusually observed in a patient when aspiration and injection were done through a nasogastric tube. PMID:25878434

  15. Cardiovascular Reflexes Activity and Their Interaction during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac output and arterial blood pressure increase during dynamic exercise notwithstanding the exercise-induced vasodilation due to functional sympatholysis. These cardiovascular adjustments are regulated in part by neural reflexes which operate to guarantee adequate oxygen supply and by-products washout of the exercising muscles. Moreover, they maintain adequate perfusion of the vital organs and prevent excessive increments in blood pressure. In this review, we briefly summarize neural reflexes operating during dynamic exercise with particular emphasis on their interaction. PMID:26557662

  16. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was increased in spinal cord injury and stroke patients by subject' voluntary movement.

  17. Functional principal component analysis of H-reflex recruitment curves

    PubMed Central

    Kipp, Kristof; Johnson, Samuel T; Hoffman, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to use Functional Principal Component Analysis (FPCA) to analyze Hoffman-reflex (H-Reflex) recruitment curves. Smoothed and interpolated recruitment curves from 38 participants were used for analysis. Standard methods were used to calculate three discrete variables (i.e, Hmax/Mmax ratio, Hth, Hslp). FPCA was then used to extract principal component functions (PCF’s) from the processed recruitment curves. PCF scores were calculated to determine how much each PCF contributed to an individuals’ recruitment curve. The analysis extracted three PCF’s, and three sets of PCF scores. Correlation analyses and systematic variation in the PCF scores indicated that the scores for the first PCF were primarily correlated to H-reflex threshold (Hth) and that the scores for the second and third PCF’s were correlated to H-reflex magnitude (Hmax/Mmax ratio) and slope (Hslp), respectively. In addition, results from the FPCA indicated that the first PCF explained 56.0% of the variance between all H-reflex recruitment curves, whereas the second and third PCF’s explained 24.1% and 13.0%, respectively. The high correlations indicate FPCA-derived PCF’s capture similar physiological information as the standard discrete variables and suggest that application of FPCA to H-reflex recruitment curves could be used in future studies to complement traditional analyses that investigate excitability of the motoneuron pool. PMID:21402105

  18. Nociceptive trigeminal reflexes in non-sedated horses.

    PubMed

    Veres-Nyéki, K O; Leandri, M; Spadavecchia, C

    2012-01-01

    Electrically induced reflexes can be used to investigate the physiology and pathophysiology of the trigeminal system in humans. Similarly, the assessment of the trigemino-cervical (TCR) and blink reflexes (BR) may provide a new diagnostic tool in horses. The aim of this study was to evoke nociceptive trigeminal reflexes and describe the electrophysiological characteristics in non-sedated horses. The infraorbital (ION) and supraorbital nerves (SON) were stimulated transcutaneously in 10 adult Warmblood horses in separate sessions using train-of-five electrical pulses. The current was increased gradually until the TCR threshold was found. The stimulus-response curve of the TCR was evaluated. At the same time as TCR, the BR response was also assessed. Surface electromyographic (EMG) responses were recorded from the orbicularis oculi, splenius and cleidomastoideus muscles. Latency, duration, amplitude of the reflexes and behavioural responses were analysed. Noxious electrical stimulation of the ION or SON evoked reflex EMG responses, with similar features regardless of the nerve that had been stimulated. Stimulations of increasing intensity elicited reflexes of increasing amplitude and decreasing latency, accompanied by stronger behavioural reactions, therefore confirming the nociceptive nature of the TCR. These findings provide a reference for the assessment of dysfunction of the equine trigeminal system. PMID:21664846

  19. The past, present, and future of health development campaigns: reflexivity and the critical-cultural approach.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mohan Jyoti; de Souza, Rebecca

    2008-07-01

    In contemporary society, health issues have gained increasing urgency in both political and academic spheres. Looking back at the failure of the modernist development initiatives, there is the need to realize that we live in a time of increasing sociopolitical complexity. The present moment is perhaps best understood in terms of a complex tension and linkage between the past and present, global and local, modern and postmodern. The critical-cultural approach to health campaigns is an approach that, through the reflexive interrogation of modernist assumptions underlying health communication campaigns, attempts to foreground the tensions inherent in the practice of health campaigns. This essay discusses the manner in which the critical-cultural approach interrogates modernist assumptions and provides an alternative paradigm for approaching the theory and practice of health campaigns by suggesting the necessity for reflexivity. Specifically, we discuss how the perspective interrogates the role of the media in development, the significance of culture, the locus of health responsibility, the impact of structural conditions, and the politics of knowledge, providing examples of campaigns that illustrate this reflexivity. PMID:18701997

  20. A cost minimisation and Bayesian inference model predicts startle reflex modulation across species

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.

    2015-01-01

    In many species, rapid defensive reflexes are paramount to escaping acute danger. These reflexes are modulated by the state of the environment. This is exemplified in fear-potentiated startle, a more vigorous startle response during conditioned anticipation of an unrelated threatening event. Extant explanations of this phenomenon build on descriptive models of underlying psychological states, or neural processes. Yet, they fail to predict invigorated startle during reward anticipation and instructed attention, and do not explain why startle reflex modulation evolved. Here, we fill this lacuna by developing a normative cost minimisation model based on Bayesian optimality principles. This model predicts the observed pattern of startle modification by rewards, punishments, instructed attention, and several other states. Moreover, the mathematical formalism furnishes predictions that can be tested experimentally. Comparing the model with existing data suggests a specific neural implementation of the underlying computations which yields close approximations to the optimal solution under most circumstances. This analysis puts startle modification into the framework of Bayesian decision theory and predictive coding, and illustrates the importance of an adaptive perspective to interpret defensive behaviour across species. PMID:25660056

  1. Motor neurone responses during a postural reflex in solitarious and gregarious desert locusts.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Laura M; Ott, Swidbert R; Matheson, Tom; Burrows, Malcolm; Rogers, Stephen M

    2010-08-01

    Desert locusts show extreme phenotypic plasticity and can change reversibly between two phases that differ radically in morphology, physiology and behaviour. Solitarious locusts are cryptic in appearance and behaviour, walking slowly with the body held close to the ground. Gregarious locusts are conspicuous in appearance and much more active, walking rapidly with the body held well above the ground. During walking, the excursion of the femoro-tibial (F-T) joint of the hind leg is smaller in solitarious locusts, and the joint is kept more flexed throughout an entire step. Under open loop conditions, the slow extensor tibiae (SETi) motor neurone of solitarious locusts shows strong tonic activity that increases at more extended F-T angles. SETi of gregarious locusts by contrast showed little tonic activity. Simulated flexion of the F-T joint elicits resistance reflexes in SETi in both phases, but regardless of the initial and final position of the leg, the spiking rate of SETi during these reflexes was twice as great in solitarious compared to gregarious locusts. This increased sensory-motor gain in the neuronal networks controlling postural reflexes in solitarious locusts may be linked to the occurrence of pronounced behavioural catalepsy in this phase similar to other cryptic insects such as stick insects. PMID:20416321

  2. A cost minimisation and Bayesian inference model predicts startle reflex modulation across species.

    PubMed

    Bach, Dominik R

    2015-04-01

    In many species, rapid defensive reflexes are paramount to escaping acute danger. These reflexes are modulated by the state of the environment. This is exemplified in fear-potentiated startle, a more vigorous startle response during conditioned anticipation of an unrelated threatening event. Extant explanations of this phenomenon build on descriptive models of underlying psychological states, or neural processes. Yet, they fail to predict invigorated startle during reward anticipation and instructed attention, and do not explain why startle reflex modulation evolved. Here, we fill this lacuna by developing a normative cost minimisation model based on Bayesian optimality principles. This model predicts the observed pattern of startle modification by rewards, punishments, instructed attention, and several other states. Moreover, the mathematical formalism furnishes predictions that can be tested experimentally. Comparing the model with existing data suggests a specific neural implementation of the underlying computations which yields close approximations to the optimal solution under most circumstances. This analysis puts startle modification into the framework of Bayesian decision theory and predictive coding, and illustrates the importance of an adaptive perspective to interpret defensive behaviour across species. PMID:25660056

  3. Loudness changes resulting from an electrically induced middle-ear reflex.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in order to determine the changes in loudness brought about by electro-cutaneous elicitation of the middle-ear reflex. Subjects were required to judge the relative loudness of the second of three consecutive 30-msec bursts of tone, the second tone being accompanied by an electrical shock to the external auditory meatus, capable of eliciting a contraction of the middle-ear muscles. The difference between these judgments and those of the control condition (shock on the arm) was taken to represent a measure of the attenuation provided by contraction of the middle-ear muscles. Test tones were 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 Hz at levels of 65, 75, 85, 95, and 105 dB. The results indicate that the middle-ear reflex decreases the middle-ear's transmission mainly for low-frequency sounds. The results fail to lend support to the Loeb-Riopelle hypothesis that the middle-ear reflex acts as a limiter, rather than a linear attenuator.

  4. Electroneurographic correlates of the monosynaptic reflex: experimental studies and normative data.

    PubMed Central

    Abbruzzese, M; Ratto, S; Abbruzzese, G; Favale, E

    1985-01-01

    The neurographic concomitants of the monosynaptic reflex, evoked either by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve at the popliteal fossa or by percussion of the Achilles tendon, have been recorded from the sciatic nerve in the lower and middle thigh. Neurographic recordings were characterised by two travelling waves (P1 and P2), respectively increasing and decreasing in latency in the proximal direction, that showed the same chronological trend of the propagated action potentials concurrently recorded in the dorsal and ventral spinal roots at the lumbar level. At variance with P2, the speed of propagation of the P1 volley was stimulus-related, being faster on mechanical than on electrical stimulation, probably because in the latter case the latency of the fastest afferents is overestimated. The P2 volley is subserved by alpha-efferent fibres in either case as suggested, inter alia, by the strict parallelism between the P2 volley and the monosynaptic reflex under appropriate experimental conditions. Simultaneous recordings of spinal root and sciatic nerve action potentials allowed the direct assessment of afferent and efferent conduction velocities, both in the proximal (that is from the middle thigh to the spinal recording site and vice-versa) and in the distal (that is from the lower to the middle thigh recording site and vice versa) segments of the reflex arc. As expected, the speed of propagation of impulses was significantly higher in the proximal than in the distal segments, as well as in the afferent than in efferent limb of the monosynaptic pathway. The P1-P2 time interval was longer on mechanical than on electrical stimulation, probably due to the increased spinal delay of the T versus the H reflex. The present study provides a reliable method for the direct assessment of alpha-efferent as well as of Ia afferent group fibres conduction velocity, provided that in the latter case mechanical stimuli be used. PMID:3998752

  5. Naloxone reverses inhibitory effect of electroacupuncture on sympathetic cardiovascular reflex responses.

    PubMed

    Chao, D M; Shen, L L; Tjen-A-Looi, S; Pitsillides, K F; Li, P; Longhurst, J C

    1999-06-01

    Acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) have been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a wide range of diseases and conditions, including angina pectoris and myocardial infarction. In a feline model of reflex-induced reversible myocardial ischemia, electrical stimulation of the median nerves to mimic EA (Neiguan acupoint) significantly improved ischemic dysfunction, secondary to an inhibitory effect of EA on reflex pressor effects evoked by bradykinin (BK). The central mechanism of EA's inhibitory effect in this model is unknown. Accordingly, in alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats, BK (10 micrograms/ml) was applied to the gallbladder to elicit a cardiovascular reflex response that significantly (P < 0.05) increased arterial blood pressure and heart rate; normalized systolic wall thickening (%WTh) of the left ventricle, measured by ultrasonic single-crystal sonomicrometer, increased by 31 +/- 11% (P < 0.05). After ligation of a side branch of the left anterior descending coronary artery, the reflex pressor response to BK resulted in a significant decrease of %WTh (-32 +/- 6%) in the ischemic region. When bilateral EA of the Neiguan acupoints was performed, the pressor response to BK was inhibited and regional myocardial function was significantly improved (+19 +/- 20%). The inhibitory effects of EA on blood pressure and %WTh were reversed by intravenous injection of naloxone (0.4 mg/kg; n = 9) or microinjection of naloxone (10 nM in 0.1 microliter/site; n = 14) into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM). Thus %WTh with intravenous naloxone was reduced to -13 +/- 29% (P<0.05) during stimulation of the gallbladder. Our results indicate that the inhibitory effect of EA on the BK-induced pressor response and the consequent improvement of ischemic dysfunction is dependent on the activation of opioid receptors, specifically receptors located in the rVLM. PMID:10362696

  6. ["Reflex--in a strict sense". Ivan Michajlovic Secenov and the founding myths of the 'Russian reflex empire'].

    PubMed

    Wurm, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    This paper aims to reconstruct Ivan Michajlovik Secenov's impact on reflex theory by looking at the different narratives which constitute his specific position in the history of science, where he is considered the Russian founder of a purely materialist framing of consciousness and behaviour, the father figure of objective psychology, and the predecessor of the 'great' Ivan Pavlov. I argue that Secenov himself was very much aware of the symbolic significance of the term "reflex" and that the rhetorical strategies in his opus magnum, The Reflexes of the Brain (1863), deliberately enforce the precarious twofold potential of reflexological conceptions as psycho-physiological structures as well as social programs. Also within the cultural and political settings of the 19th and 20th century, Secenov's comprehensive and multifaceted research work in the field of nerve physiology was gradually reduced to a strong, ideologically interpretable message: "All movements bearing the name of voluntary in physiology are reflex in a strict sense". PMID:19824305

  7. Artificial balancer - supporting device for postural reflex.

    PubMed

    Wojtara, Tytus; Sasaki, Makoto; Konosu, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masashi; Shimoda, Shingo; Alnajjar, Fady; Kimura, Hidenori

    2012-02-01

    The evolutionarily novel ability to keep ones body upright while standing or walking, the human balance, deteriorates in old age or can be compromised after accidents or brain surgeries. With the aged society, age related balance problems are on the rise. Persons with balance problems are more likely to fall during their everyday life routines. Especially in elderly, falls can lead to bone fractures making the patient bedridden, weakening the body and making it more prone to other diseases. Health care expenses for a fall patient are often very high. There is a great deal of research being done on exoskeletons and power assists. However, these technologies concentrate mainly on the amplifications of human muscle power while balance has to be provided by the human themself. Our research has been focused on supporting human balance in harmony with the human's own posture control mechanisms such as postural reflexes. This paper proposes an artificial balancer that supports human balance through acceleration of a flywheel attached to the body. Appropriate correcting torques are generated through our device based on the measurements of body deflections. We have carried out experiments with test persons standing on a platform subject to lateral perturbations and ambulatory experiments while walking on a balance beam. These experiments have demonstrated the effectiveness of our device in supporting balance and the possibility of enhancing balance-keeping capability in human beings through the application of external torque. PMID:22169384

  8. Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Bernard; Kozlovskaia, Inessa; Raphan, Theodore; Solomon, David; Helwig, Denice; Cohen, Nathaniel; Sirota, Mikhail; Iakushin, Sergei

    1992-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.

  9. Impaired Sacculocollic Reflex in Lateral Medullary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonhye; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine saccular dysfunction by measuring cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) and to correlate abnormality of cVEMP with results of other vestibular function tests in lateral medullary infarction (LMI). Methods: We recorded cVEMP in 21 patients with LMI documented on MRI. cVEMP was induced by a short tone burst and was recorded in contracting sternocleidomastoid muscle while patients turned their heads forcefully to the contralateral side against resistance. Patients also underwent video-oculographic recording of spontaneous, gaze-evoked and head shaking nystagmus (HSN), evaluation of ocular tilt reaction (OTR), measurement of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) tilt, bithermal caloric tests, and audiometry. Results: Nine patients (43%) showed abnormal cVEMP, unilateral in seven and bilateral in two. The cVEMP abnormalities included decreased p13–n23 amplitude in four, delayed p13/n23 responses in five, and both decreased and delayed responses in two. The abnormal cVEMP was ipsilesional in five, contralesional in two, and bilateral in two. The prevalence of OTR/SVV tilt, spontaneous nystagmus, and HSN did not differ between the patients with normal and abnormal cVEMP. Conclusion: cVEMP was abnormal in approximately half of the patients with LMI. The abnormal cVEMP indicates damage to the descending sacculocollic reflex pathway or disruption of commissural modulation between the vestibular nuclei. PMID:21415908

  10. Vergence-dependent adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Richard F.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) normally depends on the distance between the subject and the visual target, but it remains uncertain whether vergence angle can be linked to changes in VOR gain through a process of context-dependent adaptation. In this study, we examined this question with an adaptation paradigm that modified the normal relationship between vergence angle and retinal image motion. Subjects were rotated sinusoidally while they viewed an optokinetic (OKN) stimulus through either diverging or converging prisms. In three subjects the diverging prisms were worn while the OKN stimulus moved out of phase with the head, and the converging prisms were worn when the OKN stimulus moved in-phase with the head. The relationship between the vergence angle and OKN stimulus was reversed in the fourth subject. After 2 h of training, the VOR gain at the two vergence angles changed significantly in all of the subjects, evidenced by the two different VOR gains that could be immediately accessed by switching between the diverged and converged conditions. The results demonstrate that subjects can learn to use vergence angle as the contextual cue that retrieves adaptive changes in the angular VOR.

  11. Trigeminocardiac reflex and haemodynamic changes during Le Fort I osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Kiani, M T; Tajik, G; Ajami, M; Fazli, H; Kharazifard, M J; Mesgarzadeh, A

    2016-05-01

    The Le Fort I osteotomy is performed under general anaesthesia and specific haemodynamic conditions, i.e. hypotensive general anaesthesia. This study assessed the incidence of the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) during the different stages of the Le Fort I osteotomy. Forty-seven patients requiring a Le Fort I osteotomy were included. General anaesthesia was induced. In terms of haemodynamic changes, each patient's oxygen saturation (SpO2), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored by SADAAT Monitoring System and recorded during the different stages of osteotomy: before the induction of anaesthesia, before osteotomy cuts, after finishing the right pterygoid plate osteotomy, after finishing the left pterygoid plate osteotomy, and after performing down-fracture of the maxilla. No significant alteration in haemodynamic values was seen at the different stages of Le Fort I osteotomy. One patient showed arrhythmia with non-sinus junction rhythm after sinus bradycardia and two premature atrial contractions in the down-fracture stage, which led to the abrupt cessation of the procedure by the surgeon. This study showed no significant alterations in haemodynamic values during the different stages of Le Fort I osteotomy. Halting the procedure momentarily was sufficient to allow spontaneous normalization of the HR, blood pressure, and dysrhythmia. PMID:26794400

  12. Pharmacological Isolation of Cognitive Components Influencing the Pupillary Light Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauer, Stuart R.; Condray, Ruth; Pless, Misha L.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive operations can be detected by reduction of the pupillary light response. Neurophysiological pathways mediating this reduction have not been distinguished. We utilized selective blockade of pupillary sphincter or dilator muscles to isolate parasympathetic or sympathetic activity during cognition, without modifying central processes. Pupil diameter was measured during the light reaction in 29 normal adults under three processing levels: No Task, during an easy task (Add 1), or a difficult task (Subtract 7). At three separate sessions, the pupil was treated with placebo, tropicamide (blocking the muscarinic sphincter receptor), or dapiprazole (blocking the adrenergic dilator receptor). With placebo, pupil diameter increased with increasing task difficulty. The light reaction was reduced only in the Subtract 7 condition. Dapiprazole (which decreased overall diameter) showed similar task-related changes in diameter and light reflex as for placebo. Following tropicamide (which increased overall diameter), there was a further increase in diameter only in the difficult task. Findings suggest two separate inhibitory components at the parasympathetic oculomotor center. Changes in baseline diameter are likely related to reticular activation. Inhibition of the light reaction in the difficult task is likely associated with cortical afferents. Sustained sympathetic activity also was present during the difficult task. PMID:26090217

  13. H-reflex excitability is inhibited in soleus, but not gastrocnemius, at the short-latency response of a horizontal jump-landing task.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cassandra S; Schabrun, Siobhan; Marshall, Paul W

    2016-06-01

    Impaired spinal-level neuromuscular control is suggested to contribute to instability and injury during dynamic landing tasks. Despite this suggestion, spinal-level neuromuscular control is yet to be examined during a horizontal jump-landing task. The aim of the current study was to assess changes in H-reflexes and its reliability at the short-latency response of landings from short and long distances. Eight healthy individuals (five male, three female; age, 22±1.2yrs; height, 178±8.1cm; weight, 72±15.7kg) participated in the study. H-reflexes were evoked at the SLR in the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles, during two landing conditions: 25% and 50% of maximal broad jump distance. H-reflexes were expressed relative to the background electromyography (EMG) and maximal M-wave responses (M-max). Soleus H-reflexes were inhibited when landing from shorter distance (25%, 13.9±7.6%; 50%, 8.3±6.5%; p<0.01). No change in H-reflex excitability was observed in medial gastrocnemius. Background EMG was unaltered across landing conditions. Inhibition of soleus H-reflex excitability from 25% to 50% landing condition indicates a reduced contribution of Ia-afferent feedback to the alpha-motor neuron during landings from greater distances, which may contribute to stiffness regulation at the ankle joint. Unaltered H-reflex excitability of medial gastrocnemius is most likely attributed to its functional role during the landing task. PMID:26826443

  14. Hippocampal State-Dependent Behavioral Reflex to an Identical Sensory Input in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Keita; Nishikawa, Michimasa; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2014-01-01

    We examined the local field potential of the hippocampus to monitor brain states during a conditional discrimination task, in order to elucidate the relationship between ongoing brain states and a conditioned motor reflex. Five 10-week-old Wistar/ST male rats underwent a serial feature positive conditional discrimination task in eyeblink conditioning using a preceding light stimulus as a conditional cue for reinforced trials. In this task, a 2-s light stimulus signaled that the following 350-ms tone (conditioned stimulus) was reinforced with a co-terminating 100-ms periorbital electrical shock. The interval between the end of conditional cue and the onset of the conditioned stimulus was 4±1 s. The conditioned stimulus was not reinforced when the light was not presented. Animals successfully utilized the light stimulus as a conditional cue to drive differential responses to the identical conditioned stimulus. We found that presentation of the conditional cue elicited hippocampal theta oscillations, which persisted during the interval of conditional cue and the conditioned stimulus. Moreover, expression of the conditioned response to the tone (conditioned stimulus) was correlated with the appearance of theta oscillations immediately before the conditioned stimulus. These data support hippocampal involvement in the network underlying a conditional discrimination task in eyeblink conditioning. They also suggest that the preceding hippocampal activity can determine information processing of the tone stimulus in the cerebellum and its associated circuits. PMID:25397873

  15. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    PubMed

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many. PMID:23444909

  16. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during treadmill-based clinical gait analysis. PMID:26669665

  17. Aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vestibular system contributes to sympathetic activation by engagement of the otolith organs. However, there is a significant loss of vestibular function with aging. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine if young and older individuals differ in their cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to otolithic stimulation (ie, head-down rotation, HDR). We hypothesized that responses to otolithic stimulation would be attenuated in older adults because of morphological and physiological alterations that occur in the vestibular system with aging. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and head rotation were measured during HDR in 11 young (26 +/- 1 years) and 11 older (64 +/- 1 years) subjects in the prone posture. Five older subjects performed head rotation (chin to chest) in the lateral decubitus position, which simulates HDR but does not alter afferent inputs from the vestibular system. MSNA responses to HDR were significantly attenuated in older as compared with young subjects (P<0.01). MSNA increased in the older subjects by only 12 +/- 5% as compared with 85 +/- 16% in the young. Furthermore, HDR elicited significant reductions in mean arterial blood pressure in older (Delta-6 +/- 1 mm Hg; P<0.01) but not young subjects (Delta1 +/- 1 mm Hg). In contrast to HDR, head rotation performed in the lateral decubitus position did not elicit hypotension. MSNA responses to baroreceptor unloading and the cold pressor test were not different between the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans and may contribute to the increased prevalence of orthostatic hypotension with age.

  18. Driving a car using reflexive fuzzy behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Vehicle control in a-priori unknown, unpredictable, and dynamic environments requires many calculational and reasoning schemes to operate on the basis of very imprecise, incomplete, or unreliable data. For such systems, in which all the uncertainties can not be engineered away, approximate reasoning may provide an alternative to the complexity and computational requirements of conventional uncertainty analysis and propagation techniques. Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to add a fuzzy inferencing capability to real-time control systems. All inferencing rules on a chip are processed in parallel, allowing execution of the entire rule base in about 30 [mu]sec, and therefore, making control of reflex-type'' of motions envisionable. The use of these boards and the approach using superposition of elemental sensor-based behaviors for the development of qualitative reasoning schemes emulating human-like navigation in a-prioii unknown environments are discussed. We describe how the human-like navigation scheme implemented on one of the qualitative inferencing boards was installed on a test-bed platform to investigate two control modes for driving a car in a-priori unknown environments on the basis of sparse and imprecise sensor data. In the first mode, the car navigates autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver's aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up or slow down depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor charmers to perceive the environment. Simulation results as well as indoor and outdoor experiments are discussed to illustrate the feasibility and robustness of autonomous navigation and/or safety enhancing driver's aid using the new fuzzy inferencing hardware system and some human-like reasoning schemes.

  19. Gravity and Development of Cardiopulmonary Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Shunji; Eno, Yuko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    Cardio-pulmonary reflex, which our cardiac activity is synchronized to the respiration by autonomic nervous system regulation, is called as "respiratory sinus arrhythmia" and commonly found in adult. The physiological function of the espiratory sinus arrhythmia is considered to maximize the gas exchange during respiration cycle. This respiration induced heart rate variability (RHRV) is only found in mammals and avian showing a remarkable postnatal development, whereas no RHRV in aquatic species such as fish or amphibian. To elucidate our hypothesis that gravity exposure may plays a key role in the postnatal development of RHRV as well as its evolutional origin in these ground animals, we have studied effects of hypergravity (2G) on the postnatal development of RHRV using rat. Pregnant Wister rats were kept in centrifugal cages system for 38 days from 6th days of pregnant mother to have neonates until 23 days old. Electrocardiograph was recorded from the neonates in 2 to 23 days old in 2G group with simultaneous control (1G) group. The RHRV analysis was performed by calculating a component of Fourier power spectral coincide with the respiration frequency. In both groups, averaged resting heart rate gradually increase from 2 to 23 days old. When comparing the heart rate between the two groups, the 2G group indicated significantly lower (240± 8 bpm) than 1G control (326±21 bpm, p¡0.001) in 2 days old, where as no significance in 23 days old. The RHRV of 2 days old neonates in both groups indicated very small magnitude but significantly lower in 2G group than 1G control (p¡0.01). The RHRV gradually increase during the first 2 weeks and then rapid increased to reached 45 fold of magnitude in 1G control, whereas 69 fold in 2G group. The results strongly suggested that the postnatal innervation from respiration to cardiovascular centers was gravity dependent.

  20. Driving a car using reflexive fuzzy behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-10-01

    Vehicle control in a-priori unknown, unpredictable, and dynamic environments requires many calculational and reasoning schemes to operate on the basis of very imprecise, incomplete, or unreliable data. For such systems, in which all the uncertainties can not be engineered away, approximate reasoning may provide an alternative to the complexity and computational requirements of conventional uncertainty analysis and propagation techniques. Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to add a fuzzy inferencing capability to real-time control systems. All inferencing rules on a chip are processed in parallel, allowing execution of the entire rule base in about 30 {mu}sec, and therefore, making control of ``reflex-type`` of motions envisionable. The use of these boards and the approach using superposition of elemental sensor-based behaviors for the development of qualitative reasoning schemes emulating human-like navigation in a-prioii unknown environments are discussed. We describe how the human-like navigation scheme implemented on one of the qualitative inferencing boards was installed on a test-bed platform to investigate two control modes for driving a car in a-priori unknown environments on the basis of sparse and imprecise sensor data. In the first mode, the car navigates autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver`s aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up or slow down depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor charmers to perceive the environment. Simulation results as well as indoor and outdoor experiments are discussed to illustrate the feasibility and robustness of autonomous navigation and/or safety enhancing driver`s aid using the new fuzzy inferencing hardware system and some human-like reasoning schemes.

