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Sample records for conditions influence bioavailability

  1. An investigation into the influence of experimental conditions on in vitro drug release from immediate-release tablets of levothyroxine sodium and its relation to oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Ivana; Homsek, Irena; Dacevic, Mirjana; Parojcic, Jelena; Miljkovic, Branislava

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of experimental conditions on levothyroxine sodium release from two immediate-release tablet formulations which narrowly passed the standard requirements for bioequivalence studies. The in vivo study was conducted as randomised, single-dose, two-way cross-over pharmacokinetic study in 24 healthy subjects. The in vitro study was performed using various dissolution media, and obtained dissolution profiles were compared using the similarity factor value. Drug solubility in different media was also determined. The in vivo results showed narrowly passing bioequivalence. Considering that levothyroxine sodium is classified as Class III drug according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System, drug bioavailability will be less sensitive to the variation in its dissolution characteristics and it can be assumed that the differences observed in vitro in some of investigated media probably do not have significant influence on the absorption process, as long as rapid and complete dissolution exists. The study results indicate that the current regulatory criteria for the value of similarity factor in comparative dissolution testing, as well as request for very rapid dissolution (more than 85% of drug dissolved in 15 min), are very restricted for immediate-release dosage forms containing highly soluble drug substance and need further investigation. The obtained results also add to the existing debate on the appropriateness of the current bioequivalence standards for levothyroxine sodium products. PMID:21748540

  2. Influence of biochar amendments on marine sediment trace metal bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, G. E.; Hsu-Kim, H.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar has become a desirable material for use in agricultural application to enhance soil quality and in-situ soil and sediment remediation to immobilize organic contaminants. We investigated the effects of biochar sediment amendments on the bioavailability of a suite of inorganic trace metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) in contaminated sediments from multiple sites in Elizabeth River, VA. We incubated sediments in microcosms with a variety of water column redox and salinity conditions and compared sediments amended with two types of woody biochar to sediments amended with charcoal activated carbon and unamended sediments. We leached sediments in artificial gut fluid mimic of the benthic invertebrate Arenicola marina as a measure of bioavailability of the trace metals analyzed. In unamended anaerobic sediments, the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction of each trace metal is 1-4% of the total sediment concentration for each metal. Initial results indicate that in anaerobic microcosms, woody biochar sediment amendments (added to 5% dry wt) decrease the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction by 30-90% for all trace metals analyzed, and have comparable performance to charcoal activated carbon amendments. However, in microcosms without controlled redox conditions, woody biochar amendments increase the bioavailable fraction of Ni and Cu by up to 80%, while decreasing the bioavailable fraction of Co, Zn, and Pb by approximately 50%; charcoal activated carbon amendments decreased the bioavailability of all trace metals analyzed by approximately 20%. In microcosms without an overlying water column, biochar and activated carbon amendments had no significant effects on trace metal bioavailability. This research demonstrates that biochar can effectively decrease the bioavailability of trace metals in marine sediments, but its efficiency is metal-specific, and environmental conditions impact biochar performance.

  3. Influence of food on the bioavailability of drugs.

    PubMed

    Melander, A

    1978-01-01

    Food intake exerts a complex influence on the bioavailability of drugs. It may interfere not only with tablet disintegration, drug dissolution and drug transit through the gastrointestinal tract, but may also affect the metabolic transformation of drugs in the gastrointestinal wall and in the liver. Different food components can have different effects, and food may interact in opposite ways, even with drugs that are chemically related. Therefore, the net effect of food on drug bioavailability can be predicted only by direct clinical studies of the drug in question. As judged mainly from single meal, single dose studies, food intake enhances the bioavailability of several different drugs, such as propranolol, metoprolol, hydrallazine, hydrochlorothiazide, canrenone (from spironolactone), nitrofurantoin, erythromycin (stearate), dicoumarol, phenytoin and carbamazepine, but reduces that of drugs such as isoniazid, rifampicin, tetracycline, penicillin and ampicillin, while having no consistent effect on the bioavailability of metronidazole, oxazepam, melperone, propylthiouracil, sulphasomidine and sulphonylureas. For some drugs such as digoxin and paracetamol, the rate but not the extent of absorption is reduced. Food may enhance bioavailability even though, or rather because, the rate of gastric emptying is reduced; this is apparently the case with hydrochlorothiazide and nitrofurantoin. The food induced enhancement of bioavailability of propranolol, metoprolol and hydrallazine is probably due to reduced first pass metabolism of these drugs, while food induced improvement of drug dissolution may explain the enhanced bioavailability of carbamazepine, canrenone, dicoumarol and phenytoin. An increased gastrointestinal pH may be in part the cause of the food induced reduction of the bioavailability of drugs such as isoniazid and tetracycline. In addition to single meal effects, repeated intake of protein-rich meals enhance, while carbohydrate-rich meals reduce, the rate

  4. Influence of Diagenesis on Bioavailable Phosphorus in Lake Mendota, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A.; Armstrong, D.; Lathrop, R.; Penn, M.

    2013-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a major driver of productivity in many freshwater systems and in excess P can cause a variety of deleterious effects. Lake Mendota, located in Madison, Wisconsin (USA), is a eutrophic calcareous lake that is influenced by both urban and agricultural sources. As measures have been implemented to control point and non-point source pollution, internal sources, including release by sediments, has become more important. We collected multiple sediment cores from seven depositional basins to determine how diagenesis is influencing the bioavailability of sediment P. Cores were sliced in 1-cm intervals and analyzed for total P (TP), various P fractions, total metals, and multiple stable isotopes. While the average amount of total P that was bioavailable was 64.8%, the range noted was 39.2% to 88.6%. Spatial differences existed among the cores when comparing TP and bioavailable P among the cores. Depth profiles elucidated temporal differences as occasional increases in TP with depth were noted. These increases were found to contain a higher percent of bioavailable P. This variation was explored to determine if it resulted from differences in source material, for example inorganic P formed by diagenesis of organic P (algal derived) rather than soil P from external inputs. Saturation index modeling using MINEQL+ suggests that phosphorus concentrations in Lake Mendota pore waters are influenced by precipitation of vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2●8H2O) and certain calcium phosphates. However, hydroxyl apatite (Ca5(PO4)3(OH)), was highly supersaturated, indicating that precipitation of hydroxyl apatite is hindered and not important in controlling phosphate concentrations in these sediments. Yet even more important than precipitation reactions, adsorption/desorption characteristics of P seem to play a major role in P bioavailability. Sediment 210Pb and 137Cs activity profiles indicate differences exist among sedimentation rates for the various depositional sites in Lake

  5. Influence of food on bioavailability of amdinocillin pivoxil.

    PubMed Central

    Bornemann, L D; Castellano, S; Lin, A H; Enthoven, D; Patel, I H

    1988-01-01

    The bioavailability of amdinocillin was not altered when amdinocillin pivoxil was ingested 1 h before a standard breakfast, and it increased by 20% when amdinocillin pivoxil was ingested with or 1 h after a standard breakfast. Amdinocillin pivoxil would be convenient for patients since it may be taken with or without food. PMID:3377469

  6. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    PubMed

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated. PMID:26717720

  7. Influence of estuarine processes on spatiotemporal variation in bioavailable selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Robin; Luoma, Samuel N.; Elrick, Kent A.; Carter, James L.; van der Wegen, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic processes (physical, chemical and biological) challenge our ability to quantify and manage the ecological risk of chemical contaminants in estuarine environments. Selenium (Se) bioavailability (defined by bioaccumulation), stable isotopes and molar carbon-tonitrogen ratios in the benthic clam Potamocorbula amurensis, an important food source for predators, were determined monthly for 17 yr in northern San Francisco Bay. Se concentrations in the clams ranged from a low of 2 to a high of 22 μg g-1 over space and time. Little of that variability was stochastic, however. Statistical analyses and preliminary hydrodynamic modeling showed that a constant mid-estuarine input of Se, which was dispersed up- and down-estuary by tidal currents, explained the general spatial patterns in accumulated Se among stations. Regression of Se bioavailability against river inflows suggested that processes driven by inflows were the primary driver of seasonal variability. River inflow also appeared to explain interannual variability but within the range of Se enrichment established at each station by source inputs. Evaluation of risks from Se contamination in estuaries requires the consideration of spatial and temporal variability on multiple scales and of the processes that drive that variability.

  8. Influence of Individual Saliva Secretion on Fluoride Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Naumova, E.A; Gaengler, P; Zimmer, S; Arnold, W.H

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to compare the individual saliva secretion rate with the fluoride bioavailability in saliva after using sodium fluoride and amine fluoride. Methods: To assess oral fluoride kinetics 10 highly trained volunteers brushed their teeth with one of the formulations and saliva was collected. The amount of saliva was measured, and the fluoride content was determined. Data underwent statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney-U test and Pearson correlation. The ex vivo experiment I included individual saliva collection of the same volunteers. Then the oral hygiene products were solved in equal amounts of whole saliva (ex-vivo experiment II), and the fluoride content was measured. Finally, both products were dispersed in distilled water (ex-vivo experiment III) to calculate the dissociation of both products in water. Results: In vivo results of fluoride content after 3 min. tooth brushing demonstrated a negative correlation with saliva secretion: for NaF r = -0.695 (p<0.01) and for amine fluoride r = -0.446 (p<0.01). The in-vitro experiment I resulted for NaF in 251.7±22.4 µg/g fluoride and for amine fluoride in 171.7±14.4 µg/g. Conclusions: Fluoride bioavailability of saliva after exposure to NaF was higher compared to amine fluoride. The individual secretion rate changes the fluoride content and normal secretors keep the fluoride availability longer. PMID:21221176

  9. Influence of aging on copper bioavailability in soils.

    PubMed

    Lock, Koen; Janssen, Colin R

    2003-05-01

    Because of long-term chemical processes, metal bioavailability in field soils decreases with time. Metal toxicity may, therefore, be overestimated if toxicity data with freshly spiked soils are used to derive soil quality criteria, a current practice. In the present study, effects of the long-term processes, called aging, on copper partitioning and ecotoxicity are investigated. Twenty-five field soils contaminated by copper runoff from bronze statues and 25 uncontaminated control soils sampled at 5-m distance from these statues were collected in Flanders (Belgium). The soils were selected so that parameters affecting copper bioavailability (pH, cation-exchange capacity, organic matter content, etc.) varied considerably. To assess the effect of aging on copper toxicity, control soils were spiked at total copper concentrations comparable to those of historically contaminated soils. Pore-water copper concentrations and 0.01 M CaCl2-extracted copper concentrations were significantly higher in freshly spiked soils compared to contaminated field soils. However, this could be a pH effect, because pH decreased after spiking. Acute toxicity to Enchytraeus albidus (14 d) as well as chronic toxicity to Folsomia candida (28-d reproduction) and Trifolium pratense (14-d growth) indicated a dose-response relationship between copper toxicity and pore-water copper concentration or the CaCl2-extracted copper fraction. PMID:12729229

  10. Influence of organic matter transformations on the bioavailability of heavy metals in a sludge based compost.

    PubMed

    Ingelmo, Florencio; Molina, Maria José; Soriano, Maria Desamparados; Gallardo, Antonio; Lapeña, Leonor

    2012-03-01

    The agricultural use of anaerobically digested sewage sludge (ADSS) as stable, mature compost implies knowing its total content in heavy metals and their bioavailability. This depends not only on the initial characteristics of the composted substrates but also on the organic matter transformations during composting which may influence the chemical form of the metals and their bioavailability. The objective of this work was to examine the relationships between the changes in the organic matter content and humus fractions, and the bioavailability of heavy metals. A detailed sampling at 0, 14, 84, and 140 days of the composting process was performed to measure C contents in humic acids (HAs), fulvic acids, (FAs) and humin, the total content of Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, and Cd, and also their distribution into mobile and mobilisable (MB), and low bioavailability (LB) forms. Significant changes of C contents in HA, FA, and Humin, and in the FA/HA, HA/Humin and C(humus)/TOC ratios were observed during composting. The MB and LB fractions of each metal also varied significantly during composting. The MB fraction increased for Zn, Cu, Ni, and Cd, and the LB fraction increased for Pb. Stepwise linear regressions and quadratic curve estimation conducted on the MB and LB fractions of each metal as dependent on the measured organic variables suggested that Zn bioavailability was mainly associated to percentage of C in FAs. Bioavailability of Cu, Ni and Cd during composting was associated to humin and HAs. Pb concentration increased in the LB form, and its variations followed a quadratic function with the C(humus)/TOC ratio. Our results suggest that the composting process renders the metals in more available forms. The main forms of metal binding in the sludge and their availability in the final compost may be better described when metal fractionation obtained in sequential extraction and humus fractionation during composting are considered together. PMID:21570172

  11. Abiotic and biotic factors that influence the bioavailability of gold nanoparticles to aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Glenn, J Brad; Klaine, Stephen J

    2013-09-17

    This research identified and characterized factors that influenced nanomaterial bioavailability to three aquatic plants: Azolla caroliniana Willd, Egeria densa Planch., and Myriophyllum simulans Orch. Plants were exposed to 4-, 18-, and 30-nm gold nanoparticles. Uptake was influenced by nanoparticle size, the presence of roots on the plant, and dissolved organic carbon in the media. Statistical analysis of the data also revealed that particle uptake was influenced by a 4-way (plant species, plant roots, particle size, and dissolved organic carbon) interaction suggesting nanoparticle bioavailability was a complex result of multiple parameters. Size and species dependent absorption was observed that was dependent on the presence of roots and nanoparticle size. The presence of dissolved organic carbon was found to associate with 4- and 18-nm gold nanoparticles in suspension and form a nanoparticle/organic matter complex that resulted in (1) minimized particle aggregation and (2) a decrease of nanoparticle absorption by the aquatic plants. The same effect was not observed with the 30-nm nanoparticle treatment. These results indicate that multiple factors, both biotic and abiotic, must be taken into account when predicting bioavailability of nanomaterials to aquatic plants. PMID:23947987

  12. Sediment properties influencing the bioavailability of uranium to Chironomus dilutus larvae in spiked field sediments.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sarah E; Liber, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    The partitioning of metals between dissolved and solid phases directly affects metal bioavailability to benthic invertebrates and is influenced by metal-binding properties of sediment phases. Little research has been done examining the effects of sediment properties on the bioavailability of uranium (U) to freshwater benthic invertebrates. In the present study, 18 field sediments with a wide range of properties (total organic carbon, fine fraction, cation exchange capacity, and iron content) were amended with the same concentrations of U to characterize the effects of these sediment properties on U bioavailability to freshwater midge, Chironomus dilutus. Bioaccumulation of U by C. dilutus larvae varied by over an order of magnitude when exposed to sediments spiked with 50 mg U kg(-1) d.w. (5-69 mg U kg(-1) d.w.) and 500 mg U kg(-1) d.w. (20-452 mg U kg(-1) d.w.), depending on the type of sediment. Variance in U bioaccumulation was best explained by differences in the cation exchange capacity, fine fraction (≤50 μm particle size), and Fe content of U-spiked sediment, with generated regression equations predicting observed bioaccumulation within a factor of two. The presented regression equations offer an easy-to-apply method for accounting for the influence of sediment properties on U bioavailability in freshwater sediment, with fine fraction being the single most practical variable. This research strongly supports that risk assessments and guidelines for U-contaminated sediments should not ignore the influence of sediment properties that can result in substantial differences in the bioaccumulation of U in benthic invertebrates. PMID:26802266

  13. Objective determination of the bioavailability of dermocorticoids--influence of the formulation.

    PubMed

    Poelman, M C; Leveque, J L; Le Gall, F

    1984-07-01

    In order to quantify the intensity of skin blanching and thus predict the bioavailability of topical corticoids, a physical device allowing the measurement of light reflected from skin without any contact between the probe and the skin was used (Leveque et al., 1984). Three series of experiments were carried out: firstly, to assess the vasoconstrictor potency of four corticoids; secondly, to show the influence of the vehicle on the bioavailability of the same drug under various galenic forms, such as fatty ointments or water in oil (W/O) and oil in water (O/W) creams; thirdly, to determine the reservoir effects, if any, of some of these formulations. The results confirm previous findings about the potency of hydrocortisone acetate, triamcinolone 17-acetonide, betamethasone 17-valerate, diflucortolone valerate and clobetasol 17-propionate. PMID:6743548

  14. Influence of the presence of ethanol on in vitro bioavailability of fungicide residues.

    PubMed

    Cermeño, S; Martínez, G; Oliva, J; Cámara, M A; Barba, A

    2016-07-01

    The influence of ethanol on the in vitro bioavailability of nine fungicides in wines of varying degrees of alcohol is studied by simulating the digestive process by dialysis in semipermeable membranes. The dose of each fungicide corresponds to its added Maximum Residue Limits in the different matrices (water, ethanol, wines of 7, 11, 13 and 14.5% ethanol). A validated analytical methodology was used which includes extraction, partition according to the modified QuEChERS multiresidue method and liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Interaction between the ethanol content and bioavailability was confirmed and increases were found in the dialyzed percentages with respect to the blank (the standard in water) for ametoctradin, mepanipyrim, cyazofamid, pyraclostrobin and metrafenone, while a decrease was observed for dimethomorph, boscalid and kresoxim-methyl. Fenhexamid showed no significant differences by alcohol content. PMID:27112541

  15. Effect of zinc on copper and iron bioavailability as influenced by dietary copper and fat source

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.C.; Jones, B.P.; Lin, F.; Sinthusek, G.; Frimpong, N.A.; Wu, S.

    1986-03-05

    In a number of experiments, they have observed that liver copper levels of young male rats fed low zinc diets were essentially the same as liver copper levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Liver iron levels of rats fed low zinc diets, however, tended to be markedly higher than liver iron levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Increases in dietary zinc (up to 200 ppm) were generally associated with decreases in liver iron deposition, but had little effect on liver copper deposition. Iron bioavailability appeared to be enhanced when fat sources high in saturated fatty acids were used, and there was evidence that the type of dietary fat influenced the effect of zinc on iron bioavailability. Liver copper deposition, however, did not appear to be markedly affected by the type of dietary fat suggesting that copper bioavailability is less affected by fat source. Increases in dietary copper were associated with increases in liver copper levels and decreases in liver iron levels of rats fed increasing levels of zinc. These data suggest that potential interrelationships between dietary factors not being considered as experimental variables could have significant effects on results and on the interrelationships between dietary variables which are being studied.

  16. Influence of natural dissolved organic carbon on the bioavailability of mercury to a freshwater alga

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorski, P.R.; Armstrong, D.E.; Hurley, J.P.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Bioavailability of mercury (Hg) to Selenastrum capricornutum was assessed in bioassays containing field-collected freshwater of varying dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. Bioconcentration factor (BCF) was measured using stable isotopes of methylmercury (MeHg) and inorganic Hg(II). BCFs for MeHg in low-DOC lake water were significantly larger than those in mixtures of lake water and high-DOC river water. The BCF for MeHg in rainwater (lowest DOC) was the largest of any treatment. Rainwater and lake water also had larger BCFs for Hg(II) than river water. Moreover, in freshwater collected from several US and Canadian field sites, BCFs for Hg(II) and MeHg were low when DOC concentrations were >5 mg L-1. These results suggest high concentrations of DOC inhibit bioavailability, while low concentrations may provide optimal conditions for algal uptake of Hg. However, variability of BCFs at low DOC indicates that DOC composition or other ligands may determine site-specific bioavailability of Hg.

  17. COMPETITIVE INFLUENCE OF PHOSPHORUS AND CALCIUM ON PB IN-VITRO BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioavailability of a metal is heavily related to the speciation of the particular metal. Further, the complexity of examining metal bioavailability is compounded by the presence of competitive ions. Thus, equally contaminated soils with varying concentrations of competitive e...

  18. Influence of dispersants on petroleum bioavailability in a marine food chain

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, M.F.; Younghans-Haug, C.O.; Tjeerdema, R.S.; Sowby, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Oil spills represent a serious threat to marine organisms. Crude oil consists of numerous compounds with a wide range of physicochemical properties critical in determining those organisms at greatest risk. Surface inhabitants may benefit from the application of dispersing agents, yet little is understood of the disposition of the dispersed components of a spill. As the functional water solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons increases in the water column, the portion that is available for uptake may also increase, placing another group of organisms at risk. Potential increases in adsorption and bioaccumulation may extend the threat of oil spills from marine organisms to human consumers. Studies to date have focused on the acute toxicity of oil and dispersants. The objective of this research was to determine the influence of a dispersant on the bioavailability of crude oil components at concentrations below the no observable effect level (NOEL). Flow-through chambers were used to expose the algae, Isochrysis galbana, to ``undispersed`` Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO) spiked with {sup 14}C naphthalene and ``dispersed`` spiked PBCO/Corexit 9527 sea water preparations. Bioavailability to Isochrysis was assessed as uptake, bioconcentration, and deputation of {sup 14}C naphthalene and its metabolites. Results of exposure studies will be presented.

  19. The influence of benthic fish bioturbation on cadmium bioavailability to Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, S.B.; Isely, J.J.; La Point, T.W.

    1994-12-31

    The authors are interested in how benthic fish bioturbation of contaminated sediments influences bioaccumulation into planktonic and, ultimately, nektonic organisms. They performed a series of exposures with cadmium-spiked sediment, 1 {mu}g/g nominal concentration, and koi carp Cyprinus carpio. Daphnia magna were placed in exposure aquaria with and without carp for six days and bioaccumulation after 48 h was measured. Preliminary results indicate that carp increased total suspended solids from 0.0 mg/L to 44.4 mg/L and mean total cadmium water concentrations, 1.4 {mu}g/L and 2.8 {mu}g/L, without and with fish, respectively. However, body burdens of Daphnia magna did not reflect the water concentration trend. Mean Cd residues of daphnids exposed without fish, 9.377 {mu}g/g, were not statistically different from those in the with-fish exposure, 8.348 {mu}g/g. Similarity in daphnid body burdens was probably due to cadmium binding with suspended sediment particles and dissolved organic carbon in the exposure chambers, therefore minimizing Cd bioavailability to D. magna. The present focus is on determining the bioavailable cadmium concentration.

  20. Influence of effluent organic matter on copper speciation and bioavailability in rivers under strong urban pressure.

    PubMed

    Matar, Z; Soares Pereira, C; Chebbo, G; Uher, E; Troupel, M; Boudahmane, L; Saad, M; Gourlay-France, C; Rocher, V; Varrault, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on spatiotemporal variations in the type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and copper binding ability both upstream and downstream of Paris. It also compares the relative influence of both natural DOM upstream of Paris and effluent dissolved organic matter (EfDOM) output from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) on trace metal speciation and bioavailability in aquatic systems. In addition to the typical high- and low-affinity binding sites, a third family of very high-affinity binding sites has been highlighted for EfDOM. In receiving waters downstream of Paris during low-flow periods, the percentage of high- and very high-affinity sites originating from EfDOM reaches nearly 60 %. According to the speciation computation, the free copper concentration upstream of Paris exceeds the downstream Paris concentration by a factor of 2 to 4. As regards copper bioavailability, the highest EC50tot values were observed for EfDOM and downstream DOM, with a very low aromaticity and low UV absorbance. This finding suggests that specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) is unlikely to be useful in assessing metal speciation and toxicity in aquatic systems subject to strong urban pressures. These results also highlight that the copper speciation computation for surface water exposed to considerable human pressures should include not only the humic and/or fulvic part of dissolved organic carbon but more hydrophilic fractions as well, originating for example from EfDOM. PMID:26257119

  1. Influence of ethnic origin (Asian v. Caucasian) and background diet on the bioavailability of dietary isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Vergne, Sébastien; Sauvant, Patrick; Lamothe, Valérie; Chantre, Philippe; Asselineau, Julien; Perez, Paul; Durand, Marlène; Moore, Nicholas; Bennetau-Pelissero, Catherine

    2009-12-01

    Soya isoflavones: genistein and daidzein are increasingly consumed in Western countries. Their beneficial effects are discussed considering nutrition and health in Asia. The present study aimed to check whether chronic ingestions, ethnic origin and dietary context can influence soya phyto-oestrogen bioavailability. Two prospective trials were carried out to blindly assess the pharmacokinetics after acute and chronic intake of soya-based cheese (45.97 (sd1.57) mg isoflavones) taken once a day for 10 d. Twelve healthy young Asians immersed for 2 months in France were randomised in a cross-over design to compare the influence of a Western v. Asian dietary context. The second trial partly nested in the first one, compared Asians under the Western diet to twelve healthy young male Caucasians under the same diet. All volunteers were non-equol producers. After an acute intake of soya in Western diet, Asians exhibited higher maximum concentration measured in plasma (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) for genistein and daidzein than Caucasians (P = 0.005, 0.006, 0.032 and 0.008, respectively). In Caucasians under Western diet, AUC and Cmax values significantly increased after chronic intake. This was not the case for daidzein in Asians whatever the dietary context. For the first time, it is evidenced that on acute intake of soya cheese, Asians absorb soya phyto-oestrogens better than Caucasians, regardless of whether the background diet is Western or Asian. On chronic ingestions, AUC and Cmax values were increased for daidzein and genistein in Caucasians but not in Asians. There are ethnic differences in isoflavone pharmacokinetic and bioavailability. This may influence health outcomes. PMID:19622188

  2. Influence of dissolved organic nitrogen on Ni bioavailability in Prorocentrum donghaiense and Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Li, Hao; Huang, Bang-qin; Liu, Feng-Jiao

    2015-07-15

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is an important nutrient in the aquatic environment. This study examined the influence of DON addition on the adsorption, absorption, and distribution in macromolecular forms of environmentally deleterious trace metal (Ni) in Prorocentrum donghaiense and Skeletonema costatum over eight days. Ni adsorption and absorption of two species increased with the addition of urea, while Ni adsorption and absorption of two species in the presence of humic substances (HS) decreased. Meanwhile, Ni adsorption and absorption of P. donghaiense were higher than that of S. costatum. Furthermore, Ni contents in the protein fraction of the cells, both in P. donghaiense and S. costatum, were increased with both urea and HS addition. Thus, urea and HS input could impact Ni biogeochemistry and bioavailability, and then affect the biodynamics thereafter. PMID:25935806

  3. Metal bioavailability in freshwater sediment samples and their influence on ecological status of river basins.

    PubMed

    Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Nieto, Elena; Gallego, Elena Pérez; Schuhmacher, Marta; Blasco, Julián

    2016-01-01

    The general aim of this work has been to check the ecological impact of metals on the Ebro river basin. In order to evaluate this, metal behavior considering water, sediment as well as metal bioaccumulation in fish has been studied. Total concentrations of metals, as well as the potentially bioavailable fraction of metals in sediment has also been analyzed by the application of the sequential extraction method (BCR method). In order to evaluate the influence of metal pollution on the river ecological status, according to the Water Framework Directive (WFD), diverse biological indices such as macroinvertebrates (IBMWP), diatoms (IPS) and macrophytes (IVAM), have been considered from an integrated point of view. Considering both water and sediment, metals which contributed in higher extend to the reduction of biological quality have been demonstrated to be Pb and Zn, as they presented a negative influence on macroinvertebrates, diatoms and macrophytes communities. As and Cr that seemed to have a significant influence on macroinvertebrates and diatoms too, while Ni negatively influenced only diatom communities. This study also demonstrated that monitoring programs only based on total metal determination in water are inefficient, as metals present even at undetectable concentrations in water are strongly accumulated in fish. Moreover, the high concentrations of Hg found in sediments indicated that this river basin may present pollution problems regarded to this metal, as demonstrated by the high Hg levels found in fish. PMID:26148425

  4. Influence of compost addition on lead and arsenic bioavailability in reclaimed orchard soil assessed using Porcellio scaber bioaccumulation test

    PubMed Central

    Udovic, M.; McBride, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    A long history of lead arsenate application in orchards has led to significant accumulation of Pb and As in the topsoil. Besides the threat that such soils represent for the environment, reclamation of old orchards for agricultural purposes implies the exposure of humans to Pb and As. In this study we assessed the influence of vegetable compost addition (as a sustainable agricultural practice) to contaminated acidic orchard soil on Pb and As bioavailability, assessed with two selective non-exhaustive chemical extractions and with an in vivo bioaccumulation test with an isopod (P. scaber). The treatment with compost caused a significant increase in soil pH and total carbon content, resulting in a consistent decrease of Pb bioavailability. In contrast, the bioavailability of As increased, indicating that a complementary treatment should be used for reducing the bioavailability of As in old orchard soils. This is the first report on the use of As accumulation in P. scaber as a tool for the assessment of As bioavailability in contaminated orchard soil. PMID:22240057

  5. Influence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on speciation and bioavailability of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwen; Zhang, Xuezhi; Zhang, Zhiyan; Chen, Yongsheng; Crittenden, John C

    2009-04-01

    In this study, the influence of the co-existence of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the speciation of arsenite [As(III)] was studied by observing its adsorption and valence changing. Moreover, the influence of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the bioavailability of As(III) was examined by bioaccumulation test using carp (Cyprinus carpio). The results showed that TiO(2) nanoparticles have a significant adsorption capacity for As (III). Equilibrium was established within 30 min, with about 30% of the initial As (III) being adsorbed onto TiO(2) nanoparticles. Most of aqueous As (III) was oxidized to As(V) in the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles under sunlight. The carp accumulated considerably more As in the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles than in the absence of TiO(2) nanoparticles, and after 25-day exposure, As concentration in carp increased by 44%. Accumulation of As in viscera, gills and muscle of the carp was significantly enhanced by the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles. PMID:18976844

  6. Influence of sediment-organic matter quality on growth and polychlorobiphenyl bioavailability in Echinodermata (Amphiura filiformis)

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnarsson, J.S.; Granberg, M.E.; Nilsson, H.C.; Rosenberg, R.; Hellman, B.

    1999-07-01

    Sediment total organic carbon (TOC) content is considered to be a primary food source for benthic invertebrates and a major factor influencing the partitioning and bioavailability of sediment-associated organic contaminants. Most studies report that both toxicity and uptake of sediment-associated contaminants by benthic organisms are inversely proportional to sediment TOC content. The aim of this study was to determine the importance of the TOC quality for the bioavailability of sediment-associated organic contaminants and the growth of benthic macrofauna. The common infaunal brittle star Amphiura filiformis was exposed to a base sediment covered by a {sup 14}C-polychlorobipenyl (3,3{prime}4,4{prime}-{sup 14}C-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB)) contaminated top layer (0--2 cm), enriched to the same TOC content with 31 g TOC/m{sup 2} of different quality and origin. The following carbon sources, ranging from labile to refractory, were used: (1) green macroalga (Ulva lactuca), (2) brown macroalga (Ascophyllum nodosum), (3) eelgrass (Zostera Marina), (4) phytoplankton (Ceratium spp.), and (5) lignins of terrestrial origin. Characterization of the organic matter quality was accomplished by measuring the content of amino acids, lipids, C, N, and polyphenolic compounds. The reactivity of the sedimentary organic matter was assessed by means of respiration and dissolved inorganic nitrogen flux measurements. The experiment was carried out in 1-L glass jars, each containing four brittle stars and the contaminated and enriched sediment. The jars were circulated in a flow-through mode with filtered seawater. Somatic growth (regeneration of a precut arm) and bioaccumulation of {sup 14}C-TCB were measured at 10 sampling occasions during 48 d of exposure. Growth rates, TCB uptake rates, and steady-state concentrations differed significantly between treatments and were correlated to the qualities of the organic substrates. The greatest TCB accumulation and growth were observed in

  7. Influence of ageing on lead bioavailability in soils: a swine study.

    PubMed

    Wijayawardena, M A Ayanka; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Lamb, Dane; Thavamani, Palanisami; Kuchel, Tim

    2015-06-01

    Aging is a time-dependent process that causes metal bioavailability to decrease with time. The current study investigated the bioavailability change of Pb in four contrasting soils over a time period until the Pb relative bioavailability (RB) levels achieved a steady state to assess the extent of the following: firstly, bioavailability change in each soil and secondly, correlation of these changes with the soil properties. Relative bioavailability of soils spiked with 1500 mg Pb/kg were measured in swine that were fed these soils, throughout an aging period (56 days) to investigate relationships between soil properties and in vivo bioavailability of Pb. Spiked soils were used to minimize the effect of varying sources of Pb on RB. The RB of Pb in GTA, IWA, and MLA decreased from their initial Pb RB values until a steady state RB of 34, 45, and 59 % was reached, respectively, by the 56th day. In contrast, however, to these RB decreases, NTA soil indicated no change in RB over the whole aging period of the experiment. The lack of change in RB in the NTA soil over time was attributed to it achieving a steady state RB within a very short time due to its comparatively high sorptive capacity (K d = 112). PMID:25249050

  8. Understanding the influence of surface properties of nanoparticles and penetration enhancers for improving bioavailability in eye tissues in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mahaling, Binapani; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2016-03-30

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems, mucoadhesive polymers and penetration enhancers have been used individually to overcome ocular barriers and increase bioavailability to eye tissues. However the combined influence of mucoadhesive polymer coating and penetration enhancers on NP permeability has not been investigated. Hence, in this study, three types of core-shell nanoparticles with same hydrophobic core but different hydrophilic mucoadhesive shells were developed. Initially the influence of a single penetration enhancer (PE) [benzalkonium chloride (BAC)] on ocular permeability of all the three core-shell nanoparticles was studied. Then ocular permeability of a single nanoparticle system [polycaprolactone-pluronicF68 (PCL-PF68)] in presence of different types of PEs namely BAC, capric acid (CA), EDTA, sodium glycocolate (SG) and sodium taurocholate (ST) was studied. The results indicated that BAC differentially enhanced ocular permeability of nanoparticles depending on their surface properties. All the PEs except EDTA enhanced ocular permeability of PCL-PF68 nanoparticles to anterior part of the eye. BAC and CA showed increased bioavailability of PCL-PF68 nanoparticles in conjunctiva, SG in cornea, iris and ciliary body, and ST in cornea. Overall, the combination of PEs and surface properties of nanoparticles can differentially influence ocular permeability and bioavailability and can be advantageously used to develop improved ocular drug delivery systems. PMID:26821059

  9. The Influence of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Bioavailability and Toxicity to Soil Microbial Communities in Alfalfa Rhizosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may affect bioavailability and toxicity of organic contaminants due to their adsorption properties. Recent studies have observed the influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other organic contaminants. Greenh...

