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Sample records for conductive carbon coatings

  1. Superhydrophobic conductive carbon nanotube coatings for steel.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sunny; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2009-04-21

    We report the synthesis of superhydrophobic coatings for steel using carbon nanotube (CNT)-mesh structures. The CNT coating maintains its structural integrity and superhydrophobicity even after exposure to extreme thermal stresses and has excellent thermal and electrical properties. The coating can also be reinforced by optimally impregnating the CNT-mesh structure with cross-linked polymers without significantly compromising on superhydrophobicity and electrical conductivity. These superhydrophobic conductive coatings on steel, which is an important structural material, open up possibilities for many new applications in the areas of heat transfer, solar panels, transport of fluids, nonwetting and nonfouling surfaces, temperature resilient coatings, composites, water-walking robots, and naval applications. PMID:19281157

  2. Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M.; Kostecki, Robert; Wilcox, James; Lau, Grace

    2007-07-13

    A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO{sub 4} and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO{sub 4} suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10{sup -9} S cm{sup -1}). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures (<800 C) required to make LiFePO{sub 4}, however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density.

  3. Conductive paper from lignocellulose wood microfibers coated with a nanocomposite of carbon nanotubes and conductive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Mangilal; Xing, Qi; Shim, Bong Sup; Kotov, Nicholas; Varahramyan, Kody; Lvov, Yuri

    2009-05-01

    Composite nanocoating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) and aqueous dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNT-PSS) on lignocellulose wood microfibers has been developed to make conductive microfibers and paper sheets. To construct the multilayers on wood microfibers, cationic poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) has been used in alternate deposition with anionic conductive PEDOT-PSS and solubilized CNT-PSS. Using a Keithley microprobe measurement system, current-voltage measurements have been carried out on single composite microfibers after deposition of each layer to optimize the electrical properties of the coated microfibers. The conductivity of the resultant wood microfibers was in the range of 10-2-2 S cm-1 depending on the architecture of the coated layer. Further, the conductivity of the coated wood microfibers increased up to 20 S cm-1 by sandwiching multilayers of conductive co-polymer PEDOT-PSS with CNT-PSS through a polycation (PEI) interlayer. Moreover, paper hand sheets were manufactured from these coated wood microfibers with conductivity ranging from 1 to 20 S cm-1. A paper composite structure consisting of conductive/dielectric/conductive layers that acts as a capacitor has also been fabricated and is reported.

  4. Efficient coating of transparent and conductive carbon nanotube thin films on plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Andrew Ng, M H; Hartadi, Lysia T; Tan, Huiwen; Patrick Poa, C H

    2008-05-21

    Optically transparent and electrically conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films were fabricated at room temperature using a dip-coating technique. The film transparency and sheet resistance can be easily tailored by controlling the number of coatings. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was used as an adhesion promoter and, together with surfactant Triton X-100, greatly improved the SWNTs coating. Only five coats were required to obtain a sheet resistance of 2.05 [Formula: see text] and film transparency of 84 %T. The dip-coated film after post-deposition treatment with nitric acid has a sheet resistance as low as 130 [Formula: see text] at 69 %T. This technique is suitable for large-scale SWNT coating at room temperature and can be used on different types of substrates such as glass and plastics. This paper will discuss the role of the adhesion promoter and surfactant in the coating process. PMID:21825746

  5. Superhydrophobic and conductive carbon nanofiber/PTFE composite coatings for EMI shielding.

    PubMed

    Das, Arindam; Hayvaci, Harun T; Tiwari, Manish K; Bayer, Ilker S; Erricolo, Danilo; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a solvent-based, mild method to prepare superhydrophobic, carbon nanofiber/PTFE-filled polymer composite coatings with high electrical conductivity and reports the first data on the effectiveness of such coatings as electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials. The coatings are fabricated by spraying dispersions of carbon nanofibers and sub-micron PTFE particles in a polymer blend solution of poly(vinyledene fluoride) and poly(methyl methacrylate) on cellulosic substrates. Upon drying, coatings display static water contact angles as high as 158° (superhydrophobic) and droplet roll-off angles of 10° indicating self-cleaning ability along with high electrical conductivities (up to 309 S/m). 100 μm-thick coatings are characterized in terms of their EMI shielding effectiveness in the X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). Results show up to 25 dB of shielding effectiveness, which changed little with frequency at a fixed composition, thus indicating the potential of these coatings for EMI shielding applications and other technologies requiring both extreme liquid repellency and high electrical conductivity. PMID:20889160

  6. Comparative study on different carbon nanotube materials in terms of transparent conductive coatings.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongrui; Kandel, Hom R; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Saini, Viney; Xu, Yang; Biris, Alexandru R; Lupu, Dan; Salamo, Gregory J; Biris, Alexandru S

    2008-03-18

    We compared conductive transparent carbon nanotube coatings on glass substrates made of differently produced single-wall (SWNT), double-wall, and multiwall carbon nanotubes. The airbrushing approach and the vacuum filtration method were utilized for the fabrication of carbon nanotube films. The optoelectronic performance of the carbon nanotube film was found to strongly depend on many effects including the ratio of metallic-to-semiconducting tubes, dispersion, length, diameter, chirality, wall number, structural defects, and the properties of substrates. The electronic transportability and optical properties of the SWNT network can be significantly altered by chemical doping with thionyl chloride. Hall effect measurements revealed that all of these thin carbon nanotube films are of p-type probably due to the acid reflux-based purification and atmospheric impurities. The competition between variable-range hoping and fluctuation-assisted tunneling in the functionized carbon nanotube system could lead to a crossover behavior in the temperature dependence of the network resistance. PMID:18251555

  7. Final Technical Report CONDUCTIVE COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J Glatkowski; Jorma Peltola; Christopher Weeks; Mike Trottier; David Britz

    2007-09-30

    US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a grant for Eikos Inc. to investigate the feasibility of developing and utilizing Transparent Conducting Coatings (TCCs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) for solar cell applications. Conventional solar cells today employ metal oxide based TCCs with both Electrical Resistivity (R) and Optical Transparency (T), commonly referred to as optoelectronic (RT) performance significantly higher than with those possible with CNT based TCCs available today. Transparent metal oxide based coatings are also inherently brittle requiring high temperature in vacuum processing and are thus expensive to manufacture. One such material is indium tin oxide (ITO). Global demand for indium has recently increased rapidly while supply has diminished causing substantial spikes in raw material cost and availability. In contrast, the raw material, carbon, needed for CNT fabrication is abundantly available. Transparent Conducting Coatings based on CNTs can overcome not only cost and availability constraints while also offering the ability to be applied by existing, low cost process technologies under ambient conditions. Processes thus can readily be designed both for rigid and flexible PV technology platforms based on mature spray or dip coatings for silicon based solar cells and continuous roll to roll coating processes for polymer solar applications.

  8. Effect of an organic molecular coating on control over the conductance of carbon nanotube channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrinetskiy, I. I.; Emelianov, A. V.; Nevolin, V. K. Romashkin, A. V.

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that the coating of carbon nanotubes with molecules with a constant dipole moment changes the conductance of the tubes due to a variation in the structure of energy levels that participate in charge transport. The I–V characteristics of the investigated structures exhibit significant dependence of the channel conductance on the gate potential. The observed memory effect of conductance level can be explained by the rearrangement of polar groups and molecules as a whole in an electric field. The higher the dipole moment per unit length and the weaker the intermolecular interaction, the faster the rearrangement process is.

  9. Bimodal Latex Effect on Spin-Coated Thin Conductive Polymer-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Layers.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mohammad-Amin; Larrakoetxea Angoitia, Katalin; van Berkel, Stefan; Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Friedrich, Heiner; Heuts, Johan P A; van der Schoot, Paul; van Herk, Alex M

    2015-11-10

    We synthesize two differently sized poly(methyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl acrylate) latexes by emulsion polymerization and mix these with a sonicated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion, in order to prepare 3% SWCNT composite mixtures. We spin-coat these mixtures at various spin-speed rates and spin times over a glass substrate, producing a thin, transparent, solid, conductive layer. Keeping the amount of SWCNTs constant, we vary the weight fraction of our smaller 30-nm latex particles relative to the larger 70-nm-sized ones. We find a maximum in the electrical conductivity up to 370 S/m as a function of the weight fraction of smaller particles, depending on the overall solid content, the spin speed, and the spin time. This maximum occurs at 3-5% of the smaller latex particles. We also find a more than 2-fold increase in conductivity parallel to the radius of spin-coating than perpendicular to it. Atomic force microscopy points at the existence of lanes of latex particles in the spin-coated thin layer, while large-area transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the SWCNTs are aligned over a grid fixed on the glass substrate during the spin-coating process. We extract the conductivity distribution on the surface of the thin film and translate this into the direction of the SWCNTs in it. PMID:26491888

  10. Investigating the Inter-Tube Conduction Mechanism in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites Prepared with Conductive Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar; Zhou, Jian; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    A well-known strategy to improve the electrical conductivity of polymers is to dope them with high-aspect-ratio and conductive nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, these nanocomposites also exhibit undesirable properties such as damage-sensitive and history-dependent conductivity because their macroscopic electrical conductivity is largely determined by the tunneling effect at the tube/tube interface. To reduce these issues, new nanocomposites have been developed with CNTs that have been coated with a conductive layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). It has been posited that the insulating region between the CNTs is replaced by a conductive polymer bridge; this has not been proven up to now. We propose here to investigate in-depth how the macroscopic conductivity of these materials is changing when (1) varying the frequency of the electrical loading (impedance spectroscopy), (2) varying the mechanical hydrostatic pressure, and (3) varying the voltage of the electrical loading. The response is systematically compared to the one of conventional carbon nanotube/polycarbonate (CNT/PC) nanocomposites so we can clarify how efficiently the tunneling effect is suppressed from these composites. The objective is to elucidate further the mechanism for conduction in such material formulations. PMID:26676996

  11. Investigating the Inter-Tube Conduction Mechanism in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites Prepared with Conductive Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar; Zhou, Jian; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    A well-known strategy to improve the electrical conductivity of polymers is to dope them with high-aspect-ratio and conductive nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, these nanocomposites also exhibit undesirable properties such as damage-sensitive and history-dependent conductivity because their macroscopic electrical conductivity is largely determined by the tunneling effect at the tube/tube interface. To reduce these issues, new nanocomposites have been developed with CNTs that have been coated with a conductive layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). It has been posited that the insulating region between the CNTs is replaced by a conductive polymer bridge; this has not been proven up to now. We propose here to investigate in-depth how the macroscopic conductivity of these materials is changing when (1) varying the frequency of the electrical loading (impedance spectroscopy), (2) varying the mechanical hydrostatic pressure, and (3) varying the voltage of the electrical loading. The response is systematically compared to the one of conventional carbon nanotube/polycarbonate (CNT/PC) nanocomposites so we can clarify how efficiently the tunneling effect is suppressed from these composites. The objective is to elucidate further the mechanism for conduction in such material formulations.

  12. Colored semitransparent conductive coatings consisting of monodisperse metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Green, Alexander A; Hersam, Mark C

    2008-05-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising materials for transparent conduction as a result of their exceptional electrical, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, since current synthetic methods yield polydisperse mixtures of SWNTs, the performance of SWNT transparent conductive films has previously been hindered by semiconducting species. Here, we describe the performance of transparent conductors produced using predominantly metallic SWNTs. Compared with unsorted material, films enriched in metallic SWNTs can enhance conductivity by factors of over 5.6 in the visible and 10 in the infrared. Moreover, by using monodisperse metallic SWNTs sorted with angstrom-level resolution in diameter, semitransparent conductive coatings with tunable optical transmittance can be produced. PMID:18393537

  13. Transparent Conductive Coating Based on Carbon Nanotubes Using Electric Field Deposition Method

    SciTech Connect

    Latununuwe, Altje; Hattu, Nikmans; Setiawan, Andhy; Winata, Toto; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Darma, Yudi

    2010-10-24

    The transparent conductive coating based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) had been fabricated using the electric field deposition method. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) results show a quite uniform CNTs on Corning glass substrates. Moreover the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results shows the peak at around 25 deg. which proves the existence of CNT materials. The CNT thin films obtained with different deposition times have different transmittance coefficients at wavelength of 550 nm. I-V measurement results shows higher sheet resistance value which relates with bigger transmittance coefficients and vice versa.

  14. Correlation Between Thermal Interface Conductance and Mechanical Adhesion Strength in Cu-Coated Glassy Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelzl, J.; Kijamnajsuk, P.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of defective areas in the interface on the correlation between the thermal interface conductance and the mechanical adhesion strength was investigated on as-prepared and heat-treated samples of copper-coated carbon flat specimens with different bonding layers between the copper film and the substrate. The thermal interface conductance was determined by frequency-domain photothermal radiometry. The mechanical adhesion strength of the film coating was deduced from pull-off experiments. The imperfect interfaces were modeled by two different values for the thermal interface conductance, G1 and G2, which co-exist at different areas on the interface and are weighted according to their areas, A1 and A2. The model parameters were determined by adjusting the frequency dependence of the normalized phases and phase differences of the PTR signals from as-prepared and heat-treated samples. The total thermal conductance of the interface was found to exhibit a correlation with the adhesion strength for most of the heat-treated samples whereas, among the as-prepared samples, considerable deviations from such a trend exist. The observations are explained by the impact of supplementary stress on the adhesion strength measurements which are due to the strain developed during the preparation process at the interface. The interfacial stress and strain are mostly released during thermal annealing. A semi-empirical formula was developed that describes the impact of the defective areas on the adhesion strength using the experimentally determined thermal model parameters.

  15. Carbon nanotubes noncovalently functionalized by an organic-inorganic hybrid: new building blocks for constructing superhydrophobic conductive coatings.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Qi, Ji; Zhou, Zhi; Liao, Zhangjie; Zhu, Zhongming; Guo, Honglei

    2010-08-17

    A facile method for constructing superhydrophobic, conductive, and transparent/translucent coatings is presented. Pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are first noncovalently (wrapped) modified by an organic-inorganic hybrid of an amphiphilic copolymer of styrene and maleic anhydride and silica with the existence of gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (a silane coupling agent). The modified MWNTs were mixed with tetraethyl orthosilicate in ethanol, air sprayed, coated with a fluoroalkylsilane, and then heat treated to obtain the superhydrophobic, conductive, and transparent/translucent coatings. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the coatings have a micrometer- and nanometer-scale hierarchical structure similar to that of lotus leaves; therefore, they show both high water contact angles (>160 degrees) and low sliding angles (<2 degrees). The coatings also exhibit good transmittance and greatly improved conductivities. This method is convenient, inexpensive, and easy to scale up. Moreover, it does not require any chemical modification of the MWNTs or use any harsh chemicals. PMID:20695543

  16. Effects of carbon nanotube and conducting polymer coated microelectrodes on single-unit recordings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Charkhkar, Hamid; Knaack, Gretchen L; Mandal, Himadri S; Keefer, Edward W; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have been utilized as biosensors that can detect all or nothing extracellular action potentials, or spikes. Coating the microelectrodes with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either pristine or conjugated with a conductive polymer, has been previously reported to improve extracellular recordings presumably via reduction in microelectrode impedance. The goal of this work was to examine the basis of such improvement in vitro. Every other microelectrode of in vitro MEAs was electrochemically modified with either conducting polymer, poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) or a blend of CNT and PEDOT. Mouse cortical tissue was dissociated and cultured on the MEAs to form functional neuronal networks. The performance of the modified and unmodified microelectrodes was evaluated by activity measures such as spike rate, spike amplitude, burst duration and burst rate. We observed that the yield, defined as percentage of microelectrodes with neuronal activity, was significantly higher by 55% for modified microelectrodes compared to the unmodified sites. However, the spike rate and burst parameters were similar for modified and unmodified microelectrodes suggesting that neuronal networks were not physiologically altered by presence of PEDOT or PEDOT-CNT. Our observations from immunocytochemistry indicated that neuronal cells were more abundant in proximity to modified microelectrodes. PMID:25569998

  17. Non-conductive ferromagnetic carbon-coated (Co, Ni) metal/polystyrene nanocomposites films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takacs, H.; Viala, B.; Tortai, J.-H.; Hermán, V.; Duclairoir, F.

    2016-03-01

    This article reports non-conductive ferromagnetic properties of metal/polymer nanocomposite films intended to be used for RF applications. The nanocomposite arrangement is unique showing a core double-shell structure of metal-carbon-polystyrene: M/C//P1/P2, where M = Co, Ni is the core material, C = graphene or carbon is the first shell acting as a protective layer against oxidation, P1 = pyrene-terminated polystyrene is the second shell for electrical insulation, and P2 = polystyrene is a supporting matrix (// indicates actual grafting). The nanocomposite formulation is briefly described, and the film deposition by spin-coating is detailed. Original spin-curves are reported and analyzed. One key outcome is the achievement of uniform and cohesive films at the wafer scale. Structural properties of films are thoroughly detailed, and weight and volume fractions of M/C are considered. Then, a comprehensive overview of DC magnetic and electrical properties is reported. A discussion follows on the magnetic softness of the nanocomposites vs. that of a single particle (theoretical) and the raw powder (experimental). Finally, unprecedented achievement of high magnetization (˜0.6 T) and ultra-high resistivity (˜1010 μΩ cm) is shown. High magnetization comes from the preservation of the existing protective shell C, with no significant degradation on the particle net-moment, and high electrical insulation is ensured by adequate grafting of the secondary shell P1. To conclude, the metal/polymer nanocomposites are situated in the landscape of soft ferromagnetic materials for RF applications (i.e., inductors and antennas), by means of two phase-diagrams, where they play a crucial role.

  18. Single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conductive films fabricated by reductive dissolution and spray coating for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Arias, Ana Claudia; Catheline, Amélie; Ligsay, Kathleen; Kim, Kee-Chan; Fogden, Siân; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio

    2014-12-22

    Solutions of unbundled and unbroken single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared using a reductive dissolution process. Transparent conductive films spray-coated from these solutions show a nearly twofold improvement in the ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorptivity versus those deposited from conventional aqueous dispersions, due to substantial de-aggregation and sizable nanotube lengths. These transparent electrodes have been utilized to fabricate P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells achieving power conversion efficiencies up to 2.3%, comparable to those of solar cells using indium tin oxide transparent electrodes.

  19. Reduced graphene oxide with ultrahigh conductivity as carbon coating layer for high performance sulfur@reduced graphene oxide cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Peng, Zhenhuan; Wang, Wenjun; Chen, Xikun; Fang, Jianhui; Xu, Jiaqiang

    2014-01-01

    We developed hydrogen iodide (HI) reduction of rGO and surfactant-assisted chemical reaction- deposition method to form hybrid material of sulfur (S) encapsulated in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets for rechargeable lithium batteries. The surfactant-assisted chemical reaction-deposition method strategy provides intimate contact between the S and graphene oxide. Chemical reduced rGO with high conductivity as carbon coating layer prevented the dissolution of polysulfide ions and improved the electron transfer. This novel core-shell structured S@rGO composites with high S content showed high reversible capacity, good discharge capacity retention and enhanced rate capability used as cathodes in rechargeable Li/S cells. We demonstrated here that an electrode prepared from a S@rGO with up to 85 wt% S maintains a stable discharge capacity of about 980 mAh g-1 at 0.05 C and 570 mAh g-1 at 1C after 200 cycles charge/discharge. These results emphasize the importance of rGO with high electrical conductivity after HI-reduced rGO homogeneously coating on the surface of S, therefore, effectively alleviating the shuttle phenomenon of polysulfides in organic electrolyte. Our surfactant-assisted chemical reaction-HI reduction approach should offer a new technique for the design and synthesis of battery electrodes based on highly conducting carbon materials.

  20. Transparent conductive coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashok, S.

    1983-01-01

    Thin film transparent conductors are discussed. Materials with electrical conductivity and optical transparency are highly desirable in many optoelectronic applications including photovoltaics. Certain binary oxide semiconductors such as tin oxide (SnO2) and indium oxide (In2O3) offer much better performance tradeoff in optoelectronics as well as better mechanical and chemical stability than thin semitransparent films. These thin-film transparent conductors (TC) are essentially wide-bandgap degenerate semiconductors - invariably n-type - and hence are transparent to sub-bandgap (visible) radiation while affording high electrical conductivity due to the large free electron concentration. The principal performance characteristics of TC's are, of course, electrical conductivity and optical transmission. The TC's have a refractive index of around 2.0 and hence act as very efficient antireflection coatings. For using TC's in surface barrier solar cells, the photovoltaic barrier is of utmost importance and so the work function or electron affinity of the TC is also a very important material parameter. Fabrication processes are discussed.

  1. Enhanced electrical conductivity and hardness of silver-nickel composites by silver-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongmok; Sim, Jeonghyun; Kim, Wonyoung; Moon, Chuldong; Cho, Wookdong; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-07-24

    We investigated electrical conductivity and Vickers hardness of Ag- and Ni-based composites prepared by powder metallurgy involving spark plasma sintering. The starting composition was Ag:Ni = 61:39 vol%, which provided an electrical conductivity of 3.30 × 10(5) S cm(-1) and a hardness of 1.27 GPa. The addition of bare multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs, 1.45 vol%) increased hardness (1.31 GPa) but decreased electrical conductivity (2.99 × 10(5) S cm(-1)) and carrier mobility (11 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) due to the formation of Ni3C in the interface between the MWNTs and Ni during spark plasma sintering. The formation of Ni3C was prevented by coating the surface of the nanotubes with Ag (nAgMWNTs), concomitantly increasing electrical conductivity (3.43 × 10(5) S cm(-1)) and hardness (1.37 GPa) of the sintered specimen (Ag:Ni:nAgMWNTs = 59.55:39:1.45 vol%). The electrical contact switching time (133 357) was also increased by 30%, demonstrating excellent feasibility as electrical contact materials for electric power industries. PMID:26133395

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Lei L; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Lei L.; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-04-01

    In this article, a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system is introduced. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper, although it is important to various forms of today’s digital printing where heat is used for imaging, as well as for toner fusing. This motivated an investigation of the thermal conductivity of paper coating. This study demonstrates that the thermal conductivity is affected by the coating mass and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect toner gloss and density. As the coating mass increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the toner gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The toner gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  4. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  5. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  6. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  7. Conductive and corrosion behaviors of silver-doped carbon-coated stainless steel as PEMFC bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Hong-feng; Fu, Jie; Tian, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Ni-Cr enrichment on stainless steel SS316L resulting from chemical activation enabled the deposition of carbon by spraying a stable suspension of carbon nanoparticles; trace Ag was deposited in situ to prepare a thin continuous Ag-doped carbon film on a porous carbon-coated SS316L substrate. The corrosion resistance of this film in 0.5 mol·L-1 H2SO4 solution containing 5 ppm F- at 80°C was investigated using polarization tests. The results showed that the surface treatment of the SS316L strongly affected the adhesion of the carbon coating to the stainless steel. Compared to the bare SS316L, the Ag-doped carbon-coated SS316L bipolar plate was remarkably more stable in both the anode and cathode environments of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and the interface contact resistance between the specimen and Toray 060 carbon paper was reduced from 333.0 mΩ·cm2 to 21.6 mΩ·cm2 at a compaction pressure of 1.2 MPa.

  8. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOEpatents

    Goldner, Ronald B.; Haas, Terry; Wong, Kwok-Keung; Seward, George

    1989-01-01

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  9. Direct and Efficient Preparation of Graphene Transparent Conductive Films on Flexible Poly Carbonate Substrate by Spray-Coating.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuqiang; Zhang, Dong; Yang, Chao; Shang, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Owing to the hydrophobic property and heat-labile of flexible substances, it is difficult to prepare graphene transparent conductive films (TCFs) on flexible substrate in a direct and effective way. Here we prepared a good dispersion of water/graphene oxide (GO)/ethanol, and the fabrication of graphene TCFs on flexible poly carbonate (PC) substrate was made by spray deposition of water/GO/ethanol, followed by the reduction of hydriodic acid (HI) fuming method. It can be found that when ethanol was added to GO solution, the drying dynamics of the spraying solvent increased and the problem of wetting property of GO dispersion on the PC could be effectively resolved. HI acid vapour can achieve an effective reduction of the GO film. The reduction effect of HI acid fuming method is more effective in comparation with traditional HI acid immersed method. An increase in spraying concentration can lead to a rise in coverage degree of film and folding degree of surface. 1/500 mg/ml is a relatively appropriate concentration for spray-coating. The thickness of the film was controlled by adjusting the spraying volume of water/GO/ethanol dispersion. The graphene TCFs exhibit a sheet resistance of less than 15.3 kΩ/sq at 74% transmittance. PMID:26682372

  10. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  11. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  12. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  13. Effects of Transitional Buffering Interface coatings on thermal contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, K. C.; Sheffield, J. W.; Sauer, H. J., Jr.; O'Keefe, T. J.; Zhang, J.

    1991-06-01

    Enhancing thermal contact conductance by a reliable and durable coating technique, Transitional Buffering Interface (TBI), has been investigated. A phase mixed coatings, Cu/C, and pure copper coatings on both primary surfaces of specimens were evaluated using four different surface roughnesses. All the samples are being tested at the following contact pressure sequence 125, 250, 375, 500, 375, 250 and 125 kPa. The test results of thermal contact conductance are presented in terms of coating thickness, surface texture and properties of coating materials. Vickers microhardness correlations are also presented for phase mixture copper and carbon and pure copper coatings. Using the experimental data, dimensionless expressions were developed that related the contact conductance of phase mixture copper-carbon and pure copper coatings to the coating thickness, the surface roughness, the contact pressure and the properties of aluminum substrate. The adhesive test indicated good durability of TBI coating surfaces.

  14. Titanium carbon nitride coating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, S.D.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the advantages of titanium carbon nitride (TiCN) coated tools. Cutting tests were conducted comparing TiCN coating directly against titanium nitride (TiN) coated and uncoated T-15 CPM end mills.

  15. Percolation-dominated superhydrophobicity and conductivity for nanocomposite coatings from the mixtures of a commercial aqueous silica sol and functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Guo, Honglei; Liao, Zhangjie; Qi, Ji; Zhou, Zhi; Fang, Zhengping; Shen, Lie

    2012-02-01

    Superhydrophobic conductive nanocomposite coatings are prepared for the first time from the simple mixture of a commercial aqueous silica sol and functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by air-spraying at ambient conditions followed by fluorosilane treatment. The relationship between MWNT content and the structure and properties of the nanocomposite coatings is investigated systematically. An ultra-low threshold (<5 vol.%) for superhydrophobicity is observed, which suggests that MWNTs are superior to any other spherical fillers for the construction of superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings. When the content of nanotubes is below the threshold, the surface roughness mainly caused by the silica nanoparticles is not enough for creating superhydrophobic surfaces. Only above the threshold, the multiscale hierarchical structure is enough for both high water contact angles (>165°) and extremely low sliding angles (<2°). The conductivity is also percolation dominated, while the threshold for conductivity is much higher than that for superhydrophobicity, which can be ascribed to the encapsulated structure and the agglomeration of nanotubes in the composite coatings during air-spraying. Moreover, the aqueous silica sols hold merits of great film-forming capability at relatively low calcination temperatures, and being free of organic solvents. PMID:22056263

  16. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 °C min-1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 °C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 µm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 µm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm-1, increased to 0.7 S cm-1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  17. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mentus, Slavko; Cirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 degrees C min(-1) up to a maximum temperature of 800 degrees C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 microm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 microm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm(-1), increased to 0.7 S cm(-1) upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy. PMID:19471087

  18. Highly Stretchable Conductive Fibers from Few-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Coated on Poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) Polymer Core/Shell Structures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shujuan; Zhang, Hongbo; Song, Shaoqing; Ma, Yanwen; Li, Jinghua; Lee, Gyeong Hee; Han, Qiwei; Liu, Jie

    2015-10-27

    A core/shell stretchable conductive composite of a few-walled carbon nanotube network coated on a poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) fiber (FWNT/PMIA) was fabricated by a dip-coating method and an annealing process that greatly enhanced interactions between the FWNT network and PMIA core as well as within the FWNT network. The first strain-conductivity test of the as-prepared FWNT/PMIA fiber showed a stretching-induced alignment of nanotubes in the shell during the deformation process and a good conductivity stability with a slight conductivity drop from 109.63 S/cm to 98.74 S/cm (Δσ/σ0 = 10%) at a strain of ∼150% (2.5 times the original length). More importantly, after the first stretching process, the fiber can be recovered with a slight increase in length but a greatly improved conductivity of 167.41 S/cm through an additional annealing treatment. The recovered fiber displays a similarly superb conductivity stability against stretching, with a decrease of only ∼13 S/cm to 154.49 S/cm (Δσ/σ0 = 8%) at a strain of ∼150%. We believe that this conductivity stability came from the formation and maintaining of aligned nanotube structures during the stretching process, which ensures the good tube-tube contacts and the elongation of the FWNT network without losing its conductivity. Such stable conductivity in stretchable fibers will be important for applications in stretchable electronics. PMID:26390200

  19. Carbon Fibers Conductivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Butkus, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the process of electrical conduction in polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers, calculations were carried out on cluster models of the fiber consisting of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO) molecular orbital (MO) method. The models were developed based on the assumption that PAN carbon fibers obtained with heat treatment temperatures (HTT) below 1000 C retain nitrogen in a graphite-like lattice. For clusters modeling an edge nitrogen site, analysis of the occupied MO's indicated an electron distribution similar to that of graphite. A similar analysis for the somewhat less stable interior nitrogen site revealed a partially localized II electron distribution around the nitrogen atom. The differences in bonding trends and structural stability between edge and interior nitrogen clusters led to a two-step process proposed for nitrogen evolution with increasing HTT.

  20. Enhancement of thermal contact conductance of coated junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kee-Chiang; Sheffield, John W.

    1995-04-01

    The thermal contact conductance of coated, contacting aluminum 6061-T651 surfaces was studied experimentally. Four different coating materials, copper, silver, a phase mixture of copper-carbon, and a phase mixture of silver-carbon were evaluated using four different surface roughnesses for each coating material. All of the samples were tested at contact pressures of 125, 250, 375, and 500 kPa. The test results of thermal contact conductance are presented in terms of coating thickness, surface texture, and properties of the coating materials. Using the experimental data, dimensionless expressions were developed that relate the contact conductance of the phase mixture and pure coatings to the coating thickness, the surface roughness, the contact pressure, and the properties of the aluminum substrate. The effects of the surface roughness and of the phase mixture of the coatings on the thermal contact conductance were investigated. In addition, the load cycling effect on the thermal contact conductance was examined for bare aluminum 6061-T651 specimens.

  1. Enhancement of thermal contact conductance of coated junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.C.; Sheffield, J.W.

    1995-04-01

    The thermal contact conductance of coated, contacting aluminum 6061-T651 surfaces was studied experimentally. Four different coating materials, copper, silver, a phase mixture of copper-carbon, and a phase mixture of silver-carbon were evaluated using four different surface roughnesses for each coating material. All of the samples were tested at contact pressures of 125, 250, 375, and 500 kPa. The test results of thermal contact conductance are presented in terms of coating thickness, surface texture, and properties of the coating materials. Using the experimental data, dimensionless expressions were developed that relate the contact conductance of the phase mixture and pure coatings to the coating thickness, the surface roughness, the contact pressure, and the properties of the aluminum substrate. The effects of the surface roughness and of the phase mixture of the coatings on the thermal contact conductance were investigated. In addition, the load cycling effect on the thermal contact conductance was examined for bare aluminum 6061-T651 specimens. 15 refs.

  2. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor description (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard power or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increase upon being exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicates that if these coatings reach a temperature above

  3. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicate that if these coatings reach a temperature above 1100 C

  4. Conductive Tether Coating for Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schuler, Pete

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), which is an on-orbit demonstration of the propulsion capabilities of electrodynamic tethers in space, is a secondary payload on a Delta 11 unmanned expendable booster. The ProSEDS tether consists of a 5 km bare electrodynamic tether and a 1 0-km non-conductive leader tether. Near the Delta 11, 160 m of the conductive tether is insulated to prevent plasma electron collection from the plasma contactor and for other science requirements. The remainder of the 5-km conductive tether is coated with a new conductive coating to collect plasma electrons. A bare metal tether easily collects electrons from the plasma, but thermal concerns preclude this design. A highly emissive conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems, Inc. has been optimized for both conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven individually coated strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire, coated with an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of COR (Colorless Oxygen Resistant) and polyanaline (PANI) known as C-COR (Conductive-Colorless Oxygen Resistant). The conductive-coated wire strands are cold-welded to individually coated strands of the insulated tether. The insulated tether is coated with 1 mil of polyimide and an atomic oxygen resistant polymer TOR-BP. The insulated tether must stand off the entire voltage of the tether (1 200 V) at various times during the mission. All seven wires are twisted around a Kevlar-29 core using the Hi-wire design. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center to qualify both the conductive coating and insulating coating for use on the ProSEDS tether. The conductive coating has been exposed to a plasma to verify the coatings ability to collect electrons from the space plasma from 0 to 1500 V, and to verify the coatings ability to collect electrons after atomic oxygen exposure. The insulated coating has been

  5. Transparent conductive coatings in the far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Park, Jung HO; Wilson, Michele M.; Keffer, Charles E.; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    In certain cases a space-borne optical instrument with a dielectric window requires a transparent conductive coating deposited on the window to remove the electrostatic charge collected due to the bombardment of ionized particles. Semiconductor and metal films are studied for use as transparent conductive coatings for the front window of far ultraviolet camera. Cr is found to be the best coating material. The theoretical search for the semiconductor and metal coating materials and experimental results for ITO and Cr films are reported.

  6. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Nagaraj, B.A.; Moore, C.S.

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC`s is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings.

  7. Coating for gasifiable carbon-graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper-Tervet, Jan (Inventor); Dowler, Warren L. (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Mueller, William A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A thin, uniform, firmly adherent coating of metal gasification catalyst is applied to a carbon-graphite fiber by first coating the fiber with a film-forming polymer containing functional moieties capable of reaction with the catalytic metal ions. Multivalent metal cations such as calcium cross-link the polymer such as a polyacrylic acid to insolubilize the film by forming catalytic metal macro-salt links between adjacent polymer chains. The coated fibers are used as reinforcement for resin composites and will gasify upon combustion without evolving conductive airborne fragments.

  8. Corrosion resistant coatings from conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1993-12-01

    Cr-based corrosion resistant undercoatings will have to be replaced because of environmental and health concerns. A coating system of a conducting polyaniline primer layer topcoated with epoxy or polyurethane, is being evaluated for corrosion resistance on mild steel in 0.1 M HCl or in a marine setting. Results of both laboratory and Beach Site testing indicate that this coating is very effective; even when the coatings are scratched to expose bare metal, the coated samples show very little signs of corrosion in the exposed area. 3 figs, 6 refs.

  9. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  10. Preparation of carbon nanotubes as the conductive coating layer on flexible thermal-resistant substrate by permeating method and its residual stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Kai; Huang, Szu-Chun; Yu, Hsin Her

    2013-04-01

    A polyarylate (PAR) substrate was first prepared by hot pressing and then carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on its surface by a low-temperature spraying method. In order to eliminate the residual stress and enhance the adhesive ability between the substrate and the coated CNT layer, an optimal thermo-permeating process is proposed. The relationship between the thickness of the permeating layer and the residual stress of coating layers was investigated. Triple-layer structure models were provided to evaluate the residual stress of coating layers. The experimental results show that if the sample was treated by the optimal thermo-permeating process, its residual stress was dramatically reduced from 1.7×103 MPa to 0.45 Pa; meanwhile, its adhesive ability was intensively enhanced from 1B to 5B according to ASTM D3359 adhesion classifications.

  11. Preparation of carbon nanotubes as the conductive coating layer on flexible thermal-resistant substrate by permeating method and its residual stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Kai; Huang, Szu-Chun; Yu, Hsin Her

    2014-03-01

    A polyarylate (PAR) substrate was first prepared by hot pressing and then carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on its surface by a low-temperature spraying method. In order to eliminate the residual stress and enhance the adhesive ability between the substrate and the coated CNT layer, an optimal thermo-permeating process is proposed. The relationship between the thickness of the permeating layer and the residual stress of coating layers was investigated. Triple-layer structure models were provided to evaluate the residual stress of coating layers. The experimental results show that if the sample was treated by the optimal thermo-permeating process, its residual stress was dramatically reduced from 1.7×103 MPa to 0.45 Pa; meanwhile, its adhesive ability was intensively enhanced from 1B to 5B according to ASTM D3359 adhesion classifications.

  12. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Conductive Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.

    1996-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate the corrosion protection performance of twenty nine proprietary conductive polymer coatings for cold rolled steel under immersion in 3.55 percent NaCl. Corrosion potential as well as Bode plots of the data were obtained for each coating after one hour immersion, All coatings, with the exception of one, have a corrosion potential that is higher in the positive direction than the corrosion potential of bare steel under the same conditions. Group A consisted of twenty one coatings with Bode plots indicative of the capacitive behavior characteristic of barrier coatings. An equivalent circuit consisting of a capacitor in series with a resistor simulated the experimental EIS data for these coatings very well. Group B consisted of eight coatings that exhibited EIS spectra showing an inflection point which indicates that two time constants are present. This may be caused by an electrochemical process taking place which could be indicitive of coating failing. These coatings have a lower impedance that those in Group A.

  13. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  14. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  15. Conducting polymers as corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Although the majority of top coatings used for corrosion protection are electrically insulating, previous workers have proposed using an electrically active barrier for corrosion control. The most effective corrosion resistant undercoatings in use today are based on chromium compounds. Coatings based on other materials will need to replace these coatings by the turn of the century because of environmental and health concerns. For this reason the authors have begun an investigation of the use of conducting polymers as corrosion resistant coatings as an alternative to metal-based coatings. Conducting polymers have long been considered to be unsuitable for commercial processing, hindering their use for practical applications. Research in the field of electrically conducting polymers has recently produced a number of polymers such as polyaniline and its derivatives which are readily soluble in common organic solvents. The authors coating system, consisting of a conducting polyaniline primer layer, topcoated with epoxy or polyurethane, has been evaluated for corrosion resistance on mild steel substrates. In this paper, the authors report the results of laboratory testing under acidic and saline conditions and the results of testing in the severe launch environment at the Beach Testing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The launch environment consists of exposure to corrosive HCl exhaust fumes and the salt spray from the Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Battery plate containing filler with conductive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The plate (10) comprises a matrix or binder resin phase (12) in which is dispersed particulate, conductive tin oxide such as tin oxide coated glass fibers (14). A monopolar plate (11) is prepared by coating a layer (18) of electrolytically active material onto a surface of the plate (10). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating a surface of the plate (10) with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (22) of lead adhered to the plate with a layer (21) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten dispersion from mixer (36) onto a sheet (30) of lead foil or by passing an assembly of a sheet (41) of resin, a sheet (43) of fiberglass and a sheet (45) of lead between the nip of heated rollers (48, 50).

  17. Battery plate containing filler with conductive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The plate (10) comprises a matrix or binder resin phase (12) in which is dispersed particulate, conductive tin oxide such as tin oxide coated glass fibers (14). A monopolar plate (11) is prepared by coating a layer (18) of electrolytically active material onto a surface of the plate (10). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating a surface of the plate (10) with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (22) of lead adhered to the plate with a layer (21) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten dispersion from mixer (36) onto a sheet (30) of lead foil or by passing an assembly of a sheet (41) of resin, a sheet (43) of fiberglass and a sheet (45) of lead between the nip of heated rollers (48, 50).

  18. Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used extensively in modern gas turbine engines to thermally insulate air-cooled metallic components from the hot gases in the engine. These coatings typically consist of a zirconia-yttria ceramic that has been applied by either plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition. Future engines will rely even more heavily on TBCs and will require materials that have even higher temperature capability with improved insulation (i.e., lower thermal conductivity even after many hours at high temperature). This report discusses new TBCs that have been developed with these future requirements in mind. The Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is funding this effort, which has been conducted primarily at Glenn with contractor support (GE and Howmet) for physical vapor deposition. As stated, the new TBC not only had to be more insulating but the insulation had to persist even after many hours of exposure-that is, the new TBC had to have both lower conductivity and improved sintering resistance. A new type of test rig was developed for this task. This new test approach used a laser to deliver a known high heat flux in an essentially uniform pattern to the surface of the coating, thereby establishing a realistic thermal gradient across its thickness. This gradient was determined from surface and backside pyrometry; and since the heat flux and coating thickness are known, this permitted continuous monitoring of thermal conductivity. Thus, this laser rig allowed very efficient screening of candidate low-conductivity, sinter-resistant TBCs. The coating-design approach selected for these new low-conductivity TBCs was to identify oxide dopants that had the potential to promote the formation of relatively large and stable groupings of defects known as defect clusters. This approach was used because it was felt that such clusters would reduce conductivity while enhancing stability. The approach proved to be

  19. Thermal Spreading in Carbon Nanotube Coating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duckjong; Shin, Dong-Sig; Yu, Jeonghwan; Kim, Haesik; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Woo, Chang-Su

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, have attracted significant attention as good candidates for next-generation heat-spreading materials because of their high thermal conductivity, mechanical flexibility, etc. Regarding the thermal spreading performance of carbon-based nanofilms, remarkable test results have been reported mainly from the industrial side, but their validity and the physical mechanism underlying the heat transfer enhancement are still under debate. In this study, we assess the thermal spreading performance of a multi-walled CNT film on a copper foil using a non-contact characterization method in a simple and methodical manner, and discuss the possibility of carbon nanofilms as heat spreaders based on the experimental and numerical results. This study provides useful information on heat transfer enhancement by carbon nanofilms and could contribute to the development of high-performance carbon-based heat-spreading coatings. PMID:26726629

  20. Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Supriyo; Anatram, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent report of quantized conductance in a 4 m long multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) raises the exciting possibility of ballistic transport at room temperature over relatively long distances. We argue that this is made possible by the special symmetry of the eigenstates of the lowest propagating modes in metallic nanotubes which suppresses backscattering. This unusual effect is absent for the higher propagating modes so that transport is not ballistic once the bias exceeds the cut-off energy for the higher modes, which is estimated to be approximately 75 meV for nanotubes of diameter approximately 15 nm. Also, we show that the symmetry of the eigenstates can significantly affect their coupling to the reservoir and hence the contact resistance. A simple model is presented that can be used to understand the observed conductance-voltage characteristics.

  1. Conduction in Carbon Nanotube Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, A. B.; Rogers, S. A.

    2003-10-01

    Recent measurements of the resistivity of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks are consistent with our model of metallic conduction interrupted by barriers. We extend our model of thermopower nonlinearities due to peaks in the density of electronic states and apply it to recent thermopower data for carbon nanotube networks.

  2. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm. PMID:27174890

  3. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-05-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm.

  4. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm. PMID:27174890

  5. Carbon nanotube based functional superhydrophobic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Sunny

    The main objective of this dissertation is synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT) based superhydrophobic materials. The materials were designed such that electrical and mechanical properties of CNTs could be combined with superhydrophobicity to create materials with unique properties, such as self-cleaning adhesives, miniature flotation devices, ice-repellant coatings, and coatings for heat transfer furnaces. The coatings were divided into two broad categories based on CNT structure: Vertically aligned CNT arrays (VA coatings) and mesh-like (non-aligned) carbon nanotube arrays (NA coatings). VA coatings were used to create self-cleaning adhesives and flexible field emission devices. Coatings with self cleaning property along with high adhesiveness were inspired from structure found on gecko foot. Gecko foot is covered with thousands of microscopic hairs called setae; these setae are further divided into hundreds of nanometer sized hairs called spatulas. When gecko presses its foot against any surface, these hairs bend and conform to the topology of the surface resulting into very large area of contact. Such large area of intimate contact allows geckos to adhere to surfaces using van der Waals (vdW) interactions alone. VA-CNTs adhere to a variety of surfaces using a similar mechanism. CNTs of suitable diameter could withstand four times higher adhesion force than gecko foot. We found that upon soiling these CNT based adhesives (gecko tape) could be cleaned using a water droplet (lotus effect) or by applying vibrations. These materials could be used for applications requiring reversible adhesion. VA coatings were also used for developing field emission devices. A single CNT can emit electrons at very low threshold voltages. Achieving efficient electron emission on large scale has a lot of challenges such as screening effect, pull-off and lower current efficiency. We have explored the use of polymer-CNT composite structures to overcome these challenges in this work. NA

  6. Interconnecting conductively coated coverslides. [for ISEE-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, E. M.; Bass, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Sun Earth Explorer-1 has the requirement that the entire outer surface of the spacecraft be conductive. A transparent coating of indium oxide was deposited for that reason on the satellite's solar cell coverglasses in order to give them a conductive surface, and the surfaces were interconnected to ground. This paper examines the interconnector attachment problem. On the ISEE-1, wires were bonded to the coverglasses by using a conductive epoxy; the resistance of these bonds increased dramatically with time. A program was initiated to find the functional cause of the resistance increase and to flight-qualify an alternative method of bonding. It was found the tests initiated were insufficient to find the cause of resistance increase and that an alternative solution of using indium solder is acceptable for bonding wires directly to indium oxide.

  7. Lower-Conductivity Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) that have both initial and post-exposure thermal conductivities lower than those of yttria-stabilized zirconia TBCs have been developed. TBCs are thin ceramic layers, generally applied by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition, that are used to insulate air-cooled metallic components from hot gases in gas turbine and other heat engines. Heretofore, yttria-stabilized zirconia (nominally comprising 95.4 atomic percent ZrO2 + 4.6 atomic percent Y2O3) has been the TBC material of choice. The lower-thermal-conductivity TBCs are modified versions of yttria-stabilized zirconia, the modifications consisting primarily in the addition of other oxides that impart microstructural and defect properties that favor lower thermal conductivity.

  8. Metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes for conductive nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Fernando, K A Shiral; Lin, Yi; Meziani, Mohammed J; Veca, L Monica; Cao, Li; Zhang, Puyu; Kimani, Martin M; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2008-01-30

    This article reports an unambiguous demonstration that bulk-separated metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes offer superior performance (consistently and substantially better than the as-produced nanotube sample) in conductive composites with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and also in transparent conductive coatings based on PEDOT:PSS. The results serve as a validation on the widely held view that the carbon nanotubes are competitive in various technologies currently dominated by conductive inorganic materials (such as indium tin oxide). PMID:18173271

  9. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  10. A conductive surface coating for Si-CNT radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Antonio; Valentini, Marco; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Melisi, Domenico; Aramo, Carla; Ambrosio, Antonio; Casamassima, Giuseppe; Cilmo, Marco; Fiandrini, Emanuele; Grossi, Valentina; Guarino, Fausto; Angela Nitti, Maria; Passacantando, Maurizio; Santucci, Sandro; Ambrosio, Michelangelo

    2015-08-01

    Silicon-Carbon Nanotube radiation detectors need an electrically conductive coating layer to avoid the nanotube detachment from the silicon substrate and uniformly transmit the electric field to the entire nanotube active surface. Coating material must be transparent to the radiation of interest, and must provide the drain voltage necessary to collect charges generated by incident photons. For this purpose various materials have been tested and proposed in photodetector and photoconverter applications. In this article interface properties and electrical contact behavior of Indium Tin Oxide films on Carbon Nanotubes have been analyzed. Ion Beam Sputtering has been used to grow the transparent conductive layer on the nanotubes. The films were deposited at room temperature with Oxygen/Argon mixture into the sputtering beam, at fixed current and for different beam energies. Optical and electrical analyses have been performed on films. Surface chemical analysis and in depth profiling results obtained by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Indium Tin Oxide layer on nanotubes have been used to obtain the interface composition. Results have been applied in photodetectors realization based on multi wall Carbon Nanotubes on silicon.

  11. Applications of thin carbon coatings and films in injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Eusebio Duarte

    In this research, the technical feasibility of two novel applications of thin carbon coatings is demonstrated. The first application consists of using thin carbon coatings on molds for molding ultra-thin plastic parts (<0.5 mm thickness) with lower pressures by promoting wall slip. The second application consists of a new approach to provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding for plastic parts using in mold coated nanoparticle thin films or nanopapers to create a conductive top layer. During this research, the technical feasibility of a new approach was proven which provides injection molding of ultra-thin parts at lower pressures, without the need of fast heating/fast cooling or other expensive mold modification. An in-house developed procedure by other members of our group, was employed for coating the mold surface using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) resulting in a graphene coating with carbide bonding to the mold surface. The coating resulted in a significant decrease of surface friction and consequently easiness of flow when compared to their uncoated counterparts. Thermoplastic polymers and their composites are a very attractive alternative but are hindered by the non-conductive nature of polymers. There are two general approaches used to date to achieve EMI shielding for plastic products. One is to spray a conductive metal coating onto the plastic surface forming a layer that must maintain its shielding effectiveness (SE), and its adhesion to the plastic throughout the expected life of the product. However, metal coatings add undesirable weight and tend to corrode over time. Furthermore, scratching the coating may create shielding failure; therefore, a protective topcoat may be required. The other approach is to use polymer composites filled with conductive fillers such as carbon black (CB), carbon nanofiber (CNF), and carbon nanotube (CNT). While conductive fillers may increase the electrical conductivity of polymer composites, the loading of

  12. Thermal conductivity of carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J., Jr.; Frost, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of several well-defined carbonate rocks were determined near 40??C. Values range from 1.2 W m-1 C-1 for a highly porous chalk to 5.1 W m-1 C-1 for a dolomite. The thermal conductivity of magnesite (5.0) is at the high end of the range, and that for Iceland Spar Calcite (3.2) is near the middle. The values for limestones decrease linearly with increasing porosity. Dolomites of comparable porosity have greater thermal conductivities than limestones. Water-sorbed samples have expected greater thermal conductivities than air-saturated (dry) samples of the same rock. An anomalously large increase in the thermal conductivity of a water-sorbed clayey dolomite over that of the same sample when dry is attributed to the clay fraction, which swells during water inhibition, causing more solid-to-solid contacts within the dolomite framework. Measurements were made with a Colora Thermoconductometer. Chemical and mineralogical analyses were made and tabulated. Porosity of the rocks was determined by mercury porosimetry and also from density measurements. The Iceland Spar Calcite and magnesite were included for reference. ?? 1973.