  1. Changes in somatosensory evoked potentials and Hoffmann reflexes during fast isometric contraction of foot plantarflexor in humans.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Wasaka, Toshiaki; Kida, Tetsuo; Nishimura, Yukio; Fumoto, Masaki; Sakamoto, Masanori; Takashi, Endoh

    2006-12-01

    In the present study, the extent to which the early component of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and the Hoffmann (H-) reflex induced by stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve are altered during the ascending and descending phases of fast plantarflexion was investigated. SEPSs and H-reflex of the soleus following tibial nerve stimulation were examined during fast plantarfiexion when performed by nine normal subjects. The analyses focused on differences in amplitude modulation of the P30-P40 component of SEP and the H-reflex between the ascending and descending phases of full-wave rectified and averaged soleus electromyographic (EMG) activity. The H-reflex amplitude was significantly increased and decreased during the ascending and descending phases more than under resting control conditions, respectively. The reduction of SEP amplitude was 49% for the ascending phase and 83% for the descending phases with respect to the resting situation. Modulation of SEP during the ascending and descending phases was robustly retained even during ischemic nerve blockade of large diameter afferent fibers. These findings suggest that the transmission of afferent inputs from muscle spindles to motoneurons and to the somatosensory cortex during fast isometric contraction of the plantar flexor is regulated in a time-dependent fashion by descending commands. PMID:17326514

  2. Long lasting activity of nociceptive muscular afferents facilitates bilateral flexion reflex pattern in the feline spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, E D; Steffens, H; Pilyavskii, A I; Maisky, V A; Brück, W; Dibaj, P; Sears, T A

    2015-06-01

    Chronic muscular limb pain requires the adoption of motor patterns distinct from the classic ipsilateral flexion, crossed extension and corresponding reciprocal inhibitions to acute exteroceptive stimulation. Using selective chemical activation of group III/IV afferents in gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) muscles we investigated bilaterally their reflex responses conditioned by (a) acute 'myositis' induced by intramuscular carrageenan; and (b) sub-acute 'myositis' induced by infusion of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Reflex transmission was detected by monosynaptic testing and c-fos staining used to identify increased neuronal activity. In all control experiments with chemical stimulation of group III/IV afferents, ipsilateral responses conformed to the flexor reflex pattern. However, the expected contralateral facilitation of GS motoneurones occurred in fewer than 50% trials while only 9% of trials induced contralateral inhibition of flexor posterior-biceps-semitendinosus (PBSt) motoneurones. During carrageenan acute myositis contralateral PBSt was transiently facilitated by selective activation of group III/IV afferents. During CFA-induced myositis, contralateral only inhibition of GS motoneurones occurred instead of any facilitation, while bidirectionally a crossed facilitation of PBST dominated. These reflex changes were mirrored in an enhanced number of neurones with enhanced c-fos expression. Muscle pain, particularly if chronically persistent, requires another behavioural response pattern than acute exteroceptive pain. PMID:25615850

  3. The pulse duration of electrical stimulation influences H-reflexes but not corticospinal excitability for tibialis anterior.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Alyssa R; Lou, Jenny W H; Collins, David F

    2014-10-01

    The afferent volley generated by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) influences corticospinal (CS) excitability and frequent NMES sessions can strengthen CS pathways, resulting in long-term improvements in function. This afferent volley can be altered by manipulating NMES parameters. Presently, we manipulated one such parameter, pulse duration, during NMES over the common peroneal nerve and assessed the influence on H-reflexes and CS excitability. We hypothesized that compared with shorter pulse durations, longer pulses would (i) shift the H-reflex recruitment curve to the left, relative to the M-wave curve; and (ii) increase CS excitability more. Using 3 pulse durations (50, 200, 1000 μs), M-wave and H-reflex recruitment curves were collected and, in separate experiments, CS excitability was assessed by comparing motor evoked potentials elicited before and after 30 min of NMES. Despite finding a leftward shift in the H-reflex recruitment curve when using the 1000 μs pulse duration, consistent with a larger afferent volley for a given efferent volley, the increases in CS excitability were not influenced by pulse duration. Hence, although manipulating pulse duration can alter the relative recruitment of afferents and efferents in the common peroneal nerve, under the present experimental conditions it is ineffective for maximizing CS excitability for rehabilitation. PMID:25223503

  4. Reflex control of inflammation by sympathetic nerves, not the vagus.

    PubMed

    Martelli, D; Yao, S T; McKinley, M J; McAllen, R M

    2014-04-01

    We investigated a neural reflex that controls the strength of inflammatory responses to immune challenge - the inflammatory reflex. In anaesthetized rats challenged with intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 60 μg kg(-1)), we found strong increases in plasma levels of the key inflammatory mediator tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) 90 min later. Those levels were unaffected by previous bilateral cervical vagotomy, but were enhanced approximately 5-fold if the greater splanchnic sympathetic nerves had been cut. Sham surgery had no effect, and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected by nerve sections, so could not explain this result. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that efferent neural activity in the splanchnic nerve and its splenic branch was strongly increased by LPS treatment. Splenic nerve activity was dependent on inputs from the splanchnic nerves: vagotomy had no effect on the activity in either nerve. Together, these data demonstrate that immune challenge with this dose of LPS activates a neural reflex that is powerful enough to cause an 80% suppression of the acute systemic inflammatory response. The efferent arm of this reflex is in the splanchnic sympathetic nerves, not the vagi as previously proposed. As with other physiological responses to immune challenge, the afferent pathway is presumptively humoral: the present data show that vagal afferents play no measurable part. Because inflammation sits at the gateway to immune responses, this reflex could play an important role in immune function as well as inflammatory diseases. PMID:24421357

  5. Reflex depression of cardiovascular function during lung inflation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, J H; Cassidy, S S

    1985-01-01

    These experiments were intended 1) to determine the cardiovascular reflex response initiated by lung inflation and 2) to determine the autonomic neural mechanisms that mediate the reflex responses. To test only the reflex effects of lung inflation and eliminate the associated mechanical effects thereof, we isolated the left airway and left pulmonary artery of dogs and performed static inflations of the left lung. Left lung inflation (LLI) to 30 cmH2O caused left ventricular systolic pressure, heart rate, and hindlimb vascular resistance to fall 20, 31, and 15%, respectively. When the hearts were paced to eliminate Bowditch effects, LLI caused left ventricular contractility, which was measured as dP/dt at 30 mmHg developed pressure and as the maximal rate of shortening of the contractile element, to fall 23 and 20%, respectively, and cardiac output (stroke volume) to fall 31%. Transection of the left cervical vagus nerve, interrupting most afferent and some efferent pathways from the left lung, virtually eliminated subsequent cardiovascular responses to LLI. Hindlimb vasodilation was mediated by alpha-adrenergic activity, and the fall in left ventricular contractile state was caused by a reduction in beta-adrenergic activity. The reflex bradycardia was mediated by increased cholinergic and decreased beta-adrenergic activity. These data establish that reflex mechanisms exist whereby expansion of the lung can reflexly modulate heart rate, ventricular contractility, systemic vasomotor tone, cardiac output, and stroke volume independent of the direct mechanical influence of lung expansion on these circulatory phenomena. PMID:3968003

  6. Time and direction preparation of the long latency stretch reflex.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Yasutaka; Hatanaka, Ryota; Jono, Yasutomo; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Tani, Keisuke; Chujo, Yuta; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated time and direction preparation of motor response to force load while intending to maintain the finger at the initial neutral position. Force load extending or flexing the index finger was given while healthy humans intended to maintain the index finger at the initial neutral position. Electromyographic activity was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle. A precue with or without advanced information regarding the direction of the forthcoming force load was given 1000ms before force load. Trials without the precue were inserted between the precued trials. A long latency stretch reflex was elicited by force load regardless of its direction, indicating that the long latency stretch reflex is elicited not only by muscle stretch afferents, but also by direction-insensitive sensations. Time preparation of motor response to either direction of force load enhanced the long latency stretch reflex, indicating that time preparation is not mediated by afferent discharge of muscle stretch. Direction preparation enhanced the long latency stretch reflex and increased corticospinal excitability 0-20ms after force load when force load was given in the direction stretching the muscle. These enhancements must be induced by preset of the afferent pathway mediating segmental stretch reflex. PMID:26854584

  7. Plasticity of the human otolith-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Smith, T. R.; Furman, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The eye movement response to earth vertical axis rotation in the dark, a semicircular canal stimulus, can be altered by prior exposure to combined visual-vestibular stimuli. Such plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has not been described for earth horizontal axis rotation, a dynamic otolith stimulus. Twenty normal human subjects underwent one of two types of adaptation paradigms designed either to attenuate or enhance the gain of the semicircular canal-ocular reflex prior to undergoing otolith-ocular reflex testing with horizontal axis rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stripe pattern that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity. Pre- and post-adaptation horizontal axis rotations were at 60 degrees/s in the dark and produced a modulation in the slow component velocity of nystagmus having a frequency of 0.17 Hz due to putative stimulation of the otolith organs. Results showed that the magnitude of this modulation component response was altered in a manner similar to the alteration in semicircular canal-ocular responses. These results suggest that physiologic alteration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex using deliberately mismatched visual and semicircular canal stimuli induces changes in both canal-ocular and otolith-ocular responses. We postulate, therefore, that central nervous system pathways responsible for controlling the gains of canal-ocular and otolith-ocular reflexes are shared.

  8. Comparison of operant escape and reflex tests of nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Yezierski, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Testing of reflexes such as flexion/withdrawal or licking/guarding is well established as the standard for evaluating nociceptive sensitivity and its modulation in preclinical investigations of laboratory animals. Concerns about this approach have been dismissed for practical reasons - reflex testing requires no training of the animals; it is simple to instrument; and responses are characterized by observers as latencies or thresholds for evocation. In order to evaluate this method, the present review summarizes a series of experiments in which reflex and operant escape responding are compared in normal animals and following surgical models of neuropathic pain or pharmacological intervention for pain. Particular attention is paid to relationships between reflex and escape responding and information on the pain sensitivity of normal human subjects or patients with pain. Numerous disparities between results for reflex and operant escape measures are described, but the results of operant testing are consistent with evidence from humans. Objective reasons are given for experimenters to choose between these and other methods of evaluating the nociceptive sensitivity of laboratory animals. PMID:25660956

  9. Processing the Chinese Reflexive “ziji”: Effects of Featural Constraints on Anaphor Resolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao; Kaiser, Elsi

    2016-01-01

    We present three self-paced reading experiments that investigate the reflexive ziji “self” in Chinese—in particular, we tested whether and how person-feature-based blocking guides comprehenders' real-time processing and final interpretation of ziji. Prior work claims that in Chinese sentences like “John thought that {I/you/Bill} did not like ZIJI,” (i) the reflexive ziji can refer to the matrix subject John if the intervening subject is also a third person entity (e.g., Bill), but that (ii) an intervening first or second person pronoun blocks reference to the matrix subject, causing ziji to refer to the first or second person pronoun. However, native speakers' judgments regarding the accessibility of long-distance antecedents are rather unstable, and researchers also disagree on what the exact configurations are that allow blocking. In addition, many open questions persist regarding the real-time processing of reflexives more generally, in particular regarding the accessibility (or lack thereof) of structurally unlicensed antecedents. We conducted three self-paced reading studies where we recorded people's word-by-word reading times and also asked questions that probed their off-line interpretation of the reflexive ziji. People's answers to the off-line questions show that blocking is not absolute: Comprehenders do allow significant numbers of non-local choices in both the first and the second person blocking conditions, albeit in small numbers. At the same time, the reading time data, particularly those from Experiments 2 and 3, show that comprehenders use person feature cues to quickly filter out inaccessible long-distance referents. The difference between on-line and off-line patterns points to the possibility that the interpretation of ziji unfolds over time: it seems that initially, during real-time processing, person-feature cues weigh more heavily and constrain what antecedent candidates get considered, but that at some later point, other kinds of information are also integrated and perhaps outweigh the person-feature constraint, resulting in consideration of referents that were initially “blocked” due to the person-feature constraint. In sum, in addition to the structural constraints identified in prior work, person-featural cues also play a key role in regulating the on-line processing of reflexives in Chinese. PMID:27148099

  10. Central and peripheral mechanisms underlying gastric distention inhibitory reflex responses in hypercapnic-acidotic rats.

    PubMed

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Hsiao, An-Fu; Longhurst, John C

    2011-03-01

    We have observed that in chloralose-anesthetized animals, gastric distension (GD) typically increases blood pressure (BP) under normoxic normocapnic conditions. However, we recently noted repeatable decreases in BP and heart rate (HR) in hypercapnic-acidotic rats in response to GD. The neural pathways, central processing, and autonomic effector mechanisms involved in this cardiovascular reflex response are unknown. We hypothesized that GD-induced decrease in BP and HR reflex responses are mediated during both withdrawal of sympathetic tone and increased parasympathetic activity, involving the rostral (rVLM) and caudal ventrolateral medulla (cVLM) and the nucleus ambiguus (NA). Rats anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine or ?-chloralose were ventilated and monitored for HR and BP changes. The extent of cardiovascular inhibition was related to the extent of hypercapnia and acidosis. Repeated GD with both anesthetics induced consistent falls in BP and HR. The hemodynamic inhibitory response was reduced after blockade of the celiac ganglia or the intraabdominal vagal nerves with lidocaine, suggesting that the decreased BP and HR responses were mediated by both sympathetic and parasympathetic afferents. Blockade of the NA decreased the bradycardia response. Microinjection of kainic acid into the cVLM reduced the inhibitory BP response, whereas depolarization blockade of the rVLM decreased both BP and HR inhibitory responses. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors in the rVLM also reduced the BP and HR reflex responses. Atropine methyl bromide completely blocked the reflex bradycardia, and atenolol blocked the negative chronotropic response. Finally, ?(1)-adrenergic blockade with prazosin reversed the depressor. Thus, in the setting of hypercapnic-acidosis, a sympathoinhibitory cardiovascular response is mediated, in part, by splanchnic nerves and is processed through the rVLM and cVLM. Additionally, a vagal excitatory reflex, which involves the NA, facilitates the GD-induced decreases in BP and HR responses. Efferent chronotropic responses involve both increased parasympathetic and reduced sympathetic activity, whereas the decrease in BP is mediated by reduced ?-adrenergic tone. PMID:21217073

  11. ACQUISITION OF A SIMPLE MOTOR SKILL: TASK-DEPENDENT ADAPTATION PLUS LONG-TERM CHANGE IN THE HUMAN SOLEUS H-REFLEX

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A.K.; Chen, X.Y.; Wolpaw, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent plasticity occurs throughout the CNS. However, investigations of skill acquisition usually focus on cortex. To expand the focus, we analyzed in humans the development of operantly conditioned H-reflex change, a simple motor skill that develops gradually and involves plasticity in both the brain and the spinal cord. Each person completed 6 baseline and 24 conditioning sessions over 10 weeks. In each conditioning session, the soleus H-reflex was measured while the subject was or was not asked to increase (HRup subjects) or decrease (HRdown subjects) it. When the subject was asked to change H-reflex size, immediate visual feedback indicated whether a size criterion had been satisfied. Over the 24 conditioning sessions, H-reflex size gradually increased in 6 of 8 HRup subjects and decreased in 8 of 9 HRdown subjects, resulting in final sizes of 140(12)% and 69(6)% of baseline size, respectively. The final H-reflex change was the sum of within-session (i.e., task-dependent) adaptation and across-session (i.e., long-term) change. Task-dependent adaptation appeared within 46 sessions and persisted thereafter, averaging +13% in HRup subjects and ?15% in HRdown subjects. In contrast, long-term change began after 10 sessions and increased gradually thereafter, reaching +27% in HRup subjects and ?16% in HRdown subjects. Thus, the acquisition of H-reflex conditioning consists of two phenomena task-dependent adaptation and long-term change that together constitute the new motor skill. In combination with previous data, this new finding further elucidates the interaction of plasticity in brain and spinal cord that underlies the acquisition and maintenance of motor skills. PMID:19420246

  12. Current-voltage Characteristics of the high Pressure Reflex Discharge in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liziakin, Gennadii; Usmanov, Ravil

    In this paper the high pressure reflex discharge is investigated. Conditions for the discharge transition from a low-current to a high-current mode are considered. The study of the discharge is carried out in the atmosphere of helium at pressures from 1 to 35 mTorr, with a magnetic field up to 2.1 kG and voltage up to 1.2 kV. The radial profile of the potential distribution in the central plane of the discharge (perpendicular to the axis) was obtained by the isolated probe method.

  13. Desflurane attenuates the somatosympathetic reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Ganjoo, P; Farber, N E; Schwabe, D; Kampine, J P; Schmeling, W T

    1996-07-01

    Arterial blood pressure and heart rate changes after afferent somatic sensory nerve stimulation are termed the "somatosympathetic reflex" (SSR). Inhibition of the SSR may partially represent an antinociceptive action. This investigation examined the actions of the volatile anesthetic, desflurane, on the SSR evoked by peripheral nerve stimulation. Rats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose (50 mg/kg) and urethane (500 mg/kg) were mechanically ventilated and cannulated with arterial and venous catheters for monitoring arterial pressure and for fluid administration, respectively. The sciatic (n = 7) or tibial (n = 6) nerves were isolated and stimulated at one, two, and four times the voltage threshold required to elicit a change in systemic hemodynamics. These cardiovascular responses were recorded before, during, and after varying concentrations of desflurane, 1.8% (0.25 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration [MAC]), 3.6% (0.5 MAC), 7.2% (1.0 MAC), and 10.8% (1.5 MAC). Desflurane decreased arterial pressure at 1.0 and 1.5 MAC and heart rate (at more than 0.5 MAC) compared to baseline levels. Tibial nerve stimulation decreased mean arterial pressure (MAP) with no consistent changes in heart rate. Desflurane significantly attenuated this depressor response to tibial nerve stimulation (MAP decrease: control; -20 +/- 2 mm Hg versus 1.0 MAC desflurane; -6 +/- 4 mm Hg). The increases in MAP after sciatic nerve stimulation were also significantly inhibited by increasing concentrations of desflurane. At more than 0.5 MAC desflurane, the pressor response to sciatic nerve stimulation was significantly converted to a depressor response in four of seven rats (MAP: control; increase 24 +/- 2 mm Hg versus 1.0 MAC desflurane; decrease -2 +/- 4 mm Hg). Sciatic nerve stimulation also elicited increases in heart rate which were significantly attenuated by desflurane (control; 37 +/- 6 bpm versus 1.5 MAC desflurane; 0 +/- 2 bpm). These findings demonstrate that desflurane produces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression in rats and, despite previous reports of sympathoexcitation, desflurane significantly attenuated both excitatory and inhibitory types of SSR. The results of this study also support a potential antinociceptive action for this anesthetic. PMID:8659765

  14. Single Canonical Model of Reflexive Memory and Spatial Attention

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Saumil S.; Red, Stuart; Lin, Eric; Sereno, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    Many neurons in the dorsal and ventral visual stream have the property that after a brief visual stimulus presentation in their receptive field, the spiking activity in these neurons persists above their baseline levels for several seconds. This maintained activity is not always correlated with the monkey’s task and its origin is unknown. We have previously proposed a simple neural network model, based on shape selective neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex, which predicts the valence and time course of reflexive (bottom-up) spatial attention. In the same simple model, we demonstrate here that passive maintained activity or short-term memory of specific visual events can result without need for an external or top-down modulatory signal. Mutual inhibition and neuronal adaptation play distinct roles in reflexive attention and memory. This modest 4-cell model provides the first simple and unified physiologically plausible mechanism of reflexive spatial attention and passive short-term memory processes. PMID:26493949

  15. A Heart Stopping Case of the Bezold-Jarisch Reflex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Bezold-Jarisch reflex is a parasympathetic reflex induced by intense mechanical stimulation of the ventricular myocytes. Exceptionally, cases have been described in patients receiving dobutamine infusion during a stress echocardiography. All were healthy middle-aged women and recovered without sequelae. A healthy 60-year-old woman suffered two 5.9-second episodes of asystole during her 20 mcg/kg/min infusion of dobutamine. Recovery was quick and without sequelae. Echocardiography and coronary angiography were both normal. In conclusion, this is the fourth documented case of a severe Bezold-Jarisch reflex causing asystole during dobutamine infusion. Diagnosis can only be made after excluding all other possible diagnoses, most importantly ischemia. This serves as a reminder of the importance of close monitoring during dobutamine infusion. PMID:26697234

  16. Reflex writing seizures in two siblings with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chifari, R; Piazzini, A; Turner, K; Canger, R; Canevini, M P; Wolf, P

    2004-03-01

    We report on two siblings who presented with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and in whom myoclonic jerks of the right arm and hand were also triggered by writing tasks. Both patients underwent intensive video-electroencephalography monitoring, with simultaneous neuropsychological tests. In both patients, reflex epileptic myoclonus was more easily triggered by writing that required a higher degree of concentration. Conversely, other cognitive tasks, such as reading, typing, thinking, or calculation never elicited any seizures or myoclonus. Valproate was effective in controlling both spontaneous and reflex epileptic seizures. The results of this study further support the notion that 'praxis-induced' reflex epilepsy precipitated by specific stimuli occurs in the context of idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Our results also illustrate that writing tasks are more effective in eliciting seizures when they require higher levels of concentration and mental elaboration. PMID:14763964

  17. Trigeminal reflexes and ingestive behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, H P; Semba, K; Jacquin, M F

    1984-12-01

    Photographic, electrophysiological, and neurobehavioral analyses were used to examine the contribution of trigeminally mediated jaw-opening reflexes to the control of ingestive behavior in the rat. During eating and drinking, jaw opening was always preceded by a period of perioral contact with the food or water source. Stimulation (electrical, mechanical) of perioral areas in anesthetized animals elicited jaw-opening reflexes (recorded from the mylohyoid nerve trunk) at short latencies and low stimulus intensities. Trigeminal orosensory deafferentation (sparing jaw muscle afferents and efferents, taste, vision, and olfaction) abolished or significantly reduced mouth opening during eating or drinking. It is concluded that motivational processes operate through trigeminal reflexes to generate eating in the rat. PMID:6508909

  18. Single Canonical Model of Reflexive Memory and Spatial Attention.

    PubMed

    Patel, Saumil S; Red, Stuart; Lin, Eric; Sereno, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Many neurons in the dorsal and ventral visual stream have the property that after a brief visual stimulus presentation in their receptive field, the spiking activity in these neurons persists above their baseline levels for several seconds. This maintained activity is not always correlated with the monkey's task and its origin is unknown. We have previously proposed a simple neural network model, based on shape selective neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex, which predicts the valence and time course of reflexive (bottom-up) spatial attention. In the same simple model, we demonstrate here that passive maintained activity or short-term memory of specific visual events can result without need for an external or top-down modulatory signal. Mutual inhibition and neuronal adaptation play distinct roles in reflexive attention and memory. This modest 4-cell model provides the first simple and unified physiologically plausible mechanism of reflexive spatial attention and passive short-term memory processes. PMID:26493949

  19. A reflexive toy-model for financial market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palatella, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    We propose a reflexive toy model for market dynamics, based on the idea that existing reflexive loops are generated by the conviction, shared by many market operators, that a certain price follows a certain model. Their trading behaviour will therefore increase the probability that the model predictions are in fact fulfilled. We analytically write the equations generating a reflexive loop stemming from a simple linear regression model, and we show that the resulting toy model yields a peculiar intermittent behavior. The presence of two unstable fixed points is apparent from our numerical calculation and the residence-time distribution density in these points asymptotically follows an inverse-power-law tail. The exponent of this tail, as well as the scaling properties of the model output, are close to those stemming from real-price time series.

  20. Automated data reduction workflows for astronomy. The ESO Reflex environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudling, W.; Romaniello, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Ballester, P.; Forchi, V.; García-Dabló, C. E.; Moehler, S.; Neeser, M. J.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Data from complex modern astronomical instruments often consist of a large number of different science and calibration files, and their reduction requires a variety of software tools. The execution chain of the tools represents a complex workflow that needs to be tuned and supervised, often by individual researchers that are not necessarily experts for any specific instrument. Aims: The efficiency of data reduction can be improved by using automatic workflows to organise data and execute a sequence of data reduction steps. To realize such efficiency gains, we designed a system that allows intuitive representation, execution and modification of the data reduction workflow, and has facilities for inspection and interaction with the data. Methods: The European Southern Observatory (ESO) has developed Reflex, an environment to automate data reduction workflows. Reflex is implemented as a package of customized components for the Kepler workflow engine. Kepler provides the graphical user interface to create an executable flowchart-like representation of the data reduction process. Key features of Reflex are a rule-based data organiser, infrastructure to re-use results, thorough book-keeping, data progeny tracking, interactive user interfaces, and a novel concept to exploit information created during data organisation for the workflow execution. Results: Automated workflows can greatly increase the efficiency of astronomical data reduction. In Reflex, workflows can be run non-interactively as a first step. Subsequent optimization can then be carried out while transparently re-using all unchanged intermediate products. We found that such workflows enable the reduction of complex data by non-expert users and minimizes mistakes due to book-keeping errors. Conclusions: Reflex includes novel concepts to increase the efficiency of astronomical data processing. While Reflex is a specific implementation of astronomical scientific workflows within the Kepler workflow engine, the overall design choices and methods can also be applied to other environments for running automated science workflows.

  1. Operating characteristics of a magnetically insulated reflex ion diode

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, G.L.

    1982-08-01

    Steady-state space charge limited-flow calculations have been carried out for an applied B/sub theta/ magnetically insulated reflexing ion diode. Reflex ion energy spectra characteristic of a thin foil cathode and of a transparent mesh have been used. A one-dimensional calculation shows higher ion current densities with a mesh cathode, and that the emission electron current density increases with the applied B/sub theta/ magnetic field. The ion current density is calculated to increase slightly with radius.

  2. The reluctance to self-disclose: reflexive or reasoned?

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Alan

    2012-07-01

    Despite a growing body of clinical literature advocating the thoughtful and judicious use of self-disclosure in psychoanalysis, there remains a reflexive reluctance to intervene in this way by many analysts of various theoretical persuasions. Why is this the case? Four motives for this reflexive reluctance to self-disclose are discussed: (1) theoretical reasons; (2) psychoanalytic authoritarianism; (3) fears of influencing the patient through suggestion; and (4) the analyst's personality characteristics. Examining the reasons for this state of affairs should help to reduce the rigidity or orthodoxy with which clinical psychoanalysis is practiced. PMID:23038902

  3. Acupuncture - An effective tool in the management of gag reflex

    PubMed Central

    Anand, M. Vijay; Rai, Rathika; Bettie, Nirmal F.; Ramachandiran, Hari; Solomon; Praveena, Subramaniyam

    2015-01-01

    Gagging is of great concern to the dentist as it is a serious impediment during the execution of various dental procedures. The etiology of gagging is multifactorial, and several suggestions have been offered to arrest this reflex, some of which are nonsustainable and does not show the immediate result. Acupuncture has been successfully employed as an adjunct to local anesthesia in dental extractions, pain management and also in the symptomatic management of temporomandibular joint disorders. The author highlights the application of acupuncture in the management of patients with gag reflex during dental procedures and its benefits are reported. PMID:26538942

  4. Features of vestibuloocular reflex modulations induced by altered gravitational forces in tadpoles ( Xenopus laevis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.

    2001-01-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, we studied the static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) in relation to modifications of the gravitational environment to find basic mechanisms of how altered gravitational forces (AGF) affect this reflex. Animals were exposed to microgravity during space flight or hypergravity (3g) for 4 to 12 days. Basic observations were that (1) the development of the rVOR is significantly affected by altered gravitational conditions, (2) the duration of 1g-readaptation depends on the strength of the test stimulus, (3) μg induces malformations of the body which are related to the rVOR depression. Future studies are based on the hypotheses (1) that the vestibular nuclei play a key roll in the adaptation to AGF conditions, (2) that the stimulus transducing systems in the sense organ are affected by AGF conditions, and (3) that fertilized eggs will be converted to normal adults guided by physiological and morphological set points representing the genetic programs. Developmental retardation or acceleration, or otherwise occurring deviations from standard development during embryonic and postembryonic life will activate genes that direct the developmental processes towards normality.

  5. Development of a data acquisition and analysis system for nociceptive withdrawal reflex and reflex receptive fields in humans.

    PubMed

    Biurrun Manresa, Jose A; Hansen, John; Andersen, Ole K

    2010-01-01

    A system for data acquisition and analysis of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) and reflex receptive field (RRF) is introduced. The system is constituted by hardware and software components. The hardware consists of devices commonly used for electrical stimulation and electromyographic and kinematic data recording. The software comprises two different programs: Wirex, a stand-alone program developed in LabView for data acquisition, and Reflex Lab, a Matlab-based toolbox for data analysis. These programs were developed to maximize the potential of the hardware, turning it into a complete stimulation system capable of automatic quantification of NWR and RRF. In this article, a brief review of NWR and RRF analysis is presented, the system features are described in detail and its present and future applications are discussed. PMID:21096727

  6. Three-dimensional vestibular eye and head reflexes of the chameleon: characteristics of gain and phase and effects of eye position on orientation of ocular rotation axes during stimulation in yaw direction.

    PubMed

    Haker, H; Misslisch, H; Ott, M; Frens, M A; Henn, V; Hess, K; Sándor, P S

    2003-07-01

    We investigated gaze-stabilizing reflexes in the chameleon using the three-dimensional search-coil technique. Animals were rotated sinusoidally around an earth-vertical axis under head-fixed and head-free conditions, in the dark and in the light. Gain, phase and the influence of eye position on vestibulo-ocular reflex rotation axes were studied. During head-restrained stimulation in the dark, vestibulo-ocular reflex gaze gains were low (0.1-0.3) and phase lead decreased with increasing frequencies (from 100 degrees at 0.04 Hz to < 30 degrees at 1 Hz). Gaze gains were larger during stimulation in the light (0.1-0.8) with a smaller phase lead (< 30 degrees) and were close to unity during the head-free conditions (around 0.6 in the dark, around 0.8 in the light) with small phase leads. These results confirm earlier findings that chameleons have a low vestibulo-ocular reflex gain during head-fixed conditions and stimulation in the dark and higher gains during head-free stimulation in the light. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye rotation axes were roughly aligned with the head's rotation axis and did not systematically tilt when the animals were looking eccentrically, up- or downward (as predicted by Listing's Law). Therefore, vestibulo-ocular reflex responses in the chameleon follow a strategy, which optimally stabilizes the entire retinal images, a result previously found in non-human primates. PMID:12783170

  7. Affective Modulation of the Startle Eyeblink and Postauricular Reflexes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Benning, Stephen D.; Holtzclaw, Tia N.; Bodfish, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Eyeblink and postauricular reflexes to standardized affective images were examined in individuals without (n = 37) and with (n = 20) autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affective reflex modulation in control participants replicated previous findings. The ASD group, however, showed anomalous reflex modulation patterns, despite similar self-report…

  8. Affective Modulation of the Startle Eyeblink and Postauricular Reflexes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Benning, Stephen D.; Holtzclaw, Tia N.; Bodfish, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Eyeblink and postauricular reflexes to standardized affective images were examined in individuals without (n = 37) and with (n = 20) autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affective reflex modulation in control participants replicated previous findings. The ASD group, however, showed anomalous reflex modulation patterns, despite similar self-report

  9. Reflex Modification by Acoustic Signals in Newborn Infants and in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Howard S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Five experiments using identical reflex modification procedures on neonates and adults suggest developmental differences in processing auditory stimuli. Neonates failed to exhibit reflex inhibition by either prior acoustic or tactile stimuli. Adults exhibited robust reflex inhibition to these same stimuli. Developmental processes implied by these…

  10. Reflex Modification by Acoustic Signals in Newborn Infants and in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Howard S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Five experiments using identical reflex modification procedures on neonates and adults suggest developmental differences in processing auditory stimuli. Neonates failed to exhibit reflex inhibition by either prior acoustic or tactile stimuli. Adults exhibited robust reflex inhibition to these same stimuli. Developmental processes implied by these

  11. On Being a Nice Country Girl and an Academic Feminist: Using Reflexivity in Rural Social Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pini, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses a study of women's participation in the Australian sugar industry to illustrate and critique the process and usefulness of reflexivity in rural research. I begin by situating the use of reflexivity within the feminist literature. Following this, I describe the way in which I used reflexivity to examine different identities I

  12. Blink reflexes and magnetic resonance imaging in focal unilateral central trigeminal pathway demyelination.

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, L; Carroll, W M

    1990-01-01

    The electrically elicited blink reflex allows quantitative analysis of the corneal reflex which traverses the trigeminal and facial nerves and the brainstem. Two patients presenting with symptomatic unilateral trigeminal lesions are described, in whom the blink reflexes showed conduction block and slowing at predictable sites in the central pathways, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed precisely the clinical and electrophysiological localisation. Images PMID:2380735

  13. Reflexive activation of newly instructed stimulus-response rules: evidence from lateralized readiness potentials in no-go trials.

    PubMed

    Meiran, Nachshon; Pereg, Maayan; Kessler, Yoav; Cole, Michael W; Braver, Todd S

    2015-06-01

    Previous behavioral and electrophysiological evidence has suggested that the instructions for a new choice task are processed even when they are not currently required, indicating intention-based reflexivity. Yet these demonstrations were found in experiments in which participants were set to execute a response (go). In the present experiment, we asked whether intention-based reflexivity would also be observed under unfavorable conditions in which participants were set not to respond (no-go). In each miniblock of our paradigm, participants received instructions for a task in which two new stimuli were mapped to right/left keys. Immediately after the instructions, a no-go phase began, which was immediately followed by a go phase. We found a significant stimulus-locked lateralized readiness potential in the first no-go trial, indicating reflexive operation of the new instructions. These results show that representing instructions in working memory provides sufficient conditions for stimuli to launch task processing, proceeding all the way until motor response-specific brain activation, which takes place even under unfavorable, no-go conditions. PMID:25216992

  14. Transference, Counter-Transference, and Reflexivity in Intercultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Jenna Min

    2015-01-01

    The article addresses the contributions psychoanalytic theory, particularly its concepts of "transference and counter-transference," can make to our understanding of reflexivity in intercultural education (IE). After the introduction, the article is organized into three parts. The first part is a psychoanalytic discussion that focuses on…

  15. Practicing Reflexivity in the Study of Italian Migrants in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seganti, Francesca Romana

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the centrality of reflexivity in qualitative research through examples from my study on the role new media play in the lives of Italians in London. My hypothesis was that Italians were "in transit" in London and they were using new media to build "temporary" communities. I conducted in-depth interviews with members of the…

  16. Emotions and Reflexivity in Feminised Education Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Erica

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses contemporary relations between emotions, gender and feminist action research. Starting from analysis of the increasing emotionalisation of everyday life, it explores the quasi-feminist--or what the author calls "feminised"--forms of incitement to reflexive confession that are increasingly gaining favour within professional and

  17. Carbon dioxide alters the Hoffmann reflex independent of hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Beekley, Matthew D

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of changes in capillary blood pH on the resting soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex in the intact human. H-max size, H-wave at 20% of H-max, M-max and H-reflex latency were recorded in 10 subjects (apparently healthy, ages 19-36) before and after exposure to 3 hours of NaHCO(3), CaCO(3), NH(4)Cl (all at 0.3 g/kg) or 10 minutes 7% Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) administration. NaHCO(3) increased capillary blood pH, CaCO(3) did not change capillary blood pH, and NH(4)Cl and 7% CO(2) decreased capillary blood pH. H-max and H-wave at 20% of M-max size were significantly decreased with no change in M-max, and H-reflex latency significantly increased during 7% CO(2) administration only. No other changes in H-maximum size or H-reflex latency in response to dry chemical administration were observed. Seven percent CO(2) administration reduces the size and increases the latency of the H-maximum size as previously found, but other chemicals which alter capillary blood pH do not. CO(2) modulates afferent nerve function, and does so, it appears, independent of changes in capillary blood pH. PMID:24134189

  18. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  19. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  20. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  1. Positioning Resumes and Cover Letters as Reflective-Reflexive Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randazzo, Chalice

    2012-01-01

    Although the resume and cover letter genre is widely discussed in both popular and scholarly publications, discussion thus far has failed to acknowledge that the process of creating a resume and cover letter has the potential for encouraging students' reflective and reflexive capacities. This article suggests that business communication educators…

  2. Evaluation of Reflex (fomesafen) herbicide for watermelon in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective preemergence herbicides are needed for weed control in watermelon grown from transplants. Reflex (fomesafen) was found to be effective and to exhibit crop safety in southeast USA. Trials were conducted during 2011 and 2012 in southeast Oklahoma to determine if this product would be useful...