  10. Influence of Dissolved Organic Matter on Tetracycline Bioavailability to an Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zeyou; Zhang, Yingjie; Gao, Yanzheng; Boyd, Stephen A; Zhu, Dongqiang; Li, Hui

    2015-09-15

    Complexation of tetracycline with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aqueous solution could alter the bioavailability of tetracycline to bacteria, thereby alleviating selective pressure for development of antibiotic resistance. In this study, an Escherichia coli whole-cell bioreporter construct with antibiotic resistance genes coupled to green fluorescence protein was exposed to tetracycline in the presence of DOM derived from humic acids. Complexation between tetracycline and DOM diminished tetracycline bioavailability to E. coli, as indicated by reduced expression of antibiotic resistance genes. Increasing DOM concentration resulted in decreasing bioavailability of tetracycline to the bioreporter. Freely dissolved tetracycline (not complexed with DOM) was identified as the major fraction responsible for the rate and magnitude of antibiotic resistance genes expressed. Furthermore, adsorption of DOM on bacterial cell surfaces inhibited tetracycline diffusion into the bioreporter cells. The magnitude of the inhibition was related to the amount of DOM adsorbed and tetracycline affinity for the DOM. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which the bioavailability of tetracycline antibiotics to bacteria is reduced by DOM present in water. Agricultural lands receiving livestock manures commonly have elevated levels of both DOM and antibiotics; the DOM could suppress the bioavailability of antibiotics, hence reducing selective pressure on bacteria for development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26370618

  11. Dissolved Organic Matter Enhances Hg Bioavailability to a Hg-Methylating Bacterium Under Mildly Sulfidic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A. M.; Gilmour, C. C.

    2011-12-01

    Field studies have demonstrated a strong linkage between dissolved organic matter (DOM) quantity and quality and in-situ methylmercury (MeHg) production. The biogeochemical basis for these field observations is unknown however. Here, we investigate the roles of DOM and sulfide in controlling Hg bioavailability to the Hg-methylating bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 in short-term washed cell assays. At environmentally relevant Hg/DOM ratios (2-4300 ng Hg/mg DOM), MeHg production increased linearly with increasing Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) concentration, even in the presence of sulfide concentrations (5-10 μM) sufficient to outcompete SRHA for inorganic Hg. The DOM-dependent enhancement in Hg-methylation cannot be attributed to an enhancement of ND132 metabolic activity or alteration of Hg sorption to cells or bottle walls. Equilibrium speciation calculations indicated that cell suspensions were supersaturated with respect to metacinnabar (β-HgS(s)) and that Hg-DOM thiol complexes were relatively minor species. Notably, SRHA addition had no effect on Hg methylation in solutions where Hg-cysteine species predominated and β-HgS(s) precipitation was not predicted. We hypothesize that DOM enhances Hg-methylation by stabilizing HgS(s) colloids or nanoparticles against aggregation and/or by reducing the crystallinty of HgS(s) particles, and that such HgS(s) colloids are bioavailable to Hg-methylating bacteria. Ongoing work in the laboratory is evaluating the role of DOM character (size, aromaticity, reduced S content, etc.) in controlling the extent of the enhancement in MeHg production. These findings highlight the limits of equilibrium speciation approaches to predicting Hg bioavailability to methylating bacteria given the demonstrated significance of Hg-DOM-sulfide interactions in the anoxic environments where methylation occurs. Our laboratory experiments provide additional insight into the role that DOM plays in determining spatial and temporal

  12. Chronic exposure to deoxynivalenol has no influence on the oral bioavailability of fumonisin B1 in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Devreese, Mathias; Van Immerseel, Filip; De Baere, Siegrid; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2015-02-01

    Both deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) are common contaminants of feed. Fumonisins (FBs) in general have a very limited oral bioavailability in healthy animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that chronic exposure to DON impairs the intestinal barrier function and integrity, by affecting the intestinal surface area and function of the tight junctions. This might influence the oral bioavailability of FB1, and possibly lead to altered toxicity of this mycotoxin. A toxicokinetic study was performed with two groups of 6 broiler chickens, which were all administered an oral bolus of 2.5 mg FBs/kg BW after three-week exposure to either uncontaminated feed (group 1) or feed contaminated with 3.12 mg DON/kg feed (group 2). No significant differences in toxicokinetic parameters of FB1 could be demonstrated between the groups. Also, no increased or decreased body exposure to FB1 was observed, since the relative oral bioavailability of FB1 after chronic DON exposure was 92.2%. PMID:25690690

  13. Chronic Exposure to Deoxynivalenol Has No Influence on the Oral Bioavailability of Fumonisin B1 in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Devreese, Mathias; Van Immerseel, Filip; De Baere, Siegrid; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2015-01-01

    Both deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) are common contaminants of feed. Fumonisins (FBs) in general have a very limited oral bioavailability in healthy animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that chronic exposure to DON impairs the intestinal barrier function and integrity, by affecting the intestinal surface area and function of the tight junctions. This might influence the oral bioavailability of FB1, and possibly lead to altered toxicity of this mycotoxin. A toxicokinetic study was performed with two groups of 6 broiler chickens, which were all administered an oral bolus of 2.5 mg FBs/kg BW after three-week exposure to either uncontaminated feed (group 1) or feed contaminated with 3.12 mg DON/kg feed (group 2). No significant differences in toxicokinetic parameters of FB1 could be demonstrated between the groups. Also, no increased or decreased body exposure to FB1 was observed, since the relative oral bioavailability of FB1 after chronic DON exposure was 92.2%. PMID:25690690

  14. Adaptation in human zinc absorption as influenced by dietary zinc and bioavailability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: An understanding of the relationship between dietary zinc (Zn) intake, bioavailability and absorption is necessary for making dietary intake recommendations. Objective: To assess adaptation in human Zn absorption with controlled differences in Zn and phytate intakes and to apply the resu...

  15. Organic amendments' dissolved organic carbon influences bioavailability of agricultural soil DOC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straathof, Angela L.; Chincarini, Riccardo; Hoffland, Ellis; Comans, Rob N. J.

    2013-04-01

    Agricultural soils benefit from additions of organic amendments because they improve soil structure, are a source of plant nutrients, and increase concentrations of soil organic carbon (SOC). The latter fuels microbial processes important for plant growth, including nutrient mineralization and the suppression of plant diseases. However, these amendment additions range in quality and quantity of C and little is known about how their properties interact with native soil C and affect turnover. The dissolved pool of SOC (DOC) may be the most important C source for these processes as it is more biologically available and thus relatively easily turned over by the soil microbial biomass. Using a rapid-batch DOC fractionation procedure, we studied the composition of different organic amendments' DOC pools and measured how their additions change the quantity and turnover of soil DOC. Fractions isolated and quantified with this procedure include humic and fulvic acids, hydrophobic neutral and hydrophilic compounds. We hypothesized that these range from biologically recalcitrant to readily available, respectively. Amendments analysed included composts of different source materials and maturation stages collected from two different compost facilities in the Netherlands. Both total DOC concentrations and proportions of the aforementioned fractions ranged highly between composts. Composts cured for >10 days had a lower proportion of hydrophilic C compounds, suggesting that these are the most bioavailable and released as CO2 via microbial activity during maturation. To measure the effects of compost DOC on soil DOC, we extracted the former and added it to a sandy soil in an incubation experiment. The amendment increased soil total DOC, CO2 production from the soil, and the pools of humic and fulvic acids as a proportion of total DOC. Turnover of C from the incubated soil was measured by substrate-induced CO2 production (an indicator of microbial activity) from a 96-well

  16. The influence of physico-chemical properties of soils on the bioavailability of 65Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetkov, Ilia; Anisimov, Vyacheslav

    2014-05-01

    Stability of soils to the effects of man-made origin pollutants is determined by their buffer capaci-ty (the ability to inactivate pollutants in a soil - soil solution - plant system). Soils are character-ized by the same types of stability as the ecosystem as a whole. Increased migration activity of pollutants is a symptom of ecological trouble, due to the soil transformation in an unstable state. Thus, the problem of the stability of soil is one of the fundamental problems of modern science. The aim of the study was to estimate the buffering capacity of soil as a key factor of their ecological and geochemical stability with respect to a relatively long-lived radionuclides 65Zn (T1/2 = 224 days), representing the radiological hazard in the location of nuclear facilities. There was proposed a method for scoring the buffering capacity of soils as for 65Zn contamination. It's based on dependence between the main physico-chemical soil properties and accumulation of the radionuclide in the aboveground plant parts (barley kind of "Zazersky-85"). The role of the considered indicators of soil health in the accumulation of radiozinc by plants was defined. The essence of this technique was to assess the contribution of individual characteristics of the soil condition, which play the most important role in the regulation of mobility (and bioavailability) of radionuclides, using the method of stepwise multiple regression analysis. For this aim representative sampling was compiled (from 20 soil types and varieties belonging to different climatic zones of the European part of the Russian Federation), thus providing a wide range of variation of the studied physical and chemical parameters, and also vegetation model experiments using 65Zn were held. On the basis of the conducted statistical analysis was revealed that the dominant contribution to the variation of the effective trait (accumulation coefficient of 65Zn) make: CaCO3 content, mobile iron (Tamm extract) and pH. As a

  17. Impacts of lake water environmental condition on bioavailable-phosphorus of surface sediments in Lixia River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, L.; Lu, C.

    2015-05-01

    Bioavailable-phosphorus (BAP) fractions of the lake surface sediments (the upper 0-5cm depth) and environmental indicators of the related lake water column were investigated in five lakes in Lixia River basin during three seasons in order to evaluate the impacts of environmental indicators of the water column on the BAP fractions of surface sediments. The concentration of BAP varied significantly in different seasons. Factor analysis was used to identify the factors which influence sedimentary BAP significantly in the different seasons. The results showed that AAP and Olsen-P were significantly affected by the chemical oxygen demand through the bacterial activity in summer. The high intensity of bacterial activity and density of algae, and low concentrations of NO3-N and dissolved oxygen under high temperature enhanced the BAP released from anaerobic sediment and significantly contributed to the eutrophication of the lake, especially in summer. In addition, macrophyte roots were beneficial to absorption of AAP and Olsen-P.

  18. Influence of formulation on the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of racemic ketoprofen in horses.

    PubMed

    Landoni, M F; Lees, P

    1995-12-01

    The bioavailability of S(+) and R(-) ketoprofen (KTP) in six horses was investigated after oral administration of the racemic (rac) mixture. Two oral formulations were studied, an oil-based paste containing micronised rac-KTP and powder from the same source in hard gelatin capsules, each at a dose rate of 2.2 mg/kg. For the oil-based paste two feeding schedules were used; horses were either allowed free access to food or access to food was restricted for 4 h before and 5 h after dosing. The drug in hard gelatin capsules was administered to horses with restricted access to food. After intravenous administration of rac-KTP, S(+) enantiomer concentrations exceeded those of the R(-) enantiomer. For S(+) and R(-)KTP, respectively, pharmacokinetic parameters were, t1/2 beta 0.99 +/- 0.14 h, 0.70 +/- 0.13 h; ClB 0.56 +/- 0.09, 0.92 +/- 0.20 L/h/kg; Vd(ss) 0.53 +/- 0.11, 0.61 +/- 0.10 L/kg. Following oral administration of rac-KTP as the oil-based paste to horses with free access to food, there were no detectable concentrations in plasma in three animals at any sampling time, while a fourth animal showed very low concentrations at two sampling times only. In the two remaining horses very low but detectable concentrations were present for 5 h. In the horses with restricted access to food, rac-KTP paste administration produced higher concentrations in plasma. However, bioavailability was very low, 2.67 +/- 0.43 and 5.75 +/- 1.48% for R(-) and S(+)KTP, respectively. When administered as pure drug substance in hard gelatin capsules, absorption of KTP was fairly rapid, but incomplete. Bioavailability was 50.55 +/- 10.95 and 54.17 +/- 9.9% for R(-) and S(+)KTP, respectively. This study demonstrates that rac-KTP had a modest bioavailability when administered as a micronised powder in hard gelatin capsules to horses with restricted access to food. When powder from the same source was administered as an oil-based paste, it was for practical purposes not bioavailable, regardless on

  19. Influence of Mycotoxin Binders on the Oral Bioavailability of Doxycycline in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Mil, Thomas De; Devreese, Mathias; Saeger, Sarah De; Eeckhout, Mia; Backer, Patrick De; Croubels, Siska

    2016-03-16

    Mycotoxin binders are feed additives that aim to adsorb mycotoxins in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, making them unavailable for systemic absorption. The antimicrobial drug doxycycline (DOX) is often used in pigs and is administered through feed or drinking water; hence, DOX can come in contact with mycotoxin binders in the gastrointestinal tract. This paper describes the effect of four mycotoxin binders on the absorption of orally administered DOX in pigs. Two experiments were conducted: The first used a setup with bolus administration to fasted pigs at two different dosages of mycotoxin binder. In the second experiment, DOX and the binders were mixed in the feed at dosages recommended by the manufacturers (= field conditions). Interactions are possible between some of the mycotoxin binders dosed at 10 g/kg feed but not at 2 g/kg feed. When applying field conditions, no influences were seen on the plasma concentrations of DOX. PMID:26902900

  20. Influence of dispersants on petroleum bioavailability in a marine food chain

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, M.; Tjeerdema, R.; Sowby, M.

    1995-12-31

    When crude oil is accidentally released into the ocean it threatens many levels of marine life. Intervention, in the form of chemical dispersing agents, may alter the normal behavior of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) by increasing their functional water solubility and the extent of their exposure to sub-surface marine organisms. Further, the dispersing agent may modify bioavailability as a result of altered interactions between dispersed PH droplets and organismal cell membranes, To date, little information exists on the sub-lethal effects of dispersants and factors modifying their role in the bioavailability and disposition of PH in marine food chains. The objective of the current research was to determine the impact of dispersing agents on PH bioavailability to primary levels of a marine food chain. Uptake, bioaccumulation, deputation, and metabolic transformation of a model PH, {sup 14}C-naphthalene, were measured and compared for dispersed Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO) vs. undispersed preparations of the water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of PBCO at two salinities (22 and 34 ppt) employing Isochrysis galbana, a primary producer, and Brachionus plicatilis, a primary consumer. Fractionation and identification of metabolites was done by HPLC co-chromatography with analytical standards, and quantitation was done by liquid scintillation counting. GC-FID characterization of WAF and dispersed oil preparations shows higher concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons and a greater number of individual constituents in the dispersed oil preparations. However, short term (eight hour) and long term (two week) static exposure studies indicate the uptake of{sup 14}C-naphthalene from WAF preparations is inhibited by up to 50% from dispersed oil preparations. Results of comparative static and flow-through chamber exposure studies will be presented.

  1. Influences of dietary uptake and reactive sulfides on metal bioavailability from aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, B.-G.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how animals are exposed to the large repository of metal pollutants in aquatic sediments is complicated and is important in regulatory decisions. Experiments with four types of invertebrates showed that feeding behavior and dietary uptake control bioaccumulation of cadmium, silver, nickel, and zinc. Metal concentrations in animal tissue correlated with metal concentrations extracted from sediments, but not with metal in porewater, across a range of reactive sulfide concentrations, from 0.5 to 30 micromoles per gram. These results contradict the notion that metal bioavailability in sediments is controlled by geochemical equilibration of metals between porewater and reactive sulfides, a proposed basis for regulatory criteria for metals.

  2. Influences of Dietary Uptake and Reactive Sulfides on Metal Bioavailability from Aquatic Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong-Gweon; Griscom, Sarah B.; Lee, Jung-Suk; Choi, Heesun J.; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Luoma, Samuel N.; Fisher, Nicholas S.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how animals are exposed to the large repository of metal pollutants in aquatic sediments is complicated and is important in regulatory decisions. Experiments with four types of invertebrates showed that feeding behavior and dietary uptake control bioaccumulation of cadmium, silver, nickel, and zinc. Metal concentrations in animal tissue correlated with metal concentrations extracted from sediments, but not with metal in porewater, across a range of reactive sulfide concentrations, from 0.5 to 30 micromoles per gram. These results contradict the notion that metal bioavailability in sediments is controlled by geochemical equilibration of metals between porewater and reactive sulfides, a proposed basis for regulatory criteria for metals.

  3. COMPETITIVE INFLUENCE OF PHOSPHORUS AND CALCIUM ON PB IN-VITRO BIOAVAILABILITY (S11-SCHECKEL101231-POSTER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioavailability of a metal is heavily related to the speciation of the particular metal. Further, the complexity of examining metal bioavailability is compounded by the presence of competitive ions. Thus, equally contaminated soils with varying concentrations of competitive e...

  4. The influence of seasonality (dry and rainy) on the bioavailability and bioconcentration of metals in an estuarine zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Alexandre Dacorso Daltro; Silva, Ana Carina Matos; Oliveira, Daiane Aparecida Francisco de; Cruz, Manoel Jerônimo Moreira da

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge on the concentration of metallic elements is important to certify the quality of ecosystems. Such behaviors in estuarine environments are dependent of factors such as rainfall and temperature of the water, interfering directly on the metal concentrations in biotic and abiotic components. This study observed the role that seasonality (dry and rainy) had on the bioavailability of metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Al) in surface water and sediment, and bioconcentration in oysters (Cassostrea rhizophorae) in the mangrove area of the São Paulo river estuary, Todos os Santos Bay. The metals concentration in three matrices analyzed varied between the periods studied. The values of physicochemical parameters also had significant variations. High levels of Zn and Cu were found in mollusks. The highest concentrations of metals analyzed were Al in waters, Fe in sediments and Zn in mollusks. These results showed that seasonality interferes directly in the physicochemical parameters analyzed (pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity and Eh), as well as on the bioavailability of metals in both water and sediment, influencing directly on the concentrations found in mollusks.

  5. Mineralogy affects geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability of zinc

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ramon M.; Schaider, Laurel A.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Shine, James P.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    We correlated mineralogical and particle characteristics of Zn-containing particles with Zn geoavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability following gavage and intranasal (IN) administration in rats. We compared samples of Zn/Pb mine waste and five pulverized pure-phase Zn minerals (<38 μm). Particles were neutron-activated to produce radioactive 65Zn. We assessed geoavailability using sequential extractions and bioaccessibility using in vitro extraction tests simulating various pH and biological conditions. Zn in vivo bioavailability and in vitro bioaccessibility decreased as follows: mine waste > hydrozincite > hemimorphite > zincite ≈ smithsonite ≫ sphalerite. We found significant correlations among geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability. In particular, Zn bioavailability post-gavage and post-IN was significantly correlated with bioaccessibility in simulated phagolysosomal fluid and gastric fluid. These data indicate that solid phase speciation influences biological uptake of Zn and that in vitro tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability in exposure assessment and effective remediation design. PMID:23933126

  6. Bioavailability of Metal Ions and Evolutionary Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hong Enriquez, Rolando P.; Do, Trang N.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been a long process that began nearly 3.5 × 109 years ago. In their initial moments, evolution was mainly influenced by anaerobic environments; with the rise of O2 and the corresponding change in bioavailability of metal ions, new mechanisms of survival were created. Here we review the relationships between ancient atmospheric conditions, metal ion bioavailability and adaptation of metals homeostasis during early evolution. A general picture linking geochemistry, biochemistry and homeostasis is supported by the reviewed literature and is further illustrated in this report using simple database searches. PMID:25371266

  7. The influence of hydrocolloid patch composition on the bioavailability of triamcinolone acetonide in humans.

    PubMed

    Martin, G P; Ladenheim, D; Marriott, C; Hollingsbee, D A; Brown, M B

    2000-01-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TACA) is a corticosteroid; it is used in the systemic and topical treatment of a variety of inflammatory conditions, including eczema and psoriasis. Conventionally, for topical use, the drug is formulated in a cream or ointment. However, it has been observed in vitro that percutaneous penetration of corticosteroids can be influenced by hydrocolloid patches. Corticosteroids produce a pallor or blanching when applied to the skin that correlates with anti-inflammatory activity; this property has been used extensively as a bioassay. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate the occlusive properties of a range of hydrocolloid patches containing TACA on the drug's penetration in vivo using visual assessment and a graded multiple measurement. The in vivo hydration of these dermatological patches was also investigated. Statistical analysis of the weight gains of patches containing either NaCMC 39% or pectin 39% showed that there was a significant difference in the rates of hydration of the two types of patch (p < .005). An increase in application time of the hydrocolloid patches allowed more TACA to be released, which was illustrated by an increase in both the maximum percentage total possible score (%TPS) values and AUC, although changes in the hydrocolloid composition did not significantly alter the blanching response. All of the patches adhered well, were unobtrusive to the normal activity of the wearers, and showed great potential for the convenient, localized, prolonged delivery of drugs to the skin. PMID:10677808

  8. [Physicochemical and microbiological factors influencing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in subsoils

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    We report progress in elucidating the microbiological variables important in determining the relative success of bacteria in utilizing soil-sorbed contaminants. Two bacterial species, Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. isolated from petroleum contaminated soil are known to differ markedly in their ability to utilize soil-sorbed napthalene based on a kinetic comparison of their capability of naphthalene mineralization in soil-containing and soil-free systems. The kinetic analysis led us to conclude that strain 17484 had direct access to naphthalene present in a labile sorbed state which promoted the rapid desorption of naphthalene from the non-labile phase. Conversely, both the rate and extent of naphthalene mineralization by strain NP-Alk suggested that this organism had access only to naphthalene in solution. Desorption was thus limited and the efficiency of total naphthalene removal from these soil slurries was poor. These conclusions were based on the average activities of cells in soil slurries without regard for the disposition of the organisms with respect to the sorbent. Since both organisms degrade naphthalene by apparently identical biochemical pathways, have similar enzyme kinetic properties, and are both motile, gram negative organisms, we undertook a series of investigations to gain a better understanding of what microbiological properties were important in bioavailability.

  9. Influence of hardness on the bioavailability of silver to a freshwater snail after waterborne exposure to silver nitrate and silver nanoparticles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoiber, Tasha L.; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Romer, Isabella; Tejamaya, Mila; Lead, Jamie R.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2015-01-01

    The release of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) into the aquatic environment is likely, but the influence of water chemistry on their impacts and fate remains unclear. Here, we characterize the bioavailability of Ag from AgNO3 and from AgNPs capped with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP AgNP) and thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG AgNP) in the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, after short waterborne exposures. Results showed that water hardness, AgNP capping agents, and metal speciation affected the uptake rate of Ag from AgNPs. Comparison of the results from organisms of similar weight showed that water hardness affected the uptake of Ag from AgNPs, but not that from AgNO3. Transformation (dissolution and aggregation) of the AgNPs was also influenced by water hardness and the capping agent. Bioavailability of Ag from AgNPs was, in turn, correlated to these physical changes. Water hardness increased the aggregation of AgNPs, especially for PEG AgNPs, reducing the bioavailability of Ag from PEG AgNPs to a greater degree than from PVP AgNPs. Higher dissolved Ag concentrations were measured for the PVP AgNPs (15%) compared to PEG AgNPs (3%) in moderately hard water, enhancing Ag bioavailability of the former. Multiple drivers of bioavailability yielded differences in Ag influx between very hard and deionized water where the uptake rate constants (kuw, l g-1 d-1 ± SE) varied from 3.1 ± 0.7 to 0.2 ± 0.01 for PEG AgNPs and from 2.3 ± 0.02 to 1.3 ± 0.01 for PVP AgNPs. Modeling bioavailability of Ag from NPs revealed that Ag influx into L. stagnalis comprised uptake from the NPs themselves and from newly dissolved Ag.

  10. Influences of humic acid on the bioavailability of phenanthrene and alkyl phenanthrenes to early life stages of marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangzhi; Yang, Chenghu; Cheng, Pakkin; He, Xiaojing; Zhu, Yaxian; Zhang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    The influences of humic acid (HA) on the environmental behavior and bioavailability of parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkyl PAHs were investigated and compared using the early life stages of marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma, O. melastigma). It was demonstrated that the binding affinity of parent phenanthrene (PHE) with HA was smaller than that of 3-methyl phenanthrene (3-MP) and 9-ethyl phenanthrene (9-EP). Furthermore, the bioaccumulation of the three PAHs and the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) were calculated to study the changes in bioavailability of PAHs in presence of HA. The results indicated that the addition of HA significantly decreased the bioaccumulation and toxicity of PAHs by decreasing free PAHs concentrations. The bioavailable fractions of HA-bound PAHs in bioaccumulation (α) and toxicity (β) were evaluated, indicating that the HA-bound 3-MP and 9-EP show higher bioavailability in bioaccumulation and lower bioavailability in toxicity relative to those of PHE. The β/α values were less than 1 for all PAH treatment groups containing HA, suggesting that the fraction of HA-bound PAHs contributing to bioaccumulation was higher than that of HA-bound PAHs inducing toxic effect. In addition, we proposed that the free PAHs generated by desorption from HA in the cell were toxic by showing that the β/α ratio values are correlated with the log KOW values (p = 0.007 and R(2) = 0.8355). Thus, oil spill risk assessments should consider both alkyl PAHs and the factors that influence the bioavailability and toxicity of PAHs in the natural aquatic environments. PMID:26735166

  11. ALUMINUM BIOAVAILABILITY FROM DRINKING WATER IS VERY LOW AND IS NOT APPRECIABLY INFLUENCED BY STOMACH CONTENTS OR WATER HARDNESS. (R825357)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives were to estimate aluminum (Al) oral bioavailability under conditions that model its consumption in drinking water, and to test the hypotheses that stomach contents and co-administration of the major components of hard water affect Al absorption. Rats received intra...

  12. Influence of acid volatile sulfide and metal concentrations on metal bioavailability to marine invertebrates in contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, B.-G.; Lee, J.-S.; Luoma, S.N.; Choi, H.J.; Koh, C.-H.

    2000-01-01

    allowed use of metal concentrations typical of nature and evaluation of processes important to chronic metal exposure. A vertical sediment column similar to that often found in nature was used to facilitate realistic biological behavior. Results showed that AVS or porewater (PW) metals controlled bioaccumulation in only 2 of 15 metal-animal combinations. Bioaccumulation of all three metals by the bivalves was related significantly to metal concentrations extracted from sediments (SEM) but not to [SEM - AVS] or PW metals. SEM predominantly influenced bioaccumulation of Ni and Zn in N. arenaceodentata, but Cd bioaccumulation followed PW Cd concentrations. SEM controlled tissue concentrations of all three metals in H. filiformis and S. missionensis, with minor influences from metal-sulfide chemistry. Significant bioaccumulation occurred when SEM was only a small fraction of AVS in several treatments. Three factors appeared to contribute to the differences between these bioaccumulation results and the results from toxicity tests reported previously: differences in experimental design, dietary uptake, and biological attributes of the species, including mode and depth of feeding.Microcosms were used to simulate environmentally realistic metal, acid volatile sulfide (AVS), and geochemical gradients in sediments to evaluate effects of metal bioavailability. The 18-d study involved five test species: two bivalves and three polychaetes. Two series of experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of metal concentration and AVS on bioaccumulation, respectively. The metals of interest were cadmium, nickel, and zinc. Results showed that the concentrations of pore-water Cd, Ni, and Zn were controlled by the concentration of AVS. Organisms bioaccumulated significant amounts of metals from the sediments when the simultaneously extracted metal was only a small fraction of the AVS. Bioavailability increased linearly with the sediment metal concentration irrespective of AVS or pore-w

  13. Influence of compost addition on lead and arsenic bioavailability in reclaimed orchard soil assessed using Porcellio scaber bioaccumulation test.

    PubMed

    Udovic, M; McBride, M B

    2012-02-29

    Long-term application of lead arsenate in orchards has led to a significant accumulation of Pb and As in the topsoil. Reclamation of old orchards for agricultural purposes entails the exposure of humans to Pb and As, which can be reduced by adequate remediation actions. In this study, we assessed the remediation efficiency of compost addition, commonly used as a sustainable agricultural practice, in decreasing the human exposure Pb and As by direct ingestion. The remediation was evaluated based on Pb and As bioavailability, assessed by means of a selective non-exhaustive chemical extraction (modified Morgan extraction, MME), with a physiologically based extraction test (PBET) for the assessment of Pb and As bioavailability in ingested soils and with a novel in vivo bioaccumulation test with isopods (Porcellio scaber). All the tests showed that compost addition consistently reduced Pb, but increased As potential bioavailability. The bioaccumulation test with P. scaber was sensitive to changes in Pb and As bioavailability in test soils. However, the results indicate that the bioavailability of As could be under- or overestimated using solely chemical extraction tests. Indirect assessment of trace metal bioavailability with bioaccumulation in isopods can be used as complementary source of data to the existing in vitro chemical extraction test approach for the estimation of human exposure to trace elements in polluted and remediated soil. This is the first report on the use of As accumulation in P. scaber as a tool for the assessment of As bioavailability in contaminated orchard soil. PMID:22240057

  14. The influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability and toxicity to soil microbial communities in alfalfa rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Babina; Anderson, Todd A; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica; Payton, Paxton; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may affect bioavailability and toxicity of organic contaminants due to their adsorption properties. Recent studies have observed the influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other organic contaminants. Greenhouse studies (49 d) were conducted with alfalfa plants in two different soil types. Four treatment conditions (0, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg MWNTs+100 mg/kg PAHs mixture-pyrene and phenanthrene) were tested in order to determine their effects on soil microbial community composition and PAH residues. Microbial community structure in the two highest treatments (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg MWNTs) showed a dramatic shift in the presence of MWNTs in sandy loam soil (1% organic matter) in comparison to the control (0 mg/kg MWNTs). Many microbial fatty acid methyl ester (FAMEs) markers (i15:0, 16:1ω5c, 10Me17:0, 10Me16:0) were missing in the control soil. However, there was a lower abundance of these FAMEs in the 25 mg/kg MWNT treatment (except 10Me17:0) and a higher presence of these FAMEs in the 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg MWNT treatments compared to control. In contrast, microbial community composition was not influenced by the MWNT treatments in sandy clay loam soil (5.9% organic matter). However, pyrene degradation in sandy clay loam soil significantly increased by 21% in the highest MWNT treatment group (100 mg/kg) and 9.34% in 50 mg/kg MWNT treatment. Under the conditions tested in this study, MWNTs significantly impacted the soil microbial community distribution and PAH degradation and effects were dependent on soil types, specifically organic matter content. PMID:25800986

  15. Influence of Mass Transfer on Bioavailability and Kinetic Rate of Uranium(VI) Biotransformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chongxuan Liu; Zheming Wang; John M. Zachara; James K. Fredrickson

    2006-06-01

    This research is investigating the influence of mass transfer process on the rate and extent of microbial reduction of U(VI) associated with intragrain domains in the Hanford subsurface sediments. The project will develop instrumental techniques to characterize microscopic mass transfer process at the sediment grain scale and to develop kinetic data and process models that describe microbial reduction of intragrain U(VI). Scientific knowledge and process models developed from this research will enhance our understanding on the future behavior of in-ground U(VI) at Hanford and other DOE sites where sediments contain U(VI) in intragrain domains or fracture-matrix systems.

  16. Influence of two dietary fibers in the oral bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters of ethinyloestradiol.