  13. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Wrobleski, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    In a joint research effort involving the Kennedy Space Center and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed as corrosion-protective coatings for metal surfaces. At the Kennedy Space Center, the launch environment consists of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid/elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  14. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karen Gebert; Bryan, Coleman J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Wrobleski, Debra A.

    1991-01-01

    In a joint effort between NASA Kennedy and LANL, electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed as corrosion protective coatings for metal surfaces. At NASA Kennedy, the launch environment consist of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid and/or elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Matthew P; Gerhardt, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce readers to the fundamental and practical aspects of nanotube assemblies made into transparent conducting networks and discuss some practical aspects of their characterization. Transparent conducting coatings (TCC) are an essential part of electro-optical devices, from photovoltaics and light emitting devices to electromagnetic shielding and electrochromic widows. The market for organic materials (including nanomaterials and polymers) based TCCs is expected to show a growth rate of 56.9% to reach nearly 20.3billionin2015,whilethemarketfortraditionalinorganictransparentelectronicswillexperiencegrowthwithratesof6.7103 billion in 2015. Emerging flexible electronic applications have brought additional requirements of flexibility and low cost for TCC. However, the price of indium (the major component in indium tin oxide TCC) continues to increase. On the other hand, the price of nanomaterials has continued to decrease due to development of high volume, quality production processes. Additional benefits come from the low cost, nonvacuum deposition of nanomaterials based TCC, compared to traditional coatings requiring energy intensive vacuum deposition. Among the materials actively researched as alternative TCC are nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes with high aspect ratio as well as their composites. The figure of merit (FOM) can be used to compare TCCs made from dissimilar materials and with different transmittance and conductivity values. In the first part of this manuscript, we will discuss the seven FOM parameters that have been proposed, including one specifically intended for flexible applications. The approach for how to measure TCE electrical properties, including frequency dependence, will also be discussed. We will relate the macroscale electrical characteristics of TCCs to the nanoscale parameters of conducting networks. The fundamental aspects of nanomaterial assemblies in conducting networks will also be addressed

  16. Pyrolytic carbon-coated nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Lindemer, Terrence B.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Beatty, Ronald L.

    1978-01-01

    An improved nuclear fuel kernel having at least one pyrolytic carbon coating and a silicon carbon layer is provided in which extensive interaction of fission product lanthanides with the silicon carbon layer is avoided by providing sufficient UO.sub.2 to maintain the lanthanides as oxides during in-reactor use of said fuel.

  17. Electrically conducting superhydrophobic microtextured carbon nanotube nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, Paul O.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2014-09-01

    We report a simple and inexpensive method of producing an electrically conductive superhydrophobic polymer surface by adding multiwall carbon nanotubes directly into the polymer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix and replicating micro/nanotexture using a replication master prepared by ultrafast-laser microtexturing process. No additional coatings on conducting PDMS are required to achieve water contact angles greater than 161°. The conductivity can be controlled by changing the percent MWCNT added to PDMS and at a bulk loading of 4.4 wt% we report a conductivity improvement over pure PDMS by a factor of more than 1011 with electrical resistivity ρ = 761 Ω cm. This combined behavior of a conductive, superhydrophobic nanocomposite has exciting applications for allowing a new class of enclosures providing EMI shielding, water repellency and sensing to provide built-in temperature feedback. The effect of temperature on the nanocomposite was investigated and a negative temperature coefficient of resistance (-0.037 Ω/K) similar to that of a thermistor was observed.

  18. Thermal Conductivity and Sintering Behavior of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings, having significantly reduced long-term thermal conductivities, are being developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  19. Conductive polymer coatings for anodes in aqueous electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfantazi, A. M.; Moskalyk, R. R.

    2003-07-01

    This article discusses the potential application of electrically conductive polymers as protective coatings for permanent lead anodes employed in aqueous electrowinning processes. Also presented are results from a preliminary study of the performance of two intrinsically conductive polymers (polyaniline and poly 3,4,5-trifluorophenylthiophene [TFPT]) under mild copper electrowinning conditions as conductive and protective coatings on anodic surfaces. The laboratory results indicated that using lead alloy anodes coated with TFPT merits continued research.

  20. Thermal conductivity of a zirconia thermal barrier coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slifka, A. J.; Filla, B. J.; Phelps, J. M.; Bancke, G.; Berndt, C. C.

    1998-03-01

    The conductivity of a thermal-barrier coating composed of atmospheric plasma sprayed 8 mass percent yttria partially stabilized zirconia has been measured. This coating was sprayed on a substrate of 410 stainless steel. An absolute, steady-state measurement method was used to measure thermal conductivity from 400 to 800 K. The thermal conductivity of the coating is 0.62 W/(m·K). This measurement has shown to be temperature independent.

  1. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the apparent thermal conductivity of the coating to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature and the scattering and absorption properties of the coating material. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can also be derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. The model prediction is found to have good agreement with experimental observations.

  2. Tests Of Protective Coats For Carbon Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G., III

    1995-01-01

    Report describes laboratory and field tests of candidate paints (primers, tie coats, and topcoats) for use in protecting carbon-steel structures against corrosion in seaside environment at Kennedy Space Center. Coating materials selected because of utility in preventing corrosion, also on basis of legal requirements, imposed in several urban areas, for reduction of volatile organic contents.

  3. Coaxial three-dimensional CoMoO4 nanowire arrays with conductive coating on carbon cloth for high-performance lithium ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yaping; Liu, Borui; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Hongsen; Jing, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-01

    Nanostructured transition metal oxides have attracted considerable attentions for both high-capacity and high-rate, but great challenges remain to utilize them. In order to overcome these challenges, hierarchical three-dimensional CoMoO4/polypyrrole core-shell nanowire (NW) arrays on flexible and conductive carbon cloth (CC) have been successfully constructed through a facile two-step solution-based approach. The hybrid NWs electrode as a binder-free lithium ion batteries (LIBs) anode material exhibits a reversible capacity of around 1400-1450 mAh g-1 at a low current density of 100 mA g-1. The specific capacity retains at 753 mAh g-1 while featuring an excellent cycling properties with a capacity of 764 mAh g-1 after 1000 cycles under the current rate of 1200 mA g-1. Furthermore, full batteries have been fabricated and demonstrated characteristics of outstanding electrical stability and superior power output characteristics, which represents an efficient way for practical implementation.

  4. Fabrication of Ketjen black-polybenzoxazine superhydrophobic conductive composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lie; Ding, Hongliang; Wang, Wen; Guo, Qipeng

    2013-03-01

    Superhydrophobic conductive Ketjen black-polybenzoxazine (KB-PBZ) composite coatings were prepared by a simple drop casting method with high static water contact angle (˜160°), low sliding angle (˜3°), and low sheet resistance (103 Ω/sq). The relationship between Ketjen black amounts and the structure and properties of the composite coatings was investigated. Under appropriate conditions, the composite coatings showed hierarchically structured roughness and possessed superhydrophobicity over the whole range of pH values. These coatings exhibited excellent thermal and environmental stability. Moreover, the superhydrophobic conductive composite coatings also can be obtained on various substrates such as wood, aluminum foil, paper, polyethylene terephthalate film and fabric.

  5. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-08-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  6. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    DOEpatents

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  7. Void forming pyrolytic carbon coating process

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, R.L.; Cook, J.L.

    2000-06-27

    A pyrolytic carbon coated nuclear fuel particle and method of making it are disclosed. The fuel particle has a core composed of a refractory compound of an actinide metal. The pyrolytic carbon coating surrounds the core so as to provide a void volume therebetween. The coating has an initial density of no greater than 1.45 grams/cm{sup 3} and an anisotropy factor than 3.0 and a final density upon heat treatment above about 2,000 C of greater than 1.7 grams/cm{sup 3} and an anisotropy factor greater than 5.

  8. Void forming pyrolytic carbon coating process

    DOEpatents

    Beatty, Ronald L.; Cook, Jackie L.

    2000-01-01

    A pyrolytic carbon coated nuclear fuel particle and method of making it. The fuel particle has a core composed of a refractory compound of an actinide metal. The pyrolytic carbon coating surrounds the core so as to provide a void volume therebetween. The coating has an initial density of no greater than 1.45 grams/cm.sup.3 and an anisotropy factor than 3.0 and a final density upon heat treatment above about 2000.degree. C. of greater than 1.7 grams/cm.sup.3 and an anisotropy factor greater than 5.

  9. Fully solution-processed transparent conducting oxide-free counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells: spray-coated single-wall carbon nanotube thin films loaded with chemically-reduced platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Yong; Kim, Yesel; Lee, Kyung Moon; Yoon, Woo Sug; Lee, Ho Seok; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Seung-Joo; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Tai Kyu; Lee, Soonil

    2014-08-27

    We report fully solution-processed fabrication of transparent conducting oxide-free counter electrodes (CEs) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by combining spray-coating of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and chemical reduction of chloroplatinic acid precursor to platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) with formic acid. The power conversion efficiency of a semitransparent DSSC with such SWCNT-based CE loaded with Pt NPs is comparable to that of a control device with a conventional CE. Quantification of Pt loading shows that network morphology of entangled SWCNTs is efficient in forming and retaining chemically reduced Pt NPs. Moreover, electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results show that mainly Pt NPs, which are tens of nanometers in diameter and reside at the surface of SWCNT CEs, contribute to electrocatalytic activity for triiodide reduction, to which we attribute strong correlation between power conversion efficiency of DSSCs and time constant deduced from equivalent-circuit analysis of impedance spectra. PMID:25122074

  10. Carbon coating may expedite the fracture of carbon-coated silicon core-shell nanoparticles during lithiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiqun; Cao, Ke; Wang, Hongtao; Liu, Jiabin; Zhou, Limin; Yao, Haimin

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies on silicon (Si) indicate that lithiation-induced fracture of crystalline Si nanoparticles can be greatly inhibited if their diameter is reduced to below a critical scale of around 150 nm. In this paper, in situ lithiation of individual carbon-coated Si nanoparticles (Si@C NPs) is conducted which shows that Si@C NPs will fracture during lithiation even though their diameter is much smaller than 150 nm, implying a deleterious effect of the carbon coating on the integrity of the Si@C NPs during lithiation. To shed light on this effect, finite element analysis is carried out which reveals that the carbon coating, if fractured during lithiation, will induce cracks terminating at the C/Si interface. Such cracks, upon further lithiation, can immediately propagate into the Si core due to the elevated driving force caused by material inhomogeneity between the coating and core. To prevent the fracture of the carbon coating so as to protect the Si core, a design guideline is proposed by controlling the ratio between the diameter of Si core and the thickness of carbon coating. The results in this paper should be of practical value to the design and application of Si-based core-shell structured anode materials for lithium ion batteries. PMID:26878967

  11. Processing and characterization of Ultrathin carbon coatings on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Rajagopalan, R.; Robinson, J.; Pantano, C.G.

    2009-04-15

    Ultrathin carbon layers, on the order of 3-6 nm in thickness, were formed on glass substrates by spin coating and pyrolysis of polymer precursors. The organic precursors used were poly(furfuryl alcohol), coal tar pitch, and a photoresist. The carbon coatings were characterized by ellipsometry, optical profilometry, water contact angle, confocal Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. We also report the transparency, hydrophobicity, friction, weathering resistance, and electrical conductivity of the carbon-coated glass. The results reveal that up to 97% transparent, ultrathin carbon films could be formed on glass substrates with a root-mean-square roughness of less than about to 0.3 nm. This carbon layer modified the otherwise hydrophilic surface of the glass to yield a water contact angle of 85{sup o}. The coatings were also found to provide a water barrier against weathering under hot and humid conditions. A 4.5-nm-thick carbon film on glass had a sheet resistance of 55.6 k {Omega} m and a conductivity of 40 S/cm.

  12. Measurement of the thermal contact conductance and thermal conductivity of anodized aluminum coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.P.; Fletcher, L.S. )

    1990-08-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the thermal contact conductance and effective thermal conductivity of anodized coatings. One chemically polished Aluminum 6061-T6 test specimen and seven specimens with anodized coatings varying in thickness from 60.9 {mu}m to 163.8 {mu}m were tested while in contact with a single unanodized aluminum surface. Measurements of the overall joint conductance, composed of the thermal contact conductance between the anodized coating and the bare aluminum surface and the bulk conductance of the coating material, indicated that the overall joint conductance decreased with increasing thickness of the anodized coating and increased with increasing interfacial load. Using the experimental data, a dimensionless expression was developed that related the overall joint conductance to the coating thickness, the surface roughness, the interfacial pressure, and the properties of the aluminum substrate. By subtracting the thermal contact conductance from the measured overall joint conductance, estimations of the effective thermal conductivity of the anodized coating as a function of pressure were obtained for each of the seven anodized specimens. At an extrapolated pressure of zero, the effective thermal conductivity was found to be approximately 0.02 W/m-K. In addition to this extrapolated value, a single expression for predicting the effective thermal conductivity as a function of both the interface pressure and the anodized coating thickness was developed and shown to be within {plus minus}5 percent of the experimental data over a pressure range of 0 to 14 MPa.

  13. Carbon-coated nanoparticle superlattices for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Yiliguma, Affa; Wang, Yifei; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) superlattices represent a unique material architecture for energy conversion and storage. Recent reports on carbon-coated NP superlattices have shown exciting electrochemical properties attributed to their rationally designed compositions and structures, fast electron transport, short diffusion length, and abundant reactive sites via enhanced coupling between close-packed NPs, which are distinctive from their isolated or disordered NP or bulk counterparts. In this minireview, we summarize the recent developments of highly-ordered and interconnected carbon-coated NP superlattices featuring high surface area, tailorable and uniform doping, high conductivity, and structure stability. We then introduce the precisely-engineered NP superlattices by tuning/studying specific aspects, including intermetallic structures, long-range ordering control, and carbon coating methods. In addition, these carbon-coated NP superlattices exhibit promising characteristics in energy-oriented applications, in particular, in the fields of lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells, and electrocatalysis. Finally, the challenges and perspectives are discussed to further explore the carbon-coated NP superlattices for optimized electrochemical performances.

  14. Carbon-coated nanoparticle superlattices for energy applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Yiliguma; Wang, Yifei; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-08-14

    Nanoparticle (NP) superlattices represent a unique material architecture for energy conversion and storage. Recent reports on carbon-coated NP superlattices have shown exciting electrochemical properties attributed to their rationally designed compositions and structures, fast electron transport, short diffusion length, and abundant reactive sites via enhanced coupling between close-packed NPs, which are distinctive from their isolated or disordered NP or bulk counterparts. In this minireview, we summarize the recent developments of highly-ordered and interconnected carbon-coated NP superlattices featuring high surface area, tailorable and uniform doping, high conductivity, and structure stability. We then introduce the precisely-engineered NP superlattices by tuning/studying specific aspects, including intermetallic structures, long-range ordering control, and carbon coating methods. In addition, these carbon-coated NP superlattices exhibit promising characteristics in energy-oriented applications, in particular, in the fields of lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells, and electrocatalysis. Finally, the challenges and perspectives are discussed to further explore the carbon-coated NP superlattices for optimized electrochemical performances. PMID:27432112

  15. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  16. Carbon and oxide coatings on continuous ceramic fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, R.S.; Cinibulk, M.K.; Petry, M.D.; Keller, K.A.; Welch, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Oxide-carbon multilayer coatings were continuously applied to various fibers of nominal SiC composition. A liquid-phase coating system that allows application of the coatings in a controlled atmosphere at relatively rapid rates was employed. Sugar-ammonium hydroxide solutions were used for carbon coatings, and aqueous sols were used for the oxides. Carbon was also deposited simultaneously with alumina by chemical vapor deposition of a hydrocarbon in the coating furnace. The coatings were extensively characterized by optical microscopy and TEM. Problems with embrittlement by oxide coatings and poor adherence of oxide coatings on carbon, and some possible solutions to these problems, are discussed.

  17. Optimization and Testing of Electrically Conductive Spacecraft Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report discussing work done for the Space Environmental Effects (SEE) program in the Materials and Processes Laboratory, on electrically conductive thermal control coatings. These thermal control coatings are being developed to have several orders of magnitude lower electrical resistivity than most available thermal control coatings. Extensive research has taken place over the last few years to develop a variety of spacecraft coatings with the unique property of being able to conduct surface charge to a substrate or grounding system. The ability to conduct surface charge to a safe point, while maintaining optical properties and performance, is highly advantageous in maintaining operational space based systems. Without this mechanism the surface of a spacecraft can accumulate charge to the point that a catastrophic electrical breakdown can occur, resulting in damage to or failure of the spacecraft. Ultimately, use of this type of coating will help mitigate many of the concerns that NASA and the space industry still have for their space based systems. The unique coatings studied here fall into two specific categories: 1) broadband absorber and 2) selective absorber. These coatings have controllable solar absorptance and electrical surface resistivity values over the designated ranges. These coatings were developed under an SBIR program which focused on the development of such constituents and coatings. This project focused on simulated space environmental effects testing with the intent of using this data to help optimize the stability and initial properties of these coatings.

  18. Diamond-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Field Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Stevan; Withers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission cathodes containing arrays of carbon nanotubes coated with diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) are undergoing development. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been shown to perform well as electron field emitters. The idea underlying the present development is that by coating carbon nanotubes with wideband- gap materials like diamond or DLC, one could reduce effective work functions, thereby reducing threshold electric-field levels for field emission of electrons and, hence, improving cathode performance. To demonstrate feasibility, experimental cathodes were fabricated by (1) covering metal bases with carbon nanotubes bound to the bases by an electrically conductive binder and (2) coating the nanotubes, variously, with diamond or DLC by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In tests, the threshold electric-field levels for emission of electrons were reduced by as much as 40 percent, relative to those of uncoated- nanotube cathodes. Coating with diamond or DLC could also make field emission-cathodes operate more stably by helping to prevent evaporation of carbon from nanotubes in the event of overheating of the cathodes. Cathodes of this type are expected to be useful principally as electron sources for cathode-ray tubes and flat-panel displays.

  19. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  20. Test Of Protective Coatings On Carbon Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis

    1993-01-01

    Report describes results of tests in which carbon-steel panels coated with one-or two-component solvent-based inorganic zinc primers and top-coated with inorganic topcoat or any of various organic topcoats, placed on outdoor racks at beach at Kennedy Space Center for 5 years. From time to time, slurry of Al(2)O(3) in 10-percent HCI solution applied to some of panels to simulate corrosive effect of effluent from solid-fuel rocket booster engines. Panels coated with inorganic topcoat performed much better than organic-topcoated panels.

  1. Polyaniline: a conductive polymer coating for durable nanospray emitters

    PubMed

    Maziarz; Lorenz; White; Wood

    2000-07-01

    Despite the tremendous sensitivity and lower sample requirements for nanospray vs. conventional electrospray, metallized nanospray emitters have suffered from one of two problems: low mechanical stability (leading to emitter failure) or lengthy, tedious production methods. Here, we describe a simple alternative to metallized tips using polyaniline (PANI), a synthetic polymer well known for its high conductivity, anticorrosion properties, antistatic properties, and mechanical stability. A simple method for coating borosilicate emitters (1.2 mm o.d.) pulled to fine tapers (4 +/- 1 microm) with water-soluble and xylene-soluble dispersions of conductive polyaniline (which allows for electrical contact at the emitter outlet) is described. The polyaniline-coated emitters show high durability and are resistant to electrical discharge, likely because of the thick (yet optically transparent) coatings; a single emitter can be used over a period of days for multiple samples with no visible indication of the destruction of the polyaniline coating. The optical transparency of the coating also allows the user to visualize the sample plug loaded into the emitter. Examples of nanospray using coatings of the water-soluble and xylene-soluble polyaniline dispersions are given. A comparison of PANI-coated and gold-coated nanospray emitters to conventional electrospray ionization (ESI) show that PANI-coated emitters provide similar enhanced sensitivity that gold-coated emitters exhibit vs. conventional ESI. PMID:10883822

  2. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  3. The effect of formic acid concentration on the conductivity and corrosion resistance of chromium carbide coatings electroplated with trivalent chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chen-En; Pu, Nen-Wen; Hou, Kung-Hsu; Tseng, Chun-Chieh; Ger, Ming-Der

    2013-10-01

    Different concentrations of formic acid were added into a trivalent chromium electroplating solution to produce chromium carbide (Crsbnd C) coatings. The influence of the formic acid concentration on chemical composition, microstructure, surface morphology, corrosion resistance, conductivity and carbon content of the resulting Crsbnd C coatings was studied. Formic acid was found to increase the carbon content in the coatings so as to form Crsbnd C films. These coatings had a nearly amorphous structure containing Cr, Cr2O3, and various Crsbnd C compounds with carbon content uniformly distributed throughout the coatings. The carbon content and the conductivity of the Crsbnd C layer were correlated with formic acid concentration. For a formic acid concentration of 2 M, the Crsbnd C layer had the highest carbon content (∼28%), the lowest contact resistance, and the best corrosion resistance along with a corrosion current density of ∼6.4 × 10-7 A/cm2.

  4. Sulfur-infiltrated graphene-backboned mesoporous carbon nanosheets with a conductive polymer coating for long-life lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yanfeng; Liu, Shaohong; Wang, Zhiyu; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Zongbin; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-04-01

    Sandwich-type, two-dimensional hybrid nanosheets were fabricated by the infiltration of nanosized sulfur into graphene-backboned mesoporous carbon with a PPy nanocoating. They exhibit a high reversible capacity for as long as 400 cycles with an ultra slow decay rate of 0.05% per cycle at the high rate of 1-3 C due to the efficient immobilization of polysulfides.Sandwich-type, two-dimensional hybrid nanosheets were fabricated by the infiltration of nanosized sulfur into graphene-backboned mesoporous carbon with a PPy nanocoating. They exhibit a high reversible capacity for as long as 400 cycles with an ultra slow decay rate of 0.05% per cycle at the high rate of 1-3 C due to the efficient immobilization of polysulfides. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, BET, SEM, XPS and more electrochemical data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01015b

  5. Sulfur-infiltrated graphene-backboned mesoporous carbon nanosheets with a conductive polymer coating for long-life lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanfeng; Liu, Shaohong; Wang, Zhiyu; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Zongbin; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-05-01

    Sandwich-type, two-dimensional hybrid nanosheets were fabricated by the infiltration of nanosized sulfur into graphene-backboned mesoporous carbon with a PPy nanocoating. They exhibit a high reversible capacity for as long as 400 cycles with an ultra slow decay rate of 0.05% per cycle at the high rate of 1-3 C due to the efficient immobilization of polysulfides. PMID:25832361

  6. Quantum conductance steps in solutions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Urbina, A; Echeverría, I; Pérez-Garrido, A; Díaz-Sánchez, A; Abellán, J

    2003-03-14

    We have prepared solutions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in Aroclor 1254, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls. The solutions are stable at room temperature. Transport measurements were performed using a scanning-tunneling probe on a sample prepared by spin coating the solution on gold substrates. Conductance steps were clearly seen. A histogram of a high number of traces shows maximum peaks at integer values of the conductance quantum G(0)=2e(2)/h, demonstrating ballistic transport at room temperature along the carbon nanotube over distances longer than 1.4 microm. PMID:12689021

  7. Oxidative Attack of Carbon/Carbon Substrates through Coating Pinholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Leonhardt, Todd; Curry, Donald; Rapp, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    A critical issue with oxidation protected carbon/carbon composites used for spacecraft thermal protection is the formation of coating pinholes. In laboratory experiments, artificial pinholes were drilled through SiC-coatings on a carbon/carbon material and the material was oxidized at 600, 1000, and 1400 C at reduced pressures of air. The attack of the carbon/carbon was quantified by both weight loss and a novel cross-sectioning technique. A two-zone, one dimensional diffusion control model was adapted to analyze this problem. Agreement of the model with experiment was reasonable at 1000 and 1400 C; however results at lower temperatures show clear deviations from the theory suggesting that surface reaction control plays a role.

  8. Conductance Oscillations in Squashed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrez, H.; Anantram, M. P.; Svizhenko, A.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics and electrical conductance calculations are used to probe the electromechanical properties of squashed metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance and bandgap of armchair nanotubes show oscillations upon squashing. The physical origin of these oscillations is attributed to interaction of carbon atoms with a fourth neighbor. Squashing of armchair and zigzag nanotubes ultimately leads to metallic behavior.

  9. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    Using a continuous powder coating process, more than 1500 meters of T 300/LaRC-TPI prepreg were produced. Two different types of heating sections in the coating line, namely electrical resistance and convection heating, were utilized. These prepregs were used to fabricate unidirectional composites. During composite fabrication the cure time of the consolidation was varied, and composites samples were produced with and without vacuum. Under these specimens, the effects of the different heating sections and of the variation of the consolidation parameters on mechanical properties and void content were investigated. The void fractions of the various composites were determined from density measurements, and the mechanical properties were measured by tensile testing, short beam shear testing and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  10. Development of Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced multi-component, low conductivity oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities and improved thermal stability due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  11. An electro-conductive organic coating for scanning electron microscopy (déjà vu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Bryan R.

    2014-09-01

    An organic compound, originally marketed as an antistatic, can form an extremely thin electro-conductive coating upon drying. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) application for this compound was first explored in the late 1960s. A coating of this compound eliminates the need for carbon or gold coating in some applications. It is well suited for the viewing of fabric samples and associated gunshot residue (GSR) in the SEM and makes it possible to quickly analyze fabric bullet wipe and bore wipe GSR. Fabric samples can also be examined for GSR from intermediate-range shots to estimate muzzle-target distances. Scanning

  12. Carbon-coated anatase titania as a high rate anode for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Yu, Chan-Yeop; Kim, Sun-Jae; Sun, Yang-Kook; Myung, Seung-Taek

    2015-05-01

    Anatase titania nanorods/nanowires, and TiO2(B) are synthesized via a hydrothermal reaction of commercial TiO2 (P-25) in strong alkaline environment. Surfaces of these products are modified by carbon to improve the electrical conductivity through carbonization of pitch as the carbon source at 700 °C for 2 h in an Ar atmosphere. Even after carbon coating, the resultants exhibit the same crystal structure and morphology as confirmed by Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data and transmission electron microscopic observation that the images display thin carbon coating layers on the surfaces of anatase nanorods and nanowires. Although the bare and carbon-coated anatase TiO2 nanorods exhibit stable cycling performance, the high rate performance is highly dependent on the presence of carbon because of high electrical conductivity, ∼10-1 S cm-1, enabling Li+ ion storage even at 30 °C (9.9 A g-1) approximately 100 mAh (g-TiO2)-1 for the carbon-coated anatase TiO2 nanorods. Besides, the bare and carbon-coated anatase TiO2 nanowires show poor electrode performances due to their large particle size and high crystallinity causing Li+ insertion into the host structure difficult. It is believed that the conducting carbon coating layers greatly improves the electrochemical property through the improved electrical conductivity and shortened diffusion path.

  13. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  14. Functional Carbon Nanocomposite, Optoelectronic, and Catalytic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu Teng

    Over the past couple decades, fundamental research into carbon nanomaterials has produced a steady stream of groundbreaking physical science. Their record setting mechanical strength, chemical stability, and optoelectronic performance have fueled many optimistic claims regarding the breadth and pace of carbon nanotube and graphene integration. However, present synthetic, processing, and economic constraints have precluded these materials from many practical device applications. To overcome these limitations, novel synthetic techniques, processing methodologies, device geometries, and mechanistic insight were developed in this dissertation. The resulting advancements in material production and composite device performance have brought carbon nanomaterials ever closer to commercial implementation. For improved materials processing, vacuum co-deposition was first demonstrated as viable technique for forming carbon nanocomposite films without property distorting covalent modifications. Co-deposited nanoparticle, carbon nanotube, and graphene composite films enabled rapid device prototyping and compositional optimization. Cellulosic polymer stabilizers were then shown to be highly effective carbon nanomaterial dispersants, improving graphene production yields by two orders of magnitude in common organic solvents. By exploiting polarity interactions, iterative solvent exchange was used to further increase carbon nanomaterial dispersion concentrations by an additional order of magnitude, yielding concentrated inks. On top of their low causticity, these cellulosic nanomaterial inks have highly tunable viscosities, excellent film forming capacity, and outstanding thermal stability. These processing characteristics enable the efficient scaling of carbon nanomaterial coatings and device production using existing roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Utilizing these process improvements, high-performance gas sensing, energy storage, transparent conductor, and photocatalytic

  15. Improving cochlear implant properties through conductive hydrogel coatings.

    PubMed

    Hassarati, Rachelle T; Dueck, Wolfram F; Tasche, Claudia; Carter, Paul M; Poole-Warren, Laura A; Green, Rylie A

    2014-03-01

    Conductive hydrogel (CH) coatings for biomedical electrodes have shown considerable promise in improving electrode mechanical and charge transfer properties. While they have desirable properties as a bulk material, there is limited understanding of how these properties translate to a microelectrode array. This study evaluated the performance of CH coatings applied to Nucleus Contour Advance cochlear electrode arrays. Cyclic voltammetry and biphasic stimulation were carried out to determine electrical properties of the coated arrays. Electrical testing demonstrated that CH coatings supported up to 24 times increase in charge injection limit. Reduced impedance was also maintained for over 1 billion stimulations without evidence of delamination or degradation. Mechanical studies performed showed negligible effect of the coating on the pre-curl structure of the Contour Advance arrays. Testing the coating in a model human scala tympani confirmed that adequate contact was maintained across the lateral wall. CH coatings are a viable, stable coating for improving electrical properties of the platinum arrays while imparting a softer material interface to reduce mechanical mismatch. Ultimately, these coatings may act to minimize scar tissue formation and fluid accumulation around electrodes and thus improve the electrical performance of neural implants. PMID:24608692

  16. Carbon coatings on polymers and their biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubáček, T.; Siegel, J.; Khalili, R.; Slepičková-Kasálková, N.; Švorčík, V.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we modified the surface properties of polymer foils (polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) by flash evaporation of carbon layers (C-layers). Adhesion and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) on carbon coated PTFE and PET were studied in vitro. Chemical composition of deposited C-layers was determined by Raman spectroscopy, surface contact angle was measured by goniometry. Surface morphology of carbon coated samples was studied using atomic force microscopy. Electrical properties of deposited C-layers were determined by measuring its sheet resistance. It was found that the carbon deposition leads to a decrease of surface roughness of PTFE and PET and to a significant increase of sample wettability. Electrical resistance and wettability of deposited C-layers depends significantly on both the thickness of C-layer and the type of polymeric substrate used. It was found that maximal stimulation of the VSMC (adhesion and proliferation) on carbon coated polymers depends on the surface roughness and contact angle of cell carriers used.

  17. Carbon coating may expedite the fracture of carbon-coated silicon core-shell nanoparticles during lithiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqun; Cao, Ke; Wang, Hongtao; Liu, Jiabin; Zhou, Limin; Yao, Haimin

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies on silicon (Si) indicate that lithiation-induced fracture of crystalline Si nanoparticles can be greatly inhibited if their diameter is reduced to below a critical scale of around 150 nm. In this paper, in situ lithiation of individual carbon-coated Si nanoparticles (Si@C NPs) is conducted which shows that Si@C NPs will fracture during lithiation even though their diameter is much smaller than 150 nm, implying a deleterious effect of the carbon coating on the integrity of the Si@C NPs during lithiation. To shed light on this effect, finite element analysis is carried out which reveals that the carbon coating, if fractured during lithiation, will induce cracks terminating at the C/Si interface. Such cracks, upon further lithiation, can immediately propagate into the Si core due to the elevated driving force caused by material inhomogeneity between the coating and core. To prevent the fracture of the carbon coating so as to protect the Si core, a design guideline is proposed by controlling the ratio between the diameter of Si core and the thickness of carbon coating. The results in this paper should be of practical value to the design and application of Si-based core-shell structured anode materials for lithium ion batteries.Previous studies on silicon (Si) indicate that lithiation-induced fracture of crystalline Si nanoparticles can be greatly inhibited if their diameter is reduced to below a critical scale of around 150 nm. In this paper, in situ lithiation of individual carbon-coated Si nanoparticles (Si@C NPs) is conducted which shows that Si@C NPs will fracture during lithiation even though their diameter is much smaller than 150 nm, implying a deleterious effect of the carbon coating on the integrity of the Si@C NPs during lithiation. To shed light on this effect, finite element analysis is carried out which reveals that the carbon coating, if fractured during lithiation, will induce cracks terminating at the C/Si interface. Such cracks, upon

  18. Performance of carbon-based hot frit substrates. 2, Coating performance studies in hydrogen at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, R.; Vanier, P.; Adams, J.; Svandrlik, J.; Powell, J.R.

    1993-07-01

    Erosion tests were conducted on coated graphite and 2D, 3D carbon- carbons in 1 atm hydrogen at high temperatures. Refractory NbC, TaC coatings were used. It was found that the most effective combination of coating and substrate was TaC deposited by chemical vapor reaction method on AXF-5QI graphite.

  19. Metallic coatings for enhancement of thermal contact conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S. )

    1994-04-01

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. Some metallic coatings, when applied to the card rail, would deform under load, increasing the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates the enhancements in thermal conductance afforded by vapor deposited silver and gold coatings. Experimental thermal conductance measurements were made for anodized aluminum 6101-T6 and electroless nickel-plated copper C11000-H03 card materials to the aluminum A356-T61 rail material. Conductance values for the electroless nickel-plated copper junction ranged from 600 to 2800 W/m(exp 2)K and those for the anodized aluminum junction ranged from 25 to 91 W/m(exp 2)K for contact pressures of 0.172-0.862 MPa and mean junction temperatures of 20-100 C. Experimental thermal conductance values of vapor deposited silver- and gold-coated aluminum A356-T61 rail surfaces indicate thermal enhancements of 1.25-2.19 for the electroless nickel-plated copper junctions and 1.79-3.41 for the anodized aluminum junctions. The silver and gold coatings provide significant thermal enhancement; however, these coating-substrate combinations are susceptible to galvanic corrosion under some conditions. 25 refs.

  20. Metallic coatings for enhancement of thermal contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, M. A.; Fletcher, L. S.

    1994-04-01

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. Some metallic coatings, when applied to the card rail, would deform under load, increasing the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates the enhancements in thermal conductance afforded by vapor deposited silver and gold coatings. Experimental thermal conductance measurements were made for anodized aluminum 6101-T6 and electroless nickel-plated copper C11000-H03 card materials to the aluminum A356-T61 rail material. Conductance values for the electroless nickel-plated copper junction ranged from 600 to 2800 W/m(exp 2)K and those for the anodized aluminum junction ranged from 25 to 91 W/m(exp 2)K for contact pressures of 0.172-0.862 MPa and mean junction temperatures of 20-100 C. Experimental thermal conductance values of vapor deposited silver- and gold-coated aluminum A356-T61 rail surfaces indicate thermal enhancements of 1.25-2.19 for the electroless nickel-plated copper junctions and 1.79-3.41 for the anodized aluminum junctions. The silver and gold coatings provide significant thermal enhancement; however, these coating-substrate combinations are susceptible to galvanic corrosion under some conditions.

  1. Powder-Derived High-Conductivity Coatings for Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2003-01-01

    Makers of high-thermal-flux engines prefer copper alloys as combustion chamber liners, owing to a need to maximize heat dissipation. Since engine environments are strongly oxidizing in nature and copper alloys generally have inadequate resistance to oxidation, the liners need coatings for thermal and environmental protection; however, coatings must be chosen with great care in order to avoid significant impairment of thermal conductivity. Powder-derived chromia- and alumina- forming alloys are being studied under NASA's programs for advanced reusable launch vehicles to succeed the space shuttle fleet. NiCrAlY and Cu-Cr compositions optimized for high thermal conductivity have been tested for static and cyclic oxidation, and for susceptibility to blanching - a mode of degradation arising from oxidation-reduction cycling. The results indicate that the decision to coat the liners or not, and which coating/composition to use, depends strongly on the specific oxidative degradation mode that prevails under service conditions.

  2. Synthesis of transparent conducting oxide coatings

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Pellin, Michael J.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2010-05-04

    A method and system for preparing a light transmitting and electrically conductive oxide film. The method and system includes providing an atomic layer deposition system, providing a first precursor selected from the group of cyclopentadienyl indium, tetrakis (dimethylamino) tin and mixtures thereof, inputting to the deposition system the first precursor for reaction for a first selected time, providing a purge gas for a selected time, providing a second precursor comprised of an oxidizer, and optionally inputting a second precursor into the deposition system for reaction and alternating for a predetermined number of cycles each of the first precursor, the purge gas and the second precursor to produce the oxide film.

  3. Carbon Coating Of Copper By Arc-Discharge Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebihara, Ben T.; Jopek, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    Adherent, abrasion-resistant coat deposited with existing equipment. Carbon formed and deposited as coating on copper substrate by pyrolysis of hydrocarbon oil in electrical-arc discharges. Technique for producing carbon deposits on copper accomplished with electrical-discharge-machining equipment used for cutting metals. Applications for new coating technique include the following: solar-energy-collecting devices, coating of metals other than copper with carbon, and carburization of metal surfaces.

  4. Superconductive niobium films coating carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Cirillo, M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Vecchione, A.; Fittipaldi, R.; Corato, V.

    2014-11-01

    Superconducting niobium (Nb) has been successfully obtained by sputter deposition on carbon nanotube fibers. The transport properties of the niobium coating the fibers are compared to those of niobium thin films deposited on oxidized Si substrates during the same deposition run. For niobium films with thicknesses above 300 nm, the niobium coating the fibers and the thin films show similar normal state and superconducting properties with critical current density, measured at T = 4.2 K, of the order of 105 A cm-2. Thinner niobium layers coating the fibers also show the onset of the superconducting transition in the resistivity versus temperature dependence, but zero resistance is not observed down to T = 1 K. We evidence by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and current-voltage measurements that the granular structure of the samples is the main reason for the lack of true global superconductivity for thicknesses below 300 nm.

  5. Effect of carbon coating on scuffing performance in diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M. F.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-06-29

    Low-sulfur and low-aromatic diesel fuels are being introduced in order to reduce various types of emissions in diesel engines to levels in compliance with current and impending US federal regulations. The low lubricity of these fuels, however, poses major reliability and durability problems for fuel injection components that depend on diesel fuel for their lubrication. In the present study, the authors evaluated the scuff resistance of surfaces in regular diesel fuel containing 500 ppm sulfur and in Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel containing no sulfur or aromatics. Tests were conducted with the high frequency reciprocating test rig (HFRR) using 52100 steel balls and H-13 tool-steel flats with and without Argonne's special carbon coatings. Test results showed that the sulfur-containing fuels provide about 20% higher scuffing resistance than does fuel without sulfur. Use of the carbon coating on the flat increased scuffing resistance in both regular and synthetic fuels by about ten times, as measured by the contact severity index at scuffing. Scuffing failure in tests conducted with coated surfaces did not occur until the coating had been removed by the two distinct mechanisms of spalling and wear.

  6. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  7. Testing and Optimization of Electrically Conductive Spacecraft Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, R. J.; Wertz, G. E.; Edwards, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report discussing the work done for the Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program. It discusses test chamber design, coating research, and test results on electrically thermal control coatings. These thermal control coatings are being developed to have several orders of magnitude higher electrical conductivity than most available thermal control coatings. Most current coatings tend to have a range in surface resistivity from 1,011 to 1,013 ohms/sq. Historically, spacecraft have had thermal control surfaces composed of dielectric materials of either polymers (paints and metalized films) or glasses (ceramic paints and optical solar reflectors). Very seldom has the thermal control surface of a spacecraft been a metal where the surface would be intrinsically electrically conductive. The poor thermal optical properties of most metals have, in most cases, stopped them from being used as a thermal control surface. Metals low infrared emittance (generally considered poor for thermal control surfaces) and/or solar absorptance, have resulted in the use of various dielectric coatings or films being applied over the substrate materials in order to obtain the required optical properties.

  8. A conductive and hydrophilic bipolar plate coating for enhanced proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance and water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Andrew P.; Salguero, Tina T.; Kirby, Kevin W.; Zhong, Feng; Blunk, Richard H. J.

    2012-07-01

    Electrically conductive and hydrophilic coatings for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stainless steel bipolar plates have been developed in order to minimize voltage losses at the plate and gas diffusion layer (GDL) interface and facilitate liquid water transport in plate channels for efficient stack operation. The coatings are based on a multifunctional silane, 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE), mixed with conductive, hydrophilic carbon black. Vulcan® XC72 carbon black was modified with either polar phenylsulfonic acid (PSA) or carboxylic acid (COOH) groups to increase hydrophilic character and wetting behavior. Wetting and electrical contact resistance performance was compared with coatings based on nano-particle titania and silica. These conductive silane and carbon composite coating precursors are conveniently formulated in alcohol solution for scalable application via spray coating. Cured films exhibit negligible contact resistance increase (<2 mΩ cm2) at 1.4 MPa when deposited on both physical vapor deposited (PVD) carbon and electroplated gold coated stainless steel. The coatings were tested for hydrophilicity retention under wet and dry fuel cell conditions where the BTSE-COOH coating remained hydrophilic on stamped stainless steel bipolar plate prototypes after greater than 1200 h of simulated fuel cell testing with only moderate loss of hydrophilicity.

  9. Oxidation of Carbon/Carbon through Coating Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Roth, d. J.; Rauser, R. W.; Cawley, J. D.; Curry, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    Reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) is used to protect the wing leading edge and nose cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter on re-entry. It is composed of a lay-up of carbon/carbon fabric protected by a SiC conversion coating. Due to the thermal expansion mismatch of the carbon/carbon and the SiC, the SiC cracks on cool-down from the processing temperature. The cracks act as pathways for oxidation of the carbon/carbon. A model for the diffusion controlled oxidation of carbon/carbon through machined slots and cracks is developed and compared to laboratory experiments. A symmetric cylindrical oxidation cavity develops under the slots, confirming diffusion control. Comparison of cross sectional dimensions as a function of oxidation time shows good agreement with the model. A second set of oxidation experiments was done with samples with only the natural craze cracks, using weight loss as an index of oxidation. The agreement of these rates with the model is quite reasonab

  10. In situ measurement of ceramic vacuum chamber conductive coating quality

    SciTech Connect

    Doose, C.; Harkay, K.; Kim, S.; Milton, S.

    1997-08-01

    A method for measuring the relative surface resistivity and quality of conductive coatings on ceramic vacuum chambers was developed. This method is unique in that it allows one to test the coating even after the ceramic chamber is installed in the accelerator and under vacuum; furthermore, the measurement provides a localized surface reading of the coating conductance. The method uses a magnetic probe is calibrated using the measured DC end-to-end resistance of the tube under test and by comparison to a high quality test surface. The measurement method has also been verified by comparison to high frequency impedance measurements. A detailed description, results, and sensitivity of the technique are given here.

  11. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Rogers, Michael Ray; Judkins, Roddie R.

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  12. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Judkins, R.R.

    2000-07-18

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  13. Carbon coated textiles for flexible energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Kristy; Perez, Carlos O; Mcdonough, John; Presser, Volker; Heon, Min; Dion, Genevieve; Gogotsi, Yury

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a flexible and lightweight fabric supercapacitor electrode as a possible energy source in smart garments. We examined the electrochemical behavior of porous carbon materials impregnated into woven cotton and polyester fabrics using a traditional printmaking technique (screen printing). The porous structure of such fabrics makes them attractive for supercapacitor applications that need porous films for ion transfer between electrodes. We used cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study the capacitive behaviour of carbon materials using nontoxic aqueous electrolytes including sodium sulfate and lithium sulfate. Electrodes coated with activated carbon (YP17) and tested at 0.25 A$g1 achieved a high gravimetric and areal capacitance, an average of 85 F$g1 on cotton lawn and polyester microfiber, both corresponding to 0.43 F$cm2.

  14. Carbon coated textiles for flexible energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Kristy; Perez, Carlos R.; McDonough, John K.; Presser, Volker; Heon, Min; Dion, Genevieve; Gogotsi, Yury

    2011-10-20

    This paper describes a flexible and lightweight fabric supercapacitor electrode as a possible energy source in smart garments. We examined the electrochemical behavior of porous carbon materials impregnated into woven cotton and polyester fabrics using a traditional printmaking technique (screen printing). The porous structure of such fabrics makes them attractive for supercapacitor applications that need porous films for ion transfer between electrodes. We used cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study the capacitive behaviour of carbon materials using nontoxic aqueous electrolytes including sodium sulfate and lithium sulfate. Electrodes coated with activated carbon (YP17) and tested at ~0.25 A·g⁻¹ achieved a high gravimetric and areal capacitance, an average of 85 F·g⁻¹ on cotton lawn and polyester microfiber, both corresponding to ~0.43 F·cm⁻².

  15. Highly Electrically Conducting Glass-Graphene Nanoplatelets Hybrid Coatings.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E; Nistal, A; Khalifa, A; Essa, Y; Martín de la Escalera, F; Osendi, M I; Miranzo, P

    2015-08-19

    Hybrid coatings consisting of a heat resistant Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (YAS) glass containing 2.3 wt % of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were developed by flame spraying homogeneous ceramic powders-GNP granules. Around 40% of the GNPs survived the high spraying temperatures and were distributed along the splat-interfaces, forming a percolated network. These YAS-GNP coatings are potentially interesting in thermal protection systems and electromagnetic interference shields for aerospace applications; therefore silicon carbide (SiC) materials at the forefront of those applications were employed as substrates. Whereas the YAS coatings are nonconductive, the YAS-GNP coatings showed in-plane electrical conductivity (∼10(2) S·m(-1)) for which a low percolation limit (below 3.6 vol %) is inferred. Indentation tests revealed the formation of a highly damaged indentation zone showing multiple shear displacements between adjacent splats probably favored by the graphene sheets location. The indentation radial cracks typically found in brittle glass coatings are not detected in the hybrid coatings that are also more compliant. PMID:26222837

  16. Mixed polyvalent-monovalent metal coating for carbon-graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper-Tervet, J.; Tervet, F. W.; Humphrey, M. F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved coating of gasification catalyst for carbon-graphite fibers is provided comprising a mixture of a polyvalent metal such as calcium and a monovalent metal such as lithium. The addition of lithium provides a lighter coating and a more flexible coating when applied to a coating of a carboxyl containing resin such as polyacrylic acid since it reduces the crosslink density. Furthermore, the presence of lithium provides a glass-like substance during combustion which holds the fiber together resulting in slow, even combustion with much reduced evolution of conductive fragments. The coated fibers are utilized as fiber reinforcement for composites.

  17. Quantum conductance of carbon nanotubes with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-07-01

    We study the conductance of metallic carbon nanotubes with vacancies and pentagon-heptagon pair defects within the Landauer formalism. Using a tight-binding model and a Green{close_quote}s function technique to calculate the scattering matrix, we examine the one-dimensional to two-dimensional crossover in these systems and show the existence of metallic tube junctions in which the conductance is suppressed for symmetry reasons. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Fabrication of transparent conductive electrode film using thermal roll-imprinted Ag metal grid and coated conductive polymer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jong-Su; Jo, Jeongdai; Yoon, Seong-Man; Kim, Do-Jin

    2012-02-01

    In this study, to fabricate a low-resistance and high optical transparent conductive electrode (TCE) film, the following steps were performed: the design and manufacture of an electroforming stamp mold, the fabrication of thermal-roll imprinted (TRI) poly-carbonate (PC) patterned films, the manufacture of high-conductivity and low-resistance Ag paste which was filled into patterned PC film using a doctor blade process and then coated with a thin film layer of conductive polymer by a spin coating process. As a result of these imprinting processes the PC films obtained a line width of 10 +/- 0.5 Mm, a channel length of 500 +/- 2 microm, and a pattern depth of 7.34 +/- 0.5 microm. After the Ag paste was used to fill part of the patterned film with conductive polymer coating, the following parameters were obtained: a sheet resistance of 9.65 Omega/sq, optical transparency values were 83.69% at a wavelength of 550 nm. PMID:22629916

  19. Formulation of electrically conductive thermal-control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shai, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    The development and formulation of electrically conductive thermal control coating was undertaken for use on the International Sun Earth Explorer spacecraft. The primary effort was to develop a coating with a bulk resistivity of less than 100,000 ohm/sqm, an optical absorptance of approximately 0.55, and a normal emittance of 0.90. The required stability in space called for a bulk resistivity of less than 100,000 ohm/sq m, an absorptance of less than 0.67, and a normal emittance of 0.90 after exposure to approximately 4 x 10 to the 16th proton/sq cm of solar-wind particles and 5300 equivalent sun-hours. These exposures represent 2 years of ISEE flight conditions. Both the unsuccessful formulation efforts and the successful use of oxide pigments fired at 1448 K are described. Problems relative to the reactivity of specific coating vehicles exposed to high humidity are discussed.