  3. Enhancing the Reflexivity of System Innovation Projects with System Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mierlo, Barbara; Arkesteijn, Marlen; Leeuwis, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Networks aiming for fundamental changes bring together a variety of actors who are part and parcel of a problematic context. These system innovation projects need to be accompanied by a monitoring and evaluation approach that supports and maintains reflexivity to be able to deal with uncertainties and conflicts while challenging current practices…

  4. Ontogeny of Infantile Oral Reflexes and Emerging Chewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Justine Joan; Mysak, Edward D.

    1984-01-01

    To document movement patterns and to examine developmental interrelationships, the ontogeny of rooting, lip, lateral tongue, mouth opening, biting, and Babkin reflexes and the development of emerging chewing behaviors were observed in two normal infants over a period from 1 week to 35 weeks of age. (Author/RH)

  5. Postoperative seizure outcome after corpus callosotomy in reflex epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kwan, S Y; Wong, T T; Chang, K P; Yang, T F; Lee, Y C; Guo, W Y; Su, M S

    2000-03-01

    Flickering light and color patterns, reading, language, movement, decision making, eating, tapping and touching, hot water immersion and auditory stimulation can induce seizures in some epileptic patients. These are known as the "reflex epilepsies". The mechanism of reflex epilepsy is not clear. Recently, we performed anterior two-thirds corpus callosotomies in two reflex epilepsy patients (ages 12 and 14 years), with follow-up for more than three years. Patient 1 had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome with auditory-induced generalized atonic or tonic seizures (startle epilepsy), which decreased by 60% after callosotomy. Patient 2 had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome with somatosensory-induced generalized tonic seizures (tap epilepsy). He was seizure-free for one year immediately after callosotomy, but his seizures recurred with the same degree and frequency as before surgery. The nonsignificant postoperative seizure outcome suggests that the corpus callosum only plays a partial role in seizure generation. Our report also discusses the possible mechanisms of generation of reflex seizures. PMID:10746422

  6. Processing Reflexives and Pronouns in Picture Noun Phrase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runner, Jeffrey T.; Sussman, Rachel S.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2006-01-01

    Binding theory (e.g., Chomsky, 1981) has played a central role in both syntactic theory and models of language processing. Its constraints are designed to predict that the referential domains of pronouns and reflexives are nonoverlapping, that is, are complementary; these constraints are also thought to play a role in online reference resolution.…

  7. The Semantics of a Child's Use of Reflexives in Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardo, Elly

    A case study of the use of reflexive constructions by a Spanish-speaking child from age 2;5.2 to 3;5.2 is presented. Sixty hours of audiotaped utterances were recorded monthly over a one year period. The utterances are analyzed in terms of self-induced actions, impersonal constructions, and two-argument predicates. The data show the regular…

  8. Normal values of patellar and ankle tendon reflex latencies.

    PubMed

    Frijns, C J; Laman, D M; van Duijn, M A; van Duijn, H

    1997-02-01

    The clinical value of latency measurement of tendon reflexes in neurological patients has been reported by several authors. However, normal values are not readily comparable. In the present study, latencies and amplitudes of patellar (PTR) and ankle tendon reflexes (ATR) were measured at rest and after facilitation in 102 normal controls. A manually operated reflex hammer, tipped with electrically conductive rubber, ensured an immediate start of the sweep of the oscilloscope. Latencies showed a significant correlation with height (r = 0.70 for PTR and r = 0.72 for ATR, P < 0.0001) and to a lesser degree with age (r = 0.16 and r = 0.30, P < 0.0001). While amplitudes were highly variable, rendering them less useful for diagnostic purposes, latencies showed minimal intra-individual variability (CV 1.5 and 0.8%, respectively). Correlation of ATR-latency with the H-reflex latency of the soleus muscle was very high (r = 0.97, P < 0.0001). Comparison with three other hammer types yielded corresponding results with a hammer supplied with a piezo-electric element; however, significantly shorter latencies were found with a hammer with a microswitch, and with another hammer with a spring-contact, due to a delay from the tap on the tendon until the start of the sweep of the monitor. PMID:9107465

  9. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  10. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  11. Opening to Possibility: Reflectivity and Reflexivity in Our Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary explores how teachers can create a culture of tolerance by promoting reflectivity and reflexivity, and considers classroom processes and activities for doing so. "Reflectivity" is considered to be the use of personal values, experiences, and habits to make meaning and is a central tenet of inquiry approaches: to build…

  12. Reconceptualising Learning as a Form of Relational Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The paper makes a connection between transmission modes and constructivism in sociology and education, respectively. There are parallels between Archer's criticism of upward and downward conflation in social theory, and approaches to learning in education. In her 2012 book, Archer seeks to reconceptualise socialisation as relational reflexivity.…

  13. Emotions and Reflexivity in Feminised Education Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Erica

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses contemporary relations between emotions, gender and feminist action research. Starting from analysis of the increasing emotionalisation of everyday life, it explores the quasi-feminist--or what the author calls "feminised"--forms of incitement to reflexive confession that are increasingly gaining favour within professional and…

  14. Language Constructing Language: The Implications of Reflexivity for Linguistic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Talbot J.

    2000-01-01

    Asks what first-order language might be like if there were no way to talk, write, or sign about it--that is, what if there were no second-order metalanguage. By considering the consequences for writing, translation, pragmatics, semantics, and language acquisition and evolution, it is suggested that without second-order, reflexive properties,…

  15. Enhancing the Reflexivity of System Innovation Projects with System Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mierlo, Barbara; Arkesteijn, Marlen; Leeuwis, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Networks aiming for fundamental changes bring together a variety of actors who are part and parcel of a problematic context. These system innovation projects need to be accompanied by a monitoring and evaluation approach that supports and maintains reflexivity to be able to deal with uncertainties and conflicts while challenging current practices

  16. Studies of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex on STS 7 and 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    Unpaced voluntary horizontal head oscillation was used to study the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) on Shuttle flights STS 7 and 8. Ten subjects performed head oscillations at 0.33 Hz + or - 30 deg amplitude under the followng conditions: VVOR (visual VOR), eyes open and fixed on a stationary target; VOR-EC, with eyes closed and fixed on the same target in imagination; and VOR-S (VOR suppression), with eyes open and fixed on a head-synchronized target. Effects of weightlessness, flight phase, and Space Motion Sickness (SMS) on head oscillation characteristics were examined. A significant increase in head oscillation frequency was noted inflight in subjects free from SMS. In subjects susceptible to SMS, frequency was reduced during their Symptomatic period. The data also suggest that the amplitude and peak velocity of head oscillation were reduced early inflight. No significant changes were noted in reflex gain or phase in any of the test conditions; however, there was a suggestion of an increase in VVOR and VOR-ES gain early inflight in asymptomatic subjects. A significant difference in VOR-S was found between SMS susceptible and non-susceptible subjects. There is no evidence that any changes in VOR characteristics contributed to SMS.

  17. A sigmoid function is the best fit for the ascending limb of the Hoffmann reflex recruitment curve.

    PubMed

    Klimstra, Marc; Zehr, E Paul

    2008-03-01

    The Hoffmann (H)-reflex has been studied extensively as a measure of spinal excitability. Often, researchers compare the H-reflex between experimental conditions with values determined from a recruitment curve (RC). An RC is obtained experimentally by varying the stimulus intensity to a nerve and recording the peak-to-peak amplitudes of the evoked H-reflex and direct motor (M)-wave. The values taken from an RC may provide different information with respect to a change in reflex excitability. Therefore, it is important to obtain a number of RC parameters for comparison. RCs can be obtained with a measure of current (HCRC) or without current (HMRC). The ascending limb of the RC is then fit with a mathematical analysis technique in order to determine parameters of interest such as the threshold of activation and the slope of the function. The purpose of this study was to determine an unbiased estimate of the specific parameters of interest in an RC through mathematical analysis. We hypothesized that a standardized analysis technique could be used to ascertain important points on an RC, regardless of data presentation methodology (HCRC or HMRC). For both HCRC and HMRC produced using 40 randomly delivered stimuli, six different methods of mathematical analysis [linear regression, polynomial, smoothing spline, general least squares model with custom logistic (sigmoid) equation, power, and logarithmic] were compared using goodness of fit statistics (r-square, RMSE). Behaviour and robustness of selected curve fits were examined in various applications including RCs generated during movement and somatosensory conditioning from published data. Results show that a sigmoid function is the most reliable estimate of the ascending limb of an H-reflex recruitment curve for both HCRC and HMRC. Further, the parameters of interest change differentially with respect to the presentation methodology and the analysis technique. In conclusion, the sigmoid function is a reliable analysis technique which mimics the physiologically based prediction of the input/output relation of the ascending limb of the recruitment curve. Therefore, the sigmoid function should be considered an acceptable and preferable analytical tool for H-reflex recruitment curves obtained with reference to stimulation current or M-wave amplitude. PMID:18046545

  18. The effects of isometric resistance training on stretch reflex induced tremor in the knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Durbaba, Rade; Cassidy, Angela; Budini, Francesco; Macaluso, Andrea

    2013-06-15

    This study examines the effect of 4 wk of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor in knee extensor muscles. Fourteen healthy volunteers were assigned to either the training group (n = 7) or the nontraining control group (n = 7). Induced tremor was assessed by measuring force fluctuations during anisometric contractions against spring loading, whose compliance was varied to allow for preferential activation of the short or long latency stretch reflex components. Effects of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor was assessed under two contraction conditions: relative force matching, where the relative level of activity was equal for both pre- and post-training sessions, set at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and absolute force matching, where the level of activity was set to 30% pretrained MVC. The training group experienced a 26.5% increase in MVC in contrast to the 0.8% for the control group. For relative force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude and frequency did not change in either the training or control group. During absolute force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude was decreased by 37.5% and 31.6% for the short and long components, respectively, with no accompanying change in frequency, for the training group. No change in either measure was observed in the control group for absolute force-matching contractions. The results are consistent with high-intensity isometric resistance training induced neural changes leading to increased strength, coupled with realignment of stretch reflex automatic gain compensation to the new maximal force output. Also, previous reported reductions in anisometric tremor following strength training may partly be due to changed stretch reflex behavior. PMID:23580599

  19. Soleus H-reflex gain in humans walking and running under simulated reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, D. P.; Aagaard, P.; Simonsen, E. B.; Farley, C. T.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Hoffmann (H-) reflex is an electrical analogue of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, elicited by bypassing the muscle spindle and directly stimulating the afferent nerve. Studying H-reflex modulation provides insight into how the nervous system centrally modulates stretch reflex responses.A common measure of H-reflex gain is the slope of the relationship between H-reflex amplitude and EMG amplitude. To examine soleus H-reflex gain across a range of EMG levels during human locomotion, we used simulated reduced gravity to reduce muscle activity. We hypothesised that H-reflex gain would be independent of gravity level.We recorded EMG from eight subjects walking (1.25 m s-1) and running (3.0 m s-1) at four gravity levels (1.0, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 G (Earth gravity)). We normalised the stimulus M-wave and resulting H-reflex to the maximal M-wave amplitude (Mmax) elicited throughout the stride to correct for movement of stimulus and recording electrodes relative to nerve and muscle fibres. Peak soleus EMG amplitude decreased by 30% for walking and for running over the fourfold change in gravity. As hypothesised, slopes of linear regressions fitted to H-reflex versus EMG data were independent of gravity for walking and running (ANOVA, P > 0.8). The slopes were also independent of gait (P > 0.6), contrary to previous studies. Walking had a greater y-intercept (19.9% Mmax) than running (-2.5% Mmax; P < 0.001). At all levels of EMG, walking H-reflex amplitudes were higher than running H-reflex amplitudes by a constant amount. We conclude that the nervous system adjusts H-reflex threshold but not H-reflex gain between walking and running. These findings provide insight into potential neural mechanisms responsible for spinal modulation of the stretch reflex during human locomotion.

  20. Ivanov-Smolensky conditioning: relationship between CR and UR form and intensity.

    PubMed

    Tarpy, R M; Scharer, J B

    1994-07-01

    The Ivanov-Smolensky conditioning procedure involves a CS followed by a command (US). There are two URs--an instructed UR and a reflexive UR such as an autonomic reaction. Anticipatory responses during the CS, of either the instructed or reflexive UR, provide a measure of conditioning. We examined whether the reflexive CR and UR are similar in form, and whether larger reflexive CRs and URs are associated with larger instructed URs. Subjects were asked to exhale "quickly and powerfully" (exhalation was thus the instructed UR) either following (Forward) or prior to (Backward) a light CS; a change in heart rate to the CS (reflexive CR) alone was the index of conditioning. The heart rate CR and UR were both deceleratory in nature, although the onset of the CR was faster than the UR. In addition, Backward-conditioned subjects demonstrated some degree of inhibitory control by the CS. Finally, the CR intensity was inversely related to exhalation magnitude. PMID:7948469

  1. Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring with Hoffmann reflex during thoracic spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Tummala, Sudhakar

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was examine the role of Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) monitoring in identifying intraoperative spinal cord injury and predicting postoperative neurological outcome in patients undergoing thoracic spine surgery. Despite the physiologic basis for the use of H-reflex to monitor spinal motor pathways, there are only a few reports highlighting its application as an intraoperative neuromonitoring tool. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of 19 consecutive patients who underwent thoracic spine surgery for metastatic thoracic spinal tumors between 2011 and 2013 at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. H-waves and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) were simultaneously monitored in our series consisting of four female and 15 male patients aged 10-71 years. In 10 of 19 patients, bilateral H-waves and SSEP were stable throughout the monitoring. Five of 19 patients had a <50% transient reduction in H-wave amplitude that later returned to baseline. SSEP were absent from baseline throughout surgery in two of 19 patients. In our series, neither general anesthesia nor low dose muscle relaxants interfered with the H-waves. At 3 and 6 month follow-ups, none of the patients exhibited new postoperative neurological deficits. Stable intraoperative H-waves are suggestive of preserved postoperative neurologic outcomes. Intraoperative H-reflex monitoring could be a reasonable alternative especially when motor evoked potentials are unattainable. Given its greater sensitivity to spinal cord ischemia, relatively low cost and ease of acquisition, H-reflex monitoring could be a useful adjunct in during thoracic spine surgeries. PMID:25769258

  2. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  3. The Hoffmann reflex of the soleus muscle. A study in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Sebille, A

    1980-03-01

    The H reflex of the soleus muscle was used to investigate the monosynaptic reflex arc of two groups of leprosy patients compared with a similar group of normal subjects. The H reflex recordings show two abnormalities: (1) An increase in the latency of the reflex without difference between lepromatous and borderline patients. (2) A decrease of the Hmax:Mmax amplitude ratio more pronounced in the lepromatous group. The discrepancy between these results and the commonly described preservation of the deep tendon reflexes in leprosy is discussed and the hypothesis that leprosy neuropathy would affect all nerve trunks related to blood vessel changes in suggested. PMID:7365508

  4. Trigeminal high-frequency stimulation produces short- and long-term modification of reflex blink gain.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Kaminer, Jaime; Enmore, Patricia; Evinger, Craig

    2014-02-01

    Reflex blinks provide a model system for investigating motor learning in normal and pathological states. We investigated whether high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve before the R2 blink component (HFS-B) decreases reflex blink gain in alert rats. As with humans (Mao JB, Evinger C. J Neurosci 21: RC151, 2001), HFS-B significantly reduced blink size in the first hour after treatment for rats. Repeated days of HFS-B treatment produced long-term depression of blink circuits. Blink gain decreased exponentially across days, indicating a long-term depression of blink circuits. Additionally, the HFS-B protocol became more effective at depressing blink amplitude across days of treatment. This depression was not habituation, because neither long- nor short-term blink changes occurred when HFS was presented after the R2. To investigate whether gain modifications produced by HFS-B involved cerebellar networks, we trained rats in a delay eyelid conditioning paradigm using HFS-B as the unconditioned stimulus and a tone as the conditioned stimulus. As HFS-B depresses blink circuits and delay conditioning enhances blink circuit activity, occlusion should occur if they share neural networks. Rats acquiring robust eyelid conditioning did not exhibit decreases in blink gain, whereas rats developing low levels of eyelid conditioning exhibited weak, short-term reductions in blink gain. These results suggested that delay eyelid conditioning and long-term HFS-B utilize some of the same cerebellar circuits. The ability of repeated HFS-B treatment to depress trigeminal blink circuit activity long term implied that it may be a useful protocol to reduce hyperexcitable blink circuits that underlie diseases like benign essential blepharospasm. PMID:24285868

  5. Analysis of contributions of acetylcholine and tachykinins to neuro-neuronal transmission in motility reflexes in the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P. J.; Bornstein, J. C.; Yuan, S. Y.; Furness, J. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The roles of acetylcholine (ACh) and tachykinins in neuro-neuronal transmission during ascending excitatory and descending inhibitory reflexes were studied by recording intracellular reflex responses of the circular muscle to physiological stimuli. Experiments were carried out in opened segments of guinea pig ileum in an organ bath that was partitioned so that three regions could be independently exposed to drugs. 2. Ascending excitatory reflexes evoked by either distension from the serosal side or compression of the mucosa were depressed by 55% and 85%, respectively, in the presence of hexamethonium (200 microM) and by 30% and 45%, respectively, by a desensitizing concentration of the selective NK3 receptor agonist, senktide (1 microM), in the chamber in which reflexes were initiated. Together, hexamethonium and senktide abolished responses to compression. A residual response to distension persisted. This was abolished by hyoscine (1 microM). 3. Hexamethonium (200 microM) abolished ascending reflexes when applied to the region between the stimulus and the recording sites, or to the recording chamber. 4. Descending reflex responses were reduced by 35% by synaptic blockade in the stimulus chamber with physiological saline containing 0.1 mM Ca2+ plus 10 mM Mg2+. Senktide (1 microM) in the stimulus chamber reduced distension reflexes to the same extent as synaptic blockade, whereas hexamethonium (200 microM) and hyoscine (1 microM) depressed responses by less than 20%. Responses to compression were reduced by 40% by senktide alone, while senktide and hexamethonium together reduced responses by 60%, an effect similar to synaptic blockade. Under these conditions, hyoscine in the stimulus chamber restored reflexes evoked by distension, but did not alter those evoked by mucosal compression. 5. Total synaptic blockade in the intermediate chamber, between stimulus and recording sites, reduced descending reflex responses by more than 90%. In contrast, hexamethonium (200 microM) had no effect and hyoscine (1 microM) reduced only the responses to distension (by 30%). Senktide (1 microM) depressed responses to both stimuli by approximately 80%. 6. Application of hexamethonium (200 microM) to the recording chamber depressed descending reflex responses to distension applied in the near stimulation chamber by 15%, but had no effect on responses to compression in the near chamber or to either stimulus applied in the far chamber. 7. Descending reflexes evoked by near chamber stimuli were unaffected by hyoscine (1 microM) or senktide (1 microM) applied to the recording chamber; hyoscine enhanced reflexes evoked by compression in the far chamber by 50%. 8. For the ascending excitatory reflex pathway, it is concluded that transmission from sensory neurones is mediated by ACh acting via both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and by tachykinins acting at NK3 receptors. Transmission from ascending interneurones appears to be predominantly via nicotinic receptors. The descending inhibitory pathways are more complex, and while transmission from sensory neurones involves nicotinic, muscarinic and NK3 receptor-dependent components, transmission from descending interneurones to inhibitory motor neurones is neither cholinergic nor due to tachykinins acting via NK3 receptors. Images Figure 8 PMID:8799571

  6. Self-protective whole body motion for humanoid robots based on synergy of global reaction and local reflex.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Saegusa, Ryo; Ikemoto, Shuhei; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Metta, Giorgio

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a self-protective whole body motor controller to enable life-long learning of humanoid robots. In order to reduce the damages on robots caused by physical interaction such as obstacle collision, we introduce self-protective behaviors based on the adaptive coordination of full-body global reactions and local limb reflexes. Global reactions aim at adaptive whole-body movements to prepare for harmful situations. The system incrementally learns a more effective association of the states and global reactions. Local reflexes based on a force-torque sensing function to reduce the impact load on the limbs independently of high-level motor intention. We examined the proposed method with a robot simulator in various conditions. We then applied the systems on a real humanoid robot. PMID:22377658

  7. Dynamic regulation of the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia californica in response to changes in the ambient tactile environment.

    PubMed

    Fischer, T M; Yuan, J W; Carew, T J

    2000-12-01

    The state of an animal's environment can be viewed as a source of information that can be used to regulate both ongoing and future behavior. The present work examined how the ambient environment can regulate the Aplysia siphon withdrawal reflex (SWR) by changing the environment between calm and turbulent. Results indicate that the SWR is dynamically regulated on the basis of variations in external conditions, so that responsiveness (measured as both reflex duration and threshold) is matched to the state of the environment. Prior exposure to a noxious stimulus (tailshock) has selective effects on this regulation, suggesting the existence of multiple regulatory mechanisms. Further, neurophysiological correlates to behavioral observations were measured in sensory and motor neurons. This will allow for a detailed cellular analysis of environmental information-processing in this system. PMID:11142653

  8. Convergence in segmental reflex pathways from nociceptive and non-nociceptive afferents to alpha-motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, H; Schomburg, E D

    1993-01-01

    1. Reflex interaction between nociceptive and non-nociceptive segmental afferents was investigated by testing for spatial facilitation of postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) in alpha-motoneurones recorded in anaemically decapitated, high spinal cats. Nociceptive segmental afferents were activated by applying noxious radiant heat to the skin. Non-nociceptive skin mechanoreceptors were activated by puffs of air. Non-nociceptive skin, joint and group I-III muscle afferents were stimulated by electrical pulses delivered to various nerves. 2. Conditioning by stimulation of nociceptive afferents facilitated transmission in various ipsilateral segmental pathways. Such spatial facilitation occurred in both excitatory and inhibitory pathways. Pathways that were facilitated included those activated by low to medium threshold cutaneous afferents, joint afferents, and group Ib and II muscle afferents. 3. In contrast, monosynaptic EPSPs evoked by stimulating ipsilateral group Ia muscle afferents did not show spatial facilitation but rather inhibition during conditioning stimulation of nociceptive afferents. Spatial facilitation of reciprocal group Ia IPSPs was rare and small if it occurred. 4. Pathways activated by cutaneous and group II muscle afferents were depressed by contralateral stimulation of nociceptive afferents. 5. We conclude that spatial facilitation observed between nociceptive and non-nociceptive afferents results from a convergence of inputs on common interneurones in the reflex pathways to alpha-motoneurones. Therefore nociceptive afferents have to be regarded as constituents of flexor reflex afferents (FRAs) and may add a specific nocifensive function to the FRA system. PMID:8410691

  9. Effect of sympathetic nervous system activation on the tonic vibration reflex in rabbit jaw closing muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, C; Deriu, F; Passatore, M

    1993-01-01

    1. In precollicular decerebrate rabbits we investigated the effect of sympathetic stimulation, at frequencies within the physiological range, on the tonic vibration reflex (TVR) elicited in jaw closing muscles by small amplitude vibrations applied to the mandible (15-50 microns, 150-180 Hz). The EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from masseter muscle and the force developed by the reflex was measured through an isometric transducer connected with the mandibular symphysis. 2. Unilateral stimulation of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic by the TVR, and a marked decrease or disappearance of the ipsilateral EMG activity. No significant changes were detected in the EMG contralateral to the stimulated nerve. Bilateral CSN stimulation reduced by 60-90% the force reflexly produced by the jaw closing muscles and strongly decreased or suppressed EMG activity on both sides. This effect was often preceded by a transient TVR enhancement, very variable in amplitude and duration, which was concomitant with the modest increase in pulmonary ventilation induced by the sympathetic stimulation. 3. During bilateral CSN stimulation, an increase in the vibration amplitude by a factor of 1.5-2.5 was sufficient to restore the TVR reduced by sympathetic stimulation. 4. The depressant action exerted by sympathetic activation on the TVR is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, since it was almost completely abolished by the I.V. administration of either phentolamine or prazosin, this last drug being a selective antagonist of alpha 1-adrenoceptors. The sympathetically induced decrease in the TVR was not mimicked by manoeuvres producing a large and sudden reduction or abolition of the blood flow to jaw muscles, such as unilateral or bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. 5. The effect of sympathetic stimulation was not significantly modified after denervation of the inferior dental arch and/or anaesthesia of the temporomandibular joint, i.e. after having reduced the afferent input from those receptors, potentially affected by CSN stimulation, which can elicit either a jaw opening reflex or a decrease in the activity of the jaw elevator muscle motoneurons. 6. These data suggest that, when the sympathetic nervous system is activated under physiological conditions, there is a marked depression of the stretch reflex which is independent of vasomotor changes and is probably due to a decrease in sensitivity of muscle spindle afferents. PMID:8271218

  10. Nitrous oxide depresses somatocardiac sympathetic A- and C-reflexes in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Adachi, T; Miyazaki, Y; Kurata, J; Utsumi, J; Shinomura, T; Nakao, S; Murakawa, M; Shichino, T; Mori, K

    1996-07-26

    Effect of nitrous oxide (N2O) on the somatosympathetic A- and C-reflexes was investigated using artificially ventilated rats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose and urethane. Somatocardiac sympathetic A- and C-reflexes were elicited in the inferior cardiac nerve by electrical stimulation of A and C afferent fibers of the tibial nerve, respectively. Both reflexes were depressed by inhalation of N2O for 20 min. The depression was greater in the C-reflex than in the A-reflex. The depressive effects of N2O on both reflexes were unchanged after pretreatment with intravenous naloxone (0.2 or 2.0 mg/kg) or by prolongation of the inhalation of N2O for 2 h. These results suggest that the opioid receptor is not involved and that acute tolerance is not developed in the depressive action of N2O on the somatosympathetic A- and C-reflexes. PMID:8844712

  11. Interlimb coupling from the arms to legs is differentially specified for populations of motor units comprising the compound H-reflex during "reduced" human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Klimstra, Marc; Lewis, Allen; Hundza, Sandra R; Zehr, E Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments have identified neuromechanical interactions between the arms and legs during human locomotor movement. Previous work reported that during the rhythmic movement of all four limbs, the influence of the arms on reflex expression in the legs was superimposed on the dominant effect of the legs. This evidence was based upon studies using cutaneous and H-reflex modulation as indices of neuronal activity related to locomotion. The earlier H-reflex study was restricted to one phase of movement and to only a fixed H-reflex amplitude. Also, all four limbs were actively engaged in locomotor movement, and this led to the speculation that the effect from the arms could be underestimated by "swamping" of the conditioning during movement of the test limb. Work from the cat suggests that descending locomotor drive may be differentially specified for different motor unit populations in the hindlimb. Accordingly, details of interlimb coordination between the arms and legs in humans require further characterization and an examination of different populations of motor units as can be obtained from H-reflex recruitment curve (RC) parameters. Using modulation of H-reflex amplitudes across the entire ascending limb as neural probes for interlimb coupling, the present study evaluated the separated influences of rhythmic activity of the arms and leg on neuronal excitability of a stationary "test leg". This three-limb "reduced" locomotion approach was applied using a stepping ergometer during the performance of three rhythmic movement tasks: arms (A); contralateral leg (L); and arms and contralateral leg (AL). Data were sampled at four different phases of the stepping cycle (using the moving leg as reference): start power (SP); end power (EP); start recovery (SR); and end recovery (ER). The main result was a large and significant influence of rhythmic AL activity on RC parameters of the H-reflex at EP and SP phases. However, the parameters (and thus motor unit populations) were differentially affected at each phase and task. For instance, a significant contribution of arms movement was noticed for H (max) (largest motor units) at EP phase (P < 0.05), but no changes was observed for other parameters related to lower reflex amplitude (e.g., H-reflex evoked with an input that elicited 50% of maximum reflex response during static condition; H@50%). On the other hand, at SR phase, the parameter H@50% was significantly affected during AL compared to L. It is suggested that the remote effect from arms rhythmic activity has been differentially manifested across motor unit populations for each phase of movement. These findings provide definitive evidence for interlimb coupling between cervical and lumbar oscillators in gating the excitability of reflex pathways to a leg muscle for different populations of motorneurons within the pool. This further supports the contention of similar functional organization for locomotor networks in the human when compared to other animals. Additionally, these data provide additional confirmation of the significant role of the output of neural control for rhythmic arm movement in modulating reflex excitability of the legs that is specifically adjusted according to the phase and task. PMID:21063693

  12. Effect of viral upper respiratory tract infection on cough reflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2014-10-01

    Acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI; common cold) is among the most common medical conditions affecting man, with cough being a typical feature of the associated syndrome. Studies employing capsaicin inhalation challenge to measure cough reflex sensitivity have demonstrated a transient tussive hyperresponsiveness induced by URI that reverts to normal by 4-8 weeks post infection. Mechanisms proposed to explain the induction of cough by URI include a number of infection-associated airway effects, such as enhanced release of cytokines, neurotransmitters, and leukotrienes; increased neural receptor levels; reduced activity of neutral endopeptidases; transient modulation of afferent neural activity; mucus hypersecretion; and, possibly, effects on cholinergic motor pathways. Recent studies evaluating urge-to-cough (UTC), the sensation of irritation preceding the motor act of coughing, have demonstrated that URI induces a transient enhancement of UTC analogous to the effect observed on cough reflex sensitivity. The recently introduced concept of the Cough Hypersensitivity Syndrome may provide an explanation for the commonly observed clinical phenomenon of acute viral URI triggering what will develop into chronic, refractory cough in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25383204

  13. Simulation of reflex late decelerations in labor with a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    van der Hout-van der Jagt, M Beatrijs; Oei, S Guid; Bovendeerd, Peter H M

    2013-01-01

    Fetal welfare during labor and delivery is commonly monitored through the cardiotocogram (CTG), the combined registration of uterus contractions and fetal heart rate (FHR). From the CTG, the fetal oxygen state is estimated as the main indicator of the fetal condition, but this estimate is difficult to make, due to the complex relation between CTG and oxygen state. Mathematical models can be used to assist in the interpretation of the CTG, since they enable quantitative modeling of the flow of events through which uterine contractions affect fetal oxygenation and FHR. We propose a mathematical model to simulate reflex 'late decelerations', i.e. variations in FHR originating from uteroplacental flow reduction during uterine contractions and mediated by the baroreflex and the chemoreflex. Results for the uncompromised fetus show that partial oxygen pressures reduce in relation to the strength and duration of the contraction. Above a certain threshold, hypoxemia will evoke a late deceleration. Results for uteroplacental insufficiency, simulated by reduced uterine blood supply or reduced placental diffusion capacity, demonstrated lower baseline FHR and smaller decelerations during contraction. Reduced uteroplacental blood volume was found to lead to deeper decelerations only. The model response in several nerve blocking simulations was similar to experimental findings by Martin et al. [18], indicating a correct balance between vagal and sympathetic reflex pathways. PMID:22840604

  14. The diving reflex in non-eosinophilic non-allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Cook, J A; Hamilton, J W; Jones, A S

    1996-06-01

    The usual nasal response to head submersion in aquatic mammals is an increase in resistance to airflow, the so-called diving reflex. Although less well developed in humans, it is nevertheless present. It is likely to occur due to a relative increase of parasympathetic over sympathetic control of the nasal vasculature. Non-eosinophilic non-allergic rhinitis is thought to be due to a similar imbalance and we have attempted to establish whether the diving reflex is abnormal in this condition. Sixteen normal subjects and 18 subjects with non-eosinophilic non-allergic rhinitis (NENAR) underwent simulated diving using the "cold face test'. Expiratory total nasal airway resistance (ETR) was measured before and after the test by means of active anterior rhinomanometry. There was no significant increase in ETR in the normal group but a significant increase in ETR in the NENAR group (pre-test median ETR-0.464 kPa.s.l(-1). post-test median ETR 0.667 kPa.s.l(-1), (Wilcoxon's signed rank test P < 0.05). The change in median ETR in the NENAR group was also significantly higher than the median change in ETR in the normal group (Mann-Whitney, extract probability P = 0.04). We conclude the nasal airway response to simulated diving in NENAR is abnormal. PMID:8818492

  15. Assessment of cardiovascular reflexes is of limited value in predicting maximal +Gz-tolerance.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, E J; van Lieshout, J J; Krol, J; Simons, M; Karemaker, J M

    1992-01-01

    The importance of +Gz-induced loss of consciousness as a major cause of inflight incapacitation emphasizes the need for predicting +Gz-tolerance and investigating its possible determinants. The cardiovascular changes from +Gz-stress are initially counteracted reflexly by the cardiovascular autonomic system. The integrity of neural cardiovascular reflex control can be assessed by analysing the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) responses to different maneuvers, such as the Valsalva maneuver, standing and forced respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The aim of the present study was to investigate a possible relation between the cardiovascular responses to these tests and +Gz-tolerance. In 10 healthy subjects continuous Finapres BP and HR responses to the tests have been determined and correlated with their G-levels of peripheral light loss (PLL) during centrifuge-runs (0.1 G/s). Only mean BP recovery during Valsalva maneuver correlated marginally significantly with PLL (r = 0.63, p = 0.049). Cardiovascular findings were within normal range revealing no cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. These results indicate that intact neural cardiovascular control seems to be a condition for tolerating +Gz-stress without determining maximal +Gz-tolerance. We conclude that assessment of cardiovascular reflexes may only confirm baroreflex integrity. However, they have limited value in predicting +Gz-tolerance. PMID:1550529

  16. Effects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sava, Simona L; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  17. Early Modern ET, Reflexive Telescopics, and Their Relevance Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Dennis

    The period from the discovery of Tycho's New Star in 1572 to Galileo's "geometrization of astronomical space" in 1610 (and the years following) saw the disintegration of the boundary between the sublunary and superlunary spheres—between the "lower storey" and "upper storey" of the Aristotelian Universe. This establishment of a strong physical affinity between the universe "up there" and the earthly realm "down here" was also complemented by the rise of Copernicanism: for once the Earth was seen as a planet, the other planets could readily be imagined as other Earths. This analogy suggested not only physical but also biological affinities and supported the plausibility of humans' capacity to travel to the Moon and beyond. Robert Burton—given the demise of Aristotle's physics—declared in 1621 that "If the heavens be penetrable … it were not amiss in this aerial progress to make wings and fly up." John Wilkins and Francis Godwin in the 1630s actively imagined creatures in the Moon and human journeys thither. The epic poet John Milton in 1667 hinted that "every star [is] perhaps a world / Of destined habitation." Moreover, space travel was no one-way street: Thomas Traherne in the 1670s imagined a dweller among the stars visiting Earth and remarking on what must be the condition of its inhabitants. In these and other ways, seventeenth-century writers offered serious and impressive speculation about extraterrestrial life and its possible perceptions of Earth. Such speculations remain pertinent to astrobiological theory today. What Hans Blumenberg in the 1970s called "reflexive telescopics"—the examination of Earth from an imagined extraterrestrial viewpoint—is an important counterpart to the search for life "out there." It serves as a reminder of the obvious but profound premise that Earth is part of the cosmos. At a popular level we often continue to speak of "outer space" as if the old "two-storey" picture of the universe still had some residual legitimacy. However, if Galileo, Wilkins, and other devotees of the New Astronomy were right about Earth's being a full participant in "the dance of the stars," then "outer" is a merely relative and parochial term, not a scientific or qualitative one. And it is no trivial claim to assert that the search for intelligent life in the universe has already identified its first specimens.