    PubMed

    García, J J; Fernández, N; Diez, M J; Sahagún, A; González, A; Alonso, M L; Prieto, C; Calle, A P; Sierra, M

    2000-11-01

    Dietary fibers are widely used in hypoglycaemic, hypolipidemic, slimming diets. It is probable that their ingestion coincides with the oral administration of drugs and a modification of their pharmacokinetics can appear. In the present study, the influence of two soluble fibers (guar gum and psyllium) was evaluated on the pharmacokinetics of ethinyloestradiol (EE) when they were administered together to female rabbits via the oral route. Three groups of rabbits were used. All animals received 1 mg/kg of EE; this compound was administered alone in the control group and with 3.5 g of guar gum or psyllium in the other two groups. When guar gum was administered, there was a decrease in the extent of EE absorbed, but no change was observed in the rate of absorption. When psyllium was administered, the extent of EE absorbed increased slightly and the rate of absorption was slower. PMID:11172796

  17. Game Theory, Conditional Preferences, and Social Influence

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Wynn C.; Felin, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Neoclassical noncooperative game theory is based on a simple, yet powerful synthesis of mathematical and logical concepts: unconditional and immutable preference orderings and individual rationality. Although this structure has proven useful for characterizing competitive multi-player behavior, its applicability to scenarios involving complex social relationships is problematic. In this paper we directly address this limitation by the introduction of a conditional preference structure that permits players to modulate their preference orderings as functions of the preferences of other players. Embedding this expanded preference structure in a formal and graphical framework provides a systematic approach for characterizing a complex society. The result is an influence network that allows conditional preferences to propagate through the community, resulting in an emergent social model which characterizes all of the social relationships that exist and which leads to solution concepts that account for both group and individual interests. The Ultimatum game is presented as an example of how social influence can be modeled with conditional preferences. PMID:23451078

  18. Designing excipient emulsions to increase nutraceutical bioavailability: emulsifier type influences curcumin stability and bioaccessibility by altering gastrointestinal fate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Liqiang; Liu, Wei; Liu, Chengmei; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2015-08-01

    The influence of emulsifier type on the ability of excipient emulsions to improve the solubility, stability, and bioaccessibility of powdered curcumin was examined. Oil-in-water emulsions prepared using three different emulsifiers (whey protein isolate, caseinate, or Tween 80) were mixed with curcumin powder and then incubated at either 30 °C (to simulate applications of salad dressings) or 100 °C (to simulate applications of cooking sauces). The transfer of curcumin into the excipient emulsions was appreciably higher for excipient emulsions held at 100 °C than those held at 30 °C, and was appreciably higher for surfactant-stabilized emulsions than protein-stabilized emulsions. For example, the amounts of curcumin transferred into emulsions held at 30 and 100 °C were 66 and 280 μg mL(-1) for Tween 80, but only 17 and 208 μg mL(-1) for caseinate. The total curcumin concentration in the digesta and mixed micelle phases collected after excipient emulsions were exposed to a simulated gastrointestinal tract (mouth, stomach, and small intestine) depended on emulsifier type. The total amount of curcumin within the digesta was higher for protein-stabilized emulsions than surfactant-stabilized ones, which was attributed to the ability of the proteins to protect curcumin from chemical degradation. For example, the digesta contained 204 μg mL(-1) curcumin for caseinate emulsions, but only 111 μg mL(-1) for Tween 80 emulsions. This study shows the potential of designing excipient emulsions to increase the oral bioavailability of curcumin for food and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26165514

  19. Influence of soil type on the mobility and bioavailability of chelated zinc.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jose M

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the distribution, mobility, and relative effectiveness of Zn from Zn-amino acids (Zn-AA) and Zn-DTPA-HEDTA-EDTA (Zn-CH) (DTPA, diethylenetriaminepentaacetate; HEDTA, N-2-hydroxyethyl-ethylenedinitrilotriacetate; and EDTA, ethylenedinitrilotetraacetate) sources by applying different Zn levels to weakly acidic and neutral soils in laboratory (incubation and soil column studies) and greenhouse conditions. The experiments were carried out for 60 days in incubation and column experiments and for 45 days in a greenhouse experiment. The zinc soil behavior was evaluated by DTPA-TEA and Mehlich-3 extractions and sequential speciation. The incubation experiment showed that the highest concentrations of available Zn in weakly acidic soil occurred with Zn-AA treatments, whereas in the neutral soil Zn-CH treatments produced the highest quantities of available Zn. The column experiment showed that in neutral soil, with slow to moderate permeability in the Ap and Bt horizons, only Zn-CH significantly increased the mobility of Zn through the column with respect to the control and the Zn-AA source: 31% of the Zn applied as synthetic chelate was leached from the column. The greenhouse experiment showed that, at different rates of Zn application, the Zn carriers increased Zn uptake by maize (Zea mays L.). The use of applied Zn by maize, or Zn utilization, was greatest when the Zn treatments were Zn-CH (3.3%) at 20 mg kg-1 and Zn-CH (4.9%) at 10 mg kg-1, in weakly acidic and neutral soils, respectively. PMID:17407310

  20. Influence of hardness on the bioavailability of silver to a freshwater snail after waterborne exposure to silver nitrate and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, Tasha; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Römer, Isabella; Tejamaya, Mila; Lead, Jamie R; Luoma, Samuel N

    2015-01-01

    The release of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) into the aquatic environment is likely, but the influence of water chemistry on their impacts and fate remains unclear. Here, we characterize the bioavailability of Ag from AgNO(3) and from AgNPs capped with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP AgNP) and thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG AgNP) in the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, after short waterborne exposures. Results showed that water hardness, AgNP capping agents, and metal speciation affected the uptake rate of Ag from AgNPs. Comparison of the results from organisms of similar weight showed that water hardness affected the uptake of Ag from AgNPs, but not that from AgNO(3). Transformation (dissolution and aggregation) of the AgNPs was also influenced by water hardness and the capping agent. Bioavailability of Ag from AgNPs was, in turn, correlated to these physical changes. Water hardness increased the aggregation of AgNPs, especially for PEG AgNPs, reducing the bioavailability of Ag from PEG AgNPs to a greater degree than from PVP AgNPs. Higher dissolved Ag concentrations were measured for the PVP AgNPs (15%) compared to PEG AgNPs (3%) in moderately hard water, enhancing Ag bioavailability of the former. Multiple drivers of bioavailability yielded differences in Ag influx between very hard and deionized water where the uptake rate constants (k(uw), l g(-1) d(-1) ± SE) varied from 3.1 ± 0.7 to 0.2 ± 0.01 for PEG AgNPs and from 2.3 ± 0.02 to 1.3 ± 0.01 for PVP AgNPs. Modeling bioavailability of Ag from NPs revealed that Ag influx into L. stagnalis comprised uptake from the NPs themselves and from newly dissolved Ag. PMID:25676617

  1. Bioavailability and generic prescribing.

    PubMed

    Mindel, J S

    1976-01-01

    Although oral drug bioinequivalence has been attributed to a number of causes (excipients, dosage form, variation in dissolution time, and aging) less is known about bioavailability problems of topical medications in ophthalmology. Factors that can alter drug absorption from solutions (pH, partition coefficient, container impurities, contact time, etc.) are noted, and cases in which bioavailability problems should be considered as causes of therapeutic failure are discussed. Various attitudes representing pharmaceutical companies, the federal government, pharmacists, consumers and physicians toward the related problems of bioinequivalence and generic prescribing are examined. Techniques for in vivo and in vitro drug testing and for establishing uniform conditions of drug manufacture and storage can contribute to identification and minimization of bioavailability problems. A rational program based on a combination of such techniques could, ultimately, lead to establishment of the terms "generic equivalency" and "therapeutic equivalency" as synonymous. PMID:13505

  2. Migration of (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (239+240)Pu in Mediterranean forests: influence of bioavailability and association with organic acids in soil.

    PubMed

    Guillén, J; Baeza, A; Corbacho, J A; Muñoz-Muñoz, J G

    2015-06-01

    The understanding of downward migration of anthropogenic radionuclides in soil is a key factor in the assessment of their environmental behavior. There are several factors that can affect this process, such as the radionuclide source, their chemical form, soil and environmental characteristics, etc. Two Mediterranean pinewood ecosystems in Spain, which were affected mainly by global fallout, were selected to assess the migration of (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (239+240)Pu. Using auxiliary modeling (diffusion-convection equation and compartmental model), it followed from field observations that the migration velocities of (90)Sr and (239+240)Pu were similar and higher than that of (137)Cs. The downward migration of radionuclides can be considered a consequence of their association with soil particles. A sequential speciation procedure also confirmed that (90)Sr was the most bioavailable radionuclide followed by (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs. Although this can explain the different velocity of (90)Sr and (137)Cs, bioavailability could not explain by itself the similar velocities of (239+240)Pu and (90)Sr. The presence of organic acids in the soil can also influence the migration of radionuclides attached to them, which decreased in the order: (239+240)Pu > (90)Sr > (137)Cs. Thus, the joint consideration of bioavailable and humic + fulvic acid fractions can explain the observed differences in the downward velocities. PMID:25827576

  3. Bioavailability of the Polyphenols: Status and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    D’Archivio, Massimo; Filesi, Carmelina; Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Masella, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    The current interest in polyphenols has been driven primarily by epidemiological studies. However, to establish conclusive evidence for the effectiveness of dietary polyphenols in disease prevention, it is useful to better define the bioavailability of the polyphenols, so that their biological activity can be evaluated. The bioavailability appears to differ greatly among the various phenolic compounds, and the most abundant ones in our diet are not necessarily those that have the best bioavailability profile. In the present review, we focus on the factors influencing the bioavailability of the polyphenols. Moreover, a critical overview on the difficulties and the controversies of the studies on the bioavailability is discussed. PMID:20480022

  4. Bioavailability of the polyphenols: status and controversies.

    PubMed

    D'Archivio, Massimo; Filesi, Carmelina; Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Masella, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    The current interest in polyphenols has been driven primarily by epidemiological studies. However, to establish conclusive evidence for the effectiveness of dietary polyphenols in disease prevention, it is useful to better define the bioavailability of the polyphenols, so that their biological activity can be evaluated. The bioavailability appears to differ greatly among the various phenolic compounds, and the most abundant ones in our diet are not necessarily those that have the best bioavailability profile. In the present review, we focus on the factors influencing the bioavailability of the polyphenols. Moreover, a critical overview on the difficulties and the controversies of the studies on the bioavailability is discussed. PMID:20480022

  5. Uniform nano-sized valsartan for dissolution and bioavailability enhancement: influence of particle size and crystalline state.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuping; Sun, Hongrui; Che, Erxi; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Sun, Changshan; Wang, Siling

    2013-01-30

    The central purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of drug particle size and crystalline state on valsartan (VAL) formulations in order to improve its dissolution and bioavailability. VAL microsuspension (mean size 22 μm) and nanosuspension (30-80nm) were prepared by high speed dispersing and anti-solvent precipitation method and converted into powders through spray drying. Differential scanning calorimetry studies indicated amorphization of VAL in the spray-dried valsartan nanosuspension (SD-VAL-Nano) but recrystallization occurred after 6 months storage at room temperature. The spray-dried valsartan microsuspension (SD-VAL-Micro) conserved the crystalline form. The VAL dissolution rate and extent were markedly enhanced with both SD-VAL-Micro and SD-VAL-Nano as compared to crude VAL crystals over the pH range of 1.2-6.8. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats demonstrated a 2.5-fold increase in oral bioavailability in the case of SD-VAL-Nano compared with the commercial product while the SD-VAL-Micro provided a much less desirable pharmacokinetic profile. In conclusion, reducing particle size to the nano-scale appears to be a worthwhile and promising approach to obtain VAL products with optimum bioavailability. In addition, the impact of crystalline state on the bioavailability of nano-sized VAL might be not as big as that of particle size. PMID:23266761

  6. [Influence of sulfur on the bioavailability of arsenic uptake by rice (Oryza. sativa L. ) and its speciation in soil ].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-jie; Tang, Bing-pei; Wang, Dai-chang; Rao, Wei; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Dan; Zhu, Yun-ji

    2014-09-01

    Pot experiments using exogenous arsenic-polluted paddy soils were carried out to investigate the influence of different forms of sulfur fertilizers (sulfur and gypsum) on As uptake by rice and its chemical speciation. Soil solution pH value ranged 7. 38-7. 45 in different growth period of rice, and the pH value of AsS0 and AsS1 treatments was higher than that of AsS2 treatment. Variation of Eh value in soil solution was about 200 mV and the Eh of AsS0 was higher than those of AsS1 and AsS2 treatments. From dry matter weight of root and stem and grain of rice, S-fertilizer applied by sulfur and gypsum could improve the amounts of dry matter in rice, while the effects of sulfur treatments and gypsum treatments were not significant. Concentrations of Fe and Mn in iron-manganese plaque on rice roots were 10-30 g.kg-1 and 0.1-1.3 g.kg-1, respectively. Contents of Fe-Mn plaque were mainly different in the tiller stage. Elemental S treatment could more greatly promote the formation of Fe-Mn plaque of rice root than gypsum treatment. Concentrations of As adsorbed by rice roots surface plaque were 583-719 mg.kg-' in tiller stage, 466-621 mg.kg-1 in boot stage, and 310-384 mg kg-1 in flower and matur stage. And it was consistent with the thickness of Fe-Mn plaque on rice root surface. Concentrations of As uptake in roots and stem and leaf and grain were significantly reduced by the application of S fertilizer, and it may be related to the amount of As adsorbed by Fe-Mn plaque at boot stage. According to chemical speciation of soil arsenic, As of non-specific and specific adsorption was most active, and their amounts of As adsorbed in AsS, treatment were significantly lower by 2.85 mg kg-~' than that in AsS2 treatment in tiller stage, and was 0.77 mg.kg- higher than that in AsS2 treatment in the flower stage. Perhaps soil arsenic was easily dissolved in the soil solution and the bioavailability of AsS, treatment was better than that of AsS, treatment. PMID:25518679

  7. REMOTE ISCHEMIC CONDITIONING INFLUENCES MITOCHONDRIAL DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Laura; Tamareille, Sophie; Kalakech, Hussein; Guillou, Sophie; Lenaers, Guy; Prunier, Fabrice; Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has emerged as an attractive strategy to protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. The mechanisms by which remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) is protective are to date unknown, yet a well-accepted theory holds that the mitochondria play a central role. Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo fusion and fission. Interventions that decrease mitochondrial fission or increase mitochondrial fusion have been associated with reduced I/R injury. However, whether RIPC influences mitochondrial dynamics or not has yet to be ascertained. We sought to determine the role played by mitochondrial dynamics in RIPC-induced cardioprotection. Male adult rats exposed in vivo to myocardial I/R were assigned to one of two groups, either undergoing 40 min of myocardial ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion (MI group) or four 5-min cycles of limb ischemia interspersed by 5 min of limb reperfusion, immediately prior to myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion (MI+RIPC group). After reperfusion, infarct size was assessed and myocardial tissue was analyzed by Western blot and electron microscopy. RIPC induced smaller infarct size (−28%), increased mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1, and preserved mitochondrial morphology. These findings suggest that mitochondrial dynamics play a role in the mechanisms of RIPC-induced cardioprotection. PMID:26555744

  8. Influence of Mycotoxins and a Mycotoxin Adsorbing Agent on the Oral Bioavailability of Commonly Used Antibiotics in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Pasmans, Frank; De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; Audenaert, Kris; Haesaert, Geert; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-01-01

    It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol), mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health. PMID:22606377

  9. Review of plant uptake of 2,3,7,8-TCDD from soil and potential influences of bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Kew, G.; Schaum, J.L.; White, P.; Evans, T.T.

    1989-08-01

    Volatilization of 2,3,7,8-TCDD from soil and resorption on foliage represents a significant route of contamination. Some studies indicate low-level uptake, translocation from roots to foliage and transpiration from foliage, while one shows more than 95% of 2,3,7,8-TCDD associated with edible fruits and with tubers is found in peels. Differences in bioavailability from different soils might account for some inconsistencies between existing studies, suggesting additional information useful in reporting future work.

  10. Copper toxicity and the influence of water quality of Dongnai River and Mekong River waters on copper bioavailability and toxicity to three tropical species.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh-Khiet L; Do-Hong, L Chi; Dao, Thanh-Son; Hoang, Tham C

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigated copper (Cu) toxicity and the influence of water quality characteristics of Dongnai River and Mekong River (Vietnam) surface waters to three tropical species; Daphnia lumholtzi, Ceriodaphnia cornuta, and Danio rerio. The river waters had a range of water quality parameters that modify Cu bioavailability and toxicity. The range of total hardness, alkalinity, pH and dissolved organic carbon were 15-64 mg/L as CaCO3, 18-58 mg/L as CaCO3, 6.62-7.88, and 6.9-14.7 mg/l, respectively. The US EPA acute toxicity test method with a modification to the light photoperiod and temperature for tropical organisms was used to investigate Cu toxicity. Result of the present study found that Cu produced toxic effect to the studied organisms at low concentrations. The 48-h LC50 ranged from 3.92 to 8.61 µg/l, 2.92-9.56 µg/l, and 15.71-68.69 µg/l dissolved Cu for D. lumholtzi, C. cornuta, and D. rerio, respectively. In general, water quality had an influence on Cu bioavailability and toxicity to the studied organisms. The toxicity of Cu was higher in water with lower hardness, DOC, and/or pH. The present study indicates a contribution of Cu hydroxide and carbonate to Cu bioavailability to Mekong organisms. Results of the present study will be used for calibrating the US Cu Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) to Mekong River water and organisms in support of application of the BLM for setting site-specific Cu water quality guidelines in the ecosystem of the Lower Mekong River Basin. PMID:26421627

  11. Acartia tonsa eggs as a biomonitor to evaluate bioavailability/toxicity of persistent contaminants in anoxic/sulfidic conditions: The case of cadmium and nickel.

    PubMed

    Sei, Sandra; Invidia, Marion; Giannetto, Marco; Gorbi, Gessica

    2016-10-01

    The evaluation of toxicity due to persistent pollutants in anoxic aquatic environments has met with various problems, as most test organisms can not withstand oxygen lack and exposure to free sulfide. We evaluated the suitability of the eggs of the brackish copepod Acartia tonsa for bioassays in anoxic/sulfidic conditions: when exposed to deep hypoxia and free sulfide, the eggs become quiescent and are able to resume hatching after restoring normoxic conditions. Tests with cadmium and nickel were performed in normoxic and deeply hypoxic conditions and in anoxic water containing H2S or H2S+FeSO4 on an equimolar basis. Active and quiescent eggs showed equivalent sensitivity to the metals, both suffering significant reductions in hatching success at 89μM Cd and 17μM Ni. As expected on the basis of the SEM/AVS model, Cd toxicity was almost completely suppressed in presence of sulfides. Dissolved Cd concentration drastically dropped and hatching success was generally >80%, as against values <6% observed in sulfide-free water, indicating that the applied experimental procedure can simulate metal-sulfide interaction. Ni toxicity was only slightly reduced by the presence of sulfides. High dissolved Ni concentrations were detected and mean hatching percentages were ≤32%, suggesting that Ni bioavailability/toxicity was only partially controlled by excess reactive sulfides. The results suggest that A. tonsa eggs could be a useful biomonitor to evaluate toxicity due persistent contaminants in anoxic conditions and the role of sulfides in reducing metal bioavailability/toxicity. PMID:27235834

  12. From conceptual model to remediation: bioavailability, a key to clean up heavy metal contaminated soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Pedron, Francesca; Pezzarossa, Beatrice

    2013-04-01

    Processes of metal bioavailability in the soil To know the bioavailability processes at site specific levels is essential to understand in detail the risks associated with pollution, and to support the decision-making process, i.e. description of the conceptual model and choice of clean up technologies. It is particularly important to assess how chemical, physical and biological processes in the soil affect the reactions leading to adsorption, precipitation or release of contaminants. The measurement of bioavailability One of the main difficulties in the practical application of the bioavailability concept in soil remediation is the lack of consensus on the method to be used to measure bioavailability. The best strategy is to apply a series of tests to assess bioavailability, since no applicable method is universally valid under all conditions. As an example, bioavailability tests for phytotechnology application should consider two distinct aspects: a physico-chemical driven solubilization process and a physiologically driven uptake process. Soil and plant characteristics strongly influence bioavailability. Bioavailability as a tool in remediation strategies Bioavailability can be used at all stages in remediation strategies: development of the conceptual model, evaluation of risk assessment, and selection of the best technology, considering different scenarios and including different environmental objectives. Two different strategies can be followed: the reduction and the increase of bioavailability. Procedures that reduce bioavailability aim to prevent the movement of pollutants from the soil to the living organisms, essentially by: i) removal of the labile phase of the contaminant, i.e. the fraction which is intrinsic to the processes of bioavailability (phytostabilization); ii) conversion of the labile fraction into a stable fraction (precipitation or adsorption); iii) increase of the resistance to mass transfer of the contaminants (inertization). Procedures

  13. Microbial reporters of metal bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Magrisso, Sagi; Erel, Yigal; Belkin, Shimshon

    2008-01-01

    Summary When attempting to assess the extent and the implications of environmental pollution, it is often essential to quantify not only the total concentration of the studied contaminant but also its bioavailable fraction: higher bioavailability, often correlated with increased mobility, signifies enhanced risk but may also facilitate bioremediation. Genetically engineered microorganisms, tailored to respond by a quantifiable signal to the presence of the target chemical(s), may serve as powerful tools for bioavailability assessment. This review summarizes the current knowledge on such microbial bioreporters designed to assay metal bioavailability. Numerous bacterial metal‐sensor strains have been developed over the past 15 years, displaying very high detection sensitivities for a broad spectrum of environmentally significant metal targets. These constructs are based on the use of a relatively small number of gene promoters as the sensing elements, and an even smaller selection of molecular reporter systems; they comprise a potentially useful panel of tools for simple and cost‐effective determination of the bioavailability of heavy metals in the environment, and for the quantification of the non‐bioavailable fraction of the pollutant. In spite of their inherent advantages, however, these tools have not yet been put to actual use in the evaluation of metal bioavailability in a real environmental remediation scheme. For this to happen, acceptance by regulatory authorities is essential, as is a standardization of assay conditions. PMID:21261850

  14. Automated microdialysis-based system for in situ microsampling and investigation of lead bioavailability in terrestrial environments under physiologically based extraction conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosende, María; Magalhães, Luis M; Segundo, Marcela A; Miró, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    In situ automatic microdialysis sampling under batch-flow conditions is herein proposed for the first time for expedient assessment of the kinetics of lead bioaccessibility/bioavailability in contaminated and agricultural soils exploiting the harmonized physiologically based extraction test (UBM). Capitalized upon a concentric microdialysis probe immersed in synthetic gut fluids, the miniaturized flow system is harnessed for continuous monitoring of lead transfer across the permselective microdialysis membrane to mimic the diffusive transport of metal species through the epithelium of the stomach and of the small intestine. Besides, the addition of the UBM gastrointestinal fluid surrogates at a specified time frame is fully mechanized. Distinct microdialysis probe configurations and membranes types were investigated in detail to ensure passive sampling under steady-state dialytic conditions for lead. Using a 3-cm-long polysulfone membrane with averaged molecular weight cutoff of 30 kDa in a concentric probe and a perfusate flow rate of 2.0 μL min(-1), microdialysis relative recoveries in the gastric phase were close to 100%, thereby omitting the need for probe calibration. The automatic leaching method was validated in terms of bias in the analysis of four soils with different physicochemical properties and containing a wide range of lead content (16 ± 3 to 1216 ± 42 mg kg(-1)) using mass balance assessment as a quality control tool. No significant differences between the mass balance and the total lead concentration in the suite of analyzed soils were encountered (α = 0.05). Our finding that the extraction of soil-borne lead for merely one hour in the GI phase suffices for assessment of the bioavailable fraction as a result of the fast immobilization of lead species at near-neutral conditions would assist in providing risk assessment data from the UBM test on a short notice. PMID:24016003

  15. Metal ion-tetracycline interactions in biological fluids. 2. Potentiometric study of magnesium complexes with tetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline, and discussion of their possible influence on the bioavailability of these antibiotics in blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Berthon, G; Brion, M; Lambs, L

    1983-08-01

    The formation constants of the various complexes formed by magnesium with four tetracycline derivatives, namely, tetracycline itself, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline, were determined by potentiometry over large pH ranges under experimental conditions pertaining to blood plasma (37 degrees C, NaCl 0.15 mol dm-3). The results were used, together with those previously obtained on the complexation of these tetracyclines with proton and calcium, to assess the influence of the two alkali earth metal ions on the bioavailability of these drugs in blood plasma. Accordingly, simulations of the distribution of the four tetracyclines into their different proton and metal complex species were calculated. The distributions confirm that, in combination with the protein-bound fraction of the tetracyclines, the metal-bound fraction represents more than 99% of these drugs in plasma, the extent of their free fraction commonly being less than 1%. PMID:6619838

  16. The influence of droplet size on the stability, in vivo digestion, and oral bioavailability of vitamin E emulsions.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, S; Muthukumar, S P; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2016-05-18

    Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) is a nutraceutical compound, which has been shown to possess potent antioxidant and anticancer activity. However, its biological activity may be limited by its poor bioavailability. Colloidal delivery systems have shown wide applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries to deliver lipophilic bioactive compounds. In this study, we have developed conventional and nanoemulsions of vitamin E from food grade ingredients (sunflower oil, saponin, and water) and showed the nanoemulsion formulation increased the oral bioavailability when compared to the conventional emulsion. The mean droplet diameters in the nano and conventional emulsions were 0.277 and 1.285 μm, respectively. The stability of the emulsion formulation after thermal processing, long-term storage at different temperatures, mechanical stress and in plasma was determined. The results showed that the saponin coated nanoemulsion was stable to droplet coalescence during thermal processing (30-90 °C), long-term storage and mechanical stress when compared to the conventional emulsion. The biological fate of the emulsion formulations were studied using male Wistar rats as an animal model. The emulsion droplet stability during passage through the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated by their introduction into rat stomachs. Microscopy was used to investigate the structural changes that occurred during digestion. Both the conventional emulsion and nanoemulsion formulations showed strong evidence of droplet flocculation and coalescence during in vivo digestion. The in vivo oral bioavailability study revealed that vitamin E in a nanoemulsion form showed a 3-fold increase in the AUC when compared to the conventional emulsion. The information reported in this study will facilitate the design of colloidal delivery systems using nanoemulsion formulations. PMID:27101870

  17. Cues of maternal condition influence offspring selfishness.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janine W Y; Lucas, Christophe; Kölliker, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of parent-offspring communication was mostly studied from the perspective of parents responding to begging signals conveying information about offspring condition. Parents should respond to begging because of the differential fitness returns obtained from their investment in offspring that differ in condition. For analogous reasons, offspring should adjust their behavior to cues/signals of parental condition: parents that differ in condition pay differential costs of care and, hence, should provide different amounts of food. In this study, we experimentally tested in the European earwig (Forficula auricularia) if cues of maternal condition affect offspring behavior in terms of sibling cannibalism. We experimentally manipulated female condition by providing them with different amounts of food, kept nymph condition constant, allowed for nymph exposure to chemical maternal cues over extended time, quantified nymph survival (deaths being due to cannibalism) and extracted and analyzed the females' cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC). Nymph survival was significantly affected by chemical cues of maternal condition, and this effect depended on the timing of breeding. Cues of poor maternal condition enhanced nymph survival in early broods, but reduced nymph survival in late broods, and vice versa for cues of good condition. Furthermore, female condition affected the quantitative composition of their CHC profile which in turn predicted nymph survival patterns. Thus, earwig offspring are sensitive to chemical cues of maternal condition and nymphs from early and late broods show opposite reactions to the same chemical cues. Together with former evidence on maternal sensitivities to condition-dependent nymph chemical cues, our study shows context-dependent reciprocal information exchange about condition between earwig mothers and their offspring, potentially mediated by cuticular hydrocarbons. PMID:24498046

  18. The influence of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) processing conditions on drug loading and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Robert J; Crean, Abina M; Ryan, Katie B

    2012-12-15

    Poor water solubility of drugs can complicate their commercialisation because of reduced drug oral bioavailability. Formulation strategies such as increasing the drug surface area are frequently employed in an attempt to increase dissolution rate and hence, improve oral bioavailability. Maximising the drug surface area exposed to the dissolution medium can be achieved by loading drug onto a high surface area carrier like mesoporous silica (SBA-15). The aim of this work was to investigate the impact of altering supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) processing conditions, in an attempt to enhance drug loading onto SBA-15 and increase the drug's dissolution rate. Other formulation variables such as the mass ratio of drug to SBA-15 and the procedure for combining the drug and SBA-15 were also investigated. A model drug with poor water solubility, fenofibrate, was selected for this study. High drug loading efficiencies were obtained using SC-CO(2), which were influenced by the processing conditions employed. Fenofibrate release rate was enhanced greatly after loading onto mesoporous silica. The results highlighted the potential of this SC-CO(2) drug loading approach to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. PMID:23041132

  19. Chitosan microparticles: influence of the gelation process on the release profile and oral bioavailability of albendazole, a class II compound.

    PubMed

    Piccirilli, Gisela N; García, Agustina; Leonardi, Darío; Mamprin, María E; Bolmaro, Raúl E; Salomón, Claudio J; Lamas, María C

    2014-11-01

    Encapsulation of albendazole, a class II compound, into polymeric microparticles based on chitosan-sodium lauryl sulfate was investigated as a strategy to improve drug dissolution and oral bioavailability. The microparticles were prepared by spray drying technique and further characterized by means of X-ray powder diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The formation of a novel polymeric structure between chitosan and sodium lauryl sulfate, after the internal or external gelation process, was observed by infrared spectroscopy. The efficiency of encapsulation was found to be between 60 and 85% depending on the internal or external gelation process. Almost spherically spray dried microparticles were observed using scanning electron microscopy. In vitro dissolution results indicated that the microparticles prepared by internal gelation released 8% of the drug within 30 min, while the microparticles prepared by external gelation released 67% within 30 min. It was observed that the AUC and Cmax values of ABZ from microparticles were greatly improved, in comparison with the non-encapsulated drug. In conclusion, the release properties and oral bioavailability of albendazole were greatly improved by using spraydried chitosan-sodium lauryl sulphate microparticles. PMID:23971494

  20. The Nutraceutical Bioavailability Classification Scheme: Classifying Nutraceuticals According to Factors Limiting their Oral Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Li, Fang; Xiao, Hang

    2015-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of a health-promoting dietary component (nutraceutical) may be limited by various physicochemical and physiological phenomena: liberation from food matrices, solubility in gastrointestinal fluids, interaction with gastrointestinal components, chemical degradation or metabolism, and epithelium cell permeability. Nutraceutical bioavailability can therefore be improved by designing food matrices that control their bioaccessibility (B*), absorption (A*), and transformation (T*) within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This article reviews the major factors influencing the gastrointestinal fate of nutraceuticals, and then uses this information to develop a new scheme to classify the major factors limiting nutraceutical bioavailability: the nutraceutical bioavailability classification scheme (NuBACS). This new scheme is analogous to the biopharmaceutical classification scheme (BCS) used by the pharmaceutical industry to classify drug bioavailability, but it contains additional factors important for understanding nutraceutical bioavailability in foods. The article also highlights potential strategies for increasing the oral bioavailability of nutraceuticals based on their NuBACS designation (B*A*T*). PMID:25705933

  1. Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Janelle L.; Paris, Hunter L.; Beals, Joseph W.; Binns, Scott E.; Giordano, Gregory R.; Scalzo, Rebecca L.; Schweder, Melani M.; Blair, Emek; Bell, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous administration of vitamin C has been shown to decrease oxidative stress and, in some instances, improve physiological function in adult humans. Oral vitamin C administration is typically less effective than intravenous, due in part to inferior vitamin C bioavailability. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of oral delivery of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes. On 4 separate randomly ordered occasions, 11 men and women were administered an oral placebo, or 4 g of vitamin C via oral, oral liposomal, or intravenous delivery. The data indicate that oral delivery of 4 g of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes (1) produces circulating concentrations of vitamin C that are greater than unencapsulated oral but less than intravenous administration and (2) provides protection from ischemia–reperfusion-mediated oxidative stress that is similar to the protection provided by unencapsulated oral and intravenous administrations. PMID:27375360

  2. Childhood Conditions Influence Adult Progesterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-de la Mora, Alejandra; Chatterton, Robert T; Choudhury, Osul A; Napolitano, Dora A; Bentley, Gillian R

    2007-01-01

    Background Average profiles of salivary progesterone in women vary significantly at the inter- and intrapopulation level as a function of age and acute energetic conditions related to energy intake, energy expenditure, or a combination of both. In addition to acute stressors, baseline progesterone levels differ among populations. The causes of such chronic differences are not well understood, but it has been hypothesised that they may result from varying tempos of growth and maturation and, by implication, from diverse environmental conditions encountered during childhood and adolescence. Methods and Findings To test this hypothesis, we conducted a migrant study among first- and second-generation Bangladeshi women aged 19–39 who migrated to London, UK at different points in the life-course, women still resident in Bangladesh, and women of European descent living in neighbourhoods similar to those of the migrants in London (total n = 227). Data collected included saliva samples for radioimmunoassay of progesterone, anthropometrics, and information from questionnaires on diet, lifestyle, and health. Results from multiple linear regression, controlled for anthropometric and reproductive variables, show that women who spend their childhood in conditions of low energy expenditure, stable energy intake, good sanitation, low immune challenges, and good health care in the UK have up to 103% higher levels of salivary progesterone and an earlier maturation than women who develop in less optimal conditions in Sylhet, Bangladesh (F9,178 = 5.05, p < 0.001, standard error of the mean = 0.32; adjusted R2 = 0.16). Our results point to the period prior to puberty as a sensitive phase when changes in environmental conditions positively impact developmental tempos such as menarcheal age (F2,81 = 3.21, p = 0.03) and patterns of ovarian function as measured using salivary progesterone (F2,81 = 3.14, p = 0.04). Conclusions This research demonstrates that human females use an extended

  3. When does relational information influence evaluative conditioning?

    PubMed

    Zanon, Riccardo; De Houwer, Jan; Gast, Anne; Smith, Colin Tucker

    2014-01-01

    Building on the intriguing findings of Peters and Gawronski (2011, Experiment 3), we examined the conditions under which relational information (i.e., information about how two stimuli are related) moderates evaluative conditioning (EC; i.e., the effect of stimulus pairing on liking). In Experiment 1, participants saw stimulus pairs that consisted of a novel nonword (conditioned stimulus; CS) and a known positive or negative word (unconditioned stimulus; US). Before or after the pairings, participants were told that the nonword had the opposite meaning to the word with which it was paired. Subsequent measures of the implicit evaluation of the nonwords revealed that nonwords paired with positive words were liked less than nonwords paired with negative words, but only when the relational information was presented before the CS-US pairings. In a second experiment, participants were first informed that the CS and US of each pair were related in one way (e.g., that they have the same meaning). Afterwards, this information was either confirmed (e.g., that they indeed have the same meaning) or reversed (e.g., that they actually have an opposite meaning). Whereas the first relational information had more impact on implicit evaluations than on explicit evaluations, the reverse was true for the second relational information. Moreover, informing participants that CS and US were equivalent produced the same effects as pairing CS and US without providing explicit relational information, thus suggesting that the mere co-occurrence of CS and US is treated as a cue for equivalence of CS and US. Implications for mental process models of EC are discussed. PMID:24670104

  4. Glucosinolates in Brassica vegetables: the influence of the food supply chain on intake, bioavailability and human health.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Ruud; Schreiner, Monika; Krumbein, Angelika; Ciska, Ewa; Holst, Birgit; Rowland, Ian; De Schrijver, Remi; Hansen, Magnor; Gerhäuser, Clarissa; Mithen, Richard; Dekker, Matthijs

    2009-09-01

    Glucosinolates (GLSs) are found in Brassica vegetables. Examples of these sources include cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower and various root vegetables (e.g. radish and turnip). A number of epidemiological studies have identified an inverse association between consumption of these vegetables and the risk of colon and rectal cancer. Animal studies have shown changes in enzyme activities and DNA damage resulting from consumption of Brassica vegetables or isothiocyanates, the breakdown products (BDP) of GLSs in the body. Mechanistic studies have begun to identify the ways in which the compounds may exert their protective action but the relevance of these studies to protective effects in the human alimentary tract is as yet unproven. In vitro studies with a number of specific isothiocyanates have suggested mechanisms that might be the basis of their chemoprotective effects. The concentration and composition of the GLSs in different plants, but also within a plant (e.g. in the seeds, roots or leaves), can vary greatly and also changes during plant development. Furthermore, the effects of various factors in the supply chain of Brassica vegetables including breeding, cultivation, storage and processing on intake and bioavailability of GLSs are extensively discussed in this paper. PMID:19035553

  5. Influence of particle surfaces on the bioavailability to different species of 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, N.A.; Edwards, P.A.; Lawrence, M.A.M.; Taylor, M.G.; Simkiss, K. . School of Animal and Microbial Sciences)

    1999-07-15

    Studies on the bioavailability of contaminants that accumulate in sediments have been complicated by the chemical and structural variability of substrates and by the different biological properties of test organisms that are used by regulators. The purpose of this work was to overcome some of these difficulties by devising a test system that used artificial particles with known chemical surfaces. These were coated with 2,4-dichlorophenol or pentachlorophenol and fed to oligochete worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) and midge larvae (Chironimus riparius). The adsorption coefficient (K[sub d]) of the particle surface was compared with the concentration of contaminant accumulated by the test organisms. There were major differences in bioaccumulation between the two species used despite identical particles and pollutants. This clearly reflects differences in the uptake and detoxification pathways between species. The particle surface and its interaction with the chlorophenols was a major factor in the accumulation of the contaminants in an organism. The techniques that are described provide a way of standardizing results between different natural sediments and different test organisms and provide some insights into the processes involved in bioaccumulation from particle surfaces.