  20. Electrically conductive, optically transparent polymer/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400-800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T.sub.g) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted by selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  1. Transparent, Conductive Coatings Developed for Arc-Proof Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Transparent, conductive thin-film coatings have many potential applications where a surface must be able to dissipate electrical charges without sacrificing its optical properties. Such applications include automotive and aircraft windows, heat mirrors, optoelectronic devices, gas sensors, and solar cell array surfaces for space applications. Many spacecraft missions require that solar cell array surfaces dissipate charges in order to avoid damage such as electronic upsets, formation of pinholes in the protective coatings on solar array blankets, and contamination due to deposition of sputtered products. In tests at the NASA Lewis Research Center, mixed thin-films of sputter-deposited indium tin oxide (ITO) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2) that could be tailored to the desired sheet resistivity, showed transmittance values of greater than 90 percent. The samples evaluated were composed of mixed, thin-film ITO/MgF2 coatings, with a nominal thickness of 650 angstroms, deposited onto glass substrates. Preliminary results indicated that these coatings were durable to vacuum ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen. These coatings show promise for use on solar array surfaces in polar low-Earth-orbit environments, where a sheet resistivity of less than 10(exp 8)/square is required, and in geosynchronous orbit environments, where a resistivity of less than 10(exp 9)/square is required.

  2. Adjustable thermal conductivity in carbon nanotube nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huaqing; Chen, Lifei

    2009-05-01

    Homogeneous and stable nanofluids have been produced by suspending well dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into ethylene glycol base fluid. CNT nanofluids have enhanced thermal conductivity and the enhancement ratios increase with the nanotube loading and the temperature. Thermal conductivity enhancement was adjusted by ball milling and cutting the treated CNTs suspended in the nanofluids to relatively straight CNTs with an appropriate length distribution. Our findings indicate that the straightness ratio, aspect ratio, and aggregation have collective influence on the thermal conductivity of CNT nanofluids.

  3. Laser Processing of Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew

    Transparent conducting films, or TCFs, are 2D electrical conductors with the ability to transmit light. Because of this, they are used in many popular electronics including smart phones, tablets, solar panels, and televisions. The most common material used as a TCF is indium tin oxide, or ITO. Although ITO has great electrical and optical characteristics, it is expensive, brittle, and difficult to pattern. These limitations have led researchers toward other materials for the next generation of displays and touch panels. The most promising material for next generation TCFs is carbon nanotubes, or CNTs. CNTs are cylindrical tubes of carbon no more than a few atoms thick. They have different electrical and optical properties depending on their atomic structure, and are extremely strong. As an electrode, they conduct electricity through an array of randomly dispersed tubes. The array is highly transparent because of gaps between the tubes, and size and optical properties of the CNTs. Many research groups have tried making CNT TCFs with opto-electric properties similar to ITO but have difficultly achieving high conductivity. This is partly attributed to impurities from fabrication and a mix of different tube types, but is mainly caused by low junction conductivity. In functionalized nanotubes, junction conductivity is impaired by covalently bonded molecules added to the sidewalls of the tubes. The addition of this molecule, known as functionalization, is designed to facilitate CNT dispersion in a solvent by adding properties of the molecule to the CNTs. While necessary for a good solution, functionalization decreases the conductivity in the CNT array by creating defects in the tube's structures and preventing direct inter-carbon bonding. This research investigates removing the functional coating (after tube deposition) by laser processing. Laser light is able to preferentially heat the CNTs because of their optical and electrical properties. Through local conduction

  4. Electrically conductive PEDOT coating with self-healing superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dandan; Lu, Xuemin; Lu, Qinghua

    2014-04-29

    A self-healing electrically conductive superhydrophobic poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) coating has been prepared by chemical vapor deposition of a fluoroalkylsilane (POTS) onto a PEDOT film, which was obtained by electrochemical deposition. The coating not only maintained high conductivity with a low resistivity of 3.2 × 10(-4) Ω·m, but also displayed a water contact angle larger than 156° and a sliding angle smaller than 10°. After being etched with O2 plasma, the coating showed an excellent self-healing ability, spontaneously regaining its superhydrophobicity when left under ambient conditions for 20 h. This superhydrophobicity recovery process was found to be humidity-dependent, and could be accelerated and completed within 2 h under a high humidity of 84%. The coating also exhibited good superhydrophobicity recovering ability after being corroded by strong acid solution at pH 1 or strong base solution at pH 14 for 3 h. PMID:24702588

  5. Fe3O4/carbon coated silicon ternary hybrid composite as supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ilgeun; Kim, Myeongjin; Kim, Jooheon

    2015-02-01

    In this study, Fe3O4/carbon-coated Si ternary hybrid composites were fabricated. A carbon layer was directly formed on the surface of Si by the thermal vapor deposition. The carbon-coating layer not only prevented the contact between Si and reactive electrolyte but also provided anchoring sites for the deposition of Fe3O4. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of carbon-coated Si by the hydrazine reducing method. The morphology and structure of Fe3O4 and carbon layer were characterized via X-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, field emission transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses. These characterizations indicate that a carbon layer was fully coated on the Si particles, and Fe3O4 particles were homogeneously deposited on the carbon-coated Si particles. The Fe3O4/carbon-coated Si electrode exhibited enhanced electrochemical performance, attributed to the high conductivity and stability of carbon layer and pseudocapacitive reaction of Fe3O4. The proposed ternary-hybrid composites may be potentially useful for the fabrication of high-performance electrodes.

  6. Plasma polymerized thin coating as a protective layer of carbon nanotubes grafted on carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einig, A.; Rumeau, P.; Desrousseaux, S.; Magga, Y.; Bai, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles addition is widely studied to improve properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites. Here, hybrid carbon fiber results from grafting of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) on the carbon fiber for mechanical reinforcement and conductive properties. Both tows and woven fabrics made of the hybrid fibers are added to the matrix for composite processing. However handling hybrid fibers may induce unwilling health risk due to eventual CNT release and a protective layer is required. A thin coating layer is deposited homogeneously by low pressure plasma polymerization of an organic monomer without modifying the morphology and the organization of grafted CNTs. The polymeric layer effect on the electrical behavior of hybrid fiber is assessed by conductivity measurements. Its influence on the mechanical properties is also studied regarding the interface adhesion between fiber and matrix. The protective role of layer is demonstrated by means of friction constraints applied to the hybrid fiber.

  7. Diamondlike carbon protective coatings for optical windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited on infrared transmitting optical windows and were evaluated as protective coatings for these windows exposed to particle and rain erosion. The DLC films were deposited on zinc selenide (ZnSe) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) by three different ion beam methods: (1) sputter deposition from a carbon target using an 8-cm argon ion source; (2) direct deposition by a 30-cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon gas in argon; and (3) dual beam direct deposition by the 30-cm hollow cathode ion source and an 8-cm argon ion source. In an attempt to improve the adherence of the DLC films on ZnSc and ZnS, ion beam cleaning, ion implantation with helium and neon ions, or sputter deposition of a thin, ion beam intermediate coating was employed prior to deposition of the DLC film. The protection that the DLC films afforded the windows from particle and rain erosion was evaluated, along with the hydrogen content, adherence, intrinsic stress, and infrared transmittance of the films. Because of the elevated stress levels in the ion beam sputtered DLC films and in those ion beam deposited with butane, films thicker than 0.1 micron and with good adherence on ZnS and ZnSe could not be generated. An intermediate coating of germanium successfully allowed the DLC films to remain adherent to the optical windows and caused only negligible reduction in the specular transmittance of the ZnS and ZnSe at 10 microns.

  8. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    and friction; thermal conductivity; chemical and thermal inertness; corrosion and wear resistance; radiation resistance and biocompatibility; electronic, acoustic, and electrochemical characteristics; and environmental compatibility. These properties make diamond attractive for a wide range of diverse applications. In particular, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond coatings offer a broad potential, since size and cost are not as limiting. The production of large, superhard diamond films or sheets at low cost make designer materials possible. This presentation is divided into two sections: properties and applications of hard coatings. The first section is concerned with the fundamental properties of the surfaces of CVD diamonds and related materials. The surface properties of hard coatings with favorable coefficients of friction (less than or equal to 0.1) and dimensional wear coefficients (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) cubic millimeters/N.m) in specific environments are discussed. The second section is devoted to applications. Examples of actual, successful applications and of potential challenging applications of the coatings.such as CVD diamond, diamondlike carbon, and cubic boron nitride-are described. Cutting tools coated with CVD diamond are of immediate commercial interest. Other applications, such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), valves, and bearings of CVD diamond, are being developed, but at a slow pace. There is a continually growing interest in commercializing diamondlike carbon for wear parts applications, such as biomedical parts and implants, forming dies, transport guides, magnetic tapes and disks, valves, and gears. Cubic boron nitride films are receiving attention because they can be used on tools to machine ferrous materials or on wear parts in sliding contact with ferrous materials.

  9. Carbon-Coated Hierarchical SnO2 Hollow Spheres for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiannan; Dou, Yuhai; Ruan, Boyang; Sun, Ziqi; Chou, Shu-Lei; Dou, Shi Xue

    2016-04-18

    Hierarchical SnO2 hollow spheres self-assembled from nanosheets were prepared with and without carbon coating. The combination of nanosized architecture, hollow structure, and a conductive carbon layer endows the SnO2 -based anode with improved specific capacity and cycling stability, making it more promising for use in lithium ion batteries. PMID:26888027

  10. Investigation of conductive thermal control coatings by a contactless method in vacuo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Shai, C. M.; Sanford, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for determining the conductance per unit area of thermal control coatings for electrostatically clean spacecraft is described. In order to simulate orbital conditions more closely, current-density-voltage (j-V) curves are obtained by a contactless method in which the paint on an aluminum substrate is the anode of a vacuum diode configuration with a tungsten filament cathode. Conductances per unit area which satisfy the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) requirement were observed on black paints containing carbon and in white and green paints filled with zinc oxide which were fired in order to induce defect conductivity. Because of surface effects and the nonhomogeneous nature of paints, large discrepancies were found between measurements with the contactless method and measurements employing metallic contacts, particularly at low current densities. Therefore, measurements with metallic contacts are considered to be of questionable value in deciding the suitability of coatings for electrostatic charge control.

  11. Conductivity of carbon nanotube polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, J T; Kung, P; Maiti, A

    2006-11-20

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulations were used to investigate methods of controlling the assembly of percolating networks of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in thin films of block copolymer melts. For suitably chosen polymers the CNTs were found to spontaneously self-assemble into topologically interesting patterns. The mesoscale morphology was projected onto a finite-element grid and the electrical conductivity of the films computed. The conductivity displayed non-monotonic behavior as a function of relative polymer fractions in the melt. Results are compared and contrasted with CNT dispersion in small-molecule fluids and mixtures.

  12. Quantum conductance of carbon nanotube peapods

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S.C.; Louie, Steven G.

    2003-08-01

    We present a first-principles study of the quantum conductance of hybrid nanotube systems consisting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) encapsulating either an isolated single C60 molecule or a chain of C60 molecules (nanotube peapods). The calculations show a rather weak bonding interaction between the fullerenes and the SWCNTs. The conductance of a (10,10) SWCNT with a single C60 molecule is virtually unaffected at the Fermi level, but exhibits quantized resonant reductions at the molecular levels. The nanotube peapod arrangement gives rise to high density of states for the fullerene highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital bands.

  13. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modificationmore » of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.« less

  14. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modification of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes - Polymer Composites with Enhanced Conductivity using Functionalized Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Chen, Jian; Gupta, Rishi

    2003-03-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes show superior electrical, mechanical and thermal properties [1]. Composite materials using carbon nanotubes as fillers are predicted to show similar superior properties. However, realization of such composites has been plagued by poor dispersion of carbon nanotubes in solvents and in polymer matrices. We have developed a method to homogenously disperse carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices using functionalized nanotubes [2]. Thin films of functionalized single walled nanotubes (SWNT) - polystyrene composites and functionalized SWNT - polycarbonate composites were prepared using solution evaporation and spin coating. Both of the composites show several orders of magnitude increase in conductivity for less than 1 wt thresholds of the composites are less than 0.2 wt nanotubes. We attribute the enhanced conduction to the superior dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in the polymer matrix and to the reduced nanotube waviness resulting from the rigid backbone of the conjugated polymer. References: [1]. R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov and W. A. de Heer, Science v297, p787 (2002); [2]. J. Chen, H. Liu, W. A. Weimer, M. D. Halls, D. H. Waldeck and G. C. Walker, J. Am. Chem. Soc. v124, p9034 (2002).

  16. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  17. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition comprising a base oxide, a primary stabilizer oxide, and at least one dopant oxide is disclosed. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. The base oxide is selected from the group consisting of zirconia and hafnia and combinations thereof. The primary stabilizing oxide is selected from the group consisting of yttria, dysprosia, erbia and combinations thereof. The dopant or group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants are selected from the group consisting of rare earth metal oxides, transitional metal oxides, alkaline earth metal oxides and combinations thereof. The dopant or dopants preferably have ionic radii different from those of the primary stabilizer and/or the base oxides.

  18. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  19. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Walker, Megan D.; Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.; Li, Jun; Yang, Cary Y.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art ICs for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/sq cm. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies, and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. Our approach involves finding new and efficient thermally conductive materials. Exploiting carbon nanotube (CNT) films and composites for their superior axial thermal conductance properties has the potential for such an application requiring efficient heat transfer. In this work, we present thermal contact resistance measurement results for CNT and CNT-Cu composite films. It is shown that Cu-filled CNT arrays enhance thermal conductance when compared to as-grown CNT arrays. Furthermore, the CNT-Cu composite material provides a mechanically robust alternative to current IC packaging technology.

  1. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  2. Antibacterial activity of carbon-coated zinc oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Jun; Yamamoto, Osamu; Ozkal, Burak; Nakagawa, Zenbe-E

    2007-03-01

    Particles of ZnO coated with carbon (ZnOCC) were prepared and evaluated for their antibacterial activity. ZnO powder and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (polymerization degree: 2,000-95,000) were mixed at a mass ratio (ZnO/PVA) of 1, and then heated at 500-650 degree C for 3 h under argon gas with a flow rate of 50ml/min. Carbon deposited on the ZnOCC surface was amorphous as revealed by X-ray diffraction studies. The ZnOCC particles maintained their shape in water, even under agitation. The antibacterial activity of ZnOCC powder against Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated quantitatively by measuring the change in the electrical conductivity of the growth medium caused by bacterial metabolism (conductimetric assay). The conductivity curves obtained were analyzed using the growth inhibition kinetic model proposed by Takahashi for calorimetric evaluation, allowing the estimation of the antibacterial efficacy and kinetic parameters of ZnOCC. In a previous study, when ZnO was immobilized on materials, such as activated carbon, the amount of ZnO immobilized was approximately 10-50%, and the antibacterial activity markedly decreased compared to that of the original ZnO. On the other hand, the ZnOCC particles prepared in this study contained approximately 95% ZnO and possessed antibacterial activity similar to that of pure ZnO. The carbon-coating treatment could maintain the antibacterial efficacy of the ZnO and may be useful in the develop-ment of multifunctional antimicrobial materials. PMID:17408004

  3. Conductive polyurethane composites containing polyaniline-coated nano-silica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-Tau; Syu, Jhan-Rong; Wang, De-Hua

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used 1.2-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) as a coupling agent to synthesize silica-polyaniline (PANI) core-shell nanoparticles. The core-shell nanoparticles and PANI oligomers were reacted with isocyanates to prepare the conductive polyurethane (PU)-PANI-silica nanocomposites. The core-shell-nanoparticle structure shows significant enhancement on electrical properties of the conductive nanocomposites even though only 0.0755-wt.% PANI was coated on the nano-silica. The surface resistance of the nanocomposite containing 5 wt.% PANI can reduce to ~10(8) Ω/sq, lowering two orders in contrast to the nanocomposite without the core-shell structure. In comparison with the neat PU, tensile strength and elongation of the nanocomposite containing silica-PANI core-shell nanoparticles can increase 3.1 and 3.8 times, respectively. We suspect that the extraordinary enhancement of electrical and mechanical properties may result from the fact that contact probability among PANI moieties and chemical bonding between particles and PU matrix increase due to the PANI coated on the surface of silica. PMID:23261334

  4. Synthesis of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles by detonation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guilei; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Qiquan; Yan, Honghao

    2010-05-15

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by detonating a mixture of ferrocene, naphthalene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in an explosion vessel under low vacuum conditions (8.1 kPa). The RDX functioned as an energy source for the decomposition of ferrocene and naphthalene. The carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were formed as soot-like deposits on the inner surface of the reactor, which were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. And a portion of the detonation soot was treated with hydrochloric acid. The product was carbon-coated nanoparticles in perfect core-shell structures with graphitic shells and bcc-Fe cores. The detonation technique offers an energy-saving route to the synthesis of carbon-coated nanomaterials.

  5. Method for applying pyrolytic carbon coatings to small particles

    DOEpatents

    Beatty, Ronald L.; Kiplinger, Dale V.; Chilcoat, Bill R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for coating small diameter, low density particles with pyrolytic carbon is provided by fluidizing a bed of particles wherein at least 50 per cent of the particles have a density and diameter of at least two times the remainder of the particles and thereafter recovering the small diameter and coated particles.

  6. Preparation of cribriform sheet-like carbon-coated zinc oxide with improved electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianhang; Yang, Zhanhong; Xie, Xiaoe; Feng, Zhaobin; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Cribriform sheet-like carbon-coated ZnO are prepared using pyrrole as the carbon source. It is found that a sheet-like precursor will form when polymerizing pyrrole in the presence of ZnO particles. After the carbonization of precursor, cribriform sheet-like carbon-coated ZnO can be obtained. Morphology and structure analysis of as-prepared carbon-coated ZnO is conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carbon overlayer not only present a barrier layer on the surface of the ZnO particles, which keeps relative high discharge capacity by inhibiting the active materials in electrode from dissolving into electrolyte, but also modify the surface status of ZnO particles so as to obtain more uniform current distribution and improved conductivity. As a result, when evaluated as an anode material for Zn/Ni cell, carbon-coated ZnO exhibit a more stable cycle performance than bare ZnO electrode.

  7. Porous palladium coated conducting polymer nanoparticles for ultrasensitive hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Seop; Kim, Sung Gun; Cho, Sunghun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-12-28

    Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen leak detection and surveillance sensor systems are needed; additionally, the ability to maintain uniformity through repetitive hydrogen sensing is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we detail the fabrication of porous palladium coated conducting polymer (3-carboxylate polypyrrole) nanoparticles (Pd@CPPys) to detect hydrogen gas. The Pd@CPPys are produced by means of facile alkyl functionalization and chemical reduction of a pristine 3-carboxylate polypyrrole nanoparticle-contained palladium precursor (PdCl(2)) solution. The resulting Pd@CPPy-based sensor electrode exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity (0.1 ppm) and stability toward hydrogen gas at room temperature due to the palladium sensing layer. PMID:26598964

  8. Carbon coating of simulated nuclear-waste material

    SciTech Connect

    Blocher, J.M. Jr.; Browning, M.F.; Kidd, R.W.

    1982-03-01

    The development of low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings as described in this report was initiated to reduce the release of volatile waste form components and to permit the coating of larger glass marbles that have low temperature softening points (550 to 600/sup 0/C). Fluidized bed coaters for smaller particles (<2mm) and newly developed screw-agitated coaters for larger particles (>2mm) were used. Coating temperatures were reduced from >1000/sup 0/C for conventional CVD high temperature PyC to approx. 500/sup 0/C by using a catalyst. The coating gas combination that produced the highest quality coatings was found to be Ni(CO)/sub 4/ as the catalyst, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ as the carbon source gas, and H/sub 2/ as a diluent. Carbon deposition was found to be temperature dependent with a maximum rate observed at 530/sup 0/C. Coating rates were typically 6 to 7 ..mu..m/hour. The screw-agitated coater approach to coating large-diameter particles was demonstrated to be feasible. Clearances are important between the auger walls and coater to eliminate binding and attrition. Coatings prepared in fluidized bed coaters using similar parameters are better in quality and are deposited at two to three times the rate as in screw-agitated coaters.

  9. Properties of conductive coatings for thermal control mirrors and solar cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, D. E.; Kan, H. K. A.

    1975-01-01

    Conductive transparent coatings applied to the dielectric surfaces of a spacecraft offer the possibility of distributing charge uniformly over the entire spacecraft surface. Optical and electrical measurements of such a coating as a function of temperature are described. These results are used in considering the impact of a conductive coating on the absorptance of thermal control mirrors and on the transmittance of solar cell cover glass, which can be improved by the application of an antireflection coating.

  10. Processable Conducting Polyaniline, Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and Their Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan

    Good processability is often required for applications of conducting materials like polyaniline (PANI), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. This can be achieved by either physical stabilization or chemical functionalization. Functionalization usually expands the possible applications for the conducting materials depending on the properties of the functional groups. Processable conducting materials can also be combined with other co-dissolving materials to prepare composites with desired chemical and physical properties. Polyanilines (PANI) doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) are soluble in many organic solvents such as chloroform and toluene. Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be dispersed into PANI/DBSA to form homogeneous solutions. PANI/DBSA functions as a conducting surfactant for SWCNTs. The mixture can be combined with two-parts polyurethanes that co-dissolve in the organic solvent to produce conducting polymer composites. The composite mixtures can be applied onto various substrates by simple spray-on methods to obtain transparent and conducting coatings. Graphene, a single layer of graphite, has drawn intense interest for its unique properties. Processable graphene has been produced in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) by a one-step solvothermal reduction of graphite oxide without the aid of any reducing reagent and/or surfactant. The as-synthesized graphene disperses well in a variety of organic solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol and tetrahydrogenfuran (THF). The conductivity of solvothermal reduced graphite oxide is comparable to hydrazine reduced graphite oxide. Attempts were made to create intrinsically conducting glue comparable to mussel adhesive protiens using polyaniline and graphene. Mussels can attach to a variety of substrates under water. Catechol residue in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the key to the wet adhesion. Tyrosine and phosphoserine with primary alkyl amine groups also participate in adhesion. A

  11. Formation mechanism of a silicon carbide coating for a reinforced carbon-carbon composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Shuford, D. M.; Mueller, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for a study to determine the mechanisms involved in a high-temperature pack cementation process which provides a silicon carbide coating on a carbon-carbon composite. The process and materials used are physically and chemically analyzed. Possible reactions are evaluated using the results of these analytical data. The coating is believed to develop in two stages. The first is a liquid controlled phase process in which silicon carbide is formed due to reactions between molten silicon metal and the carbon. The second stage is a vapor transport controlled reaction in which silicon vapors react with the carbon. There is very little volume change associated with the coating process. The original thickness changes by less than 0.7%. This indicates that the coating process is one of reactive penetration. The coating thickness can be increased or decreased by varying the furnace cycle process time and/or temperature to provide a wide range of coating thicknesses.

  12. Update on diamond and diamond-like carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettington, Alan H.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reviewed the infrared uses of diamond-like carbon thin films and the potential uses of synthetic diamond layers. Diamond-like carbon is used widely as a protective anti-reflection coating for exposed germanium infrared windows and lenses and as thin protective coatings for front surface aluminium mirrors. This material is also used in protective anti-reflective coatings for zinc sulphide as the outer thin film in multi-layer designs incorporating variable index intermediate layers of germanium carbide. The maximum thickness of diamond-like carbon that can be used is often limited by the stress induced in the layer through the method of deposition and by the absorption present in the basic material. This stress and absorption can be far lower in synthetic diamond layers but there are now problems associated with the high substrate temperatures, difficulties in coating large areas uniformly and problems arising from surface scattering and low deposition rates.

  13. Oxidation resistant slurry coating for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Rybicki, G. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating is produced on carbon-base materials, and the same processing step effects an infiltration of the substrate with silicon containing material. The process comprises making a slurry of nickel and silicon powders in a nitrocellulose lacquer, spraying onto the graphite or carbon-carbon substrate, and sintering in vacuum to form a fused coating that wets and covers the surface as well as penetrates into the pores of the substrate. Optimum wetting and infiltration occurs in the range of Ni-60 w/o Si to Ni-90 w/o Si with deposited thicknesses of 25-100 mg/sq. cm. Sintering temperatures of about 1200 C to about 1400 C are used, depending on the melting point of the specific coating composition. The sintered coating results in Ni-Si intermetallic phases and SiC, both of which are highly oxidation resistant.

  14. Multilayered Polymer Coated Carbon Nanotubes to Deliver Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas L.; Grimes, Stuart W.; Lewis, Robert L.; Alexis, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Multilayered, multifunctional polymer coatings were grafted onto carbon nanotubes (CNT) using a one-pot, ring-opening polymerization in order to control the release kinetic and therapeutic efficacy of dasatinib. Biocompatible, biodegradable multilayered coatings composed of poly(glycolide) (PGA), and poly(lactide) (PLA) were polymerized directly onto hydroxyl-functionalized CNT surfaces. Sequential addition of monomers into the reaction vessel enabled multilayered coatings of PLA-PGA, or PGA-PLA. Poly(ethylene glycol) capped the polymer chain ends, resulting in a multifunctional amphiphilic coating. Multilayer polymer coatings on CNTs enabled control of anticancer dasatinib’s release kinetics and enhanced the in vitro therapeutic efficacy against U-87 glioblastoma compared to monolayer polymer coatings. PMID:24294824

  15. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOEpatents

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  16. Influence of carbon nanomaterials on the properties of paint coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanok, S. A.; Krauklis, A. V.; Borisevich, K. O.; Prokopchuk, N. P.; Nikolaichik, A. V.; Stanovoi, P. G.

    2011-11-01

    The conditions for obtaining carbon nanomaterials with the use of a low-temperature plasma are described. The product obtained was analyzed using the electron microscopy and a laser diffraction particle-size analyzer. The influence of the carbon nanomaterials on the physicochemical properties of paint coatings, their adhesion, impact and bending strengths, hardness, and protection characteristics was investigated.

  17. Heat Conduction in Ceramic Coatings: Relationship Between Microstructure and Effective Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachanov, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic coatings and its relation to the microstructure continued. Results (obtained in Task 1) for the three-dimensional problem of heat conduction in a solid containing an inclusion (or, in particular, cavity - thermal insulator) of the ellipsoidal shape, were further advanced in the following two directions: (1) closed form expressions of H tensor have been derived for special cases of ellipsoidal cavity geometry: spheroid, crack-like spheroidal cavity and needle shaped spheroidal cavity; (2) these results for one cavity have been incorporated to construct heat energy potential for a solid with many spheroidal cavities (in the approximation of non-interacting defects). This problem constitutes a basic building block for further analyses.

  18. Analytical performance characteristics of nanoelectrospray emitters as a function of conductive coating.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas R; Moy, Marie A; Dolan, Anthony R; Wood, Troy D

    2006-04-01

    As miniaturization of electrospray continues to become more prevalent in the mass spectrometry arsenal, numerous types of conductive coatings have been developed with miniaturized electrospray emitters. Different conductive coatings have different properties that may lead to differences in analytical performance. This paper investigates and compares the analytical properties of a series of applied conductive coatings for low-flow electrospray ionization developed in this laboratory vs. commercially-available types. Evaporated graphite is thoroughly compared with commercially available polyaniline (PANI) coated emitters and metal coated emitters. Each set of emitters was investigated to determine various performance characteristics, including susceptibility to electrical discharge in both positive and negative ionization modes, as well as emitter reproducibility and generation of a standard curve to determine each emitter coating's limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Furthermore, evaporated graphite and polyaniline coated fused silica capillaries were investigated to determine which coating is more stable over long-term analyses and during electrical discharge. PMID:16568172

  19. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) oxidation resistant material samples - Baseline coated, and baseline coated with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) impregnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantz, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Reinforced carbon-carbon material specimens were machined from 19 and 33 ply flat panels which were fabricated and processed in accordance with the specifications and procedures accepted for the fabrication and processing of the leading edge structural subsystem (LESS) elements for the space shuttle orbiter. The specimens were then baseline coated and tetraethyl orthosilicate impregnated, as applicable, in accordance with the procedures and requirements of the appropriate LESS production specifications. Three heater bars were ATJ graphite silicon carbide coated with the Vought 'pack cementation' coating process, and three were stackpole grade 2020 graphite silicon carbide coated with the chemical vapor deposition process utilized by Vought in coating the LESS shell development program entry heater elements. Nondestructive test results are reported.

  20. Chemical sensors using coated or doped carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  1. Porous palladium coated conducting polymer nanoparticles for ultrasensitive hydrogen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Seop; Kim, Sung Gun; Cho, Sunghun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen leak detection and surveillance sensor systems are needed; additionally, the ability to maintain uniformity through repetitive hydrogen sensing is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we detail the fabrication of porous palladium coated conducting polymer (3-carboxylate polypyrrole) nanoparticles (Pd@CPPys) to detect hydrogen gas. The Pd@CPPys are produced by means of facile alkyl functionalization and chemical reduction of a pristine 3-carboxylate polypyrrole nanoparticle-contained palladium precursor (PdCl2) solution. The resulting Pd@CPPy-based sensor electrode exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity (0.1 ppm) and stability toward hydrogen gas at room temperature due to the palladium sensing layer.Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen leak detection and surveillance sensor systems are needed; additionally, the ability to maintain uniformity through repetitive hydrogen sensing is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we detail the fabrication of porous palladium coated conducting polymer (3-carboxylate polypyrrole) nanoparticles (Pd@CPPys) to detect hydrogen gas. The Pd@CPPys are produced by means of facile alkyl functionalization and chemical reduction of a pristine 3-carboxylate polypyrrole nanoparticle-contained palladium precursor (PdCl2) solution. The resulting Pd@CPPy-based sensor electrode exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity (0.1 ppm

  2. Thermophysical properties of thermal sprayed coatings on carbon steel substrates by photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.A.; Mandelis, A.; Farahbakhsh, B.; Lebowitz, C.; Harris, I.

    1999-09-01

    Laser infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) was used to measure the thermophysical properties (thermal diffusivity and conductivity) of various thermal sprayed coatings on carbon steel. A one-dimensional photothermal model of a three-layered system in the backscattered mode was introduced and compared with experimental measurements. The uppermost layer was used to represent a roughness-equivalent layer, a second layer represented the substrate. The thermophysical parameters of thermal sprayed coatings examined in this work were obtained when a multiparameter-fit optimization algorithm was used with the backscattered PTR experimental results. The results also suggested a good method to determine the thickness of tungsten carbide and stainless-steel thermal spray coatings once the thermal physical properties are known. The ability of PTR to measure the thermophysical properties and the coating thickness has a strong potential as a method for in situ characterization of thermal spray coatings.

  3. Pyrolytic carbon-coated silicon/carbon nanofiber composite anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanli; Hu, Yi; Shao, Jianzhong; Shen, Zhen; Chen, Renzhong; Zhang, Xiangwu; He, Xia; Song, Yuanze; Xing, Xiuli

    2015-12-01

    Pyrolytic carbon-coated Si/C nanofibers (Si/C-CNFs) composites have been prepared through the sucrose coating and secondary thermal treatment of Si/CNFs composites produced via electrospinning and carbonization. This results in a structure in which Si nanoparticles are distributed along the fibers, with the fiber surface being coated with an amorphous carbon layer through pyrolysis of the sucrose. This carbon coating not only limits the volume expansion of the exposed Si nanoparticles, preventing their direct contact with the electrolyte, but also creates a connection between the fibers that is beneficial to Li+ ion transport, structural integrity, and electrochemical conductivity. Consequently, the Si/C-CNFs composite exhibits a more stable cycle performance, better rate performance, and higher conductivity than Si/CNFs alone. The optimal level of performance was attained with a 20:200 mass ratio of sucrose to deionized water, with a high retained capacity of 1215.2 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles, thus indicating that it is a suitable anode material for Li-ion batteries.

  4. Functionalization, coordination, and coating of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Christopher Eric

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were covalently end-functionalized with various donor ligands in order to facilitate the coordination of metal catalyst nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to optimize catalyst complexation to SWNT ends, allowing growth from preformed seeds (SWNT-cats). The "SWNT amplification" method is envisioned as a route to bulk single-chirality nanotube samples. Study by 31P MAS NMR was undertaken in order to characterize SWNT phosphine derivatives. The synthesis of new N-aryl dipyridylamines (dpas) and related compounds is reported. The products, chelating N-donor ligands, will be used to prepare copper complexes. Copper dpa complexes are able to discriminate between olefin isomers in simple mixtures. Similar triarylamines have been similarly prepared and characterized; these have been tested for their ability to separate SWNTs of particular diameters (or chiral angles) by selective pi-pi stacking interactions. This method is a possible route to single or few-chirality samples, which could then be subjected to SWNT amplification. A novel method for production of high-yield dispersions of single and few layer graphene is presented. o-Dichlorobenzene suspensions of graphene provide twice the yield of previous methods. Moreover, ODCB graphene dispersions form a convenient platform from which to pursue covalent derivatization of graphene in a nonpolar medium. ODCB dispersions have been used to covalently functionalize graphene with perfluoroalkyl groups by a free radical method. Initiation of radical reactions was achieved by both UV photolysis and thermal decomposition of peroxides. Perfluoroalkylated graphene is highly exfoliated and shows great promise for use in polymer composites, lubricants and coatings. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) of II-VI semiconductor materials on SWNT substrates is demonstrated. Bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices have been prepared from these SWNT-semiconductor composites. The CBD process of depositing

  5. Redirected charge transport arising from diazonium grafting of carbon coated LiFePO4.

    PubMed

    Madec, L; Seid, K A; Badot, J-C; Humbert, B; Moreau, P; Dubrunfaut, O; Lestriez, B; Guyomard, D; Gaubicher, J

    2014-11-01

    The morphological and the electrical properties of carbon coated LiFePO4 (LFPC) active material functionalized by 4-ethynylbenzene tetrafluoroboratediazonium salt were investigated. For this purpose, FTIR, Raman, XPS, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS) were considered. Electronic conductivities of LFPC samples at room temperature were found to decrease in a large frequency range upon simple immersion in polar solvents and to decrease further upon functionalization. Due to their high dipole moment, strongly physisorbed molecules detected by XPS likely add barriers to electron hopping. Significant alteration of the carbon coating conductivity was only observed, however, upon functionalization. This effect is most presumably associated with an increase in the sp(3) content determined by Raman spectroscopy, which is a strong indication of the formation of a covalent bond between the organic layer and the carbon coating. In this case, the electron flux appears to be redirected and relayed by short-range (intra chain) and long-range (inter chain) electron transport through molecular oligomers anchored at the LFPC surface. The latter are controlled by tunnelling and slightly activated hopping, which enable higher conductivity at low temperature (T < 250 K). Alteration of the electron transport within the carbon coating also allows detection of a relaxation phenomenon that corresponds to small polaron hopping in bulk LiFePO4. XPS and HRTEM images allow a clear correlation of these findings with the island type oligomeric structure of grafted molecules. PMID:25234701

  6. Performance characteristics of zinc-rich coatings applied to carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of topcoated and untopcoated zinc-rich coatings. Sacrificial coatings of this type are required for protecting carbon steel structures from the aggressive KSC sea coast environment. A total of 59 commercially available zinc-rich coatings and 47 topcoated materials were exposed for an 18-month period. Test panels were placed in special racks placed approximately 30.5 m (100 feet) above the high tide line at the KSC Corrosion Test Site. Laboratory tests to determine the temperature resistance, abrasion resistance, and adhesion of the untopcoated zinc-rich coatings were also performed. It has been concluded that: (1) The inorganic types of zinc-rich coatings are far superior to the organic types in the KSC environment. (2) Organic zinc-rich coatings applied at 0.1 - 0.15 mm (4-6 mils) film thickness provide better corrosion protection than when applied at the manufacturers' recommended nominal film thickness of .08 mm (3 mils). (3) Topcoats are not necessary, or even desirable, when used in conjunction with zinc-rich coatings in the KSC environment. (4) Some types of inorganic zinc-rich coatings require an extended outdoor weathering period in order to obtain adequate mechanical properties. and (5) A properly formulated inorganic zinc-rich coating is not affected by a 24-hour thermal exposure to 400 C (752 F).

  7. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  8. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku-Herrera, J. J.; Avilés, F.; Nistal, A.; Cauich-Rodríguez, J. V.; Rubio, F.; Rubio, J.; Bartolo-Pérez, P.

    2015-03-01

    Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as "sizing"), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

  9. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    DOEpatents

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  10. Development of conductive coated polyester film as RPC electrodes using screen printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Satyanarayana, B.; Verma, P.; Datar, V. M.

    2009-05-01

    Each of the three 16 kton ICAL detector modules at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) will use RPCs as the active element, sandwiched between 6 cm thick soft iron plates, for measurements on atmospheric neutrinos. The electrodes of the RPC are float glass sheets having a volume resistivity of about 10 12-10 13 Ω cm (at room temperature) covered with carbon/graphite or a conductive paint with a surface resistivity of ˜800 kΩ/square to 1 MΩ/square to apply high voltage on the glass surface, so that this surface does not shield the discharge signal from the external pickup plates and is small compared to the resistivity of the glass to provide a uniform potential across the entire surface. We initially coated the surface with locally available graphite powder, mixed with lacquer and thinner, and were able to get a few hundred kΩ/square resistivity. However, we observed a drastic reduction in surface resistivity with time and it came unstuck from the glass. Subsequently a conductive paint developed by Kansai-Nerolac was used. This paint uses modified acrylic resin as binder, conductive black pigment and solvents, which include aromatic hydrocarbons and alcohols. At room temperature, the surface dries in 10 minutes, while complete drying takes ˜18 hours. The spraying is done at a pressure of 4 kg/cm 2 with the glass plate kept at a distance of 8-10 in. Using this paint, we are able to achieve the required resistance of ˜ few hundred kΩ/square. We still need to study the long term stability and best curing method. We need to automate the procedure to get a uniform coat and to coat a large number of glasses for the final detector. While robotic systems are available abroad costing about 5 000 000 rupees, we are exploring other alternatives. In particular, we are in the process of developing a polyester film, with a conductive coating on one side, which can be glued on to the glass. The coating was done using on a local commercial screen printing machine

  11. Conductive surface modification of LiFePO4 with nitrogen doped carbon layers for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sukeun; Liao, Chen; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bridges, Craig A; Unocic, Raymond R; Nanda, Jagjit; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2012-01-01

    The LiFePO4 rod surface modified with nitrogen doped carbon layer has been prepared using hydrothermal processing followed by post-annealing in the presence of an ionic liquid. The coated LiFePO4 rod exhibits good capacity retention and high rate capability as the nitrogen doped carbon improves conductivity and prevents aggregation of the rod during cycling.

  12. Ultrahigh currents in dielectric-coated carbon nanotube probes.

    PubMed

    Lisunova, Yuliya; Levkivskyi, Ivan; Paruch, Patrycja

    2013-09-11

    Carbon nanotubes used as conductive atomic force microscopy probes are expected to withstand extremely high currents. However, in existing prototypes, significant self-heating results in rapid degradation of the nanotube probe. Here, we investigate an alternative probe design, fabricated by dielectric encapsulation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, which can support unexpectedly high currents with extreme stability. We show that the dielectric coating acts as a reservoir for Joule heat removal, and as a chemical barrier against thermal oxidation, greatly enhancing transport properties. In contact with Au surfaces, these probes can carry currents of 0.12 mA at a power of 1.5 mW and show no measurable change in resistance at current densities of 10(12) A/m(2) over a time scale of 10(3) s. Our observations are in good agreement with theoretical modeling and exact numerical calculations, demonstrating that the enhanced transport characteristics of such probes are governed by their more effective heat removal mechanisms. PMID:23978224

  13. New solar selective coating based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Thomas; Leupolt, Beate; Mäder, Gerrit; Härtel, Paul; Grählert, Wulf; Althues, Holger; Kaskel, Stefan; Beyer, Eckhard

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be applied to assemble a new type of solar selective coating system for solar thermal applications. In this work the predominant absorption processes occurring by interaction with π-plasmon and Van Hove singularities (VHS) were investigated by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and ellipsometry. Not only optical properties for as deposited SWCNT thin films itself, but also the potential for systematic tailoring will be presented. Besides low cost technologies required, the adjustability of optical properties, as well as their thermal stability render CNT based solar selective coatings as promising alternative to commercially available coating systems.

  14. HYDROTHERMALLY SELF-ADVANCING HYBRID COATINGS FOR MITIGATING CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA, T.

    2006-11-22

    Hydrothermally self-advancing hybrid coatings were prepared by blending two starting materials, water-borne styrene acrylic latex (SAL) as the matrix and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the hydraulic filler, and then their usefulness was evaluated as the room temperature curable anti-corrosion coatings for carbon steel in CO{sub 2}-laden geothermal environments at 250 C. The following two major factors supported the self-improving mechanisms of the coating during its exposure in an autoclave: First was the formation of a high temperature stable polymer structure of Ca-complexed carboxylate groups containing SAL (Ca-CCG-SAL) due to hydrothermal reactions between SAL and CAC; second was the growth with continuing exposure time of crystalline calcite and boehmite phases coexisting with Ca-CCG-SAL. These two factors promoted the conversion of the porous microstructure in the non-autoclaved coating into a densified one after 7 days exposure. The densified microstructure not only considerably reduced the conductivity of corrosive ionic electrolytes through the coatings' layers, but also contributed to the excellent adherence of the coating to underlying steel' s surface that, in turn, retarded the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction at the corrosion site of steel. Such characteristics including the minimum uptake of corrosive electrolytes by the coating and the retardation of the cathodic corrosion reaction played an important role in inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel in geothermal environments.

  15. Adhesion of preceramic inorganic polymer coatings to carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhry, T.M.; Drzal, L.T.; Ho, H.; Laine, R.

    1996-12-31

    To determine whether the preceramic inorganic polymer coating can provide not only the thermal oxidative protection during both processing and use in metal matrix composites or ceramic matrix composites but also the appropriate composite properties, it is desirable to know how and at what point in the thermal processing cycle the coating-carbon fiber interface undergoes changes that affect the interfacial adhesion and failure mode. Also, it is important to identify the locus of interfacial failure i.e. between fiber and coating or between coating and matrix. This work is directed at determining the interfacial changes and the locus of failure in order to optimize both the coating chemistry and the conversion process. The characteristics of the benchmark interface coating material, silicon oxycarbide, SiO{sub x}C{sub y} or black glass have been studied. SiO{sub x}C{sub y} was chosen because (1) SiO{sub x}C{sub y} is amorphous, (2) it is possible to prepare very well-defined materials, where the chemistry and the evolution of the material with time and temperature are known in detail, and (3) SiO{sub x}C{sub y} is a matrix material used in commercial composites. It has been shown that these coatings are effective in increasing the oxidation resistance of the carbon fibers themselves.

  16. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  17. Optimum Me-DLC coatings and hard coatings for tribological performance[Diamond-Like Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.L.; Kao, W.H.

    2000-02-01

    In this study, hard coatings (TiN, TiCN, CrN, and CrCN) and Me-DLC coatings (Ti{sub x%}-C:H and Cr{sub x%}-C:H) were deposited on tungsten carbide (WC) substrate by multiarc physical vapor deposition (MAPVD) and unbalanced magnetron (UBM) sputtering, respectively. Counterbodies of the AISI 1045 steel cylinder and the AA7075T65l aluminum cylinder were used in the cylinder-on-disk, line-contact wear mode under dry condition; a counterbody of the AISI 51200 steel ball was used in the ball-on-disk, point-contact wear mode, under both dry and lubricated conditions. All wear tests were conducted with a reciprocating machine. After the tests, the most suitable coating for various counterbodies and test environments was selected. For the coating/1045 steel cylinder, the Ti{sub 10%}-C:H coating possesses excellent tribological characteristics. For the coating/7075T651 aluminum cylinder, hard coatings display excellent wear resistance. For the coating/steel ball, CrCN and CrN coatings display very little wear under both dry and lubricated conditions. On TiN and TiCN coatings, special wear mechanisms of material transfer, adhesion wear, and fatigue fracture occurred during initial tests under kerosene lubrication.

  18. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  19. Na-doped hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon composites: Preparation, in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hejun; Zhao, Xueni; Cao, Sheng; Li, Kezhi; Chen, Mengdi; Xu, Zhanwei; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2012-12-01

    Na-doped hydroxyapatite (Na-HA) coating was directly prepared onto carbon/carbon (C/C) composites using electrochemical deposition (ECD) and the mean thickness of the coating is approximately 10 ± 2 μm. The formed Na-HA crystals which are Ca-deficient, are rod-like with a hexagonal cross section. The Na/P molar ratios of the coating formed on C/C substrate is 0.097. During the deposition, the Na-HA crystals grow in both radial and longitudinal directions, and faster along the longitudinal direction. The pattern formation of crystal growth leads to dense coating which would help to increase the bonding strength of the coating. The average shear bonding strength of Na-HA coating on C/C is 5.55 ± 0.77 MPa. The in vitro bioactivity of the Na-HA coated C/C composites were investigated by soaking the samples in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days. The results indicate that the Na-HA coated C/C composites can rapidly induce bone-like apatite nucleation and growth on its surface in SBF. The in vitro cellular biocompatibility tests reveal that the Na-HA coating was better to improve the in vitro biocompatibility of C/C composites compared with hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. It was suggested that the Na-HA coating might be an effective method to improve the surface bioactivity and biocompatibility of C/C composites.

  20. Conducting polymers on non-conducting substrates: Chemical coating processes and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Genies, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    The presentation will be as follows: {emdash}Historical background {emdash}Oxidizing polymerization mechanism of heterocycles and aromatic compounds: the cases of pyrrole and anilin {emdash}The processes: solute, gas phase and from conducting polymer solutions {emdash}The substrates: glass, polymers, inorganic materials, textiles, powders. {emdash}Properties of coatings: {emdash}Chemical properties: redox, acid-base {emdash}Properties resulting from the polymer doping counter-ion {emdash}Physical properties: : optical, magnetic, conducting, microwave absorption {emdash}Stability {emdash}Applications: optics, microelectronics, sensors, electrochrome glasses, electromagnetic and antistatic shielding, military applications, packaging for electronic components, biocompat- ibility, plasturgy. {emdash}Commercial applications throughout the world. How to obtain these materials {emdash}Conclusions The examples will be taken from the results of our laboratory, those of CEA-Direction des Technologies Avanc{acute e}es{emdash}Centre d{close_quote}Etudes et de Recherche sur les Mat{acute e}riaux{emdash}Centre d{close_quote}Etudes Nucl{acute e}aires de Grenoble (Mssrs R. Jolly and J. C. Thi{acute e}blemont), from the Milliken Research Corp. (Dr. H. H. Kuhn), from the Zipperlin Kessler company (Dr. B. Wessling), from the Americhem company and from I.B.M. (Dr. M. Angelopoulos). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks in conductive composite materials.

    PubMed

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leo G J; de With, G Bert

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conductive composite materials can be used for a wide range of applications because they combine the advantages of a specific polymeric material (e.g., thermal and mechanical properties) with the electrical properties of conductive filler particles. However, the overall electrical behaviour of these composite materials is usually much below the potential of the conductive fillers, mainly because by mixing two different components, new interfaces and interphases are created, changing the properties and behaviours of both. Our goal is to characterize and understand the nature and influence of these interfaces on the electrical properties of composite materials. We have improved a technique based on the use of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water, followed by coating glass substrates, and drying and removing the CMC with a nitric acid treatment. We used electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques to characterize the SWCNT films, and developed an in situ resistance measurement technique to analyse the influence of both the individual components and the mixture of an epoxy/amine system on the electrical behaviour of the SWCNTs. The results showed that impregnating a SWCNT network with a polymer is not the only factor that affects the film resistance; air exposure, temperature, physical and chemical properties of the individual polymer components, and also the formation of a polymeric network, can all have an influence on the macroscopic electrical properties of the initial SWCNT network. These results emphasize the importance of understanding the effects that each of the components can have on each other before trying to prepare an efficient polymer composite material. PMID:25430670

  2. Nano-coatings on carbon structures for interfacial modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulikollu, Rajasekhar V.