  18. 'Diving reflex' in man - Its relation to isometric and dynamic exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, S. A., Jr.; Campbell, J. K.; Wildenthal, K.

    1972-01-01

    To test the influence of physical activity on the diving reflex, 10 normal men held their breath with their faces immersed in 15 C water during rest, bicycle exercise, and sustained isometric handgrip contraction. At all conditions, a slight but statistically significant elevation of blood pressure and a marked decrease in heart rate occurred during each dive. During moderate bicycle exercise heart rate fell more rapidly than at rest and the final level of bradycardia approached that achieved at rest, despite the fact that predive heart rates were much higher during exercise. When diving occurred in combination with isometric exercise, bradycardia was less severe than during resting dives and final heart rates could be represented as the sum of the expected responses to each intervention alone. In all conditions apnea without face immersion caused bradycardia that was less severe than during wet dives.

  19. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: description of a case with skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Vergara, Aránzazu; Isarría, María J; Prado Sánchez-Caminero, María; Guerra, Aurora

    2005-10-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy or algodystrophy is a poorly defined syndrome in which the patient develops pain disproportionate to the cause. It is included among the complex regional pain syndromes. The symptoms are triggered by some type of trauma, at times trivial, and consist of burning pain, edema, changes in skin color, alterations in vascularization, temperature changes, hyperhidrosis and skin disorders, which primarily consist of atrophic changes. Other less frequent cutaneous manifestations have been described in patients with this syndrome. These include papules, blisters, inflammatory lesions and reticulated hyperpigmentation. We discuss the case of a patient with reflex sympathetic dystrophy who presented with superficial ulcers on the affected limb, which mimicked dermatitis artefacta. PMID:16476289

  20. Trigeminocardiac reflex: the current clinical and physiological knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Mendelowith, David; Golanov, Eugene; Spiriev, Toma; Arasho, Belachew; Sandu, Nora; Sadr-Eshkevari, Pooyan; Meuwly, Cyrill; Schaller, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) is defined as the sudden onset of parasympathetic dysrhythmia, sympathetic hypotension, apnea, or gastric hypermotility during stimulation of any of the sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve. Clinically, the TCR has been reported in all the surgical procedures in which a structure innervated by the trigeminal nerve is involved. Although, there is an abundant literature with reports of incidences and risk factors of the TCR; the physiological significance and function of this brainstem reflex has not yet been fully elucidated. In addition, there are complexities within the TCR that requires examination and clarification. There is also a growing need to discuss its cellular mechanism and functional consequences. Therefore, the current review provides an updated examination of the TCR with a particular focus on the mechanisms and diverse nature of the TCR. PMID:25602626

  1. Lateral asymmetry of the Hoffmann reflex: relation to cortical laterality.

    PubMed Central

    Goode, D J; Glenn, S; Manning, A A; Middleton, J F

    1980-01-01

    Lateral asymmetry of the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) recovery curve was found in seven subjects with no personal or family history of neurological or psychiatric disorder. Differences between recovery curves from the right and left leg were larger than differences in the same leg on two successive test days. In a group of 27 psychiatric inpatients, lateral asymmetry of the later portion of the recovery curve was correlated with cortical laterality, as measured by selective identification of differing verbal stimuli presented simultaneously to both ears (DL) and to total laterality scores, a sum of visual half-field, DL, and motor laterality scores. Asymmetry of the recovery curve is related in part to cortical laterality, possibly through selective activation of cortical motor centres on the preferred side. PMID:7420106

  2. The afferent volleys responsible for spinal proprioceptive reflexes in man

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Gandevia, Simon C.; McKeon, Brian

    1983-01-01

    1. To define the neural volleys responsible for the Achilles tendon jerk and the H reflex, muscle afferent activity was recorded using micro-electrodes inserted percutaneously into appropriate fascicles of the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa. 2. The response of soleus muscle afferents to tendon percussion consisted of a dispersed volley, starting 3·5-7·0 ms after percussion, increasing to a peak over 6·5-11·0 ms, and lasting 25-30 ms, depending on the strength of percussion. Electrical stimuli to the sciatic nerve at a level adequate to evoke an H reflex but subthreshold for the M wave produced a more synchronized volley, the fastest fibres of which had conduction velocities of 62-67 m/s, and the slowest 36-45 m/s. 3. The wave of acceleration produced by percussion subthreshold for the ankle jerk spread along the skin at over 150 m/s. Midway between the bellies of the gastrocnemii it consisted of a damped oscillation with four to five separate phases and maximum amplitude approximately one-twentieth of that recorded on the Achilles tendon. 4. With ten primary spindle endings, tendon percussion subthreshold for the ankle jerk elicited two to five spike discharges per tap, the shortest interspike intervals being 4-7 ms. Tendon percussion elicited single discharges from two Golgi tendon organs, and altered the discharge pattern of a single secondary spindle ending. The degree of dispersion of the multi-unit muscle afferent volley can be explained by the pattern of discharge of primary spindle endings. 5. Percussion on the Achilles tendon evoked crisp afferent volleys in recordings from nerve fascicles innervating flexor hallucis longus, tibialis posterior, the intrinsic muscles of the foot and the skin of the foot. Electrical stimuli delivered to the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa at a level sufficient for the H reflex of soleus produced either a volley in muscle afferents from the intrinsic muscles of the foot or a volley in cutaneous afferents from the foot. 6. For comparable stimuli in the two positions, the H reflex was inhibited but the Achilles tendon jerk enhanced when the ankle was dorsiflexed from 105° to 90°. 7. The duration of the rise times of the excitatory post-synaptic potentials (e.p.s.p.s) produced in soleus motoneurones by electrical stimulation, and by tendon percussion subthreshold for the H reflex and the ankle jerk respectively, was estimated from post-stimulus time histograms of the discharge of voluntarily activated single motor units in soleus. The mean e.p.s.p. rise times were 1·9 ms for electrical stimulation and 6·6 ms for tendon percussion. There was evidence that the duration of the electrically evoked e.p.s.p. was curtailed by an inhibitory post-synaptic potential (i.p.s.p.) of only slightly longer latency than the e.p.s.p. 8. The mechanically induced and electrically induced afferent volleys are not homogeneous volleys in group I a afferents from triceps surae. The afferent volleys differ in so many respects that it is probably invalid to compare the H reflex and tendon jerk as a measure of fusimotor activity. It is suggested that neither reflex can be considered a purely monosynaptic reflex. PMID:6887033

  3. Results of the REFLEX (Return Flux Experiment) Flight Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Mauersberger, Konrad; Johnson, Bradford W.; Manning, Heidi K.

    1997-01-01

    The numerous problems occurring in this first flight of the REFLEX experiment, both in the spacecraft and with the instrument package, seriously constrained the acquisition and analysis of data and severely limited the interpretation of the data that were obtained. Of these, the ambient helium measurements appear to be the most promising. They are summarized and discussed in Appendix A. Further analyses could be attempted to establish the correct values for the energy centers as they varied during the mission. In addition, an extensive laboratory recalibration on a high-speed beam system could in principle provide corrections to be used in analyzing and interpreting the returned data set. The unknown malfunction which generated the energy drift needs to be understood and corrected before the REFLEX experiment is reflown; some hardware modification, or at least retuning, is likely to be required.

  4. [Guillain-Barré syndrome with preserved reflexes].

    PubMed

    Zouiri, G; Abilkassem, R; Zerhouni, A; Dini, N; Agadr, A

    2016-05-01

    Guillain-Barré is a rare, autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system. It can affect all ages beginning in the intrauterine or neonatal period. Clinical forms are diverse and include acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN). We report on a pediatric case of AMAN. A 2.5-year-old child presented with acute flaccid paralysis and preserved reflexes. Etiologic investigations argued in favor of Guillain-Barré syndrome in its AMAN form. Treatment based on IV immunoglobulins resulted in a total decline of paralysis and motor recovery. The AMAN form of Guillain-Barré syndrome should be considered as a potential diagnosis in all cases of acute flaccid paralysis with preserved reflexes. PMID:27021810

  5. Blink reflex latency after exposure to trichloroethylene in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, R.G.; Chirico-Post, J.; Proctor, S.P.

    1988-03-01

    The electrophysiological measurement of the blink reflex (BR) can quantify the conduction latency in the reflex arc involving the Vth (trigeminal) and VIIth (facial) cranial nerves. We measured the electrophysiological BR in a population (N = 21), which had alleged chronic exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) through the public drinking water at levels 30-80 times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contamination Level (MCL). A highly significant difference was observed in the conduction latency means of the BR components (p less than .0001), when the study population was compared with laboratory controls (N = 27). This difference suggests a subclinical alteration of the Vth cranial nerve function due to chronic, environmental exposure to TCE.

  6. Medial olivocochlear efferent reflex inhibition of human cochlear nerve responses.

    PubMed

    Lichtenhan, J T; Wilson, U S; Hancock, K E; Guinan, J J

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of cochlear amplifier gain by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system has several putative roles: aiding listening in noise, protection against damage from acoustic overexposure, and slowing age-induced hearing loss. The human MOC reflex has been studied almost exclusively by measuring changes in otoacoustic emissions. However, to help understand how the MOC system influences what we hear, it is important to have measurements of the MOC effect on the total output of the organ of Corti, i.e., on cochlear nerve responses that couple sounds to the brain. In this work we measured the inhibition produced by the MOC reflex on the amplitude of cochlear nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) in response to moderate level (52-60 dB peSPL) clicks from five, young, normal hearing, awake, alert, human adults. MOC activity was elicited by 65 dB SPL, contralateral broadband noise (CAS). Using tympanic membrane electrodes, approximately 10 h of data collection were needed from each subject to yield reliable measurements of the MOC reflex inhibition on CAP amplitudes from one click level. The CAS produced a 16% reduction of CAP amplitude, equivalent to a 1.98 dB effective attenuation (averaged over five subjects). Based on previous reports of efferent effects as functions of level and frequency, it is possible that much larger effective attenuations would be observed at lower sound levels or with clicks of higher frequency content. For a preliminary comparison, we also measured MOC reflex inhibition of DPOAEs evoked from the same ears with f2's near 4 kHz. The resulting effective attenuations on DPOAEs were, on average, less than half the effective attenuations on CAPs. PMID:26364824

  7. The Mammalian Diving Response: An Enigmatic Reflex to Preserve Life?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian diving response is a remarkable behavior that overrides basic homeostatic reflexes. It is most studied in large aquatic mammals but is seen in all vertebrates. Pelagic mammals have developed several physiological adaptations to conserve intrinsic oxygen stores, but the apnea, bradycardia, and vasoconstriction is shared with those terrestrial and is neurally mediated. The adaptations of aquatic mammals are reviewed here as well as the neural control of cardiorespiratory physiology during diving in rodents. PMID:23997188

  8. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the hands: clinical and scintigraphic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, L.E.; Mackinnon, S.E.

    1984-08-01

    In an attempt to establish specific scintigraphic criteria for the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) as defined by a group of specialized hand surgeons, 145 consecutive patients, 23 of whom had clinical RSD, underwent three phase radionuclide bone scanning (TPBS). Specific patterns for positive radionuclide angiogram, blood pool, and delayed images were established. The delayed images were sensitive (96%), specific (97%), and had a valuable negative predictive value (99%). It was concluded that TPBS could provide an objective marker for RSD.

  9. Multiple scattering of electrons in the reflex triode

    SciTech Connect

    Creedon, J.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Analytical theories and Monte Carlo calculations are used to treat the scattering and energy loss of electrons in the anode of a reflex triode. The solution of this scattering problem is combined with the equations for particle flow in vacuum to give a quantitative theory of triode operation. It is now possible to calculate several important properties of this device. These include the operating voltage in the constant voltage mode, the ratio of ion-to-electron current and the ion transit time.

  10. Influence of body position on fibularis longus and soleus Hoffmann reflexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Hertel, Jay

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that Hoffmann (H) reflex amplitudes of the soleus decrease as complexity of body positions increases, but it is not known if this same mechanism of postural control is seen in other ankle muscles such as fibularis longus (FL). Our purpose was to assess if FL H-reflex changed in different body positions and if the adaptations were correlated to soleus H-reflex modulation. Fifteen healthy subjects had their FL and soleus H-reflexes measured in three positions (prone, bipedal, unipedal). Maximal H-reflexes (H-max) and motor responses (M-max) were collected bilaterally. The average H-max and M-max were used to calculate H(max)/M(max) ratios. To control influences of background muscle activity on H-reflex measures, the ratios were normalized to their corresponding mean EMG amplitudes over a 50-ms time epoch. H-reflex amplitudes of both muscles were significantly lower in unipedal stance than other positions. Additionally, there were strong correlations (R(2)>0.7) in H-reflex modulation between the two muscles when transitioning from prone to either bipedal or unipedal stance. Down-modulation of H-reflex when transitioning to unipedal stance was present in both FL and soleus suggesting that H-reflex modulation of both muscles may play a similar role in control of upright posture. PMID:22795783

  11. Reflex carotid body chemoreceptor control of phrenic sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Revenko, S; Szulczyk, P

    1993-04-01

    The reflex reaction of phrenic sympathetic neurons to stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors was tested in chloralose-anesthetized and paralyzed cats with both vago-aortic nerves cut. During systemic hypoxia (animals ventilated with 10% O2 in N2) the sympathetic phrenic nerve activity increased from 100% in the control to 269%. This increase was markedly attenuated after cutting both sinus nerves. Reflex excitatory response in phrenic sympathetic neurons with the latency of 150 msec was evoked by electrical stimulation of the right carotid sinus nerve (3 pulses of 0.2 msec, 333 Hz). The central transmission time of the reflex was about 90 msec. Injecting 0.1 ml of 1 M NaHCO3 saturated with CO2 (in order to activate carotid body chemoreceptors) into the right or left carotid sinus, evoked excitatory responses in sympathetic neurons regardless of the side. The stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors also increased somatic phrenic nerve activity. The three methods applied to the stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors produced increase of phrenic nerve sympathetic activity. PMID:8390088

  12. Reflex Epilepsy Induced by Playing Oriental Card or Board Games

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Jung; Kang, Joong Koo

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose There are currently few studies on clinical profiles of reflex epilepsy induced by thinking and spatial tasks. We studied the clinical characteristics of reflex epilepsy induced by playing oriental card and board games. Methods This study included 17 patients who presented with seizures that occur predominantly while playing games. We collected clinical data via protocol-based interviews. EEGs and brain MRI were performed. Results All of the subjects were men, and all of them were older than 30 years at the onset of seizure. Thirteen patients (76%) experienced their seizures while playing the oriental card game "Go-stop" and the remaining four patients (24%) experienced them while playing the oriental board game "Baduk". Generalized tonic-clonic seizures were frequently preceded by prodromal symptoms, but myoclonus was not evident. Most patients had no spontaneous seizures and generalized epileptiform discharges on EEGs, and infrequent seizures that were well controlled. Conclusions Our patients exhibited some features that differ from those described previously in the literature, suggesting that the clinical spectrum of reflex epilepsy induced by thinking and spatial tasks is wide. PMID:20396530

  13. Skeletal muscle tone and the misunderstood stretch reflex.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, R A

    1992-05-01

    This review presents a revision of long-accepted tenets regarding the genesis of muscle tone in humans. Most discussions liken muscle tone in humans to the reflex tone described by Sherrington in decerebrate animals. That tradition presumes that muscle tone is fully determined by the monosynaptic stretch reflex, that tonic fusimotor activity is necessary for its production in normal humans, and that tonic muscle tone in antigravity leg muscles is responsible for the maintenance of posture. Data reviewed here show that nonreflex, mechanical mechanisms are involved in the maintenance of resting muscle tone; that spinal cord reflex responses are not stereotyped responses, but depend upon the ongoing activity in interneurons upon which inputs from a variety of peripheral sensory receptors and descending fiber systems converge; that long-latency transcortical responses are elicited when a muscle is stretched, and these responses effectively deal with large displacements; and that inertial components and viscoelastic muscle forces can counterbalance small amounts of body sway during quiet standing. In sum, the response to muscle stretch is not fixed and inflexible, but can be adjusted according to the demands of the moment. PMID:1579249

  14. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity. PMID:26627365

  15. Cardioinhibitory reflex due to a karate kick: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Froidmont, Sébastien; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Michaud, Katarzyna; Palmiere, Cristian; Augsburger, Marc-Pierre; Mangin, Patrice; Grabherr, Silke

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the case of a 17-year-old adolescent boy who received a foot kick in the trunk area from an expert in karate. He presented with immediate cardiocirculatory arrest. After a prolonged resuscitation, he was transferred to a hospital where he died 5 days later without ever regaining consciousness. Postmortem investigations including autopsy, radiology, histology, toxicology, and postmortem chemistry were performed that showed signs of multiple organ failure, an acute hemorrhage in the region of the celiac plexus, and signs of medical resuscitation. No preexisting disease, particularly those concerning the heart, was objectified. The cause of death was attributed to multiple organ failure after a prolonged cardiocirculatory arrest. Concerning the origin of the cardiac arrest, 2 hypotheses were considered-a cardioinhibitory reflex and a cardiac contusion (commotio cordis). Because of the presence of traumatic lesions in the celiac plexus, the first hypothesis was finally submitted. This case is reported because rare cases of sudden death from celiac reflex are described in the literature where it is almost impossible to find references with accurate documentation. The presented case confirms the importance of detailed documentation of the circumstances and postmortem investigations to establish a diagnosis of death due to cardioinhibitory reflex. PMID:25881816

  16. Neural reflex pathways in intestinal inflammation: hypotheses to viable therapy.

    PubMed

    Willemze, Rose A; Luyer, Misha D; Buurman, Wim A; de Jonge, Wouter J

    2015-06-01

    Studies in neuroscience and immunology have clarified much of the anatomical and cellular basis for bidirectional interactions between the nervous and immune systems. As with other organs, intestinal immune responses and the development of immunity seems to be modulated by neural reflexes. Sympathetic immune modulation and reflexes are well described, and in the past decade the parasympathetic efferent vagus nerve has been added to this immune-regulation network. This system, designated 'the inflammatory reflex', comprises an afferent arm that senses inflammation and an efferent arm that inhibits innate immune responses. Intervention in this system as an innovative principle is currently being tested in pioneering trials of vagus nerve stimulation using implantable devices to treat IBD. Patients benefit from this treatment, but some of the working mechanisms remain to be established, for instance, treatment is effective despite the vagus nerve not always directly innervating the inflamed tissue. In this Review, we will focus on the direct neuronal regulatory mechanisms of immunity in the intestine, taking into account current advances regarding the innervation of the spleen and lymphoid organs, with a focus on the potential for treatment in IBD and other gastrointestinal pathologies. PMID:25963513

  17. An overset grid method for the study of reflex tearing.

    PubMed

    Maki, K L; Braun, R J; Driscoll, T A; King-Smith, P E

    2008-09-01

    We present an overset grid method to simulate the evolution of human tear film thickness subject to reflex tearing. The free-surface evolution is governed by a single fourth-order non-linear equation derived from lubrication theory with specified film thickness and volume flux at each end. The model arises from considering the limiting case where the surfactant is strongly affecting the surface tension. In numerical simulations, the overset grid is composed of fine boundary grids near the upper and lower eyelids to capture localized capillary thinning referred to as 'black lines' and a Cartesian grid covers the remaining domain. Numerical studies are performed on a non-linear test problem to confirm the accuracy and convergence of the scheme. The computations on the tear film model show qualitative agreement with in vivo tear film thickness measurements. Furthermore, the role of the black lines in the presence of tear supply from the lid margins, reflex tearing, was found to be more subtle than a barrier to tear fluid flow between the anterior of the eye and the meniscus at the lid margin. During reflex tearing, tears may flow through the region normally containing the black line and drift down over the cornea under the influence of gravity. PMID:18628245

  18. Sweet Taste and Menthol Increase Cough Reflex Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Paul M.; Breslin, Paul A.S.; Dalton, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  19. Stimulus-induced reflex epileptic spasms in 5p- syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kentaro; Saito, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Atushi; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Here we describe two patients with 5p- syndrome who suffered from epilepsy characterised by stimulus-induced epileptic spasms manifesting as head nodding. In patient 1, a series of spasms were exclusively triggered by eating, and were associated with diffuse high-voltage slow waves on ictal EEG, particularly presenting as a positive slow potential at the left mid-temporal area. Clusters of sharp waves with negative polarity emerged in the same area during the inter-spasm periods during eating. In patient 2, spasms were provoked by either eating or micturition. Ictal EEG of clustered spasms after micturition showed positive slow or triphasic waves, which correlated with each spasm, over the bifrontal and vertex areas. These findings suggest that the focal cortical areas act as trigger regions in reflex epilepsies, and that a spasm-generator responsible for the execution of reflex spasms exists either in other cortical areas or in the subcortical structures. Although epilepsy is an unusual complication of 5p- syndrome, this syndrome may have a propensity to develop reflex epilepsy, particularly epileptic spasms. However, identification of responsible genes and their roles in this phenotype requires further investigations. PMID:26298410

  20. Trait Dominance Promotes Reflexive Staring at Masked Angry Body Postures

    PubMed Central

    Hortensius, Ruud; van Honk, Jack; de Gelder, Beatrice; Terburg, David

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that dominant individuals sustain eye-contact when non-consciously confronted with angry faces, suggesting reflexive mechanisms underlying dominance behaviors. However, dominance and submission can be conveyed and provoked by means of not only facial but also bodily features. So far few studies have investigated the interplay of body postures with personality traits and behavior, despite the biological relevance and ecological validity of these postures. Here we investigate whether non-conscious exposure to bodily expressions of anger evokes reflex-like dominance behavior. In an interactive eye-tracking experiment thirty-two participants completed three social dominance tasks with angry, happy and neutral facial, bodily and face and body compound expressions that were masked from consciousness. We confirmed our predictions of slower gaze-aversion from both non-conscious bodily and compound expressions of anger compared to happiness in high dominant individuals. Results from a follow-up experiment suggest that the dominance behavior triggered by exposure to bodily anger occurs with basic detection of the category, but not recognition of the emotional content. Together these results suggest that dominant staring behavior is reflexively driven by non-conscious perception of the emotional content and triggered by not only facial but also bodily expression of anger. PMID:25549321

  1. Trait dominance promotes reflexive staring at masked angry body postures.

    PubMed

    Hortensius, Ruud; van Honk, Jack; de Gelder, Beatrice; Terburg, David

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that dominant individuals sustain eye-contact when non-consciously confronted with angry faces, suggesting reflexive mechanisms underlying dominance behaviors. However, dominance and submission can be conveyed and provoked by means of not only facial but also bodily features. So far few studies have investigated the interplay of body postures with personality traits and behavior, despite the biological relevance and ecological validity of these postures. Here we investigate whether non-conscious exposure to bodily expressions of anger evokes reflex-like dominance behavior. In an interactive eye-tracking experiment thirty-two participants completed three social dominance tasks with angry, happy and neutral facial, bodily and face and body compound expressions that were masked from consciousness. We confirmed our predictions of slower gaze-aversion from both non-conscious bodily and compound expressions of anger compared to happiness in high dominant individuals. Results from a follow-up experiment suggest that the dominance behavior triggered by exposure to bodily anger occurs with basic detection of the category, but not recognition of the emotional content. Together these results suggest that dominant staring behavior is reflexively driven by non-conscious perception of the emotional content and triggered by not only facial but also bodily expression of anger. PMID:25549321

  2. The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Faris, I B; Iannos, J; Jamieson, G G; Ludbrook, J

    1980-01-01

    1. A method is described for altering the pressure across the wall of the carotid sinus in conscious rabbits by enclosing the carotid bifurcation in a rigid, fluid-filled capsule. The extracapsular arterial baroreceptors were denervated. 2. The baroreceptor--heart rate reflex, elicited by injecting vasoactive drugs or inflating aortic and vena caval cuffs, was used to test the new method. The function of the carotid sinus was shown to be unaffected by enclosure in the capsule. Denervation of the extracapsular baroreceptors reduced the gain of the baroreceptor--heart rate reflex two- to threefold. 3. The characteristics of the carotid baroreceptor reflex were studied in sixteen animals by the capsule method. Median estimates of maximum gain, and the range over which blood pressure changed, were 1.1 mmHg/mmHg and 57 mmHg respectively. There was good agreement between duplicate estimates made 1--20 days apart. 4. There was only a weak association between the effects on blood pressure and heart rate of altering carotid sinus transmural pressure. Autonomic blockade of the heart, so that its rate was fixed, did not reduce the gain or range of blood pressure change. PMID:7359409

  3. The glenohumeral-biceps reflex in the feline.

    PubMed

    Knatt, T; Guanche, C; Solomonow, M; Lu, Y; Baratta, R; Zhou, B H

    1995-05-01

    The existence of a reflex arc from the anterior aspects of the glenohumeral capsule to the long head of the biceps was determined in a feline. A single articular branch of the musculocutaneous nerve terminating in the capsule was identified and stimulated with 100 microseconds supramaximal pulse train at 10 pulses per second. It was shown tht stimulation of the musculocutaneous articular nerve elicited myoelectric discharge in the biceps muscle. Transection of the articular nerve just distal to its emergence from the main trunk of the musculocutaneous nerve abolished the myoelectric discharge in the biceps, confirming the afferent nature of this articular nerve. The mean (+/- standard deviation) time delay from the application of the stimulus to the articular nerve to the recording of the corresponding myoelectric discharge in the biceps was 2.7 (+/- 0.3) milliseconds. The existence of a reflex arc from the capsule to the biceps confirms and extends the concept of passive (ligaments) and active (muscles) restraints of a joint and the synergy between them toward maintaining shoulder stability. If demonstrated in the human, such a reflex may have significant implications in modification of surgical procedures and the design of new rehabilitation modalities for treatment of shoulder defects. PMID:7634642

  4. Stapedial reflex and recruitment: what is the relationship with tinnitus?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fernando Laffitte; Guimarães, Alexandre Caixeta; de Carvalho, Guilherme Machado; Mezzalira, Raquel; Stoler, Guita; Paschoal, Jorge Rizzato

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus is characterized by an auditory perception of sound, with no stimuli from the external environment. Tinnitus is an increasingly significant complaint, affecting 10-17% of the world population. As a symptom, it should always be considered with pathology in the auditory system. Our study aims to assess the relationship of this symptom with the presence of a stapedial reflex and the phenomenon of recruitment. Medical records of patients complaining of subjective tinnitus during their first consultation in the Outpatient Clinic of the Unicamp Teaching Hospital, in Brazil, between 2011 and 2012 were analyzed. We carried out a study with 65 non-randomized tinnitus individuals using questionnaires, clinical and audiological evaluations. The visual analogue scale was used to characterize the degree of disturbance caused by tinnitus. Statistical tests were performed using the IBM SPSS Statistics 19. No association was found between tinnitus and the presence of acoustic reflex or phenomenon of recruitment. We concluded that there is no relationship between tinnitus, the phenomenon of recruitment or the presence of an acoustic reflex. PMID:25387539

  5. An estimate of the secondary spindle receptor afferent contribution to the stretch reflex in extensor muscles of the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, K; Rymer, W Z

    1977-01-01

    1. Vibration or stretch of the medial gastrocnemius muscle in the decerebrate cat each caused a significant increase in the tension of a synergist, the lateral gastrocenmius. 2. Simultaneous vibration and stretch of the medial gastrocnemius resulted in a substantial increase of lateral gastrocnemius tension which was greater that that produced by medial gastrocnemius vibration alone. The size of this force increase was proportional to the amplitude of medial gastrocnemius stretch, for the limited range of amplitudes examined. 3. Since the discharge of the medial gastrocnemius I a afferent fibres was held constant by vibration, the additional tension in lateral gastrocnemius provoked by medial gastrocnemius stretch must have resulted from the activation of an excitatory pathway separate from the I a afferent system. The secondary spindle afferent pathway was considered to be the most likely candidate. 4. The contributions of the Ia afferents and the additional stretch induced excitation to the stretch reflex were compared. The Ia potency was calculated from the ration of tonic vibration reflex force and the vibration frequency. The total Ia contribution to the stretch reflex, which was estimated from the product of this ratio and the primary ending stretch sensitivity, seemed modest, and was consistently smaller than the proposed secondary contribution. 5. The medial gastrocnemius nerve was subjected to anodal blockade at a strength sufficient to eliminate Ia transmission. Under these conditions, the lateral gastrocnemius excitation produced by medial gastrocnemius stretch or vibration was largely eliminated. When lateral gastrocnemius vibration was superimposed, the excitatory effect of medial gastrocnemius stretch was partly restored suggesting that some central facilitation by group Ia afferents may be necessary for group II pexcitatory effects to be manifested. 6. Although the additional excitatory actions of medial gastrocnemius stretch were examined exclusively in a synergist, it is suggested that similar effects are likely to occur in the homonymous stretch reflex. PMID:138737