  6. [Physicochemical and microbiological factors influencing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in subsoils]. Progress report, [July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    We report progress in elucidating the microbiological variables important in determining the relative success of bacteria in utilizing soil-sorbed contaminants. Two bacterial species, Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. isolated from petroleum contaminated soil are known to differ markedly in their ability to utilize soil-sorbed napthalene based on a kinetic comparison of their capability of naphthalene mineralization in soil-containing and soil-free systems. The kinetic analysis led us to conclude that strain 17484 had direct access to naphthalene present in a labile sorbed state which promoted the rapid desorption of naphthalene from the non-labile phase. Conversely, both the rate and extent of naphthalene mineralization by strain NP-Alk suggested that this organism had access only to naphthalene in solution. Desorption was thus limited and the efficiency of total naphthalene removal from these soil slurries was poor. These conclusions were based on the average activities of cells in soil slurries without regard for the disposition of the organisms with respect to the sorbent. Since both organisms degrade naphthalene by apparently identical biochemical pathways, have similar enzyme kinetic properties, and are both motile, gram negative organisms, we undertook a series of investigations to gain a better understanding of what microbiological properties were important in bioavailability.

  7. Bioavailability and influence of ¹⁴C-carbofuran on Eisenia andrei avoidance, growth and reproduction in treated natural tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Regina C B; Papini, Solange; de Andréa, Mara M

    2015-01-01

    The bioavailability of carbofuran to the compost worms Eisenia andrei and the influence of its residual amounts on the avoidance, reproduction and growth of this species were studied in two natural tropical soils: a Typic Humaquept (GM) and a Typic Hapludox (LVD), as indicated by the Brazilian environmental authorities for ecotoxicological tests. The worms avoided the soil LVD treated with different doses of carbofuran. The pesticide also affected the production of juvenile specimens in both soils, but cocoon production was reduced only in the GM soil. The earthworms' growth and weight loss were affected by carbofuran (2,2-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1-1-benzofuran-7-yl methylcarbamate. CAS number 1563-66-2) only in the LVD and the mortality detected at 56 days of contact with the treated soils was not statistically significant in both of them. Fourteen days after the soil treatment with(14) c-carbofuran, most residues detected in the soils were bound residues (approximately 36% and 30% in the GM and LVD, respectively) and neither mortality nor bioaccumulation was detected in the earthworms, even with absorptions of 13% and 43%, respectively. The LVD soil has lower organic matter content, and the effects of carbofuran on different aspects of the earthworms' life were more pronounced in this soil, most likely due to the higher bioavailability of the pesticide in the soil solution. The results for carbofuran clearly demonstrate that even small quantities of residues do not assure lack of toxicity. They also make evident the necessity of studying the effects of pesticides in natural agricultural soils. Furthermore, as the bound residues and the earthworm contamination are not detected by conventional techniques, they are not taken into account and may be underestimated on environmental risk assessments. PMID:25714458

  8. Dissolved organic matter kinetically controls mercury bioavailability to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chiasson-Gould, Sophie A; Blais, Jules M; Poulain, Alexandre J

    2014-03-18

    Predicting the bioavailability of inorganic mercury (Hg) to bacteria that produce the potent bioaccumulative neurotoxin monomethylmercury remains one of the greatest challenges in predicting the environmental fate and transport of Hg. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects mercury methylation due to its influence on cell physiology (as a potential nutrient) and its influence on Hg(II) speciation in solution (as a complexing agent), therefore controlling Hg bioavailability. We assessed the role of DOM on Hg(II) bioavailability to a gram-negative bacterium bioreporter under oxic pseudo- and nonequilibrium conditions, using defined media and field samples spanning a wide range of DOM levels. Our results showed that Hg(II) was considerably more bioavailable under nonequilibrium conditions than when DOM was absent or when Hg(II) and DOM had reached pseudoequilibrium (24 h) prior to cell exposure. Under these enhanced uptake conditions, Hg(II) bioavailability followed a bell shaped curve as DOM concentrations increased, both for defined media and natural water samples, consistent with bioaccumulation results in a companion paper (this issue) observed for amphipods. Experiments also suggest that DOM may not only provide shuttle molecules facilitating Hg uptake, but also alter cell wall properties to facilitate the first steps toward Hg(II) internalization. We propose the existence of a short-lived yet critical time window (<24 h) during which DOM facilitates the entry of newly deposited Hg(II) into aquatic food webs, suggesting that the bulk of mercury incorporation in aquatic food webs would occur within hours following its deposition from the atmosphere. PMID:24524696

  9. Influence of weather-climatic conditions on biospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorushko, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The significance of meteorological processes and phenomena in the biosphere functioning is revealed. The influence of various weather conditions on human health is considered; the factors and mechanisms of their action are described. The impact of meteorological processes on animals is discussed and concrete examples of such impacts are presented. The influence of meteorological processes and phenomena on plants at different stages of their life (pollination, growth, ripening, transport of seeds, damage, and death) and on some abiotic natural components is shown. It is inferred that weather-climatic conditions have a great influence on biospheric processes.

  10. Conditional local influence in case-weights linear regression.

    PubMed

    Poon, W Y; Poon, Y S

    2001-05-01

    The local influence approach proposed by Cook (1986) makes use of the normal curvature and the direction achieving the maximum curvature to assess the local influence of minor perturbation of statistical models. When the approach is applied to the linear regression model, the result provides information concerning the data structure different from that contributed by Cook's distance. One of the main advantages of the local influence approach is its ability to handle the simultaneous effect of several cases, namely, the ability to address the problem of 'masking'. However, Lawrance (1995) points out that there are two notions of 'masking' effects, the joint influence and the conditional influence, which are distinct in nature. The normal curvature and the direction of maximum curvature are capable of addressing effects under the category of joint influences but not conditional influences. We construct a new measure to define and detect conditional local influences and use the linear regression model for illustration. Several reported data sets are used to demonstrate that new information can be revealed by this proposed measure. PMID:11393899

  11. The bioavailability of the soluble algal products of different microalgal strains and its influence on microalgal growth in unsterilized domestic secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yin; Wu, Yin-Hu; Zhu, Shu-Feng; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2015-03-01

    Soluble algal products (SAPs) accumulated in microalgal culture could be used as carbon source by bacteria, and thus induce serious bacteria contamination. In this study, three freshwater microalgal strains, Scenedesmus sp. LX1 (S. LX1), Chlorella ellipsoidea YJ1 (C. YJ1) and Haematococcus pluvialis (H. pluvialis), were used to investigate the bioavailability of SAPs and its influence on microalgal growth in unsterilized domestic secondary effluent. S. LX1 and H. pluvialis could grow well whether secondary effluent was sterilized or not, while C. YJ1 showed poor growth without sterilization. The assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentration and AOC content in the SAPs of C. YJ1 was as high as 180μg-CL(-1) and 3.2%, respectively, which induced more serious bacteria contamination and thus inhibited the growth of C. YJ1. Based on the results, in microalgal strain selection for massive cultivation, AOC assays of SAPs could be applied to examine microalgal susceptibility to bacteria contamination. PMID:25608873

  12. Influence of chloride and metals on silver bioavailability to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) yolk-sac fry.

    PubMed

    Bury, Nicolas R; Hogstrand, Christer

    2002-07-01

    The effects of differing water chloride concentrations (0-10 mM) or competing metals [Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Pb(II), Co(II) (1-10,000 nM)] on Ag(I) uptake in yolk-sac fry of two salmonid species, the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were studied. None of the metals tested were strong competitors of Atlantic salmon yolk-sac fry whole body Ag(I) influx. Inhibition of Ag(I) influx was only seen with a 100-fold excess of Cu(II) or Cd(II) or a 1000-fold excess of Pb(II) or Co(II). At these concentrations, the degree of competition appears to be directly proportional to the conditional stability constant of the competing metal to the gill (metal-gill log K). The range of [Cl-] allowed an assessment of Ag+, AgCl(aq), and AgCl2- bioavailability. The pattern of Ag(I) uptake was similar for each fish species. At <1 mM Cl-, where the [Ag+] dominates, the Ag(I) accumulation rate was constant. Above 1 mM Cl-, where the [AgCl(aq)] is dominant and the [AgCl2-] increases, there was a decline in Ag(I) uptake rate. However, even when very little Ag+ was present (i.e., at 10 mM Cl-) Ag(I) accumulated, albeit at a lower rate. This was suggestive of passive influx by AgCl(aq) and indicated little or no entry of negatively charged silver chloride complexes. The decline in Ag(I) uptake above 1 mM Cl- demonstrated that, if Ag(I) was present as both Ag+ and AgCl(aq), salmonid Ag(I) accumulation was dominated by Ag+ uptake. Therefore, the order of bioavailability of the Ag(I) species was determined as Ag+ > AgCl(aq) > AgCl2-. PMID:12144263

  13. Influencing and Facilitating Conditions for Developing Reflective Assessment Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rønsen, Anne Kristin; Smith, Kari

    2014-01-01

    By following a professional development project focusing on enhancing assessment competence amongst teachers, the current study examines how teachers use reflective writing and systematic discussions as tools for developing competence in assessment. More specifically, the article aims at identifying conditions that influence and facilitate…

  14. Enhancing Nutraceutical Bioavailability from Raw and Cooked Vegetables Using Excipient Emulsions: Influence of Lipid Type on Carotenoid Bioaccessibility from Carrots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruojie; Zhang, Zipei; Zou, Liqiang; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Guodong; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    The influence of the nature of the lipid phase in excipient emulsions on the bioaccessibility and transformation of carotenoid from carrots was investigated using a gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model. Excipient emulsions were fabricated using whey protein as an emulsifier and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), fish oil, or corn oil as the oil phase. Changes in particle size, charge, and microstructure were measured as the carrot-emulsion mixtures were passed through simulated mouth, stomach, and small intestine regions. Carotenoid bioaccessibility depended on the type of lipids used to form the excipient emulsions (corn oil > fish oil ≫ MCT), which was attributed to differences in the solubilization capacity of mixed micelles formed from different lipid digestion products. The transformation of carotenoids was greater for fish oil and corn oil than for MCT, which may have been due to greater oxidation or isomerization. The bioaccessibility of the carotenoids was higher from boiled than raw carrots, which was attributed to greater disruption of the plant tissue facilitating carotenoid release. In conclusion, excipient emulsions are highly effective at increasing carotenoid bioaccessibility from carrots, but lipid type must be optimized to ensure high efficacy. PMID:26585671

  15. Influence of soil conditioning on ground deformation during longitudinal tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingjing; Yin, Zhen-Yu

    2014-03-01

    Soil conditioning is often adopted to facilitate EPB shield tunneling. However, the resulting improvement of soil fluidity and the reduction of friction forces will also raise the ground deformation problem. This paper aims to investigate the influence of soil conditioning on the ground deformation during longitudinal tunneling. DEM is employed for this study due to its advantages in analyzing large deformations and discontinuous processes. Soil conditioning is modeled by reducing the interparticle friction of soils in a specific zone around the cutterhead of the tunnel. The tunnel advance with different soil-conditioning treatments is thus modeled. Comparisons are carried out on the ground deformation, i.e. ground surface settlement, vertical and horizontal displacements. The influence of soil conditioning on the ground deformation is clarified, and is associated with the fluidity from poor to favorite, and the mechanical properties from dilative to contractive are associated with the increase of soil conditioning. The results are helpful to determine the conditioned soils and control ground deformation for real constructions.

  16. The influence of humic substances on the speciation and bioavailability of dissolved mercury and methylmercury, measured as uptake by Chaoborus larvae and loss by volatilization.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, A; Meili, M; Sundbom, M

    2000-10-16

    The influence of dissolved humic substances (HS) on the bioavailability of dissolved inorganic and methyl mercury (Hg) was quantified by measuring the direct uptake of 203Hg in Chaoborus larvae using laboratory microcosms containing artificial freshwater. The animals were exposed individually in triplicate aquaria at 10 different concentrations of HS covering the whole range found in natural freshwaters (0-110 mg C l(-1)). Mercury-203 concentrations were monitored repeatedly in the same individuals and in their ambient water during up to 10 days. Near-steady state Hg concentrations in Chaoborus were usually reached within 5 days. The bioconcentration factor (BCF, direct uptake only) for the larvae in the absence of HS was 0.55+/-0.09 (S.E.) ml individual(-1) for inorganic Hg and 5.3+/-0.7 ml individual(-1) for methyl Hg, thus showing a 10-fold difference. Normalizing to the organic carbon content of the larvae yields a BCF(OC) in the absence of HS of 2.8+/-0.4 x 10(3) ml (gC)(-1) for inorganic Hg and 2.7+/-0.3 x 10(4) ml (gC)(-1) for methyl Hg. The uptake of both inorganic and methyl Hg decreased markedly with increasing concentration of HS. For inorganic Hg, the decrease in uptake was most pronounced at HS concentrations below 0.2 mg C l(-1). For methyl Hg, the relationship between uptake and log([HS]) was sigmoid, showing a reduction by > 90% when increasing HS concentrations from 1 to 50 mg C l(-1). Similar patterns were observed for losses of Hg from the water phase, mainly through volatilization. These results have implications for both the biouptake and the abiotic cycling of Hg in natural ecosystems and suggest that most dissolved inorganic Hg is bound to dissolved organic matter in most natural freshwaters, whereas dissolved methyl Hg is bound only in humic waters. Assuming that only free aqueous Hg is taken up by the organisms, the rather simple methodology employed here can be used for estimating distribution coefficients (K(OC)) for Hg between HS and

  17. In vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model to estimate cadmium and lead bioaccessibility/bioavailability in two vegetables: the influence of cooking and additives.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jin; Cui, Yanshan

    2013-09-01

    The estimation of heavy metal bioaccessibility and bioavailability in vegetables is helpful for human health risk assessment. Using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model, the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in raw/cooked pakchoi (Brassica rapa L., Chinensis Group) and Malabar spinach (Basella rubra L.) were studied. The effect of the addition of iron, calcium and acetic acid to the samples was also determined. The results indicated that Cd bioaccessibility was higher in the gastric phase and Pb bioaccessibility was higher in the small intestinal phase. Cadmium and Pb bioavailability were 11.2% and 9.4% in the raw vegetables, respectively, and found to be higher significantly than the cooked vegetables with 6.1% for Cd and 3.2% for Pb. The results showed that it will be overestimating the risk of Pb and Cd based on the data of raw vegetables ingestion. Using bioavailability values, average Cd and Pb daily intake by adult were 23% and 28% respectively, of the base bioaccessibility values. Our study will be better understanding the possible health risks of some vegetables base on the bioaccessibility or bioavailability. PMID:23791752

  18. Environmental conditions influence tissue regeneration rates in scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Sabine, Alexis M; Smith, Tyler B; Williams, Dana E; Brandt, Marilyn E

    2015-06-15

    Natural and anthropogenic factors may influence corals' ability to recover from partial mortality. To examine how environmental conditions affect lesion healing, we assessed several water quality parameters and tissue regeneration rates in corals at six reefs around St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. We hypothesized that sites closer to developed areas would have poor water quality due to proximity to anthropogenic stresses, which would impede tissue regeneration. We found that water flow and turbidity most strongly influenced lesion recovery rates. The most impacted site, with high turbidity and low flow, recovered almost three times slower than the least impacted site, with low turbidity, high flow, and low levels of anthropogenic disturbance. Our results illustrate that in addition to lesion-specific factors known to affect tissue regeneration, environmental conditions can also control corals' healing rates. Resource managers can use this information to protect low-flow, turbid nearshore reefs by minimizing sources of anthropogenic stress. PMID:25982415

  19. Conditions for Viral Influence Spreading through Multiplex Correlated Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental problem in network science is to predict how certain individuals are able to initiate new networks to spring up "new ideas." Frequently, these changes in trends are triggered by a few innovators who rapidly impose their ideas through "viral" influence spreading, producing cascades of followers and fragmenting an old network to create a new one. Typical examples include the rise of scientific ideas or abrupt changes in social media, like the rise of Facebook to the detriment of Myspace. How this process arises in practice has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that a condition for sustaining a viral spreading process is the existence of a multiplex-correlated graph with hidden "influence links." Analytical solutions predict percolation-phase transitions, either abrupt or continuous, where networks are disintegrated through viral cascades of followers, as in empirical data. Our modeling predicts the strict conditions to sustain a large viral spreading via a scaling form of the local correlation function between multilayers, which we also confirm empirically. Ultimately, the theory predicts the conditions for viral cascading in a large class of multiplex networks ranging from social to financial systems and markets.

  20. Bioavailability of Fullerene under Environmentally Relevant Conditions: Effects of Humic Acid and Fetal Bovine Serum on Accumulation in Lipid Bilayers and Cellular Uptake.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yeonjeong; Wang, Xianzhe; Liljestrand, Howard M; Maynard, Jennifer A; Katz, Lynn E

    2016-07-01

    Carbon fullerene (C60) has emerged at the forefront of nanoscale research and application due to its unique properties. As the production of this nanoparticle rapidly increases, it can be released into natural aquatic environments and can accumulate in biological systems. This research examined the effects of humic acid and fetal bovine serum (FBS), which are ubiquitous in aquatic environments and representative of blood plasma in living organisms, respectively, on bioavailability of fullerene. Bioavailability was investigated using in vitro methods for lipid membrane accumulation and cellular uptake studies. Humic acid and FBS significantly changed the characteristics of fullerene including its particle size and surface charge. The effects of humic acid on lipid accumulation of fullerene depended on the lipid head charge. FBS also significantly decreased the lipid accumulation when positively charged and zwitterionic head groups were present on the lipids, possibly due to the higher steric repulsion of the protein coated nanoparticles. In addition, both humic acid and FBS protein effectively lowered the amounts of fullerene taken up by Caco-2 cells, which are derived from a human colorectal adenocarcinoma and have similar functions to the small intestinal epithelium. Results of this study suggest that surface modification of fullerene by environmentally relevant matrices can significantly affect the biological transport, as well as the possible toxicity of this nanomaterial. PMID:26943027

  1. Influence of maternal dysmetabolic conditions during pregnancy on cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Palinski, Wulf; Nicolaides, Eric; Liguori, Antonio; Napoli, Claudio

    2009-09-01

    Pathogenic factors associated with maternal hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and diabetic conditions during pregnancy influence fetal development and predispose offspring to cardiovascular disease. Animal models have established cause-effect relationships consistent with epidemiological findings in humans and have demonstrated, in principle, that interventions before or during pregnancy can reduce or prevent pathogenic in utero programming. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which maternal dysmetabolic conditions enhance disease susceptibility in offspring. Identification of these mechanisms is rendered more difficult by the fact that programming effects in offspring may be latent and may require conventional risk factors and inherited genetic co-factors to become clinically manifest. Given the increasing prevalence of maternal risk factors, which is expected to lead to a wave of cardiovascular disease in the coming decades, and the length of prospective studies on developmental programming in humans, greater-than-usual emphasis on experimental models and translational studies is necessary. PMID:19655024

  2. Estrous cycle phase and gonadal hormones influence conditioned fear extinction

    PubMed Central

    Milad, Mohammed R; Igoe, Sarah A; Lebron-Milad, Kelimer; Novales, Juan E

    2009-01-01

    Gonadal hormones modulate fear acquisition, but less is known about the influence of gonadal hormones on fear extinction. We assessed sex differences and the influence of gonadal hormone fluctuations and exogenous manipulations of estrogen and progesterone on acquisition, extinction learning and extinction recall in a 3-day auditory fear conditioning and extinction protocol. Experiments were conducted on males and naturally cycling female rats. Regarding female rats, significant differences in fear extinction were observed between subgroups of females, depending on their phase of the estrous cycle. Extinction that took place during the proestrus (high estrogen/progesterone) phase was more fully consolidated, as evidenced by low freezing during a recall test. This suggests that estrogen and/or progesterone facilitate extinction. In support of this, injection of both estrogen and progesterone prior to extinction learning in female rats during the metestrus phase of the cycle (low estrogen/progesterone) facilitated extinction consolidation, and blockade of estrogen and progesterone receptors during the proestrus phase impaired extinction consolidation. When comparing male to female rats without consideration of the estrous cycle phase, no significant sex differences were observed. When accounting for cycle phase in females, sex differences were observed only during extinction recall. Female rats that underwent extinction during the metestrus phase showed significantly higher freezing during the recall test relative to males. Collectively, these data suggest that gonadal hormones influence extinction behavior possibly by influencing the function of brain regions involved in the consolidation of fear extinction. Moreover, the elevated fear observed in female relative to male rats during extinction recall suggests that gonadal hormones may in part play a role in the higher prevalence of anxiety disorders in women. PMID:19761818

  3. Human Folate Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Ohrvik, Veronica E.; Witthoft, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    The vitamin folate is recognized as beneficial health-wise in the prevention of neural tube defects, anemia, cardiovascular diseases, poor cognitive performance, and some forms of cancer. However, suboptimal dietary folate intake has been reported in a number of countries. Several national health authorities have therefore introduced mandatory food fortification with synthetic folic acid, which is considered a convenient fortificant, being cost-efficient in production, more stable than natural food folate, and superior in terms of bioavailability and bioefficacy. Other countries have decided against fortification due to the ambiguous role of synthetic folic acid regarding promotion of subclinical cancers and other adverse health effects. This paper reviews recent studies on folate bioavailability after intervention with folate from food. Our conclusions were that limited folate bioavailability data are available for vegetables, fruits, cereal products, and fortified foods, and that it is difficult to evaluate the bioavailability of food folate or whether intervention with food folate improves folate status. We recommend revising the classical approach of using folic acid as a reference dose for estimating the plasma kinetics and relative bioavailability of food folate. PMID:22254106

  4. Geoeffective and Climate-Influencing Solar and Interplanetary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A.

    Several connections have been detected and demonstrated between solar magnetic conditions and climatic responses which hint at a highly complicated mechanism of sun-climate relations through plasma streams. The present contribution overviews our results about the possible factors of this mechanism. The main factor is the negative value of the interplanetary magnetic B_z component which exhibits a fairly complex behaviour. Its strength is influenced by the solar dipole cycle, the nature of ejected plasma (CME or fast stream), the magnetic topology of the CME and the position of the Earth (Rosenberg-Coleman and Russell-McPherron effects). The persistence of the negative B_z is also effective. The impacts of these features can be pointed out in the climatic responses.

  5. Influence of overconsolidated condition on permeability evolution in silica sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Kaneko, H.; Ito, T.; Nishimura, O.; Minagawa, H.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability of sediments is important factors for production of natural gas from natural gas hydrate bearing layers. Methane-hydrate is regarded as one of the potential resources of natural gas. As results of coring and logging, the existence of a large amount of methane-hydrate is estimated in the Nankai Trough, offshore central Japan, where many folds and faults have been observed. In the present study, we investigate the permeability of silica sand specimen forming the artificial fault zone after large displacement shear in the ring-shear test under two different normal consolidated and overconsolidated conditions. The significant influence of overconsolidation ratio (OCR) on permeability evolution is not found. The permeability reduction is influenced a great deal by the magnitude of normal stress during large displacement shearing. The grain size distribution and structure observation in the shear zone of specimen after shearing at each normal stress level are analyzed by laser scattering type particle analyzer and scanning electron microscope, respectively. It is indicated that the grain size and porosity reduction due to the particle crushing are the factor of the permeability reduction. This study is financially supported by METI and Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (the MH21 Research Consortium).

  6. Bioavailability of Micronutrients from Plant Foods: An Update.

    PubMed

    Platel, Kalpana; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2016-07-26

    Deficiencies of iron, zinc, iodine and vitamin A are widespread in the developing countries, poor bioavailability of these micronutrients from plant-based foods being the major reason for their wide prevalence. Diets predominantly vegetarian are composed of components that enhance as well as inhibit mineral bioavailability, the latter being predominant. However, prudent cooking practices and use of ideal combinations of food components can significantly improve micronutrient bioavailability. Household processing such as heat treatment, sprouting, fermentation and malting have been evidenced to enhance the bioavailability of iron and β-carotene from plant foods. Food acidulants amchur and lime are also shown to enhance the bioavailability of not only iron and zinc, but also of β-carotene. Recently indentified newer enhancers of micronutrient bioaccessibility include sulphur compound-rich Allium spices-onion and garlic, which also possess antioxidant properties, β-carotene-rich vegetables-carrot and amaranth, and pungent spices-pepper (both red and black) as well as ginger. Information on the beneficial effect of these dietary compounds on micronutrient bioaccessibility is novel. These food components evidenced to improve the bioavailability of micronutrients are common ingredients of Indian culinary, and probably of other tropical countries. Fruits such as mango and papaya, when consumed in combination with milk, provide significantly higher amounts of bioavailable β-carotene. Awareness of the beneficial influence of these common dietary ingredients on the bioavailability of micronutrients would help in devising dietary strategies to improve the bioavailability of these vital nutrients. PMID:25748063

  7. Influence of leaching conditions for ecotoxicological classification of ash.

    PubMed

    Stiernström, S; Enell, A; Wik, O; Hemström, K; Breitholtz, M

    2014-02-01

    The Waste Framework Directive (WFD; 2008/98/EC) states that classification of hazardous ecotoxicological properties of wastes (i.e. criteria H-14), should be based on the Community legislation on chemicals (i.e. CLP Regulation 1272/2008). However, harmonizing the waste and chemical classification may involve drastic changes related to choice of leaching tests as compared to e.g. the current European standard for ecotoxic characterization of waste (CEN 14735). The primary aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the influence of leaching conditions, i.e. pH (inherent pH (∼10), and 7), liquid to solid (L/S) ratio (10 and 1000 L/kg) and particle size (<4 mm, <1 mm, and <0.125 mm), for subsequent chemical analysis and ecotoxicity testing in relation to classification of municipal waste incineration bottom ash. The hazard potential, based on either comparisons between element levels in leachate and literature toxicity data or ecotoxicity testing of the leachates, was overall significantly higher at low particle size (<0.125 mm) as compared to particle fractions <1mm and <4mm, at pH 10 as compared to pH 7, and at L/S 10 as compared to L/S 1000. These results show that the choice of leaching conditions is crucial for H-14 classification of ash and must be carefully considered in deciding on future guidance procedures in Europe. PMID:24280620

  8. Influence of Spanwise Boundary Conditions on Slat Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    2015-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system is being investigated through computational fluid dynamics simulations with the OVERFLOW code in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustics solver. In the present study, two different spanwise grids are being used to investigate the effect of the spanwise extent and periodicity on the near-field unsteady structures and radiated noise. The baseline grid with periodic boundary conditions has a short span equal to 1/9th of the stowed chord, whereas the other, longer span grid adds stretched grids on both sides of the core, baseline grid to allow inviscid surface boundary conditions at both ends. The results indicate that the near-field mean statistics obtained using the two grids are similar to each other, as are the directivity and spectral shapes of the radiated noise. However, periodicity forces all acoustic waves with less than one wavelength across the span to be two-dimensional, without any variation in the span. The spanwise coherence of the acoustic waves is what is needed to make estimates of the noise that would be radiated from realistic span lengths. Simulations with periodic conditions need spans of at least six slat chords to allow spanwise variation in the low-frequencies associated with the peak of broadband slat noise. Even then, the full influence of the periodicity is unclear, so employing grids with a fine, central region and highly stretched meshes that go to slip walls may be a more efficient means of capturing the spanwise decorrelation of low-frequency acoustic phenomena.

  9. Arsenic Bioavailability, Bioaccessibility, And Speciation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term bioavailability has many different meanings across various disciplines. Often bioavailability is concerned with human health aspects such as the case of urban children interacting with contaminated soil. The still utilized approach to base risk assessment on total meta...

  10. Anthocyanins in purple-orange carrots (Daucus carota L.) do not influence the bioavailability of beta-carotene in young women.

    PubMed

    Arscott, Sara A; Simon, Philipp W; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2010-03-10

    Purple carrots contain anthocyanins in addition to the provitamin A carotenoids in typical orange carrots. Simultaneous consumption of these phytochemicals in carrots may affect the bioavailability of carotenoids. The bioavailability of beta-carotene in humans was assessed from an acute feeding of orange (OC) and purple (PC) carrots with white (WC) as a control. Carrot smoothies were served to female subjects (n = 5, aged 21-26 years) for breakfast after 1 week on a low carotenoid diet and overnight fast. OC and PC smoothies were equalized to 10.3 mg of all-trans beta-carotene. Plasma beta-carotene was measured for 144 h following treatments. Peak plasma concentrations of OC and PC treatments did not differ. The PC treatment 0-144 h area-under-the-curve for beta-carotene was 76% of the OC treatment (P < 0.05). However, when the first 24 h were compared, OC and PC treatments did not differ, suggesting that anthocyanins in purple carrots do not affect the absorption of beta-carotene postprandially. PMID:20131807

  11. SLUDGE ORGANICS BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. vailable data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. ludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical c...

  12. The Influence of Soil Properties and Local Characteristics on the Distribution, Migration and Potential Bioavailability of Radio-Cesium in Bavarian Forest Ecosystems More Than 20 Years After the Chernobyl Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelbauer, J.; Voelkel, J.; Leopold, M.; Huerkamp, K.; Dehos, R.

    2008-12-01

    Soil properties and local characteristics of landscapes and ecosystems influence the behaviour of Radio- Cesium. Humic horizons are a main factor in understanding the migration and potential bioavailability of radio-nuclides in soils. Until 1962 and in the year 1986, nuclear arms tests in the Pacific and the Chernobyl reactor accident emitted persistent radionuclides in the atmosphere that are stored in several European ecosystems. Short-term high as well as long-term low immissions lead to enrichments and increasing contamination of the environment up to superposition effects in certain ecosystems. South German forest ecosystems like the Bavarian Forest or the Northern pre-Alps are subareas of the cesium fallout affected sites after the Chernobyl accident. Cesium-137 is constantly contained in the vegetation and food chain in spite of decreasing local doses. Investigations have shown that the enrichment of cesium is mainly restricted to the organic top layers of the forest soils. Examples of several Bavarian forest ecosystems are given. Horizontal and vertical forest soil distributions of the cesium contamination and its bioavailability were determined to provide a default-document how to act in case of a repetition of a nuclear accident. Such a guideline has been created by order of the Bavarian State Government and its scope is presented here.