    Surface modification of materials is a rapidly growing field as structures become smaller, more integrated and complex. It opens up the possibility of combining the optimum bulk properties of a material with optimized surface properties such as enhanced bonding, corrosion resistance, reactivity, stress transfer, and thermal, optical or electrical behavior. Therefore, surface functionalization or modification can be an enabling step in a wide variety of modern applications. In this dissertation several surface modification approaches on carbon foam and carbon nano-fibers will be discussed. These are recently developed sp2 graphitic carbon based structures that have significant potential in aerospace, automotive and thermal applications. Influence of surface modification on composite formation and properties have also been investigated. Two types of property changes have been investigated: one for enhancing the surface reactivity and another for surface inertness. Characterization techniques such as X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Contact Angle Measurement, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and mechanical testing are used in this study to find out the influence of these coatings on surface composition, chemistry and morphology. Mechanical testing has been performed on composites and stand alone foam to study the influence of surface modification on physical and mechanical properties of the composite materials. The effectiveness of these coatings on metallic/graphite interface has also been investigated for metal-matrix composite related applications. Additionally, the influence of plasma coatings on nucleation and growth of nanotubes on larger carbon structures (to produce multiscale, multifunctional materials) have also been studied. It is seen that the liquid phase activation treatment introduces oxygen functional groups on the surface, but may cause severe enough degradation that

  3. Development of electrically conductive DLC coated stainless steel separators for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuo; Watanabe, Masanori; Toda, Tadao; Fujii, Toshiaki

    2013-06-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as one of generation devices of electrical power is rapidly expanding the market as clean energy instead of petroleum and atomic energy. Residential fuel cell goes into quantity production and introduction of fuel cell for use in automobiles starts in the year 2015 in Japan. Critical subject for making fuel cell expand is how to reduce cost of fuel cell. In this paper we describe about separator plate which domains large ratio of cost in fuel cell stack. In present time, carbon is used in material of residential fuel cell separator. Metal separators are developed in fuel cell for use in automobiles because of need of mechanical strength at first. In order to make fuel cell expand in market, further cost reduction is required. But the metal separator has problem that by using metal separator contact resistance occurred by metal corrosion increases and catalyst layer and membrane degrade. In recent time we found out to protect from corrosion and dissolution of metals by coating the film of porous free conductive DLC with plasma ion implantation and deposition technology that we have developed. Film of electrically conductive DLC was formed with high speed of 13 μm/hr by ICP plasma, and coating cost breakout was performed.

  4. Flexible transparent conductive films combining flexographic printed silver grids with CNT coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Lixin; Ran, Jun; Yang, Li; Fang, Yi; Zhai, Qingbin; Li, Luhai

    2016-02-01

    A high-performance ITO-free transparent conductive film (TCF) has been made by combining high resolution Ag grids with a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating. Ag grids printed with flexography have a 20 μm line width at a grid interval of 400 μm. The Ag grid/CNT hybrid film exhibits excellent overall performance, with a typical sheet resistance of 14.8 Ω/□ and 82.6% light transmittance at room temperature. This means a 23.98% reduction in sheet resistance and only 2.52% loss in transmittance compared to a pure Ag grid film. Analysis indicates that filling areas between the Ag grids and interconnecting the silver nanoparticles with the CNT coating are the primary reasons for the significantly improved conductivity of the hybrid film that also exhibits excellent flexibility and mechanical strength compared to an ITO film. The hybrid film may fully satisfy the requirements of different applications, e.g. use as the anode of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The J-V curve shows that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs using the Ag grid/CNT hybrid anode is 0.61%, which is 24.5% higher than that of the pure Ag grids with a PCE of 0.49%. Further investigations to improve the performance of the solar cells based on the printed hybrid TCFs are ongoing.

  5. Flexible transparent conductive films combining flexographic printed silver grids with CNT coating.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lixin; Ran, Jun; Yang, Li; Fang, Yi; Zhai, Qingbin; Li, Luhai

    2016-02-12

    A high-performance ITO-free transparent conductive film (TCF) has been made by combining high resolution Ag grids with a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating. Ag grids printed with flexography have a 20 μm line width at a grid interval of 400 μm. The Ag grid/CNT hybrid film exhibits excellent overall performance, with a typical sheet resistance of 14.8 Ω/□ and 82.6% light transmittance at room temperature. This means a 23.98% reduction in sheet resistance and only 2.52% loss in transmittance compared to a pure Ag grid film. Analysis indicates that filling areas between the Ag grids and interconnecting the silver nanoparticles with the CNT coating are the primary reasons for the significantly improved conductivity of the hybrid film that also exhibits excellent flexibility and mechanical strength compared to an ITO film. The hybrid film may fully satisfy the requirements of different applications, e.g. use as the anode of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The J-V curve shows that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs using the Ag grid/CNT hybrid anode is 0.61%, which is 24.5% higher than that of the pure Ag grids with a PCE of 0.49%. Further investigations to improve the performance of the solar cells based on the printed hybrid TCFs are ongoing. PMID:26758939

  6. Electrically Conductive, Corrosion-Resistant Coatings Through Defect Chemistry for Metallic Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2006-12-31

    The principal objective of this work was to develop oxidation protective coatings for metallic interconnect based on a defect chemistry approach. It was reasoned that the effectiveness of a coating is dictated by oxygen permeation kinetics; the slower the permeation kinetics, the better the protection. All protective coating materials investigated to date are either perovskites or spinels containing metals exhibiting multiple valence states (Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, etc.). As a result, all of these oxides exhibit a reasonable level of electronic conductivity; typically at least about {approx}0.05 S/cm at 800 C. For a 5 micron coating, this equates to a maximum {approx}0.025 {Omega}cm{sup 2} area specific resistance due to the coating. This suggests that the coating should be based on oxygen ion conductivity (the lower the better) and not on electronic conductivity. Measurements of ionic conductivity of prospective coating materials were conducted using Hebb-Wagner method. It was demonstrated that special precautions need to be taken to measure oxygen ion conductivity in these materials with very low oxygen vacancy concentration. A model for oxidation under a protective coating is presented. Defect chemistry based approach was developed such that by suitably doping, oxygen vacancy concentration was suppressed, thus suppressing oxygen ion transport and increasing effectiveness of the coating. For the cathode side, the best coating material identified was LaMnO{sub 3} with Ti dopant on the Mn site (LTM). It was observed that LTM is more than 20 times as effective as Mn-containing spinels. On the anode side, LaCrO3 doped with Nb on the Cr site (LNC) was the material identified. Extensive oxidation kinetics studies were conducted on metallic alloy foils with coating {approx}1 micron in thickness. From these studies, it was projected that a 5 micron coating would be sufficient to ensure 40,000 h life.

  7. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposite Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Luyi; O'Reilly, Jonathan Y.; Tien, Chi-Wei; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective approach to prepare conductive polystyrene/carbon nanofiber (PS/CNF) nanocomposite films via a solution dispersion method is presented. Inexpensive CNF, which has a structure similar to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, is chosen as a nanofiller in this experiment to achieve conductivity in PS films. A good dispersion is…

  8. Comparison of carbon onions and carbon blacks as conductive additives for carbon supercapacitors in organic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckel, N.; Weingarth, D.; Zeiger, M.; Aslan, M.; Grobelsek, I.; Presser, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates carbon onions (∼400 m2 g-1) as a conductive additive for supercapacitor electrodes of activated carbon and compares their performance with carbon black with high or low internal surface area. We provide a study of the electrical conductivity and electrochemical behavior between 2.5 and 20 mass% addition of each of these three additives to activated carbon. Structural characterization shows that the density of the resulting film electrodes depends on the degree of agglomeration and the amount of additive. Addition of low surface area carbon black (∼80 m2 g-1) enhances the power handling of carbon electrodes but significantly lowers the specific capacitance even when adding small amounts of carbon black. A much lower decrease in specific capacitance is observed for carbon onions and the best values are seen for carbon black with a high surface area (∼1390 m2 g-1). The overall performance benefits from the addition of any of the studied additives only at either high scan rates and/or electrolytes with high ion mobility. Normalization to the volume shows a severe decrease in volumetric capacitance and only at high current densities nearing 10 A g-1 we can see an improvement of the electrode capacitance.

  9. Synthesis of Doped Semiconductor Nanocrystals and Conductive Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Andrew Wilke

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are an intriguing class of materials because of their size-tunable properties. This makes them promising for future optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light emitting diodes. Realization of these devices, however, requires precise control of the flow of electricity through the particles. In bulk semiconductors, this is achieved by using materials with few unintentional defects, then intentionally adding particular defects or dopants to alter the semiconductor's electronic properties. In contrast, the addition of electrically active dopants has scarcely been demonstrated in semiconductor nanocrystals, and charge transport is hindered by the barrier of electron hopping between particles. The goal of this thesis, therefore, is to discover new methods to control charge transport in nanocrystals. It divides into three major thrusts: 1) the investigation of the doping process in semiconductor nanocrystals, 2) the invention of new synthetic methods to incorporate electrically active dopants into semiconductor nanocrystals, and 3) the invention of a new nanocrystal surface coating that aids processing of nanocrystals into devices but can be removed to enhance charge transport between particles. The first objective is achieved by the comparison of four different precursors that have been used to dope Mn into nanocrystals. Experiments show that dimethylmanganese incorporates efficiently into ZnSe nanocrystals while other precursors are less efficient and sometimes lower the quality of the nanocrystals produced. The second goal is met by the application of a core-shell synthetic strategy to the incorporation of non-isovalent impurities (Al and In) into CdSe nanocrystals. By separating the three steps of nucleation, dopant binding, and growth, each step can be optimized so that doping is achieved and high quality particles are produced. Detailed characterization shows dopant incorporation and local environment, while transistor

  10. Thermal contact conductance of non-flat, rough, metallic coated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S.

    1996-12-31

    Thermal contact conductance is an important consideration in such applications as thermally induced stress in supersonic and hypersonic flight vehicles, nuclear reactor cooling, electronics packaging, spacecraft thermal control, and gas turbine and internal combustion engine cooling. In many instances, the highest possible thermal contact conductance is desired. For this reason, soft, high conductivity, metallic coatings are sometimes applied to contacting surfaces (often metallic) to increase thermal contact conductance. Two previously developed theoretical models for thermal contact conductance of metallic coated metals have been proven accurate for flat, rough surfaces. However, these two theories often substantially over-predict the conductance of non-flat, rough, metallic coated metals. In this investigation, a previously developed semi-empirical conductance model for flat and non-flat, rough, uncoated metals is employed in predicting the conductance of flat and non-flat, rough, metallic coated metals. The more commonly cited of the previous theoretical models for flat surfaces and the semi-empirical model are compared to experimental thermal contact conductance results from a number of investigations in the literature. Results for a number of metallic coating/substrate combinations on surfaces with widely varying flatness and roughness were analyzed. Both models agree well with experimental results for flat, rough, metallic coated metals. However, the semi-empirical model is substantially more accurate and more conservative than the theoretical model compared to the majority of experimental results for non-flat, rough, metallic coated metals.

  11. Reactive Plasma-Sprayed Aluminum Nitride-Based Coating Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Egota, Kazumi; Okamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Recently, thick aluminum nitride/alumina (AlN/Al2O3) composite coatings were successfully fabricated through the reactive plasma spraying of fine Al2O3/AlN mixture in the N2/H2 atmospheric plasma. The coatings consist of AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and α-Al2O3 phases. This study will evaluate the thermal conductivity of these complicated plasma-sprayed coatings and optimize the controlling aspects. Furthermore, the influence of the process parameters on the coatings thermal conductivity will be investigated. The fabricated coatings showed very low thermal conductivity (2.43 W/m K) compared to the AlN sintered compacts. It is attributed to the phase composition of the fabricated coatings, oxide content, and porosity. The presence of Al2O3, Al5O6N and the high coating porosity decreased its thermal conductivity. The presence of oxygen in the AlN lattice creates Al vacancies which lead to phonon scattering and therefore suppressed the thermal conductivity. The formation of γ-Al2O3 phase in the coating leads to further decrease in its conductivity, due to its lower density compared to the α-phase. Moreover, the high porosity of the coating strongly suppressed the conductivity. This is due to the complicated microstructure of plasma spray coatings (splats, porosity, and interfaces, particularly in case of reactive spray process), which obviously lowered the conductivity. Furthermore, the measured coating density was lower than the AlN value and suppressed the coating conductivity. In addition, the spraying parameter showed a varied effect on the coating phase composition, porosity, density, and therefore on its conductivity. Although the N2 gas flow improved the nitride content, it suppressed the thermal conductivity gradually. It is attributed to the further increase in the porosity and further decrease in the density of the coatings with the N2 gas. Furthermore, increasing the arc did not show a significant change on the coating thermal conductivity. On the other hand

  12. Coating of carbon fibers -- The strength of the fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Helmer, T.; Peterlik, H.; Kromp, K.

    1995-01-01

    The 6k carbon fiber Torayca T800H was coated with pyrolytic carbon by a CVD process. Fiber bundles were tested and evaluated. By this procedure, the whole distribution of the failure probability with respect to the fiber strength is obtained in a single experiment. The 50% strength of the fiber bundle, i.e., the strength at which 50% of the fibers in the bundle are broken, is inversely proportional to the square root of the thickness of the coating. By relating the strength to the defect size according to linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), the probability density function of the defects was derived. It is Weibull-shaped for the uncoated fiber and shows an increasing bimodal shape for the increasing coating thicknesses.

  13. Fiber optic ultrasound transducers with carbon/PDMS composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Bhachu, Davinder S.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Novel ultrasound transducers were created with a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that was dip coated onto the end faces of optical fibers. The CNTs were functionalized with oleylamine to allow for their dissolution in xylene, a solvent of PDMS. Ultrasound pulses were generated by illuminating the composite coating with pulsed laser light. At distances of 2 to 16 mm from the end faces, ultrasound pressures ranged from 0.81 to 0.07 MPa and from 0.27 to 0.03 MPa with 105 and 200 μm core fibers, respectively. Using an optical fiber hydrophone positioned adjacent to the coated 200 µm core optical fiber, ultrasound reflectance measurements were obtained from the outer surface of a sheep heart ventricle. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound transducers that comprise optical fibers with CNT-PDMS composite coatings may be suitable for miniature medical imaging probes.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Packed Electrospun PAN-Based Carbon Fibers Incorporated with Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi; Lu, Chunyuan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Jin, Chunzi; Yoon, Soo Jong; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2016-02-01

    Multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond are renowned as superlative material due to their relatively high thermal conductivity and hardness while comparing with any bulk materials. In this research, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution incorporated with MWCNTs at an alteration of mass fractions (0 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 1 wt%, 2 wt%) were fabricated via electrospinning under optimized parameters. Dried composite nanofibers were stabilized and carbonized, after which water base polytrafluorethylene (PTFE) mixed with nano diamond powder solution was spin coated on them. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray scattering and Laserflash thermal conductivity were used to characterize the composite nanofiber sheets. The result shows that the thermal conductivity increased to 4.825 W/m K from 2.061 W/mK. The improvement of thermal conductivities is suggesting the incorporation of MWCNTs. PMID:27433684

  15. Biomedical applications of diamond-like carbon coatings: a review.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ritwik Kumar; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2007-10-01

    Owing to its superior tribological and mechanical properties with corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and hemocompatibility, diamond-like carbon (DLC) has emerged as a promising material for biomedical applications. DLC films with various atomic bond structures and compositions are finding places in orthopedic, cardiovascular, and dental applications. Cells grew on to DLC coating without any cytotoxity and inflammation. DLC coatings in orthopedic applications reduced wear, corrosion, and debris formation. DLC coating also reduced thrombogenicity by minimizing the platelet adhesion and activation. However, some contradictory results (Airoldi et al., Am J Cardiol 2004;93:474-477, Taeger et al., Mat-wiss u Werkstofftech 2003;34:1094-1100) were also reported that no significant improvement was observed in the performance of DLC-coated stainless stent or DLC-coated femoral head. This controversy should be discussed based on the detailed information of the coating such as atomic bond structure, composition, and/or electronic structure. In addition, instability of the DLC coating caused by its high level of residual stress and poor adhesion in aqueous environment should be carefully considered. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are thus required to confirm its use for medical devices. PMID:17285609

  16. Electrically conductive, black thermal control coatings for space craft application. II - Silicone matrix formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, V. F.; Bauer, J. L.; O'Donnell, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    Five black electrically conductive thermal-control coatings have been formulated and tested for application on the Galileo spacecraft. The coatings consisted of organic and inorganic systems applied on titanium and aluminum surfaces. The coatings were tested under simulated space environment conditions. Coated specimens were subjected to thermal radiation and convective and conductive heating from -196 to 538 C. Mechanical, physical, thermal, electrical, and optical characteristics, formulation, mixing, application, surface preparation of substrates, and a method of determining electrical resistance are presented for the silicone matrix formulation designated as GF-580.

  17. Formation of a Conductive Nanocomposite on Plastic and Glass Substrates Through Wet Chemical Deposition of Well Dispersed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dahoudi, N.

    2007-08-01

    Carbon multi-wall nanotubes (MWNTs) powder was successfully dispersed using microfluidizer with different loading ratio in a water-based inorganic organic monomer composing a stable coating sol. The coatings made of the sol showed that the conductivity behave according to a power percolation law model with critical volume fraction of 0.0825. The highest obtained electrical conductivity of a single 85 nm thick layer of the system was 103 Ω-1.m-1. At the same time the coatings are transparent showing a transmission quite similar to that of the substrate.

  18. Electronic and ionic co-conductive coating on the separator towards high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingsong; Wen, Zhaoyin; Yang, Jianhua; Jin, Jun; Huang, Xiao; Wu, Xiangwei; Han, Jinduo

    2016-02-01

    A thin coating layer composed of the mixture of the electronic conductive carbon and lithium ionic conductive inorganic solid electrolyte was introduced on one side of the routine Celgard separator. This functional coated separator is designed to localize the polysulfides on the cathode side and act as an upper current collector for further utilization of sulfur while alleviating the ion conductivity decrease induced by the dissolved polysulfides in the discharge and charge process. Moreover, catalytic conversion of polysulfides by the solid state highly ionic conductor is observed. This brings significant improvement in battery specific capacity and cycling stability, with an initial discharge capacity of 1247 mA h g-1 and a reversible capacity of 830 mA h g-1 after 150 extended cycles at 0.5 C rate. Rest-testing proves a low self-discharge and excellent capacity retention of the modified cells.

  19. Respiration sensor made from indium tin oxide-coated conductive fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Hee; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Jee, Seung Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Conductive fabrics with new properties and applications have been the subject of extensive research over the last few years, with wearable respiration sensors attracting much attention. Different methods can be used to obtain fabrics that are electrically conducting, an essential property for various applications. For instance, fabrics can be coated with conductive polymers. Here, indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated conductive fabrics with cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol (C-PVA) were prepared using a doctor-blade. The C-PVA was employed in the synthesis to bind ITO on the fabrics with the highest possible mechanical strength. The feasibility of a respiration sensor prepared using the ITO-coated conductive fabric was investigated. The ITO-coated conductive fabric with the C-PVA was demonstrated to have a high potential for use in respiration sensors.

  20. Bioglass-based scaffolds with carbon nanotube coating for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Meng, Decheng; Ioannou, John; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2009-10-01

    Highly porous 45S5 Bioglass-based foam scaffolds were coated with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. By placing the scaffolds in between the two electrodes of the EPD cell, a CNT coating of up to 1 mum thickness was achieved on the surface throughout the whole three dimensional (3D) matrix. A 0.5 wt% CNT aqueous suspension was used and EPD was carried out at 2.8 V for 10 mins. The compression strength of this CNT/Bioglass composite was measured to be 0.70 MPa. Moreover the increased electrical conductivity of the composite with CNT coating was confirmed. The scaffolds have the potential for applications in bone tissue engineering due to the high bioactivity, nano-roughness in 3D and electrical conductivity provided by the addition of CNT. PMID:19437104

  1. Diamondlike carbon protective coatings for IR materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nir, D.; Swec, D. M.; Banks, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films have the potential to protect optical windows in applications where it is important to maintain the integrity of the specular transmittance of these films on ZnS and ZnSe infrared transmitting windows. The films must be adherent and durable such that they protect the windows from rain and particle erosion as well as chemical attack. In order to optimize the performance of these films, 0.1 micro m thick diamondlike carbon films were deposited on fused silica and silicon wafers, using three different methods of ion beam deposition. One method was sputter deposition from a carbon target using an 8 cm ion source. The merits of hydrogen addition were experimentally evaluated in conjunction with this method. The second method used a 30 cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon/Argon gases to deposit diamondlike carbon films from the primary beam at 90 to 250 eV. The third method used a dual beam system employing a hydrocarbon/Argon 30 cm ion source and an 8 cm ion source. Films were evaluated for adherence, intrinsic stress, infrared transmittance between 2.5 and 50 micro m, and protection from particle erosion. An erosion test using a sandblaster was used to give quantitative values of the protection afforded to the fused silica by the diamondlike carbon films. The fused silica surfaces protected by diamondlike carbon films were exposed to 100 micro m diameter SiO particles at 60 mi/hr (26.8/sec) in the sandblaster.

  2. Production and characterization of Ni and Cu composite coatings by electrodeposition reinforced with carbon nanotubes or graphite nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, M. R. Abdul; Pavese, M.; Ambrosio, E. P.; Ugues, D.; Lombardi, M.; Biamino, S.; Badini, C.; Fino, P.

    2013-06-01

    Electrodeposition is well-known as a versatile and economical processing technique to produce metal coatings on conductive substrates. Recently, it has been gaining increasing interest also for the production of tailored composite coatings, containing for instance floropolymers or silicon carbide. A more novel approach concerns the use of carbon nanotubes or even graphene, in the form of graphite nano-platelets. The production of Ni- and Cu-based nanocomposites containing carbon nanoreinforcements was carried out by using standard electrodeposition conditions, but with a particular attention to the dispersion of the nanotubes. The obtained coatings were strong and well adherent to the steel substrate, and presented rather well dispersed carbon nanotubes or graphite nanoplatelets, even if some agglomerates could be present in samples obtained from highly concentrated suspensions. In the case of nickel-based composite coatings, the size of nickel grains was reduced, and pin-on-disc tests demonstrated a significant increase in the life of the coating. In the case of copper-based composite coatings, thermal diffusivity measurements demonstrated that the carbon nanomaterial does not reduce the conductivity of the pure copper coating.

  3. Field Enhanced Thermionic Electron Emission from Oxide Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Christopher; Jin, Feng; Liu, Yan; Little, Scott

    2006-03-01

    We have created a novel nanostructure by coating carbon nanotubes with a thin functional oxide layer. The structure was fabricated by sputter deposition of a thin film of oxide materials on aligned carbon nanotubes, which were grown on a tungsten substrate with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. This structure combines the low work function of the oxide coating with a high field enhancement factor introduced by carbon nanotubes and we have demonstrated that it can be used as a highly efficient electron source. A field enhancement factor as high as 2000 was observed and thermionic electron emission current at least an order of magnitude higher than the emission from a conventional oxide cathode was obtained.

  4. Optical And Protective Properties Of Hard Carbon Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dischler, B.; Bubenzer, A.; Koidl, P.; Brandt, G.

    1983-09-01

    In recent years amorphous carbon coatings found growing interest because of their optical and protective properties. We have deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon films (a-C:H) from an RF excited discharge in benzene vapour. Substrates include germanium, glass and MgF2. The refractive index can be tuned between 1.8 and 2.2 and efficient antireflection coatings on Ge have been prepared. We have determined the optical absorption from the UV to the IR range (0.2 - 25 μm). A typical 1 µm thick a-C:H film is transparent (> 50% transmission) from 750 nm to the far infrared. Amorphous carbon films are harder than sapphire and are resistant to concentrated acids and bases.

  5. Modified carbon fibers to improve composite properties. [sizing fibers for reduced electrical conductivity and adhesion during combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepler, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thin coatings, 5 to 10 wt. percent, were applied to PAN-based carbon fibers. These coatings were intended to make the carbon fibers less electrically conductive or to cause fibers to stick together when a carbon fiber/epoxy composite burned. The effectiveness of the coatings in these regards was evaluated in burn tests with a test rig designed to simulate burning, impact and wind conditions which might release carbon fibers. The effect of the coatings on fiber and composite properties and handling was also investigated. Attempts at sizing carbon fibers with silicon dioxide, silicon carbide and boron nitride meet with varying degrees of success; however, none of these materials provided an electrically nonconductive coating. Coatings intended to stick carbon fibers together after a composite burned were sodium silicate, silica gel, ethyl silicate, boric acid and ammonium borate. Of these, only the sodium silicate and silica gel provided any sticking together of fibers. The amount of sticking was insufficient to achieve the desired objectives.

  6. Diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopaedic applications: an evaluation of tribological performance.

    PubMed

    Xu, T; Pruitt, L

    1999-02-01

    A detailed investigation of the tribological behaviour of vacuum arc diamond-like carbon coated Ti-6Al-4V against a medical grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene is conducted in this work in order to investigate the potential use of diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopaedic appplications. Lubricated and non-lubricated wear experiments are performed using a standard pin-on-disc wear tester. The coefficient of friction is monitored continuously during testing and wear rate calculations are performed using surface profilometry measurements of worn disc surfaces. Sliding wear tests show the existence of two distinct friction and wear regimes distinguished by physically different mechanisms. In the first stages of wear, adhesion and abrasion are the dominant mechanisms of wear while fatigue processes are activated later in the tests. The effects of diamond-like carbon coating structure, surface roughness and lubrication on tribological behaviour are presented. Optimal process-structure-property design for vacuum arc plasma deposition is utilized in order to obtain strong adhesion to the titanium alloy substrate. Diamond-like carbon coatings significantly improve the friction and wear performance of the orthopaedic bearing pair and show exceptional promise for biomedical applications. PMID:15347929

  7. Conducting polymer/polyimide-clay nanocomposite coatings for corrosion protection of AA-2024 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kunal G.

    Corrosion of metals is a major problem in the aerospace and automobile industry. The current methods of corrosion protection such as chromate conversion coatings are under increased scrutiny from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) due to their carcinogenic nature. Intrinsically conducting polymers (ICPs) like polyaniline and polypyrrole have been considered as a potential replacement for chromate conversion coatings and have been under investigation since past decade. The goal of this study is to replace the chromate conversion coating by an environmentally friendly organic coating. Poly (N-ethyl aniline) coating was electrodeposited as the primer layer and polyimide-clay nanocomposite was solution cast as the barrier layer on AA-2024 alloy. This study will provide a better understanding of the corrosion protection mechanism of the conducting polymer coating. Various characterization techniques such as infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the formation, chemical structure and morphology of the coatings. Electrodeposition parameters like monomer concentration, applied current density and the reaction time were varied in order to optimize the properties of the conducting polymer coating. The corrosion performance of the primer coating was evaluated by DC polarization studies. It was found that poly (N-ethyl aniline) reduces from emeraldine to leucoemeraldine form; reducing the rate of cathodic reaction, which reduces the rate of corrosion of AA-2024 alloy. Polyimide-clay nanocomposite coating was solution cast on the conducting polymer primer layer for enhancing the barrier and corrosion properties of the coating system. The concentration of polyimide (10--25 vol%) and clay (0.1 and 1 wt%) were varied in the coating formulation to optimize the barrier properties of topcoat. X-ray diffraction showed that the intergallery clay distance decreased from 17.2 A to 11.79 A after immidization of polyimide

  8. Magnetic alignment of nickel-coated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Chuncheng; State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, 710049 ; Li, Xiaojiao; Wang, Guizhen

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanofibers were subjected to a two-step pretreatment, sensitization and activation. Carbon nanofibers were encapsulated by a uniform layer of nickel nanoparticles. The prepared composites are ferromagnetic and with a small value of coercivity. Upon such functionalization, the carbon nanofibers can be aligned in a relatively small external magnetic field. Highlights: {center_dot} A simple microwave-assisted procedure for the magnetic composite. {center_dot} Dense layer of nickel on pretreated carbon nanofibers. {center_dot} Ferromagnetic properties and low coercivity. {center_dot} A long-chain aligned structure under magnetic field. -- Abstract: Magnetic composites of nickel-coated carbon nanofibers have been successfully fabricated by employing a simple microwave-assisted procedure. The scanning electron microscopy images show that a complete and uniform nickel coating with mean size of 25 nm could be deposited on carbon fibers. Magnetization curves demonstrate that the prepared composites are ferromagnetic and that the coercivity is 96 Oe. The magnetic carbon nanofibers can be aligned as a long-chain structure in an external magnetic field.

  9. Novel Carbon Nanomaterial Coating for Dispersibility, Delivery and Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swierczewska, Magdalena

    Carbon nanomaterials have been cited to provide great potential in biomedical applications such as in vivo imaging, drug delivery, and biomarker detection. Yet poor dispersibility in physiological conditions greatly limits their biomedical promise. As with most nanoparticles, the surface interaction with biological systems is the driving force towards effective activity in vivo, namely exhibiting dispersion, low cytotoxicity, and molecular targetability. Therefore, by surface engineering carbon nanomaterials with a distinct biocompatible coating, their applications in imaging, drug delivery, biomarker detection, and therapy can be empowered. We render carbon nanomaterials useful for such in vivo biomedical applications by providing dispersibility, delivery and sensing capabilities with a facile surface coating method. A single, yet multifunctional, hyaluronic acid-based biosurfactant was strategically chosen to meet the design criteria. The amphiphilic material, hyaluronic acid-5beta-cholanic acid (HACA), is an efficient dispersing agent for carbon nanomaterials, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in physiological conditions for a sustained period of time. Furthermore, the biological activity and cancer cell targeting of HACA wrapped SWCNTs (HACA-SWCNTs) were evaluated in vitro and in vivo utilizing imaging techniques intrinsic to SWCNTs, HACA, and HACA-SWCNTs. Fluorescent dye-labeled HACA-SWCNTs were designed to activate fluorescence signals intracelluarly, not only serving as an approach to image cellular uptake but also to determine the coating efficacy of HACA onto SWCNTs. SWCNT localization within cells was also confirmed by tracking the intrinsic Raman signals of carbon nanomaterials. In vivo photoacoustic, fluorescence, and positron emission tomography imaging display high tumor targeting capability of HACA-SWCNTs in a murine tumor model. Once targeted, HACA-SWCNTs have potential to serve as photothermal tumor ablation agents after laser

  10. Texture structure and ablation behavior of TaC coating on carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao-Ke, Chen; Xiang, Xiong; Guo-Dong, Li; Wei, Sun; Ying, Long

    2010-11-01

    TaC coatings with hybrid, (2 0 0) and (2 2 0) texture structure were prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by isothermal chemical vapor deposition with TaCl5-Ar-C3H6 system. The residual stress, hardness and ablation behaviors of the different coatings were characterized by Raman spectra, nano-indentation and oxyacetylene flame ablation machine respectively. Results shown tensile stress exists in the TaC coatings and increases when texture orientation turns from hybrid to (2 2 0) and (2 0 0), while nano-indentation hardness of the coatings also obeys the same trend. The deposited coatings could improve the ablation-resistance properties of C/C composites effectively. The texture structure also had great effects on the ablation properties and ablation morphologies of the coatings. The mass ablation rate obviously decreases when the texture structure changes from hybrid orientation to (2 0 0) and (2 2 0) orientations. The hybrid orientation and (2 0 0) texture coatings exhibit coarse oxide morphologies with crater or some breakage existed; while the (2 2 0) texture coating shows dense, molten oxide morphology. The main ablation behaviors of the hybrid, (2 0 0) and (2 2 0) texture TaC coatings are oxidation and particle denudation and block denudation, oxidation and block denudation, oxidation and mechanical erosion and block denudation, respectively.

  11. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  12. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  13. Effect of the rheological properties of carbon nanotube dispersions on the processing and properties of transparent conductive electrodes.

    PubMed

    Maillaud, Laurent; Poulin, Philippe; Pasquali, Matteo; Zakri, Cécile

    2015-06-01

    Transparent conductive films are made from aqueous surfactant stabilized dispersions of carbon nanotubes using an up-scalable rod coating method. The processability of the films is governed by the amount of surfactant which is shown to alter strongly the wetting and viscosity of the ink. The increase of viscosity results from surfactant mediated attractive interactions between the carbon nanotubes. Links between the formulation, ink rheological properties, and electro-optical properties of the films are determined. The provided guidelines are generalized and used to fabricate optimized electrodes using conductive polymers and carbon nanotubes. In these electrodes, the carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient viscosifiers that allow the optimized ink to be homogeneously spread using the rod coating method. From a general point of view and in contrast to previous studies, the CNTs are optimally used in the present approach as conductive additives for viscosity enhancements of electronic inks. PMID:25961667

  14. Durable superhydrophobic carbon soot coatings for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmeryan, K. D.; Radeva, E. I.; Avramov, I. D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of durable superhydrophobic (SH) carbon soot coatings used in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based gas or liquid sensors is reported. The method uses modification of the carbon soot through polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) by means of glow discharge RF plasma. The surface characterization shows a fractal-like network of carbon nanoparticles with diameter of ~50 nm. These particles form islands and cavities in the nanometer range, between which the plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) embeds and binds to the carbon chains and QCM surface. Such modified surface structure retains the hydrophobic nature of the soot and enhances its robustness upon water droplet interactions. Moreover, it significantly reduces the insertion loss and dynamic resistance of the QCM compared to the commonly used carbon soot/epoxy resin approach. Furthermore, the PPHMDSO/carbon soot coating demonstrates durability and no aging after more than 40 probing cycles in water based liquid environments. In addition, the surface layer keeps its superhydrophobicity even upon thermal annealing up to 540 °C. These experiments reveal an opportunity for the development of soot based SH QCMs with improved electrical characteristics, as required for high-resolution gas or liquid measurements.

  15. Tuning Electrical Conductivity of Inorganic Minerals with Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anton A; Tour, James M

    2015-12-01

    Conductive powders based on Barite or calcium carbonate with chemically converted graphene (CCG) were successfully synthesized by adsorption of graphene oxide (GO) or graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) onto the mineral surfaces and subsequent chemical reduction with hydrazine. The efficient adsorption of GO or GONRs on the surface of Barite and calcium carbonate-based mineral particles results in graphene-wrapped hybrid materials that demonstrate a concentration dependent electrical conductivity that increases with the GO or GONR loading. PMID:26544547

  16. Conductive hydrophobic hybrid textiles modified with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, D.; Brzeziński, S.; Makowski, T.; Fortuniak, W.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of modifying and testing modern hybrid polyester-cotton woven fabrics with deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes and imparted hydrophobicity. The effect of the carbon nanotubes deposited on these fabrics on their conductive properties and hydrophobicity has been assessed. The electro-conductive and hydrophobic composite fabrics obtained in this way, being light, elastic and resistant to mechanical effects, make it possible to be widely used in various industrial fields.

  17. Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles

    DOEpatents

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2013-12-17

    A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

  18. Poly(4-vinylpyridine)-coated glassy carbon flow detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Golden, T.; Tuzhi, P.

    1987-03-01

    The performance of a thin-layer flow detector with a glassy carbon electrode coated with a film of protonated poly(4-vinylpyridine) is described. Substantial improvement in the selectivity of amperometric detection for liquid chromatography and flow injection systems is observed as a result of excluding cationic species from the surface. The detector response was evaluated with respect to flow rate, solute concentration, coating scheme, film-to-film reproducibility, and other variables. Despite the increase in diffusional resistance, low detection limits of ca. 0.04 and 0.10 ng of ascorbic acid and uric acid, respectively, are maintained. Protection from organic surfactants can be coupled to the charge exclusion effect by using a bilayer coating, with a cellulose acetate film atop the poly(4-vinylpyridine) layer. Applicability to urine sample is demonstrated.

  19. RTA-treated carbon fiber/copper core/shell hybrid for thermally conductive composites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seunggun; Park, Bo-In; Park, Cheolmin; Hong, Soon Man; Han, Tae Hee; Koo, Chong Min

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we demonstrate a facile route to produce epoxy/carbon fiber composites providing continuous heat conduction pathway of Cu with a high degree of crystal perfection via electroplating, followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment and compression molding. Copper shells on carbon fibers were coated through electroplating method and post-treated via RTA technique to reduce the degree of imperfection in the Cu crystal. The epoxy/Cu-plated carbon fiber composites with Cu shell of 12.0 vol % prepared via simple compression molding, revealed 18 times larger thermal conductivity (47.2 W m(-1) K(-1)) in parallel direction and 6 times larger thermal conductivity (3.9 W m(-1) K(-1)) in perpendicular direction than epoxy/carbon fiber composite. Our novel composites with RTA-treated carbon fiber/Cu core/shell hybrid showed heat conduction behavior of an excellent polymeric composite thermal conductor with continuous heat conduction pathway, comparable to theoretical values obtained from Hatta and Taya model. PMID:24758290

  20. The Electrochemical Behavior of Zn-Mn Alloy Coating in Carbonated Concrete Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touazi, S.; Bučko, M.; Makhloufi, L.; Legat, A.; Bajat, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the protective performance of Zn coating on reinforcing steel in concrete, the electrochemical deposition of Zn-Mn coatings was conducted on steel surface. The morphology, chemical and phase compositions of Zn-Mn coatings obtained from sulfate-citrate bath were investigated in the first part of paper. In the second part, the obtained deposits were tested in solution simulating carbonated concrete, consisting of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3. Data obtained from Tafel analysis showed higher corrosion resistance for Zn-Mn alloy deposits obtained at -1700 and -1800mV versus SCE, when compared to pure Zn deposit. Impedance spectroscopy investigations revealed that the total impedance of Zn-Mn coatings increased steadily with time, and was significantly higher as compared to pure Zn after 24h in corrosion solution. On the contrary, for pure Zn, the impedance increased in the first 12h, and then decreased during prolonged exposure time, which can be explained by rapid growth of nonprotective white rust and the degradation of zinc coating, as was confirmed by optical microscope after 24h of immersion in carbonated concrete pore solution.

  1. Furnace Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Multi-Component Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Nesbitt, James A.; Barrett, Charles A.; McCue, Terry R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling, thus helping achieve future engine low emission, high efficiency and improved reliability goals. Advanced multi-component zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings are being developed using an oxide defect clustering design approach to achieve the required coating low thermal conductivity and high temperature stability. Although the new composition coatings were not yet optimized for cyclic durability, an initial durability screening of the candidate coating materials was conducted using conventional furnace cyclic oxidation tests. In this paper, furnace cyclic oxidation behavior of plasma-sprayed zirconia-based defect cluster thermal barrier coatings was investigated at 1163 C using 45 min hot cycles. The ceramic coating failure mechanisms were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) phase analysis after the furnace tests. The coating cyclic lifetime is also discussed in relation to coating processing, phase structures, dopant concentration, and other thermo-physical properties.

  2. Inner Surface Coating of Non-Conductive Tubular Substrate Using Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreethawate, L.; Larpkiattaworn, S.; Jiemsirilers, S.; Uchikoshi, T.

    2011-10-01

    Inner surface of microporous alumina tube was coated with nanoporous alumina layer using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. Polypyrrole (Ppy) film was formed on the inner wall of the porous tube to give electrical conductivity by chemical polymerization of pyrrole (Py). The nanoporous structure was controled using bimodal suspension of alumina powders with 0.6 μm and 30 nm in ethanol. The thickness of the coated layer was controlled by varying the processing parameters such as deposition time and DC applied voltage. After the deposition, the coated substrate was sintered at 1250°C for 2 h to bond the coated layer with the substrate.The microstructure of the substrate and the coated layer was observed by SEM. The results show the good interfacial joining between the substrate and the coated layer; they are not seperatated after the Ppy burnt-out. Crack-free and nanoporous layer on the microporous substrate was successfully fabricated.

  3. Investigation into conductivity of silver-coated cenosphere composites prepared by a modified electroless process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiao Guo; Zhang, Hai Yan

    2013-01-01

    Silver-coated cenosphere composites are successfully fabricated by a modified electroless plating process that is modified by replacing the conventional pretreatment and sensitization steps by only using surface hydroxylation step to simplify the steps and reduce the overall cost of the coating process. Furthermore, the activation and electroless plating steps are merged into one step. The cenosphere particles are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) before and after the coating process. The relatively continuous and compact coating is obtained under the given coating conditions. The results indicated that the conductivity of Ag-coated cenospheres was improved with increasing the AgNO3 solution dosage and reaction time. It was also found that the optimum AgNO3 solution concentration was 0.05 mol/L, and the optimum range of reaction temperature was from 50 °C to 65 °C.

  4. Evaluation of the Lifetime and Thermal Conductivity of Dysprosia-Stabilized Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Nicholas; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Östergren, Lars; Li, Xin-Hai; Dorfman, Mitch

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was the further development of dysprosia-stabilized zirconia coatings for gas turbine applications. The target for these coatings was a longer lifetime and higher insulating performance compared to today's industrial standard thermal barrier coating. Two morphologies of ceramic top coat were studied: one using a dual-layer system and the second using a polymer to generate porosity. Evaluations were carried out using a laser flash technique to measure thermal properties. Lifetime testing was conducted using thermo-cyclic fatigue testing. Microstructure was assessed with SEM and Image analysis was used to characterize porosity content. The results show that coatings with an engineered microstructure give performance twice that of the present reference coating.

  5. Single Wall Carbon Nano Tube Films and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, T. V.; Kumar, Satish; Ericson, Lars M.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2002-03-01

    Purified single wall carbon nano tubes (SWNTs) produced from the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPCO) process have been dissolved /dispersed in oleum. These solutions /dispersions were optically homogeneous and have been used to form stand-alone SWNT films. The washed, dried, and heat-treated films are isotropic. The scanning electron micrographs of the film surface shows that the nanotube ropes (or fibrils) of about 20 nm diameters are arranged just like macroscopic fibers in a non-woven fabric. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of the SWNT film confirms the isotropic nature of these films. The films are being characterized for their thermal, mechanical as well electrical properties. Thin nano tube coatings, including optically transparent coatings, have also been made on a variety of substrates such as glass, polyethylene, polystyrene, polypropylene, silicon wafer, as well as stainless steel.

  6. Substrate/layer interface of amorphous-carbon hard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, O.; Cebollada, A.; Yang, S.; Teer, D. G.; Albella, J. M.; Román, E.

    2000-08-01

    A combined study of the crystalline structure, the chemical interaction, and diffusion processes of the substrate/layer interface of amorphous-carbon hard coatings is presented. The structure of the coatings and their gradient layer interface to a chromium buffer layer has been investigated on two substrates [Si(100) and tool steel] using x-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical interaction and diffusion processes at the interfaces and within the layers were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy depth profiles. The chromium buffer layer revealed similar textured structure on both substrates. The subsequent gradient layer was determined (within XRD limits) to be amorphous and composed of an amorphous-carbon and chromium-carbide composite. The chromium carbide maintains the same stoichiometry (Cr3C2), regardless of the gradually changing chromium content. No large-scale interdiffusion was measured, either between or within the layers.

  7. Low temperature charge transport and microwave absorption of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polymer composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon coated Fe nanoparticle–PVC composite films were prepared by solution casting method. ► A low electrical percolation threshold of 2.2 was achieved. ► The low temperature electrical conductivity follows variable range hopping type conduction. ► An EMI shielding of 18 dB was achieved in 200 micron thick film. -- Abstract: In this paper, the low temperature electrical conductivity and microwave absorption properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polyvinyl chloride composite films are investigated for different filler fractions. The filler particles are prepared by the pyrolysis of ferrocene at 980 °C and embedded in polyvinyl chloride matrix. The high resolution transmission electron micrographs of the filler material have shown a 5 nm thin layer graphitic carbon covering over iron particles. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the composite film changes by 10 orders of magnitude with the increase of filler concentration. A percolation threshold of 2.2 and an electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI SE) of ∼18.6 dB in 26.5–40 GHz range are observed for 50 wt% loading. The charge transport follows three dimensional variable range hopping conduction.

  8. Bio-lnspired dielectric elastomer actuator with AgNWs coated on carbon black electrode.

    PubMed

    Jun, K W; Lee, J M; Lee, J Y; Ohl, I K

    2014-10-01

    Bio-inspired dielectric elastomer actuators with AgNW-coated carbon black electrodes were developed in this study. The novel elastomer actuators show large in-plane deformations by electrical stimulation through the both electrodes. When a certain input voltage is applied to the elastomer electrode, the electrostatic force between cathode and anode electrodes compress the dielectric elastomer film, resulting large in in-plane direction deformation. The expanded area of the circular actuation device under 70 mV/m electric field was measured up to 50% due to a synergistic effect of highly conductive AgNW network and ultrahigh capacitance of carbon black electrodes. PMID:25942813

  9. Carbon--silicon coating alloys for improved irradiation stability

    DOEpatents

    Bokros, J.C.

    1973-10-01

    For ceramic nuclear fuel particles, a fission product-retaining carbon-- silicon alloy coating is described that exhibits low shrinkage after exposure to fast neutron fluences of 1.4 to 4.8 x 10/sup 21/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E = 0.18 MeV) at irradiation temperatures from 950 to 1250 deg C. Isotropic pyrolytic carbon containing from 18 to 34 wt% silicon is co-deposited from a gaseous mixiure of propane, helium, and silane at a temperature of 1350 to 1450 deg C. (Official Gazette)

  10. Radiative absorption enhancement from coatings on black carbon aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Xinfeng; Yang, Lingxiao; Chen, Bing; Chen, Jianmin; Andersson, August; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-05-01

    The radiative absorption enhancement of ambient black carbon (BC), by light-refractive coatings of atmospheric aerosols, constitutes a large uncertainty in estimates of climate forcing. The direct measurements of radiative absorption enhancement require the experimentally-removing the coating materials in ambient BC-containing aerosols, which remains a challenge. Here, the absorption enhancement of the BC core by non-absorbing aerosol coatings was quantified using a two-step removal of both inorganic and organic matter coatings of ambient aerosols. The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of decoated/pure atmospheric BC aerosols of 4.4±0.8m(2)g(-1) was enhanced to 9.6±1.8m(2)g(-1) at 678-nm wavelength for ambiently-coated BC aerosols at a rural Northern China site. The enhancement of MAC (EMAC) rises from 1.4±0.3 in fresh combustion emissions to ~3 for aged ambient China aerosols. The three-week high-intensity campaign observed an average EMAC of 2.25±0.55, and sulfates were primary drivers of the enhanced BC absorption. PMID:26874760

  11. Conducting antireflection coatings with low polarization dependent loss for telecommunication applications.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, J; Ford, Joseph; Sullivan, Brian; Lu, Liping; Osborne, Norman

    2004-12-13

    Conducting optical coatings for the visible light range are commonly made of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO), but ITO is unsuitable for near-infrared telecommunications wavelengths because it can become absorptive after extended illumination. In this paper we show an alternative approach which uses conventional coating materials to create either non-conducting or conducting antireflection (AR) coatings that are effective over a fairly broad spectral region ( lambdalong/lambdashort approximately 1.40) and also usable for a wide range of angles of incidence (0-38 masculine, or 0-55 masculine) in the telecom wavelength range. Not only is the transmittance of windows treated with such coatings quite high, but they can be made to have extreme polarization independence (low polarization dependent loss values). A number of such coating designs are presented in the paper. A prototype of one of the conducting AR coating designs was fabricated and the measurements were found to be in reasonable agreement with the calculated performance. Such AR coatings should be of interest for telecommunication applications and especially for anti-static hermetic packaging of MEMS devices such as optical switches. PMID:19488272

  12. Conductance Degradation in HTS Coated Conductor Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavan, Edgar R.; Leidecker, Henning; Panashchenko, Lyudmyla

    2015-12-01

    Solder joints between YBCO coated conductors and normal metal traces have been analysed as part of an effort to develop a robust HTS lead assembly for a spaceflight mission. Measurements included critical current and current transfer profiles. X-ray micrographs were used to verify proper solder flow and to determine the extent of voiding. SEM of cross-sections with EDS analysis was crucial in understanding the diffusion of the protective silver layer over the YBCO into the solder for different solder processes. The assembly must be stored for an extended period of time prior to final cool-down and operation. Measurements of the joint resistance over the course of months show a significant increase with time. Understanding the interface condition suggests an explanation for the change.

  13. Observed nighttime conductance alters modeled global hydrology and carbon budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardozzi, D. L.; Zeppel, M. J. B.; Fisher, R. A.; Tawfik, A.

    2015-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere regulates climate through carbon, water, and energy exchanges with the atmosphere. Land surface models estimate plant transpiration, which is actively regulated by stomatal pores, and provide projections essential for understanding Earth's carbon and water resources. Empirical evidence from 204 species suggests that significant amounts of water are lost through leaves at night, though land surface models typically reduce stomatal conductance to nearly zero at night. Here, we apply observed nighttime stomatal conductance values to a global land surface model, to better constrain carbon and water budgets. We find that our modifications increase transpiration up to 5 % globally, reduce modeled available soil moisture by up to 50 % in semi-arid regions, and increase the importance of the land surface on modulating energy fluxes. Carbon gain declines up to ~ 4 % globally and > 25 % in semi-arid regions. We advocate for realistic constraints of minimum stomatal conductance in future climate simulations, and widespread field observations to improve parameterizations.

  14. Compilation of diamond-like carbon properties for barriers and hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Outka, D.A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Boehme, D.R.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Ottesen, D.K.; Johnsen, H.A.; Clift, W.M.; Headley, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an amorphous form of carbon which resembles diamond in its hardness, lubricity, and interest for hardness, lubricity, and resistance to chemical attack. Such properties make DLC of use in barrier and hard coating technology. This report examines a variety of properties of DLC coatings which are relevant to its use as a protective coating. This includes examining substrates on which DLC coatings can be deposited; the resistance of DLC coatings to various chemical agents; adhesion of DLC coatings; and characterization of DLC coatings by electron microscopy, FTIR, sputter depth profiling, stress measurements, and nanoindentation.