  6. The Correlation between Modified Ashworth Scale and Biceps T-reflex and Inter-rater and Intra-rater Reliability of Biceps T-reflex

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ji Hong; Joa, Kyung Lim; Ko, Sung Hwa; Shin, Myung Jun; Chang, Jae Hyeok; Ko, Hyun-Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish a correlation between the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and amplitude and latency of T-reflex and to demonstrate inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the T-reflex of the biceps muscle for assessing spasticity after stroke. Method A total of 21 patients with hemiplegia and spasticity after ischemic stroke were enrolled for this study. The spasticity of biceps muscle was evaluated by an occupational therapist using the MAS. The mean value of manual muscle test of biceps muscles was 2.3±0.79. Latency and amplitude of T-reflex were recorded from biceps muscles by two physicians. The onset latency and peak to peak amplitude of the mean of 5 big T-reflex were measured. The examinations were carried out by two physicians at the same time to evaluate the inter-rater reliability. Further, one of the physicians performed the examination again after one week to evaluate the intra-rater reliability. The correlations between MAS and T-reflex, and the intra- and inter-rater reliability of biceps T-reflex were established by calculating the Spearman correlation coefficients and the intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Results Amplitude of the biceps T-reflex increased with increasing level of MAS (rs=0.464 and 0.573, respectively, p<0.01). ICCs of latency and amplitude of biceps T-reflex were 0.914 and 0.822. The Spearman correlation coefficients of latency and amplitude of biceps T-reflex were 0.937 and 0.635, respectively (p<0.01). Conclusion Biceps T-reflex demonstrates a good quantitative measurement and correlation tool with MAS for spasticity, and also shows acceptable inter- and intra-rater reliability, which can be used for patients with spasticity after stroke. PMID:22977780

  7. Vestibulo-spinal and vestibulo-ocular reflexes are modulated when standing with increased postural threat.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, E N; Cleworth, T W; Allum, J H J; Inglis, J T; Lea, J; Westerberg, B D; Carpenter, M G

    2016-02-01

    We investigated how vestibulo-spinal reflexes (VSRs) and vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) measured through vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) and video head impulse test (vHIT) outcomes, respectively, are modulated during standing under conditions of increased postural threat. Twenty-five healthy young adults stood quietly at low (0.8 m from the ground) and high (3.2 m) surface height conditions in two experiments. For the first experiment (n = 25) VEMPs were recorded with surface EMG from inferior oblique (IO), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), trapezius (TRP), and soleus (SOL) muscles in response to 256 air-conducted short tone bursts (125 dB SPL, 500 Hz, 4 ms) delivered via headphones. A subset of subjects (n = 19) also received horizontal and vertical head thrusts (∼150°/s) at each height in a separate session, comparing eye and head velocities by using a vHIT system for calculating the functional VOR gains. VEMP amplitudes (IO, TRP, SOL) and horizontal and vertical vHIT gains all increased with high surface height conditions (P < 0.05). Changes in IO and SCM VEMP amplitudes as well as horizontal vHIT gains were correlated with changes in electrodermal activity (ρ = 0.44-0.59, P < 0.05). VEMP amplitude for the IO also positively correlated with fear (ρ = 0.43, P = 0.03). Threat-induced anxiety, fear, and arousal have significant effects on VSR and VOR gains that can be observed in both physiological and functional outcome measures. These findings provide support for a potential central modulation of the vestibular nucleus complex through excitatory inputs from neural centers involved in processing fear, anxiety, arousal, and vigilance. PMID:26631147

  8. Hypnotizability, Hypnosis and Prepulse Inhibition of the Startle Reflex in Healthy Women: An ERP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Russo, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    A working model of the neurophysiology of hypnosis suggests that highly hypnotizable individuals (HHs) have more effective frontal attentional systems implementing control, monitoring performance, and inhibiting unwanted stimuli from conscious awareness, than low hypnotizable individuals (LHs). Recent studies, using prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory startle reflex (ASR), suggest that HHs, in the waking condition, may show reduced sensory gating although they may selectively attend and disattend different stimuli. Using a within subject design and a strict subject selection procedure, in waking and hypnosis conditions we tested whether HHs compared to LHs showed a significantly lower inhibition of the ASR and startle-related brain activity in both time and intracerebral source localization domains. HHs, as compared to LH participants, exhibited (a) longer latency of the eyeblink startle reflex, (b) reduced N100 responses to startle stimuli, and (c) higher PPI of eyeblink startle and of the P200 and P300 waves. Hypnosis yielded smaller N100 waves to startle stimuli and greater PPI of this component than in the waking condition. sLORETA analysis revealed that, for the N100 (107 msec) elicited during startle trials, HHs had a smaller activation in the left parietal lobe (BA2/40) than LHs. Auditory pulses of pulse-with prepulse trials in HHs yielded less activity of the P300 (280 msec) wave than LHs, in the cingulate and posterior cingulate gyrus (BA23/31). The present results, on the whole, are in the opposite direction to PPI findings on hypnotizability previously reported in the literature. These results provide support to the neuropsychophysiological model that HHs have more effective sensory integration and gating (or filtering) of irrelevant stimuli than LHs. PMID:24278150

  9. Methodological optimization of tinnitus assessment using prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, R J; Galazyuk, A V

    2012-11-16

    Recently prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR) became a popular technique for tinnitus assessment in laboratory animals. This method confers a significant advantage over the previously used time-consuming behavioral approaches utilizing basic mechanisms of conditioning. Although this technique has been successfully used to assess tinnitus in different laboratory animals, many of the finer details of this methodology have not been described enough to be replicated, but are critical for tinnitus assessment. Here we provide detail description of key procedures and methodological issues that provide guidance for newcomers with the process of learning to correctly apply gap detection techniques for tinnitus assessment in laboratory animals. The major categories of these issues include: refinement of hardware for best performance, optimization of stimulus parameters, behavioral considerations, and identification of optimal strategies for data analysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tinnitus Neuroscience. PMID:22513102

  10. Feasibility analysis of digital single lens reflex applied in the field of aerospace measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xinghao; Li, Manliang; Tang, Xuehai

    2015-10-01

    The mainstrean digital single lens reflex (DSLR) image has the characteristics of true color and high quality, this paper proposes apply DSLR to probe spacecraft in order to obtain better quality Color images. Firstly, the performance parameters of mainstream DSLR and industrial-grade optical detector are analysed and compared detailedly; Secondly, the performance and positioning ways etc. of optical detector and DSLR system integrated special telephoto lens are analysed and compared. Furthermore, some experiments have been done in different conditions. The experiments indicate that the performances of DSLR and optical detector are similar. In addition, DSLR has the advantage of small size, low cost and Easy positioning, which can be used to obtain the scene of spacecraft in the takeoff phase and part of reentry phase.

  11. Control of ocular torsion in the rotational vestibulo-ocular reflexes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard J M

    2008-01-01

    Visual stabilization of the retina during rotational head movements requires that in far vision the eyes rotate about the same axis as the head but in opposite direction with a gain close to unity (optimal strategy). To achieve this goal the vestibulo-oculomotor system must be able to independently control all three rotational degrees of freedom of the eye. Studies of the human rotational vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) have shown that its spatial characteristics are best explained by a strategy that lies halfway between the optimal image stabilization and perfect compliance with Listing's law. Here we argue that these spatial characteristics are fully compatible with an optimal strategy under the condition of a restrained gain of the torsional velocity-to-position integration. One implication of this finding is that the rotational VORs must override the default operation mode of the ocular plant that, according to recent findings, mechanically favours movements obeying Listing's law. PMID:18718301

  12. A study of the H-reflex by single fibre EMG.

    PubMed

    Trontelj, J V

    1973-12-01

    The latency of consecutive H-reflex responses of single human triceps surae motoneurones varies up to 2,500 μs. A large part of this variation was shown to occur at the synaptic transmission. A moderate increase in stimulus strength from the threshold value shortened the mean latency and reduced the latency variation, presumably as a result of spatial summation of excitatory inputs. Further increase to maximum strength lengthened the mean latency, increased the variation, and resulted in a dropping out of some responses which was not produced by collision by antidromic impulses. These effects are believed to be due to an active inhibition. Changes of the latency were also obtained by Jendrassik's manoeuvre and facilitatory and inhibitory conditioning stimuli. PMID:4359164

  13. Reflex limb dilatation following norepinephrine and angiotensin II in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatner, S. F.; Mcritchie, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The extent to which norepinephrine (NE) and angiotensin II (AN) constrict the mesenteric, renal, and iliac beds in conscious dogs is evaluated with a view to elicit opposing reflex actions tempering the vasoconstriction in the limb of the animals tested. The afferent and efferent mechanisms mediating this reflex are analyzed. It is shown that intravenous NE and AN cause striking reflex iliac dilatation in the limb of the conscious dog. The afferent arc of this reflex involves both arterial baroreceptor and vagal path-ways, whereas the efferent mechanism involves an interaction of alpha-adrenergic and histaminergic receptors.

  14. Learning reflexively from a health promotion professional development program in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Beaudet, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, reflexivity has received much attention in the professional education and training literature, especially in the public health and health promotion fields. Despite general agreement on the importance of reflexivity, there appears to be no consensus on how to assess reflexivity or to conceptualize the different forms developed among professionals and participants of training programs. This paper presents an analysis of the reflexivity outcomes of the Health Promotion Laboratory, an innovative professional development program aimed at supporting practice changes among health professionals by fostering competency development and reflexivity. More specifically, this paper explores the difference between two levels of reflexivity (formative and critical) and highlights some implications of each for practice. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with participants from two intervention sites. Results showed that involvement in the Health Promotion Laboratory prompted many participants to modify their vision of their practice and professional role, indicating an impact on reflexivity. In many cases, new understandings seem to have played a formative function in enabling participants to improve their practice and their role as health promoters. The reflective process also served a critical function culminating in a social and moral understanding of the impacts on society of the professionals' practices and roles. This type of outcome is greatly desired in health promotion, given the social justice and equity concerns of this field of practice. By redefining the theoretical concept of reflexivity on two levels and discussing their impacts on practice, this study supports the usefulness of both levels of reflexivity. PMID:23996539

  15. Reflexivity: The Creation of Liminal Spaces-Researchers, Participants, and Research Encounters.

    PubMed

    Enosh, Guy; Ben-Ari, Adital

    2016-03-01

    Reflexivity is defined as the constant movement between being in the phenomenon and stepping outside of it. In this article, we specify three foci of reflexivity-the researcher, the participant, and the encounter-for exploring the interview process as a dialogic liminal space of mutual reflection between researcher and participant. Whereas researchers' reflexivity has been discussed extensively in the professional discourse, participants' reflexivity has not received adequate scholarly attention, nor has the promise inherent in reflective processes occurring within the encounter. PMID:25987582

  16. Interactions between stretch and startle reflexes produce task-appropriate rapid postural reactions

    PubMed Central

    Shemmell, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Neural pathways underpinning startle reflex and limb stretch reflexes evolved independently and have served vastly different purposes. In their most basic form, the pathways responsible for these reflex responses are relatively simple processing units that produce a motoric response that is proportional to the stimulus received. It is becoming clear however, that rapid responses to external stimuli produced by human and non-human primates are context-dependent in a manner similar to voluntary movements. This mini review discusses the nature of startle and stretch reflex interactions in human and non-human primates and the involvement of the primary motor cortex in their regulation. PMID:25674055

  17. The Validity and Reliability of Motion Analysis in Patellar Tendon Reflex Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Lai Kuan; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Lim, Kheng Seang

    2013-01-01

    Background The deep tendon reflex assessments that are essential to the accurate diagnosis of neurological or neuromuscular disorders are conducted subjectively in clinical neurology. Our aim was to assess deep tendon reflexes objectively with a new reflex quantification method. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study used a motion analysis technique to collect quantitative measurements for both the input and output of normal patellar tendon reflex. Reflex responses were measured as knee angles. The patellar tendon reflexes of 100 healthy subjects were examined using 6 levels of tendon taps, where all the assessments were captured using motion capture system. A linear relationship was found between the experimental maximum tapping velocity and tapping angle (coefficient of determination = 0.989), which was consistent with the theoretical values. Tapping velocities were predictable according to tapping angles. The findings proved the reproducibility of tapping method in producing consistent input. The reflex amplitude was consistent between two randomly assigned groups, and linearly proportionate to the tapping velocity. Conclusions/Significance The findings on reflex amplitude indicate that motion analysis is a valid and reliable method of assessing and measuring deep tendon reflexes. PMID:23409022

  18. [CO2-stunning of slaughter pigs: effects on EEG, catecholamines and clinical reflexes].

    PubMed

    Hartung, J; Nowak, B; Waldmann, K H; Ellerbrock, S

    2002-03-01

    Investigations were carried out on the response of slaughter pigs to CO2 stunning with two different gas concentrations (80 vol%, 90 vol%, 73 s) under practical conditions in a one gondola-dip-lift system. EEG measurements were performed and blood constituents such as catecholamines (adrenaline, nor-adrenaline) and lactate as well as clinical reactions (nasal septum and corneal reflex, heart beats) investigated. Special EEG-electrodes were adapted for the measurement on pigs and a mobile data logger was prepared for the use in the lairage of the slaughter house and in the stunning unit. The CO2 concentrations were measured continuously close to the head of the pigs when transported up and down in the stunning gondola. The results show that the technique is suited to monitor the effects of different CO2 gas concentrations on the EEG of the pigs under practical conditions. There is strong evidence that CO2 concentrations of 80 vol% applied over 70 s as required by law are not sufficient to stun pigs properly. A large part of the animals still showed typical reflexes when leaving the stunning pit. When an atmosphere of 90 vol% CO2 is applied, most animals are already dead before bleeding commences. This may create problems in respect to meat hygiene. The blood analysis revealed very high concentrations of catecholamines after stunning. The values for adrenaline and nor-adrenaline in the sticking blood rose by a factor of about 1000 as compared to the concentrations in blood samples taken in the lairage before stunning. It seems necessary to revise the current legislation on gas stunning and to look in greater detail in the effects of CO2 stunning on the welfare of slaughter pigs. PMID:11963365

  19. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, V. E.; Leigh, R. J.; Thomas, C. W.; Averbuch-Heller, L.; Zivotofsky, A. Z.; Discenna, A. O.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P < 0.001), with minimal phase changes, such that mean retinal image slip was held below 5 degrees/s. However, no corresponding modulation in vestibuloocular reflex gain occurred with increasing peak head velocity during a control condition when subjects were rotated in darkness. 3. During both horizontal SP and CEHT, tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. Rapid motor learning in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Wu; Weldon, Patrick; Tang, Bingfeng; King, W. M.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Motor learning was induced in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (TVOR) when monkeys were repeatedly subjected to a brief (0.5 sec) head translation while they tried to maintain binocular fixation on a visual target for juice rewards. If the target was world-fixed, the initial eye speed of the TVOR gradually increased; if the target was head-fixed, the initial eye speed of the TVOR gradually decreased. The rate of learning acquisition was very rapid, with a time constant of approximately 100 trials, which was equivalent to <1 min of accumulated stimulation. These learned changes were consolidated over >or=1 d without any reinforcement, indicating induction of long-term synaptic plasticity. Although the learning generalized to targets with different viewing distances and to head translations with different accelerations, it was highly specific for the particular combination of head motion and evoked eye movement associated with the training. For example, it was specific to the modality of the stimulus (translation vs rotation) and the direction of the evoked eye movement in the training. Furthermore, when one eye was aligned with the heading direction so that it remained motionless during training, learning was not expressed in this eye, but only in the other nonaligned eye. These specificities show that the learning sites are neither in the sensory nor the motor limb of the reflex but in the sensory-motor transformation stage of the reflex. The dependence of the learning on both head motion and evoked eye movement suggests that Hebbian learning may be one of the underlying cellular mechanisms.

  1. The Central Nervous Connections Involved in the Vomiting Reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brizzee, K. R.; Mehler, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    The vomiting reflex may be elicited by a number of different types or classes of stimuli involving many varieties of receptor structures and considerable diversity in afferent pathways and central connections. Central relay or mediating structures thus may vary widely according to the type of initial emetic stimulus. The emetic circuits which have been most completely delineated to date are probably those in which the Chemoreceptor Trigger Zone (CTZ) in the Area Postrema (AP) functions as a key mediating structure. Even in this system, however, there are large gaps in our knowledge of the nerve tracts and central nervous connections involved. Knowledge of most other emetic circuits subserving the emetic reflex resulting from many diverse types of stimuli such, for example, as emotional stress (e.g. psychogenic vomiting, Wruble et al. 1982), pain (e.g. testicular trauma), and chemical or mechanical irritation of the gastrointestinal tract or urinary tract is quite incomplete at this time, thus precluding any very adequate description of their central connections at present. One physiological system, however, which has received considerable attention recently in relation to the vomiting reflex elicited by motion stimuli is the vestibular system. Due to the paucity of data on central nervous connections of several or the non-vestibular types of emetic stimuli cited above, we will devote most of our attention in this brief review to the central connections of the vestibular system which seem likely to be involved in the vomiting response to motion stimuli. However, the latter part of the review will be concerned with the concept of the reticular vomiting centre in relation to the ParviCellular Reticular Formation (PCRF), and will thus probably pertain to all of the many classes of emetic stimuli since it will address the question of the final common emetic pathway.

  2. Maturation of respiratory reflex responses in the piglet.

    PubMed

    Haxhiu-Poskurica, B; Carlo, W A; Miller, M J; DiFiore, J M; Haxhiu, M A; Martin, R J

    1991-02-01

    Stimulation of chemo-, irritant, and pulmonary C-fiber receptors reflexly constricts airway smooth muscle and alters ventilation in mature animals. These reflex responses of airway smooth muscle have, however, not been clearly characterized during early development. In this study we compared the maturation of reflex pathways regulating airway smooth muscle tone and ventilation in anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated 2- to 3- and 10-wk-old piglets. Tracheal smooth muscle tension was measured from an open tracheal segment by use of a force transducer, and phrenic nerve activity was measured from a proximal cut end of the phrenic nerve. Inhalation of 7% CO2 caused a transient increase in tracheal tension in both age groups, whereas hypoxia caused no airway smooth muscle response in either group. The phrenic responses to 7% CO2 and 12% O2 were comparable in both age groups. Lung deflation and capsaicin (20 micrograms/kg iv) administration did not alter tracheal tension in the younger piglets but caused tracheal tension to increase by 87 +/- 28 and 31 +/- 10%, respectively, in the older animals (both P less than 0.05). In contrast, phrenic response to both stimuli was comparable between ages: deflation increased phrenic activity while capsaicin induced neural apnea. Laryngeal stimulation did not increase tracheal tension but induced neural apnea in both age groups. These data demonstrate that between 2 and 10 wk of life, piglets exhibit developmental changes in the reflex responses of airway smooth muscle situated in the larger airways in response to irritant and C-fiber but not chemoreceptor stimulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2022552

  3. Modification of Otolith Reflex Asymmetries Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Andrew H.; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that changes in otolith-mediated reflexes adapted for microgravity contribute to perceptual, gaze and postural disturbances upon return to Earth s gravity. Our goal was to determine pre- versus post-fight differences in unilateral otolith reflexes that reflect these adaptive changes. This study represents the first comprehensive examination of unilateral otolith function following space flight. Ten astronauts participated in unilateral otolith function tests three times pre-flight and up to four times after Shuttle flights from landing day through the subsequent 10 days. During unilateral centrifugation (UC, +/- 3.5cm at 400deg/s), utricular function was examined by the perceptual changes reflected by the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and by video-oculographic measurement of the otolith-mediated ocular counter-roll (OOR). Unilateral saccular reflexes were recorded by measurement of collic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (cVEMP). Although data from a few subjects were not obtained early post-flight, a general increase in asymmetry of otolith responses was observed on landing day relative to pre-flight baseline, with a subsequent reversal in asymmetry within 2-3 days. Recovery to baseline levels was achieved within 10 days. This fluctuation in the asymmetry measures appeared strongest for SVV, in a consistent direction for OOR, and in an opposite direction for cVEMP. These results are consistent with our hypothesis that space flight results in adaptive changes in central nervous system processing of otolith input. Adaptation to microgravity may reveal asymmetries in otolith function upon to return to Earth that were not detected prior to the flight due to compensatory mechanisms.

  4. Production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Verigin, A.A.; Volkov, S.N.; Krasik, Y.E.; Podkatov, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    An experimental study of the production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode is reported. The ions had various ratios Z/M. When the anode plasma is produced in a preliminary charging pulse of the accelerator, the plasma density is too low for operation under charge-limited emission conditions. In this case, an ion beam is observed to be produced from the plasma formed by the direct heating of the anode material by oscillating electrons. When an anode plasma resulting from the breakdown of a dielectric insert or of the vacuum gap of a composite andode by an external voltage source is used to produce an ion beam, the reflex triode operating conditions depend on delaying the operation of the accelerator with respect to the external source. The highest efficiency (approx. =20%) in the production of an ion beam is observed at t/sub d/ = 3--6 ..mu..s. In this case, the reflex triode operates under increasing or constant impedance conditions. It was shown in the course of the experiments that the ion beam which is produced is nonuniform. There are three groups of ions: H/sup +/, C/sup n//sup +/, and Cu/sup n//sup +/. The energy of the heavy ions depends on the applied anode potential. The different mass components of the ion beam do not appear at the same time. The macroscopic divergence of the beam is 4--6/sup 0/ at the periphery and drops off to approx. <1/sup 0/ at the center. The microscopic divergence of the beam is 3/sup 0/. The total energy of the ion beam which is produced is less than 120 J at an average current approx. =2.8 kA.

  5. Abnormal pupillary light reflex with chromatic pupillometry in Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Aya; Shirai, Kentarou; Kubota, Norika; Takayama, Rumiko; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Onuki, Takanori; Numakura, Chikahiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Hamada, Yusuke; Sakai, Norio; Ohno, Atsuko; Asami, Maya; Matsushita, Shoko; Hayashi, Anri; Kumada, Tomohiro; Fujii, Tatsuya; Horino, Asako; Inoue, Takeshi; Kuki, Ichiro; Asakawa, Ken; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ohno, Koyo; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Kousaku

    2014-01-01

    The hallmark of neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD) is oculomotor abnormalities, but ophthalmological assessment is difficult in uncooperative patients. Chromatic pupillometry is a quantitative method to assess the pupillary light reflex (PLR) with minimal patient cooperation. Thus, we investigated whether chromatic pupillometry could be useful for neurological evaluations in GD. In our neuronopathic GD patients, red light-induced PLR was markedly impaired, whereas blue light-induced PLR was relatively spared. In addition, patients with non-neuronopathic GD showed no abnormalities. These novel findings show that chromatic pupillometry is a convenient method to detect neurological signs and monitor the course of disease in neuronopathic GD. PMID:25356393

  6. Abnormal Control of Orbicularis Oculi Reflex Excitability in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cabib, Christopher; Llufriu, Sara; Martinez-Heras, Eloy; Saiz, Albert; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis may lead to abnormal excitability of brainstem reflex circuits because of impairment of descending control pathways. We hypothesized that such abnormality should show in the analysis of blink reflex responses in the form of asymmetries in response size. The study was done in 20 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 12 matched healthy subjects. We identified first patients with latency abnormalities (AbLat). Then, we analyzed response size by calculating the R2c/R2 ratio to stimulation of either side and the mean area of the R2 responses obtained in the same side. Patients with significantly larger response size with respect to healthy subjects in at least one side were considered to have abnormal response excitability (AbEx). We also examined the blink reflex excitability recovery (BRER) and prepulse inhibition (BRIP) of either side in search for additional indices of asymmetry in response excitability. Neurophysiological data were correlated with MRI-determined brain lesion-load and volume. Eight patients were identified as AbLat (median Expanded Disability Status Scale–EDSS = 2.75) and 7 of them had ponto-medullary lesions. Nine patients were identified as AbEx (EDSS = 1.5) and only 2 of them, who also were AbLat, had ponto-medullary lesions. In AbEx patients, the abnormalities in response size were confined to one side, with a similar tendency in most variables (significantly asymmetric R1 amplitude, BRER index and BRIP percentage). AbEx patients had asymmetric distribution of hemispheral lesions, in contrast with the symmetric pattern observed in AbLat. The brainstem lesion load was significantly lower in AbEx than in AbLat patients (p = 0.04). Asymmetric abnormalities in blink reflex response excitability in patients with multiple sclerosis are associated with lesser disability and lower tissue loss than abnormalities in response latency. Testing response excitability could provide a reliable neurophysiological index of dysfunction in early stages of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25083902

  7. Bone scintigraphy in the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kozin, F.; Soin, J.S.; Ryan, L.M.; Carrera, G.F.; Wortmann, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients were studied for possible reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS). They were divided into five groups, based upon specific clinical criteria, and the radiographic and scintigraphic findings in each group were examined. Osteoporosis was the most common radiographic abnormality. Scintigraphic abnormalities were noted in 60% of RSDS patients but in only 7% of the others. These findings included increased blood flow and enhanced periarticular radionuclide activity in the affected extremity. The scan may reflect an active, potentially reversible disorder of local blood flow in RSDS. Furthermore, the scintigraphic patterns may be useful in the diagnosis and in predicting which patients are likely to respond to systemic steroid therapy.

  8. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz. PMID:8552975

  9. Formation of H/sup -/ beams in reflex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Volkov, S.N.; Krasik, Y.E.

    1986-11-01

    The formation of H/sup -/ beams in reflex systems has been studied. The use of charge-exchange method and suppression of the background from protons accelerated from the anode made it possible to determine the concentration of H/sup -/ ions in the plasma near the cathode at the level of 0.5--2%. The H/sup -/ current density lies in the range 0.25 +- 0.15 A/cm/sup 2/. A significant improvement in measurement accuracy can be achieved by using a deuterated coating on the cathode and by switching to a high accelerator current density.

  10. Anode-plasma expansion in pinch-reflex diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Colombant, D.G.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1983-10-24

    Anode-plasma expansion in pinch-reflex diodes is investigated with use of a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model. Early in time, the plasma undergoes thermal expansion and its front is slowed down as a result of j x B. After the current has reached its maximum and for small radius where j and B are larger, j x B may accelerate the bulk of the anode plasma to large velocities. Good qualitative agreement is obtained with observations of the time dependence of the plasma velocity as well as its radial profile. The maximum expansion velocities reach tens of centimeters per microsecond.

  11. The reflex-diode HPM source on Aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Huttlin, G.A.; Bushell, M.S.; Conrad, D.B.; Davis, D.P.; Litz, M.S.; Ruth, B.G.; Agee, F.J. ); Ebersole, K.L.; Judy, D.C.; Lezcano, P.A.; Pereira, N.R.; Weidenheimer, D.M. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the most recent in a series of experiments to develop the reflex diode as a source of microwaves on the Aurora relativistic electron-beam pulser. The authors have achieved an overall output for radial extraction of {approximately} 400 J in microwave bursts from {approximately} 100 to 150 ns at frequencies below 1 GHz. The diagnostics for radial extraction have included directional couplers, card calorimeters, and free-field sensors. The authors have varied the anode/cathode spacing, downstream microwave reflector, and a second anode foil, but, within the range of variations, no strong trends have been noted.

  12. The proprioceptive reflex control of the intercostal muscles during their voluntary activation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. Newsom; Sears, T. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. A quantitative study has been made of the reflex effects of sudden changes in mechanical load on contracting human intercostal muscles during willed breathing movements involving the chest wall. Averaging techniques were applied to recordings of electromyogram (EMG) and lung volume, and to other parameters of breathing. 2. Load changes were effected for brief periods (10-150 msec) at any predetermined lung volume by sudden connexion of the airway to a pressure source variable between ± 80 cm H2O so that respiratory movement could be either assisted or opposed. In some experiments airway resistance was suddenly reduced by porting from a high to a low resistance external airway. 3. Contracting inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles showed a `silent period' with unloading which is attributed to the sudden withdrawal from intercostal motoneurones of monosynaptic excitation of muscle spindle origin. 4. For both inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles the typical immediate effect of an increase in load was an inhibitory response (IR) with a latency of about 22 msec followed by an excitatory response (ER) with a latency of 50-60 msec. 5. It was established using brief duration stimuli (< 40 msec) that the IR depended on mechanical events associated with the onset of stimulation, whereas stimuli greater than 40 msec in duration were required to evoke the ER. 6. For constant expiratory flow rate and a constant load, the ER of expiratory intercostal muscles increased as lung volume decreased within the limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool as residual volume was approached. 7. The ER to a constant load increased directly with the expiratory flow rate at which the load applied, also within limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool. 8. For a given load, the ER during phonation was greater than that occurring at a similar expiratory flow rate without phonation when the resistance of the phonating larynx was mimicked by an external airway resistance. 9. It is argued that the IR is due to autogenetic inhibition arising from tendon organs and that the ER is due to autogenetic excitation arising from intercostal muscle spindles. 10. The initial dominance of inhibition in this dual proprioceptive reflex control was not predicted by the servo theory. It is proposed that the reflex pathways subserving autogenetic inhibition are under a centrifugal control which determines in relation to previous experience (learning) the conditions under which autogenetic facilitation is allowed. PMID:5499805

  13. Estradiol alters the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex in female rats by augmenting sympathoinhibition and attenuating sympathoexcitation.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-06-01

    The chemosensitive cardiac vagal and sympathetic afferent reflexes are implicated in driving pathophysiological changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in cardiovascular disease states. This study investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex. Experiments were performed in anaesthetized, sinoaortic baroreceptor denervated male, female and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats with either intact cardiac innervation or bilateral vagotomy. To investigate the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflexes renal SNA, heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure (AP) were recorded before and following application of capsaicin onto the epicardial surface of the left ventricle. Compared to males, ovary-intact females displayed similar cardiac afferent reflex mediated changes in renal SNA albeit with a reduced maximum sympathetic reflex driven increase in renal SNA. In females, ovariectomy significantly attenuated the cardiac vagal afferent reflex mediated inhibition of renal SNA (renal SNA decreased 2 ± 17% in OVX versus -50 ± 4% in ovary-intact females, P < 0.05) and augmented cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex mediated sympathoexcitation (renal SNA increased 91 ± 11% in OVX vs 62 ± 9% in ovary-intact females, P < 0.05) so that overall increases in reflex driven sympathoexcitation were significantly enhanced. Chronic estradiol replacement, but not progesterone replacement, begun at time of ovariectomy restored cardiac afferent reflex responses to be similar as ovary-intact females. Vagal denervation eliminated all group differences. The current findings show ovariectomy in female rats, mimicking menopause in women, results in greater chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex driven sympathoexcitation and does so, at least partly, via the loss of estradiols actions on the cardiac vagal afferent reflex pathway. PMID:25810130

  14. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E.; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K.

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury. PMID:27049521

  15. Researching Reflexively With Patients and Families: Two Studies Using Video-Reflexive Ethnography to Collaborate With Patients and Families in Patient Safety Research.