  13. The influence of scaffold material on chondrocytes in inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Heenam; Sun, Lin; Cairns, Dana M.; Rainbow, Roshni S.; Preda, Rucsanda Carmen; Kaplan, David L.; Zeng, Li

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering aims to repair damaged cartilage tissue in arthritic joints. As arthritic joints have significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1β and TNFα that cause cartilage destruction, it is critical to engineer stable cartilage in an inflammatory environment. Biomaterial scaffolds constitute an important component of the microenvironment for chondrocytes in engineered cartilage. However, it remains unclear how scaffold material influences the response of chondrocytes seeded in these scaffolds under inflammatory stimuli. Here, we compared the response of articular chondrocytes seeded within three different polymeric scaffolding materials (silk, collagen and polylactic acid (PLA)) to IL-1β and TNFα. These scaffolds have different physical characteristics and yielded significant differences in the expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix production and degradation, cell adhesion and cell death. Silk and collagen scaffolds released pro-inflammatory cytokines faster and had higher uptake water abilities than PLA scaffolds. Correspondingly, chondrocytes cultured in silk and collagen scaffolds maintained higher levels of cartilage matrix than those in PLA, suggesting that these biophysical properties of scaffolds may regulate gene expression and response to inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes. Based on this study, we concluded that selecting the proper scaffolding material will aid in the engineering of more stable cartilage tissues for cartilage repair; and that silk and collagen are the more optimal scaffolds in supporting the stability of 3D cartilage under inflammatory conditions. PMID:23333441

  14. On the influence of mechanical conditions in osteochondral defect healing.

    PubMed

    Duda, Georg N; Maldonado, Zully M; Klein, Petra; Heller, Markus O W; Burns, Justin; Bail, Hermann

    2005-04-01

    Despite the introduction of new surgical techniques, the treatment of cartilage defects remains challenging. Delay or complete failure of cartilage healing is associated with problems in biological regeneration. The influence of mechanical conditions on this process, however, remains unevaluated. Osteochondral defects were generated on the left femoral condyle in 18 Yucatan minipigs. After 4, 6 and 12 weeks the defect filling, trabecular orientation and bone density were compared to the intact contralateral side. The mechanical straining during this period was then analyzed using an adaptive finite element technique. Histologically, the osteochondral defects showed bone resorption at the base and bone formation from the circumference. At 12 weeks, the macroscopically healed specimens showed fibrous cartilage formation, a minimally organized trabecular structure and increased trabecular volume fraction compared to the controls (p < 0.002). The amount of cancellous, cartilagineous, and fibrous tissue and the defect size as measured in histomorphometric analysis for the three time points (4, 6 and 12 weeks) was comparable in magnitude to that predicted by finite element analysis. The simulated osteochondral healing process was not fully capable of re-establishing a hyaline-like cartilage layer. The correlation between simulation and histology allows identification of mechanical factors that appear to have a larger impact on the healing of osteochondral defects than previously considered. PMID:15713306

  15. Influence of combined oral contraceptives on the periodontal condition

    PubMed Central

    DOMINGUES, Roberta Santos; FERRAZ, Bruna Fidêncio Rahal; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; PASSANEZI, Euloir; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Most studies investigating the impact of oral contraceptives have been performed some years ago, when the level of sexual hormones was greater than the actual formulations. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of current combined oral contraceptives (COC) on periodontal tissues, correlating the clinical parameters examined with the total duration of continuous oral contraceptive intake. Material and methods Twenty-five women (19-35 years old) taking combined oral contraceptives for at least 1 year were included in the test group. The control group was composed by 25 patients at the same age range reporting no use of hormone-based contraceptive methods. Clinical parameters investigated included pocket probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcular bleeding index (SBI) and plaque index (Pl.I). Data were statistically evaluated by unpaired t test, Pearson's correlation test and Spearman's correlation test. Results The test group showed increased PD (2.228±0.011 x 2.154±0.012; p<0.0001) and SBI (0.229±0.006 x 0.148±0.005, p<0.0001) than controls. No significant differences between groups were found in CAL (0.435±0.01 x 0.412±0.01; p=0.11). The control group showed greater Pl.I than the test group (0.206±0.007 x 0.303±0.008; p<0.0001). No correlation between the duration of oral contraceptive intake, age and periodontal parameters was observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that the use of currently available combined oral contraceptives can influence the periodontal conditions of the patients, independently of the level of plaque accumulation or total duration of medication intake, resulting in increased gingival inflammation. PMID:22666846

  16. The Influence of Specific Physical Health Conditions on Retirement Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Kenneth S.; Wang, Mo

    2007-01-01

    Physical health has consistently been shown to strongly influence the retirement decision-making process. Unfortunately, "physical health" is typically operationalized in global terms. As a result, we know little about the specific aspects of physical health that influence the decision to retire. Therefore, in the present study, data from three…

  17. Prebiotics and calcium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin

    2003-03-01

    A prebiotic substance has been defined as a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon. Therefore, compared to probiotics, which introduce exogenous bacteria into the colonic microflora, a prebiotic aims at stimulating the growth of one or a limited number of the potentially health-promoting indigenous micro-organisms, thus modulating the composition of the natural ecosystem. In recent years, increasing attention has been focussed on the possible beneficial effects of prebiotics, such as enhanced resistance to invading pathogens, improved bowel function, anti-colon cancer properties, lipid lowering action, improved calcium bioavailability, amongst others. The objective of this review is to critically assess the available data on the effects of prebiotics on calcium bioavailability, and place it in the context of human physiology and, when possible, explain the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. The review will also try to highlight future areas of research that may help in the evaluation of prebiotics as potential ingredients for functional foods aimed at enhancing calcium bioavailability and protecting against osteoporosis. PMID:12691259

  18. The Influence of Meteorological Conditions on Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, N. A.; Gipps, J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the distribution of air pollutants as related to such meteorological conditions as temperature inversions, ground inversion, and wind velocity. Uses a power station to illustrate the effect of some of the meteorological conditions mentioned. (GS)

  19. Eight Conditions Influencing the Implementation of Educational Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, R. Murray

    The extent to which claims to educational rights are actually fulfilled in a society depends on a variety of conditions. There are eight conditions that can contribute to a society's falling short in the implementation of those rights. The conditions include: (1) complacency--failure to take steps toward ensuring that the right is honored in…

  20. Chronic Heat Stress and Cognitive Development: An Example of Thermal Conditions Influencing Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riniolo, Todd C.; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2006-01-01

    Although thermal conditions influence the development of living organisms in a wide variety of ways, this topic has been recently ignored in humans. This paper reintroduces thermal conditions as a topic of importance for developmentalists by presenting an example of how thermal conditions are hypothesized to influence a particular developmental…

  1. Use of chemical methods to assess Cd and Pb bioavailability to the snail Cantareus aspersus: a first attempt taking into account soil characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pauget, B; Gimbert, F; Coeurdassier, M; Scheifler, R; de Vaufleury, A

    2011-09-15

    Bioavailability is a key parameter in conditioning contaminant transfer to biota. However, in risk assessment of terrestrial contamination, insufficient attention is being paid to the influence of soil type on trace metal bioavailability. This paper addresses the influence of soil properties on the chemical availability of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) (CaCl(2) extraction and ionic activity) and bioavailability (accumulation kinetics) to the land snail Cantareus aspersus. Snails were exposed to nine contaminated soils differing by a single characteristic (pH or organic matter content or clay content) for 28 days. Toxicokinetic models were applied to determine metal uptake and excretion rates in snails and multivariate regression was used to relate uptake parameters to soil properties. The results showed that alkalinisation of soil and an increase of the organic matter content decreased Pb and Cd bioavailability to snails whereas kaolin clay had no significant influence. The CaCl(2)-extractable concentrations tended to overestimate the effects of pH when used to explain metal uptake rate. We conclude that factors other than those controlling the extractable fraction affect metal bioavailability to snails, confirming the requirement of biota measurements in risk assessment procedures. PMID:21813240

  2. Suboptimal Light Conditions Influence Source-Sink Metabolism during Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Annelies; De Keyser, Ellen; Pauwels, Els; De Riek, Jan; Gobin, Bruno; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids). Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS) was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural) and optimal (supplemental light) light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark) to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions. PMID:26973689

  3. Suboptimal Light Conditions Influence Source-Sink Metabolism during Flowering.

    PubMed

    Christiaens, Annelies; De Keyser, Ellen; Pauwels, Els; De Riek, Jan; Gobin, Bruno; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids). Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS) was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural) and optimal (supplemental light) light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark) to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions. PMID:26973689

  4. Influence of dynamic conditions on biofilm formation by staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Stepanović, S; Vuković, D; Jezek, P; Pavlović, M; Svabic-Vlahović, M

    2001-07-01

    The modified microtiter plate test was used to investigate biofilm formation by staphylococci under both static and dynamic conditions. The quantity of biofilm produced under static conditions was used as a reference. Dynamic conditions, which were achieved by incubating microtiter plates on a horizontal shaker with and without the presence of glass beads in wells, either reduced biofilm formation or left it unchanged. Dynamic conditions particularly affected the capacity of certain species to produce biofilm: these species included the causative agents of infections associated with a foreign body (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus). On the basis of these results, dynamic conditions should be included as a parameter for evaluating biofilm formation by staphylococci in vitro. PMID:11561809

  5. Conditions Influencing Faculty Voting in Collective Bargaining Elections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornheimer, Deane G.

    1985-01-01

    The factors that influenced voting behavior in two faculty union defeats at New York University are examined. The importance of the swing votes cast in a run-off election by the members of a previously defeated third party is discussed. (Author/MLW)

  6. Conditions that Influence Drivers' Yielding Behavior for Uncontrolled Crossings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourquin, Eugene; Emerson, Robert Wall; Sauerburger, Dona

    2011-01-01

    Pedestrians with visual impairments need to cross streets where traffic signals and traffic signage are not present. This study examined the influences of several interventions, including a pedestrian's use of a mobility cane, on the behavior of drivers when they were expected to yield to a pedestrian crossing at an uncontrolled crossing.…

  7. Iron bioavailability to phytoplankton: an empirical approach

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Hagar; Shaked, Yeala; Kranzler, Chana; Keren, Nir; Morel, François M M

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton are often limited by iron in aquatic environments. Here we examine Fe bioavailability to phytoplankton by analyzing iron uptake from various Fe substrates by several species of phytoplankton grown under conditions of Fe limitation and comparing the measured uptake rate constants (Fe uptake rate/ substrate concentration). When unchelated iron, Fe′, buffered by an excess of the chelating agent EDTA is used as the Fe substrate, the uptake rate constants of all the eukaryotic phytoplankton species are tightly correlated and proportional to their respective surface areas (S.A.). The same is true when FeDFB is the substrate, but the corresponding uptake constants are one thousand times smaller than for Fe′. The uptake rate constants for the other substrates we examined fall mostly between the values for Fe′ and FeDFB for the same S.A. These two model substrates thus empirically define a bioavailability envelope with Fe′ at the upper and FeDFB at the lower limit of iron bioavailability. This envelope provides a convenient framework to compare the relative bioavailabilities of various Fe substrates to eukaryotic phytoplankton and the Fe uptake abilities of different phytoplankton species. Compared with eukaryotic species, cyanobacteria have similar uptake constants for Fe′ but lower ones for FeDFB. The unique relationship between the uptake rate constants and the S.A. of phytoplankton species suggests that the uptake rate constant of Fe-limited phytoplankton has reached a universal upper limit and provides insight into the underlying uptake mechanism. PMID:25350155

  8. Influence of initial conditions on compressible vorticity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, D.; Hussain, F.

    1993-11-01

    Prompted by the lack of a unique choice of pressure ( P) and density (ρ) fields for a compressible free vortex and by the observed dependence of turbulence dynamics on initial P and ρ in compressible simulations, we address the effects of initial conditions on the evolution of a single vortex, on the prototypical phenomenon of vortex reconnection, and on two-dimensional turbulence. Two previous choices of initial conditions used for numerical simulations of compressible turbulence have been: (i) both P and ρ uniform (constant initial conditions, CIC), and (ii) uniform ρ with P determined from the Poisson equation (constant density initial conditions, CDIC). We find these initial conditions to be inappropriate for compressible vorticity dynamics studies. Specifically, in compressible reconnection, the effects of baroclinic vorticity generation and shocklet formation cancel each other during early evolution for CDIC, thus leading to almost incompressible behavior. Although CIC captures compressibility effects, it incorrectly changes the initial vorticity distribution by introducing strong acoustic transients, thereby significantly altering the evolving dynamics. Here, a new initial condition, called polytropic initial condition (PIC), is proposed, for which the Poisson equation is solved for initially polytropically related P and ρ fields. PIC provides P and ρ distributions within vortices which are consistent with those observed in shock-wedge interaction experiment and also leads to compressible solutions with no acoustic transients. At low Mach number ( M), we show that the effects of all these three initial conditions can be predicted by low- M asymptotic theories of the Navier-Stokes equations. At high M, it is shown here that inappropriate initial conditions may alter the evolutionary dynamics and, hence, lead to wrong conclusions regarding compressibility effects. We argue that PIC is a more appropriate choice.

  9. Sludge organics bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

  10. Influence of surfactants in self-microemulsifying formulations on enhancing oral bioavailability of oxyresveratrol: Studies in Caco-2 cells and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sangsen, Yaowaporn; Wiwattanawongsa, Kamonthip; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Graidist, Potchanapond; Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn

    2016-02-10

    Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) containing two types (Tween80 and Labrasol) and two levels (low; 5% and high; 15%) of co-surfactants were formulated to evaluate the impact of surfactant phase on physical properties and oral absorption of oxyresveratrol (OXY). All formulations showed a very rapid release in the simulated gastric fluid (SGF) pH 1.2. After dilution with different media, the microemulsion droplet sizes of the Tween80-based (∼26 to 36 nm) were smaller than that of the Labrasol-based systems (∼34 to 45 nm). Both systems with high levels of surfactant increased the Caco-2 cells permeability of OXY compared to those with low levels of surfactant (1.4-1.7 folds) and the unformulated OXY (1.9-2.0 folds). It was of interest, that there was a reduction (4.4-5.3 folds) in the efflux transport of OXY from both systems compared to the unformulated OXY. The results were in good agreement with the in vivo absorption studies of such OXY-formulations in rats. Significantly greater values of Cmax and AUC(0-10h) (p<0.05) were obtained from the high levels of Tween80-based (F(r,0-10h) 786.32%) compared to those from the Labrasol-based system (F(r,0-10h) 218.32%). These finding indicate the importance of formulation variables such as type and quantity of surfactant in the SMEDDS to enhance oral drug bioavailability. PMID:26680318

  11. Influence of thermal conditioning media on Charpy specimen test temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Swain, R.L.; Berggren, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact test is used extensively for determining the toughness of structural materials. Research programs in many technologies concerned with structural integrity perform such testing to obtain Charpy energy vs temperature curves. American Society for Testing and Materials Method E 23 includes rather strict requirements regarding determination and control of specimen test temperature. It specifies minimum soaking times dependent on the use of liquids or gases as the medium for thermally conditioning the specimen. The method also requires that impact of the specimen occur within 5 s removal from the conditioning medium. It does not, however, provide guidance regarding choice of conditioning media. This investigation was primarily conducted to investigate the changes in specimen temperature which occur when water is used for thermal conditioning. A standard CVN impact specimen of low-alloy steel was instrumented with surface-mounted and embedded thermocouples. Dependent on the media used, the specimen was heated or cooled to selected temperatures in the range {minus}100 to 100{degree}C using cold nitrogen gas, heated air, acetone and dry ice, methanol and dry ice, heated oil, or heated water. After temperature stabilization, the specimen was removed from the conditioning medium while the temperatures were recorded four times per second from all thermocouples using a data acquisition system and a computer. The results show that evaporative cooling causes significant changes in the specimen temperatures when water is used for conditioning. Conditioning in the other media did not result in such significant changes. The results demonstrate that, even within the guidelines of E 23, significant test temperature changes can occur which may substantially affect the Charpy impact test results if water is used for temperature conditioning. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Increased bioavailability of celecoxib under fed versus fasted conditions is determined by postprandial bile secretion as demonstrated in a dynamic gastrointestinal model.

    PubMed

    Lyng, Eric; Havenaar, Robert; Shastri, Prathap; Hetsco, Lucy; Vick, Andrew; Sagartz, John

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize physiologically relevant dynamic dissolution testing with the TNO intestinal model (TIM-1) in vitro gastrointestinal model to investigate the bioaccessibility of celecoxib. A single 200-mg dose of celecoxib was evaluated under average adult human physiological conditions simulated in the TIM-1 system. The in vitro data were compared with the clinically established pharmacokinetic data. When expressed as a percent of drug that progresses from the duodenum to the jejunum and ileum compartments (bioaccessible sites), the study demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the total bioaccessibility for celecoxib when co-administered with a high-fat meal as opposed to co-administration with a glass of water (fasted conditions). That increase in bioaccessibility was similar to a 1.2 to 1.6-fold increase in systemic exposure in adults and children following co-administration with a high-fat meal when compared to the exposure measured when celecoxib was co-administered with only water. Following that comparison, the flexibility of the TIM-1 system was used to more specifically investigate individual parameters of gastrointestinal conditions, such as the rate of bile secretion (emptying of the bile bladder) that accompanies high-fat meal consumption. We demonstrated that increased bile secretion after co-administration of a high-fat meal played a more important role in the increased celecoxib bioaccessibility than did the food matrix. This indicates that in humans without a bile bladder the exposure of celecoxib administered with food might be as low as under fasted state. PMID:26755336

  13. Influence of impurity gases and operating conditions on PAFC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, K.; Iwasa, N.; Suzuki, M.; Okada, O.

    1996-12-31

    On-site Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) Cogeneration system is installed at various test sites, such as at underground parking lot, within chemical plant premises and near urban streets. Since in the current PAFC system, cathode air is supplied to the cell with no particular pretreatment, impurity gases in the air might influence on cell performance. We have investigated the influence of various impurity gases in the cathode gas, on sub-scale single cells, and have found that NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and toluene affect negatively on cell performance. The results of these experiments and the conceivable mechanism of these effects on cell degradation are reported. We have also investigated the influence of other operating parameters, such as temperature, current density, fuel utilization on cell performance. From these experiments, we have found that operating temperature is a significant factor, which mainly determines cell voltage decline rate. The results of sub-scale single cell tests and a short-stack verification test are also reported.

  14. Body condition and forage type influence intramuscular and rump fat, and reproductive performance of postpartum Brahman-influenced cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiparous Brahman-influenced cows were managed to achieve marginal (BCS = 4.9 ± 0.1; n = 55) or moderate (BCS = 6.5 ± 0.1; n = 55) body condition (BC) to determine the influence of forage type on estrous characteristics, intramuscular fat percentage (IMF), rump fat (RF), and reproductive performan...

  15. Micronutrient bioavailability research priorities.

    PubMed

    Casgrain, Amélie; Collings, Rachel; Harvey, Linda J; Boza, Julio J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2010-05-01

    A micronutrient bioavailability workshop, which involved international experts and members of the scientific community and the food industry, with interactive breakout sessions based on synectics principles, was organized by the International Life Sciences Institute Europe Addition of Nutrients to Food Task Force and the European Commission Network of Excellence European Micronutrient Recommendations Aligned. After presentations by experts, a series of "challenge statements" was discussed. The aim was to address topical issues, in particular those that linked bioavailability with the derivation of micronutrient requirements and dietary recommendations, to identify gaps in knowledge and to consider research priorities. Several generic research priorities were identified, including improving the quality of dietary surveys/food composition tables, the need for more metabolic studies that use stable isotopes and high-quality longer-term interventions, and the development of multifactorial mathematical models. Among the common recurrent factors identified as important were polymorphisms/genotype, consideration of the whole diet, chemical form of the micronutrient, and the determination of physiologic requirements. The involvement of all participants in the structured discussions ensured a broad overview of current knowledge, state-of-the-art research, and consideration of priorities for future research. PMID:20200267

  16. Influence of cholestyramine on the pharmacokinetics of rosiglitazone and its metabolite, desmethylrosiglitazone, after oral and intravenous dosing of rosiglitazone: impact on oral bioavailability, absorption, and metabolic disposition in rats.

    PubMed

    Muzeeb, S; Venkatesh, P; Mullangi, R; Srinivas, N R

    2006-09-01

    The possible influence of the bile acid-sequestering agent cholestyramine (CSA), which is a basic co-medication in hypercholesterolemic patients, on the pharmacokinetics of rosiglitazone (RGL) and its circulating metabolite desmethylrosiglitazone (DMRGL) was investigated following a single oral and intravenous dose of RGL to Wistar rats. The pharmacokinetic parameters of RGL and DMRGL were evaluated following oral or intravenous administration of RGL to rats at 10 mg kg-1 with and without pre-treatment (0.5 h before RGL administration) of CSA at 0.057, 0.115, 0.23 and 0.34 g kg-1 doses. With an increase in CSA dose there was dose-dependent decrease in area under the curve (AUC)(0-infinity) and Cmax with no change in Tmax, Kel and t1/2 values for both RGL and DMRGL following oral administration of RGL. The oral bioavailability of RGL was reduced by 19.9, 35.6, 53.8 and 72.0% in rats following pre-treatment with CSA at 0.057, 0.115, 0.230 and 0.340 g kg-1, respectively. There was no change in the above-mentioned pharmacokinetic parameters for RGL and DMRGL in rats when RGL was given intravenously following pre-treatment with the above-mentioned oral doses of CSA. Another objective of the study was to determine the effect of staggered oral CSA dosing at 1, 2 and 4 h after oral RGL administration at 10 mg kg-1. AUC(0-infinity) of RGL and DMRGL was reduced following CSA staggered administration at 1 h, whereas 2- and 4-h staggered dose administration of CSA had no effect on the AUC(0-infinity) of RGL and DMRGL. Irrespective of CSA staggered dose administration there was no change in other pharmacokinetic parameters, namely Cmax, Tmax, Kel and t1/2. The apparent formation rate constant (Kf) of DMRGL was also calculated to show that only the absorption of RGL was affected, not the apparent formation rate of DMRGL. The authors also studied the in vitro adsorption of RGL (100, 250, 500 microg ml-1) at various pH conditions (pH 2, 4 and 7) and different concentrations of CSA

  17. The influence of living conditions on adolescent girls’ health

    PubMed Central

    Sundler, Annelie Johansson; Ekebergh, Margaretha

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is described by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare as the healthiest period in life. However, adolescent girls differ in that they self-report that their health decreases with age. The aim of this hermeneutical study was to describe the meaning of living conditions in relation to adolescent girls’ health. Guided by principles of reflective lifeworld research, 15 interviews with adolescent girls were analysed. The result section consists of four narratives with their existential interpretations illustrating different ways of approaching living conditions and their meaning for health and well-being. The narratives are: Approaching everyday life in a balanced way—feeling harmonious; approaching everyday life with ambiguity—feeling confused; approaching everyday life as an intellectual project—striving for control; approaching everyday life as a struggle—feeling forlorn. In addition, a comprehensive understanding was developed by using the lifeworld dimensions: lived body, lived room, lived time, and lived relations. These dimensions may deepen the understanding of important parts of those living conditions which are meaningful for the girls’ health and well-being. By using the dimensions, complex living conditions have been explored and the meaning of different parts clarified. The girls’ thoughts and feelings are often ambiguous and sometimes contradictory, depending on the situation. The health of adolescent girls needs to be understood against the background of their experiences of living conditions. One way to support their health and well-being seems to be to supply them with forums where they can talk about their living conditions. PMID:23237626

  18. INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX CONDITIONS ON COPPER LEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching behavior of metals from a mineral processing waste at varying pH and redox conditions was studies. Effect of combinations of pH and Eh on leaching of copper is described. Leaching of copper was found to be dependent on both pH and Eh. Higher concentrations of Cu were ...

  19. Influencing Children's Pregambling Game Playing via Conditional Discrimination Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Taylor E.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated a transformation of stimulus functions under similar conditions using gambling tasks and adults (e.g., Zlomke & Dixon, 2006), and the present study attempted to extend this research. Experimenters exposed 7 children (ages 7 to 10 years) to a simulated board game with concurrently available dice differing only by…

  20. Influence of pavement condition on horizontal curve safety.

    PubMed

    Buddhavarapu, Prasad; Banerjee, Ambarish; Prozzi, Jorge A

    2013-03-01

    Crash statistics suggest that horizontal curves are the most vulnerable sites for crash occurrence. These crashes are often severe and many involve at least some level of injury due to the nature of the collisions. Ensuring the desired pavement surface condition is one potentially effective strategy to reduce the occurrence of severe accidents on horizontal curves. This study sought to develop crash injury severity models by integrating crash and pavement surface condition databases. It focuses on developing a causal relationship between pavement condition indices and severity level of crashes occurring on two-lane horizontal curves in Texas. In addition, it examines the suitability of the existing Skid Index for safety maintenance of two-lane curves. Significant correlation is evident between pavement condition and crash injury severity on two-lane undivided horizontal curves in Texas. Probability of a crash becoming fatal is appreciably sensitive to certain pavement indices. Data suggested that road facilities providing a smoother and more comfortable ride are vulnerable to severe crashes on horizontal curves. In addition, the study found that longitudinal skid measurement barely correlates with injury severity of crashes occurring on curved portions. The study recommends exploring the option of incorporating lateral friction measurement into Pavement Management System (PMS) databases specifically at curved road segments. PMID:23298704

  1. Pharmacological activity of metal binding agents that alter copper bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Helsel, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Iron, copper and zinc are required nutrients for many organisms but also potent toxins if misappropriated. An overload of any of these metals can be cytotoxic and ultimately lead to organ failure, whereas deficiencies can result in anemia, weakened immune system function, and other medical conditions. Cellular metal imbalances have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infection. It is therefore critical for living organisms to maintain careful control of both the total levels and subcellular distributions of these metals to maintain healthy function. This perspective explores several strategies envisioned to alter the bioavailability of metal ions by using synthetic metal-binding agents targeted for diseases where misappropriated metal ions are suspected of exacerbating cellular damage. Specifically, we discuss chemical properties that influence the pharmacological outcome of a subset of metal-binding agents known as ionophores, and review several examples that have shown multiple pharmacological activities in metal-related diseases, with a specific focus on copper. PMID:25797044

  2. Can environmental conditions experienced in early life influence future generations?

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Tim; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of early developmental conditions for performance in later life are now subjected to convergent interest from many different biological sub-disciplines. However, striking data, largely from the biomedical literature, show that environmental effects experienced even before conception can be transmissible to subsequent generations. Here, we review the growing evidence from natural systems for these cross-generational effects of early life conditions, showing that they can be generated by diverse environmental stressors, affect offspring in many ways and can be transmitted directly or indirectly by both parental lines for several generations. In doing so, we emphasize why early life might be so sensitive to the transmission of environmentally induced effects across generations. We also summarize recent theoretical advancements within the field of developmental plasticity, and discuss how parents might assemble different ‘internal’ and ‘external’ cues, even from the earliest stages of life, to instruct their investment decisions in offspring. In doing so, we provide a preliminary framework within the context of adaptive plasticity for understanding inter-generational phenomena that arise from early life conditions. PMID:24807254

  3. Analysis of weather condition influencing fire regime in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciu, Valentina; Masala, Francesco; Salis, Michele; Sirca, Costantino; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Fires have a crucial role within Mediterranean ecosystems, with both negative and positive impacts on all biosphere components and with reverberations on different scales. Fire determines the landscape structure and plant composition, but it is also the cause of enormous economic and ecological damages, beside the loss of human life. In addition, several authors are in agreement suggesting that, during the past decades, changes on fire patterns have occurred, especially in terms of fire-prone areas expansion and fire season lengthening. Climate and weather are two of the main controlling agents, directly and indirectly, of fire regime influencing vegetation productivity, causing water stress, igniting fires through lightning, or modulating fire behavior through wind. On the other hand, these relationships could be not warranted in areas where most ignitions are caused by people (Moreno et al. 2009). Specific analyses of the driving forces of fire regime across countries and scales are thus still required in order to better anticipate fire seasons and also to advance our knowledge of future fire regimes. The objective of this work was to improve our knowledge of the relative effects of several weather variables on forest fires in Italy for the period 1985-2008. Meteorological data were obtained through the MARS (Monitoring Agricultural Resources) database, interpolated at 25x25 km scale. Fire data were provided by the JRC (Join Research Center) and the CFVA (Corpo Forestale e di Vigilanza Ambientale, Sardinia). A hierarchical cluster analysis, based on fire and weather data, allowed the identification of six homogeneous areas in terms of fire occurrence and climate (pyro-climatic areas). Two statistical techniques (linear and non-parametric models) were applied in order to assess if inter-annual variability in weather pattern and fire events had a significant trend. Then, through correlation analysis and multi-linear regression modeling, we investigated the

  4. Mycotoxins: toxicity, carcinogenicity, and the influence of various nutritional conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Newberne, Paul M.

    1974-01-01

    Toxicologic diseases of man and animals, associated with molds growing on foods, have been recognized for centuries. Only in recent years, however, have these mycotoxicoses received the attention of many laboratories and skilled scientists around the world in a broad inter-disciplinary effort. This review covers the literature on mycotoxicoses but centers on those about which most is known, particularly the diseases associated with metabolites elaborated by some strains of Aspergilli, Penicillia, Fusaria, Stachybotrys, and Claviceps. The ubiquitous nature of the aflatoxins, toxic metabolites produced by Aspergillus flavus, make them important to public health, especially since it is now known that certain areas of endemic liver disease coincide with consumption of aflatoxins and, often, malnutrition. The older disease of ergotism, the scourge of Europe for centuries, is considered in detail. Alimentary toxic aleukia, which has caused enormous suffering in Russian human and animal populations, is better understood as a result of relatively recent experimental investigations. Stachybotryotoxicosis, a disease previously considered to be of significance only to man has now been identified in domestic animals. Finally, Japanese studies have clearly revealed the hepatotoxicity of certain metabolites of Penicillium molds. Factors that influence susceptibility to mycotoxins and the hazards they present to man are also reviewed. ImagesFIGURE 2. PMID:4620330

  5. Comparing Observed Hurricane Conditions Against Potential Future Climate Change Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Climate Adaptation Science Investigators: (CASI) is to advance and apply NASA's scientific expertise and products to develop climate adaptation strategies that support NASA's overall mission by minimizing risks to each center's operations, physical assets, and personnel. Using Hurricane Katrina observations as a baseline, we use ADCIRC to model surge extent with simple modifications of the storm track. We examine two time now (T0) scenarios of present-day climatological factors: 1) translating the 2005 path 7 km west; and 2) rotating the approach angle from due-north to WNW. Second, we examine two future time scenarios (TX) by infusing climate change conditions, such as sea level rise and increased storm intensity, into a T0 baseline to assess future impacts. The primary goal of this work entails planning and protecting NASA assets and infrastructure. The adjacent communities, state and local emergency managers, gain benefit from this NASA work as data and analysis includes the surrounding geography.

  6. Sample storage conditions significantly influence faecal microbiome profiles

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Leong, Lex EX; Rogers, Geraint B

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing-based studies of the human faecal microbiota are increasingly common. Appropriate storage of sample material is essential to avoid the introduction of post-collection bias in microbial community composition. Rapid freezing to −80 °C is commonly considered to be best-practice. However, this is not feasible in many studies, particularly those involving sample collection in participants’ homes. We determined the extent to which a range of stabilisation and storage strategies maintained the composition of faecal microbial community structure relative to freezing to −80 °C. Refrigeration at 4 °C, storage at ambient temperature, and the use of several common preservative buffers (RNAlater, OMNIgene.GUT, Tris-EDTA) were assessed relative to freezing. Following 72 hours of storage, faecal microbial composition was assessed by 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Refrigeration was associated with no significant alteration in faecal microbiota diversity or composition. However, samples stored using other conditions showed substantial divergence compared to −80 °C control samples. Aside from refrigeration, the use of OMNIgene.GUT resulted in the least alteration, while the greatest change was seen in samples stored in Tris-EDTA buffer. The commercially available OMNIgene.GUT kit may provide an important alternative where refrigeration and cold chain transportation is not available. PMID:26572876

  7. Age at menarche: the influence of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, E.; Shalev, C.; Dalal, I.; Sod-Moriah, U. A.

    1988-03-01

    Age at menarche was studied by the recollection method in two groups of Causasian Jewish high school girls, inhabitants of two towns in Israel, Safad and Elat. The two towns differ mainly in climatic conditions. The age at menarche was found to be significantly lower ( P<0.02) in the hot town of Elat than in the temperate town of Safad: 13.30±1.21 and 13.58±0.9 years, respectively (mean ±SD). A significant association was found between the age at menarche and the town in which the girls lived. Accordingly, in the hot town of Elat, the percentage of girls who had their first menstrual cycle by the age of 12 years and earlier, was more than double that of the girls in Safad (17.9% and 7.1%, respectively). It is concluded that the environmental temperature, with or without any possible interaction of humidity, is probably responsible for the tendency for an earlier onset of menarche in girls living in the hot town of Elat.

  8. Potassium Intake, Bioavailability, Hypertension, and Glucose Control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael S.; Martyn, Lisa; Weaver, Connie M.

    2016-01-01

    Potassium is an essential nutrient. It is the most abundant cation in intracellular fluid where it plays a key role in maintaining cell function. The gradient of potassium across the cell membrane determines cellular membrane potential, which is maintained in large part by the ubiquitous ion channel the sodium-potassium (Na+-K+) ATPase pump. Approximately 90% of potassium consumed (60–100 mEq) is lost in the urine, with the other 10% excreted in the stool, and a very small amount lost in sweat. Little is known about the bioavailability of potassium, especially from dietary sources. Less is understood on how bioavailability may affect health outcomes. Hypertension (HTN) is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and a major financial burden ($50.6 billion) to the US public health system, and has a significant impact on all-cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relationship between increased potassium supplementation and a decrease in HTN is relatively well understood, but the effect of increased potassium intake from dietary sources on blood pressure overall is less clear. In addition, treatment options for hypertensive individuals (e.g., thiazide diuretics) may further compound chronic disease risk via impairments in potassium utilization and glucose control. Understanding potassium bioavailability from various sources may help to reveal how specific compounds and tissues influence potassium movement, and further the understanding of its role in health. PMID:27455317

  9. Selenium bioavailability with reference to human nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Young, V.R.; Nahapetian, A.; Janghorbani, M.