  15. Increase in the DSSC efficiency when using metal-coated carbon nanowall counter electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangjoon; Choi, Won Seok; Lim, Dong-Gun; Choi, Eun Chang; Hong, Byungyou

    2014-08-01

    This research was conducted to improve the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using metal-layer-coated carbon nanowalls (CNWs) as counter electrodes. The CNWs were synthesized on a fluorine-doped tin-oxide (FTO) glass substrate in a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system using methane (CH4), and the CNWS were sputter-coated with metal films several times by using an RF magnetron sputtering system and four-inch metal targets (Cu, W and Ni, separately). Then, the metal-layer-coated CNWs were used as counter electrodes for manufacturing the DSCCs. The vertical and the surface conditions of the metal-coated CNWs used as the DSCC electrodes were characterized by their electrical variations through field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Hall measurements. Their optical characteristics were analyzed using UV-Vis equipment, and the energy conversion efficiencies of the DSSCs manufactured using the metal-layer-coated CNWs as the counter electrodes were measured. The results confirmed that the efficiency improved when the W-coated CNW was used as the counter electrode.

  16. Investigations of conductive polymer coatings for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racicot, Robert James

    The anti-corrosion properties of a novel double strand conductive polymer coating on aluminum alloys in salt environments as a possible replacement for chromium conversion coatings was investigated. The conductive coating consisted of a double helix backbone structure of polyaniline wrapped with an esterified polyacrylic acid strand. This polymer complex offers advantages over other conductive polymer systems in material stability and processability. The polymer is soluble in single organic solvents and was sprayed onto square AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy samples. The coatings were investigated for corrosion protection properties using cyclic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and long term exposure in aggressive salt environments. The polymer coated samples were tested against two commercial chromate conversion coatings and uncoated alloy samples. The cyclic polarization tests show a two order of magnitude lowering of the corrosion current over the uncoated samples, a one order of magnitude lowering of Isbcorr over the second type of chromate coating and a one order of magnitude higher Isbcorr over the first type of chromate coating. Impedance results show a two order of magnitude higher impedance at low frequencies over the uncoated and equivalent performance for both types of chromate coatings. EIS and cyclic polarization tests of the conductive state (green colored) versus a non-conductive state (blue colored) of the polymer coating shows that the electrically conductive state is more effective than the insulating state for corrosion protection. This data indicates that the electro-active nature of the polymer coating plays a role in the protection of the alloys. After two months exposure in a.5N NaCl solution, there is no evidence of pitting at the alloy surface for the polymer coated samples under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, indicating a change in the typical corrosion mechanism for aluminum alloys. The

  17. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  18. Conductive Carbon Nanotube Inks for Use with Desktop Inkjet Printing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke; Williams, Martha; Tate, LaNetra; Fortier, Craig; Smith, David; Davia, Kyle; Gibson, Tracy; Snyder, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Inkjet printing is a common commercial process. In addition to the familiar use in printing documents from computers, it is also used in some industrial applications. For example, wire manufacturers are required by law to print the wire type, gauge, and safety information on the exterior of each foot of manufactured wire, and this is typically done with inkjet or laser printers. The goal of this work was the creation of conductive inks that can be applied to a wire or flexible substrates via inkjet printing methods. The use of inkjet printing technology to print conductive inks has been in testing for several years. While researchers have been able to get the printing system to mechanically work, the application of conductive inks on substrates has not consistently produced adequate low resistances in the kilohm range. Conductive materials can be applied using a printer in single or multiple passes onto a substrate including textiles, polymer films, and paper. The conductive materials are composed of electrical conductors such as carbon nanotubes (including functionalized carbon nanotubes and metal-coated carbon nanotubes); graphene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (e.g., pentacene and bisperipentacene); metal nanoparticles; inherently conductive polymers (ICP); and combinations thereof. Once the conductive materials are applied, the materials are dried and sintered to form adherent conductive materials on the substrate. For certain formulations, increased conductivity can be achieved by printing on substrates supported by low levels of magnetic field alignment. The adherent conductive materials can be used in applications such as damage detection, dust particle removal, smart coating systems, and flexible electronic circuitry. By applying alternating layers of different electrical conductors to form a layered composite material, a single homogeneous layer can be produced with improved electrical properties. It is believed that patterning alternate layers of

  19. Electrical Properties of Conductive Cotton Yarn Coated with Eosin Y Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunju; Arul, Narayanasamy Sabari; Han, Jeong In

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the fabrication and investigation of the electrical properties of two types of conductive cotton yarns coated with eosin Y or eosin B functionalized reduced graphene (RGO) and bare graphene oxide (GO) using dip-coating method. The surface morphology of the conductive cotton yarn coated with reduced graphene oxide was observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Due to the strong electrostatic attractive forces, the negatively charged surface such as the eosin Y functionalized reduced graphene oxide or bare GO can be easily coated to the positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI) treated cotton yarn. The maximum current for the conductive cotton yarn coated with eosin Y functionalized RGO and bare GO with 20 cycles repetition of (5D + R) process was found to be 793.8 μA and 3482.8 μA. Our results showed that the electrical conductivity of bare GO coated conductive cotton yarn increased by approximately four orders of magnitude with the increase in the dipping cycle of (5D+R) process. PMID:27427672

  20. Polyaniline-coated freestanding porous carbon nanofibers as efficient hybrid electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Chau; Singhal, Richa; Lawrence, Daniel; Kalra, Vibha

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional, free-standing, hybrid supercapacitor electrodes combining polyaniline (PANI) and porous carbon nanofibers (P-CNFs) were fabricated with the aim to integrate the benefits of both electric double layer capacitors (high power, cyclability) and pseudocapacitors (high energy density). A systematic investigation of three different electropolymerization techniques, namely, potentiodynamic, potentiostatic, and galvanostatic, for electrodeposition of PANI on freestanding carbon nanofiber mats was conducted. It was found that the galvanostatic method, where the current density is kept constant and can be easily controlled facilitates conformal and uniform coating of PANI on three-dimensional carbon nanofiber substrates. The electrochemical tests indicated that the PANI-coated P-CNFs exhibit excellent specific capacitance of 366 F g-1 (vs. 140 F g-1 for uncoated porous carbon nanofibers), 140 F cm-3 volumetric capacitance, and up to 2.3 F cm-2 areal capacitance at 100 mV s-1 scan rate. Such excellent performance is attributed to a thin and conformal coating of PANI achieved using the galvanostatic electrodeposition technique, which not only provides pseudocapacitance with high rate capability, but also retains the double-layer capacitance of the underlying P-CNFs.

  1. Nonplanar conductive surfaces via "bottom-up" nanostructured gold coating.

    PubMed

    Vinod, T P; Jelinek, Raz

    2014-03-12

    Development of technologies for the construction of bent, curved, and flexible conductive surfaces is among the most important albeit challenging goals in the promising field of "flexible electronics". We present a generic solution-based "bottom-up" approach for assembling conductive gold nanostructured layers on nonplanar polymer surfaces. The simple two-step experimental scheme is based upon incubation of an amine-displaying polymer [the abundantly used poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), selected here as a proof of concept] with Au(SCN)4(-), followed by a brief treatment with a conductive polymer [poly(3,4-thylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate)] solution. Importantly, no reducing agent is co-added to the gold complex solution. The resultant surfaces are conductive and exhibit a unique "nanoribbon" gold morphology. The scheme yields conductive layers upon PDMS in varied configurations: planar, "wrinkled", and mechanically bent surfaces. The technology is simple, inexpensive, and easy to implement for varied polymer surfaces (and other substances), opening the way for practical applications in flexible electronics and related fields. PMID:24548243

  2. Quantum conductance of silicon-doped carbon wire nanojunctions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Unknown quantum electronic conductance across nanojunctions made of silicon-doped carbon wires between carbon leads is investigated. This is done by an appropriate generalization of the phase field matching theory for the multi-scattering processes of electronic excitations at the nanojunction and the use of the tight-binding method. Our calculations of the electronic band structures for carbon, silicon, and diatomic silicon carbide are matched with the available corresponding density functional theory results to optimize the required tight-binding parameters. Silicon and carbon atoms are treated on the same footing by characterizing each with their corresponding orbitals. Several types of nanojunctions are analyzed to sample their behavior under different atomic configurations. We calculate for each nanojunction the individual contributions to the quantum conductance for the propagating σ, Π, and σ∗electron incidents from the carbon leads. The calculated results show a number of remarkable features, which include the influence of the ordered periodic configurations of silicon-carbon pairs and the suppression of quantum conductance due to minimum substitutional disorder and artificially organized symmetry on these nanojunctions. Our results also demonstrate that the phase field matching theory is an efficient tool to treat the quantum conductance of complex molecular nanojunctions. PMID:23130998

  3. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings. PMID:25942897

  4. A facile hydrothermal approach for construction of carbon coating on TiO2 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Olurode, Kehinde; Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi; Luo, Zhiphing

    2012-01-01

    Herein a facile hydrothermal approach is used to construct carbon coated TiO2 nanoparticles employing dextrose as the source of carbon. The procedure is operated at a low temperature of 200 °C. Fourier infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the successful coating of carbon on TiO2 nanoparticles. The phase composition of TiO2 and carbon coated TiO2 nanoparticles were studied using X-ray diffraction and the surface morphology was analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The existence of carbon coating on TiO2 nanoparticles was revealed by thermogravimetric analysis through different thermograms exhibited for TiO2 and carbon coated TiO2 nanoparticles. The reported method offers a simple and efficient approach for production of carbon coating TiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:22297036

  5. Polypyrrole-coated electrospun poly(lactic acid) fibrous scaffold: effects of coating on electrical conductivity and neural cell growth.

    PubMed

    Sudwilai, Thitima; Ng, Jun Jye; Boonkrai, Chatikorn; Israsena, Nipan; Chuangchote, Surawut; Supaphol, Pitt

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal activities play critical roles in both neurogenesis and neural regeneration. In that sense, electrically conductive and biocompatible biomaterial scaffolds can be applied in various applications of neural tissue engineering. In this study, we fabricated a novel biomaterial for neural tissue engineering applications by coating electrospun poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers with a conducting polymer, polypyrole (PPy), via admicellar polymerization. Optimal conditions for polymerization and preparation of PPy-coated electrospun PLA nanofibers were obtained by comparing results from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, and surface conductivity tests. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that PPy-coated electrospun PLA fibrous scaffold is not toxic. The scaffold could support attachment and migration of neural progenitor cells. Neurons derived from progenitor exhibited long neurite outgrowth under electrical stimulation. Our study concluded that PPy-coated electrospun PLA fibers had a good biocompatibility with neural progenitor cells and may serve as a promising material for controlling progenitor cell behaviors and enhancing neural repair. PMID:24933469

  6. The physics of gridded and conductive coated dielectrics for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okress, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of electrostatic control and design of gridded and conductive film bonded polymers, for spacecraft Thermo-optical blankets are considered. Brief commentaries relative to the salient features of the primarily developed facility for and characterization of said polymers is also considered.

  7. Effect of carbon nanofibers on the infiltration and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jinsong; Luo, Ruiying; Yan, Ying

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} The CNFs improve the infiltration rate and thermal properties of carbon/carbon composites. {yields} The densification rate increases with the CNF content increasing at the beginning of infiltration. {yields} The values of the thermal conductivity of the composite obtain their maximum values at 5 wt.%. -- Abstract: Preforms containing 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.% carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were fabricated by spreading layers of carbon cloth, and infiltrated using the electrified preform heating chemical vapor infiltration method (ECVI) under atmospheric pressure. Initial thermal gradients were determined. Resistivity and density evolutions with infiltration time have been recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, polarized light micrograph and X-ray diffraction technique were used to analyze the experiment results. The results showed that the infiltration rate increased with the rising of CNF content, and after 120 h of infiltration, the density was the highest when the CNF content was 5 wt.%, but the composite could not be densified efficiently as the CNF content ranged from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. CNF-reinforced C/C composites have enhanced thermal conductivity, the values at 5 wt.% were increased by nearly 5.5-24.1% in the X-Y direction and 153.8-251.3% in the Z direction compared to those with no CNFs. When the additive content was increased to 20 wt.%, due to the holes and cavities in the CNF web and between carbon cloth and matrix, the thermal conductivities in the X-Y and Z directions decreased from their maximum values at 5 wt.%.

  8. Metal coated functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes for composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiang

    This study is considered as a method for producing multifunctional composite materials by using metals coated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this research, various metals (Ni, Cu, Ag) were successfully deposited onto the surface of SWCNTs. It has been found that homogenous dispersion and dense nucleation sites are the necessary conditions to form uniform coatings on SWCNTs. Functionalization has been applied to achieve considerable improvement in the dispersion of purified SWCNTs and creates more nucleation sites for subsequent metal deposition. A three-step electroless plating approach was used and the coating mechanism is described in the paper. The samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Bulk copper/aluminum-SWNT composites were processed by powder metallurgy with wet mixing techniques. Coated SWCNTs were well dispersed in the metal matrix. Cold pressing followed by sintering was applied to control porosity. The relationships between hardness and SWCNTs addition were discussed. Ni-SWCNTs composite coatings were prepared by electro-composite deposition. SWCNTs were suspended in a Ni deposition electrolyte and deposited together with nickel during electrodeposition. SWCNTs concentrations in the coatings were found to be related to the SWCNTs concentration in the solution, current density and agitation rate. The microstructure of the coatings has been examined by electron microscopy. Ni coated SWCNTs were also incorporated into the high temperature Bismaleimide (BMI)/graphite composite to improve Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding and surface conductivity. The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) was used to process these composites. Surface and volume resistivity and EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites

  9. Effect of metallic coatings on the thermal contact conductance of turned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, T. K.; Peterson, G. P.; Fletcher, L. S.

    1990-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the degree to which the thermal contact conductance at the interface of contacting Aluminum 6061 T6 surfaces could be enhanced through the use of vapor-deposited metallic coatings. Three different coating materials (lead, tin, and indium) were evaluated using four different thicknesses for each coating material. The results verified the existence of an optimum coating thickness, shown to be in the range of 2.0 to 3.0 microns for indium, 1.5 to 2.5 microns for lead, and 0.2 to 0.5 microns for tin. The enhancement factors for thermal contact conductance were found to be on the order of 700, 400, and 50 percent, respectively. Based upon the experimental data, the hardness of the coating materials appears to be the most significant parameter in ranking the substrate and coating material combinations; however, additional experimental data are needed to substantiate this hypothesis. Finally, it was apparent that the thermal contact conductance enhancement effect was greatest at low contact pressures and decreased significantly with increases in the contact pressure.

  10. Effect of metallic coatings on the thermal contact conductance of turned surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, T. K.; Peterson, G. P.; Fletcher, L. S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the degree to which the thermal contact conductance at the interface of contacting Aluminum 6061 T6 surfaces could be enhanced through the use of vapor-deposited metallic coatings. Three different coating materials (lead, tin, and indium) were evaluated using four different thicknesses for each coating material. The results verified the existence of an optimum coating thickness, shown to be in the range of 2.0 to 3.0 microns for indium, 1.5 to 2.5 microns for lead, and 0.2 to 0.5 microns for tin. The enhancement factors for thermal contact conductance were found to be on the order of 700, 400, and 50 percent, respectively. Based upon the experimental data, the hardness of the coating materials appears to be the most significant parameter in ranking the substrate and coating material combinations; however, additional experimental data are needed to substantiate this hypothesis. Finally, it was apparent that the thermal contact conductance enhancement effect was greatest at low contact pressures and decreased significantly with increases in the contact pressure.

  11. A New Thermionic Cathode Using Oxide Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Christopher; Jin, Feng; Liu, Yan; Little, Scott

    2006-03-01

    We have demonstrated a new type of thermionic cathode utilizing carbon nanotubes that exhibited superior electron emission properties. A field enhancement factor as high as 2000 was observed and thermionic electron emission current at least an order of magnitude higher than the emission from a conventional oxide cathode was obtained. This cathode combines the low work function of the oxide coating with a high field enhancement factor introduced by carbon nanotubes and we have demonstrated that it can be used as a highly efficient electron source. The cathode was fabricated by sputter deposition of a thin film of oxide materials on aligned carbon nanotubes, which were grown on a tungsten substrate with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  12. Reconfiguration of lithium sulphur batteries: "Enhancement of Li-S cell performance by employing a highly porous conductive separator coating"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeck, Ulrich; Balach, Juan; Klose, Markus; Wadewitz, Daniel; Ahrens, Eike; Eckert, Jürgen; Giebeler, Lars

    2016-03-01

    Li-S batteries are an emerging technology and the most promising successor of current lithium ion technology. While there is great perspective in terms of superior theoretical specific capacity and energy density great challenges have to be addressed. One major challenge, severely limiting cycle performance and capacity retention, is the shuttling of polysulphide species. In this contribution we show a reconfiguration of the usual Li-S cell. Instead of generating a carbon/sulphur composite by melt infiltration a highly porous, conductive nitrogen-rich carbon material (TNC) is coated onto a commercial polypropylene separator foil. The thin conductive coating of TNC on the separator enables the application of very simple sulphur/carbon black cathodes. Because the melt infiltration of sulphur in a porous host material becomes unnecessary the electrode processing is significantly simplified. The specific capacity and cycling stability of reconfigurated cells are both improved significantly compared to the performance of a standard cell setup using a pristine separator. At a constant charging rate of C/5 cells with modified separator showed 2.5 times higher residual capacity (1016 mAh g-1) than cells with pristine separator (405 mAh g-1).

  13. Chitosan/silica coated carbon nanotubes composite proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai; Gong, Chunli; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Huanli; Cheng, Fan; Wang, Guangjin; Zheng, Genwen; Qin, Caiqin; Wen, Sheng

    2016-01-20

    Silica-coated carbon nanotubes (SCNTs), which were obtained by a simple sol-gel method, were utilized in preparation of chitosan/SCNTs (CS/SCNTs) composite membranes. The thermal and oxidative stability, morphology, mechanical properties, water uptake and proton conductivity of CS/SCNTs composite membranes were investigated. The insulated and hydrophilic silica layer coated on CNTs eliminates the risk of electronic short-circuiting and enhances the interaction between SCNTs and chitosan to ensure the homogenous dispersion of SCNTs, although the water uptake of CS/SCNTs membranes is reduced owing to the decrease of the effective number of the amino functional groups of chitosan. The CS/SCNTs composite membranes are superior to the pure CS membrane in thermal and oxidative stability, mechanical properties and proton conductivity. The results of this study suggest that CS/SCNTs composite membranes exhibit promising potential for practical application in proton exchange membranes. PMID:26572483

  14. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of an Electron-Beam Physical-Vapor-Deposition Coating

    PubMed Central

    Slifka, A. J.; Filla, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    An industrial ceramic thermal-barrier coating designated PWA 266, processed by electron-beam physical-vapor deposition, was measured using a steady-state thermal conductivity technique. The thermal conductivity of the mass fraction 7 % yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was measured from 100 °C to 900 °C. Measurements on three thicknesses of coatings, 170 μm, 350 μm, and 510 μm resulted in thermal conductivity in the range from 1.5 W/(m·K) to 1.7 W/(m·K) with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 20 %. The thermal conductivity is not significantly dependent on temperature.

  15. Cotton Fabric Coated with Conducting Polymers and its Application in Monitoring of Carnivorous Plant Response.

    PubMed

    Bajgar, Václav; Penhaker, Marek; Martinková, Lenka; Pavlovič, Andrej; Bober, Patrycja; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the electrical plant response to mechanical stimulation monitored with the help of conducting polymers deposited on cotton fabric. Cotton fabric was coated with conducting polymers, polyaniline or polypyrrole, in situ during the oxidation of respective monomers in aqueous medium. Thus, modified fabrics were again coated with polypyrrole or polyaniline, respectively, in order to investigate any synergetic effect between both polymers with respect to conductivity and its stability during repeated dry cleaning. The coating was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. The resulting fabrics have been used as electrodes to collect the electrical response to the stimulation of a Venus flytrap plant. This is a paradigm of the use of conducting polymers in monitoring of plant neurobiology. PMID:27070612

  16. Review of the thermal contact conductance of junctions with metallic coatings and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, M. A.; Fletcher, L. S.

    1993-10-01

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. The surface irregularities resulting from the machining or extruding of the components cause the true contact area to be much less than the apparent contact area, increasing the contact resistance. Some metallic coatings deform easily under load and increase the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates possible coatings and determines those most suitable for enhancing contact conductance based upon predictions using existing theories for thermal contact conductance of coated junctions.

  17. Cotton Fabric Coated with Conducting Polymers and its Application in Monitoring of Carnivorous Plant Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Václav; Penhaker, Marek; Martinková, Lenka; Pavlovič, Andrej; Bober, Patrycja; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the electrical plant response to mechanical stimulation monitored with the help of conducting polymers deposited on cotton fabric. Cotton fabric was coated with conducting polymers, polyaniline or polypyrrole, in situ during the oxidation of respective monomers in aqueous medium. Thus, modified fabrics were again coated with polypyrrole or polyaniline, respectively, in order to investigate any synergetic effect between both polymers with respect to conductivity and its stability during repeated dry cleaning. The coating was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. The resulting fabrics have been used as electrodes to collect the electrical response to the stimulation of a Venus flytrap plant. This is a paradigm of the use of conducting polymers in monitoring of plant neurobiology. PMID:27070612

  18. Scratch-resistant, highly conductive, and high-strength carbon nanotube-based composite yarns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Ruifeng; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2010-10-26

    High-strength and conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns are very attractive in many potential applications. However, there is a difficulty when simultaneously enhancing the strength and conductivity of CNT yarns. Adding some polymers into CNT yarns to enhance their strength will decrease their conductivity, while treating them in acid or coating them with metal nanoparticles to enhance their conductivity will reduce their strength. To overcome this difficulty, here we report a method to make high-strength and highly conductive CNT-based composite yarns by using a continuous superaligned CNT (SACNT) yarn as a conductive framework and then inserting polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the intertube spaces of the framework through PVA/dimethyl sulphoxide solution to enhance the strength of yarns. The as-produced CNT/PVA composite yarns possess very high tensile strengths up to 2.0 GPa and Young's moduli more than 120 GPa, much higher than those of the CNT/PVA yarns reported. The electric conductivity of as-produced composite yarns is as high as 9.2 × 10(4) S/m, comparable to HNO(3)-treated or Au nanoparticle-coated CNT yarns. These composite yarns are flexible, lightweight, scratch-resistant, very stable in the lab environment, and resistant to extremely humid ambient and as a result can be woven into high-strength and heatable fabrics, showing potential applications in flexible heaters, bullet-proof vests, radiation protection suits, and spacesuits. PMID:20831235

  19. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced.

  20. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications is disclosed. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. 8 figs.

  1. Electrically Conductive Chitosan/Carbon Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  2. Electrically conductive chitosan/carbon scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana M; Eng, George; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-02-10

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  3. Pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt as a high-performance anode for bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kun; Hidalgo, Diana; Tommasi, Tonia; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-07-01

    Scale up of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) requires highly conductive, biocompatible and stable electrodes. Here we present pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt (C-SS felt) as a high-performance and scalable anode. The electrode is created by generating a carbon layer on stainless steel felt (SS felt) via a multi-step deposition process involving α-d-glucose impregnation, caramelization, and pyrolysis. Physicochemical characterizations of the surface elucidate that a thin (20±5μm) and homogenous layer of polycrystalline graphitic carbon was obtained on SS felt surface after modification. The carbon coating significantly increases the biocompatibility, enabling robust electroactive biofilm formation. The C-SS felt electrodes reach current densities (jmax) of 3.65±0.14mA/cm(2) within 7days of operation, which is 11 times higher than plain SS felt electrodes (0.30±0.04mA/cm(2)). The excellent biocompatibility, high specific surface area, high conductivity, good mechanical strength, and low cost make C-SS felt a promising electrode for BESs. PMID:27058401

  4. Electrical conductivity and rheology of carbon black composites under elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    Electrical properties of conductive polymer composites are governed by filler particle structures which are formed in the material during the mixing. Therefore, knowledge of the behavior of conductive particle structures under defined conditions of deformation is necessary to produce materials with balanced electrical and rheological properties. Whereas the electrical conductivity evolution under shear can be nowadays studied even with the commercial rheometers, the investigations under elongation were not performed up to now. In this work simultaneous electrical and rheological measurements in elongation on polystyrene/carbon black composites are introduced. Such kind of experiment can help in understanding the relationships between processing conditions and properties of conductive polymer composites.

  5. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  6. Microstructure and properties of SiC-coated carbon fibers prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Du, Zuojuan; Xiao, Jianrong; Zhou, Shan; Wei, Yongshan

    2016-04-01

    SiC-coated carbon fibers are prepared at room temperature with different radio-frequency magnetron sputtering powers. Results show that the coated carbon fibers have uniform, continuous, and flawless surfaces. The mean strengths of the coated carbon fibers with different sputtering powers are not influenced by other factors. Filament strength of SiC-coated carbon fibers increases by approximately 2% compared with that of uncoated carbon fibers at a sputtering power of <200 W. The filament strengths of the coated fibers increase by 9.3% and 12% at sputtering powers of 250 and 300 W, respectively. However, the mean strength of the SiC-coated carbon fibers decreased by 8% at a sputtering power of 400 W.

  7. Novel conduction behavior in nanopores coated with hydrophobic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagurusamy, Venkat; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Afzali-Ardakani, Ali

    2015-03-01

    We obtain (Bi0.7Pb0.3)Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 nano-crystals by sol-gel improved with acrylamide and microwaves, not reported in the literature. TGA gives an idea of the reaction temperatures (200-550 ° C) for the formation of binary, ternary and unknown materials. SEM and TEM shows morphology and crystal size 30-33 nm. We studied the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the gel quenching, by varying the temperature and time according to a previous thermal analysis. Starting compounds (bismuth oxide, strontium carbonate, copper acetate, lead nitrate and calcium sulfate) were analyzed by XRD. By AFM we observed the dehydrated gel surface absorbed water from the environment. From the micrographs we measured the size of the fibers, grains and nano-crystals. We found at 560 ° C Bi1.6Pb0.4Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox compound with tetragonal crystal structure, corresponding to the 2:2:2:3 compound, with Tc 110 K. At 860 ° C seen a shift of some reflections corresponding to two phases. Xerogel magnetic measurement shows antiferromagnetic behavior at 63 K.

  8. Targeting breast cancer with sugar-coated carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenholtz, Cale D; Hadimani, Mallinath; King, S Bruce; Torti, Suzy V; Singh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the use of glucosamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (glyco-MWCNTs) for breast cancer targeting. Materials & methods Two types of glucosamine functionalized MWCNTs were developed (covalently linked glucosamine and non-covalently phospholipid-glucosamine coated) and evaluated for their potential to bind and target breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Results & conclusion Binding of glyco-MWCNTs in breast cancer cells is mediated by specific interaction with glucose transporters. Glyco-MWCNTs prepared by non-covalent coating with phospholipid-glucosamine displayed an extended blood circulation time, delayed urinary clearance, low tissue retention and increased breast cancer tumor accumulation in vivo. These studies lay the foundation for development of a cancer diagnostic agent based upon glyco-MWCNTs with the potential for superior accuracy over current radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26296098

  9. Compilation of diamond-like carbon properties for barriers and hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Outka, D.A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Phillips, K.; Boehme, D.R.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Ottesen, D.K.; Johnsen, H.A.; Clift, W.M.; Headley, T.J.

    1994-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an amorphous form of carbon which resembles diamond in its hardness, lubricity, and resistance to chemical attack. Such properties make DLC of interest for use in barrier and hard coating technology. This report examines a variety of properties of DLC coatings. This includes examining substrates on which DLC coatings can be deposited; the resistance of DLC coatings to various chemical agents; adhension of DLC coatings; and characterization of DLC coatings by electron microscopy, FTIR, sputter depth profiling, stress measurements and nanoindentation.

  10. Preparation of carbon-coated iron nanofluid and its application in radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiguang; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Minshan; Zhang, Yaojun; Huang, Junting; Xu, Zuowen; Wang, Wenguang

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles (Fe@C CCINs) were synthesized by carbon arc discharge method and were studied via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that CCINs have good core-shell structure and are in size of 40-50 nm. Also, carbon-coated iron nanofluid (CCINs-nanofluid) was prepared via two-step method by dispersing as-prepared CCINs and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) into physiological saline. Its dispersion stability and thermal conductivity were detected by gravity sedimentation method and Hotdisk thermal constant analyzer respectively. The results indicated that CCINs-nanofluid possesses good dispersity and stability. Moreover, CCINs-nanofluid showed enhanced thermal conductivity compared with its base fluid physiological saline. The enhancement of thermal conductivity even reaches 41%. Additionally, CCINs-nanofluid injection aided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was carried out. The relation between tissue temperature and ablation time revealed that by injecting CCINs-nanofluid into pork livers during RFA, target tissue temperatures were less than 100°C. Dissected pork livers showed that there was little or no tissue charring around the ablation probe. Results of ablation area calculation showed that the ablation area of CCINs-nanofluid injection aided RFA was 67% larger than that of saline injection aided RFA, indicating that a larger-volume tumor tissue necrosis at a single session can be achieved by CCINs-nanofluid injection aided RFA. PMID:25171467

  11. Corrosion resistance and electrical properties of carbon/chromium-titanium-nitride multilayer coatings on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kai; Li, Zhuguo; Lu, Fenggui; Huang, Jian; Cai, Xun; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-03-01

    High electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance are central to advances in wider application of metallic bipolar plates in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this study, C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coatings are deposited by physical vapor deposition and the effect of Cr:Ti ratio on the corrosion resistance and interfacial contact resistance (ICR) are systematically investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) result shows that the carbon layer is compact and uniform. Excellent corrosion resistance of 0.127 μA cm-2 current density at operating voltage in PEMFC cathode environment and low ICR of 2.03 mΩ-cm2 at compaction force of 150 N cm-2 are achieved when Cr:Ti ratio is 2:4 and 3:3, respectively. The significant enhancement in surface conductivity is probably because that the current comes from carbon paper is homogenized by two electrically conductive layers and flows to the passive film with much more contact area. After polarization, ICR increase to 3.07 mΩ-cm2 and 3.02 mΩ-cm2 in the simulated PEMFC cathode and anode environment, respectively. However, the Raman spectroscopy results disclose that the bonding type of top carbon film before and after polarization shows little difference. The results indicate that C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coating with Cr:Ti ratio of 2:4 achieves the optimal composition.

  12. Effect of metallic coatings on the thermal contact conductance of turned surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, T.K.; Peterson, G.P.; Fletcher, L.S. )

    1990-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the degree to which the thermal contact conductance at the interface of contacting Aluminum 6061 T6 surfaces could be enhanced through the use of vapor-deposited metallic coating. Three different coating materials (lead, tin, and indium) were evaluated using four different thicknesses for each coating material. The results verified the existence of an optimum coating thickness, shown to be in the range of 2.0 to 3.0 {mu}m for indium, 1.5 to 2.5 {mu}m for lead, and 0.2 to 0.5 {mu}m for tin. The enhancement factors for thermal contact condcutance were found to be on the order of 700, 400, and 50%, respectively. Based upon the experimental data, the hardness of the coating materials appears to be the most significant parameter in ranking the substrate and coating material combinations; however, addition experimental data are needed to substantiate this hypothesis. Finally, it was apparent that the thermal contact conductance enhancement effect was greatest at low contact pressures and decreased significantly with increases in the contact pressure.

  13. Thermal Conductivity and Water Vapor Stability of Ceramic HfO2-Based Coating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 are candidate thermal/environmental barrier coating materials for gas turbine ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liner applications because of their relatively low thermal conductivity and high temperature capability. In this paper, thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability of plasma-sprayed coatings and/or hot-pressed HfO2-5mol%Y2O3, HfO2-15mol%Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 were evaluated at temperatures up to 1700 C using a steady-state laser heat-flux technique. Sintering behavior of the plasma-sprayed coatings was determined by monitoring the thermal conductivity increases during a 20-hour test period at various temperatures. Durability and failure mechanisms of the HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 coatings on mullite/SiC Hexoloy or CMC substrates were investigated at 1650 C under thermal gradient cyclic conditions. Coating design and testing issues for the 1650 C thermal/environmental barrier coating applications will also be discussed.

  14. Thermal Conductivity and Water Vapor Stability of HfO2-based Ceramic Coating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 are candidate thermal/environmental barrier coating materials for gas turbine ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liner applications because of their relatively low thermal conductivity and high temperature capability. In this paper, thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability of plasma-sprayed coatings and/or hot-pressed HfO2-5mol%Y2O3, HfO2- 15mol%Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 were evaluated at temperatures up to 1700 C using a steady-state laser heat-flux technique. Sintering behavior of the plasma-sprayed coatings was determined by monitoring the thermal conductivity increases during a 20-hour test period at various temperatures. Durability and failure mechanisms of the HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 coatings on mullite/SiC Hexoloy or CMC substrates were investigated at 1650 C under thermal gradient cyclic conditions. Coating design and testing issues for the 1650 C thermaVenvironmenta1 barrier coating applications will also be discussed.

  15. Radiation-induced deposition of transparent conductive tin oxide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umnov, S.; Asainov, O.; Temenkov, V.

    2016-04-01

    The study of tin oxide films is stimulated by the search for an alternative replacement of indium-tin oxide (ITO) films used as transparent conductors, oxidation catalysts, material gas sensors, etc. This work was aimed at studying the influence of argon ions irradiation on optical and electrical characteristics of tin oxide films. Thin films of tin oxide (without dopants) were deposited on glass substrates at room temperature using reactive magnetron sputtering. After deposition, the films were irradiated with an argon ion beam. The current density of the beam was (were) 2.5 mA/cm2, and the particles energy was 300-400 eV. The change of the optical and electrical properties of the films depending on the irradiation time was studied. Films optical properties were investigated by photometry in the range of 300-1100 nm. Films structural properties were studied using X-ray diffraction. The diffractometric research showed that the films, deposited on a substrate, had a crystal structure, and after argon ions irradiation they became quasi-crystalline (amorphous). It has been found that the transmission increases proportionally with the irradiation time, however the sheet resistance increases disproportionally. Tin oxide films (thickness ~30 nm) with ~100% transmittance and sheet resistance of ~100 kOhm/sq. were obtained. The study has proved to be prospective in the use of ion beams to improve the properties of transparent conducting oxides.

  16. Gas Sensors Based on Coated and Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2008-01-01

    Efforts are underway to develop inexpensive, low-power electronic sensors, based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), for measuring part-per-million and part-per-billion of selected gases (small molecules) at room temperature. Chemically unmodified SWCNTs are mostly unresponsive to typical gases that one might wish to detect. However, the electrical resistances of SWCNTs can be made to vary with concentrations of gases of interest by coating or doping the SWCNTs with suitable materials. Accordingly, the basic idea of the present development efforts is to incorporate thus-treated SWCNTs into electronic devices that measure their electrical resistances.

  17. Reversibly stretchable transparent conductive coatings of spray-deposited silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Akter, Tahmina; Kim, Woo Soo

    2012-04-01

    Here, we report the creation of highly adhesive transparent and stretchable coatings via spray-deposition of solution-based silver nanowires (AgNWs). The AgNW dispersion was spray-deposited on a polydopamine-modified stretchable elastomeric substrate to prepare thin, stretchable, transparent, highly conductive films. The polydopamine layer on the elastomeric substrate created a highly hydrophilic surface, which facilitated the subsequent spraying of the AgNW solution. Additionally, the spray-deposited AgNWs demonstrated excellent adhesion to the substrate, which allowed the fabrication of stretchable electrodes with high conductivity. The AgNW-coated elastomeric substrate exhibited ~80% transmittance with an average sheet resistance of ~35 Ω/□, making it suitable for transparent electrode applications. The conductivity of the transparent electrode was maintained up to ~20% mechanical elongation, which demonstrated the stretchable characteristics of the AgNW-coated elastomeric substrate. PMID:22471630

  18. Analysis of scattering wave for a conducting cylinder coated with eccentric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bo; Yang, Feng; Hao, Honggang; Li, Changyong

    2013-05-01

    Object coated with plasma has stimulated great interests of many people because of its stealth capability. The study on a conducting cylinder coated with coaxial plasma is very much, but there are little works on a conducting cylinder coated with eccentric plasma. In this article, a model for a conducting cylinder coated with eccentric unmagnetized plasma is set up, the scattering cross section of the object cylinder is studied by adopting the superposition of cylindrical wave functions and the coordinate transformation, where these wave functions are the solutions of Maxwell's equations with boundary conditions in cylindrical coordinates. The results show that the radar cross section for a conducting cylinder coated with eccentric plasma in every direction decrease obviously with an increase of the distance between two eccentric axes, but is almost not impacted by electron-neutral collision frequency of plasma, and the backscattering cross section of the target reduce with the increase of electron density. Comparing with the coaxial model, the backscattering cross section of the eccentric model has a smaller value in a wide frequency band. This is of significance for the target plasma stealth technology in practice.

  19. Strong, light, multifunctional fibers of carbon nanotubes with ultrahigh conductivity.

    PubMed

    Behabtu, Natnael; Young, Colin C; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E; Kleinerman, Olga; Wang, Xuan; Ma, Anson W K; Bengio, E Amram; ter Waarbeek, Ron F; de Jong, Jorrit J; Hoogerwerf, Ron E; Fairchild, Steven B; Ferguson, John B; Maruyama, Benji; Kono, Junichiro; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Cohen, Yachin; Otto, Marcin J; Pasquali, Matteo

    2013-01-11

    Broader applications of carbon nanotubes to real-world problems have largely gone unfulfilled because of difficult material synthesis and laborious processing. We report high-performance multifunctional carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers that combine the specific strength, stiffness, and thermal conductivity of carbon fibers with the specific electrical conductivity of metals. These fibers consist of bulk-grown CNTs and are produced by high-throughput wet spinning, the same process used to produce high-performance industrial fibers. These scalable CNT fibers are positioned for high-value applications, such as aerospace electronics and field emission, and can evolve into engineered materials with broad long-term impact, from consumer electronics to long-range power transmission. PMID:23307737

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide/Carbon Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, S.; Watson, K. A.; Delozier, D. M.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In efforts to improve the thermal conductivity (TC) of Ultem(TM) 1000, it was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nano-fillers were aligned. Samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and the mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction using the Nanoflash technique. The results of this study will be presented.

  1. Thermal conductivity and temperature profiles in carbon electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burheim, Odne S.; Aslan, Mesut; Atchison, Jennifer S.; Presser, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of supercapacitor film electrodes composed of activated carbon (AC), AC with 15 mass% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), AC with 15 mass% onion-like carbon (OLC), and only OLC, all mixed with polymer binder (polytetrafluoroethylene), has been measured. This was done for dry electrodes and after the electrodes have been saturated with an organic electrolyte (1 M tetraethylammonium-tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, TEA-BF4). The thermal conductivity data was implemented in a simple model of generation and transport of heat in a cylindrical cell supercapacitor systems. Dry electrodes showed a thermal conductivity in the range of 0.09-0.19 W K-1 m-1 and the electrodes soaked with an organic electrolyte yielded values for the thermal conductivity between 0.42 and 0.47 W K-1 m-1. It was seen that the values related strongly to the porosity of the carbon electrode materials. Modeling of the internal temperature profiles of a supercapacitor under conditions corresponding to extreme cycling demonstrated that only a moderate temperature gradient of several degrees Celsius can be expected and which depends on the ohmic resistance of the cell as well as the wetting of the electrode materials.

  2. Stretchable transistors with buckled carbon nanotube films as conducting channels

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Michael S; Xu, Feng

    2015-03-24

    Thin-film transistors comprising buckled films comprising carbon nanotubes as the conductive channel are provided. Also provided are methods of fabricating the transistors. The transistors, which are highly stretchable and bendable, exhibit stable performance even when operated under high tensile strains.

  3. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The dorsal root ganglion is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach. Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as a result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main results. Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance. This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities.

  4. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Objective The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as the result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main Results Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities. PMID:25485675

  5. Thermal conductivity and elastic modulus evolution of thermal barrier coatings under high heat flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-06-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may be encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser-simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8% Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m K to 1.15, 1.19, and 1.5 W/m K after 30 h of testing at surface temperatures of 990, 1100, and 1320 °C, respectively, Hardness and elastic modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and microindentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 h of testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced microporosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various TBC applications.

  6. Electrically Conductive, Optically Transparent Polymer/Carbon Nanotube Composites and Process for Preparation Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, A. (Inventor); Ounales, Zoubeida (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400-800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T(sub g)) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted hy selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  7. Electrically Conductive, Optically Transparent Polymer/Carbon Nanotube Composites and Process for Preparation Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400-800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T.sub.g) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted by selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  8. Electrically conductive, optically transparent polymer/carbon nanotube composites and process for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400 800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T.sub.g) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted by selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  9. Thermal Conductivity Database of Various Structural Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Ransone, Philip O.; Tsou, Hwa-Tsu

    1997-01-01

    Advanced thermal protection materials envisioned for use on future hypersonic vehicles will likely be subjected to temperatures in excess of 1811 K (2800 F) and, therefore, will require the rapid conduction of heat away from the stagnation regions of wing leading edges, the nose cap area, and from engine inlet and exhaust areas. Carbon-carbon composite materials are candidates for use in advanced thermal protection systems. For design purposes, high temperature thermophysical property data are required, but a search of the literature found little thermal conductivity data for carbon-carbon materials above 1255 K (1800 F). Because a need was recognized for in-plane and through-the-thickness thermal conductivity data for carbon-carbon composite materials over a wide temperature range, Langley Research Center (LaRC) embarked on an effort to compile a consistent set of thermal conductivity values from room temperature to 1922 K (3000 F) for carbon-carbon composite materials on hand at LaRC for which the precursor materials and thermal processing history were known. This report documents the thermal conductivity data generated for these materials. In-plane thermal conductivity values range from 10 to 233 W/m-K, whereas through-the-thickness values range from 2 to 21 W/m-K.

  10. Macrodispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for conductive films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duckjong; Zhu, Lijing; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Han, Chang-Soo; Baik, Seunghyun

    2012-04-01

    Understanding of the effect of the multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) dispersion process on physical properties of MWCNT film is crucial in process optimization of MWCNT film-based products. In the present work, the electrical conduction property of MWCNT films according to various conditions in MWCNT dispersion is investigated. Spectroscopic analysis of dispersed MWCNTs show that the electrical resistance of the MWCNT conductive film is affected by an increase in the electrical contacts between adjacent CNTs due to CNT debundling and physical damage caused by ultrasonic processing. Based on the two conflicting parameters, dispersion guidelines for highly conductive MWCNT film are presented. PMID:22849134

  11. Stability of conductance oscillations in carbon atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Hou, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Xiu-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The conductance stabilities of carbon atomic chains (CACs) with different lengths are investigated by performing theoretical calculations using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method combined with density functional theory. Regular even-odd conductance oscillation is observed as a function of the wire length. This oscillation is influenced delicately by changes in the end carbon or sulfur atoms as well as variations in coupling strength between the chain and leads. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in odd-numbered chains is the main transmission channel, whereas the conductance remains relatively small for even-numbered chains and a significant drift in the highest occupied molecular orbital resonance toward higher energies is observed as the number of carbon atoms increases. The amplitude of the conductance oscillation is predicted to be relatively stable based on a thiol joint between the chain and leads. Results show that the current-voltage evolution of CACs can be affected by the chain length. The differential and second derivatives of the conductance are also provided. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304079, 11404094, and 51201059), the Priority Scientific and Technological Project of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 14A140027), the School Fund (Grant No. 2012BS055), and the Plan of Natural Science Fundamental Research of Henan University of Technology, China (Grant No. 2014JCYJ15).

  12. Composite yarns of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with metallic electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Randeniya, Lakshman K; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Tran, Canh-Dung

    2010-08-16

    Unique macrostructures known as spun carbon-nanotube fibers (CNT yarns) can be manufactured from vertically aligned forests of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These yarns behave as semiconductors with room-temperature conductivities of about 5 x 10(2) S cm(-1). Their potential use as, for example, microelectrodes in medical implants, wires in microelectronics, or lightweight conductors in the aviation industry has hitherto been hampered by their insufficient electrical conductivity. In this Full Paper, the synthesis of metal-CNT composite yarns, which combine the unique properties of CNT yarns and nanocrystalline metals to obtain a new class of materials with enhanced electrical conductivity, is presented. The synthesis is achieved using a new technique, self-fuelled electrodeposition (SFED), which combines a metal reducing agent and an external circuit for transfer of electrons to the CNT surface, where the deposition of metal nanoparticles takes place. In particular, the Cu-CNT and Au-CNT composite yarns prepared by this method have metal-like electrical conductivities (2-3 x 10(5) S cm(-1)) and are mechanically robust against stringent tape tests. However, the tensile strengths of the composite yarns are 30-50% smaller than that of the unmodified CNT yarn. The SFED technique described here can also be used as a convenient means for the deposition of metal nanoparticles on solid electrode supports, such as conducting glass or carbon black, for catalytic applications. PMID:20665629

  13. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pujada, B. R.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Arnoldbik, W. M.; Sloof, W. G.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.

    2009-02-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) whereas composition and energy distribution functions of positive ions were obtained by electron probe microanalyzer, elastic recoil detection analysis, and mass-energy analyzer (MEA). It has been observed that the compressive stress decreases with increasing acetylene partial pressure, showing an abrupt change from -5.0 to -1.6 GPa at an acetylene partial pressure of 0.012 Pa. TEM micrographs show that by increasing the acetylene partial pressure in the plasma from 0 to 0.012 Pa, the microstructure of the coating changes from polycrystalline to amorphous. MEA results show that the most probable energy of positive ions bombarding the substrate during deposition in pure argon and argon/acetylene atmosphere is the same. Based on the results, it is concluded that the huge variation in the compressive stress at low acetylene partial pressures is due to a change in the microstructure of the coating from polycrystalline to amorphous and not to the energy of positive ions bombarding the film.

  14. Upper bound to the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalopin, Yann; Volz, Sebastian; Mingo, Natalio

    2009-04-01

    Using atomistic Green's function calculations, we find that the phonon thermal conductivity of pellets composed of ˜μm long carbon nanotubes has an upper bound of a few W/m K. This is in striking contrast with the extremely high thermal conductivity of individual nanotubes (˜3000 W/m K). We show that, at room temperature, this upper bound does not depend on the nanotube diameter. Conversely, for low temperatures, an inverse proportionality with nanotube diameter is predicted. We present concrete results as a function of nanotube length and chirality, pellet density, and temperature. These results imply that carbon nanotube pellets belong to the category of thermal insulators, contrasting with the good conducting properties of parallel nanotube arrays, or individual nanotubes.

  15. Conformal Deep Trench Coating with both Conducting and InsulatingMaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Lili; Kim, Jung-Kuk; Ji, Qing; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Chen, Ye; Gough, Rick A.

    2006-06-01

    A thin film coating system has been developed for deposition of both conductive and insulating material. The system employs an RF discharge plasma source with four straight RF antennas, which is made of or covered with the deposition material, thus serving simultaneously as a sputtering target. The average deposition rate of the copper thin film can be as high as 500 nm/min when operated in CW mode. Film properties under different plasma conditions have been investigated experimentally. By adjusting RF power, gas pressure, duty factor, and substrate biasing conditions, several thin film coating schemes can be achieved, one of which has been demonstrated to be suitable for conformal deep trench coating. Conformal coating over trenches of high aspect ratio (>6:1) has been demonstrated at both micron and submicron scales.

  16. Corrosion protection of aluminum bipolar plates with polyaniline coating containing carbon nanotubes in acidic medium inside the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the corrosion resistance of conductive polymer coating (polyaniline) that coated aluminum bipolar plates in acidic environment inside the PEM fuel cell (0.1 M H2SO4) was investigated using electrical conductivity, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the coating morphology. The results show that the addition of CNTs to polyaniline coating enhanced the electrical conductivity and the corrosion resistance of polyaniline polymer. The inhibition efficiency of polyaniline polymer increased with increasing CNTs concentration. The best inhibition was generally obtained at 0.8% CNTs concentration in the acidic medium. This was further confirmed by decreasing the oxygen and water permeability and increasing coating adhesion in the presence of CNTs. EIS measurements indicated that the incorporation of CNTs in coating increased both the charge transfer and pore resistances while reducing the double layer capacitance.

  17. Carbon and carbon-coated electrodes for multistage depressed collectors for electron-beam devices - A technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, Arthur N.

    1986-01-01

    Various aspects of carbon and carbon-coated multistaged depressed collector (MDC) electrode technology are reviewed. The physical properties of untreated graphite electrodes, ion-textured graphite electrodes, and textured, carbon-coated copper electrodes, and surface treatment procedures for these electrodes are described. The secondary electron emissions of the three electrode types are analyzed. MDC fabrication methods are discussed. The performances of MDCs fabricated with untreated graphite electrodes, ion-textured graphite electrodes, and textured, carbon-coated copper electrodes are evaluated. MDC and TWT efficiency levels for tubes fabricated with the three materials are measured.

  18. TiO{sub 2}-coated carbon nanotubes: A redshift enhanced photocatalysis at visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.-Y.; Tang, C.-W.; Lin, Y.-H.; Kuo, H.-F.; Lai, Y.-C.; Ouyang Hao; Hsu, W.-K.; Tsai, M.-Y.