    PubMed

    Collier, Aileen; Wyer, Mary

    2016-06-01

    Patient safety research has to date offered few opportunities for patients and families to be actively involved in the research process. This article describes our collaboration with patients and families in two separate studies, involving end-of-life care and infection control in acute care. We used the collaborative methodology of video-reflexive ethnography, which has been primarily used with clinicians, to involve patients and families as active participants and collaborators in our research. The purpose of this article is to share our experiences and findings that iterative researcher reflexivity in the field was critical to the progress and success of each study. We present and analyze the complexities of reflexivity-in-the-field through a framework of multilayered reflexivity. We share our lessons here for other researchers seeking to actively involve patients and families in patient safety research using collaborative visual methods. PMID:26658233

  16. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury

    PubMed Central

    Striemer, Christopher L.; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D.; Danckert, James A.; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices—regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention. PMID:26300756

  17. Coronary Spasm in Neurosurgical Patients and Role of Trigeminocardiac Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, Nora; Cappellani, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Coronary artery spasm (CAS) is a rarely reported complication in neurosurgical patients and its main causative mechanism was attributed to vagal mediated responses. However, these may be the unusual manifestations of trigeminal cardiac reflex (TCR) which is a well established brain stem reflex observed in various neurosurgical patients. Methods and Results. In this review, we have searched for the case reports/papers related to intraoperative coronary spasm in neurosurgical patients and described the role of TCR in this regard. TCR is a possible mechanism in producing CAS in most of the cases in which stimulation occurred at or near the vicinity of trigeminal nerve. It is likely that TCR mediated coronary spasm may be a physiological mechanism and not related to actual myocardial insult apparent by cardiac enzymes or echocardiography studies in most of the cases. Some common risk factors may also exist related to occurrence of CAS as well as TCR. Conclusions. In conclusion, neurosurgical procedures occurring at the vicinity of trigeminal nerve may produce CAS even in previously healthy patients and may produce catastrophic consequences. There is a need for future reports and experimental studies on the interaction of TCR and pathophysiological mechanisms related to CAS. PMID:24587903

  18. The use of rat spinal reflexes to quantify injection pain.

    PubMed

    Ami, Nozomi; Satou, Hideki

    2015-07-10

    Pain caused by subcutaneous injections is unpleasant, which may limit patient compliance. The objective of this study was to use spinal reflexes to quantify subcutaneous injection pain. Spinal reflexes were measured using an electromyogram (EMG) test. The effects of injection volume, pH and osmotic pressure were investigated. The EMG responses increased with injection volume and the acidity of the solution but did not depend on the osmotic pressure of the solution. The EMG responses differed for subcutaneously injected sodium chloride and glucose over the same range of osmotic pressures. Pain caused by the subcutaneous injections was unrelated to the osmotic ratio up to approximately 5. The injection pain caused by therapeutic protein solutions was also evaluated. We compared the EMG responses of the adalimumab and etanercept, as the injection of adalimumab is more painful than that of etanercept in humans. The EMG magnitude for adalimumab was twice that induced by etanercept as observed for the EMG tests performed in rats. Therapeutic proteins account for an increasingly large proportion of pharmaceutical drugs. When a high dose of therapeutic proteins is required, the protein solution must often be highly concentrated to reduce the injection volume. For patient comfort, it is critical to reduce injection pain. The EMG test reported here allows subcutaneous injection pain to be quantified and may be useful for optimizing drug formulations. PMID:25850075

  19. Trigemino-cervical reflex in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uzun, Nurten; Örnek, Nurettin İrem; Ünalan, Halil; Karamehmetoğlu, Şafak Sahir; Kızıltan, Meral E

    2014-09-19

    Abnormal enhancement of polysynaptic brainstem reflexes has been previously reported in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). We aimed to investigate trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) in SCI since it may reflect alterations in the connections of trigeminal proprioceptive system and cervical motoneurons. Consecutive 14 patients with SCI and 16 healthy subjects were included in this study. All patients were in the chronic phase. TCR was recorded over sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and splenius capitis (SC) muscles by stimulation of infraorbital nerve. We measured onset latency, amplitudes and durations of responses and compared between groups. We obtained stable responses over both muscles after one sided stimulation in healthy volunteers whereas probability of TCR was decreased in patients over both SCM (78.6% vs. 100%, p=0.050) and SC (71.4% vs. 100%, p=0.022). The absence of TCR was related to use of oral baclofen (≥50mg/day). However, when present, responses of SCI group had higher amplitudes and were more persistent. We demonstrated that TCR probability was similar to healthy subjects in SCI patients who used no or low dose oral baclofen. But it had higher amplitudes and longer durations. It was not obtained in only two patients who used oral baclofen more than 50mg/day. PMID:25128217

  20. Forebrain neurocircuitry associated with human reflex cardiovascular control

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, J. Kevin; Goswami, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis depends upon adequate integration and responsiveness of sensory information with the autonomic nervous system to affect rapid and effective adjustments in end organ control. Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system leads to cardiovascular disability with consequences as severe as sudden death. The neural pathways involved in reflexive autonomic control are dependent upon brainstem nuclei but these receive modulatory inputs from higher centers in the midbrain and cortex. Neuroimaging technologies have allowed closer study of the cortical circuitry related to autonomic cardiovascular adjustments to many stressors in awake humans and have exposed many forebrain sites that associate strongly with cardiovascular arousal during stress including the medial prefrontal cortex, insula cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala and hippocampus. Using a comparative approach, this review will consider the cortical autonomic circuitry in rodents and primates with a major emphasis on more recent neuroimaging studies in awake humans. A challenge with neuroimaging studies is their interpretation in view of multiple sensory, perceptual, emotive and/or reflexive components of autonomic responses. This review will focus on those responses related to non-volitional baroreflex control of blood pressure and also on the coordinated responses to non-fatiguing, non-painful volitional exercise with particular emphasis on the medial prefrontal cortex and the insula cortex. PMID:26388780

  1. Vestibulospinal control of reflex and voluntary head movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Secondary canal-related vestibulospinal neurons respond to an externally applied movement of the head in the form of a firing rate modulation that encodes the angular velocity of the movement, and reflects in large part the input "head velocity in space" signal carried by the semicircular canal afferents. In addition to the head velocity signal, the vestibulospinal neurons can carry a more processed signal that includes eye position or eye velocity, or both (see Boyle on ref. list). To understand the control signals used by the central vestibular pathways in the generation of reflex head stabilization, such as the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), and the maintenance of head posture, it is essential to record directly from identified vestibulospinal neurons projecting to the cervical spinal segments in the alert animal. The present report discusses two key features of the primate vestibulospinal system. First, the termination morphology of vestibulospinal axons in the cervical segments of the spinal cord is described to lay the structural basis of vestibulospinal control of head/neck posture and movement. And second, the head movement signal content carried by the same class of secondary vestibulospinal neurons during the actual execution of the VCR and during self-generated, or active, rapid head movements is presented.

  2. Blink reflex: comparison of latency measurements in different human races.

    PubMed

    Kimaid, Paulo Andre Teixeira; Resende, Luiz Antonio Lima; Castro, Heloisa Amélia de Lima; Berzin, Fausto; Barreira, Amilton Antunes

    2002-09-01

    The blink reflex latencies and cephalometric indexes were analysed in 30 male volunteers from three different races, 10 white, 10 black, and 10 Oriental. Ages ranged from 15 to 59 years, height from 1,60 to 1,80 m, and weight from 60 to 80 kg. Blink reflexes were obtained after unilateral electric stimulation of the supraorbital nerve for quantitative analysis of 3 responses, early ipsilateral (R1), late ipsilateral (R2i) and late contralateral (R2c), obtained from the orbicularis oculi muscle. Cephalometric indexes were calculated by multiplying the ratio between the longer transverse and the longer saggital head diameters by 100. The R1, R2i and R2c latencies were consistent with other published papers revealing no differences between the different racial groups. The mean of the cephalometric indexes of each group were consistent with respective racial characteristics. This study revealed that there are no differences between R1, R2i and R2c latencies in the 3 different studied races. PMID:12244392

  3. Vestibulosympathetic reflex during orthostatic challenge in aging humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    Aging attenuates the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and elicits hypotension during otolith organ engagement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to determine the neural and cardiovascular responses to otolithic engagement during orthostatic stress in older adults. We hypothesized that age-related impairments in the vestibulosympathetic reflex would persist during orthostatic challenge in older subjects and might compromise arterial blood pressure regulation. MSNA, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate responses to head-down rotation (HDR) performed with and without lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in prone subjects were measured. Ten young (27 +/- 1 yr) and 11 older subjects (64 +/- 1 yr) were studied prospectively. HDR performed alone elicited an attenuated increase in MSNA in older subjects (Delta106 +/- 28 vs. Delta20 +/- 7% for young and older subjects). HDR performed during simultaneous orthostatic stress increased total MSNA further in young (Delta53 +/- 15%; P < 0.05) but not older subjects (Delta-5 +/- 4%). Older subjects demonstrated consistent significant hypotension during HDR performed both alone (Delta-6 +/- 2 mmHg) and during LBNP (Delta-7 +/- 2 mmHg). These data provide experimental support for the concept that age-related impairments in the vestibulosympathetic reflex persist during orthostatic challenge in older adults. Furthermore, these findings are consistent with the concept that age-related alterations in vestibular function might contribute to altered orthostatic blood pressure regulation with age in humans.

  4. Virtues in participatory design: cooperation, curiosity, creativity, empowerment and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Steen, Marc

    2013-09-01

    In this essay several virtues are discussed that are needed in people who work in participatory design (PD). The term PD is used here to refer specifically to an approach in designing information systems with its roots in Scandinavia in the 1970s and 1980s. Through the lens of virtue ethics and based on key texts in PD, the virtues of cooperation, curiosity, creativity, empowerment and reflexivity are discussed. Cooperation helps people in PD projects to engage in cooperative curiosity and cooperative creativity. Curiosity helps them to empathize with others and their experiences, and to engage in joint learning. Creativity helps them to envision, try out and materialize ideas, and to jointly create new products and services. Empowerment helps them to share power and to enable other people to flourish. Moreover, reflexivity helps them to perceive and to modify their own thoughts, feelings and actions. In the spirit of virtue ethics-which focuses on specific people in concrete situations-several examples from one PD project are provided. Virtue ethics is likely to appeal to people in PD projects because it is practice-oriented, provides room for exploration and experimentation, and promotes professional and personal development. In closing, some ideas for practical application, for education and for further research are discussed. PMID:22806218

  5. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury.

    PubMed

    Striemer, Christopher L; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D; Danckert, James A; Schweizer, Tom A

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices-regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention. PMID:26300756

  6. Reflex effects on the heart of stimulating left atrial receptors

    PubMed Central

    Furnival, C. M.; Linden, R. J.; Snow, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    1. Stimulation of left atrial receptors, by distension of the pulmonary vein/left atrial junctions, is known to cause a reflex increase in heart rate; the efferent pathway is known to be solely in the sympathetic nerves. 2. In expectation of a concomitant positive inotropic response the effect of stimulating the left atrial receptors on the inotropic state of the left ventricle was studied, using as a known sensitive index of inotropic changes the maximal rate of rise of pressure in the left ventricle (dP/dt max). 3. Stimulation of left atrial receptors resulted in an increase in heart rate but there were no significant concomitant changes in dP/dt max. 4. It is concluded that activity in this discrete efferent pathway does not include an inotropic effect on the left ventricle and therefore the reflex involves only those sympathetic nerves which innervate the sinu-atrial node. 5. The possible function of atrial receptors in the regulation of heart volumes is discussed. PMID:5124571

  7. Participation of the anterior hypothalamus in the baroreceptor reflex

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, S. M.; Spyer, K. M.

    1971-01-01

    1. On the basis of discrete electrical stimulation in the pre-optic region and anterior hypothalamus of anaesthetized cats, a depressor area has been defined, stimulation of which elicits a fall of arterial blood pressure of 30-50 mm Hg and a bradycardia of some 25%, caused by inhibition of sympathetic vasomotor tone and by vagal activation respectively. These are accompanied by a reduction in rate and depth of respiration. 2. The depressor area, from which this pattern of response is elicited, lies ventral and caudal to the anterior commissure, and extends caudally in the dorsal hypothalamus, dorsal to the fornix. 3. The pattern of response elicited from identified points in the depressor area was shown to be indistinguishable from that to baroreceptor afferent stimulation. 4. A lesion destroying the hypothalamic depressor area bilaterally reduced the response to baroreceptor afferent stimulation. Lesions in the medullary depressor area which spared a large part of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius also reduced, but did not abolish, the baroreceptor reflex response. The two lesions combined abolished the reflex. 5. It is concluded that the whole brain-stem depressor area, from the hypothalamus through the mid-brain to the medulla, constitutes a functional unit which integrates the response to baroreceptor afferent stimulation. PMID:5124567

  8. Revisiting global body politics in Nepal: A reflexive analysis.

    PubMed

    Harcourt, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Using the example of a human rights training in Nepal, the author looks at global body politics in a reflexive piece on her engagement in development practices that translate western feminist ideas on gender inequality and empowerment via UN human rights policies into non-western contexts. It firsts look at postcolonial and critical literature on feminist engagement in gender and development processes including a discussion on the concept of global body politics before examining briefly the framing of gender-based violence in Nepal. The core of the paper is a reflexive analysis and interrogation of the training in Nepal in order to bring out the tensions and contradictions around western developmental, feminist and human rights discourses. The discussion looks at how difficult it is for feminist, human rights and developmental discourses and practices to unmoor themselves from the notion of the 'expert' and those who do the rights/work/righting rights training and those who are perennially seen as requiring training. The conclusion reflects on possibilities of other epistemic practices found in intercultural dialogues. PMID:26268778

  9. Interpretation of English Reflexives by Adolescent Speakers of Serbo-Croatian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Susan

    1994-01-01

    In a study of first-language transfer and second-language (L2) acquisition of reflexive binding, the interpretation of English reflexives by native speakers of Serbo-Croatian was investigated using two types of written sentence comprehension tasks. Results support the transfer hypothesis and suggest learners have access to Universal Grammar in L2…

  10. Second Language Acquisition of Reflexive Verbs in Russian by L1 Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexieva, Petia Dimitrova

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the process of acquisition of semantic classes of reflexive verbs (RVs) in Russian by L2 learners with a native language English. The purpose of this study is to bridge the gap between current linguistic knowledge and the pedagogical literature existing in English on reflexives in Russian. RVs are taught partially and…

  11. Second Language Acquisition of Reflexive Verbs in Russian by L1 Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexieva, Petia Dimitrova

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the process of acquisition of semantic classes of reflexive verbs (RVs) in Russian by L2 learners with a native language English. The purpose of this study is to bridge the gap between current linguistic knowledge and the pedagogical literature existing in English on reflexives in Russian. RVs are taught partially and

  12. Temporal facilitation of spastic stretch reflexes following human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hornby, T George; Kahn, Jennifer H; Wu, Ming; Schmit, Brian D

    2006-03-15

    Recent evidence suggests that alterations in ionic conductances in spinal motoneurones, specifically the manifestation of persistent inward currents, may be partly responsible for the appearance of hyperexcitable reflexes following spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesized that such alterations would manifest as temporal facilitation of stretch reflexes in human SCI. Controlled, triangular wave, ankle joint rotations applied at variable velocities (30-120 deg s(-1)) and intervals between stretches (0.25-5.0 s) were performed on 14 SCI subjects with velocity-dependent, hyperexcitable plantarflexors. Repeated stretch elicited significant increases in plantarflexion torques and electromyographic (EMG) activity from the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG). At higher velocities (> or = 90 deg s(-1)), reflex torques declined initially, but subsequently increased to levels exceeding the initial response, while mean EMG responses increased throughout the joint perturbations. At lower velocities (< or = 60 deg s(-1)), both joint torques and EMGs increased gradually. Throughout a range of angular velocities, reflex responses increased significantly only at intervals < or = 1 s between stretches and following at least four rotations. Ramp-and-hold perturbations used to elicit tonic stretch reflexes revealed significantly prolonged EMG responses following one or two triangular stretches, as compared to single ramp-and-hold excursions. Post hoc analyses revealed reduced reflex facilitation in subjects using baclofen to control spastic behaviours. Evidence of stretch reflex facilitation post-SCI may reflect changes in underlying neuronal properties and provide insight into the mechanisms underlying spastic reflexes. PMID:16540600

  13. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with

  14. The Modified Blink Reflex and individual Differences in Speed of Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Mary; Anderson, Mike; Hammond, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    Studied a new method of measuring speed of processing, the modified blink reflex (MBR), in 2 experiments involving 57 adults. Findings are consistent with the view that interconnecting pathways allow higher level processing of a tone to prime the lower-level reflex pathway. Discusses implications for MBR and measurement of speed of processing.

  15. Reflexive Clitics in the Slavic and Romance Languages. A Comparative View from an Antipassive Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    In this work, I offer a unified analysis of all the constructions that involve a reflexive clitic SE in Slavic and Romance languages. Next to canonical constructions, in which the reflexive clitic semantically identifies the two arguments of a transitive verb, cf. "John" SE "wash" means "John washes himself," there are constructions in which it is…

  16. Changes in Soleus H-Reflex Modulation after Treadmill Training in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Maike; Vry, Julia; Mall, Volker; Faist, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In healthy children, short latency leg muscle reflexes are profoundly modulated throughout the step cycle in a functionally meaningful way and contribute to the electromyographic (EMG) pattern observed during gait. With maturation of the corticospinal tract, the reflex amplitudes are depressed via supraspinal inhibitory mechanisms. In the soleus

  17. Reflexivity and the Politics of Knowledge: Researchers as "Brokers" and "Translators" of Educational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriprakash, Arathi; Mukhopadhyay, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    This paper interrogates the ways in which "reflexivity" has proliferated as a normative methodological discourse in the field of international and comparative education. We argue that the dominant approach to reflexivity foregrounds the standpoints of researchers and their subjects in a way that does not attend to the situated,…

  18. On reflexivity and the conduct of the self in everyday life: reflections on Bourdieu and Archer.

    PubMed

    Akram, Sadiya; Hogan, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a critique of the concept of reflexivity in social theory today and argues against the tendency to define agency exclusively in terms of reflexivity. Margaret Archer, in particular, is highlighted as a key proponent of this thesis. Archer argues that late modernity is characterized by reflexivity but, in our view, this position neglects the impact of more enduring aspects of agency, such as the routinization of social life and the role of the taken-for-granted. These concepts were pivotal to Bourdieu and Giddens' theorization of everyday life and action and to Foucault's understanding of technologies of the self. We offer Bourdieu's habitus as a more nuanced approach to theorizing agency, and provide an alternative account of reflexivity. Whilst accepting that reflexivity is a core aspect of agency, we argue that it operates to a backdrop of the routinization of social life and operates from within and not outside of habitus. We highlight the role of the breach in reflexivity, suggesting that it opens up a critical window for agents to initiate change. The article suggests caution in over-ascribing reflexivity to agency, instead arguing that achieving reflexivity and change is a difficult and fraught process, which has emotional and moral consequences. The effect of this is that people often prefer the status quo, rather than to risk change and uncertainty. PMID:26434736

  19. Processing Reflexives in a Second Language: The Timing of Structural and Discourse-Level Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felser, Claudia; Cunnings, Ian

    2012-01-01

    We report the results from two eye-movement monitoring experiments examining the processing of reflexive pronouns by proficient German-speaking learners of second language (L2) English. Our results show that the nonnative speakers initially tried to link English argument reflexives to a discourse-prominent but structurally inaccessible antecedent,…

  20. Encouraging Reflexivity in Urban Geography Fieldwork: Study Abroad Experiences in Singapore and Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork in urban geography courses can encourage reflexivity among students regarding the cities they encounter. This article outlines how student reflexivity was encouraged within a new international field research course in Singapore and Malaysia. Drawing on examples from students' field exercises written during an intensive and…

  1. Teaching Critical Reflexivity in Short-Term International Field Courses: Practices and Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This study critiques the use of critical reflexivity in short-term international field courses. Critical reflexivity's benefits include preparing students for professional research, deepening their learning, and giving the chance to see how student perspectives on fieldwork sites are influenced by their own identity and positionality. I use an…

  2. The tibialis anterior reflex in healthy subjects and in L5 radicular compression.

    PubMed Central

    Stam, J

    1988-01-01

    Phasic stretch reflexes were evoked in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle, by tapping the dorsal side of the foot with a hand-held reflex hammer. The responses were recorded by means of surface electrodes. The TA reflex was examined in 70 healthy subjects and in 18 patients with L5 radicular compression. In 58 (83%) of the healthy subjects the reflex could be recorded bilaterally, in eight (11%) subjects no reflex was found on either side, and in four (6%) it was absent in one leg. Simultaneous recordings from the gastrocnemius-soleus showed that TA responses were not caused by volume conduction from that muscle. In the 18 patients with L5 radicular compression the TA reflex was absent on the affected side 13 times (72%) and present bilaterally in the other five cases. If asymmetry of the reflex (unilateral absence) is considered as a test for the presence of L5 radicular compression, the likelihood ratio for a positive test is 12.0, and for a negative test 0.3. The examination of the TA reflex is easily performed and can be useful in the diagnosis of L5 radicular compression. PMID:3361331

  3. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  4. Erecting Closets and Outing Ourselves: Uncomfortable Reflexivity and Community-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Sarah J.; Miller, Robin Lin; Nnawulezi, Nkiru; Valenti, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    Feminist scholars and community psychologists have argued that reflexivity is a necessary component to conducting socially conscious research. Reflexivity, however, is rarely evident in community psychology. In this article, we share the uncomfortable realities that surfaced during a community-based research project in which we adapted and

  5. Prevalence of Persistent Primary Reflexes and Motor Problems in Children with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhillips, M.; Sheehy, N.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that some children with reading difficulties have underlying developmental delay and that this may be related to the persistence of primary reflexes. This study investigated the prevalence of persistent primary reflexes in the ordinary primary school population and how this related to other cognitive and social factors. Three…

  6. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in a red and white pattern (see Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), S5.7... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December...

  7. A Comparison of Statistical Models for Calculating Reliability of the Hoffmann Reflex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, A.; Kamen, G.; Boucher, Jean P.; Inglis, J. Greig; Gabriel, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The Hoffmann reflex is obtained through surface electromyographic recordings, and it is one of the most common neurophysiological techniques in exercise science. Measurement and evaluation of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the Hoffmann reflex has been guided by the observation that it is a variable response that requires multiple trials to obtain a…

  8. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in a red and white pattern (see Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), S5.7... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December...

  9. Same Source, Same Target, Different Paths: From "Person" to Reflexive in Umpithamu and Other Paman Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstraete, Jean-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    This study analyses a case of parallel grammaticalization in five genetically related languages, with a lexical source meaning "person" developing to a grammatical function of reflexive marking. Although not typologically unusual, this case is special because, in spite of the overall parallelism, the resulting reflexive markers are located in…

  10. Reflexive Clitics in the Slavic and Romance Languages. A Comparative View from an Antipassive Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    In this work, I offer a unified analysis of all the constructions that involve a reflexive clitic SE in Slavic and Romance languages. Next to canonical constructions, in which the reflexive clitic semantically identifies the two arguments of a transitive verb, cf. "John" SE "wash" means "John washes himself," there are constructions in which it is

  11. Surface EMG Recording of the Perioral Reflexes: Preliminary Observations on Stutterers and Nonstutterers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, Michael D.

    1987-01-01

    Surface electrodes were used to describe the perioral reflexes in seven stutterers and five nonstutterers and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were obtained at electrode sites associated with the orbicularis oris inferior muscle and the depressor labia inferior muscle. A difference was noted in the pattern of reflex response between the two…

  12. A Comparison of Statistical Models for Calculating Reliability of the Hoffmann Reflex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, A.; Kamen, G.; Boucher, Jean P.; Inglis, J. Greig; Gabriel, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The Hoffmann reflex is obtained through surface electromyographic recordings, and it is one of the most common neurophysiological techniques in exercise science. Measurement and evaluation of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the Hoffmann reflex has been guided by the observation that it is a variable response that requires multiple trials to obtain a

  13. Erecting Closets and Outing Ourselves: Uncomfortable Reflexivity and Community-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Sarah J.; Miller, Robin Lin; Nnawulezi, Nkiru; Valenti, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    Feminist scholars and community psychologists have argued that reflexivity is a necessary component to conducting socially conscious research. Reflexivity, however, is rarely evident in community psychology. In this article, we share the uncomfortable realities that surfaced during a community-based research project in which we adapted and…

  14. Spinal Reflex Arc Excitability Corresponding to the Vastus Medialis Obliquus and Vastus Medialis Longus Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Tanino, Yoshitsugu; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The gross morphology of the vastus medialis (VM) muscle has been thoroughly described. However, there is insufficient evidence of physiological differentiation between the VM obliquus (VMO) and VM longus (VML). To elucidate spinal reflex arc excitability in two divisions of the VM, we compared H-reflexes and T-waves in VMO and VML. [Subjects] Twenty-three healthy male volunteers participated in this study. [Methods] The H-reflex was evoked from the VMO and VML by electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve during knee extension at 10% maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Also, the patellar tendon was tapped by an examiner using an electrical tendon hammer, and a component of the compound muscle action potential (T-wave) was recorded. [Results] The configurations of the H-reflex and T-wave were sharp and slow in VMO and VML, respectively. No significant differences in the amplitudes of the H-reflexes and T-waves were observed between VMO and VML. The durations of VML H-reflexes and T-waves were significantly longer than those in VMO. [Conclusion] Spinal reflex arc excitability corresponding to VMO and VML was similar. However, the configurations and durations of the H-reflex and T-wave were differentiated with electromyography. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that VMO and VML are electrophysiologically distinct entities. PMID:24567685

  15. Intrapartum Synthetic Oxytocin Reduce the Expression of Primitive Reflexes Associated with Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Olza Fernández, Ibone; Malalana Martínez, Ana M.; González Armengod, Carmen; Costarelli, Valeria; Millán Santos, Isabel; Fernández-Cañadas Morillo, Aurora; Pérez Riveiro, Pilar; López Sánchez, Francisco; García Murillo, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Several synthetic peptide manipulations during the time surrounding birth can alter the specific neurohormonal status in the newborn brain. This study is aimed at assessing whether intrapartum oxytocin administration has any effect on primitive neonatal reflexes and determining whether such an effect is dose-dependent. Materials and Methods: A cohort prospective study was conducted at a tertiary hospital. Mother–infant dyads who received intrapartum oxytocin (n=53) were compared with mother–infant dyads who did not receive intrapartum oxytocin (n=45). Primitive neonatal reflexes (endogenous, antigravity, motor, and rhythmic reflexes) were quantified by analyzing videotaped breastfeeding sessions in a biological nurturing position. Two observers blind to the group assignment and the oxytocin dose analyzed the videotapes and assesed the newborn's state of consciousness according to the Brazelton scale. Results: The release of all rhythmic reflexes (p=0.01), the antigravity reflex (p=0.04), and total primitive neonatal reflexes (p=0.02) in the group exposed to oxytocin was lower than in the group not exposed to oxytocin. No correlations were observed between the dose of oxytocin administered and the percentage of primitive neonatal reflexes released (r=0.03; p=0.82). Conclusions: Intrapartum oxytocin administration might inhibit the expression of several primitive neonatal reflexes associated with breastfeeding. This correlation does not seem to be dose-dependent. PMID:25785487

  16. The Modified Blink Reflex and individual Differences in Speed of Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Mary; Anderson, Mike; Hammond, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    Studied a new method of measuring speed of processing, the modified blink reflex (MBR), in 2 experiments involving 57 adults. Findings are consistent with the view that interconnecting pathways allow higher level processing of a tone to prime the lower-level reflex pathway. Discusses implications for MBR and measurement of speed of processing.…

  17. Encouraging Reflexivity in Urban Geography Fieldwork: Study Abroad Experiences in Singapore and Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork in urban geography courses can encourage reflexivity among students regarding the cities they encounter. This article outlines how student reflexivity was encouraged within a new international field research course in Singapore and Malaysia. Drawing on examples from students' field exercises written during an intensive and

  18. Changes in Soleus H-Reflex Modulation after Treadmill Training in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Maike; Vry, Julia; Mall, Volker; Faist, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In healthy children, short latency leg muscle reflexes are profoundly modulated throughout the step cycle in a functionally meaningful way and contribute to the electromyographic (EMG) pattern observed during gait. With maturation of the corticospinal tract, the reflex amplitudes are depressed via supraspinal inhibitory mechanisms. In the soleus…

  19. Central Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Acquisition of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning is established by paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) such as a tone or light, and an unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits the blink reflex. Conditioned stimulus information is projected from the basilar pontine nuclei to the cerebellar interpositus nucleus and cortex. The cerebellar cortex,

  20. Central Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Acquisition of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning is established by paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) such as a tone or light, and an unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits the blink reflex. Conditioned stimulus information is projected from the basilar pontine nuclei to the cerebellar interpositus nucleus and cortex. The cerebellar cortex,…

  1. Activation of mu-opioid receptors in rat ventrolateral medulla selectively blocks baroreceptor reflexes while activation of delta opioid receptors blocks somato-sympathetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, T; Goodchild, A K; Pilowsky, P M

    2002-01-01

    The effects of activation of mu and delta-opioid receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) on somato-sympathetic, baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes, as well as respiratory rhythmicity in sympathetic nerves, were examined in urethane anaesthetized (1.1-1.2 g/kg) and artificially ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats. Microinjection of the delta-opioid receptor agonist [D-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE; 8 mM, 50 nl) bilaterally into the RVLM potently inhibited the post-inspiratory-related burst discharges of lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) but had only limited effects on splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and phrenic nerve discharge. Injection of DPDPE into the RVLM strongly attenuated the somato-sympathetic reflex (approximately 50-80%) evoked in the lumbar sympathetic nerve and splanchnic sympathetic nerve by tibial nerve stimulation but had no effect on baroreceptor reflexes and chemoreceptor reflexes evoked by aortic nerve stimulation and brief hypoxia, respectively. Injection of the mu-opioid receptor agonist, [D-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO; 4 mM, 50 nl), also elicited a greater inhibition of LSNA than SSNA accompanied by an abolition of phrenic nerve discharge. Injection of DAMGO inhibited the baroreceptor reflex without significant effect on either the somato-sympathetic or the chemoreceptor reflexes. We propose that opioid peptides diminish specific excitatory and inhibitory inputs to the presympathetic neurons in RVLM via distinct presynaptic receptor subclasses. PMID:11784705

  2. Reflexive anaphor resolution in spoken language comprehension: structural constraints and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Clackson, Kaili; Heyer, Vera

    2014-01-01

    We report results from an eye-tracking during listening study examining English-speaking adults’ online processing of reflexive pronouns, and specifically whether the search for an antecedent is restricted to syntactically appropriate positions. Participants listened to a short story where the recipient of an object was introduced with a reflexive, and were asked to identify the object recipient as quickly as possible. This allowed for the recording of participants’ offline interpretation of the reflexive, response times, and eye movements on hearing the reflexive. Whilst our offline results show that the ultimate interpretation for reflexives was constrained by binding principles, the response time, and eye-movement data revealed that during processing participants were temporarily distracted by a structurally inappropriate competitor antecedent when this was prominent in the discourse. These results indicate that in addition to binding principles, online referential decisions are also affected by discourse-level information. PMID:25191290

  3. Reflexive anaphor resolution in spoken language comprehension: structural constraints and beyond.

    PubMed

    Clackson, Kaili; Heyer, Vera

    2014-01-01

    We report results from an eye-tracking during listening study examining English-speaking adults' online processing of reflexive pronouns, and specifically whether the search for an antecedent is restricted to syntactically appropriate positions. Participants listened to a short story where the recipient of an object was introduced with a reflexive, and were asked to identify the object recipient as quickly as possible. This allowed for the recording of participants' offline interpretation of the reflexive, response times, and eye movements on hearing the reflexive. Whilst our offline results show that the ultimate interpretation for reflexives was constrained by binding principles, the response time, and eye-movement data revealed that during processing participants were temporarily distracted by a structurally inappropriate competitor antecedent when this was prominent in the discourse. These results indicate that in addition to binding principles, online referential decisions are also affected by discourse-level information. PMID:25191290

  4. When planning results in loss of control: intention-based reflexivity and working-memory

    PubMed Central

    Meiran, Nachshon; Cole, Michael W.; Braver, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss the seemingly paradoxical loss of control associated with states of high readiness to execute a plan, termed “intention-based reflexivity.” The review suggests that the neuro-cognitive systems involved in the preparation of novel plans are different than those involved in preparation of practiced plans (i.e., those that have been executed beforehand). When the plans are practiced, intention-based reflexivity depends on the prior availability of response codes in long-term memory (LTM). When the plans are novel, reflexivity is observed when the plan is pending and the goal has not yet been achieved. Intention-based reflexivity also depends on the availability of working-memory (WM) limited resources and the motivation to prepare. Reflexivity is probably related to the fact that, unlike reactive control (once a plan is prepared), proactive control tends to be relatively rigid. PMID:22586382