    1982-05-01

    Various aspects of selenium metabolism and nutrition in relation to the question of selenium bioavailability in foods and the diet of man are reviewed. Few published studies exist on selenium metabolism in human subjects, particularly those representative of healthy individuals in the United States. Animal studies reveal that various factors, including the source and chemical form of selenium in foods and feeds, influence selenium bioavailability. However, the quantitative significance of animal assay data for human nutrition is not known. The limited number of published studies in man suggest that the metabolic fate and physiological function of dietary selenite may differ from that of selenomethionine or of food selenium. However, much additional research will be required to establish an adequate picture of the significance of dietary selenium bioavailability in human nutrition and health. Based on initial human experiments carried out at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, use of stable isotopes of selenium offers promising opportunities for closing the gap of knowledge that now exists concerning the role and significance of factors that determine how the selenium present in foods is used to meet the physiological requirements of the consumer.

  10. Potassium Intake, Bioavailability, Hypertension, and Glucose Control.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael S; Martyn, Lisa; Weaver, Connie M

    2016-01-01

    Potassium is an essential nutrient. It is the most abundant cation in intracellular fluid where it plays a key role in maintaining cell function. The gradient of potassium across the cell membrane determines cellular membrane potential, which is maintained in large part by the ubiquitous ion channel the sodium-potassium (Na+-K+) ATPase pump. Approximately 90% of potassium consumed (60-100 mEq) is lost in the urine, with the other 10% excreted in the stool, and a very small amount lost in sweat. Little is known about the bioavailability of potassium, especially from dietary sources. Less is understood on how bioavailability may affect health outcomes. Hypertension (HTN) is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and a major financial burden ($50.6 billion) to the US public health system, and has a significant impact on all-cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relationship between increased potassium supplementation and a decrease in HTN is relatively well understood, but the effect of increased potassium intake from dietary sources on blood pressure overall is less clear. In addition, treatment options for hypertensive individuals (e.g., thiazide diuretics) may further compound chronic disease risk via impairments in potassium utilization and glucose control. Understanding potassium bioavailability from various sources may help to reveal how specific compounds and tissues influence potassium movement, and further the understanding of its role in health. PMID:27455317

  11. Influence of meteorological conditions on RSV infection in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira-Santos, M.; Santos, J. A.; Soares, J.; Dias, A.; Quaresma, M.

    2016-04-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis is a common cause for infant hospital admissions. Of all etiological agents, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is commonly the most frequent. The present study assesses relationships between atmospheric factors and RSV infections in under 3-year-old patients admitted to the Inpatient Paediatric Service of Vila Real (North of Portugal). For this purpose, (1) clinical files of children admitted with a diagnosis of acute bronchiolitis from September 2005 to December 2015 (>10 years) were scrutinised and (2) local daily temperature/precipitation series, as well as six weather types controlling meteorological conditions in Portugal, were used. Fifty-five percent of all 770 admitted children were effectively infected with a given virus, whilst 48 % (367) were RSV+, i.e. 87 % of virus-infected children were RSV+. The bulk of incidence is verified in the first year of age (82 %, 302), slightly higher in males. RSV outbreaks are typically from December to March, but important inter-annual variability is found in both magnitude and shape. Although no clear connections were found between monthly temperatures/precipitation and RSV outbreaks apart from seasonality, a linkage to wintertime cold spells is apparent on a daily basis. Anomalously low minimum temperatures from the day of admittance back to 10 days before are observed. This relationship is supported by anomalously high occurrences of the E and AA weather types over the same period, which usually trigger dry and cold weather. These findings highlight some predictability in the RSV occurrences, revealing potential for modelling and risk assessments.

  12. The influence of convection parameterisations under alternate climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades several convection parameterisations have been developed to consider the impact of small-scale unresolved processes in Earth System Models associated with convective clouds. Global model simulations, which have been performed under current climate conditions with different convection schemes, significantly differ among each other in the simulated precipitation patterns due to the parameterisation assumptions and formulations, e.g. the simplified treatment of the cloud microphysics. Additionally, the simulated transport of short-lived trace gases strongly depends on the chosen convection parameterisation due to the differences in the vertical redistribution of mass. Furthermore, other meteorological parameters like the temperature or the specific humidity show substantial differences in convectively active regions. This study presents uncertainties of climate change scenarios caused by different convection parameterisations. For this analysis two experiments (reference simulation with a CO2 concentration of 348 ppm; 2xCO2-simulation with a CO2 concentration of 696 ppm) are calculated with the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) model applying four different convection schemes (Tiedtke, ECMWF, Emanuel and Zhang-McFarlane - Hack) and two resolutions (T42 and T63), respectively. The results indicate that the equilibrium climate sensitivity is independent of the chosen convection parameterisation. However, the regional temperature increase, induced by a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration, demonstrates differences of up to a few Kelvin at the surface as well as in the UTLS for the ITCZ region depending on the selected convection parameterisation. The interaction between cloud and convection parameterisations results in a large disagreement of precipitation patterns. Although every 2xCO2 -experiment simulates an increase in global mean precipitation rates, the change of regional precipitation patterns differ widely. Finally, analysing

  13. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). PMID:26707985

  14. Bioavailability of tocotrienols: evidence in human studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As a minor component of vitamin E, tocotrienols were evident in exhibiting biological activities such as neuroprotection, radio-protection, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and lipid lowering properties which are not shared by tocopherols. However, available data on the therapeutic window of tocotrienols remains controversial. It is important to understand the absorption and bioavailability mechanisms before conducting in-depth investigations into the therapeutic efficacy of tocotrienols in humans. In this review, we updated current evidence on the bioavailability of tocotrienols from human studies. Available data from five studies suggested that tocotrienols may reach its target destination through an alternative pathway despite its low affinity for α-tocopherol transfer protein. This was evident when studies reported considerable amount of tocotrienols detected in HDL particles and adipose tissues after oral consumption. Besides, plasma concentrations of tocotrienols were shown to be higher when administered with food while self-emulsifying preparation of tocotrienols was shown to enhance the absorption of tocotrienols. Nevertheless, mixed results were observed based on the outcome from 24 clinical studies, focusing on the dosages, study populations and formulations used. This may be due to the variation of compositions and dosages of tocotrienols used, suggesting a need to understand the formulation of tocotrienols in the study design. Essentially, implementation of a control diet such as AHA Step 1 diet may influence the study outcomes, especially in hypercholesterolemic subjects when lipid profile might be modified due to synergistic interaction between tocotrienols and control diet. We also found that the bioavailability of tocotrienols were inconsistent in different target populations, from healthy subjects to smokers and diseased patients. In this review, the effect of dosage, composition and formulation of tocotrienols as well as study populations on the

  15. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    SciTech Connect

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  16. Influence of discharge and urbanization on the concentration, speciation, and bioavailability of trace metals in the Raritan River, New Jersey. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, F.B.; Ashley, G.M.; Renwick, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Raritan River and its tributaries are a vital drinking water and recreational resource in central New Jersey. These waters also serve as disposal media for municipal and industrial wastes and urban stormwater runoff. Rapid development over the last several decades has intensified the pressures on the quality and use of Raritan waters. The concentration and speciation of ten trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn) were investigated in the Raritan Basin. From September 1985 to April 1987, one hundred twenty depth-integrated samples were collected at four locations and analyzed by Direct-Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry for concentrations of dissolved, particulate-associated, total, and suspended sediment trace metals. The concentrations of trace metals readily available, potentially available, and not available to aquatic and terrestrial biota are also reported. Discharge is the most important factor influencing the concentration and speciation of trace metals in the Raritan River and its tributaries. Seasonal variations affect speciation patterns, but have a minor impact on concentration and availability to biota. The sub-basin draining a more-urbanized area in the Raritan Basin appeared to have elevated concentrations and increased biological availability of trace metals relative to less-urbanized basins.

  17. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones. PMID:23161396

  18. BIOSURFACES AND BIOAVAILABILITY: A NANOSCALE OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally, contaminant bioavailability is a key parameter in determining exposure assessment and ultimately risk assessment/risk management. Defining bioavailability requires knowledge of the contaminant spatial/temporal disposition and transportability and the thermodyna...

  19. Analysis of the Influence of Thermal Conditions on the Operation of Optoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakovskaya, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The optoelectronic device has been considered from the viewpoint of system analysis. It has been shown that thermal conditions influence the transfer function of this system and, as a consequence, the desired signal. Moreover, the self-radiation of the device's elements, which also leads to a change in the output signal of the device, depends on the thermal conditions. Translated from Inzhenerno-Fizicheskii Zhurnal, Vol. 86, No. 4, pp. 894-904, July-August, 2013.

  20. Self nanoprecipitating preconcentrate of tamoxifen citrate for enhanced bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Kapse, Sonali V; Gaikwad, Rajiv V; Samad, Abdul; Devarajan, Padma V

    2012-06-15

    We disclose a self nanoprecipitating preconcentrate (SNP) of tamoxifen citrate (TMX), which forms TMX loaded polymeric nanoparticles, on dilution with aqueous media. SNP comprised TMX, polymer (Kollidon SR) and surfactant/s dissolved in a pharmaceutically acceptable vehicle. Binary surfactant mixtures of Aerosol OT (AOT) with Tween 80 revealed synergistic reduction in surface tension to enable both high entrapment efficiency (EE) and low particle size (PS). Synergism of the surfactants was confirmed by molecular interaction parameter(β(σ)). Combination of AOT and Tween 80 resulted in EE (∼85%) and PS (<250nm). Formation of TMX-KSR nanoparticles in situ was reproducible under most experimental conditions and exhibited pH independent behavior. Dilution volume (>80mL) influenced both PS and EE while dilution temperature influenced only PS. Marginal increase in size was evident at the end of 1h nevertheless was not of concern as TMX SNP exhibited near complete release in 1h. DSC and XRD studies revealed amorphous nature of TMX in nanoparticles. FTIR imaging confirmed uniform distribution of TMX in nanoparticles. ESEM and TEM revealed spherical nanoparticles. Biodistribution studies of (99m)Tc labeled TMX SNP in rats revealed no significant absorption however oral pharmacokinetics revealed enhanced oral bioavailability of TMX (165%) compared to TMX suspension. SNP presents a new in situ approach, for design of drug loaded polymeric nanoparticles. PMID:22414426

  1. Influence of Body Condition on Influenza A Virus Infection in Mallard Ducks: Experimental Infection Data

    PubMed Central

    Arsnoe, Dustin M.; Ip, Hon S.; Owen, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (−20%, −10%, and normal ±5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl. PMID:21857940

  2. Influence of body condition on influenza A virus infection in mallard ducks: Experimental infection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, Dustin M.; Ip, Hon S.; Owen, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ±5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl.

  3. Influence of body condition on influenza a virus infection in mallard ducks: Experimental infection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, D.M.; Ip, H.S.; Owen, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ??5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl. ?? 2011 Arsnoe et al.

  4. Maternal Condition Does Not Influence Birth Sex Ratios in Anubis Baboons (Papio anubis)

    PubMed Central

    Silk, Joan B.; Strum, Shirley C.

    2010-01-01

    Trivers and Willard predicted that when parental condition has differential effects on the fitness of male and female offspring, parents who are in good condition will bias investment toward the sex that benefits most from additional investment. Efforts to test predictions derived from Trivers and Willard's model have had mixed results, perhaps because most studies have relied on proxy measures of parental condition, such as dominance rank. Here, we examine the effects of female baboons condition on birth sex ratios and post-natal investment, based on visual assessments of maternal body condition. We find that local environmental conditions have significant effects on female condition, but maternal condition at conception has no consistent relationship with birth sex ratios. Mothers who are in poorer condition at the time of conception resume cycling significantly later than females who are in better condition, but the sex of their infants has no effect on the time to resumption of cycling. Thus, our findings provide strong evidence that maternal condition influences females' ability to reproduce, but females do not facultatively adjust the sex ratio of their offspring in relation to their dominance rank or current condition. PMID:20877648

  5. [Bioavailability and metabolism of flavonoids].

    PubMed

    Makarova, M N

    2011-01-01

    In the review the modern data about bioavailability and a metabolism of flavonoids is considered. The data about absorption flavonoids in a digestive path, participation of microorganisms in their hydrolysis, pharmacokinetic the data on the basic classes flavonoids: flavanes (flavan-3-ols), anthocyanes, flavones, flavonols and flavanones is cited. PMID:21842747

  6. [Bioavailability and metabolism of flavonoids].

    PubMed

    Makarova, N M

    2011-01-01

    Published data about bioavailability and metabolism of flavonoids are reviewed. Information concerning the absorption of flavonoids in a digestive path and the participation of microorganisms in their hydrolysis is summarized. Parameters of pharmacokinetics are presented for the main classes of flavonoids, including flavanes (flavan-3-ols), anthocyans, flavones, flavonols, and flavanones. PMID:21870774

  7. Bioavailability of Promethazine during Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Wang, Zuwei; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Promethazine (PMZ) is the choice anti-motion sickness medication for treating space motion sickness (SMS) during flight. The side effects associated with PMZ include dizziness, drowsiness, sedation, and impaired psychomotor performance which could impact crew performance and mission operations. Early anecdotal reports from crewmembers indicate that these central nervous system side effects of PMZ are absent or greatly attenuated in microgravity, potentially due to changes in pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics in microgravity. These changes could also affect the therapeutic effectiveness of drugs in general and PMZ, in particular. In this investigation, we examined bioavailability and associated pharmacokinetics of PMZ in astronauts during and after space flight. Methods. Nine astronauts received, per their preference, PMZ (25 or 50 mg as intramuscular injection, oral tablet, or rectal suppository) on flight day one for the treatment of SMS and subsequently collected saliva samples and completed sleepiness scores for 72 h post dose. Thirty days after the astronauts returned to Earth, they repeated the protocol. Bioavailability and PK parameters were calculated and compared between flight and ground. Results. Maximum concentration (Cmax) was lower and time to reach Cmax (tmax) was longer in flight than on the ground. Area under the curve (AUC), a measure of bioavailability, was lower and biological half-life (t1/2) was longer in flight than on the ground. Conclusion. Results indicate that bioavailability of PMZ is reduced during spaceflight. Number of samples, sampling method, and sampling schedule significantly affected PK parameter estimates.

  8. Drug Bioavailability Data: (Un)Available.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capomacchia, Anthony C.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The obtainability of drug bioavailability data from both brand-name and generic-drug manufacturers was studied to document the relative change in availability to pharmacy students of drug bioavailability data between 1978 and 1976 for drugs exhibiting bioavailability problems. The results indicate no major change. (JMD)

  9. Understanding the conditions for improvement: research to discover which context influences affect improvement success.

    PubMed

    Øvretveit, John

    2011-04-01

    Context can be defined as all factors that are not part of a quality improvement intervention itself. More research indicates which aspects are 'conditions for improvement', which influence improvement success. However, little is known about which conditions are most important, whether these are different for different quality interventions or whether some become less or more important at different times in carrying out an improvement. Knowing more about these conditions could help speed up and spread improvements and develop the science. This paper proposes ways to build knowledge about the conditions needed for different changes, and to create conditional-attribution explanations to provide qualified generalisations. It describes theory-based, non-experimental research designs. It also suggests that 'practical improvers' can make their changes more effective by reflecting on and revising their own 'assumption-theories' about the conditions which will help and hinder the improvements they aim to implement. PMID:21450764

  10. Understanding the conditions for improvement: research to discover which context influences affect improvement success

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Context can be defined as all factors that are not part of a quality improvement intervention itself. More research indicates which aspects are ‘conditions for improvement’, which influence improvement success. However, little is known about which conditions are most important, whether these are different for different quality interventions or whether some become less or more important at different times in carrying out an improvement. Knowing more about these conditions could help speed up and spread improvements and develop the science. This paper proposes ways to build knowledge about the conditions needed for different changes, and to create conditional-attribution explanations to provide qualified generalisations. It describes theory-based, non-experimental research designs. It also suggests that ‘practical improvers’ can make their changes more effective by reflecting on and revising their own ‘assumption-theories’ about the conditions which will help and hinder the improvements they aim to implement. PMID:21450764

  11. Lead Speciation And Bioavailability In Apatite-Amended Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The in situ sequestration of lead (Pb) in sediment with a phosphate amendment was investigated by Pb speciation and bioavailability. Sediment Pb in preamendment samples was identified as galena (PbS) with trace amounts of absorbed Pb. Sediment exposed to atmospheric conditions ...

  12. Past Experience Influences the Processing of Stimulus Compounds in Human Pavlovian Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchers, Klaus G.; Lachnit, Harold; Shanks, David R.

    2004-01-01

    In two human skin conductance conditioning experiments we investigated whether processing of stimulus compounds can be influenced by past experience. Participants were either pre-trained with a discrimination problem that could be solved elementally (A+, B-, AB+, C- in Experiment 1 and A+, AB+, C-, CB- in Experiment 2) or one that required a…

  13. A critical review of social and structural conditions that influence HIV risk among Mexican deportees

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexican migrants who are deported from the US may be at elevated risk for HIV infection. Deportations of Mexican migrants by the US have reached record numbers. We critically reviewed existing literature to assess how social and structural conditions in post-deportation settings can influence Mexican deported migrants' HIV risk. We also identify critical research gaps and make research recommendations. PMID:24583278

  14. Antibacterial Properties of Copper Nanoparticle Dispersions: Influence of Synthesis Conditions and Physicochemical Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godymchuk, A.; Frolov, G.; Gusev, A.; Zakharova, O.; Yunda, E.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The production of bactericidal plasters, bandages and medicines with the inclusion of copper nanoparticles and copper ions may have a great potential in terms of their biomedical application. The work considers the influence of the synthesis conditions, size, aggregation status, and charge of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions as well as the type of microorganisms to the antibacterial properties of water suspensions of electroexplosive copper nanoparticles in the conditions in vitro in relation to strains Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus. Water dispersions of copper nanoparticles were shown to inhibit the growth of test cells for both G+ and G- microbacteria but the degree of such an influence strongly depended on the type of a test strain. The authors have demonstrated that use of deeply purified water and alcohol-containing stabilizers at the synthesis of nanoparticles via metals electric erosion in the liquid prevents the copper nanoparticles coagulation and significantly influences on their physicochemical characteristics and, consequently, antibacterial properties.

  15. Influence of recruit condition on food competition and predation risk in a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Booth, David J; Beretta, Giglia A

    2004-07-01

    Settlement rate is considered to be a major determinant of the population structure of coral reef fishes. In this study, the effects of larval physiological condition on survival, predation risk and competitive ability are assessed for a small damselfish, Pomacentrus moluccensis. New settlers were collected and fed for 5 days to produce high and low condition (measured as lipid) treatment fish. In a field experiment, pairs (one high and one low condition fish) were transplanted to corals. Persistence over 2 weeks was much higher (100% vs. 25%) in high condition fish. In mixed groups in the laboratory, high condition fish were both aggressively dominant and consumed more of a limiting prey source than low condition fish. In addition, low condition fish were shown to be at much higher risk of predation. All of the low condition fish but only 33% of high condition fish in mixed groups were consumed by fish predators, and in a separate experiment, 73% of feeding strikes by predators were directed at low condition fish. Quality of new settlers can have an important influence on subsequent juvenile survival. The mechanisms for this effect are likely to include a combination of effects of condition on food competition and predation risk. PMID:15179583

  16. The influence of initial and surface boundary conditions on a model-generated January climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. F.; Spar, J.

    1981-01-01

    The influence on a model-generated January climate of various surface boundary conditions, as well as initial conditions, was studied by using the GISS coarse-mesh climate model. Four experiments - two with water planets, one with flat continents, and one with mountains - were used to investigate the effects of initial conditions, and the thermal and dynamical effects of the surface on the model generated-climate. However, climatological mean zonal-symmetric sea surface temperature is used in all four runs over the model oceans. Moreover, zero ground wetness and uniform ground albedo except for snow are used in the last experiments.

  17. Influence of Microwaves on the Thermal Conditions of a "Polymer-Semiconductor-Composite" System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. G.; Kravchenko, E. V.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical analysis of the influence of microwaves on the thermal conditions of elements of electronic equipment (EE) has been carried out. Investigations have shown that the temperature field of the ″polymer-semiconductor-composite″ system under the action of microwaves is nonuniform. It has been established that under rather typical operating conditions with increasing electric field intensity there is a considerable increase (from 362 to 387 K) in the maximum temperature of the modeled object. Such a strong influence of microwaves on the thermal conditions of the ″polymer-semiconductor-composite″ system is comparable to the increase in the ambient temperature by 20 K or the increase in the heat release of the internal source by 30%.

  18. The influence of dexamethasone on behaviorally conditioned immunomodulation and plasma corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Kusnecov, A W; Husband, A J; King, M G

    1990-03-01

    Utilizing a conditioned taste aversion paradigm we have previously shown that rats re-exposed to a saccharin solution previously paired with cyclophosphamide (CY) demonstrate significantly reduced in vitro mitogen-induced spleen cell proliferation and IgM secretion assessed 24 h after saccharin re-exposure. In this report treatment of similarly conditioned rats with dexamethasone (DEX) either before conditioning or before re-exposure abrogated the conditioned modulation of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced spleen cell proliferation. The finding that DEX pretreatment on the conditioning day was as effective in abrogating the conditioned response as DEX treatment prior to the test day does not support pituitary-adrenal mediation of the conditioned immusuppressive effect following re-exposure of conditioned animals to the CS. There was no significant conditioned immunosuppression observed with respect to PHA- and Con A-induced proliferation and the influence of DEX on these parameters could not be assessed. The effect on PWM-induced IgM production was inconclusive since the reduced IgM response among conditioned animals was of only borderline significance. PMID:2110491

  19. Bioavailability of iron, zinc, folic acid, and vitamin A from fortified maize.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Diego; Biebinger, Ralf; Bruins, Maaike J; Hoeft, Birgit; Kraemer, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    Several strategies appear suitable to improve iron and zinc bioavailability from fortified maize, and fortification per se will increase the intake of bioavailable iron and zinc. Corn masa flour or whole maize should be fortified with sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetate (NaFeEDTA), ferrous fumarate, or ferrous sulfate, and degermed corn flour should be fortified with ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate. The choice of zinc fortificant appears to have a limited impact on zinc bioavailability. Phytic acid is a major inhibitor of both iron and zinc absorption. Degermination at the mill will reduce phytic acid content, and degermed maize appears to be a suitable vehicle for iron and zinc fortification. Enzymatic phytate degradation may be a suitable home-based technique to enhance the bioavailability of iron and zinc from fortified maize. Bioavailability experiments with low phytic acid-containing maize varieties have suggested an improved zinc bioavailability compared to wild-type counterparts. The bioavailability of folic acid from maize porridge was reported to be slightly higher than from baked wheat bread. The bioavailability of vitamin A provided as encapsulated retinyl esters is generally high and is typically not strongly influenced by the food matrix, but has not been fully investigated in maize. PMID:24329552

  20. Vitamin B12 sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumio

    2007-11-01

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B(12) are animal foods, meat, milk, egg, fish, and shellfish. As the intrinsic factor-mediated intestinal absorption system is estimated to be saturated at about 1.5-2.0 microg per meal under physiologic conditions, vitamin B(12) bioavailability significantly decreases with increasing intake of vitamin B(12) per meal. The bioavailability of vitamin B(12) in healthy humans from fish meat, sheep meat, and chicken meat averaged 42%, 56%-89%, and 61%-66%, respectively. Vitamin B(12) in eggs seems to be poorly absorbed (< 9%) relative to other animal food products. In the Dietary Reference Intakes in the United States and Japan, it is assumed that 50% of dietary vitamin B(12) is absorbed by healthy adults with normal gastro-intestinal function. Some plant foods, dried green and purple lavers (nori) contain substantial amounts of vitamin B(12), although other edible algae contained none or only traces of vitamin B(12). Most of the edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) used for human supplements predominantly contain pseudovitamin B(12), which is inactive in humans. The edible cyanobacteria are not suitable for use as vitamin B(12) sources, especially in vegans. Fortified breakfast cereals are a particularly valuable source of vitamin B(12) for vegans and elderly people. Production of some vitamin B(12)-enriched vegetables is also being devised. PMID:17959839

  1. Influence of Dynamic Hydraulic Conditions on Nitrogen Cycling in Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassen, Niklas; von Netzer, Frederick; Ryabenko, Evgenia; Lüders, Tillmann; Stumpp, Christine

    2015-04-01

    In order to improve management strategies of agricultural nitrogen input, it is of major importance to further understand which factors influence turnover processes within the nitrogen cycle. Many studies have focused on the fate of nitrate in hydrological systems, but up to date only little is known about the influence of dynamic hydraulic conditions on the fate of nitrate at the soil-groundwater interface. We conducted column experiments with natural sediment and compared a system with a fluctuating water table to systems with different water content and static conditions under the constant input of ammonia into the system. We used hydrochemical methods in order to trace nitrogen species, 15N isotope methods to get information about dominating turnover processes and microbial community analysis in order to connect hydrochemical and microbial information. We found that added ammonia was removed more effectively under dynamic hydraulic conditions than under static conditions. Furthermore, denitrification is the dominant process under saturated, static conditions, while nitrification is more important under unsaturated, static conditions. We conclude that a fluctuating water table creates hot spots where both nitrification and denitrification processes can occur spatially close to each other and therefore remove nitrogen more effectively from the system. Furthermore, the fluctuating water table enhances the exchange of solutes and triggers hot moments of solute turnover. Therefore we conclude that a fluctuating water table can amplify hot spots and trigger hot moments of nitrogen cycling.

  2. Body size and condition influence migration timing of juvenile Arctic grayling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heim, Kurt C.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Whitman, Matthew S.; Seitz, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater fishes utilising seasonally available habitats within annual migratory circuits time movements out of such habitats with changing hydrology, although individual attributes of fish may also mediate the behavioural response to environmental conditions. We tagged juvenile Arctic grayling in a seasonally flowing stream on the Arctic Coastal Plain in Alaska and recorded migration timing towards overwintering habitat. We examined the relationship between individual migration date, and fork length (FL) and body condition index (BCI) for fish tagged in June, July and August in three separate models. Larger fish migrated earlier; however, only the August model suggested a significant relationship with BCI. In this model, 42% of variability in migration timing was explained by FL and BCI, and fish in better condition were predicted to migrate earlier than those in poor condition. Here, the majority (33%) of variability was captured by FL with an additional 9% attributable to BCI. We also noted strong seasonal trends in BCI reflecting overwinter mass loss and subsequent growth within the study area. These results are interpreted in the context of size and energetic state-specific risks of overwinter starvation and mortality (which can be very high in the Arctic), which may influence individuals at greater risk to extend summer foraging in a risky, yet prey rich, habitat. Our research provides further evidence that heterogeneity among individuals within a population can influence migratory behaviour and identifies potential risks to late season migrants in Arctic beaded stream habitats influenced by climate change and petroleum development.

  3. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid, in 12 healthy male volunteers. Doses of 200 mg were given to each of the volunteers in a randomized, crossover manner 1 week apart orally and as a 10-min intravenous infusion. Half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) for the intravenous and oral administration arms were 4.2 +/- 0.77 and 4.11 +/- 0.74 h, respectively. The serum clearance rate averaged 28.5 +/- 4.7 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous administration arm. The renal clearance rate accounted for approximately 60% of the corresponding serum clearance rate and was 16.9 +/- 3.0 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous arm and 17.0 +/- 2.86 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the oral administration arm. Absorption was rapid, with peak concentrations in serum occurring at 0.71 +/- 0.15 h. Bioavailability, defined as the ratio of the area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for the oral to the intravenous dose, was 69 +/- 7%. We conclude that ciprofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and reliably bioavailable in these healthy volunteers. Further studies with ciprofloxacin should be undertaken in target patient populations under actual clinical circumstances. PMID:3777908

  4. Bioavailability of Organic Solvents in Soils: Input into Biologically Based Dose-Response Models for Human Risk Assessments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R. C.

    2000-10-01

    Compared to dermal exposures with neat or aqueous compound, little is understood about the dermal bioavailability of solvents in soil, dust, sludge, or sediment matrices. Therefore, research in this project was designed to provide an understanding of the influence of various environmental factors on the kinetics and bioavailability of solvent-laden soils.

  5. Influence of sound-conditioning on noise-induced susceptibility of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Anne E; Stagner, Barden B; Martin, Glen K; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L

    2015-07-01

    Cochlear damage caused by loud sounds can be attenuated by "sound-conditioning" methods. The amount of adaptation for distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) measured in alert rabbits previously predicted an ear's susceptibility to a subsequent noise exposure. The present study investigated if sound-conditioning influenced the robustness of such DPOAE adaptation, and if such conditioning elicited more protection by increasing the amount of DPOAE adaptation. Toward this end, rabbits were divided into two study groups: (1) experimental animals exposed to a sound-conditioning protocol, and (2) unconditioned control animals. After base-line measures, all rabbits were exposed to an overstimulation paradigm consisting of an octave band noise, and then re-assessed 3 weeks post-exposure to determine permanent changes in DPOAEs. A major result was that prior sound-conditioning protected reductions in DPOAE levels by an average of 10-15 dB. However, DPOAE adaptation decreased with sound-conditioning, so that such conditioning was no longer related to noise-induced reductions in DPOAEs. Together, these findings suggest that sound-conditioning affected neural pathways other than those that likely mediate DPOAE adaptation (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent and/or middle-ear muscle reflexes). PMID:26233006

  6. Influence of the slip conditions on the stress corrosion cracking microprocesses in fcc materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.; Chateau, J.P.; Magnin, T.

    1997-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is to carefully analyze the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) microprocesses of f.c.c. single crystals, not only for the influence of the tensile axis orientation but also for the influence of the cracking direction (imposed or not). 316L (in MgCl{sub 2}) and copper (in nitrites) single crystals of well defined tensile axis will be strained using the slow strain rate technique. The authors focus on the influence of the relative orientations of the cracking direction and the slip planes on the crystallography of fracture. The effect of slip conditions on the corrosion-deformation interactions leading to fracture are then emphasized, which gives major information relevant to the micromodelling of SCC.

  7. Topological quantum scattering under the influence of a nontrivial boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Herondy

    2016-04-01

    We consider the quantum scattering problem of a relativistic particle in (2 + 1)-dimensional cosmic string spacetime under the influence of a nontrivial boundary condition imposed on the solution of the Klein-Gordon equation. The solution is then shifted as consequence of the nontrivial boundary condition and the role of the phase shift is to produce an Aharonov-Bohm-like effect. We examine the connection between this phase shift and the electromagnetic and gravitational analogous of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and compare the present results with previous ones obtained in the literature, also considering non-relativistic cases.

  8. Genotypic influence on aversive conditioning in honeybees, using a novel thermal reinforcement procedure.

    PubMed

    Junca, Pierre; Carcaud, Julie; Moulin, Sibyle; Garnery, Lionel; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In Pavlovian conditioning, animals learn to associate initially neutral stimuli with positive or negative outcomes, leading to appetitive and aversive learning respectively. The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is a prominent invertebrate model for studying both versions of olfactory learning and for unraveling the influence of genotype. As a queen bee mates with about 15 males, her worker offspring belong to as many, genetically-different patrilines. While the genetic dependency of appetitive learning is well established in bees, it is not the case for aversive learning, as a robust protocol was only developed recently. In the original conditioning of the sting extension response (SER), bees learn to associate an odor (conditioned stimulus - CS) with an electric shock (unconditioned stimulus - US). This US is however not a natural stimulus for bees, which may represent a potential caveat for dissecting the genetics underlying aversive learning. We thus first tested heat as a potential new US for SER conditioning. We show that thermal stimulation of several sensory structures on the bee's body triggers the SER, in a temperature-dependent manner. Moreover, heat applied to the antennae, mouthparts or legs is an efficient US for SER conditioning. Then, using microsatellite analysis, we analyzed heat sensitivity and aversive learning performances in ten worker patrilines issued from a naturally inseminated queen. We demonstrate a strong influence of genotype on aversive learning, possibly indicating the existence of a genetic determinism of this capacity. Such determinism could be instrumental for efficient task partitioning within the hive. PMID:24828422

  9. Genotypic Influence on Aversive Conditioning in Honeybees, Using a Novel Thermal Reinforcement Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Junca, Pierre; Carcaud, Julie; Moulin, Sibyle; Garnery, Lionel; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In Pavlovian conditioning, animals learn to associate initially neutral stimuli with positive or negative outcomes, leading to appetitive and aversive learning respectively. The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is a prominent invertebrate model for studying both versions of olfactory learning and for unraveling the influence of genotype. As a queen bee mates with about 15 males, her worker offspring belong to as many, genetically-different patrilines. While the genetic dependency of appetitive learning is well established in bees, it is not the case for aversive learning, as a robust protocol was only developed recently. In the original conditioning of the sting extension response (SER), bees learn to associate an odor (conditioned stimulus - CS) with an electric shock (unconditioned stimulus - US). This US is however not a natural stimulus for bees, which may represent a potential caveat for dissecting the genetics underlying aversive learning. We thus first tested heat as a potential new US for SER conditioning. We show that thermal stimulation of several sensory structures on the bee’s body triggers the SER, in a temperature-dependent manner. Moreover, heat applied to the antennae, mouthparts or legs is an efficient US for SER conditioning. Then, using microsatellite analysis, we analyzed heat sensitivity and aversive learning performances in ten worker patrilines issued from a naturally inseminated queen. We demonstrate a strong influence of genotype on aversive learning, possibly indicating the existence of a genetic determinism of this capacity. Such determinism could be instrumental for efficient task partitioning within the hive. PMID:24828422

  10. [Advance in the bioavailability monitoring of heavy metal based on microbial whole-cell sensor].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qi-Hui; Ma, An-Shou; Zhuang, Xiu-Liang; Zhuang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microbial whole-cell biosensor is an excellent tool to assess the bioavailability of heavy metal in soil and water. However, the traditional physicochemical instruments are applied to detect the total metal. Furthermore, microbial whole-cell biosensor is simple, rapid and economical in manipulating, and is thus a highly qualified candidate for emergency detection of pollution incidents. The biological component of microbial whole-cell biosensor mostly consists of metalloregulatory proteins and reporter genes. In detail, metalloregulatory proteins mainly include the MerR family, ArsR family and RS family, and reporter genes mainly include gfp, lux and luc. Metalloregulatory protein and reporter gene are related to the sensitivity, specificity and properties in monitoring. The bioavailability of heavy metals is alterable under different conditions, influenced by pH, chelate and detection methods and so on. Increasing the accumulation of intracellular heavy metal, modifying the metalloregulatory proteins and optimizing the detecting conditions are important for improving the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the microbial whole-cell biosensor. The future direction of microbial whole-cell biosensor is to realize the monitoring of pollutions in situ and on line. PMID:23487961

  11. Influence of temper condition on the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of boron-aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Herakovich, E. T.; Tenney, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of temper condition on the tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior for six boron-aluminum laminates was investigated. In addition to monotonic tension and compression tests, tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension--compression tests were conducted to study the effects of cyclic loading. Tensile strength results are a function of the laminate configuration; unidirectional laminates were affected considerably more than other laminates with some strength values increasing and others decreasing.