    2010-06-07

    Annealing of carbon nanotubes coated with thin and uniform TiO{sub 2} results in carbon diffusion into oxygen lattices and doping induced redshift is evident by an efficient photocatalysis at visible light. The underlying mechanism is discussed.

  19. Anisotropy measurement of pyrolytic carbon layers of coated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vesyolkin, Ju. A. Ivanov, A. S.; Trushkina, T. V.

    2015-12-15

    Equipment at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute intended for the anisotropy determination of pyrolytic carbon layers in coated particles (CPs) of the GT-MGR reactor is tested and calibrated. The dependence of the anisotropy coefficient on the size of the measurement region is investigated. The results of measuring the optical anisotropy factor (OPTAF) for an aluminum mirror, rutile crystal, and available CP samples with the known characteristics measured previously using ORNL equipment (United States) are presented. In addition, measurements of CP samples prepared at VNIINM are performed. A strong dependence of the data on the preparation quality of metallographic sections is found. Our investigations allow us to make the conclusion on the working capacity of the existing equipment for measuring the anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon CP coatings using the equipment at the Kurchatov Institute with the relative error of about 1%. It is shown that the elimination of the errors caused by the stochastic fluctuations in a measuring path by mathematical processing of the signal allows us to decrease the relative error of OPTAF measurements to ∼0.3%.

  20. Anisotropy measurement of pyrolytic carbon layers of coated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesyolkin, Ju. A.; Ivanov, A. S.; Trushkina, T. V.

    2015-12-01

    Equipment at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute intended for the anisotropy determination of pyrolytic carbon layers in coated particles (CPs) of the GT-MGR reactor is tested and calibrated. The dependence of the anisotropy coefficient on the size of the measurement region is investigated. The results of measuring the optical anisotropy factor (OPTAF) for an aluminum mirror, rutile crystal, and available CP samples with the known characteristics measured previously using ORNL equipment (United States) are presented. In addition, measurements of CP samples prepared at VNIINM are performed. A strong dependence of the data on the preparation quality of metallographic sections is found. Our investigations allow us to make the conclusion on the working capacity of the existing equipment for measuring the anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon CP coatings using the equipment at the Kurchatov Institute with the relative error of about 1%. It is shown that the elimination of the errors caused by the stochastic fluctuations in a measuring path by mathematical processing of the signal allows us to decrease the relative error of OPTAF measurements to ~0.3%.

  1. Microwave conductance of aligned multiwall carbon nanotube textile sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brian L.; Bykova, Julia S.; Howard, Austin R.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Lee, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) sheets are a class of nanomaterial-based multifunctional textile with potentially useful microwave properties. To understand better the microwave electrodynamics, complex AC conductance measurements from 0.01 to 50 GHz were made on sheets of highly aligned MWNTs with the alignment texture both parallel and perpendicular to the microwave electric field polarization. In both orientations, the AC conductance is modeled to first order by a parallel frequency-independent conductance and capacitance with no inductive contribution. This is consistent with low-frequency diffusive Drude AC conduction up to 50 GHz, in contrast to the "universal disorder" AC conduction reported in many types of single-wall nanotube materials.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide/Carbon Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delozier, D. M.; Watson, K. A.; Ghose, S.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Ultem(TM) was mixed with three different carbon-based nanofillers in efforts to increase the thermal conductivity of the polymer. After initial mixing, the nanocomposites were extruded or processed via the Laboratory Mixing Molder (LMM) process. High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) revealed significant alignment of the nanofillers in the extruded samples. Thermal conductivity measurements were made both in the direction and perpendicular to the direction of alignment of nanofillers as well as for unaligned samples. It was found that the largest improvement in thermal conductivity was achieved in the case of aligned samples when the measurement was performed in the direction of alignment. Unaligned samples also showed a significant improvement in thermal conductivity and may be useful in applications when it is not possible to align the nanofiller. However the improvements in thermal conductivity did not approach those expected based on a rule of mixtures. This is likely due to poor phonon transfer through the matrix.

  3. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  4. Development of Low Conductivity and Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Coatings Using A High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 17OOOC) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, ultra-high temperature ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity: the initial conductivity rise under a steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and the later coating conductivity reduction under a subsequent cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on the damage accumulations and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The coating external radiation resistance is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser heated intense radiation flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature is derived.

  5. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  6. One-pot synthesis of carbon-coated nanosized LiTi2(PO4)3 as anode materials for aqueous lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhantao; Qin, Xusong; Xu, Hui; Chen, Guohua

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a one-pot sintering process incorporating sol-gel preparation route and in-situ carbon coating was proposed for the synthesis of carbon-coated nanosized LiTi2(PO4)3. Experimental results show that the prepared LiTi2(PO4)3 particles are of high crystallinity and well-coated by turbostratic carbon. Attributed to nanosized particles and enhanced conductivity provided by turbostratic carbon coating, the carbon-coated LiTi2(PO4)3 showed high rate performance and good cycling life in aqueous electrolyte. Particularly, the carbon-coated LiTi2(PO4)3 exhibited initial specific capacities of 103 and 89 mAh g-1, and retained 80.6% and 97% of the initial capacities after 120 cycles at 1C and 10C in aqueous electrolyte, respectively. The high rate performance and good cycling life of carbon-coated LiTi2(PO4)3 in aqueous electrolyte reveal its potential as negative electrode in aqueous lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles and industrial-scale energy storage systems.

  7. Determination of the intershell conductance in a multiwall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetter, A.; Vancea, J.; Back, C. H.

    2008-10-01

    We have measured the current induced voltage drop along an individual multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of the distance to the current injecting electrode. The measurements have been performed at room temperature using scanning probe potentiometry combined with scanning electron microscopy. For a nanotube with an incomplete outer shell, a sharp potential jump was observed at the end of the outermost shell. The electric potential variation along the carbon nanotube has been used to determine the contact resistance between metal electrodes and the tube, the intrashell resistance, and the intershell conductance.

  8. Thermography Used to Test Conductivity of Carbon Based Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Testing of the ability of carbon fiber to radiatively cool a heat source. The carbon fibers are attached to a heat source. The heat conducts into the fiber than along the fiber away from the heat source. The test are done in a vacuum chamber (10-5 Torr typical). The IR camera is viewing the fiber through a ZnSe window. A thermocouple (TC) in contact with the fiber is at the top right hand side of the area of interest and one is near the bottom. Thin shielding fins, seen edge on, are just above the top thermocouple.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings Evaluated by a Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Nagaraj, Ben A.; Bruce, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Zr02-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined by a steady-state heat flux laser technique. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of the EB-PVD ceramic coatings were also obtained in real time, at high temperatures, under the laser high heat flux, long term test conditions. The thermal conductivity increase due to micro-pore sintering and the decrease due to coating micro-delaminations in the EB-PVD coatings were evaluated for grooved and non-grooved EB-PVD coating systems under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions. The coating failure modes under the high heat flux test conditions were also investigated. The test technique provides a viable means for obtaining coating thermal conductivity data for use in design, development, and life prediction for engine applications.

  10. High-precision micropipette thermal sensor for measurement of thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Ramesh

    The thesis describes novel glass micropipette thermal sensor fabricated in cost-effective manner and thermal conductivity measurement of carbon nanotubes (CNT) thin film using the developed sensor. Various micrometer-sized sensors, which range from 2 microm to 30 microm, were produced and tested. The capability of the sensor in measuring thermal fluctuation at micro level with an estimated resolution of +/-0.002°C is demonstrated. The sensitivity of sensors was recorded from 3.34 to 8.86 microV/°C, which is independent of tip size and dependent on the coating of Nickel. The detailed experimental setup for thermal conductivity measurement of CNT film is discussed and 73.418 W/m°C was determined as the thermal conductivity of the CNT film at room temperature.

  11. Conductivity of PEDOT:PSS on Spin-Coated and Drop Cast Nanofibrillar Cellulose Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtakari, Dimitar; Liu, Jun; Kumar, Vinay; Xu, Chunlin; Toivakka, Martti; Saarinen, Jarkko J.

    2015-10-01

    Aqueous dispersion of conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) was deposited on spin-coated and drop cast nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC)-glycerol (G) matrix on a glass substrate. A thin glycerol film was utilized on plasma-treated glass substrate to provide adequate adhesion for the NFC-glycerol (NFC-G) film. The effects of annealing temperature, the coating method of NFC-G, and the coating time intervals on the electrical performance of the PEDOT:PSS were characterized. PEDOT:PSS on drop cast NFC-G resulted in 3 orders of magnitude increase in the electrical conductivity compared to reference PEDOT:PSS film on a reference glass substrate, whereas the optical transmission was only slightly decreased. The results point out the importance of the interaction between the PEDOT:PSS and the NFC-G for the electrical and barrier properties for thin film electronics applications.

  12. Electrically conductive, black thermal control coatings for spacecraft application. I - Silicate matrix formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L.; Odonnell, T. P.; Hribar, V. F.

    1986-01-01

    The formulation of the graphite silicate paints MH-11 and MH-11Z, which will serve as electrically conductive, heat-resistant thermal control coatings for the Galileo spacecraft's 400 Newton engine plume shield, 10 Newton thruster plume shields, and external shunt radiators, is described, and performance results for these paints are reported. The MH-11 is produced by combining a certain grade of graphite powder with a silicate base to produce a black, inorganic, electrically conductive, room temperature cure thermal control paint having high temperature capability. Zinc oxide is added to the MH-11 formulation to produce the blister resistant painta MH-11Z. The mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and radiation characteristics of the coatings are reported. The formulation, mixing, application, and surface preparation of the substrates are described, and a method of determining the electrical resistance of the coatings is demonstrated.

  13. Laser patterning of transparent conductive metal nanowire coatings: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Henley, Simon J; Cann, Maria; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan; Milne, David

    2014-01-21

    Transparent and electrically conductive metal nanowire networks are possible replacements for costly indium tin oxide (ITO) films in many optoelectronic devices. ITO films are regularly patterned using pulsed lasers so similar technologies could be used for nanowire coatings to define electrode structures. Here, the effects of laser irradiation on conducting silver nanowire coatings are simulated and then investigated experimentally for networks formed by spray deposition onto transparent substrates. The ablation threshold fluence is found experimentally for such nanowire networks and is then related to film thickness. An effective model using finite-element heat transfer analysis is examined to look at energy dissipation through these nanowire networks and used to understand mechanisms at play in the laser-material interactions. It is demonstrated that the three-dimensional nature of these coatings and the relative ratios of the rates of lateral to vertical heat diffusion are important controlling parameter affecting the ablation threshold. PMID:24287486

  14. Nanoporous Conducting Polymer-Based Coatings in Microextraction Techniques for Environmental and Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Szultka-Mlynska, Malgorzata; Olszowy, Pawel; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-05-01

    Biologically active compounds constitute a wide group of chemicals, therefore it is a big challenge to create sorbents that are sensitive as well as selective. Development of nanoporous sorbents based on conducting polymers has expanded the boundaries of detection and quantification. Additionally, electrochemical synthesis used to deposit polymeric coatings directly on solid supports makes it possible to control physico-chemical properties of such sorbents. Besides the development of new polymeric nanoporous materials, the question of selectivity needs to be addressed. One possibility, successfully adapted to solid-phase microextraction, is molecular imprinting. Coatings created with this technology allow obtaining higher selectivity, with sensitivity at a constantly high level. The main aim of this review is to present comprehensively the concept of nanoporous sorbents based on conducting polymers, possible coating methods with their characteristics, and their various applications. This article focuses on applications in environmental and biomedical analyses. PMID:26322903

  15. Development of carbon coatings for cordierite foams: an alternative to cordierite honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Hódar, Francisco José; Morales-Torres, Sergio; Ribeiro, Filipa; Silva, Elisabete Ribeiro; Pérez-Cadenas, Agustín Francisco; Carrasco-Marín, Francisco; Oliveira, Fernando A Costa

    2008-04-01

    Cordierite foams were prepared by replication of polyurethane foams and were coated with three types of carbon xerogels. The dip coating and synthesis conditions were optimized, and the coated foams were characterized exhaustively. The composition of the starting solution, coat loading, and carbonization temperature are the most important parameters determining both textural and mechanical properties. Carbon xerogel coatings obtained from aqueous solutions of resorcinol (R) and formaldehyde (F) are macro-, meso-, and microporous but present the greatest shrinkage, which causes a loss of adhesion between ceramic foams and carbon coatings. The coatings from polyfurfuryl alcohol (PFA) and RF-poly(vinyl butyral) (Butvar) resin are highly microporous and present very good adhesion even after carbonization. In all cases, coatings induce the improvement of the mechanical properties, which is related to the fact that the coating fills the defects present in the cordierite foams, thereby affecting both the rigidity and the way cracks propagate through the coated samples. These materials, due to the synergetic role of the highly porous coatings and the tortuous channels of the ceramic foams, are suitable materials for adsorption or catalytic treatments of fluids. PMID:18290682

  16. Drastically Enhanced High-Rate Performance of Carbon-Coated LiFePO4 Nanorods Using a Green Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Method for Lithium Ion Battery: A Selective Carbon Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruiyuan; Liu, Haiqiang; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Jiankun; Tan, Xinghua; Liu, Guangyao; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Xiaohua; Guo, Yanjun; Wang, Hanfu; Sun, Lianfeng; Chu, Weiguo

    2015-06-01

    Application of LiFePO4 (LFP) to large current power supplies is greatly hindered by its poor electrical conductivity (10(-9) S cm(-1)) and sluggish Li+ transport. Carbon coating is considered to be necessary for improving its interparticle electronic conductivity and thus electrochemical performance. Here, we proposed a novel, green, low cost and controllable CVD approach using solid glucose as carbon source which can be extended to most cathode and anode materials in need of carbon coating. Hydrothermally synthesized LFP nanorods with optimized thickness of carbon coated by this recipe are shown to have superb high-rate performance, high energy, and power densities, as well as long high-rate cycle lifetime. For 200 C (18s) charge and discharge, the discharge capacity and voltage are 89.69 mAh g(-1) and 3.030 V, respectively, and the energy and power densities are 271.80 Wh kg(-1) and 54.36 kW kg(-1), respectively. The capacity retention of 93.0%, and the energy and power density retention of 93.6% after 500 cycles at 100 C were achieved. Compared to the conventional carbon coating through direct mixing with glucose (or other organic substances) followed by annealing (DMGA), the carbon phase coated using this CVD recipe is of higher quality and better uniformity. Undoubtedly, this approach enhances significantly the electrochemical performance of high power LFP and thus broadens greatly the prospect of its applications to large current power supplies such as electric and hybrid electric vehicles. PMID:25970716

  17. Tuning carbon nanotube assembly for flexible, strong and conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Shaokai; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes are ideal scaffolds for designing and architecting flexible graphite films with tunable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Herein, we demonstrate that the assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes with different aggregation density and morphology leads to different mechanical properties and anisotropic electrical conduction along the films. Using drying evaporation under tension treatment, the carbon nanotubes can be assembled into strong films with tensile strength and Young's modulus as high as 3.2 GPa and 124 GPa, respectively, leading to a remarkable toughness of 54.38 J g-1, greatly outperforming conventional graphite films, spider webs and even Kevlar fiber films. Different types of solvents may result in the assembly of CNTs with different aggregation morphology and therefore different modulus. In addition, we reveal that the high density assembly of aligned CNTs correlates with better electric conduction along the axial direction, enabling these flexible graphite films to be both strong and conductive.Carbon nanotubes are ideal scaffolds for designing and architecting flexible graphite films with tunable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Herein, we demonstrate that the assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes with different aggregation density and morphology leads to different mechanical properties and anisotropic electrical conduction along the films. Using drying evaporation under tension treatment, the carbon nanotubes can be assembled into strong films with tensile strength and Young's modulus as high as 3.2 GPa and 124 GPa, respectively, leading to a remarkable toughness of 54.38 J g-1, greatly outperforming conventional graphite films, spider webs and even Kevlar fiber films. Different types of solvents may result in the assembly of CNTs with different aggregation morphology and therefore different modulus. In addition, we reveal that the high density assembly of aligned CNTs correlates with better electric conduction

  18. Selective electroless coating of palladium nanoparticles on metallic single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yiyu; Lv, Peng; Zhang, Xuequan; Li, Yu; Feng, Wei

    2010-08-01

    The selective electroless coating of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles on metallic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was studied. The remarkable increase in conductivity of SWNT/Pd films up to fourfold higher than pure SWNT was due to p-type doping and Ohmic contact. Metallic behavior of SWNT/Pd-Field effect transistor (on/off ratio=1.2) was attributed to more hole carriers and no electrostatic barrier between nanotube and Pd. G-band and radial breathing mode in Raman indicates a definitive increase in the proportion of metallic SWNT. Results indicate Pd are selectively coated on metallic SWNT with more negative potential allowing for the electroless Pd2+ reduction.

  19. Measurement of the thermal properties of electrically conducting fluids using coated transient hot wires

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    Measurements of fluid thermal properties using the transient hot-wire technique are described. When bare hot wires are used in electrically conducting fluids there are additional measurement uncertainties due to the formation of electric double layers on the surfaces of the wires and the cell wall. If the electrical conductivity of the fluid is large enough there is also significant power generation in the fluid. These measurement uncertainties can be eliminated by electrically insulating the hot wires with a thin film. The use of tantalum hot wires with an anodized layer of tantalum pentoxide is demonstrated with measurements on nonpolar argon and polar 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane (R134a). Although coated tantalum hot wires have been used previously in a transient mode to measure the thermal conductivity of liquids, this work is the first demonstration of the use of coated wires to measure thermal conductivity in the liquid, vapor, and supercritical gas phases.

  20. Enhancement of backscattering by a conducting cylinder coated with gradient metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yuping; Shen, Zhongxiang; Feng, Keming

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a highly effective method for enhancing the backscattering by a conducting cylinder that is coated with a gradient metasurface. The employed metasurface exhibits a phase gradient continuously varying along the circumferential direction of the cylinder so that in-phase retroreflection can be produced to enhance the backscattering. It is demonstrated that the cylinder coated with the proposed gradient metasurface can generate backscattering very close to that from a conducting plate with the same dimensions as the cylinder's cross-section perpendicular to the incident plane wave. Compared with a bare conducting cylinder, the backscattering is significantly enhanced by the gradient metasurface made of conducting strips printed on a grounded dielectric substrate. Effects of cell numbers along the cylinder axis, incident angle, and polarization of the incoming electromagnetic wave on the backscattering enhancement are examined and discussed. A good agreement between simulated and measured backscattering results validates the observations.

  1. Measurement of the thermal properties of electrically conducting fluids using coated transient hot wires

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Measurements of fluid thermal properties using the transient hot-wire technique are described. When bare hot wires are used in electrically conducting fluids there are additional measurement uncertainties due to the formation of electric double layers on the surfaces of the wires and the cell wall. If the electrical conductivity of the fluid is large enough there is also significant power generation in the fluid. These measurement uncertainties can be eliminated by electrically insulating the hot wires with a thin film. The use of tantalum hot wires with an anodized layer of tantalum pentoxide is demonstrated with measurements on nonpolar argon and polar 1,1,1,2 tetrafluorethane (R134a). Although coated tantalum hot wires have been used previously in a transient mode to measure the thermal conductivity of liquids, this work is the first demonstration of the use of coated wires to measure thermal conductivity in the liquid, vapor, and supercritical gas phases.

  2. Grain Boundary Carbon in Synthetic Quartzite: Implications for Electrical Conduction in the Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, J. D.; Watson, E. B.; Wark, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Despite the repeated implication that grain boundary graphite forms electrically connected networks in the earth's deep crust, little is known about the equilibrium microstructure of graphite at high pressures and temperatures. To evaluate this, we conducted several piston cylinder experiments designed to equilibrate carbon with crystalline SiO2. In one set of experiments, stacked single crystal (SC) disks of polished quartz were coated with 0 to 150 nm of carbon film in 50 nm increments. The stacks were positioned horizontally in graphite capsules and were heated at 1.4 GPa to 1150° C for 48 hours in one experiment, and to 1500° C for 0.05 and 5 hours in two others. In another set of experiments, we produced two polycrystalline (PC) quartzites in textural equilibrium with small amounts of carbon. A powder consisting of 75-150 μ m grains of natural crystals was fired for three days at atmospheric P and 1000° C and coated with a 30-50 nm carbon film. In one experiment, the powder was encased in a graphite capsule; in the other, a Pt capsule was used. Both were equilibrated for 120 hours at 1300° C, 1 GPa. Polished sections of the products revealed that the low-T SC run contained a thin, dark film on all interfaces including the uncoated face; the short duration, high-T SC run contained a dark film on all of the coated interfaces, but not on the uncoated interface; and the longer duration, high-T SC run contained isolated opaque blebs that increased in density with increasing thickness of the initial film. Additionally, these SC products contained a small number of fractures with thin, dark films, blebs, or dendrites. Both PC experiments produced similar products, largely composed of polygonal quartz grains and apparently unconnected small dark grains located along grain boundaries. Most of these dark grains exhibited a rounded or globular morphology, but a few showed rational faces. The results suggest that carbon films are not stable along quartz grain

  3. Controlled synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes and their applications in transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervishi, Enkeleda

    carbon formation, and higher crystallinity compared with the ones grown by the external furnace cCVD method. Lastly, this research presents the development and characterization of carbon nanotube polymer composites and conductive transparent nanotube thin film coatings. Electrostatic charge dissipation presents a major problem for applications ranging from electronics to space exploration. Nanotube polymer composites with new and improved bulk and surface properties were found to have the highest charge dissipation rates with decay times of seconds. Moreover, a comparative study of conductive transparent thin coatings on glass substrates using different types of CNTs is also discussed. The optoelectronic performance of the carbon nanotube films was found to strongly depend on many effects; including the ratio of metallic-to-semiconducting tubes, dispersion, length, diameter, wall number, and defects.

  4. Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coating for carbon/carbon composites prepared by pulsed electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shou-jie; Li, He-jun; Zhang, Lei-lei; Feng, Lei; Yao, Pei

    2015-12-01

    Trace elements substituted apatite coatings have received a lot of interest recently as they have many benefits. In this work, strontium and magnesium substituted DCPD (SM-DCPD) coatings were deposited on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by pulsed electrodeposition method. The morphology, microstructure, corrosion resistance and in vitro bioactivity of the SM-DCPD coatings are analyzed. The results show that the SM-DCPD coatings exhibit a flake-like morphology with dense and uniform structure. The SM-DCPD coatings could induce the formation of apatite layers on their surface in simulated body fluid. The electrochemical test indicates that the SM-DCPD coatings can evidently decrease the corrosion rate of the C/C composites in simulated body fluid. The SM-DCPD has potential application as the bioactive coatings.

  5. Influence of carbon fillers on the thermal conductivity of Poly (methyl methacrylate)/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Komal; Chauhan, Alok P. S.

    2016-04-01

    In the present research on carbon polymer composites, the effects of variation of the concentration of conductive fillers on the thermal conductivity of the resultant composite were studied. Carbon powders in the form of Carbon Fibers (CF) (200µm), Carbon Black (CB) (30-100 nm) and Graphite (75-100µm) were being considered as conductive fillers in the Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix. Nielsen model was found to be the best proposed model that incorporated geometric configuration comprising of both the orientation and shape of fillers. It was established that the calculated values of thermal conductivity of PMMA composites with single fillers of CF were higher than those of CB followed by Graphite. Furthermore, a visible synergy was observed between the combinations of these fillers such as Graphite and CF, Graphite and CB, CF and CB, as well as CB and CF.

  6. Carbon as a Shallow Donor in Transparent Conducting Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. L.; Steiauf, D.; Janotti, A.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon is a common unintentional impurity in oxide semiconductors. We use hybrid density functional theory to calculate the electronic and structural properties of carbon impurities in ZnO, In2O3 , and Ga2O3 —materials that are used as transparent conductors. In each of these semiconducting oxides, we find that carbon is most likely to occupy the cation site under most electronic and chemical potential conditions. In ZnO, CZn acts as a shallow double donor and exhibits large local breathing-mode relaxations. In In2O3 and Ga2O3 , C acts as a shallow donor and moves off the cation site to become threefold oxygen coordinated. In all three oxides, Ccation exhibits modest formation energies, indicating that these species will be likely to incorporate. Our results indicate that C impurities are suitable donor dopants in these oxides and will contribute to background n -type conductivity if unintentionally present.

  7. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    To increase contact conductance between two mating surfaces, a conductive tape has been developed by growing dense arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, graphite layers folded into cylinders) on both sides of a thermally conductive metallic foil. When the two mating surfaces are brought into contact with the conductive tape in between, the CNT arrays will adhere to the mating surface. The van der Waals force between the contacting tubes and the mating surface provides adhesion between the two mating surfaces. Even though the thermal contact conductance of a single tube-to-tube contact is small, the tremendous amount of CNTs on the surface leads to a very large overall contact conductance. Interface contact thermal resistance rises from the microroughness and the macroscopic non-planar quality of mating surfaces. When two surfaces come into contact with each other, the actual contact area may be much less than the total area of the surfaces. The real area of contact depends on the load, the surface roughness, and the elastic and inelastic properties of the surface. This issue is even more important at cryogenic temperatures, where materials become hard and brittle and vacuum is used, which prevents any gas conduction through the interstitial region. A typical approach to increase thermal contact conductance is to use thermally conducting epoxies or greases, which are not always compatible with vacuum conditions. In addition, the thermal conductivities of these compounds are often relatively low. The CNTs used in this approach can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the folding angle and diameter. The electrical resistivity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been reported. MWCNTs can pass a current density and remain stable at high temperatures in air. The thermal conductivity of a MWCNT at room temperature is measured to be approximately 3,000 W/m-K, which is much larger than that of diamond. At room temperature, the thermal conductance of a 0.3 sq cm

  8. Nanomechanical properties of silica-coated multiwall carbon nanotubes-poly(methyl methacrylate) composites.

    PubMed

    Olek, M; Kempa, K; Jurga, S; Giersig, M

    2005-03-29

    The mechanical properties of polymer composites, reinforced with silica-coated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), have been studied using the nanoindentation technique. The hardness and the Young's modulus have been found to increase strongly with the increasing content of these nanotubes in the polymer matrix. Similar experiments conducted on thin films containing MWNTs, but without a silica shell, revealed that the presence of these nanotubes does not affect the nanomechanical properties of the composites. While carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a very high tensile strength due to the nanotube stiffness, composites fabricated with CNTs may exhibit inferior toughness. The silica shell on the surface of a nanotube enhances its stiffness and rigidity. Our composites, at 4 wt % of the silica-coated MWNTs, display a maximum hardness of 120 +/- 20 MPa, and a Young's modulus of 9 +/- 1 GPa. These are respectively 2 and 3 times higher than those for the polymeric matrix. Here, we describe a method for the silica coating of MWNTs. This is a simple and efficient technique, adaptable to large-scale production, and might lead to new advanced polymer based materials, with very high axial and bending strength. PMID:15779997

  9. Effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and conducting polymer on capacitance of mesoporous carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anmiao; Cheng, Yingwen; Zhang, Hongbo; Hou, Ye; Wang, Yanqin; Liu, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Porous carbon is the most widely used electrode materials in energy storage devices. It is generally accepted that in such electrodes, mesoporosity is more desired in supercapacitor than microporosity for the ions tranportation. However, the relatively poor conductivity of porous carbon often leads to low capacitance. To improve the capacity of mesoporous carbon based electrode, we designed a composite film composed of mesoporous carbon, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and conducting polymer, Poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS), and hoped that each component in the composed film could contribute synergetically to improve electrochemical properties. The electrochemical performance of the film was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and constant current charge/discharge method. With the assistance of MWNTs and conducting polymer, the specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbon based electrode was amplified six times. The electrode also presented excellent charge/discharge rate and good cycling stability, retaining about 94% of its initial capacitance after 1000 cycles. The results demonstrated that mesoporous carbon is more effectively utilized with assistance of MWNTs and conducting polymer in the electrode. Such method is very promising for the future applications of the porous carbon in electrode materials for high performance electrochemical supercapacitors. PMID:25924364

  10. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon-copper composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng'ao; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Hongbo; Xiong, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Using 2.5-dimensional carbon fiber fabrics as the reinforcement, porous carbon/carbon(C/C) substrates were firstly fabricated by impregnation/carbonization (I/C) technique with furan resin and then treated at 2000, 2300 and 3000 °C, respectively. Finally, carbon fiber reinforced carbon and copper(C/C-Cu) composites were prepared by infiltrating melt copper alloy into C/C substrates under pressure. The effects of treating temperatures on microstructures and thermal conductivities of the composites were investigated. The results show that heat treatment plays an important role in the microstructure and thermal conductivity of C/C-Cu composites. It is conducive not only to rearrange the carbon crystallite of resin-based carbon in oriented layer structure, but also to improve the content and connectivity of copper alloy. The thermal conductivity increases with the increase in heat treatment temperature in both parallel and perpendicular direction; the thermal conductivity in parallel direction is evidently superior to that in perpendicular direction.

  11. Thermally Conductive Metal-Tube/Carbon-Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of fabricating joints between metal and carbon-fiber-based composite materials in lightweight radiators and heat sinks has been devised. Carbon-fiber-based composite materials have been used in such heat-transfer devices because they offer a combination of high thermal conductivity and low mass density. Metal tubes are typically used to carry heat-transfer fluids to and from such heat-transfer devices. The present fabrication method helps to ensure that the joints between the metal tubes and the composite-material parts in such heat-transfer devices have both (1) the relatively high thermal conductances needed for efficient transfer of heat and (2) the flexibility needed to accommodate differences among thermal expansions of dissimilar materials in operation over wide temperature ranges. Techniques used previously to join metal tubes with carbon-fiber-based composite parts have included press fitting and bonding with epoxy. Both of these prior techniques have been found to yield joints characterized by relatively high thermal resistances. The present method involves the use of a solder (63 percent Sn, 37 percent Pb) to form a highly thermally conductive joint between a metal tube and a carbon-fiber-based composite structure. Ordinarily, the large differences among the coefficients of thermal expansion of the metal tube, solder, and carbon-fiber-based composite would cause the solder to pull away from the composite upon post-fabrication cooldown from the molten state. In the present method, the structure of the solder is modified (see figure) to enable it to deform readily to accommodate the differential thermal expansion.

  12. Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product

    DOEpatents

    Liu, P.K.T.; Gallaher, G.R.; Wu, J.C.S.

    1993-11-16

    A method is described for producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane. 12 figures.

  13. Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Paul K. T.; Gallaher, George R.; Wu, Jeffrey C. S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane.

  14. Contact Resistance and Metallurgical Connections Between Silver Coated Polymer Particles in Isotropic Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Sigurd R.; Kristiansen, Helge; Nagao, Shijo; Helland, Susanne; Njagi, John; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in silver thin film coated polymer spheres as conductive fillers in isotropic conductive adhesives (ICAs). Such ICAs yield resistivities similar to conventional silver flake based ICAs while requiring only a fraction of the silver content. In this work, effects of the nanostructure of silver thin films on inter-particle contact resistance were investigated. The electrical resistivity of ICAs with similar particle content was shown to decrease with increasing coating thickness. Scanning electron micrographs of ion milled cross-sections revealed that the silver coatings formed continuous metallurgical connections at the contacts between the filler particles after adhesive curing at 150°C. The electrical resistivity decreased for all samples after environmental treatment for 3 weeks at 85°C/85% relative humidity. It was concluded that after the metallurgical connections formed, the bulk resistance of these ICAs were no longer dominated by the contact resistance, but by the geometry and nanostructure of the silver coatings. A figure of merit (FoM) was defined based on the ratio between bulk silver resistivity and the ICA resistivity, and this showed that although the resistivity was lowest in the ICAs containing the most silver, the volume of silver was more effectively used in the ICAs with intermediate silver contents. This was attributed to a size effect due to smaller grains in the thickest coating.

  15. Switchable photoluminescence liquid crystal coated bacterial cellulose films with conductive response.

    PubMed

    Tercjak, Agnieszka; Gutierrez, Junkal; Barud, Hernane S; Ribeiro, Sidney J L

    2016-06-01

    Three different low molecular weight nematic liquid crystals (LCs) were used to impregnate bacterial cellulose (BC) film. This simple fabrication pathway allows to obtain highly transparent BC based films. The coating of BC film with different liquid crystals changed transmittance spectra in ultraviolet-visible region and allows to design UVC and UVB shielding materials. Atomic force microscopy results confirmed that liquid crystals coated BC films maintain highly interconnected three-dimensional network characteristic of BC film and simultaneously, transversal cross-section scanning electron microscopy images indicated penetration of liquid crystals through the three-dimensional network of BC nanofibers. Investigated BC films maintain nematic liquid crystal properties being switchable photoluminiscence as a function of temperature during repeatable heating/cooling cycles. Conductive response of the liquid crystal coated BC films was proved by tunneling atomic force microscopy measurement. Moreover, liquid crystal coated BC films maintain thermal stability and mechanical properties of the BC film. Designed thermoresponsive materials possessed interesting optical and conductive properties opening a novel simple pathway of fabrication liquid crystal coated BC films with tuneable properties. PMID:27083359

  16. Contact Resistance and Metallurgical Connections Between Silver Coated Polymer Particles in Isotropic Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Sigurd R.; Kristiansen, Helge; Nagao, Shijo; Helland, Susanne; Njagi, John; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2016-07-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in silver thin film coated polymer spheres as conductive fillers in isotropic conductive adhesives (ICAs). Such ICAs yield resistivities similar to conventional silver flake based ICAs while requiring only a fraction of the silver content. In this work, effects of the nanostructure of silver thin films on inter-particle contact resistance were investigated. The electrical resistivity of ICAs with similar particle content was shown to decrease with increasing coating thickness. Scanning electron micrographs of ion milled cross-sections revealed that the silver coatings formed continuous metallurgical connections at the contacts between the filler particles after adhesive curing at 150°C. The electrical resistivity decreased for all samples after environmental treatment for 3 weeks at 85°C/85% relative humidity. It was concluded that after the metallurgical connections formed, the bulk resistance of these ICAs were no longer dominated by the contact resistance, but by the geometry and nanostructure of the silver coatings. A figure of merit (FoM) was defined based on the ratio between bulk silver resistivity and the ICA resistivity, and this showed that although the resistivity was lowest in the ICAs containing the most silver, the volume of silver was more effectively used in the ICAs with intermediate silver contents. This was attributed to a size effect due to smaller grains in the thickest coating.

  17. Tribological behavior of near-frictionless carbon coatings in high- and low-sulfur diesel fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Ozturk, O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.

    2000-01-19

    The sulfur content in diesel fuel has a significant effect on diesel engine emissions, which are currently subject to environmental regulations. It has been observed that engine particulate and gaseous emissions are directly proportional to fuel sulfur content. With the introduction of low-sulfur fuels, significant reductions in emissions are expected. The process of sulfur reduction in petroleum-based diesel fuels also reduces the lubricity of the fuel, resulting in premature failure of fuel injectors. Thus, another means of preventing injector failures is needed for engines operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels. In this study, the authors evaluated a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating (developed at Argonne National Laboratory) as a possible solution to the problems associated with fuel injector failures in low-lubricity fuels. Tribological tests were conducted with NFC-coated and uncoated H13 and 52100 steels lubricated with high- and low- sulfur diesel fuels in a high-frequency reciprocating test machine. The test results showed that the NFC coatings reduced wear rates by a factor of 10 over those of uncoated steel surfaces. In low-sulfur diesel fuel, the reduction in wear rate was even greater (i.e., by a factor of 12 compared to that of uncoated test pairs), indicating that the NFC coating holds promise as a potential solution to wear problems associated with the use of low-lubricity diesel fuels.

  18. Carbon-coated MoS2 nanosheets as highly efficient electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Dou, Shuo; Wu, Jianghong; Tao, Li; Shen, Anli; Huo, Jia; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-01-29

    As a green and highly efficient energy resource, hydrogen (H2) has attracted much attention in recent years. Electrochemical water splitting is an economic process to generate H2. MoS2 is a promising candidate to replace traditional Pt-based electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) under acidic conditions. But low electrical conductivity is one of bottlenecks for the large-scale application of MoS2. In this work, a carbon-coated MoS2 hybrid electrocatalyst was prepared with a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) approach to improve the electrical conductivity of MoS2. In addition to the surface-coating carbon, a small graphene-like layer could also be inserted into the interlayers of MoS2 during the CVD process which resulted in more active sites being exposed in MoS2. Enhanced electrical conductivity and more exposed active sites lead to excellent HER activity. PMID:26657536

  19. Carbon-coated MoS2 nanosheets as highly efficient electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Shuo; Wu, Jianghong; Tao, Li; Shen, Anli; Huo, Jia; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-01-01

    As a green and highly efficient energy resource, hydrogen (H2) has attracted much attention in recent years. Electrochemical water splitting is an economic process to generate H2. MoS2 is a promising candidate to replace traditional Pt-based electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) under acidic conditions. But low electrical conductivity is one of bottlenecks for the large-scale application of MoS2. In this work, a carbon-coated MoS2 hybrid electrocatalyst was prepared with a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) approach to improve the electrical conductivity of MoS2. In addition to the surface-coating carbon, a small graphene-like layer could also be inserted into the interlayers of MoS2 during the CVD process which resulted in more active sites being exposed in MoS2. Enhanced electrical conductivity and more exposed active sites lead to excellent HER activity.

  20. Transparent conductive coatings by printing coffee ring arrays obtained at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Layani, Michael; Gruchko, Michael; Milo, Oded; Balberg, Isaac; Azulay, Doron; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2009-11-24

    We report here a concept for utilization of the "coffee ring effect" and inkjet printing to obtain transparent conductive patterns, which can replace the widely used transparent conductive oxides, such as ITO. The transparent conductive coating is achieved by forming a 2-D array of interconnected metallic rings. The rim of the individual rings is less than 10 microm in width and less than 300 nm in height, surrounding a "hole" with a diameter of about 150 microm; therefore the whole array of the interconnected rings is almost invisible to the naked eye. The rims of the rings are composed of self-assembled, closely packed silver nanoparticles, which make the individual rings and the resulting array electrically conductive. The resulting arrays of rings have a transparency of 95%; resistivity of 0.5 cm(2) was 4 +/- 0.5 Omega/, which is better than conventional ITO transparent thin films. The silver rings and arrays are fabricated by a very simple, low cost process, based on inkjet printing of a dispersion of 0.5 wt % silver nanoparticles (approximately 20 nm diameter) on plastic substrates. The performance of this transparent conductive coating was demonstrated by using it as an electrode for a plastic electroluminescent device, demonstrating the applicability of this concept in plastics electronics. It is expected that such transparent conductive coatings can be used in a wide range of applications such as displays (LCD, plasma, touch screens, e-paper), lighting devices (electroluminescence, OLED), and solar cells. PMID:19928933

  1. Conduction regime in innovative carbon nanotube via interconnect architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coiffic, J. C.; Fayolle, M.; Maitrejean, S.; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Le Poche, H.

    2007-12-01

    We report on the electrical properties of multiwall carbon nanotube based via interconnects over a broad range of temperature and bias voltage. By using innovating processing techniques, high density nanotube vias have been fabricated from single damascene and double damascene via architectures with diameters down to 140nm. For single damascene structures, resistances as low as 20Ω have been achieved for 300nm via size. Further measurements show that the conductance increases with temperature following an exponential law, which can be interpreted in terms of a disordered quasi-one dimensional conduction regime.

  2. Carbon nanotube dispersed conductive network for microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Yamanaka, K.; Ogikubo, H.; Akasaka, H.; Ohtake, N.

    2014-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are promising devices for capturing biomass energy. Although they have recently attracted considerable attention, their power densities are too low for practical use. Increasing their electrode surface area is a key factor for improving the performance of MFC. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which have excellent electrical conductivity and extremely high specific surface area, are promising materials for electrodes. However, CNTs are insoluble in aqueous solution because of their strong intertube van der Waals interactions, which make practical use of CNTs difficult. In this study, we revealed that CNTs have a strong interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. CNTs attach to the cells and are dispersed in a mixture of water and S. cerevisiae, forming a three-dimensional CNT conductive network. Compared with a conventional two-dimensional electrode, such as carbon paper, the three-dimensional conductive network has a much larger surface area. By applying this conductive network to MFCs as an anode electrode, power density is increased to 176 μW/cm2, which is approximately 25-fold higher than that in the case without CNTs addition. Maximum current density is also increased to approximately 8-fold higher. These results suggest that three-dimensional CNT conductive network contributes to improve the performance of MFC by increasing surface area.

  3. Electrochemical Deposition of Nanostructured Conducting Polymer Coatings on Neural Prosthetic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junyan; Martin, David

    2003-03-01

    Micromachined neural prosthetic devices facilitate the functional stimulation of and recording from the central nervous system (CNS). These devices have been fabricated to consist of silicon shanks that have gold or iridium sites along their surface. Our goal is to improve the biocompatibility and long-term performance of the neural prosthetic probes when they are implanted chronically in the brain. In our most recent efforts we have established that electrochemical polymerization can be used to deposit fuzzy coatings of conducting polymers specifically on the electrode sites. For neural prosthetic devices that are intended for long term implantation, we need to develop surfaces that provide intimate contact and promote efficient signal transport at the interface of the microelectrode array and brain tissue. We have developed methods to rapidly and reliably fabricate nanostructured conducting polymer coatings on the electrode probes using templated and surfactant-mediated techniques. Conducting polymer nanomushrooms and nanohairs of polypyrrole (PPy) were electrochemically polymerized onto the functional sites of neural probes by using either nanoporous block copolymers thin films, "track-etched" polycarbonate films or anodic aluminium oxide membranes as templates. Nanofibers of conducting polymers have also been successfully obtained by polymerizations in the presence of surfactants. The influence of current density, monomer concentration, surfactant concentration, and deposition charge on the thickness and morphology of the nanostructured conducting polymer coatings has been studied by optical, scanned probe, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. As compared with the normal nodular morphology of polypyrrole, the nanostructured morphologies grown from the neural electrode result in fuzzy coatings with extremely high surface area. The electrical properties of the polymer coatings were studied by Impedance Spectroscopy (IS) and Cyclic Voltammetry

  4. Comparing graphene, carbon nanotubes, and superfine powdered activated carbon as adsorptive coating materials for microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Ellerie, Jaclyn R; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2013-10-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), nano-graphene platelets (NGPs), and superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) were comparatively evaluated for their applicability as adsorptive coatings on microfiltration membranes. The objective was to determine which materials were capable of contaminant removal while causing minimal flux reduction. Methylene blue and atrazine were the model contaminants. When applied as membrane coatings, MWCNTs had minimal retention capabilities for the model contaminants, and S-PAC had the fastest removal. The membrane coating approach was also compared with a stirred vessel configuration, in which the adsorbent was added to a stirred flask preceding the membrane cell. Direct application of the adsorbent to the membrane constituted a greater initial reduction in permeate concentrations of the model contaminants than with the stirred flask setup. All adsorbents except S-PAC showed flux reductions less than 5% after application as thin-layer membrane coatings, and flux recovery after membrane backwashing was greater than 90% for all materials and masses tested. PMID:23911830

  5. Arc spraying of nano-structured wire on carbon steel: examination of coating microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Al Askandarani, A.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2011-01-17

    Arc spraying of nano-structured wire (TAFA 95MX) onto carbon steel is carried out. The workpieces coated were heat treated at temperature similar to the operating temperature of the hot-path components of power gas turbines. The morphological and microstructural changes in the coating are examined using optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The surface roughness and microhardness of the resulting coatings are measured. It is found that the formation of dimples like structure at surface increased the surface roughness of the coating. The microhardness of the resulting coating is significantly higher than the base material hardness. Heat treatment does not alter the microstructure and microhardness of the coating.

  6. Nanoindentation and nanoscratching of hard carbon coatings for magnetic disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, T.Y.; Pharr, G.M.; Oliver, W.C.; Bhatia, C.S.; White, R.L.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Brown, I.G.

    1995-06-01

    Nanoindentation and nanoscratching experiments have been performed to assess the mechanical properties of several carbon thin films with potential application as wear resistant coatings for magnetic disks. These include three hydrogenated-carbon films prepared by sputter deposition in a H{sub 2}/Ar gas mixture (hydrogen contents of 20, 34, and 40 atomic %) and a pure carbon film prepared by cathodic-arc plasma techniques. Each film was deposited on a silicon substrate to thickness of about 300 run. The hardness and elastic modulus were measured using nanoindentation methods, and ultra-low load scratch tests were used to assess the scratch resistance of the films and measure friction coefficients. Results show that the hardness, elastic modulus, and scratch resistance of the 20 and 34% hydrogenated films are significantly greater than the 40% film, thereby showing that there is a limit to the amount of hydrogen producing beneficial effects. The cathodic-arc film, with a hardness of greater than 59 GPa, is considerably harder than any of the hydrogenated films and has a superior scratch resistance.

  7. Spray-coated nanoscale conductive patterns based on in situ sintered silver nanoparticle inks.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Li, Shuguang; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale patterns with high conductivity based on silver nanoparticle inks were fabricated using spray coating method. Through optimizing the solution content and spray operation, accurate nanoscale patterns consisting of silver nanoparticles with a square resistance lower than 1 Ω /cm2 were obtained. By incorporating in situ sintering to substitute the general post sintering process, the time consumption could be significantly reduced to one sixth, qualifying it for large-scale and cost-effective fabrication of printed electronics. To testify the application of spray-coated silver nanoparticle inks, an inverted polymer solar cell was also fabricated, which exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 2.76%. PMID:24666992

  8. Spray-coated nanoscale conductive patterns based on in situ sintered silver nanoparticle inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yifan; Li, Shuguang; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng

    2014-03-01

    Nanoscale patterns with high conductivity based on silver nanoparticle inks were fabricated using spray coating method. Through optimizing the solution content and spray operation, accurate nanoscale patterns consisting of silver nanoparticles with a square resistance lower than 1 Ω /cm2 were obtained. By incorporating in situ sintering to substitute the general post sintering process, the time consumption could be significantly reduced to one sixth, qualifying it for large-scale and cost-effective fabrication of printed electronics. To testify the application of spray-coated silver nanoparticle inks, an inverted polymer solar cell was also fabricated, which exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 2.76%.

  9. Improvement of Electrical Contact Reliability by Conductive Polymer Coated Elastomer Structure in Woven Electronic Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Miyake, Koji; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2012-12-01

    This article presents an improvement in the stability and durability of the electrical contacts employed in flexible devices. A coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(4-styrenesulfonate) in form of a solid conductive layer on a silicone elastomer structure is employed in creating an electrical circuit embedded into the fabric of a woven electronic textile, where the coating serves as an electrical contact between weft and warp ribbons. When the contact load increases to 1 mN, then, due to the flexibility of the structure, an electric current begins to flow through the circuit. The structure can sextuplicate the life of the electrical contact.

  10. Spray-coated nanoscale conductive patterns based on in situ sintered silver nanoparticle inks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale patterns with high conductivity based on silver nanoparticle inks were fabricated using spray coating method. Through optimizing the solution content and spray operation, accurate nanoscale patterns consisting of silver nanoparticles with a square resistance lower than 1 Ω /cm2 were obtained. By incorporating in situ sintering to substitute the general post sintering process, the time consumption could be significantly reduced to one sixth, qualifying it for large-scale and cost-effective fabrication of printed electronics. To testify the application of spray-coated silver nanoparticle inks, an inverted polymer solar cell was also fabricated, which exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 2.76%. PMID:24666992

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Heat Conduction in Carbon Nanotube Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Feng; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios; Duong, Hai

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels have attracted a lot of interest due to their ultrahigh strength/weight and surface area/weight ratios. They are promising advanced materials used in energy storage systems, hydrogen storage media and weight-conscious devices such as satellites, because of their ultralight and highly porous quality. CNT aerogels can have excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical strength. However, the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels are as low as 0.01-0.1 W/mK, which is five orders of magnitude lower than that of CNT (2000-5000 W/mK). To investigate the mechanisms for the low thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels, multiscale models are built in this study. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are first carried out to investigate the heat transfer between CNT and different gases (e.g. nitrogen and hydrogen), and the thermal conductance at CNT-CNT interface. The interfacial thermal resistances of CNT-gas and CNT-CNT are estimated from the MD simulations. Mesoscopic modeling of CNT aerogels are then built using an off-lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to replicate the realistic CNT aerogels. The interfacial thermal resistances estimated from MD simulations are used as inputs in the MC models to predict the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels. The volume fractions and the complex morphologies of CNTs are also quantified to study their effects on the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels. The quantitative findings may help researchers to obtain the CNT aerogels with expected thermal conductivity.

  12. Bragg gratings in carbon coated optical fibers and their potential sensor applications in harsh environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaowen; Kudelko, David J.; Hokansson, Adam S.; Simoff, Debra A.; Stolov, Andrei A.; Ng, Joanna; Mann, Joel

    2014-05-01

    We have demonstrated that fiber Bragg gratings can be written through the carbon layer of carbon-coated optical fibers having different coating thicknesses. Specifically, grating index modulation amplitudes of ~2.5x10-5 and 0.52x10-5 were obtained in optical fibers having carbon layers 29 nm and 56 nm thick, respectively, without any extra photosensitization of the fibers. Subsequent experimental results showed that the carbon coatings in the grating areas didn't change their hermetic properties. Finally, we describe the advantages of these gratings and their potential applications in fiber optic sensing.