  5. Review: Effect of drugs on human cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent extract of red peppers, has been used in clinical research for almost three decades. Capsaicin has gained favor as the provocative agent of choice to measure cough reflex sensitivity, as it induces cough in a safe, reproducible, and dose-dependent manner. One of the major uses of capsaicin cough challenge testing has been to evaluate the effect of a pharmacological intervention on the human cough reflex. The current review summarizes the published experience with capsaicin inhalation challenge in the evaluation of drug effects on cough reflex sensitivity. A notable contrast evident between studies demonstrating a drug effect (inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity) and those that do not, is the predominance of healthy volunteers as subjects in the latter. This observation suggests that subjects with pathological cough, rather than normal volunteers, comprise the optimal group in which to evaluate the effect of potential antitussive agents on human cough reflex sensitivity. PMID:23146824

  6. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  7. Neural mechanisms of reflex facilitation and inhibition of gastric motility to stimulation of various skin areas in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kametani, H; Sato, A; Sato, Y; Simpson, A

    1979-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed on chloralose-urethane anaesthetized rats to determine the involvement of extrinsic gastric autonomic nerves in reflex facilitation and inhibition of gastric motility when mechanical nociceptive stimulation was delivered to either hind paw or abdominal skin, respectively. 2. After bilaterally sectioning the splanchnic nerves in vagal intact animals, the reflex facilitation of gastric motility produced by hind paw stimulation persisted, but the reflex inhibition previously produced by abdominal skin stimulation disappeared. 3. Hind paw stimulation increased efferent activity of the gastric branch of the vagus nerve, but stimulation of abdominal skin had little influence. 4. Bilateral vagotomy in splanchnic nerve intact animals did not influence the gastric reflex inhibition by abdominal skin stimulation, but either abolished gastric reflex facilitation produced by hind paw stimulation or reversed the reflex facilitation response to slight reflex inhibition. 5. Efferent activity of the gastric sympathetic nerve was greatly increased by abdominal skin stimulation, and was either slightly increased or not influenced by hind paw stimulation. 6. It was concluded that reflex increase of efferent activity of the gastric vagi was responsible for the gastric motility facilitation produced by hind paw stimulation, and also that reflexly increased efferent activity of the gastric sympathetic nerves resulted in gastric motility inhibition produced by abdominal skin stimulation. It is suggested efferents are inhibitory. 7. After spinal transection at the cervical level, the reflex facilitation of gastric motility previously produced by stimulation of a hind paw was completely abolished, or reversed to slight reflex inhibition, while reflex inhibition of gastric motility produced by stimulation of abdominal skin remained. It was concluded that the gastric reflex inhibition was a spinal reflex. 8. Interaction between reflex facilitation and inhibition of gastric motility during simultaneous stimulation of both hind paws and abdominal skin was observed as partial cancellation of each effect by the other. However, sympathetic reflex inhibition of gastric motility seemed to be much stronger than the vagal reflex facilitatory effect. PMID:512950

  8. Amplification of background EMG activity affects the interpretation of H-reflex gain.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, Behdad; Kitano, Koichi; Hong, Siang L; Koceja, David M

    2010-12-01

    In many H-reflex studies, the modulation of the H-reflex is usually compared relative to the normal EMG activity within the muscle. Such comparisons enable the investigators to infer whether the change in the amplitude of the H-reflex was independent of normally occurring muscle activity. This interpretation of the H-reflex is regarded as H-reflex gain, a popular dependent variable in human H-reflex studies. However, in many studies to date, the muscle activity level has been determined from the same EMG signal from which the H-reflex is recorded. This leads to an important methodological consideration: measuring the ongoing normal EMG activity from the same signal might result in an inaccurate measurement, since this EMG signal will need to be minimally amplified to capture the synchronous volley of the H-reflex amplitude. In this study we examined this possibility and found that comparing the EMG activity level from the seated position to standing position yields different results (on average 8.03% in the measurement of the increase of muscle activity). This difference was both dependent on the task and also on the EMG instrumentation used. To solve this problem we suggest the bifurcation of the EMG signal from the recording electrodes with differential amplification of the signal. With this method, both the naturally occurring muscle activity and the H-reflex signal are collected from the same area of the muscle and a more accurate measurement of the H-reflex gain will be yielded. PMID:20708409

  9. Neuromuscular and biomechanical coupling in human cycling: modulation of cutaneous reflex responses to sural nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mileva, Katya; Green, David A; Turner, Duncan L

    2004-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the modulation of cutaneous reflexes during human cycling would be dependent on muscle biomechanical function and phase of leg movement. The coupling between neuromuscular (electromyographic, EMG), kinetic and kinematic responses to brief innocuous (75% of the pain threshold PnT) and noxious (125% PnT) sural nerve stimulation were studied. Stimuli were delivered pseudorandomly at eight equidistant (45 degrees) positions of the crank cycle. Peak ipsilateral middle latency EMG reflex responses were calculated between 70 and 130 ms post stimulus in Biceps Femoris (BF), Rectus Femoris (RF), Tibialis Anterior (TA) and Soleus (SOL). Peak torque, knee and ankle joint angle changes were calculated between 140 and 220 ms post stimulus to quantify net kinetic and kinematic reflex modulation. Reflex responses were predominately suppressive during early activation of all muscles and facilitatory during BF and TA muscle inactivation. EMG reflex responses in monoarticular lower leg muscles TA and SOL were well correlated with ankle angle in dorsi/plantaflexion, whereas the correlation between reflex modulation in biarticular upper leg muscles (BF and RF) and knee angle changes in flexion/extension was weaker. Stimulation provoked significant ankle eversion over the whole crank cycle for both stimulus intensities, which was correlated with TA and BF EMG reflex responses. Torque modulation followed EMG and kinematic changes in a movement phase-dependent manner. Reflex magnitude was stimulation intensity-dependent. Supplementary nociceptive activation may contribute for this increase. We conclude that sural nerve stimulation during human cycling evokes distinct reflex responses in muscles operating around the knee (BF and RF) and the ankle (TA and SOL). These reflexes are modulated in a phase-dependent manner depending on muscle biomechanical function to generate energy for limb and crank propulsion during a specific region in the cycle. This modulation contributed to a specific adaptation of joint motion and force production in order to maintain task performance. PMID:15221175

  10. The effects of morphine on supraspinal and propriospinal somatocardiac reflexes in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, S; Suzuki, A; Hotta, H; Sato, A

    1999-07-16

    In anesthetized rats, the effects of i.v. injection of morphine on supraspinally- and spinally-mediated tachycardiac reflex responses of heart rate (HR) and cardiac sympathetic nerve reflex activity were examined following electrical stimulation of either a non-segmental hindlimb (tibial) or a segmental (3rd or 4th intercostal, IC3-4) afferent nerve. In central nervous system (CNS)-intact rats, the supraspinally-mediated reflex increase in HR in response to tibial afferent nerve stimulation was augmented by morphine, whereas the increase in response to IC3-4 afferent nerve stimulation was variable. Both the supraspinally-mediated myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) reflex discharges in the cardiac sympathetic nerve elicited by tibial afferent nerve stimulation were augmented by morphine. The effects of morphine on A- and C-sympathetic reflex discharges elicited by IC3-4 afferent nerve stimulation varied depending upon whether the discharge was of supraspinal or spinal origin. In spinal rats (spinalized at the cervical level), tibial afferent nerve stimulation did not produce any HR response, whereas IC3-4 afferent nerve stimulation produced a reflex increase in both HR and sympathetic reflex discharges of spinal origin. Furthermore, these spinal HR and sympathetic nerve reflex responses were inhibited by morphine. In conclusion, morphine depressed somatocardiac sympathetic reflexes at the spinal level, but enhanced these reflexes at the supraspinal level, leading to different effects of morphine on somatically-induced HR responses of supraspinal and spinal origins depending upon the segmental levels of afferent nerves stimulated. PMID:10454157

  11. Respiratory kinematic and airflow differences between reflex and voluntary cough in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Brandimore, Alexandra E.; Troche, Michelle S.; Huber, Jessica E.; Hegland, Karen W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cough is a defensive behavior that can be initiated in response to a stimulus in the airway (reflexively), or on command (voluntarily). There is evidence to suggest that physiological differences exist between reflex and voluntary cough; however, the output (mechanistic and airflow) differences between the cough types are not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the lung volume, respiratory kinematic, and airflow differences between reflex and voluntary cough in healthy young adults. Methods: Twenty-five participants (14 female; 18–29 years) were recruited for this study. Participants were evaluated using respiratory inductance plethysmography calibrated with spirometry. Experimental procedures included: (1) respiratory calibration, (2) three voluntary sequential cough trials, and (3) three reflex cough trials induced with 200 μM capsaicin. Results: Lung volume initiation (LVI; p = 0.003) and lung volume excursion (LVE; p < 0.001) were significantly greater for voluntary cough compared to reflex cough. The rib cage and abdomen significantly influenced LVI for voluntary cough (p < 0.001); however, only the rib cage significantly impacted LVI for reflex cough (p < 0.001). LVI significantly influenced peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) for voluntary cough (p = 0.029), but not reflex cough (p = 0.610). Discussion: Production of a reflex cough results in significant mechanistic and airflow differences compared to voluntary cough. These findings suggest that detection of a tussigenic stimulus modifies motor aspects of the reflex cough behavior. Further understanding of the differences between reflex and voluntary cough in older adults and in persons with dystussia (cough dysfunction) will be essential to facilitate the development of successful cough treatment paradigms. PMID:26500560

  12. 3-Nitropropionic acid-induced depression of spinal reflexes does not involve 5-hydroxytryptaminergic system in contrast to ischemia-induced depression in neonatal rat spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajesh; Jha, Archana; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2008-12-01

    The involvement of 5-hydroxytryptaminergic (5-HTergic) system for the 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA)-induced depression of spinal reflexes was evaluated and compared with other energy deficiency condition (ischemia; glucose-free and O2-free). The monosynaptic (MSR) and polysynaptic reflex (PSR) potentials were recorded at ventral root by stimulating the corresponding dorsal root in neonatal rat spinal cord in vitro. Superfusion of 3-NPA (3.4 mM) or ischemic solution depressed the reflexes in a time-dependent manner abolishing them by 35 min. Pretreatment with pindolol (1 microM), ketanserin (10 microM) or ondansetron (0.1 microM); 5-HT1, 5-HT2, or 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, respectively, did not block the 3-NPA-induced depression of reflexes whereas, ischemia-induced depression was blocked by ondansetron. 5-HT content of the spinal cords incubated with 3-NPA (3.4 mM) for 30 min was decreased significantly (33 ng/g tissue) while increased (286 ng/g) in cords exposed to ischemic solution as compared to saline-treated cords (161 ng/g). Thus, 3-NPA-induced depression of spinal reflexes does not involve 5-HTergic pathway unlike ischemia-induced depression. PMID:18817848

  13. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W; Pettibon, Burl R; Schlappi, Heidi; Schlappi, Mark; Ireland, Trevor V

    2005-01-01

    Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or all of the postural reflexes either in Earth's gravity or in microgravitational environments. Studies testing the function of each postural component, as well as those discussing postural reflex interactions, were also included in this review. Discussion It is quite apparent from the indexed literature we searched that posture is largely maintained by reflexive, involuntary control. While reflexive components for postural control are found in skin and joint receptors, somatic graviceptors, and baroreceptors throughout the body, much of the reflexive postural control mechanisms are housed, or occur, within the head and neck region primarily. We suggest that the postural reflexes may function in a hierarchical fashion. This hierarchy may well be based on the gravity-dependent or gravity-independent nature of each postural reflex. Some or all of these postural reflexes may contribute to the development of a postural body scheme, a conceptual internal representation of the external environment under normal gravity. This model may be the framework through which the postural reflexes anticipate and adapt to new gravitational environments. Conclusion Visual and vestibular input, as well as joint and soft tissue mechanoreceptors, are major players in the regulation of static upright posture. Each of these input sources detects and responds to specific types of postural stimulus and perturbations, and each region has specific pathways by which it communicates with other postural reflexes, as well as higher central nervous system structures. This review of the postural reflex structures and mechanisms adds to the growing body of posture rehabilitation literature relating specifically to chiropractic treatment. Chiropractic interest in these reflexes may enhance the ability of chiropractic physicians to treat and correct global spine and posture disorders. With the knowledge and understanding of these postural reflexes, chiropractors can evaluate spinal configurations not only from a segmental perspective, but can also determine how spinal dysfunction may be the ultimate consequence of maintaining an upright posture in the presence of other postural deficits. These perspectives need to be explored in more detail. PMID:16091134

  14. Effect of vergence on the gain of the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, M.; Merfeld, D. M.; Mendoza, J. C.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We measured the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) and vergence, using binocular search coils, in 3 humans. The subjects were accelerated sinusoidally at 0.5 Hz and 0.2 g peak acceleration, in complete darkness, while performing three different tasks: i) mental arithmetic; ii) tracking a remembered target at either 0.34 m or 0.14 m distance; and iii) maintaining vergence at either of these distances by means of audio biofeedback based on vergence. Subjects could control vergence using the audio feedback; there was greater convergence with the near audio target. However, there was no significant difference in vergence between the near and far remembered target conditions. With audio feedback, the amplitude of smooth tracking was not consistently different for the near and the far conditions. However, the amplitude of tracking (saccades and smooth component) in the remembered target conditions was greater for near than for far targets. These results suggest that linear VOR amplitude is not determined by vergence alone.

  15. Association between melanopsin gene polymorphism (I394T) and pupillary light reflex is dependent on light wavelength

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our aim was to determine the association between melanopsin gene polymorphism and pupillary light reflex under diverse photic conditions, including different intensities and wavelengths. Methods A total of 195 visually corrected subjects volunteered for investigation of the melanopsin gene of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of rs1079610 (I394T). The genotype groups were TT (n = 126), TC (n = 55), and CC (n = 8), and 75 of the subjects, including subjects with TT (n = 34), TC (n = 33), and CC (n = 8) participated in our experiment. Three monochromatic lights with peak wavelengths of 465 nm (blue), 536 nm (green), and 632 nm (red) were prepared, and each light was projected to the subjects with five intensities, 12, 13, 14, 14.5 and 15 log photons/(cm2 s), for one minute. The pupil size of the left eye was measured under each light condition after a 1-minute adaptation. Results The pupils of the TC + CC genotypes (n = 38) were significantly smaller than those of the TT genotype (n = 31) under a blue (463 nm) light condition with 15 log photons/(cm2 s) (P < 0.05). In contrast, there were no significant differences under green (536 nm) and red (632 nm) light conditions. Conversely, relative pupil constrictions of the TC + CC genotypes were greater than those of the TT genotype under both blue and green conditions with high intensities (14.5 and 15 log photons/(cm2 s)). In contrast, there were no significant differences between genotype groups in pupil size and relative pupilloconstriction under the red light conditions. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the melanopsin gene polymorphism (I394T) functionally interacts with pupillary light reflex, depending on light intensity and, particularly, wavelength, and that under a light condition fulfilling both high intensity and short wavelength, the pupillary light response of subjects with the C allele (TC + CC) is more sensitive to light than that of subjects with the TT genotype. PMID:24119231

  16. Kinesio taping in young healthy subjects does not affect postural reflex reactions and anticipatory postural adjustments of the trunk: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Voglar, Matej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-09-01

    Therapeutic Kinesio Taping method is used for treatment of various musculo-skeletal conditions. Kinesio Taping might have some small clinically important beneficial effects on range of motion and strength but findings about the effects on proprioception and muscle activation are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to test if Kinesio Taping influences anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex reactions. To test the hypothesis twelve healthy young participants were recruited in randomized, participants blinded, placebo controlled cross-over study. In the experimental condition the tape was applied over the paravertebral muscles and in placebo condition sham application of the tape was done transversally over the lumbar region. Timing of anticipatory postural adjustments to fast voluntary arms movement and postural reflex reactions to sudden loading over the hands were measured by means of superficial electromyography before and one hour after each tape application. Results showed no significant differences between Kinesio Taping and placebo taping conditions for any of the analyzed muscles in anticipatory postural adaptations (F1,11 < 0.23, p > 0.64, η2 < 0.04) or postural reflex reactions (F1,11 < 4.16, p > 0.07, η(2) < 0.49). Anticipatory postural adjustments of erector spinae and multifidus muscles were initiated significantly earlier after application of taping (regardless of technique) compared to pre-taping (F1,11 = 5.02, p = 0.046, η(2) = 0.31 and F1,11 = 6.18, p = 0.030, η(2) = 0.36 for erector spinae and multifidus, respectively). Taping application over lumbar region has potential beneficial effects on timing of anticipatory postural adjustments regardless of application technique but no effect on postural reflex reactions in young pain free participants. Further research in patients with low back pain would be encouraged. Key PointsApplication of Kinesio Taping does not affect postural reflex reactions in young healthy population.Earlier anticipatory postural adjustments were observed under both Kinesio Taping and placebo conditions.There were no significant differences between Kinesio Taping and placebo condition. PMID:25177198

  17. Kinesio Taping in Young Healthy Subjects Does Not Affect Postural Reflex Reactions and Anticipatory Postural Adjustments of the Trunk: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Voglar, Matej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic Kinesio Taping method is used for treatment of various musculo-skeletal conditions. Kinesio Taping might have some small clinically important beneficial effects on range of motion and strength but findings about the effects on proprioception and muscle activation are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to test if Kinesio Taping influences anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex reactions. To test the hypothesis twelve healthy young participants were recruited in randomized, participants blinded, placebo controlled cross-over study. In the experimental condition the tape was applied over the paravertebral muscles and in placebo condition sham application of the tape was done transversally over the lumbar region. Timing of anticipatory postural adjustments to fast voluntary arms movement and postural reflex reactions to sudden loading over the hands were measured by means of superficial electromyography before and one hour after each tape application. Results showed no significant differences between Kinesio Taping and placebo taping conditions for any of the analyzed muscles in anticipatory postural adaptations (F1,11 < 0.23, p > 0.64, η2 < 0.04) or postural reflex reactions (F1,11 < 4.16, p > 0.07, η2 < 0.49). Anticipatory postural adjustments of erector spinae and multifidus muscles were initiated significantly earlier after application of taping (regardless of technique) compared to pre-taping (F1,11 = 5.02, p = 0.046, η2 = 0.31 and F1,11 = 6.18, p = 0.030, η2 = 0.36 for erector spinae and multifidus, respectively). Taping application over lumbar region has potential beneficial effects on timing of anticipatory postural adjustments regardless of application technique but no effect on postural reflex reactions in young pain free participants. Further research in patients with low back pain would be encouraged. Key Points Application of Kinesio Taping does not affect postural reflex reactions in young healthy population. Earlier anticipatory postural adjustments were observed under both Kinesio Taping and placebo conditions. There were no significant differences between Kinesio Taping and placebo condition. PMID:25177198

  18. [Electroneurophysiologic studies of patients with reflex syndromes of cervical osteochondrosis].

    PubMed

    Amirov, R Z; Vinnikov, A A; Strelkova, N I; Shchepina, T I

    1987-01-01

    In 21 patients with reflex syndromes of cervical osteochondrosis aged 24-63 years the authors studied short latent somatosensory evoked potentials (EP) in response to stimulation of the median nerve, the rate of impulse conduction along the efferent fibers of the ulnar and median nerves determined with the help of the P wave. The findings obtained by both methods showed a bilateral (on the side of pain and contralaterally) decrease in the rate of impulse conduction along the ulnar and median nerves. The study of the somatosensory systems by registration of EP on the side of pain revealed an increased amplitude and diminished latency of the P9 component which reflects manifestations of irritation of cervical cerebrospinal nodes. PMID:3035834

  19. Pupillary light reflex to light inside the natural blind spot

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kentaro; Murakami, Ikuya

    2015-01-01

    When a light stimulus covers the human natural blind spot (BS), perceptual filling-in corrects for the missing information inside the BS. Here, we examined whether a filled-in surface of light perceived inside the BS affects the size of the short-latency pupillary light reflex (PLR), a pupil response mediated by a subcortical pathway for unconscious vision. The PLR was not induced by a red surface that was physically absent but perceptually filled-in inside the BS in the presence of a red ring surrounding it. However, a white large disk covering the BS unexpectedly induced a larger PLR than a white ring surrounding the BS border did, even though these two stimuli must be equivalent for the visual system, and trial-by-trial percepts did not predict PLR size. These results suggest that some physiological mechanism, presumably the retinal cells containing the photopigment melanopsin, receives the light projected inside the BS and enhances PLR. PMID:26115182

  20. Who's arguing? A call for reflexivity in bioethics.

    PubMed

    Ives, Jonathan; Dunn, Michael

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we set forth what we believe to be a relatively controversial argument, claiming that 'bioethics' needs to undergo a fundamental change in the way it is practised. This change, we argue, requires philosophical bioethicists to adopt reflexive practices when applying their analyses in public forums, acknowledging openly that bioethics is an embedded socio-cultural practice, shaped by the ever-changing intuitions of individual philosophers, which cannot be viewed as a detached intellectual endeavour. This said, we argue that in order to manage the personal, social and cultural embeddedness of bioethics, philosophical bioethicists should openly acknowledge how their practices are constructed and should, in their writing, explicitly deal with issues of bias and conflict of interest, just as empirical scientists are required to do. PMID:20500762

  1. Spatial Transformation of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.; Reschke, Millard F.

    1996-01-01

    It was hypothesized that the absence of the gravitational reference cues may be responsible for adaptive changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). These changes result in the alteration of the direction of the compensatory slow phase (SP) eye movements in microgravity. In order to test this hypothesis, the direction of the VOR SP relative to head motion was investigated in three astronauts during and after an eight-day orbital flight by passive sinusoidal pitch or yaw angular motion at two frequencies. The results of the inflight and postflight testing are considered. The observed deviation between VOR SP and head motion suggests that spatial transformation in the VOR occurred during adaptation to microgravity. It is considered that, although this spatial transformation might be due to a sensory bias, it may reflect central changes in the reference system used for spatial orientation in microgravity.

  2. Enhanced magnetic ionization in hydrogen reflex discharge plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, E.I.; Covlea, V.N.

    2005-03-01

    The effect of enhanced magnetic ionization on the external and internal parameters of a high-density, low pressure reflex plasma source operating in hydrogen is studied. The Langmuir probe method and Druyvesteyn procedure coupled with suitable software are used to measure the internal parameters. The bulk plasma region is free of an electric field and presents a high degree of uniformity. The electron energy distribution function is bi-Maxwellian with a dip/shoulder structure around 5.5 eV, independent of external parameters and radial position. Due to the enhanced hollow cathode effect by the magnetic trapping of electrons, the electron density n{sub e} is as high as 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the electron temperature T{sub e} is as low as a few tens of an electron volt, for dissipated energy of tens of Watts. The bulk plasma density scales with the dissipated power.

  3. A procedure concept for local reflex control of grasping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Chang, Jeffrey

    1989-01-01

    An architecture is proposed for the control of robotic devices, and in particular of anthropomorphic hands, characterized by a hierarchical structure in which every level of the architecture contains data and control function with varying degree of abstraction. Bottom levels of the hierarchy interface directly with sensors and actuators, and process raw data and motor commands. Higher levels perform more symbolic types of tasks, such as application of boolean rules and general planning operations. Layers implementation has to be consistent with the type of operation and its requirements for real time control. It is proposed to implement the rule level with a Boolean Artificial Neural Network characterized by a response time sufficient for producing reflex corrective action at the actuator level.

  4. Local reflexive mechanisms essential for snakes' scaffold-based locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kano, Takeshi; Sato, Takahide; Kobayashi, Ryo; Ishiguro, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Most robots are designed to work in predefined environments, and irregularities that exist in the environment interfere with their operation. For snakes, irregularities play the opposite role: snakes actively utilize terrain irregularities and move by effectively pushing their body against the scaffolds that they encounter. Autonomous decentralized control mechanisms could be the key to understanding this locomotion. We demonstrate through modelling and simulations that only two local reflexive mechanisms, which exploit sensory information about the stretching of muscles and the pressure on the body wall, are crucial for realizing locomotion. This finding will help develop robots that work in undefined environments and shed light on the understanding of the fundamental principles underlying adaptive locomotion in animals. PMID:22918023

  5. Stick balancing with reflex delay in case of parametric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insperger, Tamas

    2011-04-01

    The effect of parametric forcing on a PD control of an inverted pendulum is analyzed in the presence of feedback delay. The stability of the time-periodic and time-delayed system is determined numerically using the first-order semi-discretization method in the 5-dimensional parameter space of the pendulum's length, the forcing frequency, the forcing amplitude, the proportional and the differential gains. It is shown that the critical length of the pendulum (that can just be balanced against the time-delay) can significantly be decreased by parametric forcing even if the maximum forcing acceleration is limited. The numerical analysis showed that the critical stick length about 30 cm corresponding to the unforced system with reflex delay 0.1 s can be decreased to 18 cm with keeping maximum acceleration below the gravitational acceleration.

  6. Effect of brotizolam on the averaged photopalpebral reflex in man

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, M.; Isozaki, H.; Mizuki, Y.; Inanaga, K.

    1983-01-01

    1 The photopalpebral reflex (PPR) is a useful method to assess level of arousal. Healthy males were given either brotizolam (0.0625, 0.125, 0.25 or 0.5 mg) or placebo within a double-blind, crossover design. Changes in PPR and subjective assessments were observed for 5 h after medication. 2 Prolongation of the latencies of PPR were dose dependent, and the amplitude tended to be reduced. These effects appeared within 30 min, and lasted about 4 h. 3 The dose-response curve of the maximum prolongation of the latencies was linear. 4 Sleepiness and slight ataxia were observed after drug ingestion. Sleepiness was correlated with the prolongation of the PPR latencies. 5 Brotizolam could be a potent hypnotic, with rapid onset and moderate duration of action, and it has no severe side-effects. PMID:6661378

  7. Towards an Autonomic Cluster Management System (ACMS) with Reflex Autonomicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Hinchey, Mike; Sterritt, Roy

    2005-01-01

    Cluster computing, whereby a large number of simple processors or nodes are combined together to apparently function as a single powerful computer, has emerged as a research area in its own right. The approach offers a relatively inexpensive means of providing a fault-tolerant environment and achieving significant computational capabilities for high-performance computing applications. However, the task of manually managing and configuring a cluster quickly becomes daunting as the cluster grows in size. Autonomic computing, with its vision to provide self-management, can potentially solve many of the problems inherent in cluster management. We describe the development of a prototype Autonomic Cluster Management System (ACMS) that exploits autonomic properties in automating cluster management and its evolution to include reflex reactions via pulse monitoring.

  8. Projection neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2014-06-15

    Changes in head position and posture are detected by the vestibular system and are normally followed by rapid modifications in blood pressure. These compensatory adjustments, which allow humans to stand up without fainting, are mediated by integration of vestibular system pathways with blood pressure control centers in the ventrolateral medulla. Orthostatic hypotension can reflect altered activity of this neural circuitry. Vestibular sensory input to the vestibulo-sympathetic pathway terminates on cells in the vestibular nuclear complex, which in turn project to brainstem sites involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, including the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medullary regions (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). In the present study, sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was used to activate this pathway, and activated neurons were identified through detection of c-Fos protein. The retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold was injected into the RVLM or CVLM of these animals, and immunofluorescence studies of vestibular neurons were conducted to visualize c-Fos protein and Fluoro-Gold concomitantly. We observed activated projection neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in the caudal half of the spinal, medial, and parvocellular medial vestibular nuclei. Approximately two-thirds of the cells were ipsilateral to Fluoro-Gold injection sites in both the RVLM and CVLM, and the remainder were contralateral. As a group, cells projecting to the RVLM were located slightly rostral to those with terminals in the CVLM. Individual activated projection neurons were multipolar, globular, or fusiform in shape. This study provides the first direct demonstration of the central vestibular neurons that mediate the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex. PMID:24323841

  9. The Muscle Stretch Reflex throughout the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Ellen; Hameed, Farah; Dhaher, Yasin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The significant sex-disparity in sports-related knee injuries may be due to underlying differences in motor control. While the development of sex-specific movement patterns is likely multi-factorial, this study specifically focuses on the potential modulatory role of sex hormones. Purpose To investigate the muscle stretch reflex (MSR) across the menstrual cycle. We hypothesized that the MSR would fluctuate throughout the menstrual cycle, and that the lowest response would correspond with peak concentrations of estrogen. Methods Nineteen healthy women ages 18–35 participated in this study: 8 eumenorrheic women and 11 women taking oral contraceptives. Serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations, anterior knee laxity (AKL) and the MSR response of the quadriceps muscles were measured three times during the menstrual cycle. Results The MSR response of the RF varied significantly across the menstrual cycle in both groups. Specifically, the RF MSR response was 2.4 times lower during the peri-ovulatory phase when compared to the luteal phase (P = 0.007). The same trend was seen in the VM, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.070). The MSR response of the VL did not change significantly across the menstrual cycle (P = 0.494). A mixed model comparison did not show an association between endogenous concentrations of estradiol and progesterone, exposure to hormonal contraceptives or AKL and the MSR response for any muscle. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the RF MSR response varies throughout the menstrual cycle with the lowest response around the time of ovulation. Additional research is needed to clarify the exact relationship between sex hormones, AKL and the MSR response and to determine the specific origin of the change along the monosynaptic reflex arc. PMID:24091990

  10. Reflex ankle stiffness is inversely correlated with natural body sway.

    PubMed

    Julien, Brianna L; Bendrups, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine whether effective ankle stiffness (EAS), measured during slow unperceived perturbations of stance, is related to natural anterior-posterior body sway. Because the perturbations are not perceived, any neural component of the response to perturbation is assumed to be "reflex", in the broad sense of an involuntary response to a stimulus. Subjects stood on a force platform for three 10-min trials. EAS was obtained from the average slope (Δτ/Δα) of the relation between ankle torque (τ) and ankle angle (α), recorded during repeated perturbations delivered at the waist by a weak spring. EAS was normalised using the subject's "load stiffness" (LS), calculated from mass (m) and height (h) above the ankle joint (m·g·h). Sway was obtained from fluctuations in ankle angle prior to perturbation. Variation in EAS and sway between subjects provided spread of data for correlation. There were no significant changes in EAS or sway across trials. All subjects had higher EAS than LS and mean EAS (1124Nm/rad) was significantly greater (p<0.01) than mean LS (531Nm/rad). There was a strong significant inverse correlation between mean sway and mean normalised EAS (r=-0.68, p=0.03). We conclude that the body, in response to slow unperceived perturbations, simulates an inverted pendulum with a stiffness of about twice LS and that EAS is largely generated by neural modulation of postural muscles. The inverse correlation between EAS and body sway suggests that the reflex mechanisms responding to perturbation also influence the extent of natural sway. PMID:27004645

  11. P2X3 receptors and sensitization of autonomic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Ford, Anthony P; Undem, Bradley J; Birder, Lori A; Grundy, David; Pijacka, Wioletta; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-09-01

    A great deal of basic and applied physiology and pharmacology in sensory and autonomic neuroscience has teased apart mechanisms that drive normal perception of mechanical, thermal and chemical signals and convey them to CNS, the distinction of fiber types and receptors and channels that mediate them, and how they may become dysfunctional or maladaptive in disease. Likewise, regulation of efferent autonomic traffic to control organ reflexes has been well studied. In both afferent and efferent limbs, a wide array of potential therapeutic mechanisms has surfaced, some of which have progressed into clinic, if not full regrastration. One conversation that has been less well progressed relates to how the afferent limb and its sensitization shapes the efferent outputs, and where modulation may offer new therapeutic avenues, especially for poorly addressed and common signs and symptoms of disease. Therapeutics for CV disease (HF, hypertension), respiratory disease (asthma, COPD), urological disease (OAB), GI disease (IBS), and inter alia, have largely focused on the efferent control of effector cells to modulate movement, contraction and secretion; medicinal needs remain with limits to efficacy, AEs and treatment resistance being common. We now must turn, in the quest for improved therapeutics, to understand how sensation from these organs becomes maladapted and sensitized in disease, and what opportunities may arise for improved therapeutics given the abundance of targets, many pharmacologically untapped, on the afferent side. One might look at the treatment resistant hypertension and the emerging benefit of renal denervation; or urinary bladder overactivity / neurogenic bladder and the emergence of neuromodulation, capsaicin instillation or botox injections to attenuate sensitized reflexes, as examples of merely the start of such progress. This review examines this topic more deeply, as applies to four major organ systems all sharing a great need from unsatisfied patients. PMID:25956567

  12. Centrally administered naloxone blocks reflex natriuresis after acute unilateral nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Lin, S Y; Humphreys, M H

    1985-09-01

    Acute unilateral nephrectomy (AUN) leads to a natriuresis and kaliuresis by the remaining kidney through reflex mechanisms involving opiate receptors. To determine whether the opiate receptors mediating these responses are located in the central nervous system, we carried out AUN in anesthetized rats undergoing continuous ventriculocisternal perfusion (VCP) with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). AUN caused large increases in both Na (UNaV) and K (UKV) excretion without changes in glomerular filtration rate or arterial blood pressure. When the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone was added to the perfusate to achieve a perfusion rate of 32 micrograms X kg-1 X h-1, AUN failed to increase either UNaV or UKV by the remaining kidney. This dose of naloxone, however, was without effect when infused intravenously. Addition of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) to the artificial CSF to achieve a VCP rate of 50 micrograms X kg-1 X h-1 also blocked the expected increase in UNaV and UKV by the remaining kidney after AUN. Infusion of TRH intravenously at the same rate did not interfere with the postnephrectomy natriuresis or kaliuresis. Higher intravenous infusion rates of TRH (1 and 2 mg X kg-1h-1) prevented the postnephrectomy natriuresis without affecting the kaliuresis. These results indicate that the effect of naloxone to block the reflex natriuresis and kaliuresis after AUN resides largely in the central nervous system. The blockade by naloxone of the postnephrectomy natriuresis is duplicated by centrally administered TRH, providing another example of the interaction of this hormone with the endogenous opioid system. Large intravenous infusions of TRH also block the postnephrectomy natriuresis but not the kaliuresis. PMID:3929623

  13. Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Based Reflex Color Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asad

    2012-02-01

    Bistable color cholesteric liquid crystal displays are unique LCDs that exhibit high reflectivity, good contrast, extremely low power operation, and are amenable to versatile roll-to-roll manufacturing. The display technology, now branded as Reflex has been in commercialized products since 1996. It has been the subject of extensive research and development globally by a variety of parties in both academic and industrial settings. Today, the display technology is in volume production for applications such as dedicated eWriters (Boogie Board), full color electronic skins (eSkin), and displays for smart cards. The flexibility comes from polymerization induced phase separation using unique materials unparalleled in any other display technology. The blend of monomers, polymers, cross linkers, and other components along with nematic liquid crystals and chiral dopants is created and processed in such ways so as to enable highly efficient manufactrable displays using ultra thin plastic substrates -- often as thin as 50μm. Other significant aspects include full color by stacking or spatial separation, night vision capability, ultra high resolution, as well as active matrix capabilities. Of particular note is the stacking approach of Reflex based displays to show full color. This approach for reflective color displays is unique to this technology. Owing to high transparency in wavelength bands outside the selective reflection band, three primarily color layers can be stacked on top of each other and reflect without interfering with other layers. This highly surprising architecture enables the highest reflectivity of any other reflective electronic color display technology. The optics, architecture, electro-topics, and process techniques will be discussed. This presentation will focus on the physics of the core technology and color, it's evolution from rigid glass based displays to flexible displays, development of products from the paradigm shifting concepts to consumer products and related markets. This is a development that spans a wide space of highly technical development and fundamental science to products and commercialization to enable the entry of the technology into consumer markets.