  12. Discharge conditions in Hall thrusters: secondary electrons emission yield and magnetic mirror influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miedzik, J.; Daniłko, D.

    2014-11-01

    One dimensional model of plasma bound by two nonconducting walls in external magnetic and electric field is developed. In particular it is designed to describe plasma in Hall thrusters. Combination of Particle-in-cell method with guiding centre approximation of electrons motion allows for kinetic description in short computational time. Comparison of plasma parameters done for two different secondary electrons emission profiles reveals insignificant influence of wall material on the condition in one dimensional model.

  13. Complex influence of space environment on materials and electronic devices in the conditions of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musabayev, T.; Zhantayev, Zh.; Grichshenko, V.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a new physical model describing the processes in materials and electronic devices under the influence of cosmic rays in microgravity. The model identifies specific features of formation of the area of radiation defects (ARD) in the electronic materials in microgravity. The mechanism of interaction between the ARD and memory modules in microgravity causing malfunction and failure of onboard electronics is considered. The results of failure of memory modules under real conditions are presented.

  14. [Enhancing of drug bioavailability using liquisolid system formulation].

    PubMed

    Gajdziok, Jan; Vraníková, Barbora

    2015-06-01

    One of the modern technologies of how to ensure sufficient bioavailability of drugs with limited water solubility is represented by the preparation of liquisolid systems. The functional principle of these formulations is the sorption of a drug in a liquid phase to a porous carrier (aluminometasilicates, microcrystalline cellulose, etc.). After addition of further excipients, in particular a coating material (colloidal silica), a powder is formed with the properties suitable for conversion to conventional solid unit dosage forms for oral administration (tablets, capsules). The drug is subsequently administered to the GIT already in a dissolved state, and moreover, the high surface area of the excipients and their surface hydrophilization by the solvent used, facilitates its contact with and release to the dissolution medium and GI fluids. This technology, due to its ease of preparation, represents an interesting alternative to the currently used methods of bioavailability improvement. The article follows up, by describing the specific aspects influencing the preparation of liquid systems, on the already published papers about the bioavailability of drugs and the possibilities of its technological improvement.Key words: liquisolid systems bioavailability porous carrier coating material preformulation studies. PMID:26400228

  15. Bioavailability and bioinequivalence of drug formulations in small animals.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D

    1992-06-01

    Differences in bioavailability of many drugs from their various dosage forms have been shown to be relatively common in human medicine. Although comparable bioavailability ('bioequivalence') is though to ensure comparable clinical effectiveness and safety ('therapeutic equivalence'), the relationship between bioinequivalence and therapeutic inequivalence is less clear. Thus the prevalence of clinically important differences in bioavailability is unknown. While similar concerns have arisen about drug products used in small animal practice, there have been few investigations and some earlier reports are incomplete. However, there are indications of bioinequivalence with enteral formulations of ampicillin, aspirin, chloramphenicol, digoxin, mitotane, oxytetracycline, penicillin V and theophylline. Other studies have suggested bioequivalence with enteral formulations of chloramphenicol, digoxin, phenytoin, oxytetracycline and thyroxine. Limited data for injectable preparations showed bioinequivalence with chloramphenicol and possibly oxytetracycline. There is no reason to expect formulation-related bioinequivalence to be less prevalent in veterinary than in human medicine. Indeed, it may be more common in veterinary practice because other potential influences on bioavailability (food, diseases, other drugs, etc.) are frequently ignored, and cheaper generic products are often favoured for economic reasons. PMID:1433477

  16. Selenium bioaccessibility and bioavailability in Se-enriched food supplements.

    PubMed

    Thiry, Celine; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Pussemier, Luc; De Temmerman, Ludwig; Ruttens, Ann

    2013-04-01

    Most European people have selenium (Se) intake inferior to recommended values that are considered necessary to ensure the beneficial action of antioxidant selenoproteins. People could therefore tend to have recourse to Se-enriched food supplements (FS) aiming to increase their Se body level. On the Belgian market, three main types of Se-rich FS are available: Se-enriched yeast, selenate-based FS, and selenite-based FS. In the present work, in vitro tests imitating gastrointestinal digestion and intestinal absorption were used to determine the bioaccessible and bioavailable fractions of Se present in one specimen of each category of FS. The aim of the study was to verify to which extent the difference in Se speciation could influence the efficiency of FS for enhancing the human Se status. Results indicated that differences exist in both bioaccessibility and bioavailability between the three types of FS, and that these differences could be related, at least partially, to the Se species profile. Overall bioavailability of the three FS was low (maximum 14 % of the original Se content). Among the three samples, the selenate-based FS produced the highest fraction of bioavailable Se, followed by Se-yeast, and finally by the selenite-based FS for which Se was almost not available at all. These results confirm the low availability of inorganic Se but were somewhat unexpected regarding the yeast-based FS since Se-rich yeasts are usually reported to contain an important fraction of available Se. PMID:23397356

  17. Influence of pH and media composition on suspension stability of silver, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles and immobilization of Daphnia magna under guideline testing conditions.

    PubMed

    Cupi, Denisa; Hartmann, Nanna B; Baun, Anders

    2016-05-01

    In aquatic toxicity testing of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) the process of agglomeration is very important as it may alter bioavailability and toxicity. In the present study, we aimed to identify test conditions that are favorable for maintaining stable ENP suspensions. We evaluated the influence of key environmental parameters: pH (2-12) and ionic strength using M7, Soft EPA (S EPA) medium, and Very Soft EPA (VS EPA) medium; and observed the influence of these parameters on zeta potential, zeta average, and acute immobilization of Daphnia magna for three different ENPs. Despite being sterically stabilized, test suspensions of silver (Ag) ENPs formed large agglomerates in both VS EPA and M7 media; and toxicity was found to be higher in VS EPA medium due to increased dissolution. Low-agglomerate suspensions for zinc oxide (ZnO) could be obtained at pH 7 in VS EPA medium, but the increase in dissolution caused higher toxicity than in M7 medium. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) ENPs had a point of zero charge in the range of pH 7-8. At pH 7 in VS EPA, agglomerates with smaller hydrodynamic diameters (~200nm) were present compared to the high ionic strength M7 medium where hydrodynamic diameters reached micrometer range. The stable suspensions of TiO2 ENPs caused immobilization of D. magna, 48-h EC50 value of 13.7mgL(-1) (95% CI, 2.4mg-79.1mgL(-1)); whereas no toxicity was seen in the unstable, highly agglomerated M7 medium suspensions, 48-h EC50 >100mgL(-1). The current study provides a preliminary approach for methodology in testing and assessing stability and toxicity of ENPs in aquatic toxicity tests of regulatory relevance. PMID:26829068

  18. Measurements of mercury methylation rates and bioavailability in the Allequash Creek Wetland, Northern Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creswell, J. E.; Babiarz, C. L.; Shafer, M. M.; Armstrong, D. E.

    2008-12-01

    amendments into homogenized sediments is that this spreads the amended mercury throughout the core section, avoiding injection channel effects. The influence of Hg(II) speciation on methylation is also being examined. Preliminary results show gross mercury methylation occurring at both sites sampled, although net methylation is negative throughout most of the depth profile, suggesting that the chemical conditions controlling the bioavailability of Hg(II) are highly variable. Because this is the first time such measurements have been made in this system, these data provide an important baseline for future studies of mercury bioavailability in northern wetlands.

  19. Bioavailability of zinc in marine systems through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Clint; Planavsky, Noah J.; Dupont, Chris L.; Kendall, Brian; Gill, Benjamin C.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Husband, Kathryn F.; Arnold, Gail L.; Wing, Boswell A.; Poulton, Simon W.; Bekker, Andrey; Anbar, Ariel D.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-02-01

    The redox state of the oceans strongly influences the concentration of dissolved trace metals in sea water. Changes in the redox state of the oceans are thought to have limited the availability of some trace metals in the past, particularly during the Proterozoic eon, 2,500 to 542 million years ago. Of these trace metals, zinc (Zn) is of particular importance to eukaryotic organisms, because it is essential for a wide range of basic cellular functions. It has been suggested that during the Proterozoic, marine environments were broadly euxinic--that is, anoxic and sulphidic--which would have resulted in low Zn availability. Low Zn bioavailability could therefore be responsible for an observed delay in eukaryote diversification. Here we present a compilation of Zn abundance data from black shales deposited under euxinic conditions from the Precambrian time to the present. We show that these values track first-order trends in seawater Zn availability. Contrary to previous estimates, we find that Zn concentrations during the Proterozoic were similar to modern concentrations, supporting recent studies that call for limited euxinia at this time. Instead, we propose that predominantly anoxic and iron-rich deep oceans, combined with large hydrothermal fluxes of Zn, maintained high levels of dissolved Zn throughout the oceans. We thus suggest that the protracted diversification of eukaryotic Zn-binding proteins was not a result of Znbiolimitation.

  20. Bioavailability-Based In Situ Remediation To Meet Future Lead (Pb) Standards in Urban Soils and Gardens

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Heather; Naujokas, Marisa F.; Attanayake, Chammi; Basta, Nicholas T.; Cheng, Zhongqi; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Maddaloni, Mark; Schadt, Christopher; Scheckel, Kirk G.

    2015-07-03

    Recently the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lowered the blood Pb reference value to 5 μg/dL. The lower reference value combined with increased repurposing of postindustrial lands are heightening concerns and driving interest in reducing soil Pb exposures. As a result, regulatory decision makers may lower residential soil screening levels (SSLs), used in setting Pb cleanup levels, to levels that may be difficult to achieve, especially in urban areas. This study discusses challenges in remediation and bioavailability assessments of Pb in urban soils in the context of lower SSLs and identifies research needs to better address those challenges. Although in situ remediation with phosphate amendments is a viable option, the scope of the problem and conditions in urban settings may necessitate that SSLs be based on bioavailable rather than total Pb concentrations. However, variability in soil composition can influence bioavailability testing and soil amendment effectiveness. Finally, more data are urgently needed to better understand this variability and increase confidence in using these approaches in risk-based decision making, particularly in urban areas.

  1. Bioavailability-Based In Situ Remediation To Meet Future Lead (Pb) Standards in Urban Soils and Gardens

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Henry, Heather; Naujokas, Marisa F.; Attanayake, Chammi; Basta, Nicholas T.; Cheng, Zhongqi; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Maddaloni, Mark; Schadt, Christopher; Scheckel, Kirk G.

    2015-07-03

    Recently the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lowered the blood Pb reference value to 5 μg/dL. The lower reference value combined with increased repurposing of postindustrial lands are heightening concerns and driving interest in reducing soil Pb exposures. As a result, regulatory decision makers may lower residential soil screening levels (SSLs), used in setting Pb cleanup levels, to levels that may be difficult to achieve, especially in urban areas. This study discusses challenges in remediation and bioavailability assessments of Pb in urban soils in the context of lower SSLs and identifies research needs to better address those challenges. Althoughmore » in situ remediation with phosphate amendments is a viable option, the scope of the problem and conditions in urban settings may necessitate that SSLs be based on bioavailable rather than total Pb concentrations. However, variability in soil composition can influence bioavailability testing and soil amendment effectiveness. Finally, more data are urgently needed to better understand this variability and increase confidence in using these approaches in risk-based decision making, particularly in urban areas.« less

  2. Bioavailability-Based In Situ Remediation To Meet Future Lead (Pb) Standards in Urban Soils and Gardens.

    PubMed

    Henry, Heather; Naujokas, Marisa F; Attanayake, Chammi; Basta, Nicholas T; Cheng, Zhongqi; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Maddaloni, Mark; Schadt, Christopher; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2015-08-01

    Recently the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lowered the blood Pb reference value to 5 μg/dL. The lower reference value combined with increased repurposing of postindustrial lands are heightening concerns and driving interest in reducing soil Pb exposures. As a result, regulatory decision makers may lower residential soil screening levels (SSLs), used in setting Pb cleanup levels, to levels that may be difficult to achieve, especially in urban areas. This paper discusses challenges in remediation and bioavailability assessments of Pb in urban soils in the context of lower SSLs and identifies research needs to better address those challenges. Although in situ remediation with phosphate amendments is a viable option, the scope of the problem and conditions in urban settings may necessitate that SSLs be based on bioavailable rather than total Pb concentrations. However, variability in soil composition can influence bioavailability testing and soil amendment effectiveness. More data are urgently needed to better understand this variability and increase confidence in using these approaches in risk-based decision making, particularly in urban areas. PMID:26140328

  3. Influence of industrial processing on orange juice flavanone solubility and transformation to chalcones under gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Gil, María Isabel; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco Abraham; Ferreres, Federico

    2003-05-01

    Orange juice manufactured at industrial scale was subjected to digestion under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions (pH, temperature, and enzyme and chemical conditions) to evaluate the influence of individual industrial processing treatments on flavanone solubility, stability, and ability to permeate through a membrane under simulated physiological conditions. Four industrial processes including squeezing, standard pasteurization, concentration, and freezing were evaluated. Hand squeezing was compared with industrial squeezing. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of the orange juices, the flavanones able to permeate through a dialysis membrane, and those remaining in the retentate were evaluated by HPLC as were those present in the insoluble fraction. In all of the assayed orange juices, a high content of precipitated chalcones ( approximately 70% of the total flavanones) was formed under the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Hand squeezing provided a higher concentration of flavanones in the permeated fraction and lower transformation to chalcones than industrial squeezing. Standard pasteurization did not influence the solubility and permeability of the orange juice flavanones and chalcones. Industrial concentration did not affect the amount of flavanones able to permeate but decreased the chalcones produced. Juices produced from frozen orange juice contained considerably smaller amounts of both soluble flavanones and insoluble chalcones. PMID:12720386

  4. The influence of gonadal hormones on conditioned fear extinction in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Milad, M R; Zeidan, M A; Contero, A; Pitman, R K; Klibanski, A; Rauch, S L; Goldstein, J M

    2010-07-14

    Recent rodent studies suggest that gonadal hormones influence extinction of conditioned fear. Here we investigated sex differences in, and the influence of estradiol and progesterone on, fear extinction in healthy humans. Men and women underwent a two-day paradigm in which fear conditioning and extinction learning took place on day 1 and extinction recall was tested on day 2. Visual cues were used as the conditioned stimuli and a mild electric shock was used as the unconditioned stimulus. Skin conductance was recorded throughout the experiment and used to measure conditioned responses (CRs). Blood samples were obtained from all women to measure estradiol and progesterone levels. We found that higher estradiol during extinction learning enhanced subsequent extinction recall but had no effects on fear acquisition or extinction learning itself. Sex differences were only observed during acquisition, with men exhibiting significantly higher CRs. After dividing women into low- and high-estradiol groups, men showed comparable extinction recall to high-estradiol women, and both of these groups showed higher extinction recall than low-estradiol women. Therefore, sex differences in extinction memory emerged only after taking into account women's estradiol levels. Lower estradiol may impair extinction consolidation in women. These findings could have practical applications in the treatment of anxiety disorders through cognitive and behavioral therapies. PMID:20412837

  5. The influence of gonadal hormones on conditioned fear extinction in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Milad, Mohammed R; Zeidan, Mohamed A.; Contero, Angelica; Pitman, Roger K.; Klibanski, Anne; Rauch, Scott L.; Goldstein, Jill M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent rodent studies suggest that gonadal hormones influence extinction of conditioned fear. Here we investigated sex differences in, and the influence of estradiol and progesterone on, fear extinction in healthy humans. Men and women underwent a two-day paradigm in which fear conditioning and extinction learning took place on day 1 and extinction recall was tested on day 2. Visual cues were used as the conditioned stimuli and a mild electric shock was used as the unconditioned stimulus. Skin conductance was recorded throughout the experiment and used to measure conditioned responses (CRs). Blood samples were obtained from all women to measure estradiol and progesterone levels. We found that higher estradiol during extinction learning enhanced subsequent extinction recall but had no effects on fear acquisition or extinction learning itself. Sex differences were only observed during acquisition, with men exhibiting significantly higher CRs. After dividing women into low- and high-estradiol groups, men showed comparable extinction recall to high-estradiol women, and both of these groups showed higher extinction recall than low-estradiol women. Therefore, sex differences in extinction memory emerged only after taking into account women's estradiol levels. Lower estradiol may impair extinction consolidation in women. These findings could have practical applications in the treatment of anxiety disorders through cognitive and behavioral therapies. PMID:20412837

  6. Influence of extreme ambient temperatures and anaerobic conditions on Peltigera aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability.

    PubMed

    Dyakov, M Yu; Insarova, I D; Kharabadze, D E; Ptushenko, V V; Shtaer, O V

    2015-11-01

    Lichen are symbiotic systems constituted by heterotrophic fungi (mycobionts) and photosynthetic microorganism (photobionts). These organisms can survive under extreme stress conditions. The aim of this work was to study the influence of low (-70 °C) or high (+70 °C) temperatures, temperature fluctuations from +70 °C to -70 °C, and anaerobic conditions on P. aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability. None of the studied stress factors affected significantly photosynthetic and respiratory activity of the thalli. No changes in morphology or ultrastructure of the cells were revealed for both photobiont and mycobiont components after extreme temperature treatment of P. aphthosa thalli. The data show the extreme tolerance of P. aphthosa to some stress factors inherent to the space flight conditions. PMID:26553640

  7. Influence of extreme ambient temperatures and anaerobic conditions on Peltigera aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakov, M. Yu.; Insarova, I. D.; Kharabadze, D. E.; Ptushenko, V. V.; Shtaer, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    Lichen are symbiotic systems constituted by heterotrophic fungi (mycobionts) and photosynthetic microorganism (photobionts). These organisms can survive under extreme stress conditions. The aim of this work was to study the influence of low (- 70 °C) or high (+ 70 °C) temperatures, temperature fluctuations from + 70 °C to - 70 °C, and anaerobic conditions on P. aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability. None of the studied stress factors affected significantly photosynthetic and respiratory activity of the thalli. No changes in morphology or ultrastructure of the cells were revealed for both photobiont and mycobiont components after extreme temperature treatment of P. aphthosa thalli. The data show the extreme tolerance of P. aphthosa to some stress factors inherent to the space flight conditions.

  8. Influences of solution chemical conditions on mobilization of TNT from contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Dante, D.A.; Tiller, C.L.; Pennell, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its byproducts are common contaminants on US military installations. Many potential remediation processes are in part limited by the transfer of TNT from the contaminated soil into the aqueous phase. The purpose of this research is to assess the release of TNT from contaminated soil under varying solution chemical conditions. In particular, influences of pH, aquatic natural organic matter, and addition of two surfactants is investigated. Uncontaminated soil was collected from a near-surface site at the Alabama Army Ammunition Plant and was artificially contaminated with TNT prior to the mobilization experiments. Results for the pH experiments show that more TNT is mobilized at neutral pH conditions than at low pH conditions. The presence of dissolved organic matter enhances the release of TNT from soil, but not by a large amount. Surfactant addition has the most significant effect on TNT mobilization.

  9. Influence of operating conditions on the optimum design of electric vehicle battery cooling plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, Anthony; Kim, Il Yong

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of cooling plates for electric vehicle batteries can be improved by optimizing the geometry of internal fluid channels. In practical operation, a cooling plate is exposed to a range of operating conditions dictated by the battery, environment, and driving behaviour. To formulate an efficient cooling plate design process, the optimum design sensitivity with respect to each boundary condition is desired. This determines which operating conditions must be represented in the design process, and therefore the complexity of designing for multiple operating conditions. The objective of this study is to determine the influence of different operating conditions on the optimum cooling plate design. Three important performance measures were considered: temperature uniformity, mean temperature, and pressure drop. It was found that of these three, temperature uniformity was most sensitive to the operating conditions, especially with respect to the distribution of the input heat flux, and also to the coolant flow rate. An additional focus of the study was the distribution of heat generated by the battery cell: while it is easier to assume that heat is generated uniformly, by using an accurate distribution for design optimization, this study found that cooling plate performance could be significantly improved.

  10. Bioavailability and Pharmacodynamics of Promethazine in Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Flynn, Chris; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is often treated in space with promethazine (PMZ). Anecdotal reports indicate that the common side effects of drowsiness and decrements in cognitive performance that are associated with PMZ administration (50 mg IM on the ground, are absent or less pronounced in space suggesting I that-the bioavailability and/or pharmacodynamic behavior of PMZ may be altered during space flight. There are limited flight opportunities available for clinical research in space, the NRA-99, therefore, solicits research required to improve, or answer specific questions about in-flight diagnosis, therapy, and post-flight rehabilitation. We propose here, to establish a noninvasive method for pharmacodynamic and therapeutic assessment of PMZ. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to, 1. Establish a saliva to plasma ratio of PMZ after administration, 2. Estimate the relative bioavailability of the three flight-specific dosage forms of PMZ, and 3. Establish the dose-response relationship of PMZ. We will estimate the bioavailability of intramuscular injection (IM), oral tablets and rectal suppositories in normal subjects during ambulatory and antiorthostatic; bed rest (ABR) conditions using novel stable isotope techniques. Drowsiness, cognitive performance and salivary flow rate will be measured as a function of circulating drug concentrations after administration of three IM doses of PMZ. We will compare and contrast the bioavailability of PMZ during normal and ABR conditions to examine whether or not ABR can simulate changes in drug, absorption and availability similar to those anticipated in a microgravity environment. Results of this study will validate methods for an approved study with this medication awaiting a flight opportunity for manifestation. These data will also provide the much needed information on the dynamics and therapeutic index. of this medication and their implications on crew fatigue and performance in space. Key words

  11. Influence of incubation conditions on hydrolysis efficiency and iodine enrichment in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Dolińska, Barbara; Zieliński, Michał; Dobrzański, Zbigniew; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Opaliński, Sebastian; Ryszka, Florian

    2012-06-01

    The influence of incubation conditions, enzyme type, hydrolysis time, and potassium iodide concentration on hydrolysis and iodine enrichment were studied in supernatant and pellets of Saccharomyces cervisiae hydrolysates. The type of enzyme used and incubation time significantly influence hydrolysis efficiency and protein concentration in supernatant and pellet. The highest protein hydrolysis efficiency was obtained by 24-h incubation with papain. Significantly lower values were observed for pepsin and autolysis. The potassium iodide concentration influences the iodine content of supernatant and pellet, but not hydrolysis. Iodide enrichment of supernatant and pellet depends on the concentration of iodide using during incubation. High concentration of iodide and long incubation times were the conditions for optimal iodide enrichment and high-protein hydrolysates. The optimal hydrolysis efficiency and iodine enrichment were obtained during 24-h incubation with papain in a 4.5-mM potassium iodide medium. The efficiency reached 98.22% with iodine concentrations of 2,664.91 and 9,200.67 μg/g iodine in pellet and supernatant, respectively. PMID:22237422

  12. Individual condition and stream temperature influence early maturation of rainbow and steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMillan, J.R.; Dunham, J.B.; Reeves, G.H.; Mills, J.S.; Jordan, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative male phenotypes in salmonine fishes arise from individuals that mature as larger and older anadromous marine-migrants or as smaller and younger freshwater residents. To better understand the processes influencing the expression of these phenotypes we examined the influences of growth in length (fork length) and whole body lipid content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were sampled from the John Day River basin in northeast Oregon where both anadromous ("steelhead") and freshwater resident rainbow trout coexist. Larger males with higher lipid levels had a greater probability of maturing as a resident at age-1+. Among males, 38% were maturing overall, and the odds ratios of the logistic model indicated that the probability of a male maturing early as a resident at age-1+ increased 49% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 23-81%) for every 5 mm increase in length and 33% (95% CI = 10-61%) for every 0. 5% increase in whole body lipid content. There was an inverse association between individual condition and water temperature as growth was greater in warmer streams while whole body lipid content was higher in cooler streams. Our results support predictions from life history theory and further suggest that relationships between individual condition, maturation, and environmental variables (e. g., water temperature) are shaped by complex developmental and evolutionary influences. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  13. Individual condition and stream temperature influence early maturation of rainbow and steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMillan, John R.; Dunham, J.B.; Reeves, G.H.; Mills, J.S.; Jordan, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative male phenotypes in salmonine fishes arise from individuals that mature as larger and older anadromous marine-migrants or as smaller and younger freshwater residents. To better understand the processes influencing the expression of these phenotypes we examined the influences of growth in length (fork length) and whole body lipid content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were sampled from the John Day River basin in northeast Oregon where both anadromous ("steelhead") and freshwater resident rainbow trout coexist. Larger males with higher lipid levels had a greater probability of maturing as a resident at age-1+. Among males, 38% were maturing overall, and the odds ratios of the logistic model indicated that the probability of a male maturing early as a resident at age-1+ increased 49% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 23-81%) for every 5 mm increase in length and 33% (95% CI = 10-61%) for every 0.5% increase in whole body lipid content. There was an inverse association between individual condition and water temperature as growth was greater in warmer streams while whole body lipid content was higher in cooler streams. Our results support predictions from life history theory and further suggest that relationships between individual condition, maturation, and environmental variables (e.g., water temperature) are shaped by complex developmental and evolutionary influences.

  14. Bioavailability and stability of mercury sulfide in Armuchee (USA) soil

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Su, Yi; Monts, David L.; Waggoner, Charles A.; Matta, Frank B.

    2007-07-01

    Because of the adverse effects of elemental mercury and mercury compounds upon human health, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in an on-going effort to monitor and remediate mercury-contaminated DOE sites. In order to more cost effectively implement those extensive remediation efforts, it is necessary to obtain an improved understanding of the role that mercury and mercury compounds play in the ecosystem. We have conducted pilot scale experiments to study the bioavailability of mercury sulfide in an Armuchee (eastern US ) soil. The effects of plants and incubation time on chemical stability and bioavailability of HgS under simulated conditions of the ecosystem have been examined, as has the dynamics of the dissolution of mercury sulfide by various extractants. The results show that mercury sulfide in contaminated Armuchee soil was still to some extent bioavailable to plants. After planting, soil mercury sulfide is more easily dissolved by both 4 M and 12 M nitric acid than pure mercury sulfide reagent. Dissolution kinetics of soil mercury sulfide and pure chemical reagent by nitric acid are different. Mercury release by EDTA from HgS-contaminated soil increased with time of reaction and soil mercury level. Chelating chemicals increase the solubility and bioavailability of mercury in HgS-contaminated soil. (authors)

  15. On the Offshore Advection of Boundary-Layer Structures and the Influence on Offshore Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörenkämper, Martin; Optis, Michael; Monahan, Adam; Steinfeld, Gerald

    2015-06-01

    The coastal discontinuity imposes strong signals to the atmospheric conditions over the sea that are important for wind-energy potential. Here, we provide a comprehensive investigation of the influence of the land-sea transition on wind conditions in the Baltic Sea using data from an offshore meteorological tower, data from a wind farm, and mesoscale model simulations. Results show a strong induced stable stratification when warm inland air flows over a colder sea. This stratification demonstrates a strong diurnal pattern and is most pronounced in spring when the land-sea temperature difference is greatest. The strength of the induced stratification is proportional to this parameter and inversely proportional to fetch. Extended periods of stable stratification lead to increased influence of inertial oscillations and increased frequency of low-level jets. Furthermore, heterogeneity in land-surface roughness along the coastline is found to produce pronounced horizontal streaks of reduced wind speeds that under stable stratification are advected several tens of kilometres over the sea. The intensity and length of the streaks dampen as atmospheric stability decreases. Increasing sea surface roughness leads to a deformation of these streaks with increasing fetch. Slight changes in wind direction shift the path of these advective streaks, which when passing through an offshore wind farm are found to produce large fluctuations in wind power. Implications of these coastline effects on the accurate modelling and forecasting of offshore wind conditions, as well as damage risk to the turbine, are discussed.

  16. The influence of the sun, moon, climate and economic conditions on crisis incidence.

    PubMed

    Snoyman, P; Holdstock, T L

    1980-10-01

    Investigated the relationship between 2,344 cases of crisis incidence over a 1-year period (1976) and geophysical, climatic and seasonal conditions. Results revealed an intricate interactive effect between the variables of sex, nature of crisis, period of analysis, and environmental conditions. Males crisis became more likely, with downward economic trends or decreased solar activity. In contrast to female incidence of crisis, which peaked in spring, that of males peaked in autumn. Increased solar activity was related strongly to the incidence of crisis experienced by people who were retarded, abused drugs and were guilty of assault and/or rape. The waxing of the moon was related closely to cases of assault and/or rape, while retardates were influenced further by the moisture content in the air. Temporal considerations revealed a positive relationship between full moon and crisis incidence on alternate months only. Generally, the increased cloud cover, rainfall and temperature in summer, gave rise to more crisis consultations. Finally, geophysical, climatic and economic conditions also were seen to act in conjunction with each other to influence crisis incidence. PMID:7440740

  17. Investigation of the solar influence on clean and dusty CO2-ice under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, E.; Hagermann, A.; Wolters, S.

    2015-10-01

    CO2 is the main component of the Martian atmosphere. Therefore the polar caps are - depending on hemisphere and season - partially or totally covered with CO2-ice. In contrast to rock and soil surface layers, which absorb and reflect incoming solar radiation immediately at the surface, ices are partially transparent in the visible spectral range, while they are opaque in the infrared. These properties are responsible for the so-called "Solid- State Greenhouse Effect" (SSGE). The SSGE may have a major influence on the sublimation and recondensation of CO2 and its circulation in the Martian atmosphere. Our work will concentrate on the influence of the SSGE on CO2-ice under Martian like conditions.

  18. Interaction of hydrogen chloride with alumina. [influence of outgas and temperature conditions on adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of outgas conditions and temperature on the adsorptive properties of two aluminas Alon-c and Al6sG were studied using adsorption isotherm measurements. Alon-C and Al6SG were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET nitrogen surface areas. Some of these techniques were applied to two other aluminas but no isotherm data was obtained. Isotherm data and techniques applied to each alumina are summarized in tabular form.

  19. Influence of convective conditions in radiative peristaltic flow of pseudoplastic nanofluid in a tapered asymmetric channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Iqbal, Rija; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper looks at the influences of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and thermal radiation on peristaltic transport of a pseudoplastic nanofluid in a tapered asymmetric channel. The tapered channel walls satisfy convective boundary conditions. The governing equations for the balance of mass, momentum, temperature and volume fraction for pseudoplastic nanofluid are first formulated and then utilized for long wavelength and small Reynolds number considerations. Effects of involved parameters on the flow characteristics have been plotted and examined. It is observed that the heat transfer Biot number shows a dual behavior on the temperature of nanofluid particles whereas the mass transfer Biot number with its increasing values enhances the fluid temperature.

  20. Bioavailability of xenobiotics in the soil environment.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Arata; Bhula, Raj; Burns, G Richard; Carazo, Elizabeth; Felsot, Allan; Hamilton, Denis; Harris, Caroline; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Kleter, Gijs; Koedel, Werner; Linders, Jan; Peijnenburg, J G M Willie; Sabljic, Aleksandar; Stephenson, R Gerald; Racke, D Kenneth; Rubin, Baruch; Tanaka, Keiji; Unsworth, John; Wauchope, R Donald

    2010-01-01

    It is often presumed that all chemicals in soil are available to microorganisms, plant roots, and soil fauna via dermal exposure. Subsequent bioaccumulation through the food chain may then result in exposure to higher organisms. Using the presumption of total availability, national governments reduce environmental threshold levels of regulated chemicals by increasing guideline safety margins. However, evidence shows that chemical residues in the soil environment are not always bioavailable. Hence, actual chemical exposure levels of biota are much less than concentrations present in soil would suggest. Because "bioavailability" conveys meaning that combines implications of chemical sol persistency, efficacy, and toxicity, insights on the magnitude of a chemicals soil bioavailability is valuable. however, soil bioavailability of chemicals is a complex topic, and is affected by chemical properties, soil properties, species exposed, climate, and interaction processes. In this review, the state-of-art scientific basis for bioavailability is addressed. Key points covered include: definition, factors affecting bioavailability, equations governing key transport and distributive kinetics, and primary methods for estimating bioavailability. Primary transport mechanisms in living organisms, critical to an understanding of bioavailability, also presage the review. Transport of lipophilic chemicals occurs mainly by passive diffusion for all microorganisms, plants, and soil fauna. Therefore, the distribution of a chemical between organisms and soil (bioavailable proportion) follows partition equilibrium theory. However, a chemical's bioavailability does not always follow partition equilibrium theory because of other interactions with soil, such as soil sorption, hysteretic desorption, effects of surfactants in pore water, formation of "bound residue", etc. Bioassays for estimating chemical bioavailability have been introduced with several targeted endpoints: microbial

  1. Comprehensive Assessment of Influence of Enhanced Component in Vapor Compression Air Conditioning System on Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinomiya, Naruaki; Nishimura, Nobuya; Iyota, Hiroyuki

    System performance prediction model for air-cooled air conditioner has been developed, and influences of Grooved tubes on performance of air conditioners with R410A were quantitatively investigated. Calculated results with simulation model correspond approximately to measured results by the authors and other researchers. After that, performances of air conditioners with grooved tubes were predicted. Results show that condensation heat transfer coefficients decrease with the rise of air conditioning load rate, and boiling heat transfer coefficients increase with the rise of air conditioning load rate. On the other hand, pressure drops increase 1.2-1.4 times in evaporator. Then, COPs of air conditioners with the grooved tube are 1.16 times higher than COP of air-conditioners with the smooth tube.