  13. Lightweight, flexible, high-performance carbon nanotube cables made by scalable flow coating

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D.; Forser, Aaron M.; Ashkar, Rana; Headrick, Robert J.; Bengio, E. Amram; Long, Christian J.; Choi, April; Luo, Yimin; Hight Walker, Angela R.; et al

    2016-01-21

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace themore » metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. In conclusion, this high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass.« less

  14. Lightweight, Flexible, High-Performance Carbon Nanotube Cables Made by Scalable Flow Coating.

    PubMed

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D; Forster, Aaron M; Ashkar, Rana; Headrick, Robert J; Bengio, E Amram; Long, Christian J; Choi, April; Luo, Yimin; Walker, Angela R Hight; Butler, Paul; Migler, Kalman B; Pasquali, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace the metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. This high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass. PMID:26791337

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Ceramic Thermal Barrier and Environmental Barrier Coating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Bansal, Narottam P.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal barrier and environmental barrier coatings (TBC's and EBC's) have been developed to protect metallic and Si-based ceramic components in gas turbine engines from high temperature attack. Zirconia-yttria based oxides and (Ba,Sr)Al2Si2O8(BSAS)/mullite based silicates have been used as the coating materials. In this study, thermal conductivity values of zirconia-yttria- and BSAS/mullite-based coating materials were determined at high temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. During the laser conductivity test, the specimen surface was heated by delivering uniformly distributed heat flux from a high power laser. One-dimensional steady-state heating was achieved by using thin disk specimen configuration (25.4 mm diam and 2 to 4 mm thickness) and the appropriate backside air-cooling. The temperature gradient across the specimen thickness was carefully measured by two surface and backside pyrometers. The thermal conductivity values were thus determined as a function of temperature based on the 1-D heat transfer equation. The radiation heat loss and laser absorption corrections of the materials were considered in the conductivity measurements. The effects of specimen porosity and sintering on measured conductivity values were also evaluated.

  16. Parylene coated carbon nanotube actuators for tactile stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Ansaldo, Alberto; Gendron, David; Brayda, Luca; Ceseracciu, Luca; Ricci, Davide

    2015-04-01

    Ionic liquid/carbon nanotube based actuators have been constantly improved in recent years owing to their suitability for applications related to human-machine interaction and robotics thanks to their light-weight and low voltage operation. However, while great attention has been paid to the development of better electrodes and electrolytes, no adequate efforts were made to develop actuators to be used in direct contact with the human skin. Herein, we present our approach, based on the use of parylene-C coating. Indeed, owning to its physicochemical properties such as high dielectric strength, resistance to solvents, biological and chemical inactivity/inertness, parylene fulfils the requirements for use in biocompatible actuator fabrication. In this paper, we study the influence of the parylene coating on the actuator performance. To do so, we analyzed its mechanical and electrochemical properties. We looked into the role of parylene as a protection layer that can prevent alteration of the actuator performance likely caused by external conditions. In order to complete our study, we designed a haptic device and investigated the generated force, displacement and energy usage.

  17. Enhancement of the Rate Capability of LiFePO4 by a New Highly Graphitic Carbon-Coating Method.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianjun; Sun, Bing; Liu, Hao; Ma, Zhipeng; Chen, Zhouhao; Shao, Guangjie; Wang, Guoxiu

    2016-06-22

    Low lithium ion diffusivity and poor electronic conductivity are two major drawbacks for the wide application of LiFePO4 in high-power lithium ion batteries. In this work, we report a facile and efficient carbon-coating method to prepare LiFePO4/graphitic carbon composites by in situ carbonization of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride during calcination. Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride containing naphthalene rings can be easily converted to highly graphitic carbon during thermal treatment. The ultrathin layer of highly graphitic carbon coating drastically increased the electronic conductivity of LiFePO4. The short pathway along the [010] direction of LiFePO4 nanoplates could decrease the Li(+) ion diffusion path. In favor of the high electronic conductivity and short lithium ion diffusion distance, the LiFePO4/graphitic carbon composites exhibit an excellent cycling stability at high current rates at room temperature and superior performance at low temperature (-20 °C). PMID:27238368

  18. Enhancing inter-tube conductivity in carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofi, Arash; Bell, Robert; Payne, Mike

    Retaining the remarkable electronic transport properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) when scaling up to macroscopic CNT networks for use in devices remains a significant challenge. As no single tube spans the device, electrons must travel between CNTs to contribute to the conductivity. Conductivity between CNTs of different chirality is suppressed due to the requirement of momentum conservation. Using a combination of analytic theory and tight-binding, I will show that this limitation can be overcome by supplying a weak perturbation to the system, resulting in order of magnitude increases of conductivity. I will present practical realizations of such perturbations, which I will demonstrate using Landauer-Buttiker transport simulations based on large-scale density-functional theory calculations. AM acknowledges support of the EPSRC under Grant EP/J015059/1.

  19. Ultrasonically carbon coated Si nanoparticles for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liping; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Donghwan; Yoon, Wooyoung

    2012-02-01

    A new and simple method for making nano-sized silicon/carbon composite materials was developed. The composite powders were prepared by dispersing HF-etched SiNPs in CHCl3, followed by bath sonication. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was used to identify the carbon layer outside the silicon particle. Impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry confirmed the improved electrode conductivity due to the carbon layer and the subsequent increased involvement of the silicon in the lithiation/delithiation process. The optimal composition of the composite, 20 wt.% SiNP/C, and 20 wt.% graphite, exhibited excellent cyclability after ten cycles with a reversible discharging capacity near 465 mAhg(-1) which is 1.5 times larger than that of the graphite and SiNPs electrode without ultrasonic process. PMID:22630015

  20. Conductive ceramic coating on polyacrylonitrile-vinyl chloride (modacrylic) discontinuous fibers via electroless deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, S. N.; McAllister, S. D.; Cheng, I. Francis; Edwards, D. B.

    Lead dioxide has electrical conductivity that is comparable to that of some of the metals. As a result like copper and nickel, lead dioxide can be deposited on non-conducting materials like polymers and ceramics using spontaneous and low cost deposition technique such as electroless deposition. This paper deals with development of conductive modacrylic fibers by coating them with lead dioxide via electroless deposition. The fibers so obtained will be used as additive in the lead-acid battery to improve its life and specific energy.

  1. Electrical conduction of carbon nanotube forests through sub-nanometric films of alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Guo, Yuzheng; Pfaendler, Sieglinde M.-L.; Fouquet, Martin; Gillen, Roland; Cepek, Cinzia; Castellarin-Cudia, Carla; Eslava, Salvador; Robertson, John

    2013-03-01

    We report both the growth of carbon nanotube forests and electrical conduction on W, Ti, and TiN substrates coated with an ultra-thin Al2O3 support layer. Varying the Al2O3 thickness, a good electrical contact and high nanotube density is possible for a 0.5 nm Al2O3 layer as such an ultra-thin film allows tunnelling. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that, when using these non-continuous Al2O3 films, Fe catalyst diffuses into the conducting substrates, eventually causing growth to stop. Forests grown on ultra-thin Al2O3 are potentially useful for applications as interconnects, supercapacitors, and heat spreaders.

  2. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  3. Microwave conductance properties of aligned multiwall carbon nanotube textile sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brian L.; Martinez, Patricia; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Lee, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the conductance properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) textile sheets in the microwave regime is essential for their potential use in high-speed and high-frequency applications. To expand current knowledge, complex high-frequency conductance measurements from 0.01 to 50 GHz and across temperatures from 4.2 K to 300 K and magnetic fields up to 2 T were made on textile sheets of highly aligned MWNTs with strand alignment oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the microwave electric field polarization. Sheets were drawn from 329 and 520 μm high MWNT forests that resulted in different DC resistance anisotropy. For all samples, the microwave conductance can be modeled approximately by a shunt capacitance in parallel with a frequency-independent conductance, but with no inductive contribution. This is consistent with diffusive Drude conduction as the primary transport mechanism up to 50 GHz. Further, it is found that the microwave conductance is essentially independent of both temperature and magnetic field.

  4. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  5. Direct synthesis of graphene 3D-coated Cu nanosilks network for antioxidant transparent conducting electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongmei; Wang, Huachun; Wu, Chenping; Lin, Na; Soomro, Abdul Majid; Guo, Huizhang; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaping; Cai, Duanjun; Kang, Junyong

    2015-06-01

    Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 μm length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by the imprint method. A magnetic manipulator equipped with a copper capsule was used to produce high Cu vapor pressure on Cu nanosilks and realize the graphene 3D-coating. The coated Cu@graphene nanosilks network achieved high transparency, low sheet resistance (41 Ohm sq-1 at 95% transmittance) and robust antioxidant ability. With this technique, the transfer process of graphene is no longer needed, and a flexible, uniform and high-performance transparent conducting film could be fabricated in unlimited size.Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 μm length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by

  6. Effective thermal conductivities of four metal ceramic composite coatings in hydrogen-oxygen rocket firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacht, R. L.; Price, H. G., Jr.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effective conductivities of four plasma-arc-sprayed, metal-ceramic gradated coatings on hydrogen-oxygen thrust chambers. The effective thermal conductivities were not a function of pressure or oxidant-to-fuel ratio. The various materials that made up these composites do not seem to affect the thermal conductivity values as much as the differences in the thermal conductivities of the parent materials would lead one to expect. Contact resistance evolving from the spraying process seems to be the controlling factor. The thermal conductivities of all the composites tested fell in the range of 0.75 to 7.5 watts per meter kelvin.

  7. Low Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Eric; Gell, Maurice

    2015-01-15

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are crucial to improved energy efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. The use of traditional topcoat materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is limited at elevated temperatures due to (1) the accelerated undesirable phase transformations and (2) corrosive attacks by calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) deposits and moisture. The first goal of this project is to use the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) process to further reduce the thermal conductivity of YSZ TBCs by introducing a unique microstructural feature of layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries (IPBs). Extensive process optimization accompanied with hundreds of spray trials as well as associated SEM cross-section and laser-flash measurements, yielded a thermal conductivity as low as 0.62 Wm⁻¹K⁻¹ in SPPS YSZ TBCs, approximately 50% reduction of APS TBCs; while other engine critical properties, such as cyclic durability, erosion resistance and sintering resistance, were characterized to be equivalent or better than APS baselines. In addition, modifications were introduced to SPPS TBCs so as to enhance their resistance to CMAS under harsh IGCC environments. Several mitigation approaches were explored, including doping the coatings with Al₂O₃ and TiO₂, applying a CMAS infiltration-inhibiting surface layer, and filling topcoat cracks with blocking substances. The efficacy of all these modifications was assessed with a set of novel CMAS-TBC interaction tests, and the moisture resistance was tested in a custom-built high-temperature moisture rig. In the end, the optimal low thermal conductivity TBC system was selected based on all evaluation tests and its processing conditions were documented. The optimal coating consisted on a thick inner layer of YSZ coating made by the SPPS process having a thermal conductivity 50% lower than standard YSZ coatings topped with a high temperature tolerant CMAS resistant gadolinium

  8. METHOD FOR FORMING A COATING OF MOLYBDENUM CARBIDE ON A CARBON BODY

    DOEpatents

    Simnad, M.T.

    1962-04-01

    A method is described for coating a carbon bodywith molybdenum carbide in such a manner that the carbon body is rendered less permeable to the flow of gases and has increased resistance to corrosion and erosion. The method includes coating a carbon body with molybdenum trioxide by contacting it at a temperature below the condensation temperature with molybdenum trioxide vapors and thereafter carburizing the molybdenum trioxide in situ in an inert atmosphere on the carhon body. (AEC)

  9. LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

  10. Solvent-free synthesis, coating and morphogenesis of conductive polymer materials through spontaneous generation of activated monomers.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Ryo; Oaki, Yuya; Kuwabara, Kento; Hayashi, Kosei; Imai, Hiroaki

    2014-10-14

    Synthesis, coating, and morphogenesis of conductive polymers were achieved on a variety of substrates through spontaneous generation of activated monomer vapors under ambient pressure and low temperature conditions. The present approach facilitates the generation of complex hierarchical morphologies and the conductive coating for improvement of electrochemical properties. PMID:25145680

  11. Enhancement of thermal conductive pathway of boron nitride coated polymethylsilsesquioxane composite.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyungbok; Ryu, Seung Han; Lee, Jun-Tae; Seong, Ki-Hun; Lee, Jae Eun; Yoon, Phil-Joong; Kim, Bum-Sung; Hussain, Manwar; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2013-11-01

    We report here in the fabrication of enhanced thermal conductive pathway nanocomposites of boron nitride (BN)-coated polymethylsilsesquioxane (PMSQ) composite beads using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as a mixing medium. Exfoliated and size-reduced boron nitride particles were successfully coated on the PMSQ beads and explained by surface charge differences. A homogeneous dispersion and coating of BN on the PMSQ beads using IPA medium was confirmed by SEM. Each condition of the composite powder was carried into the stainless still mould and then hot pressed in an electrically heated hot press machine. Three-dimensional percolation networks and conductive pathways created by exfoliated BN were precisely formed in the nanocomposites. The thermal conductivity of nanocomposites was measured by multiplying specific gravity, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity, based upon the laser flash method. Densification of the composite resulted in better thermal properties. For an epoxy reinforced composite with 30 vol% BN and PMSQ, a thermal conductivity of nine times higher than that of pristine PMSQ was observed. PMID:24245317

  12. Characterisation of graphene fibres and graphene coated fibres using capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector.

    PubMed

    Cabot, Joan M; Duffy, Emer; Currivan, Sinéad; Ruland, Andres; Jalili, Rouhollah; Mozer, Attila J; Innis, Peter C; Wallace, Gordon G; Breadmore, Michael; Paull, Brett

    2016-04-25

    The use of capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) for the characterisation of thin conductive graphene fibres, graphene composite fibres, and graphene coated fibrous materials is demonstrated for the first time. Within a few seconds, the non-destructive C(4)D detector provides a profile of the longetudinal physical homogeneity of the fibre, as well as extra information regarding fibre mophology and composition. In addition to the theoretical considerations related to the factors affect the output signal, this work evaluates the properties of graphene fibres using scanning C(4)D following the manufacturing process of wet-spinning. Furthermore, conductive graphene-coated fibrous materials and the effectiveness of the coating and reduction procedures applied could be investigated. Apart from the application of C(4)D in the monitoring of such processes, the feasibility of this small, highly sensitive and rapidly-responsive detector to monitor strain and elasticity responses of conductive and elastomeric composite fibres for applications in motion sensing, biomedical monitoring, and stretchable electronics was also demonstrated. PMID:26911662

  13. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    adhesion and durability in the environment. Though these coatings are efficient in protecting polymer composites, their application imposes severe constraints. Their thermal expansion coefficients may differ markedly from those of polymer composite substrates: as a result, cracks develop in the coatings on thermal cycling and AO can penetrate through them to the substrate. In addition to the technicalities of forming an effective barrier, such factors as cost, convenience of application and ease of repair are important considerations in the selection of a coating for a particular application. The latter issues drive the aerospace research toward the development of novel light composite materials, like the so called polymer nanocomposites, which are materials with a polymer matrix and a filler with at least one dimension less than 100 nanometers. Current interest in nanocomposites has been generated and maintained because nanoparticle-filled polymers exhibit unique combinations of properties not achievable with traditional composites. These combinations of properties can be achieved because of the small size of the fillers, the large surface area the fillers provide, and in many cases the unique properties of the fillers themselves. In particular, the carbon fiber-based polymeric composite materials are the basic point of interest: the aim of the present study is to find new solution to produce carbon fiber-based composites with even more upgraded performances. One intriguing strategy to tackle such an issue has been picked out in the coupling between the carbon fibers and the carbon nanostructures. That for two main reasons: first, carbon nanostructures have shown fancy potentialities for any kind of technological applications since their discovery, second, the chemical affinity between fiber and nanostructure (made of the same element) should be a likely route to approach the typical problems due to thermo-mechanical compatibility. This work is joined in such framework

  14. Processing of fused silicide coatings for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The processing and oxidation resistance of fused Al-Si and Ni-Si slurry coatings on ATJ graphite was studied. Ni-Si coatings in the 70 to 90 percent Si range were successfully processed to melt, wet, and bond to the graphite. The molten coatings also infiltrated the porosity in graphite and reacted with it to form SiC in the coating. Cyclic oxidation at 1200 C showed that these coatings were not totally protective because of local attack of the substrate, due to the extreme thinness of the coatings in combination with coating cracks.

  15. Estimating hydraulic conductivities of the soil aggregates and their clay-organic coatings using numerical inversion of capillary rise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fér, Miroslav; Kodešová, Radka

    2012-10-01

    SummarySoil aggregates are in some soils and their horizons covered by organomineral coatings, which may significantly influence water and solute transfer into the aggregates. Knowledge of a coating occurrence, their structure and hydraulic properties is required for a more precise description of water flow and contaminant transport in soils. The aim of this study was to describe hydraulic properties of clay and organic matter coatings in the iluvial (Bt2) horizon of Haplic Luvisol. Sets of 30 unsorted aggregates, 24 aggregates with mostly clay coatings and 24 aggregates with clay-organic coatings, respectively, were studied to evaluate an impact of various coating composition. The coatings were removed from a half of the aggregates of each set. First, the wetting soil-water retention curve was measured on all soil aggregates. Then the capillary rise from the saturation pan into the multiple aggregates (set of 14 or 15 aggregates) without and with coatings was measured. Numerical inversion of the measured cumulative capillary rise data using the HYDRUS-1D program were applied to estimate the saturated hydraulic conductivities of the aggregates, Ks,aggr, and their coatings, Ks,coat. Results were compared with saturated hydraulic conductivities evaluated analytically using the sorptivity method, which was proposed previously. Data of the soil-water retention curves, measured on aggregates with and without coatings, did not allow distinguishing between retention curve parameters of the soil aggregates and their coatings. Therefore the same parameters were evaluated for both. Capillary rise into the soil aggregates without coatings was always faster than into the aggregates with coatings. As result the optimized saturated hydraulic conductivities, Ks,coat, of the clay and the organic matter coatings (the average values for unsorted, mostly clay and clay-organic coatings were 3.69 × 10-7, 2.76 × 10-7 and 1.81 × 10-7 cm min-1, respectively) were one to two order of

  16. Thermal conductance of carbon nanotube contacts: Molecular dynamics simulations and general description of the contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-07-01

    The contact conductance of carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions is the key factor that controls the collective heat transfer through CNT networks or CNT-based materials. An improved understanding of the dependence of the intertube conductance on the contact structure and local environment is needed for predictive computational modeling or theoretical description of the effective thermal conductivity of CNT materials. To investigate the effect of local structure on the thermal conductance across CNT-CNT contact regions, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for different intertube contact configurations (parallel fully or partially overlapping CNTs and CNTs crossing each other at different angles) and local structural environments characteristic of CNT network materials. The results of MD simulations predict a stronger CNT length dependence present over a broader range of lengths than has been previously reported and suggest that the effect of neighboring junctions on the conductance of CNT-CNT junctions is weak and only present when the CNTs that make up the junctions are within the range of direct van der Waals interaction with each other. A detailed analysis of the results obtained for a diverse range of intertube contact configurations reveals a nonlinear dependence of the conductance on the contact area (or number of interatomic intertube interactions) and suggests larger contributions to the conductance from areas of the contact where the density of interatomic intertube interactions is smaller. An empirical relation accounting for these observations and expressing the conductance of an arbitrary contact configuration through the total number of interatomic intertube interactions and the average number of interatomic intertube interactions per atom in the contact region is proposed. The empirical relation is found to provide a good quantitative description of the contact conductance for various CNT configurations investigated in the MD

  17. Anisotropic conductivity of magnetic carbon nanotubes embedded in epoxy matrices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Tae; Tannenbaum, Allen; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2010-01-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) hybrid-materials were synthesized and their anisotropic electrical conductivities as a result of their alignment in a polymer matrix under an external magnetic field were investigated. The tethering of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the surface of MWCNT was achieved by a modified sol-gel reaction, where sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) was used in order to inhibit the formation of a 3D iron oxide gel. These hybrid-materials, specifically, magnetized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (m-MWCNTs) were readily aligned parallel to the direction of a magnetic field even when using a relatively weak magnetic field. The conductivity of the epoxy composites formed in this manner increased with increasing m-MWCNT mass fraction in the polymer matrix. Furthermore, the conductivities parallel to the direction of magnetic field were higher than those in the perpendicular direction, indicating that the alignment of the m-MWCNT contributed to the enhancement of the anisotropic electrical properties of the composites in the direction of alignment. PMID:23019381

  18. Leaf conductance and carbon gain under salt-stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of plants to salt stress is often accompanied by reductions in leaf photosynthesis and in stomatal and mesophyll conductances. To separate the effects of salt stress on these quantities, a model based on the hypothesis that carbon gain is maximized subject to a water loss cost is proposed. The optimization problem of adjusting stomatal aperture for maximizing carbon gain at a given water loss is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function. A key novel theoretical outcome of the optimality hypothesis is an explicit relationship between the stomatal and mesophyll conductances that can be evaluated against published measurements. The approaches here successfully describe gas-exchange measurements reported for olive trees (Olea europea L.) and spinach (Spinacia oleraceaL.) in fresh water and in salt-stressed conditions. Salt stress affected both stomatal and mesophyll conductances and photosynthetic efficiency of both species. The fresh water/salt water comparisons show that the photosynthetic capacity is directly reduced by 30%-40%, indicating that reductions in photosynthetic rates under increased salt stress are not due only to a limitation of CO2diffusion. An increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water parameter (or marginal water use efficiency) exceeding 100%, analogous in magnitude to findings from extreme drought stress studies. The proposed leaf-level approach can be incorporated into physically based models of the soil-plant-atmosphere system to assess how saline conditions and elevated atmospheric CO2 jointly impact transpiration and photosynthesis.

  19. Nonaligned carbon nanotubes partially embedded in polymer matrixes: a novel route to superhydrophobic conductive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Liao, Zhangjie; Qi, Ji; Zhou, Zhi

    2010-08-17

    A new method for transforming common polymers into superhydrophobic conductive surfaces, with both a high static water contact angle (approximately 160 degrees) and a low sliding angle (2.0 degrees-4.5 degrees), and a low sheet resistance on the order of 10(1)-10(3) ohms/sq is presented. A layer of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is first distributed on the surface of a polymer substrate, then by a single step of pressing, the MWNTs are partially embedded inside the substrate surface and form a superhydrophobic coating with a "carpet-" or "hair"-like morphology. The infiltration of polymer melts into the porous MWNT layer follows Darcy's law, and the pressing time greatly influence the morphology and superhydrophobicity. Moreover, the coating can be electrically heated by 20-70 degrees C with a voltage as low as 4-8 V at an electric energy density below 1.6 J/cm(2) and therefore can be used for deicing applications. Hydroxylation and fluoroalkylsilane treatment can greatly improve the stability of the superhydrophobicity of MWNTs. This method is convenient and applicable to a variety of thermoplastic polymers and nonpolymer substrates coated by silicone rubber. PMID:20695606

  20. Liquid fuel combustion within silicon-carbide coated carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Vijaykant, S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2007-10-15

    Combustion of kerosene inside porous inert medium (PIM) has been investigated with the goal of reducing the emissions of nitric oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO) and soot. Silicon-carbide (SiC) coated carbon foam is used as PIM to attain high structural strength. The two-zone porous burner design consists of preheat and combustion sections. Different PIM configurations were tested by stacking together square porous pieces of 2.5 cm thickness. Two types of fuel injectors are considered: (i) in the air-assist injector, approximately 5% of the combustion air is used for atomization and the remaining air enters as the primary co-flow around the injector, and (ii) in the swirling-air injector, all of the combustion air enters the injector to create a swirling flow around the fuel jet to enhance atomization and fuel-air premixing. The distance between the injector and PIM inlet is a key operational parameter, which was varied in experiments with both injectors over a range of equivalence ratios and heat release rates. The NO{sub x} and CO emissions were measured to optimize the PIM configuration with minimum emissions. Results show stable combustion over a wide operating range. Three combustor operational regimes are identified depending upon the injector location. (author)

  1. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-12-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R&D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates.

  2. Carbon-Coated Co(3+)-Rich Cobalt Selenide Derived from ZIF-67 for Efficient Electrochemical Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Peng, Sijia; Huang, Linsong; Cui, Xiaoqi; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-08-17

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts are confronted with challenges such as sluggish kinetics, low conductivity, and instability, restricting the development of water splitting. In this study, we report an efficient Co(3+)-rich cobalt selenide (Co0.85Se) nanoparticles coated with carbon shell as OER electrocatalyst, which are derived from zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) precursor. It is proposed that the organic ligands in the ZIF-67 can effectively enrich and stabilize the Co(3+) ions in the inorganic-organic frameworks and subsequent carbon-coated nanoparticles. In alkaline media, the catalyst exhibits excellent OER performances, which are attributed to its abundant active sites, high conductivity, and superior kinetics. PMID:27488352

  3. Effect of Microstructure on the Thermal Conductivity of Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3-YSZ Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuemei; Liu, Ziwei; Kong, Mingguang; Wang, Yongzhe; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    The microstructures of three atmospheric plasma-sprayed (APS) Al2O3-ZrO2 coatings were investigated using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The differences in the microstructures of the three Al2O3-ZrO2 coatings, including their phase compositions, cracks, pores, grain sizes, and solid solutions, were analyzed in detail. A close relationship was observed between the thermal conductivities of the coatings and the microstructures, and the Al2O3-YSZ coatings with more spherical pores, fewer vertical cracks, and finer grains exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity of 0.91 W/m·K. Compared with YSZ coatings, Al2O3-YSZ coatings can exhibit lower thermal conductivity, which may be attributed to the formation of an amorphous phase, smaller grains, and Al2O3-YSZ solid solution.

  4. Investigations on the Mechanical Properties of Conducting Polymer Coating-Substrate Structures and Their Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Shu; Tang, Hua-Ping; Li, Xu-Dong; Hua, Xin

    2009-01-01

    This review covers recent advances and work on the microstructure features, mechanical properties and cracking processes of conducting polymer film/coating- substrate structures under different testing conditions. An attempt is made to characterize and quantify the relationships between mechanical properties and microstructure features. In addition, the film cracking mechanism on the micro scale and some influencing factors that play a significant role in the service of the film-substrate structure are presented. These investigations cover the conducting polymer film/coating nucleation process, microstructure-fracture characterization, translation of brittle-ductile fractures, and cracking processes near the largest inherent macromolecule defects under thermal-mechanical loadings, and were carried out using in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, as a novel method for evaluation of interface strength and critical failure stress. PMID:20054470

  5. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmanov, Iskandar N.; Kim, TaeYoung; Domingues, Sergio H.; Kim, Jin-Young; Tan, Cheng; Magnuson, Carl W.; Li, Huifeng; Piner, Richard; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2013-06-01

    Graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition of hydrocarbon gases on metal surfaces have been integrated with single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) films. Using simple thin film fabrication methods and the sequential deposition of these two components we obtained graphene/SWNT hybrid films with good structural quality. Obtained graphene/SWNT films possess opto-electrical properties better than that of pure graphene or SWNT films, making them promising for transparent conductive film (TCF) applications. The hybrid films have been tested as a transparent electrode in electrochromic (EC) devices to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) TCFs.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate Copolymer/Carbon Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, S.; Watson, K. A.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Lin, Y.; Sun, Y. P.

    2007-01-01

    To reduce weight and increase the mobility, comfort, and performance of future spacesuits, flexible, thermally conductive fabrics and plastic tubes are needed for the Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment. Such improvements would allow astronauts to operate more efficiently and safely for extended extravehicular activities. As an approach to raise the thermal conductivity (TC) of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (Elvax 260), it was compounded with three types of carbon based nanofillers: multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and expanded graphite (EG). In addition, other nanofillers including metallized CNFs, nickel nanostrands, boron nitride, and powdered aluminum were also compounded with Elvax 260 in the melt at various loading levels. In an attempt to improve compatibility between Elvax 260 and the nanofillers, MWCNTs and EG were modified by surface coating and through noncovalent and covalent attachment of organic molecules containing alkyl groups. Ribbons of the nanocomposites were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned in the direction of flow. Samples were also fabricated by compression molding to yield nanocomposites in which the nanofillers were randomly oriented. Mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing while the degree of dispersion and alignment of nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. TC measurements were performed using a laser flash (Nanoflash ) technique. TC of the samples was measured in the direction of, and perpendicular to, the alignment direction. Additionally, tubing was also extruded from select nanocomposite compositions and the TC and mechanical flexibility measured.

  7. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  8. Milling damage on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer using TiAlN coated End mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konneh, Mohamed; Izman, Sudin; Rahman Kassim, Abdullah Abdul

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the damage caused by milling Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composite (CFRP) with 2-flute 4 mm-diameter solid carbide end mills, coated with titanium aluminium nitride. The machining parameters considered in work are, rotation speed, feed rate and depth of cut. Experiments were designed based on Box-Behnken design and the experiments conducted on a Mikrotool DT-110 CNC micro machine. A laser tachometer was used to ascertain a rotational speed for conducting any machining trial. Optical microscopy examination reveals minimum delamination value of 4.05 mm at the spindle speed of 25,000 rpm, depth of cut of 50μm and feed rate of 3 mm/min and the maximum delamination value of 5.04 mm at the spindle speed of 35000 rpm, depth of cut of 150μm and feed rate of 9 mm/min A mathematical model relating the milling parameters and delamination has been established.

  9. Modified SiC-MoSi2 Oxidation Protective Coating for SiC-COATED Carbon/carbon Composites Through Infiltrating Liquid Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhong; Li, He-Jun; Ma, Chao; Fu, Qian-Gang; Zhang, Yu-Lei; Wu, Heng; Tao, Jun

    To improve the oxidation resistance of the SiC-MoSi2 coating prepared by two-step pack cementation, a liquid Si infiltrating method was adopted to modify it. The phase composition and microstructure of the coatings were analyzed by XRD and SEM. The results show that the size and number of the cracks in the modified coating decreased evidently after infiltrating Si. The oxidation test results in air at 1773 K show that the mass loss of the SiC-MoSi2 coating coated carbon/carbon (C/C) composites was up to 1.18% after oxidation for 206 h, while that of the modified coating coated C/C composites was only 0.77% after oxidation for 460 h. The reason is that the cracks formed in the pack cementation process were partly sealed and there were no penetrable cracks in the modified coating. Therefore, there were no direct channels for the oxygen to diffuse into the C/C substrate.

  10. Carbon black and carbon black-conducting polymer composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeshwar, K.; Wampler, W.A.; Goeringer, S.; Gerspacher, M.

    1996-12-31

    A large fraction of the carbon black commercially produced in the U. S. and other parts of the world goes into the automobile tire industry and other rubber applications. However, specialty applications of this material are expected to grow in the future. The present study explores the applicability of composites of carbon black and an electronically conductive polymer, polypyrrole, in environmental pollution abatement scenarios. Chromium was used as a model environmental pollutant for demonstration of our approach.

  11. Fabrication of highly conductive carbon nanotube fibers for electrical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fengmei; Li, Can; Wei, Jinquan; Xu, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Zelin; Cui, Xian; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential for use as electrical wires because of their outstanding electrical and mechanical properties. Here, we fabricate lightweight CNT fibers with electrical conductivity as high as that of stainless steel from macroscopic CNT films by drawing them through diamond wire-drawing dies. The entangled CNT bundles are straightened by suffering tension, which improves the alignment of the fibers. The loose fibers are squeezed by the diamond wire-drawing dies, which reduces the intertube space and contact resistance. The CNT fibers prepared by drawing have an electrical conductivity as high as 1.6 × 106 s m-1. The fibers are very stable when kept in the air and under cyclic tensile test. A prototype of CNT motor is demonstrated by replacing the copper wires with the CNT fibers.

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  13. Effects of Compression and Filler Particle Coating on the Electrical Conductivity of Thermoplastic Elastomer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Willem M.; Karttunen, Mikko; Wikström, Lisa; Vilkman, Taisto

    2013-10-01

    Elastomeric polymers can be filled with metallic micro- or nanoparticles to obtain electrical conductivity, in which the conductivity is largely determined by the intrinsic conductivity of and contact resistance between the particles. Electrons will flow through the material effectively when the percolation threshold for near-neighbor contacts is exceeded and sufficiently close contacts between the filler particles are realized for electron tunneling to occur. Silver-coated glass microparticles of two types (fibers and spheres) were used as fillers in a thermoplastic elastomer composite based on styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene copolymer, and the direct-current (DC) resistance and radiofrequency impedance were significantly reduced by coating the filler particles with octadecylmercaptan. Not only was the resistance reduced but also the atypical positive piezoresistivity effect observed in these elastomers was strongly reduced, such that resistivity values below 0.01 Ω cm were obtained for compression ratios up to 20%. In the DC measurements, an additional decrease of resistivity was obtained by inclusion of π-extended aromatic compounds, such as diphenylhexatriene. Some qualitative theories are presented to illuminate the possible mechanisms of action of these surface coatings on the piezoresistivity.

  14. Direct synthesis of graphene 3D-coated Cu nanosilks network for antioxidant transparent conducting electrode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongmei; Wang, Huachun; Wu, Chenping; Lin, Na; Soomro, Abdul Majid; Guo, Huizhang; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaping; Cai, Duanjun; Kang, JunYong

    2015-06-28

    Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 μm length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by the imprint method. A magnetic manipulator equipped with a copper capsule was used to produce high Cu vapor pressure on Cu nanosilks and realize the graphene 3D-coating. The coated Cu@graphene nanosilks network achieved high transparency, low sheet resistance (41 Ohm sq(-1) at 95% transmittance) and robust antioxidant ability. With this technique, the transfer process of graphene is no longer needed, and a flexible, uniform and high-performance transparent conducting film could be fabricated in unlimited size. PMID:26018299

  15. Composite lithium metal anode by melt infusion of lithium into a 3D conducting scaffold with lithiophilic coating.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng; Lin, Dingchang; Zhao, Jie; Lu, Zhenda; Liu, Yayuan; Liu, Chong; Lu, Yingying; Wang, Haotian; Yan, Kai; Tao, Xinyong; Cui, Yi

    2016-03-15

    Lithium metal-based battery is considered one of the best energy storage systems due to its high theoretical capacity and lowest anode potential of all. However, dendritic growth and virtually relative infinity volume change during long-term cycling often lead to severe safety hazards and catastrophic failure. Here, a stable lithium-scaffold composite electrode is developed by lithium melt infusion into a 3D porous carbon matrix with "lithiophilic" coating. Lithium is uniformly entrapped on the matrix surface and in the 3D structure. The resulting composite electrode possesses a high conductive surface area and excellent structural stability upon galvanostatic cycling. We showed stable cycling of this composite electrode with small Li plating/stripping overpotential (<90 mV) at a high current density of 3 mA/cm(2) over 80 cycles. PMID:26929378

  16. [Use of meshendoprostheses with diamond-like carbon coating in abdominal hernias surgery].

    PubMed

    Kulikovskiĭ, V F; Soloshenko, A V; Iarosh, A L; Dolzhikov, A A; Kolpakov, A Ia; Karpachev, A A; Bitenskaia, E P; Molchanova, A S

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of implantation of meshendoprostheses with and without carbon coating for surgical treatment of abdominal hernias in experiment and clinical practice. It was shown that diamond-like carbon coating minimizes primary tissue reaction against foreign material and provides complete implant's biological integration into subcutaneous connective tissue as are active encapsulation with connective tissue. Suggested meshendoprostheses with diamond-like carbon coating decrease local inflammatory reaction in operated area and thereby reduce number of exudative complications in early postoperative period. PMID:26031953

  17. Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Gradient Cyclic Behavior of Refractory Silicate Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed mullite and BSAS coatings have been developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites from high temperature environmental attack. In this study, thermal conductivity and thermal barrier functions of these coating systems are evaluated using a laser high-heat-flux test rig. The effects of water vapor on coating thermal conductivity and durability are studied by using alternating furnace and laser thermal gradient cyclic tests. The influence of laser high thermal-gradient cycling on coating failure modes is also investigated.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of carbon-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yun-hai; Shi, Xiao-qin; Xia, Hui; Xie, Jian

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Carbon-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The nanocomposite electrode shows a large reversible capacity up to 740 mAh g{sup −1}. • The nanocomposite electrode shows promising cycling stability and rate capability. - Abstract: The carbon-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes were synthesized by partial reduction of monodispersed hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoflakes with carbon coating. The carbon-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements. It has been demonstrated that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be completely converted to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} during the reduction process and carbon can be successfully coated on the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes, forming a conductive matrix. As anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the carbon-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes exhibit a large reversible capacity up to 740 mAh g{sup −1} with significantly improved cycling stability and rate capability compared to the bare Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoflakes. The superior electrochemical performance of the carbon-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes can be attributed to the synthetic effects between small particle size and highly conductive carbon matrix.

  19. Investigation of non-isocyanate urethane functional latexes and carbon nanofiller/epoxy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lei

    polymerization. The mechanical properties were improved with increasing urethane and the best was from the urethane in the shell due to higher concentration of urethane in the continuous phase. The inorganic/organic alkoxysilane modified epoxy coating system was formulated with carbon nanofillers, i.e. carbon black, mixture of carbon black and nanotubes, unpurified and purified non-fullerene carbon nanotubes and fullerene carbon nanotubes. Mechanical, thermal, electrical and anticorrosive properties of cured films were evaluated by tensile tests, DMTA, DSC, four-point probe method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. It was found that the most efficient material to enhance the electrical conductivity and anticorrosive properties of nanocomposite coating systems was fullerene CNTs.

  20. Time domain scattering and radar cross section calculations for a thin, coated perfectly conducting plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) calculations for flat, perfectly conducting plates are readily available through the use of conventional frequency domain techniques such as the Method of Moments (MOM). However, if the plate is covered with a dielectric material that is relatively thick in comparison with the wavelength in the material, these frequency domain techniques become increasingly difficult to apply. We present the application of the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Technique to the problem of electromagnetic scattering and RCS calculations from a thin, perfectly conducting plate that is coated with a thick layer of lossless dielectric material. Both time domain and RCS calculations are presented and disclosed.

  1. Time domain scattering and radar cross section calculations for a thin, coated perfectly conducting plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) calculations for flat, perfectly conducting plates are readily available through the use of conventional frequency domain techniques such as the Method of Moments (MOM). However, if the plate is covered with a dielectric material that is relatively thick in comparison with the wavelength in the material, these frequency domain techniques become increasingly difficult to apply. The application is presented of the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique to the problem of electromagnetic scattering and RCS calculations from a thin, perfectly conducting plate that is coated with a thick layer of lossless dielectric material. Both time domain and RCS calculations are presented and discussed.

  2. Multiwalled-carbon nanotubes and polyaniline coating on electro-active paper for bending actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Kim, Jaehwan

    2006-06-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and polyaniline are coated on an electro-active paper (EAPap) to improve the performance of the bending actuator, and its performance is tested. EAPap actuators made with cellulose paper have merits in terms of large bending displacement, ultra-lightweight, dryness, low actuation voltage and power consumption, low cost and biodegradability. However, the force output of actuators is small and the actuation frequency is low. Thus, MWNT and emeraldine salt polyaniline (PANI) are coated on the EAPap material to improve the force and the actuation frequency. The MWNT and PANI solution is made by sonication, and the sonication time and the weight per cents of the MWNT and PANI are optimized to improve the hybrid actuator performance. The optimum condition is associated with conversion of the partial conductive state PANI into the emeraldine formed PANI by the chemical bonding between the MWNT and PANI. The performance improvement of the EAPap actuator coated with MWNT/PANI is investigated in terms of displacement, blocking force and efficiency. In the presence of an electric field (0.35 V µm-1) on the hybrid EAPap actuator, 250% of the output force, 160% of the resonance frequency and 50% of efficiency are improved.

  3. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    adhesion and durability in the environment. Though these coatings are efficient in protecting polymer composites, their application imposes severe constraints. Their thermal expansion coefficients may differ markedly from those of polymer composite substrates: as a result, cracks develop in the coatings on thermal cycling and AO can penetrate through them to the substrate. In addition to the technicalities of forming an effective barrier, such factors as cost, convenience of application and ease of repair are important considerations in the selection of a coating for a particular application. The latter issues drive the aerospace research toward the development of novel light composite materials, like the so called polymer nanocomposites, which are materials with a polymer matrix and a filler with at least one dimension less than 100 nanometers. Current interest in nanocomposites has been generated and maintained because nanoparticle-filled polymers exhibit unique combinations of properties not achievable with traditional composites. These combinations of properties can be achieved because of the small size of the fillers, the large surface area the fillers provide, and in many cases the unique properties of the fillers themselves. In particular, the carbon fiber-based polymeric composite materials are the basic point of interest: the aim of the present study is to find new solution to produce carbon fiber-based composites with even more upgraded performances. One intriguing strategy to tackle such an issue has been picked out in the coupling between the carbon fibers and the carbon nanostructures. That for two main reasons: first, carbon nanostructures have shown fancy potentialities for any kind of technological applications since their discovery, second, the chemical affinity between fiber and nanostructure (made of the same element) should be a likely route to approach the typical problems due to thermo-mechanical compatibility. This work is joined in such framework

  4. Energy efficient graphite polyurethane electrically conductive coatings for thermally actuated smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Dervishi, E.; Berry, B.; Viswanathan, T.; Bourdo, S.; Kim, H.; Sproles, R.; Hudson, M. K.

    2007-02-01

    The concept of graphite-polyurethane coatings as efficient, electrical resistors is the focus of this paper. A 60-40 graphite-polyurethane mix (weight %) demonstrated an electrical resistivity of 40.71 Ω mm. The graphite-polyurethane mix was coated on electrically insulating Kapton tape, which was then wrapped on a nichrome wire (nominal dimensions: 100 mm length and 1.5 mm diameter). This three-phase assembly was heated by Joule heating of the graphite-polyurethane layer. Steady state temperatures as high as 180 °C were attained under free convection conditions, at a very low power requirement of about 2.5 W as opposed to about 18 W for uncoated wires. Interestingly, the effect on transients (heating and cooling times) was not as dramatic. Experiments were also performed under vacuum conditions, following which an analysis is offered regarding the different modes of heat transfer. These coatings can potentially be used as efficient resistors for highly conductive, moderately high temperature shape memory alloys (e.g. the copper-aluminium-nickel system) or electrically insulating shape memory polymers. Any other thermally activated shape memory alloy (e.g. the popular nickel-titanium system) may also use the coatings as resistors due to the potentially dramatic energy savings that may be realized without a dramatic adverse impact on the frequency response.

  5. Deposition of Electrically Conductive Coatings on Castable Polyurethane Elastomers by the Flame Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafizadeh, H.; McDonald, A.; Mertiny, P.

    2016-02-01

    Deposition of metallic coatings on elastomeric polymers is a challenging task due to the heat sensitivity and soft nature of these materials and the high temperatures in thermal spraying processes. In this study, a flame spraying process was employed to deposit conductive coatings of aluminum-12silicon on polyurethane elastomers. The effect of process parameters, i.e., stand-off distance and air added to the flame spray torch, on temperature distribution and corresponding effects on coating characteristics, including electrical resistivity, were investigated. An analytical model based on a Green's function approach was employed to determine the temperature distribution within the substrate. It was found that the coating porosity and electrical resistance decreased by increasing the pressure of the air injected into the flame spray torch during deposition. The latter also allowed for a reduction of the stand-off distance of the flame spray torch. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed to investigate the effect of the increase in temperature within the substrate on its dynamic mechanical properties. It was found that the spraying process did not significantly change the storage modulus of the polyurethane substrate material.

  6. Mass loss of a TEOS-coated, reinforced carbon-carbon composite subjected to a simulted shuttle entry environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, C. W.; Rummler, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Coated, reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) is used for the leading edges of the space shuttle. The mass loss characteristics of RCC specimens coated with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were determine for conditions which simulated the environment expected at the lug attachment area of the leading edge. Mission simulation included simultaneous application of load, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure. Maximum specimen temperature was 900 K (1160 F). Specimens were exposed for up to 80 simulated missions. Stress levels up to 6.8 MPa (980 psi) did not significantly affect the mass loss characteristics of the TEOS-coated RCC material. Mass loss was correlated with the bulk density of the specimens.

  7. Effect of temperature and concentration on thermal conductivity and viscosity of ferrofluid loaded with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahsavar, A.; Saghafian, M.; Salimpour, M. R.; Shafii, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the thermal conductivity and viscosity of a hybrid nanofluid containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles and gum arabic (GA) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs), experimentally. The magnetic nanoparticles and CNTs are physically attached as the result of interaction between the TMAH and GA molecules. The morphology and structure of the samples are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiments are carried out in the magnetic nanoparticles volume concentration range of 0.1-0.9 %, CNT volume concentration range of 0.05-1.35 % and the temperature range of 25-55 °C. The viscosity of the hybrid nanofluid increases with the increase of volume concentration, while it decreases with the increase of temperature. Besides, results show that hybrid nanofluid behaves as a shear thinning fluid. Furthermore, it is observed that the thermal conductivity of the hybrid nanofluid enhances with temperature and volume concentration.

  8. Carbon nanotubes filled polymer composites: A comprehensive study on improving dispersion, network formation and electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthi, Divya Kannan

    In this dissertation, we determine how the dispersion, network formation and alignment of carbon nanotubes in polymer nanocomposites affect the electrical properties of two different polymer composite systems: high temperature bismaleimide (BMI) and polyethylene. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate optimization of the above mentioned parameters, which would further enhance the electrical properties of polymer nanocomposites. BMI carbon fiber composites filled with nickel-coated single walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-SWNTs) were processed using high temperature vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to study the effect of lightning strike mitigation. Coating the SWNTs with nickel resulted in enhanced dispersions confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). An improved interface between the carbon fiber and Ni-SWNTs resulted in better surface coverage on the carbon plies. These hybrid composites were tested for Zone 2A lightning strike mitigation. The electrical resistivity of the composite system was reduced by ten orders of magnitude with the addition of 4 weight percent Ni-SWNTs (calculated with respect to the weight of a single carbon ply). The Ni-SWNTs - filled composites showed a reduced amount of damage to simulated lightning strike compared to their unfilled counterparts indicated by the minimal carbon fiber pull out. Methods to reduce the electrical resistivity of 10 weight percent SWNTs --- medium density polyethylene (MDPE) composites were studied. The composites processed by hot coagulation method were subjected to low DC electric fields (10 V) at polymer melt temperatures to study the effect of viscosity, nanotube welding, dispersion and, resultant changes in electrical resistivity. The electrical resistivity of the composites was reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to 10 wt% CNT-MDPE baseline. For effective alignment of SWNTs, a new process called Electric field Vacuum Spray was devised to

  9. Characterization and modeling of piezo-resistive properties of carbon nanotube-based conductive polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Giang Truong

    Electrically conductive polymers (ECPs), offering capabilities such as electrostatic discharge protection and electromagnetic interference shielding, have been the subject of intensive research and development both in academia and industry. The emergence of new conductive nano-fillers in recent decades, particularly carbon nanotubes (CNTs), further fuels more enthusiasm. Thanks to CNTs' excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical/electronic properties, CNT-filled polymers possess not only conductive properties, but a range of other properties desirable for multi-functional and high performance applications. In order to fully exploit the benefits of CNT-based conductive polymers (CNT-ECPs), researchers have conducted diverse studies primarily to characterize the electrical conductivity of the composites. A crucial area that is less studied is the piezoresistive behaviors of CNT-ECPs, that is, the change in material conductive properties due to an applied stress or strain. Given broad usage of ECPs, it would be reasonable to assume that ECP products commonly operate under certain stress or strain conditions. For instance, an electrostatic discharge (ESD)-protected conductive coating for spacecraft would be affected by strain induced by mechanical or aerodynamic loads. A more systematic understanding of the materials' piezoresistivity, therefore, is instrumental in ensuring satisfactory conductive performance of those material applications. Additionally, knowledge of conductive characteristics of the CNT-ECPs against stress/strain can open the door to newer material applications, e.g., strain gage or multifunctional conductive coating with strain-sensing capability. This research aims to achieve a more fundamental understanding of the mechanism of piezoresistive property of CNT-ECPs, and to develop a model that permits quantifying the structure-property relationships of CNT-ECPs' piezoresistivity. In this research, expanded experimental studies with various

  10. Adherent diamond like carbon coatings on metals via plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on various materials. Many of these techniques use metallic interlayers, such as Ti or Si, to improve the adhesion of a DLC coating to a ferrous substrate. An alternative processing route would be to use plasma source ion implantation (PSII) to create a carbon composition gradient in the surface of the ferrous material to serve as the interface for a DLC coating. The need for interlayer deposition is eliminated by using a such a graded interfaces PSII approach has been used to form adherent DLC coatings on magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, brass, nickel, and tungsten. A PSII process tailored to create a graded interface allows deposition of adherent DLC coatings even on metals that exhibit a positive heat of formation with carbon, such as magnesium, iron, brass and nickel.