  14. PROJECTION NEURONS OF THE VESTIBULO-SYMPATHETIC REFLEX PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Gay R.; Friedrich, Victor L.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in head position and posture are detected by the vestibular system and are normally followed by rapid modifications in blood pressure. These compensatory adjustments, which allow humans to stand up without fainting, are mediated by integration of vestibular system pathways with blood pressure control centers in the ventrolateral medulla. Orthostatic hypotension can reflect altered activity of this neural circuitry. Vestibular sensory input to the vestibulo-sympathetic pathway terminates on cells in the vestibular nuclear complex, which in turn project to brainstem sites involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, including the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medullary regions (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). In the present study, sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was used to activate this pathway, and activated neurons were identified through detection of c-Fos protein. The retrograde tracer FluoroGold was injected into the RVLM or CVLM of these animals, and immunofluorescence studies of vestibular neurons were conducted to visualize c-Fos protein and FluoroGold concomitantly. We observed activated projection neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in the caudal half of the spinal, medial and parvocellular medial vestibular nuclei. Approximately two-thirds of the cells were ipsilateral to FluoroGold injection sites in both RVLM and CVLM and the remainders were contralateral. As a group, cells projecting to RVLM were located slightly rostral to those with terminals in CVLM. Individual activated projection neurons were multipolar, globular or fusiform in shape. This study provides the first direct demonstration of the central vestibular neurons that mediate the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex. PMID:24323841

  15. Potentiation of the exercise pressor reflex by muscle ischemia.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, C L; Longhurst, J C

    1989-03-01

    The reflex responses to static contraction are augmented by ischemia. The metabolic "error signals" that are responsible for these observed responses are unknown. Therefore this study was designed to test the hypothesis that static contraction-induced pressor responses, which are enhanced during muscle ischemia, are the result of alterations in muscle oxygenation, acid-base balance, and K+. Thus, in 36 cats, the pressor response, active muscle blood flow, and muscle venous pH, PCO2, PO2, lactate, and K+ were compared during light and intense static contractions with and without arterial occlusion. During light contraction (15-16% of maximal), active muscle blood flow increased without and decreased with arterial occlusion (+35 +/- 12 vs. -60 +/- 11%). Arterial occlusion augmented these pressor responses by 132 +/- 25%. Without arterial occlusion, changes (P less than 0.05) were seen in PO2, O2 content, PCO2, and K+. Lactate and pH were unchanged. With arterial occlusion, changes in muscle PCO2 were augmented and significant changes were seen in pH and lactate. During intense static contraction (67-69% of maximal), muscle blood flow decreased without arterial occlusion (-39 +/- 9%) and decreased further during occlusion (-81 +/- 6%). Arterial occlusion augmented the pressor responses by 39 +/- 12%. All metabolic variables increased during contraction without arterial occlusion, but occlusion failed to augment any of these changes. These data suggest that light static ischemic contractions cause increases in muscle PCO2 and lactate and decreases in pH that may signal compensatory reflex-induced changes in arterial blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2496081

  16. A new predisposing factor for trigemino-cardiac reflex during subdural empyema drainage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The trigemino-cardiac reflex is defined as the sudden onset of parasympathetic dysrhythmia, sympathetic hypotension, apnea, or gastric hypermotility during stimulation of any of the sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve. Clinically, trigemino-cardiac reflex has been reported to occur during neurosurgical skull-base surgery. Apart from the few clinical reports, the physiological function of this brainstem reflex has not yet been fully explored. Little is known regarding any predisposing factors related to the intraoperative occurrence of this reflex. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man who demonstrated a clearly expressed form of trigemino-cardiac reflex with severe bradycardia requiring intervention that was recorded during surgical removal of a large subdural empyema. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intracranial infection leading to perioperative trigemino-cardiac reflex. We therefore add a new predisposing factor for trigemino-cardiac reflex to the existing literature. Possible mechanisms are discussed in the light of the relevant literature. PMID:21118536

  17. A role for the basal ganglia in nicotinic modulation of the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Evinger, C; Basso, M A; Manning, K A; Sibony, P A; Pellegrini, J J; Horn, A K

    1993-01-01

    In humans and rats we found that nicotine transiently modifies the blink reflex. For blinks elicited by stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve, nicotine decreased the magnitude of the orbicularis oculi electromyogram (OOemg) and increased the latency of only the long-latency (R2) component. For blinks elicited by electrical stimulation of the cornea, nicotine decreased the magnitude and increased the latency of the single component of OOemg response. Since nicotine modified only one component of the supraorbitally elicited blink reflex, nicotine must act primarily on the central nervous system rather than at the muscle. The effects of nicotine could be caused by direct action on lower brainstem interneurons or indirectly by modulating descending systems impinging on blink interneurons. Since precollicular decerebration eliminated nicotine's effects on the blink reflex, nicotine must act through descending systems. Three lines of evidence suggest that nicotine affects the blink reflex through the basal ganglia by causing dopamine release in the striatum. First, stimulation of the substantia nigra mimicked the effects of nicotine on the blink reflex. Second, haloperidol, a dopamine (D2) receptor antagonist, blocked the effect of nicotine on the blink reflex. Third, apomorphine, a D2 receptor agonist, mimicked the effects of nicotine on the blink reflex. PMID:8454014

  18. Modulation of somatocardiac sympathetic reflexes mediated by opioid receptors at the spinal and brainstem level.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1995-01-01

    Modulation of somatosympathetic reflexes at the spinal cord and the brainstem was studied by administering opioid receptor agonists into the intrathecal space of the lumbar spinal cord and into the subarachnoid space of the cisterna magna in rats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose and urethane. Somatocardiac sympathetic A- and C-reflexes were elicited by electrical stimulation of myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) afferent fibers of the tibial nerve, respectively. Intrathecal administration of the mu-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO selectively depressed the C-reflex in a dose-dependent manner (minimum effective dose 10 ng), whereas the intrathecal injection of the delta-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE and the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U-50,488H only at doses of 10 micrograms and 100 micrograms, respectively, led to a significant depression of the C-reflex. Injection of DAMGO into the cisterna magna enhanced both A- and C-reflexes in a dose-dependent manner (minimum effective dose 1 ng). The administration of neither DPDPE nor U-50,488H into the cisterna magna affected A- or C-reflexes. It is concluded that the activation of mu-opioid receptors is mainly or exclusively responsible for suppressing somatosympathetic C-reflexes at the spinal cord and for enhancing them at the brainstem. PMID:7589306

  19. Systemic hypoxia facilitates somato-cardiac sympathetic A- and C-reflexes in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Li, W M; Sato, A; Suzuki, A; Trzebski, A

    1996-10-01

    In rats anesthetized with urethane, electrical stimuli applied to tibial nerve afferents produced a somato-sympathetic A-reflex of 41 +/- 2 (mean +/- SEM)ms latency and C-reflex of 210 +/- 13 ms latency recorded in the left inferior cardiac sympathetic nerve. Hypoxia was induced by switching room air to nitrogen/oxygen gas mixture in the inspiratory line reducing end-tidal oxygen from about 18% FETO2 to 10% FETO2 and 6% FETO2 for 60s, respectively. During 6% FETO2 hypoxia, the amplitude of the somato-cardiac sympathetic A-reflex increased significantly to 138 +/- 13% of the control, and that of the C-reflex increased to 186 +/- 18% of the control. During 10% FETO2 hypoxia, the A-reflex increased insignificantly to 117 +/- 8%; the amplitude of the C-reflex was augmented significantly to 149 +/- 11% of the control. Peripheral carotid chemoreceptor denervation abolished the facilitatory effects of systemic hypoxia. It is concluded that carotid chemoreceptor stimulation enhances the responsiveness of somato-cardiac sympathetic excitatory reflexes originating in the hind limb receptors. PMID:8897486

  20. Analgesic-antiinflammatory drugs inhibit orbicularis oculi reflexes in humans via a central mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, S; Leardi, M G; Cruccu, G; Fabbri, A; Itil, T M

    1994-01-01

    1. A cross-over single blind study examined the possible central effects of non-opioid analgesic drugs on the trigeminal reflexes. 2. The corneal reflex and blink reflex (R1, R2) were recorded electromyographically and response areas measured in healthy volunteers before and after intramuscular injection of piroxicam (40 mg); and after intravenous injection of lysine acetylsalicylate (500 mg). After the last drug recording the subjects received intravenous naloxone (2 mg) followed 5 minutes later by further reflex testing. Saline was used as a placebo in control experiments. 3. Both analgesics reduced the corneal reflex: piroxicam induced a 27% and lysine acetylsalicylate a 21% a reduction that naloxone did not reverse. Neither drug reduced the early or the late component of the blink reflex. 4. The marked inhibitory changes that the two non-narcotic analgesics produced on the corneal reflex--a nociceptive response--indicate a centrally-mediated action. 5. Naloxone's failure to reverse the induced analgesia argues against opiate receptor mediation. PMID:8115666

  1. The Neuroanatomical Correlates of Training-Related Perceptuo-Reflex Uncoupling in Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Hellyer, Peter J.; Nachev, Parashkev; Sharp, David J.; Seemungal, Barry M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory input evokes low-order reflexes and higher-order perceptual responses. Vestibular stimulation elicits vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) and self-motion perception (e.g., vertigo) whose response durations are normally equal. Adaptation to repeated whole-body rotations, for example, ballet training, is known to reduce vestibular responses. We investigated the neuroanatomical correlates of vestibular perceptuo-reflex adaptation in ballet dancers and controls. Dancers' vestibular-reflex and perceptual responses to whole-body yaw-plane step rotations were: (1) Briefer and (2) uncorrelated (controls' reflex and perception were correlated). Voxel-based morphometry showed a selective gray matter (GM) reduction in dancers' vestibular cerebellum correlating with ballet experience. Dancers' vestibular cerebellar GM density reduction was related to shorter perceptual responses (i.e. positively correlated) but longer VOR duration (negatively correlated). Contrastingly, controls' vestibular cerebellar GM density negatively correlated with perception and VOR. Diffusion-tensor imaging showed that cerebral cortex white matter (WM) microstructure correlated with vestibular perception but only in controls. In summary, dancers display vestibular perceptuo-reflex dissociation with the neuronatomical correlate localized to the vestibular cerebellum. Controls' robust vestibular perception correlated with a cortical WM network conspicuously absent in dancers. Since primary vestibular afferents synapse in the vestibular cerebellum, we speculate that a cerebellar gating of perceptual signals to cortical regions mediates the training-related attenuation of vestibular perception and perceptuo-reflex uncoupling. PMID:24072889

  2. Soleus H-reflex tests and clinical signs of the upper motor neuron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koelman, J H; Bour, L J; Hilgevoord, A A; van Bruggen, G J; Ongerboer de Visser, B W

    1993-01-01

    Soleus H-reflex tests are used for elucidating pathophysiological mechanisms in motor control. The cumulative vibratory inhibition of the soleus H-reflex, the ratio of the reflex to direct muscle potential (H to M ratio) and the recovery curve of the soleus H-reflex were studied in 38 patients with varying signs of the upper motor neuron syndrome for a possible relation with clinical features. The results were compared with those obtained from a group of healthy volunteers. The magnitude of vibratory inhibition decreased with increase of hypertonia. The H to M ratio increased as the activity of the tendon reflex was enhanced and correlated to a lesser degree with muscle tone. Both the H to M ratio and late facilitation of the soleus H-reflex recovery curve were elevated in clonus. The findings suggest that alterations in the results of soleus H-reflex tests relate to specific clinical features of the upper motor neuron syndrome. Possible pathophysiological implications are discussed. PMID:8331353

  3. Grooming reflexes and Brown-Séquard epilepsy in cats with pontile lesions.

    PubMed

    Randall, W; Randall, S; Johnson, R F

    1985-02-01

    The literature on the relation between the scratch reflex and Brown-Séquard epilepsy in the guinea pig indicates that the scratch reflex is a stimulus-induced myoclonus that is the first component of a complete seizure. Cats with pontile lesions and cats with frontal neocortical lesions exhibit the scratch reflex and other grooming reflexes. The grooming reflexes in cats with pontile lesions develop over a period of a year or more into complete seizures that are similar to Brown-Séquard epilepsy as described for the guinea pig by Brown-Séquard and others. Cinematographic analyses revealed that the scratch reflex in cats with pontile lesions and in cats with frontal neocortical lesions has the same frequency and the same complex spatial and temporal pattern as normal scratching behavior. In addition, the myoclonus of the complete seizures is identified as the scratch reflex, representing a very vigorous and long-lasting afterdischarge. Reconstruction of the pontile lesions indicate that the lateral and rostral portions of the paralemniscal tegmental fields were destroyed along with portions of the pontile gray and pyramidal tract. PMID:3929802

  4. Acupuncture stimulation inhibits somato-renal sympathetic A- and C-reflexes in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Arita, Hideko; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    Stimulation of peripheral nerve afferent for example tibial nerve by a strong electrical stimulation (rectanfular wave with 20V amplitude; pulse duration of 0.5 ms, 0.3 pulses/sec) can evoke a discharge of the somato-sympathetic reflex which is recorded on the efferent of renal sympathetic nerve. The component of the somato-sympathetic reflex can be divided into two parts: one is related to the transmission of the myelinated afferent fibers with a short lantency (41+/-2 ms) and is defined A-reflex, the other is related to the transmission of the unmyelinated afferent fibers with a long latency (210+/-13 ms) and is defined C-reflex. In the present study, an acupuncture needle (diameter 0.34 mm) was inserted into the hind limbs of the rat, dorsolaterally at the area of acupoint: huantiao (GB30), at a depth of 4-5 mm and was twisted right and left twice every second during recording the somato-renal sympathetic reflex. It was found that acupuncture on the huantiao acupoint significantly inhibited both A- and C-reflexes. There was no different inhibition of the A- and C-reflexes by acupuncture on the right or left side. However acupuncture on the fore limbs of the rat dorsolaterally at the area of acupoint: quchi (LI11) showed no effect on neither A- nor C-reflexes. These results suggest that acupuncture at the same spinal segment of the acupoint inhibits the somatorenal sympathetic reflex. PMID:12269720

  5. Hip proprioceptors preferentially modulate reflexes of the leg in human spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Onushko, Tanya; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2013-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferent feedback from hip muscles has been shown to trigger long-lasting, multijoint reflex responses in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). These reflexes could have important implications for control of leg movements during functional activities, such as walking. Because the control of leg movement relies on reflex regulation at all joints of the limb, we sought to determine whether stretch of hip muscles modulates reflex activity at the knee and ankle and, conversely, whether knee and ankle stretch afferents affect hip-triggered reflexes. A custom-built servomotor apparatus was used to stretch the hip muscles in nine chronic SCI subjects by oscillating the legs about the hip joint bilaterally from 10° of extension to 40° flexion. To test whether stretch-related feedback from the knee or ankle would be affected by hip movement, patellar tendon percussions and Achilles tendon vibration were delivered when the hip was either extending or flexing. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) and joint torques were recorded from both legs. Patellar tendon percussions and Achilles tendon vibration both elicited reflex responses local to the knee or ankle, respectively, and did not influence reflex responses observed at the hip. Rather, the movement direction of the hip modulated the reflex responses local to the joint. The patellar tendon reflex amplitude was larger when the perturbation was delivered during hip extension compared with hip flexion. The response to Achilles vibration was modulated by hip movement, with an increased tonic component during hip flexion compared with extension. These results demonstrate that hip-mediated sensory signals modulate activity in distal muscles of the leg and appear to play a unique role in modulation of spastic muscle activity throughout the leg in SCI. PMID:23615544

  6. Trigemino-cardiac reflex as lethal mechanism in a suicidal fire death case.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Riccardo; Lodise, Maria; Lancia, Massimo; Bacci, Mauro; De-Giorgio, Fabio; Cascini, Fidelia

    2014-05-01

    In the vast majority of immediate fire deaths, the mechanism of death is inhalation of toxic gases (especially carbon monoxide), direct thermal injury, or neurogenic shock due to the redistribution of the body's blood volume produced by surface heat on the skin. We present a suicidal case that is unusual because the mechanism of immediate fire death could arguably be explained in terms of a primitive autonomic reflex/the trigemino-cardiac reflex. Although this reflex is well known to surgeons and anesthetists, with possible lethal consequences in the course of invasive surgical procedures on the head and neck region, it is much less familiar to forensic pathologists. PMID:24502511

  7. Role of the cerebellum and the vestibular apparatus in regulation of orthostatic reflexes in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doba, N.; Reis, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The contribution of the fastigial nucleus and the vestibular nerves (eighth cranial nerves) to the orthostatic reflexes in anesthetized, paralyzed cats was studied. Bilateral lesions of the rostral fastigial nucleus resulted in impairment of the reflex changes in blood pressure, femoral arterial flow, and resistance evoked by head-up tilting to 30 deg or 60 deg. The rostral fastigial nucleus, which might be triggered by the vestibular apparatus, appears to participate in concert with the baroreceptors in the initiation and possibly the maintenance of the orthostatic reflexes.

  8. Modulation of the human nociceptive flexion reflex by pleasant and unpleasant odors.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; Serrao, Mariano; Gamgebeli, Zurab; Alpaidze, Marina; Perrotta, Armando; Padua, Luca; Pierelli, Francesco; Nappi, Giuseppe; Sandrini, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR), a defensive response that allows withdrawal from a noxious stimulus, is a reliable index of spinal nociception in humans. It has been shown that various kinds of stimuli (emotional, visual, auditory) can modulate the transmission and perception of pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, by means of the NWR, the modulatory effect on the spinal circuitry of olfactory stimuli with different emotional valence. The magnitude of the NWR elicited by electrical stimulation of the sural nerve was measured while 18 subjects (9 women, 9 men) smelled pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral odors. The NWR was conditioned by odor probe with interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 500 ms and 1,500 ms. The magnitude of NWR was significantly greater after the unpleasant odor probe (P <.001) and reduced following the pleasant odor probe (P<.001) at both ISIs. A significant effect of olfactory stimuli on subjective pain ratings were found at both ISIs for pleasant vs unpleasant odors (P<.000), and for both pleasant and unpleasant odors vs neutral and basal conditions (P<.000). No statistical differences in subjective pain ratings at different ISIs were found. Consistent with the notion that NWR magnitude and pain perception can be modulated by stimuli with different emotional valence, these results show that olfactory stimuli, too, can modulate spinal nociception in humans. PMID:24040974

  9. Headshake versus whole-body rotation testing of the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Goebel, J A; Fortin, M; Paige, G D

    1991-07-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is usually evaluated by whole-body rotary chair oscillation in darkness, but is limited to ambulatory patients. In order to develop a portable method of VOR assessment, eye movements from 10 normal subjects were studied under three conditions: 1. whole-body rotary chair oscillation in the dark and in the light with a head mounted blank field, 2. passive head-on-body rotation in the light with a blank field, and 3. active head-on-body rotation in the light with a blank field. The influence of visual fixation, neck rotation, and volition on VOR gain was to be assessed. Head oscillations were maintained at 0.5 and 1.0 Hz, 50 degrees/s peak velocity. Mean VOR gains with blank field testing were indistinguishable from those obtained in darkness during whole-body rotation. In addition, there were no significant differences in the mean gain between whole-body, passive head rotation or active head rotation. Two vestibulopathic patients (absent calorics bilaterally and oscillopsia) were also studied to illustrate potential clinical utility of the methods. Rotations under all conditions revealed low but variable gains. The evaluation of the VOR in the light with a blank visual surround and passive or active head rotation is a potentially useful clinical method of bedside assessment of the VOR. PMID:2062148

  10. A Reevaluation of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex: New Ideas of its Purpose, Properties, Neural Substrate, and Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. John; Brandt, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Conventional views of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) have emphasized testing with caloric stimuli and by passively rotating patients at low frequencies in a chair. The properties of the VOR tested under these conditions differ from the performance of this reflex during the natural function for which it evolved-locomotion. Only the VOR (and not visually mediated eye movements) can cope with the high-frequency angular and linear perturbations of the head that occur during locomotion; this is achieved by generating eye movements at short latency (less than 16 msec). Interpretation of vestibular testing is enhanced by the realization that, although the di- and trisynaptic components of the VOR are essential for this short-latency response, the overall accuracy and plasticity of the VOR depend upon a distributed, parallel network of neurons involving the vestibular nuclei. Neurons in this network variously encode inputs from the labyrinthine semicircular canals and otoliths, as well as from the visual and somatosensory systems. The central vestibular pathways branch to contact vestibular cortex (for perception) and the spinal cord (for control of posture). Thus, the vestibular nuclei basically coordinate the stabilization of gaze and posture, and contribute to the perception of verticality and self-motion. Consequently, brainstem disorders that disrupt the VOR cause not just only nystagmus, but also instability of posture (eg, increased fore-aft sway in patients with downbeat nystagmus) and disturbance of spatial orientation (eg, tilt of the subjective visual vertical in Wallenberg's syndrome).

  11. [Effect of section of the hypoglossal nerve on the glossopharyngeal-hypoglossal reflex in the frog].

    PubMed

    Rapuzzi, G; Gilberti Vitali, G; Villa Balduini, A; Violante, A

    1980-11-30

    This research concerns the modulation by lingual afferences of the reflex activity of frog XII nucleus. Some informations on the processes utilized to obtain this effect has been achieved by comparing the glossopharyngeal-hypoglossal reflex evoked bilaterally after excision of one hypoglossal nerve. The reflex response and electrotonic potential become more intense omolaterally to the section of XII at the IV-V day; However these effects disappear later (XII-XV day). These observations completely disagree with the presence of a large injury normally produced in the nucleus of XII by retrograde motoneuron degeneration. The reflex facilitation has been attributed therefore to the degeneration of the afferent component which is associated in the amphibia to the XII and exerts centrally a PAD effects. PMID:7225238

  12. Arnold's nerve cough reflex: evidence for chronic cough as a sensory vagal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicole M; Gibson, Peter G; Birring, Surinder S

    2014-10-01

    Arnold's nerve ear-cough reflex is recognised to occur uncommonly in patients with chronic cough. In these patients, mechanical stimulation of the external auditory meatus can activate the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold's nerve) and evoke reflex cough. This is an example of hypersensitivity of vagal afferent nerves, and there is now an increasing recognition that many cases of refractory or idiopathic cough may be due to a sensory neuropathy of the vagus nerve. We present two cases where the cause of refractory chronic cough was due to sensory neuropathy associated with ear-cough reflex hypersensitivity. In both cases, the cough as well as the Arnold's nerve reflex hypersensitivity were successfully treated with gabapentin, a treatment that has previously been shown to be effective in the treatment of cough due to sensory laryngeal neuropathy (SLN). PMID:25383210

  13. REFLEX MODIFICATION AND THE DETECTION OF TOXICANT-INDUCED AUDITORY DYSFUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides a reviev of reflex modification. eflex modification of the acoustic startle response is a technique that can provide rapid, objective and quantitative assessments of sensorimotor function. dvantages of this technique involve the ability to test animals rapidl...

  14. Surface EMG crosstalk during phasic involuntary muscle activation in the nociceptive withdrawal reflex.

    PubMed

    Frahm, Ken S; Jensen, Michael B; Farina, Dario; Andersen, Ole K

    2012-08-01

    The human nociceptive withdrawal reflex is typically assessed using surface electromyography (sEMG). Based on sEMG, the reflex receptive field (RRF) can be mapped. However, EMG crosstalk can cause erroneous results in the RRF determination. Single differential (SD) vs. double differential (DD) surface EMG were evaluated. Different electrode areas and inter-electrode-distances (IED) were evaluated. The reflexes were elicited by electrical stimulation of the sole of the foot. EMG was obtained from both tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) using both surface and intramuscular EMG (iEMG). The amount of crosstalk was significantly higher in SD recordings than in DD recordings (P < 0.05). Crosstalk increased when electrode measuring area increased (P < 0.05) and when IED increased (P < 0.05). Reflex detection sensitivity decreases with increasing measuring area and increasing IED. These results stress that for determination of RRF and similar tasks, DD recordings should be applied. PMID:22806372

  15. How Can Hypnodontics Manage Severe Gag Reflex for Root Canal Therapy? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Mohsen; zarenejad, Nafiseh; Parirokh, Masoud; Zahedpasha, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, severe involuntary gagging can have a severe impact on treatment procedure. There are many ways to ease the gag reflex, one of which is hypnosis. A 34-year-old male was referred for root canal treatment of a molar tooth. He had not received any dental treatments for the past nine years due to fear of severe gag reflex. Three hypnotic sessions based upon eye fixation, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques were spent for psychosomatic management. The gag reflex was controlled and reduced to a normal level, and the required dental treatments including root canal therapy and restoration were performed successfully. This report shows that hypnosis can control gag reflex for dental treatments. PMID:27141226

  16. Role of Autonomic Reflex Arcs in Cardiovascular Responses to Air Pollution Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The body responds to environmental stressors by triggering autonomic reflexes in the pulmonary receptors, baroreceptors, and chemoreceptors to maintain homeostasis. Numerous studies have shown that exposure to various gases and airborne particles can alter the functional outcome ...

  17. How Can Hypnodontics Manage Severe Gag Reflex for Root Canal Therapy? A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Mohsen; Zarenejad, Nafiseh; Parirokh, Masoud; Zahedpasha, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, severe involuntary gagging can have a severe impact on treatment procedure. There are many ways to ease the gag reflex, one of which is hypnosis. A 34-year-old male was referred for root canal treatment of a molar tooth. He had not received any dental treatments for the past nine years due to fear of severe gag reflex. Three hypnotic sessions based upon eye fixation, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques were spent for psychosomatic management. The gag reflex was controlled and reduced to a normal level, and the required dental treatments including root canal therapy and restoration were performed successfully. This report shows that hypnosis can control gag reflex for dental treatments. PMID:27141226

  18. Reciprocal inhibition during the tonic stretch reflex in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, T C; Hultborn, H; Larsson, R; Lundberg, A

    1978-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate post-synaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition during the stretch reflex; particularly the extent to which an increased Ia excitation of the Ia inhibitory interneurones will be counteracted by recurrent inhibition from motor axon collaterals. For this purpose we investigated depression of monosynaptic test reflexes antagonist flexors (reciprocal inhibition) during static stretch of quadriceps or triceps surae in unanaesthetized decerebrate cats. 3. With increasing stretch of the extensor muscle there was first a linear augmentation of reciprocal inhibition, but along with the stretch reflex in the extensor a plateau appeared in the inhibition of the flexors, although the extensor stretch reflex (judged by the e.m.g.) increased with further stretching. Within the range of stretching of triceps surae which gave increased stretch reflexes the plateau in the reciprocal inhibition was usually maintained, while during stretching of quadriceps a second phase of augmenting reciprocal inhibition often appeared. Stretch beyond the level which increased the stretch reflex activity gave augmenting reciprocal inhibition both in case of quadriceps and triceps surae. 3. Excitability measurements from central terminals of Ia afferents revealed that the increasing reciprocal inhibition during increasing stretch reflex activity in quadriceps was associated with a primary afferent depolarization in knee flexor Ia afferents; there was no corresponding effect in ankle flexor Ia afferents during stretch reflexes in triceps surae. 4. The primary afferent depolarization evoked in knee flexor Ia afferents by electrical nerve stimulation was then compared with the presynaptic inhibition of knee flexor monosynaptic test reflexes produced by the same stimuli. The results suggest that the second phase of increasing reciprocal inhibition in knee flexors is due to presynaptic inhibition and accordingly that the depth of post-synaptic reciprocal inhibition remains constant at different degrees of stretch reflex activity in both knee and ankle extensors. 5. It is postulated that during increasing stretch reflex activity the increment in Ia excitation and recurrent inhibitio; on to the Ia inhibitory interneurones almost exactly balance each other. It is suggested that recurrent inhibition of Ia inhibitory interneurones may serve as a segmental autoregulatory mechanism to keep 'alpha-gamma-linked reciprocal inhibition' at a constant depth during different levels of agonist activity. PMID:731548

  19. Ablation of Cerebellar Nuclei Prevents H-Reflex Down-Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiang Yang; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2005-01-01

    While studies of cerebellar involvement in learning and memory have described plasticity within the cerebellum, its role in acquisition of plasticity elsewhere in the CNS is largely unexplored. This study set out to determine whether the cerebellum is needed for acquisition of the spinal cord plasticity that underlies operantly conditioned…

  20. [Conditioned reflexes following destruction of the deep structures of the brain].

    PubMed

    Garibian, A A; Khodzhaiants, I Iu; Gambarian, L S

    1983-01-01

    The role and the relative significance of paleo-, archi- and neostriatum as well as Corpus Luysii, substantia innominata, substantia nigra, nucl. ruber and the hippocampus, in the mechanism of purposeful behaviour of animals, were studied on cats and rats. It has been shown that the above structures, together with the cerebral cortex, take part in operational memory. The data obtained continue the evolutionary concept of L. A. Orbeli that in higher vertebrates with a well-developed cortex, the deeper brain structures do not lose their initial function, and together with the cortex, participate in the provision for the integrative activity of the brain. PMID:6624248