  2. Influence of Heat Treatment Conditions on the Properties of Vanadium Oxide Thin Films for Thermochromic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donguk; Kwon, Samyoung; Park, Young; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Nam, Sang-Hun; Joo, Yang Tae; Kim, Minha; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2016-05-01

    In present work, the effects of the heat treatment on the structural, optical, and thermochromic properties of vanadium oxide films were investigated. Vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films were deposited on glass substrate by reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering from a vanadium metal target in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen gas. Various heat treatment conditions were applied in order to evaluate their influence on the crystal phases formed, surface morphology, and optical properties. The films were characterized by an X-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to investigate the crystal structure and identify the phase change as post-annealing temperature of 500-600 degrees C for 5 minutes. Surface conditions of the obtained VO2(M) films were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the semiconductor-metal transition (SMT) characteristics of the VO2 films were evaluate by optical spectrophotometry in the UV-VIS-NIR, controlling temperature of the films. PMID:27483853

  3. Environmental Conditions Influence Allometric Patterns in the Blow Fly, Chrysomya albiceps

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, M Battán; Peretti, Av

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study variations in allometry of body characters in females and males of two populations of blow flies, Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), under different environmental conditions to establish patterns of morphological variation. Body size of both males and females in the experimental population was significantly higher than in the individuals of the natural population, indicating an important influence of food on body size. All genitalic and non-genitalic characters in males and females of the two populations showed a trend towards negative allometry rather than isometry. Allometric patterns were modified in both sexes and between populations. The data show generally larger allometric slopes in females than in males. We confirmed that the environmental conditions have an important effect on allometric patterns and body size. PMID:22224467

  4. Influence of setting condition on characteristics of Savonius hydraulic turbine with a shield plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iio, Shouichiro; Katayama, Yusuke; Uchiyama, Fuminori; Sato, Eiichi; Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to improve power performance of Savonius hydraulic turbine utilizing small stream for electric generation. An attempt was made to increase the power coefficient of runner by the use of flat shield plate placed upstream of the runner. The difference of the power coefficient is discussed in relation to clearance between the runner and the bottom wall and the rotation direction of the runner. The flow field around the runner was also examined visually to clarify influences of setting conditions on the power performance. From this study it was found that the power coefficient is achieved for 0.47 by only using a flat shield plate, the increase is up to 80% over the runner without the plate. Moreover, it is the proper condition that clearance ratio is 0.73 in this study.

  5. Review of parameters influencing the structural response of a submerged body under cavitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escaler, X.; De La Torre, O.; Farhat, M.

    2015-12-01

    Submerged structures that operate under extreme flows are prone to suffer large scale cavitation attached to their surfaces. Under such conditions the added mass effects differ from the expected ones in pure liquids. Moreover, the existence of small gaps between the structure and surrounding bodies filled with fluid also influence the dynamic response. A series of experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out with a truncated NACA0009 hydrofoil mounted as a cantilever beam at the LMH-EPFL cavitation tunnel. The three first modes of vibration have been determined and analysed under various hydrodynamic conditions ranging from air and still water to partial cavitation and supercavitation. A remote nonintrusive excitation system with piezoelectric patches has been used for the experiments. The effects of the cavity properties and the lateral gap size on the natural frequencies and mode shapes have been determined. As a result, the significance of several parameters in the design of such structures is discussed.

  6. The Influence of Atmospheric Conditions on the Production of Ozone during VOC Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. Reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight produce ozone. Ozone production is a non-linear function of the concentrations of both NOx and VOC, with VOC acting as the "fuel" for ozone production and NOx as the "catalyst". Different VOC, due to their differing structure and carbon content, have different maximum potential to produce ozone. Due to different degrees of reactivity, VOC also differ in the time taken to reach this maximum ozone production potential under ideal conditions. Ozone production is also influenced by meteorological factors such as radiation, temperature, advection and mixing, which may alter the rate of ozone production, and the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential. Identifying the chemical and meteorological processes responsible for controlling the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential could inform decisions on emission control to efficiently tackle high levels of tropospheric ozone. In this study we use a boxmodel to determine the chemical processes affecting ozone production under different meteorological and chemical conditions. The chemistry scheme used by the boxmodel is "tagged" for each initial VOC enabling attribution of ozone production to its VOC source. We systematically vary a number of meteorological parameters along with the source of NOx within the box model to simulate a range of atmospheric conditions. These simulations are compared with a control simulation done under conditions of maximum ozone formation to determine which parameters affect the rate at which VOC produce ozone and the extent to which they reach their maximum potential to produce ozone. We perform multi-day simulations in order to examine whether these processes can influence ozone production over

  7. Phase behavior and oral bioavailability of amorphous Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Yogesh B; Shete, Ganesh; Popat, Dharmesh; Bansal, Arvind K

    2012-08-30

    Amorphous form has been used as a means to improve aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. The objective of present study was to characterize thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of amorphous form of Curcumin (CRM-A). CRM-A was found to be a good glass former with glass transition temperature (T(g)) of 342.64K and critical cooling rate below 1K/min. CRM-A had a moderate tendency of crystallization and exhibited Kauzmann temperature (T(KS)) of 294.23 K. CRM-A was found to be fragile in nature as determined by T(m)/T(g) (1.32), C(p)(1 iq):C(p)(glass) (1.22), strength parameter (D<10), fragility index (m>75), T(K)/T(g) (0.85), and T(g)-T(K) (48.41). Theoretically predicted aqueous solubility advantage of 43.15-folds, was reduced to 17-folds under practical conditions. This reduction in solubility was attributed to water induced devitrification, as evident through PXRD and SEM analysis. Further, oral bioavailability study of CRM-A was undertaken to investigate bioavailability benefits, if any. C(max) was improved by 1.97-folds (statistically significant difference over control). However, oral bioavailability (AUC(0-)(∞)) was improved by 1.45-folds (statistically non significant difference over control). These observations pointed towards role of rapid devitrification of CRM-A in GIT milieu, thus limiting its oral bioavailability advantage. PMID:22609283

  8. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein ...

  9. Overview on gastroretentive drug delivery systems for improving drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Bettencourt, Catarina; Rossi, Alessandra; Buttini, Francesca; Barata, Pedro

    2016-08-20

    In recent decades, many efforts have been made in order to improve drug bioavailability after oral administration. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are a good example; they emerged to enhance the bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs with a narrow absorption window in the upper gastrointestinal tract and/or to promote local activity in the stomach and duodenum. Several strategies are used to increase the gastric residence time, namely bioadhesive or mucoadhesive systems, expandable systems, high-density systems, floating systems, superporous hydrogels and magnetic systems. The present review highlights some of the drugs that can benefit from gastroretentive strategies, such as the factors that influence gastric retention time and the mechanism of action of gastroretentive systems, as well as their classification into single and multiple unit systems. PMID:27173823

  10. Bioavailability of Glucosinolates and Their Breakdown Products: Impact of Processing.

    PubMed

    Barba, Francisco J; Nikmaram, Nooshin; Roohinejad, Shahin; Khelfa, Anissa; Zhu, Zhenzhou; Koubaa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects, and are mainly found in cruciferous plants. After ingestion, glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. However, the largest fraction is metabolized in the gut lumen. When cruciferous are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme present in these plants hydrolyzes the glucosinolates in the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. When cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates transit to the colon where they are hydrolyzed by the intestinal microbiota. Numerous factors, such as storage time, temperature, and atmosphere packaging, along with inactivation processes of myrosinase are influencing the bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products. This review paper summarizes the assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability. PMID:27579302

  11. Bioavailability of Glucosinolates and Their Breakdown Products: Impact of Processing

    PubMed Central

    Barba, Francisco J.; Nikmaram, Nooshin; Roohinejad, Shahin; Khelfa, Anissa; Zhu, Zhenzhou; Koubaa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects, and are mainly found in cruciferous plants. After ingestion, glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. However, the largest fraction is metabolized in the gut lumen. When cruciferous are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme present in these plants hydrolyzes the glucosinolates in the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. When cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates transit to the colon where they are hydrolyzed by the intestinal microbiota. Numerous factors, such as storage time, temperature, and atmosphere packaging, along with inactivation processes of myrosinase are influencing the bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products. This review paper summarizes the assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability. PMID:27579302

  12. The Influence of Different Operating Conditions on the Blood Damage of a Pulsatile Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zihao; Yang, Ming; Wang, Xianghui; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Because of pulsatile blood flow's benefit for myocardial recovery, perfusion of coronary arteries and end organs, pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VADs) are still widely used as paracorporeal mechanical circulatory support devices in clinical applications, especially in pediatric heart failure patients. However, severe blood damage limits the VAD's service period. Besides optimizing the VAD geometry to reduce blood damage, the blood damage may also be decreased by changing the operating conditions. In this article, a pulsatile VAD was used to investigate the influence of operating conditions on its blood damage, including hemolysis, platelet activation, and platelet deposition. Three motion profiles of pusher plate (sine, cosine, and polynomial), three stroke volumes (ejection fractions) (56 ml [70%], 42 ml [52.5%], and 28 ml [35%]), three pulsatile rates (75, 100, and 150 bpm), and two assist modes (copulsation and counterpulsation) were implemented respectively in VAD fluid-structure interaction simulations to calculate blood damage. The blood damage indices indicate that cosine motion profile, higher ejection fraction, higher pulsatile rate, and counterpulsation can decrease platelet deposition whereas increase hemolysis and platelet activation, and vice versa. The results suggest that different operating conditions have different effects on pulsatile VAD's blood damage and may be beneficial to choose suitable operating condition to reduce blood damage in clinical applications. PMID:26164600

  13. High-power UV-LED degradation: Continuous and cycled working condition influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arques-Orobon, F. J.; Nuñez, N.; Vazquez, M.; Segura-Antunez, C.; González-Posadas, V.

    2015-09-01

    High-power (HP) UV-LEDs can replace UV lamps for real-time fluoro-sensing applications by allowing portable and autonomous systems. However, HP UV-LEDs are not a mature technology, and there are still open issues regarding their performance evolution over time. This paper presents a reliability study of 3 W UV-LEDs, with special focus on LED degradation for two working conditions: continuous and cycled (30 s ON and 30 s OFF). Accelerated life tests are developed to evaluate the influence of temperature and electrical working conditions in high-power LEDs degradation, being the predominant failure mechanism the degradation of the package. An analysis that includes dynamic thermal and optical HP UV-LED measurements has been performed. Static thermal and stress simulation analysis with the finite element method (FEM) identifies the causes of package degradation. Accelerated life test results prove that HP UV-LEDs working in cycled condition have a better performance than those working in continuous condition.

  14. Assessment of heavy metals bioavailability and toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri in sediment of the Huelva estuary.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Daniel; Usero, José; Morillo, José

    2016-06-01

    Relationship between toxicity and bioavailable metals in sediments from the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence was analyzed. Toxicity was assessed with Microtox(®) bioassay using a marine luminescent bacterium: Vibrio fischeri. Bioavailable metals were considered as both, acid extractable fraction of BCR procedure and the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier sequential extraction. A bioavailable metals index was calculated to integrate results in a single figure. Toxicity and bioavailable metals showed a similar pattern. Higher levels were found in the estuary than in the littoral (140 TU/g). In Huelva estuary, highest levels were found in the Tinto estuary (5725 TU/g), followed by the Odiel estuary (5100 TU/g) and the Padre Santo Canal (2500 TU/g). Results in this area were well over than those in nearby estuaries. Furthermore, they are similar to or even higher than those in other polluted sediments around the world. Bioavailable metal index showed a stronger correlation with acid extractable fraction of BCR (R(2) = 0.704) than that for the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier (R(2) = 0.661). These results suggest that bioavailable metals are an important source of sediment toxicity in the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence, an area with one of the highest mortality risks of Spain. PMID:27002282

  15. Use of Tunable Whole-Cell Bioreporters to Assess Bioavailable Cadmium and Remediation Performance in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Youngdae; Kim, Sunghoon; Chae, Yooeun; Kang, Yerin; Lee, Youngshim; Jeong, Seung-Woo; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-01-01

    It is important to have tools to measure the bioavailability to assess the risks of pollutants because the bioavailability is defined as the portions of pollutants showing the biological effects on living organisms. This study described the construction of tunable Escherichia coli whole-cell bioreporter (WCB) using the promoter region of zinc-inducible operon and its application on contaminated soils. It was verified that this WCB system showed specific and sensitive responses to cadmium rather than zinc in the experimental conditions. It was inferred that Cd(II) associates stronger with ZntR, a regulatory protein of zinc-inducible operon, than other metal ions. Moreover, the expression of reporter genes, egfp and mcherry, were proportional to the concentration of cadmium, thereby being a quantitative sensor to monitor bioavailable cadmium. The capability to determine bioavailable cadmium was verified with Cd(II) amended LUFA soils, and then the applicability on environmental systems was investigated with field soils collected from smelter area in Korea before and after soil-washing. The total amount of cadmium was decreased after soil washing, while the bioavailability was increased. Consequently, it would be valuable to have tools to assess bioavailability and the effectiveness of soil remediation should be evaluated in the aspect of bioavailability as well as removal efficiency. PMID:27171374

  16. Influence of growth conditions on exchange bias of NiMn-based spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Wienecke, Anja; Kruppe, Rahel; Rissing, Lutz

    2015-05-07

    As shown in previous investigations, a correlation between a NiMn-based spin valve's thermal stability and its inherent exchange bias exists, even if the blocking temperature of the antiferromagnet is clearly above the heating temperature and the reason for thermal degradation is mainly diffusion and not the loss of exchange bias. Samples with high exchange bias are thermally more stable than samples with low exchange bias. Those structures promoting a high exchange bias are seemingly the same suppressing thermally induced diffusion processes (A. Wienecke and L. Rissing, “Relationship between thermal stability and layer-stack/structure of NiMn-based GMR systems,” in IEEE Transaction on Magnetic Conference (EMSA 2014)). Many investigations were carried out on the influence of the sputtering parameters as well as the layer thickness on the magnetoresistive effect. The influence of these parameters on the exchange bias and the sample's thermal stability, respectively, was hardly taken into account. The investigation described here concentrates on the last named issue. The focus lies on the influence of the sputtering parameters and layer thickness of the “starting layers” in the stack and the layers forming the (synthetic) antiferromagnet. This paper includes a guideline for the evaluated sputtering conditions and layer thicknesses to realize a high exchange bias and presumably good thermal stability for NiMn-based spin valves with a synthetic antiferromagnet.

  17. Influences of surface hydrophilicity on frost formation on a vertical cold plate under natural convection conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2007-07-15

    Surface hydrophilicity has a strong influence on frost nucleation according to phase transition theory. To study this effect, a close observation of frost formation and deposition processes on a vertical plate was made under free convection conditions. The formation and shape variation of frost crystals during the initial period are described and the frost thickness variation with time on both hydrophobic and plain copper cold surfaces are presented. The various influencing factors are discussed in depth. The mechanism of surface hydrophilicity influence on frost formation was analyzed theoretically. This revealed that increasing the contact angle can increase the potential barrier and restrain crystal nucleation and growth and thus frost deposition. The experimental results show that the initial water drops formed on a hydrophobic surface are smaller and remain in the liquid state for a longer time compared with ones formed on a plain copper surface. It is also observed that the frost layer deposited on a hydrophobic surface is loose and weak. Though the hydrophobic surface can retard frost formation to a certain extent and causes a looser frost layer, our experimental results show that it does not depress the growth of the frost layer. (author)

  18. Influence of oxic/anoxic condition on sorption behavior of PFOS in sediment.

    PubMed

    Ololade, Isaac Ayodele; Zhou, Qin; Pan, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Sediment components and redox properties change with oxic/anoxic condition, which affect the environmental transport of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). Herein, the influence of oxic/anoxic condition on the variation of redox and residual components of sediments, where organic matter, iron and manganese oxides are separated from the original sediment collected from Lake Taihu, China, are investigated. Meanwhile, the distinguishing sorption behaviors of PFOS on various residual sediments under oxic and anoxic condition are studied. Sediment after extracting iron and manganese (S-FeMn), which possessed the highest organic carbon (0.99%), had the highest affinity for PFOS under oxic condition. However, anoxic environment resulted in an increase of the pH, dissolving of organic carbon and de-protonation of S-FeMn, which caused the lower sorption capacity of PFOS on S-FeMn. Sediment after extracting manganese (S-Mn) had the higher sorption ability in anoxic environment because the Fe(2+) from S-Mn provided more effective electrostatic sites for anionic PFOS. When the environment changed to oxic condition, the iron existed as trivalent form in S-Mn, which resulted in a block of effective sorption site and reduced the sorption amounts of PFOS. The higher percentage of manganese oxides restrained the sorption of PFOS. Hence, whether or not oxic/anoxic condition promoted the PFOS sorption depended on both the percentage and form of various components in the sediment. The study generated further insight into the environmental transport of PFOS in the sediments with different properties and the wetland system, where oxic/anoxic subsurface flow was constructed. PMID:26350897

  19. Conditional symbolic analysis detects nonlinear influences of respiration on cardiovascular control in humans

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Alberto; Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Jordan, Jens; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello

    2015-01-01

    We propose a symbolic analysis framework for the quantitative characterization of complex dynamical systems. It allows the description of the time course of a single variable, the assessment of joint interactions and an analysis triggered by a conditioning input. The framework was applied to spontaneous variability of heart period (HP), systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and integrated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) with the aim of characterizing cardiovascular control and nonlinear influences of respiration at rest in supine position, during orthostatic challenge induced by 80° head-up tilt (TILT) and about 3 min before evoked pre-syncope signs (PRESY). The approach detected (i) the exaggerated sympathetic modulation and vagal withdrawal from HP variability and the increased presence of fast MSNA variability components during PRESY compared with TILT; (ii) the increase of the SAP–HP coordination occurring at slow temporal scales and a decrease of that occurring at faster time scales during PRESY compared with TILT; (iii) the reduction of the coordination between fast MSNA and SAP patterns during TILT and PRESY; (iv) the nonlinear influences of respiration leading to an increased likelihood to observe the abovementioned findings during expiration compared with inspiration one. The framework provided simple, quantitative indexes able to distinguish experimental conditions characterized by different states of the autonomic nervous system and to detect the early signs of a life threatening situation such as postural syncope. PMID:25548269

  20. Conditional symbolic analysis detects nonlinear influences of respiration on cardiovascular control in humans.

    PubMed

    Porta, Alberto; Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Jordan, Jens; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello

    2015-02-13

    We propose a symbolic analysis framework for the quantitative characterization of complex dynamical systems. It allows the description of the time course of a single variable, the assessment of joint interactions and an analysis triggered by a conditioning input. The framework was applied to spontaneous variability of heart period (HP), systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and integrated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) with the aim of characterizing cardiovascular control and nonlinear influences of respiration at rest in supine position, during orthostatic challenge induced by 80° head-up tilt (TILT) and about 3 min before evoked pre-syncope signs (PRESY). The approach detected (i) the exaggerated sympathetic modulation and vagal withdrawal from HP variability and the increased presence of fast MSNA variability components during PRESY compared with TILT; (ii) the increase of the SAP-HP coordination occurring at slow temporal scales and a decrease of that occurring at faster time scales during PRESY compared with TILT; (iii) the reduction of the coordination between fast MSNA and SAP patterns during TILT and PRESY; (iv) the nonlinear influences of respiration leading to an increased likelihood to observe the abovementioned findings during expiration compared with inspiration one. The framework provided simple, quantitative indexes able to distinguish experimental conditions characterized by different states of the autonomic nervous system and to detect the early signs of a life threatening situation such as postural syncope. PMID:25548269

  1. The influence of surface condition on the localized corrosion of 316L stainless steel orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Beddoes, J; Bucci, K

    1999-07-01

    The localized corrosion of austenitic stainless steel 316L intended for use as orthopaedic implants is determined as a function of the surface condition and metallurgical state. From the examination of samples exposed to a ferric chloride solution, at both 22 and 37 degrees C, the independent contribution of crevice and pitting corrosion to localized corrosion is determined. Both forms of localized corrosion occur to a greater extent at the higher temperature. The results indicate that weight loss measurements may not be sufficient to determine the extent of crevice corrosion separately from the influence of pitting corrosion. More importantly, the surface conditions required for the best resistance to crevice or pitting corrosion differ. Electropolished surfaces provide the best resistance to crevice corrosion, while "bead blasted" surfaces provide the best resistance to pitting corrosion. The implication of this result in terms of the serviceability as orthopaedic implants is discussed. The current results indicate the cold-worked state exhibits improved resistance to pitting corrosion. However, the influence of the metallurgical state could not be separated from a possible compositional effect. PMID:15348123

  2. The influence of pitch dimensions on performance during small-sided and conditioned soccer games.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Luís; Duarte, Ricardo; Silva, Pedro; Chow, Jia Yi; Davids, Keith

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the influence of pitch dimensions in small-sided soccer games in shaping opportunities for performers to maintain ball possession, pass to teammates and shoot at goal. Fifteen amateur standard male participants (M = 21.87, σ = 1.96 years) played 5 v 5 small-sided soccer games in three varying pitch conditions (28 m × 14 m, 40 m × 20 m and 52 m × 26 m). Thirty sequences of play in each condition were selected for digitisation using TACTO software, allowing the capture of bi-dimensional displacement coordinate data of all players and the ball. The values of interpersonal distance between all attackers and immediate defenders and the relative distances of defenders to intercept a shot and a pass were computed as dependent variables. Results showed existence of fewer opportunities to maintain ball possession on smaller pitches, compared to medium and larger pitches. Conversely, the different dimensions set to the pitch did not influence opportunities for players to shoot at goal, or to perform passes to other teammates. By examining the specific spatial-temporal relationships of players and key-task constraints, the data from this study explain how effects of manipulating pitch dimensions of small-sided games might enhance opportunities for acquiring specific movement and decision-making skills. PMID:24915106

  3. The Influence of the Biological Pump on Marine Redox Conditions During Earth History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K. M.; Ridgwell, A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Evidence for bottom-water anoxia on the continental shelves waned over the course of the Phanerozoic, which may be influenced by secular changes in the biological pump that led to weaker positive feedbacks within the oceans. The biological pump describes the transfer of carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean, which creates vertical gradients in nutrients and oxygen, both important influences in the structure of marine ecosystems. We used the cGENIE Earth system model to quantitatively test the hypothesis that reductions in the efficiency of the nutrient recycling loop of the biological pump during the past 550 Ma reduced the extent of anoxia on the shelves and acted as an important control on marine animal ecosystems. When the modeled remineralization depth is shallow relative to the modern ocean, anoxia tends to be more widespread at continental shelf depths. As the modeled remineralization depth increases toward modern conditions, anoxia is less prevalent and occurs at depths below the continental shelves. Reduced marine productivity in the closed system configuration of cGENIE cannot produce the frequent bottom-water anoxia conditions envisioned for the Paleozoic. We hypothesize that evidence for greater animal abundance and metabolic demand during the Phanerozoic was driven by progressive oxygenation of shelf environments related to changes in the biological pump rather than greater food availability. In general, these model simulations suggest changes in the depth distribution of organic carbon remineralization may have controlled observed shifts in ocean chemistry, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem structure during the Phanerozoic.

  4. Chemosensitivity measurements of human tumour cells by soft agar assays are influenced by the culture conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Endresen, L.; Tveit, K. M.; Rugstad, H. E.; Pihl, A.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the influence of culture conditions on the in vitro responses of tumour cells to anticancer drugs, the sensitivities observed with the soft agar methods of Hamburger & Salmon (1977) (H-S) and of Courtenay & Mills (1978) (C-M) were compared. In all cases the ID50 values were determined from dose-response curves. Six human tumour cell lines exposed to 10 different agents, and 9 patients' melanomas exposed to 5 different agents, were examined. In the studies of cell lines the H-S method gave higher sensitivity values than the C-M method in 38 out of 52 cases, whereas in 14 cases the results were the same. In the patients' tumours the H-S method gave higher sensitivity in 21 of 35 cases, equal sensitivity in 11, and lower sensitivity in 3 cases. In many instances the ID50 values obtained with the two test systems differed by factors of 10 or more, both in the case of cell lines and tumour specimens. Systematic alterations in the culture conditions indicated that the presence or absence of rat erythrocytes is the most important factor responsible for the differences observed. Also, other factors, such as supplements (in the H-S method) and the use of different serum types, appeared to influence both colony growth and chemosensitivity. PMID:4005141

  5. The blackberry fruit: a review on its composition and chemistry, metabolism and bioavailability, and health benefits.

    PubMed

    Kaume, Lydia; Howard, Luke R; Devareddy, Latha

    2012-06-13

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) fruit contains high levels of anthocyanins and other phenolic compounds, mainly flavonols and ellagitannins, which contribute to its high antioxidant capacity and other biological activities. Blackberry phenolic composition and concentrations are known to be influenced by genetics, growing conditions, and maturation. Despite the current knowledge of their chemistry, research specific to blackberry phenolic compounds' health benefits, metabolism, bioavailability, and mechanism by which they confer health benefits is scarce. Blackberry phenolic compounds have protective effects on age-related neurodegenerative diseases and bone loss in vivo and can inhibit low-density lipoprotein and liposomal oxidation in vitro. Blackberry extracts have also exerted antimutagenic effects in vitro and in vivo by modifying cell signaling pathways and suppressing tumor promotion factors. However, the antiobesity, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties of blackberry phenolic compounds need investigation. Similarly, studies that elucidate the in vivo physiologically effective concentrations of blackberry phenolic compounds are necessary. PMID:22082199

  6. Influence of drawing conditions on the properties of bismuth borate glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Juergen

    In this study the influence of forming conditions, namely draw temperature and draw speed, on thermal properties of glass fibers of the composition 0.25 Bi2O3--0.75 B2O 3 were examined using mainly DSC measurements and confocal micro---Raman spectroscopy. Glass fibers were drawn at temperatures of 525, 550 and 575°C and draw speeds ranging from 1 to 10 m/sec. DSC measurements were performed to measure glass transition, heat capacity, fictive temperature, and pre--T g exotherm, both in strength and the onset. Concurrently micro---Raman measurements were used to identify the structural borate groups present in the fibers and their change with forming conditions. Several trends could be observed. As draw speed increases the glass transition decreases, indicating a more disordered structure. Pre--Tg exotherms show a local maximum at draw speeds of 4 m/s. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of [BiO6] octahedra that are becoming more distorted as the draw speed increases. The local maximum in both the pre--Tg exotherm and the corresponding Raman peak show that there is an optimal distortion. Pre--T g exotherm onset temperatures show a linear decrease with draw speeds. All this supports the conclusion that there is no major structural rearrangement. Heat capacity shows no overall trends of behavior dependant on forming conditions. These glass fibers also show a decrease in glass transition height during reheating that indicates a decreasing amount of glass. This can either be due to crystallization or phase separation. Finally the aspect ratio of the glass fibers seems to have a direct influence on heat capacity. As the aspect ratio increases the heat capacity of the glass fibers increases suddenly by a factor of two. The exact mechanism for this effect is unclear at this point.

  7. Statistical approach for assessing the influence of synoptic and meteorological conditions on ozone concentrations over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Noelia; Butler, Tim; Sillmann, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution has become a serious problem in many industrialized and densely-populated urban areas due to its negative effects on human health, damages agricultural crops and ecosystems. The concentration of air pollutants is the result of several factors, including emission sources, lifetime and spatial distribution of the pollutants, atmospheric properties and interactions, wind speed and direction, and topographic features. Episodes of air pollution are often associated with stationary or slowly migrating anticyclonic (high-pressure) systems that reduce advection, diffusion, and deposition of atmospheric pollutants. Certain weather conditions facilitate the concentration of pollutants, such as the incidence of light winds that contributes to the increasing of stagnation episodes affecting air quality. Therefore, the atmospheric circulation plays an important role in air quality conditions that are affected by both, synoptic and local scale processes. This study assesses the influence of the large-scale circulation along with meteorological conditions on tropospheric ozone in Europe. The frequency of weather types (WTs) is examined under a novel approach, which is based on an automated version of the Lamb Weather Types catalog (Jenkinson and Collison, 1977). Here, we present an implementation of such classification point-by-point over the European domain. Moreover, the analysis uses a new grid-averaged climatology (1°x1°) of daily surface ozone concentrations from observations of individual sites that matches the resolution of global models (Schnell,et al., 2014). Daily frequency of WTs and meteorological conditions are combined in a multiple regression approach for investigating the influence on ozone concentrations. Different subsets of predictors are examined within multiple linear regression models (MLRs) for each grid cell in order to identify the best regression model. Several statistical metrics are applied for estimating the robustness of the

  8. Carryover effects and climatic conditions influence the postfledging survival of greater sage-grouse

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Erik J; Sedinger, James S; Gibson, Daniel; Coates, Peter S; Casazza, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Prebreeding survival is an important life history component that affects both parental fitness and population persistence. In birds, prebreeding can be separated into pre- and postfledging periods; carryover effects from the prefledging period may influence postfledging survival. We investigated effects of body condition at fledging, and climatic variation, on postfledging survival of radio-marked greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Great Basin Desert of the western United States. We hypothesized that body condition would influence postfledging survival as a carryover effect from the prefledging period, and we predicted that climatic variation may mediate this carryover effect or, alternatively, would act directly on survival during the postfledging period. Individual body condition had a strong positive effect on postfledging survival of juvenile females, suggesting carryover effects from the prefledging period. Females in the upper 25th percentile of body condition scores had a postfledging survival probability more than twice that (Φ = 0.51 ± 0.06 SE) of females in the bottom 25th percentile (Φ = 0.21 ± 0.05 SE). A similar effect could not be detected for males. We also found evidence for temperature and precipitation effects on monthly survival rates of both sexes. After controlling for site-level variation, postfledging survival was nearly twice as great following the coolest and wettest growing season (Φ = 0.77 ± 0.05 SE) compared with the hottest and driest growing season (Φ = 0.39 ± 0.05 SE). We found no relationships between individual body condition and temperature or precipitation, suggesting that carryover effects operated independently of background climatic variation. The temperature and precipitation effects we observed likely produced a direct effect on mortality risk during the postfledging period. Conservation actions that focus on improving prefledging habitat for sage-grouse may have indirect benefits

  9. Carryover effects and climatic conditions influence the postfledging survival of greater sage-grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blomberg, Erik J.; Sedinger, James S.; Gibson, Daniel; Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Prebreeding survival is an important life history component that affects both parental fitness and population persistence. In birds, prebreeding can be separated into pre- and postfledging periods; carryover effects from the prefledging period may influence postfledging survival. We investigated effects of body condition at fledging, and climatic variation, on postfledging survival of radio-marked greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Great Basin Desert of the western United States. We hypothesized that body condition would influence postfledging survival as a carryover effect from the prefledging period, and we predicted that climatic variation may mediate this carryover effect or, alternatively, would act directly on survival during the postfledging period. Individual body condition had a strong positive effect on postfledging survival of juvenile females, suggesting carryover effects from the prefledging period. Females in the upper 25th percentile of body condition scores had a postfledging survival probability more than twice that (Φ = 0.51 ± 0.06 SE) of females in the bottom 25th percentile (Φ = 0.21 ± 0.05 SE). A similar effect could not be detected for males. We also found evidence for temperature and precipitation effects on monthly survival rates of both sexes. After controlling for site-level variation, postfledging survival was nearly twice as great following the coolest and wettest growing season (Φ = 0.77 ± 0.05 SE) compared with the hottest and driest growing season (Φ = 0.39 ± 0.05 SE). We found no relationships between individual body condition and temperature or precipitation, suggesting that carryover effects operated independently of background climatic variation. The temperature and precipitation effects we observed likely produced a direct effect on mortality risk during the postfledging period. Conservation actions that focus on improving prefledging habitat for sage-grouse may have indirect benefits

  10. Influence of temperature and relative humidity conditions on the pan coating of hydroxypropyl cellulose molded capsules.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Elena; Zema, Lucia; Pandey, Preetanshu; Gazzaniga, Andrea; Felton, Linda A

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based capsular shells prepared by injection molding and intended for pulsatile release were successfully coated with 10mg/cm(2) Eudragit® L film. The suitability of HPC capsules for the development of a colon delivery platform based on a time dependent approach was demonstrated. In the present work, data logging devices (PyroButton®) were used to monitor the microenvironmental conditions, i.e. temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH), during coating processes performed under different spray rates (1.2, 2.5 and 5.5g/min). As HPC-based capsules present special features, a preliminary study was conducted on commercially available gelatin capsules for comparison purposes. By means of PyroButton data-loggers it was possible to acquire information about the impact of the effective T and RH conditions experienced by HPC substrates during the process on the technological properties and release performance of the coated systems. The use of increasing spray rates seemed to promote a tendency of the HPC shells to slightly swell at the beginning of the spraying process; moreover, capsules coated under spray rates of 1.2 and 2.5g/min showed the desired release performance, i.e. ability to withstand the acidic media followed by the pulsatile release expected for uncoated capsules. Preliminary stability studies seemed to show that coating conditions might also influence the release performance of the system upon storage. PMID:26686650