  11. Load-Bearing Biomedical Applications of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings - Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Alakoski, Esa; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Soininen, Antti; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2008-01-01

    The current status of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for biomedical applications is reviewed with emphasis on load-bearing coatings. Although diamond-like carbon coating materials have been studied for decades, no indisputably successful commercial biomedical applications for high load situations exist today. High internal stress, leading to insufficient adhesion of thick coatings, is the evident reason behind this delay of the break-through of DLC coatings for applications. Excellent adhesion of thick DLC coatings is of utmost importance for load-bearing applications. According to this review superior candidate material for articulating implants is thick and adherent DLC on both sliding surfaces. With the filtered pulsed arc discharge method, all the necessary requirements for the deposition of thick and adherent DLC are fulfilled, provided that the substrate material is selected properly. PMID:19478929

  12. Load-bearing biomedical applications of diamond-like carbon coatings - current status.

    PubMed

    Alakoski, Esa; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Soininen, Antti; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2008-01-01

    The current status of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for biomedical applications is reviewed with emphasis on load-bearing coatings. Although diamond-like carbon coating materials have been studied for decades, no indisputably successful commercial biomedical applications for high load situations exist today. High internal stress, leading to insufficient adhesion of thick coatings, is the evident reason behind this delay of the break-through of DLC coatings for applications. Excellent adhesion of thick DLC coatings is of utmost importance for load-bearing applications. According to this review superior candidate material for articulating implants is thick and adherent DLC on both sliding surfaces. With the filtered pulsed arc discharge method, all the necessary requirements for the deposition of thick and adherent DLC are fulfilled, provided that the substrate material is selected properly. PMID:19478929

  13. Wormlike micelle assisted rod coating: a general method for facile fabrication of large-area conductive nanomaterial thin layer onto flexible plastics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingyi; Wang, Huan; Bai, Huadong; Yang, Peng; Shi, Mengxue; Guo, Peng; Wang, Chen; Yang, Wantai; Song, Huaihe

    2012-06-27

    Through combined application of wormlike-micelle and rod-coating technique, a general method was demonstrated for the facile reparation of thin transparent conductive films (TCF) of various nanomaterials and their hybrids on flexible plastics. The cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide (CTAOH)/p-toluenesulfonic acid (CTAT) wormlike micelle system was selected for both the dispersion of different nanomaterials and the enhancement of viscosities of the coating fluids. With the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/wormlike micelle aqueous dispersions as coating fluid, TCFs of SWNTs on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates made by rod-coating method were demonstrated. After doping by immersion into thionyl chloride solution, the sheet resistance of SWNTs thin films, which had a transmittance of about 78%, was as low as 480Ω/sq. This coating method was extended to the preparation of thin films or networks of other materials such as reduced graphene oxide and Ag nanowires. The obtained TCF from Ag nanowire networks has a low sheet resistance of 17Ω/sq, which is comparable to the value of best indium tin oxide (ITO) coating on plastic substrates. Finally, hybrid thin films of different nanomaterials were demonstrated by this method. PMID:22551382

  14. Palladium-nanoparticle-coated carbon nanotube gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Maeum; Jung, Daewoong; Lee, Gil S.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible hydrogen gas sensors were fabricated using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) decorated with Pd nanoparticles for the detection of H2 gas at room temperature. A comparative gas-sensing study was carried out on both the Pd-nanoparticles-decorated and undecorated MWCNT sheets in order to examine the effect of Pd nanoparticles on the gas-sensing performances at room temperature. Experimental results showed that the MWCNTs/Pd sensor exhibited fast response and recovery as well as high sensitivity compared with the pure MWCNT sensor. The improved sensing properties of this sensor were attributed to the spillover effect of Pd nanoparticles and the highly conductive MWCNT sheet.

  15. Low-Thermal-Conductivity Pyrochlore Oxide Materials Developed for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    When turbine engines operate at higher temperatures, they consume less fuel, have higher efficiencies, and have lower emissions. The upper-use temperatures of the base materials (superalloys, silicon-based ceramics, etc.) used for the hot-section components of turbine engines are limited by the physical, mechanical, and corrosion characteristics of these materials. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied as thin layers on the surfaces of these materials to further increase the operating temperatures. The current state-of-the-art TBC material in commercial use is partially yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is applied on engine components by plasma spraying or by electron-beam physical vapor deposition. At temperatures higher than 1000 C, YSZ layers are prone to sintering, which increases thermal conductivity and makes them less effective. The sintered and densified coatings can also reduce thermal stress and strain tolerance, which can reduce the coating s durability significantly. Alternate TBC materials with lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance are needed to further increase the operating temperature of turbine engines.

  16. Protection of nuclear graphite toward liquid fluoride salt by isotropic pyrolytic carbon coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiujie; Song, Jinliang; Xu, Li; Tan, Jie; Xia, Huihao; Zhang, Baoliang; He, Zhoutong; Gao, Lina; Zhou, Xingtai; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhu, Zhiyong; Bai, Shuo

    2013-11-01

    Infiltration studies were performed on uncoated nuclear graphite and isotropic pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coated graphite in molten FLiNaK salt at 650 °C under argon atmosphere at 1, 3 and 5 atm. Uncoated graphite shows weight gain more obviously than that of PyC coated graphite. Nuclear graphite with PyC coating exhibits excellent infiltration resistance in molten salt due to the small open porosity as conformed from scanning electron microscopy and mercury injection experiments.

  17. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Coated Carbon Nanotubes: Interlayer Polarization Improved Field Emission.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han-Chen; Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Lin, Wen-Yi; Chu, Yung-Chi; Hsu, Wen-Kuang

    2015-07-01

    Coating of h-BN onto carbon nanotubes induces polarization at interfaces, and charges become localized at N and C atoms. Field emission of coated tubes is found to be highly stable, and current density fluctuates within 4%. Study further reveals that the electric field established between coatings and tubes facilitates charge transfer across interfaces and electrons are emitted through occupied and unoccupied bands of N and B atoms. PMID:26070100

  18. Morphological and microstructural studies on aluminizing coating of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Samsu, Zaifol; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Daud, Abd Razak; Hussein, Hishammuddin

    2013-11-27

    Hot dip aluminizing is one of the most effective methods of surface protection for steels and is gradually gaining popularity. The morphology and microstructure of an inter-metallic layer form on the surface of low carbon steel by hot dip aluminization treatment had been studied in detail. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the reaction between the steel and the molten aluminium leads to the formation of Fe–Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that a two layer coating was formed consisting of an external Al layer and a (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) inter metallic on top of the substrate after hot dip aluminizing process. The inter-metallic layer is ‘thick’ and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. Microhardness testing shown that the intermetallic layer has high hardness followed by steel substrate and the lowest hardness was Al layer.

  19. Pulsed Plasma Synthesis of Iron and Nickel Nanoparticles Coated by Carbon for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Zhypargul; Omurzak, Emil; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Ihara, Hirotaka; Subban Ganapathy, Hullathy; Sulaimankulova, Saadat; Koinuma, Michio; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Fe and Ni magnetic nanoparticles coated by carbon were synthesized between the Fe-Fe and Ni-Ni metal electrodes, submerged in ethanol using pulsed plasma in a liquid method. Iron coated carbon (Fe@C) nanoparticles have an average size of 32 nm, and Ni@C nanoparticles are 40 nm. Obtained samples exhibit a well-defined crystalline structure of the inner Fe and Ni cores, encapsulated in the graphitic carbon coatings. Cytotoxicity studies performed on the MCF-7 (breast cancer) cell line showed small toxicity about 88-74% at 50 µg/mL of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles, which can be significant criteria for use them in medical cancer treatment. In addition, appropriate sizes, good magnetic properties and well-organized graphitic carbon coatings are highlight merits of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed plasma.

  20. The fabrication of carbon-nanotube-coated electrodes and a field-emission-based luminescent device.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sanjay; Yamini Sarada, B; Kar, Kamal K

    2010-02-10

    Tungsten substrates were coated with an Ni or Ni-Co catalyst by the electroless dip coating technique. Various carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method under different growth conditions. It was observed that Ni-and Ni-Co-coated tungsten substrates give very good growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in terms of yield, uniformity and alignment at a growth temperature of 600 degrees C. We fabricated a field-emission-based luminescent light bulb where a tungsten wire coated with carbon nanotubes served as a cathode. Results show lower threshold voltage, better emission stability and higher luminescence for CNT cathodes in comparison with uncoated tungsten cathodes. We found that aligned-coiled carbon nanotubes are superior to straight CNTs in terms of field emission characteristics and luminescence properties. PMID:20057034

  1. Superhydrophobic conductive textiles with antibacterial property by coating fibers with silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Chen, Jia; Yin, Wei; Jia, Shun-Tian; Ma, Jian-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were produced on cotton fibers by reduction of [Ag(NH3)2]+ complex with glucose. Further modification of the fibers coated by Ag NPs with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane led to superhydrophobic cotton textiles. Scanning electron microscopy images of the textiles showed that the treated fibers were covered with uniform Ag NPs, which generate a dual-size roughness on the textiles favouring the formation of superhydrophobic surfaces, and the Ag NPs formed dense coating around the fibers rendering the intrinsic insulating cotton textiles conductive. Antibacterial test showed that the as-fabricated textiles had high antibacterial activity against the gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. These multifunctional textiles might find applications in biomedical electronic devices.

  2. Low temperature growth of ultra-high mass density carbon nanotube forests on conductive supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Yang, Junwei; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Oliver, Rachel A.; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia; Robertson, John

    2013-08-01

    We grow ultra-high mass density carbon nanotube forests at 450 °C on Ti-coated Cu supports using Co-Mo co-catalyst. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows Mo strongly interacts with Ti and Co, suppressing both aggregation and lifting off of Co particles and, thus, promoting the root growth mechanism. The forests average a height of 0.38 μm and a mass density of 1.6 g cm-3. This mass density is the highest reported so far, even at higher temperatures or on insulators. The forests and Cu supports show ohmic conductivity (lowest resistance ˜22 kΩ), suggesting Co-Mo is useful for applications requiring forest growth on conductors.

  3. PROGRESS REPORT. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project explores the behavior of calcium carbonate grain coatings, including how they form and dissolve, their reactivity toward key Hanford contaminants, their impact (as surface coatings) on the reactivity of other mineral substrates, and on their in-ground composition and...

  4. ANNUAL REPORT. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this project is to investigate the role of calcium carbonate grain coatings on adsorption and heterogeneous reduction reactions of key chemical and radioactive contaminants in sediments on the Hanford Site. Research will ascertain whether these coatings p...

  5. Structure and mechanical properties of tungsten-containing hydrogenated diamond like carbon coatings for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Zheng; Hui, Zhou; Zhi-hua, Wan; Rui-peng, Sang

    Tungsten-containing diamond like carbon (W-C:H) coatings were prepared by unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBM) using tungsten carbide targets in Ar/C2H2 atmosphere. The structure and mechanical properties of these coatings with different C2H2 flow (from 40 sccm to 140 sccm) were studied. According to the analysis of Raman spectroscopy and the measurement of hardness and Young's modulus about the coatings, it was showed that sp3/sp2 ratio in the coatings changed and the hardness and Young's modulus decreased with increase of the C2H2 flow. Besides, the adhension and friction wear properties of the coatings were evaluated using the scratch test and dry sliding tests respectively. It was found that the coatings exhibited very good adhension and the C2H2 flow (actually the hydrogen) played a very important role in the tribological behavior of the W-C:H coatings in vacuum.

  6. COATED CARBON ELEMENT FOR USE IN NUCLEAR REACTORS AND THE PROCESS OF MAKING THE ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Pyle, R.J.; Allen, G.L.

    1963-01-15

    S>This patent relates to a carbide-nitride-carbide coating for carbon bodies that are to be subjected to a high temperature nuclear reactor atmosphere, and a method of applying the same. This coating is a highly efficient diffusion barrier and protects the C body from corrosion and erosion by the reactor atmosphere. Preferably, the innermost coating is Zr carbide, the middle coatlng is Zr nitride, and the outermost coating is a mixture of Zr and Nb carbide. The nitride coating acts as a diffusion barrier, while the innermost carbide bonds the nitride to the C body and prevents deleterious reaction between the nitride and C body. The outermost carbide coating protects the nitride coating from the reactor atmosphere. (AEC)

  7. Preparation, characterization and wear behavior of carbon coated magnesium alloy with electroless plating nickel interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yan; Li, Zhuguo; Feng, Kai; Guo, Xingwu; Zhou, Zhifeng; Dong, Jie; Wu, Yixiong

    2015-02-01

    Poor wear resistance of rare earth magnesium alloys has prevented them from wider application. In this study, composite coating (PVD carbon coating deposited on electroless plating nickel interlayer) is prepared to protect GW83 magnesium alloys against wear. The Ni + C composite coating has a dense microstructure, improved adhesion strength and hardness due to the effective support of Ni interlayer. The wear test result shows that the Ni + C composite coating can greatly prolong the wear life of the magnesium alloy. The wear track of the Ni + C coated magnesium alloy is obviously narrower and shows less abrasive particles as compared with the bare one. Abrasive wear is the wear mechanism of the coatings at the room temperature. In conclusion, the wear resistance of the GW83 magnesium alloy can be greatly improved by the Ni + C composite coating.

  8. Improved microwave shielding behavior of carbon nanotube-coated PET fabric using plasma technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji, Aminoddin; Semnani Rahbar, Ruhollah; Mousavi Shoushtari, Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Four different procedures were conducted to load amine functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (NH2-MWCNT) onto poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric surface to obtain a microwave shielding sample. Plasma treated fabric which was subsequently coated with NH2-MWCNT in the presence of acrylic acid was chosen as the best sample. Surface changes in the PET fabrics were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study the crystalline structure of the PET fabric. The microwave shielding performance of the PET fabrics in term of reflection loss was determined using a network analyzer at X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). The XPS results revealed that the carbon atomic percentage decreased while the oxygen atomic percentage increased when the fabric was plasma treated and coated with NH2-MWCNT. The SEM images showed that the NH2-MWCNTs were homogenously dispersed and individually separated in the surface of fabric. Moreover, the structural studies showed that the crystalline region of the fabrics was not affected by NH2-MWCNT and plasma treatment. The best microwave absorbing properties were obtained from the plasma treated fabric which was then coated with 10% NH2-MWCNT in the presence of acrylic acid. It showed a minimum reflection loss of ∼-18.2 dB about 11 GHz. Proper attachments of NH2-MWCNT on the PET fabric surface was explained in the suggested mechanism in which hydrogen bonding and amide linkage are responsible for the achievement of microwave shielding properties with high durability.

  9. Electrically Conductive Multiphase Polymer Blend Carbon-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigandi, Paul James

    The use of multiphase polymer blends provides unique morphologies and properties to reduce the percolation concentration and increase conductivity of carbon-based polymer composites. These systems offer improved conductivity, temperature stability and selective distribution of the conductive filler through unique morphologies at significantly lower conductive filler concentration. In this work, the kinetic and thermodynamic effects on a series of multiphase conductive polymer composites were investigated. The polymer blend phase morphology, filler distribution, electrical conductivity, and rheological properties of CB-filled PP/PMMA/EAA conductive polymer composites were determined. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were found to influence the morphology development and final composite properties. The morphology and CB distribution were found to be kinetically driven when annealed for a short period of time following the shear-intensive mixing process, whereas the three-phase polymer blend morphology is driven by thermodynamics when given sufficient time under high temperature annealing conditions in the melt state. At short annealing times, the CB distribution was influenced by the compounding sequence where the CB was added after being premixed with one of the polymer phases or directly added to the three phase polymer melt, but again was thermodynamically driven at longer annealing times with the CB migrating to the EAA phase. The resistivity was found to decrease by a statistically significant amount to similar levels for all of the composite systems with increasing annealing time, providing evidence of gradual phase coalescence to a tri-continuous morphology and CB migration. The addition of CB via the PP and EAA masterbatch results in significantly faster percolation and lower resistivity compared to when added direct to the system during compounding after 30 minutes annealing by a statistically significant amount. Dynamic oscillatory shear rheology using

  10. Tribological investigation of diamond-like carbon coated micro-dimpled surface under bovine serum and osteoarthritis oriented synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Mamat, Azuddin Bin; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis-oriented synovial fluid (OASF), i.e., that typical of a patient with osteoarthritis, has different physical and biological characteristics than bovine serum (BS), a lubricant widely used in biotribological investigations. Micro-dimpled and diamond-like carbon- (DLC) coated surfaces are key emerging interfaces for orthopedic implants. In this study, tribological performances of dimpled surfaces, with and without DLC coating, have been investigated under both BS and OASF. The friction tests were performed utilizing a pin on a disk tribometer, whereas contact pressure, speed, and temperature were simulated to a ‘medium walking gait’ of hip joint conditions. The mechanical properties of the specimen and the physical properties of the lubricant were characterized before the friction test. Raman analysis was conducted to identify the coating condition both before and after the test. The DLC-coated dimpled surface showed maximum hardness and residual stress. A DLC-coated dimpled surface under an OASF lubricated condition yielded a lower friction coefficient and wear compared to those of plain and dimpled specimens. The higher graphitization of coated materials with increasing load was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Carbon nanocoating: an effective nanoreactor towards well-defined carbon-coated GaN hollow nanospindles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenlong; Wang, Yanrong; Etogo, Atangana; Ning, Jiqiang; Xie, Yunlong; Hu, Yong

    2014-03-21

    Carbon-coated GaN hollow nanospindles with uniform morphology and good structural stability are facilely prepared by nitridizing solid carbon-coated GaOOH nanospindles in an ammonia atmosphere at 800 °C for 2 h. The carbon nanocoating acts as a nanoreactor which not only preserves the spindle-like morphology, but also prevents the growth of GaN particles during the thermal treatment. The significant advantage is that the hollow nanostructures so obtained exhibit superior resistance to distortion, collapse, and shrinkage. PMID:24496107

  12. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac-dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons' source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  14. Growth and Characterization of Carbon Nanofibers on Fe/C-Fiber Textiles Coated by Deposition-Precipitation and Dip-Coating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-09-01

    This research was conducted to synthesize carbon nanofibers on C-fiber textiles, by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Fe catalyst. The substrate, which was a carbon textile consisting of non-woven carbon fibers and attached graphite particles, was oxidized by nitric acid, before the deposition process. Hydroxyl groups were created on the C-fiber textile, due to the oxidization step. Fe(III) hydroxide was subsequently deposited on the oxidized surface of the C-fiber textile. To deposit ferric particles, two different methods were tested: (i) deposition-precipitation, and (ii) dip-coating. For the experiments using both types of catalyst deposition, the weight ratio of Fe to C-fiber textile was also varied. Ferric particles were reduced to iron after deposition, by using H2/N2 gas, and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown by flowing ethylene gas. Properties of carbon nanofibers created like this were analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectoscopy (XPS), Thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and Raman spectroscopy. In the case of the deposition-precipitation method, the results show that the diameter of carbon nanofibers grew up to 40-60 nm and 30-55 nm, at which the weight ratios of Fe catalyst to C-fiber textiles were 1:30 and 1:70, respectively. When Fe particles were deposited by the dip-coating method, the diameter of carbon nanofibers grew up to 40-60 nm and 25-30 nm, for the ratios of Fe catalyst to C-fiber textiles of 1:10 and 1:30, respectively. PMID:26716329

  15. Characterization of low thermal conductivity PAN-based carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzman, Howard A.; Adams, P. M.; Le, T. D.; Hemminger, Carl S.

    1992-01-01

    The microstructure and surface chemistry of eight low thermal conductivity (LTC) PAN-based carbon fibers were determined and compared with PAN-based fibers heat treated to higher temperatures. Based on wide-angle x ray diffraction, the LTC PAN fibers all appear to have a similar turbostratic structure with large 002 d-spacings, small crystallite sizes, and moderate preferred orientation. Limited small-angle x ray scattering (SAXS) results indicate that, with the exception of LTC fibers made by BASF, the LTC fibers do not have well developed pores. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the texture of the two LTC PAN-based fibers studied (Amoco T350/23X and /25X) consists of multiple sets of parallel, wavy, bent layers that interweave with each other forming a complex three dimensional network oriented randomly around the fiber axis. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis finds correlations between heat treated temperatures and the surface composition chemistry of the carbon fiber samples.

  16. Thermal conductivity of various thermal barrier coatings and its rationalization on the basis of the effects of microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kyongjun

    This research is aimed at understanding the factors governing the thermal conductivity of monolithic as well as multilayer coatings consisting of Al 2O3 and ZrO2 stabilized by 8 wt-% Y2O 3 (8YSZ), deposited by plasma spray and electron-beam physical-vapor-deposition (EB-PVD) techniques. The work is divided into two major categories. In the first, the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of plasma-spray-deposited monolithic coatings and multilayer coatings consisting of Al2O3 and 8YSZ was investigated. The coatings exhibited a large reduction in thermal conductivity at all temperatures when compared to the bulk monolithic Al2O3 and Y2O 3 stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ). This reduction was found to be due to porosity as well as thermal resistance brought about by interfaces in the coatings. The largest decrease in thermal conductivity of the coatings relative to monolithic fully dense materials was found to be due to splat interfaces within each layer as well as the coating-substrate interface. On the other hand, the multilayer coatings showed little variation in thermal conductivity with the number of layers, suggesting that the influence of interlayer interfaces on heat transfer is relatively small. In the second, single-layer and multilayer coatings consisting of Al 2O3 and 8YSZ were deposited on Ni-base superalloy substrates by electron-beam physical-vapor-deposition (EB-PVD). A columnar microstructure with (200) texture and [200] direction oriented nearly perpendicularly to the plane of the coating, was observed in the single-layer 8YSZ coating. In multilayer coatings of alternating layers of Al2O3 and 8YSZ the tendency to develop columnar structure, as well as the intensity of (200) texture, decreased as the number of layers increased. In both the single layer and the multilayer coatings, the 8YSZ layer consisted almost entirely of tetragonal (T) phase with a negligible amount of monoclinic (M) phase. This is in contrast to the microstructure of the bulk

  17. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei; Deng, Chengcheng; Yang, Nuo

    2015-01-01

    The ultra-low thermal conductivity of bulk polymers may be enhanced by combining them with high thermal conductivity materials such as carbon nanotubes. Different from random doping, we find that the aligned carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites has a high thermal conductivity by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The analyses indicate that the aligned composite not only take advantage of the high thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes, but enhance thermal conduction of polyethylene chains. PMID:26552843

  18. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Polyethylene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei; Deng, Chengcheng; Yang, Nuo

    2015-11-01

    The ultra-low thermal conductivity of bulk polymers may be enhanced by combining them with high thermal conductivity materials such as carbon nanotubes. Different from random doping, we find that the aligned carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites has a high thermal conductivity by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The analyses indicate that the aligned composite not only take advantage of the high thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes, but enhance thermal conduction of polyethylene chains.

  19. Conducting linear chains of sulphur inside carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Toshihiko; Morelos-Gómez, Aarón; Zhu, Zhen; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Futamura, Ryusuke; Urita, Koki; Terrones, Mauricio; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Young Hong, Sang; Chul Choi, Young; Tománek, David; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research for more than 200 years, the experimental isolation of monatomic sulphur chains, which are believed to exhibit a conducting character, has eluded scientists. Here we report the synthesis of a previously unobserved composite material of elemental sulphur, consisting of monatomic chains stabilized in the constraining volume of a carbon nanotube. This one-dimensional phase is confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Interestingly, these one-dimensional sulphur chains exhibit long domain sizes of up to 160 nm and high thermal stability (~800 K). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction shows a sharp structural transition of the one-dimensional sulphur occurring at ~450–650 K. Our observations, and corresponding electronic structure and quantum transport calculations, indicate the conducting character of the one-dimensional sulphur chains under ambient pressure. This is in stark contrast to bulk sulphur that needs ultrahigh pressures exceeding ~90 GPa to become metallic. PMID:23851903

  20. Thermal conductivity of chirality-sorted carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Feifei; Llinas, Juan P.; Li, Zuanyi; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of significant interest, yet their dependence on SWNT chirality has been, until now, not explored experimentally. Here, we used electrical heating and infrared thermal imaging to simultaneously study thermal and electrical transport in chirality-sorted SWNT networks. We examined solution processed 90% semiconducting, 90% metallic, purified unsorted (66% semiconducting), and as-grown HiPco SWNT films. The thermal conductivities of these films range from 80 to 370 W m-1 K-1 but are not controlled by chirality, instead being dependent on the morphology (i.e., mass and junction density, quasi-alignment) of the networks. The upper range of the thermal conductivities measured is comparable to that of the best metals (Cu and Ag), but with over an order of magnitude lower mass density. This study reveals important factors controlling the thermal properties of light-weight chirality-sorted SWNT films, for potential thermal and thermoelectric applications.

  1. Smart electronic yarns and wearable fabrics for human biomonitoring made by carbon nanotube coating with polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Shim, Bong Sup; Chen, Wei; Doty, Chris; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2008-12-01

    The idea of electronic yarns and textiles has appeared for quite some time, but their properties often do not meet practical expectations. In addition to chemicallmechanical durability and high electrical conductivity, important materials qualifications include weavablity, wearability, light weight, and "smart" functionalities. Here we demonstrate a simple process of transforming general commodity cotton threads into intelligent e-textiles using a polyelectrolyte-based coating with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Efficient charge transport through the network of nanotubes (20 omega/cm) and the possibility to engineer tunneling junctions make them promising materials for many high-knowledge-content garments. Along with integrated humidity sensing, we demonstrate that CNT-cotton threads can be used to detect albumin, the key protein of blood, with high sensitivity and selectivity. Notwithstanding future challenges, these proof-of-concept demonstrations provide a direct pathway for the application of these materials as wearable biomonitoring and telemedicine sensors, which are simple, sensitive, selective, and versatile. PMID:19367926

  2. Pyrolytic carbon coating for cytocompatibility of titanium oxide nanoparticles: a promising candidate for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Imani, Mohammad; Yousefi, Mohammad; Galinetto, Pietro; Simchi, Abdolreza; Amiri, Houshang; Stroeve, Pieter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticles for biomedical use must be cytocompatible with the biological environment that they are exposed to. Current research has focused on the surface functionalization of nanoparticles by using proteins, polymers, thiols and other organic compounds. Here we show that inorganic nanoparticles such as titanium oxide can be coated by pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and that the coating has cytocompatible properties. Pyrolization and condensation of methane formed a thin layer of pyrolytic carbon on the titanium oxide core. The formation of the PyC shell retards coalescence and sintering of the ceramic phase. Our MTT assay shows that the PyC-coated particles are cytocompatible at employed doses.

  3. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications. PMID:23171130

  4. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  5. Corrosion behavior of modified nano carbon black/epoxy coating in accelerated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior and anticorrosion properties of modified carbon black (CB) nanoparticles in epoxy coatings were investigated in accelerated conditions. Nanoparticles of CB were modified by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant. Dispersion of nanoparticles into epoxy was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The accelerated condition was prepared at 65 °C. CB nanoparticles improved corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. The optimum concentration of CB in the epoxy coating was 0.75 wt%. Results showed that the CB hinder the corrosion due to its barrier properties. CB can decrease the diffusion coefficient of water in the coating with filling the micropores.

  6. Laser-generated ultrasound with optical fibres using functionalised carbon nanotube composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Mosse, Charles A.; Bhachu, Davinder S.; Bear, Joseph C.; Carmalt, Claire J.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Treeby, Bradley E.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-04-01

    Optical ultrasound transducers were created by coating optical fibres with a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Dissolution of CNTs in PDMS to create the composite was facilitated by functionalisation with oleylamine. Composite surfaces were applied to optical fibres using dip coating. Under pulsed laser excitation, ultrasound pressures of 3.6 MPa and 4.5 MPa at the coated end faces were achieved with optical fibre core diameters of 105 and 200 μm, respectively. The results indicate that CNT-PDMS composite coatings on optical fibres could be viable alternatives to electrical ultrasound transducers in miniature ultrasound imaging probes.

  7. Water electrolysis with a conducting carbon cloth: subthreshold hydrogen generation and superthreshold carbon quantum dot formation.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Mandakini; Deshpande, Aparna; Kelkar, Sarika; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-03-01

    A conducting carbon cloth, which has an interesting turbostratic microstructure and functional groups that are distinctly different from other ordered forms of carbon, such as graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, was synthesized by a simple one-step pyrolysis of cellulose fabric. This turbostratic disorder and surface chemical functionalities had interesting consequences for water splitting and hydrogen generation when such a cloth was used as an electrode in the alkaline electrolysis process. Importantly, this work also gives a new twist to carbon-assisted electrolysis. During electrolysis, the active sites in the carbon cloth allow slow oxidation of its surface to transform the surface groups from COH to COOH and so forth at a voltage as low as 0.2 V in a two-electrode system, along with platinum as the cathode, instead of 1.23 V (plus overpotential), which is required for platinum, steel, or even graphite anodes. The quantity of subthreshold hydrogen evolved was 24 mL cm(-2)  h(-1) at 1 V. Interestingly, at a superthreshold potential (>1.23 V+overpotential), another remarkable phenomenon was found. At such voltages, along with the high rate and quantity of hydrogen evolution, rapid exfoliation of the tiny nanoscale (5-7 nm) units of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are found in copious amounts due to an enhanced oxidation rate. These CQDs show bright-blue fluorescence under UV light. PMID:24492961

  8. Laser synthesized super-hydrophobic conducting carbon with broccoli-type morphology as a counter-electrode for dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Rohan; Agarkar, Shruti; Debgupta, Joyashish; Shinde, Deodatta; Lefez, Benoit; Banerjee, Abhik; Jog, Jyoti; More, Mahendra; Hannoyer, Beatrice; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2012-11-01

    A laser photochemical process is introduced to realize superhydrophobic conducting carbon coatings with broccoli-type hierarchical morphology for use as a metal-free counter electrode in a dye sensitized solar cell. The process involves pulsed excimer laser irradiation of a thin layer of liquid haloaromatic organic solvent o-dichlorobenzene (DCB). The coating reflects a carbon nanoparticle-self assembled and process-controlled morphology that yields solar to electric power conversion efficiency of 5.1% as opposed to 6.2% obtained with the conventional Pt-based electrode. PMID:23034799

  9. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  10. Thermal contact conductance of metallic coated BiCaSrCuO superconductor/copper interfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.; Fletcher, L. S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of vapor deposited coatings on the thermal contact conductance of cold pressed, normal state BiCaSrCuO superconductor/oxygen-free copper interfaces were experimentally investigated over a pressure range of 200 to 2000 kPa. Using traditional vapor deposition processes, thin coatings of indium or lead were applied to the superconductor material to determine the effect on the heat transfer occurring at the interface. The test data indicate that the contact conductance can be enhanced using these coatings, with indium providing the greater enhancement. The experimental program revealed the need for a better understanding and control of the vapor deposition process when using soft metallic coatings. Also, the temperature-dependent microhardness of copper was experimentally determined and found to increase by approximately 35 percent as the temperature decreased from 300 to 85 K. An empirical model was developed to predict the effect of soft coatings on the thermal contact conductance of the superconductor/copper interfaces. When applied, the model agreed well with the data obtained in this investigation at low coating thicknesses but overpredicted the data as the thickness increased. In addition, the model agreed very well with data obtained in a previous investigation for silver-coated nickel substrates at all coating thicknesses.

  11. Theoretical Investigation on Alcohol Sensing of Glycine-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Kussow, Gary; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2007-03-01

    It has been observed that single walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors (SWNT-FET) coated with glycine can be used as alcohol sensors. The original semiconducting glycine-coated SWNT-FET have been changed to be metalic in the presence of alcohol. Using ab initio density functional theory, we compute the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes coated with glycine in the absence or in the presence of alcohol (Isopropanol) to investigate alcohol sensing mechanism. To demonstrate specificity of such glycine-coated SWNT-FETs on alcohol, we also study those properties in the presence of other molecules, such as acetone and water. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of an external fields on glycine-coated SWNT with IPA, and indentify the gate-electric-field screening in SWNT-FET to be a major role for alcohol sensing.

  12. Solution deposition of thin carbon coatings on LiFePO₄.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianxin; Yoo, Kevin; El-Halees, Ibrahim; Kisailus, David

    2014-12-10

    We report the synthesis of ultrathin carbon coatings on polycrystalline LiFePO4 via solution deposition and subsequent annealing. The annealing temperature was systematically investigated with polymer systems on LiFePO4 nanostructures. The crystal structures, sizes, and morphologies were monitored and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Micro-Raman and TEM were used to interrogate the carbon coatings after heat-treatments. Electrochemical performance of coated materials was investigated by cyclic voltammograms (CVs) and galvanostatic charge-discharge analysis. The olivine structured LiFePO4 remained stable up to 600 °C but underwent a rapid reduction reaction from LiFePO4 to Fe2P above 700 °C. The good compatibility between polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the surface of LiFePO4 enabled the formation of core-shell structure, which was transformed into a thin carbon coating on LiFePO4 after annealing. Both PEG and sucrose carbon-based sources yielded high-quality carbon coatings after annealing, as determined by the graphitic/disordered (G/D) ratios of 1.30 and 1.20, respectively. By producing more uniform and coherent coatings on LiFePO4 particles, batteries with significantly less carbon (i.e., 0.41 wt %) were fabricated and demonstrated comparable performance to traditionally synthesized carbon-coated LiFePO4 with higher carbon loadings (ca. 2.64 wt %). This will enable development of batteries with higher active material loading and therefore significantly larger energy densities. PMID:25387242

  13. Modification of carbon nanotube transparent conducting films for electrodes in organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Mu, Xue; Li, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Wen-Yi; Meng, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Bing; Chen, Li-Ting; Cui, Li-Jun; Wu, Xiaoming; Geng, Hong-Zhang

    2013-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transparent conducting films (TCFs) were fabricated for the electrodes of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs); three types of film were studied. The as-prepared SWCNT TCFs displayed a relatively low sheet resistance of 82.6 Ω/sq at 80.7 T% with a relatively large surface roughness of 30 nm. The TCFs were top-coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) to obtain PEDOT:PSS-coated TCFs. The PEDOT:PSS cover improved the conductivity and decreased the surface roughness to 12 nm at the cost of film transmittance. The SWCNT TCFs mixed with PEDOT:PSS (PM-TCFs) exhibited a high conductivity (70.6 Ω/sq at 81 T%) and a low surface roughness (3 nm) and were thus selected as the best TCFs for OLEDs. Blue flexible OLEDs with 4,4‧-bis(2,2‧-diphenylvinyl)-1,1‧-biphenyl (Dpvbi) as the emitting layer were fabricated on TCFs with the same structures to evaluate the performances of the different types of SWCNT films for use in OLEDs. Of these three types of OLEDs, the PM-TCF devices exhibited the optimal performance with a maximum luminance of 2587 cd m-2 and a current efficiency of 5.44 cd A-1. This result was explored using field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to further study the mechanisms that are involved in applying SWCNT TCFs to OLEDs.

  14. Boron-doped, carbon-coated SnO2/graphene nanosheets for enhanced lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxin; Liu, Ping; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, Yanshan; Tang, Yanping; Su, Yuezeng; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Xinliang

    2015-03-27

    Heteroatom doping is an effective method to adjust the electrochemical behavior of carbonaceous materials. In this work, boron-doped, carbon-coated SnO2 /graphene hybrids (BCTGs) were fabricated by hydrothermal carbonization of sucrose in the presence of SnO2/graphene nanosheets and phenylboronic acid or boric acid as dopant source and subsequent thermal treatment. Owing to their unique 2D core-shell architecture and B-doped carbon shells, BCTGs have enhanced conductivity and extra active sites for lithium storage. With phenylboronic acid as B source, the resulting hybrid shows outstanding electrochemical performance as the anode in lithium-ion batteries with a highly stable capacity of 1165 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1) after 360 cycles and an excellent rate capability of 600 mA h g(-1) at 3.2 A g(-1), and thus outperforms most of the previously reported SnO2-based anode materials. PMID:25694249

  15. Carbon coatings with olive oil, soybean oil and butter on nano-LiFePO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ketack; Jeong, Ji Hwa; Kim, Ick-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    Kitchen oils (olive, soybean and butter) are selected for carbon coatings on LiFePO 4. The surface properties of LiFePO 4 are unknown or vary depending on synthetic methods. The multi-functional groups of fatty acids in the oils can orient properly to cope with the variable surface properties of LiFePO 4, which can lead to dense carbon coatings. The low price and low toxicity of kitchen oils are other advantages of the coating process. LiFePO 4 (D 50 = 121 nm)combined with the carbon coating enhances the rate capability. Capacities at the 2 C rate reach 150 mAh g -1 or higher. The charge retention values of 2.0 C/0.2 C are between 94.4 and 98.9%.

  16. Adsorption of doxorubicin on poly(methyl methacrylate)-chitosan-heparin-coated activated carbon beads.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianjun; Zhang, Fuming; Takieddin, Majde; Mousa, Shaker; Linhardt, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    Extracorporeal filter cartridges, filled with an activated carbon bead (ACB) adsorbent, have been used for removal of overdosed cancer drugs from the blood. Coatings on adsorbent matrices, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/activated carbon bead and PMMA/chitosan/heparin/ACB composites, were tested to improve their biocompatibility and blood compatibility. PMMA coating on ACBs was accomplished in a straightforward manner using a PMMA solution in ethyl acetate. A one-step hybrid coating of ACBs with PMMA-anticoagulant heparin required the use of acetone and water co-solvents. Multilayer coatings with three components, PMMA, chitosan, and heparin, involved three steps: PMMA was first coated on ACBs; chitosan was then coated on the PMMA-coated surface; and finally, heparin was covalently attached to the chitosan coating. Surface morphologies were studied by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the -SO(3)(-) group. Adsorption, of a chemotherapy drug (doxorubicin) from both water and phosphate-buffered saline, by the coated ACBs was examined. The adsorption isotherm curves were fitted using the Freundlich model. The current adsorption system might find potential applications in the removal of high-dose regional chemotherapy drugs while maintaining high efficiency, biocompatibility, and blood compatibility. PMID:22313019

  17. Porous carbon-coated graphite electrodes for energy production from salinity gradient using reverse electrodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Su-Yoon; Jeong, Ye-Jin; Chae, So-Ryong; Yeon, Kyeong-Ho; Lee, Yunkyu; Kim, Chan-Soo; Jeong, Nam-Jo; Park, Jin-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Performance of graphite foil electrodes coated by porous carbon black (i.e., Vulcan) was investigated in comparison with metal electrodes for reverse electrodialysis (RED) application. The electrode slurry that was used for fabrication of the porous carbon-coated graphite foil is composed of 7.2 wt% of carbon black (Vulcan X-72), 0.8 wt% of a polymer binder (polyvinylidene fluoride, PVdF), and 92.0 wt% of a mixing solvent (dimethylacetamide, DMAc). Cyclic voltammograms of both the porous carbon (i.e., Vulcan)-coated graphite foil electrode and the graphite foil electrode without Vulcan showed good reversibility in the hexacyanoferrate(III) (i.e., Fe(CN)63-) and hexacyanoferrate(II) (i.e., Fe(CN)64-) redox couple and 1 M Na2SO4 at room temperature. However, anodic and cathodic current of the Vulcan-coated graphite foil electrode was much higher than those of the graphite foil electrode. Using a bench-scale RED stack, the current-voltage polarization curve of the Vulcan-coated graphite electrode was compared to that of metal electrodes such as iridium (Ir) and platinum (Pt). From the results, it was confirmed that resistance of four different electrodes increased with the following order: the Vulcan-coated graphite foilcoated titanium (Ti) meshcoated Ti platecoated graphite foil showed 5-10% higher power density than the metal mesh electrodes. From the polarization curve of the Vulcan-coated graphite foil electrode, it was found that total resistance decreased as thickness and geometric surface area of the electrode increased.

  18. Electrocatalytic Transformation of Carbon Dioxide into Low Carbon Compounds on Conducting Polymers Derived from Multimetallic Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Dreyse, Paulina; Honores, Jessica; Quezada, Diego; Isaacs, Mauricio

    2015-11-01

    The electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide is studied herein by using conducting polymers based on metallotetraruthenated porphyrins (MTRPs). The polymers on glassy carbon electrodes were obtained by electropolymerization processes of the monomeric MTRP. The linear sweep voltammetry technique resulted in polymeric films that showed electrocatalytic activity toward carbon dioxide reduction with an onset potential of -0.70 V. The reduction products obtained were hydrogen, formic acid, formaldehyde, and methanol, with a tendency for a high production of methanol with a maximum value of turnover frequency equal to 15.07 when using a zinc(II) polymeric surface. Studies of the morphology (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results provide an adequate background to explain that the electrochemical reduction is governed by the roughness of the polymer, for which the possible mechanism involves a series of one-electron reduction reactions. PMID:26383015

  19. Performance of Ultra Hard Carbon Wear Coatings on Microgears Fabricated by Liga

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, J.W.; Brown, I.G.; Christenson, T.R.; Dugger, M.T.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Monteiro, O.R.

    1998-12-18

    Stiction and friction are of concern for the reliable, long-term application of Ni-alloy micromachines. We have found that the application of a 30-70 nm hard carbon coating produces a significant reduction in the friction coefficient and wear rate of electroformed Ni substrates in reciprocating sliding contact under simulated MEMS operating conditions. To evaluate the performance of coated components, a series of 70-pm-thick microgears ranging in diameter from 0.2 to 2.2 mm were fabricated from electroformed Ni via standard LIGA processes and fixtured on posts in preparation for the coating procedure. A pulsed vacuum- arc deposition process was used to deposit a carbon coating on the gears with the plasma incident at a shallow angle to the gears' top surface. A sample bias of -2 keV was used in order to produce a coating with relatively low stress and good adhesion while maintaining high hardness. This coating process is known to be somewhat comformal to the component surfaces. The coating uniformity, particularly in the high-aspect-ratio areas between the gear teeth, was evaluated with micro-Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the coating can be applied uniformly on the top gear surface. Between the gear teeth the coating was the same thickness as on top of the gear down to a point 50 ~m below the top surface. Below that point (i.e. between 50 and 70 Lm), the coating thickness is somewhat thinner, but is still present. These results demonstrate that it is possible to a deposit hard carbon coating on microgears to reduce friction and wear in micromachines.

  20. Carbon nanocoating: an effective nanoreactor towards well-defined carbon-coated GaN hollow nanospindles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenlong; Wang, Yanrong; Etogo, Atangana; Ning, Jiqiang; Xie, Yunlong; Hu, Yong

    2014-02-01

    Carbon-coated GaN hollow nanospindles with uniform morphology and good structural stability are facilely prepared by nitridizing solid carbon-coated GaOOH nanospindles in an ammonia atmosphere at 800 °C for 2 h. The carbon nanocoating acts as a nanoreactor which not only preserves the spindle-like morphology, but also prevents the growth of GaN particles during the thermal treatment. The significant advantage is that the hollow nanostructures so obtained exhibit superior resistance to distortion, collapse, and shrinkage.Carbon-coated GaN hollow nanospindles with uniform morphology and good structural stability are facilely prepared by nitridizing solid carbon-coated GaOOH nanospindles in an ammonia atmosphere at 800 °C for 2 h. The carbon nanocoating acts as a nanoreactor which not only preserves the spindle-like morphology, but also prevents the growth of GaN particles during the thermal treatment. The significant advantage is that the hollow nanostructures so obtained exhibit superior resistance to distortion, collapse, and shrinkage. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures, additional SEM images and XRD patterns. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06274k

  1. Transparent conductive reduced graphene oxide thin films produced by spray coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, HongFei; Wang, Can; Sun, ZhiPei; Zhou, YueLiang; Jin, KuiJuan; Yang, GuoZhen

    2015-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide thin films were fabricated on quartz by spray coating method using a stable dispersion of reduced graphene oxide in N,N-Dimethylformamide. The dispersion was produced by chemical reduction of graphene oxide, and the film thickness was controlled with the amount of spray volume. AFM measurements revealed that the thin films have near-atomically flat surface. The chemical and structural parameters of the samples were analyzed by Raman and XPS studies. It was found that the thin films show electrical conductivity with good optical transparency in the visible to near infrared region. The sheet resistance of the films can be significantly reduced by annealing in vacuum and reach 58 kΩ with a light transmittance of 68.69% at 550 nm. The conductive transparent properties of the reduced graphene oxide thin films would be useful to develop flexible electronics.

  2. Conducting polymer-coated Physarum polycephalum towards the synthesis of bio-hybrid electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lacy Costello, B. J. P.; Mayne, R.; Adamatzky, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a generic method for the production of functionalized coatings on biological substrates. The specific method described involves the functionalization of the living plasmodial stage of Physarum polycephalum with the conducting organic polymer polypyrrole. The simple method involves localized treatment of tube sections with a solution of ferric chloride, followed by exposure to the vapour or a liquid solution of the pyrrole monomer. This technique enables the production of surface-coated conducting plasmodial tubes of certain lengths to be formed at specific points. Measurement of the electrical resistance of a 1 cm functionalized tube gave a value of 100 k? . The use of this selective functionalization technique means that the majority of the growing plasmodium remains unfunctionalized and living; thus, a true hybrid device is formed. It can be seen how a range of functionalized polymers and materials whereby a chemical activator, for the formation of the product (or the pre-cursor) can be added to P. polycephalum (or other organisms) followed by reaction to form a hybrid material.

  3. Predicting the Thermal Conductivity of AlSi/Polyester Abradable Coatings: Effects of the Numerical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolot, Rodolphe; Seichepine, Jean-Louis; Qiao, Jiang Hao; Coddet, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The final target of this study is to achieve a better understanding of the behavior of thermally sprayed abradable seals such as AlSi/polyester composites. These coatings are used as seals between the static and the rotating parts in aero-engines. The machinability of the composite coatings during the friction of the blades depends on their mechanical and thermal effective properties. In order to predict these properties from micrographs, numerical studies were performed with different software packages such as OOF developed by NIST and TS2C developed at the UTBM. In 2008, differences were reported concerning predictions of effective thermal conductivities obtained with the two codes. In this article, a particular attention was paid to the mathematical formulation of the problem. In particular, results obtained with a finite difference method using a cell-centered approach or a nodal formulation allow explaining the discrepancies previously noticed. A comparison of the predictions of the computed effective thermal conductivities is thus proposed. This study is part of the NEWAC project, funded by the European Commission within the 6th RTD Framework programm (FP6).

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fundamental research is proposed to investigate the role of calcium carbonate grain coatings on the vadose zone chemical reactivity of key Hanford contaminants (i.e., 60Co2+, 90Sr2+, CrO42-, and 99TcO4-). Calcium carbonate is widely distributed through the Hanford vadose zone as...

  5. New Method for Development of Carbon Coated Silica Phases for Liquid Chromatography Part I. Preparation of Carbon Phases

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Changyub; McCormick, Alon V.; Carr, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Owing to its combination of unique selectivity and mechanical strength, commercial carbon clad zirconia (C/ZrO2) has been widely used for many applications, including fast two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2DLC). However, the low surface area available (only 20 - 30 m2/g for commercial porous ZrO2) limits its retentivity. We have recently addressed this limitation by developing a carbon phase coated on the high surface area of HPLC grade alumina (C/Al2O3). This material provides higher retentivity and comparable selectivity, but its use is still limited by how few HPLC quality types of alumina particles (e.g., particle size, surface area, pore size) are available. In this work, we have developed useful carbon phases on silica particles, which are available in various particle sizes, pore sizes and forms of HPLC grade. To make the carbon phase on silica, we first treat the silica surface with a monolayer or less of metal cations that bind to deprotonated silanols to provide catalytic sites for carbon deposition. After Al (III) treatment, a carbon phase is formed on the silica surface by chemical vapor deposition at 700 °C using hexane as the carbon source. The amount of Al (III) on the surface was varied to assess its effect on carbon deposition, and the carbon loading was varied at different Al (III) levels to assess its effect on the chromatographic properties of the various carbon adsorbents. We observed that use of a concentration of Al (III) corresponding to a full monolayer leads to the most uniform carbon coating. A carbon coating sufficient to cover all the Al (III) sites, required about 4 – 5 monolayers in this work, provided the best chromatographic performance. The resulting carbon phases behave as reversed phases with reasonable efficiency (50,000 – 79,000 plates/meter) for non-aromatic test species. PMID:21295308

  6. Microcontact printing for patterning carbon nanotube/polymer composite films with electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Hitoshi; Kibayashi, Hiro; Saji, Tetsuo

    2012-09-26

    Patterned carbon nanotube (CNT)/acrylic resin composite films were prepared using microcontact printing (μCP). To prepare ink for μCP, CNTs were dispersed into propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA) solution in which acrylic resin and a commercially available dispersant (Disperbyk-2001) dissolved. The resulting ink were spin-coated onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps. By drying solvent components from the ink, CNT/polymer composite films were prepared over PDMS stamps. Contact between the stamps and glass substrates provided CNT/polymer composite patternings on the substrates. The transfer behavior of the CNT/polymer composite films depended on the thermal-treatment temperature during μCP; thermal treatment at temperatures near the glass-transition temperature (T(g)) of the acrylic resin was effective to form uniform patternings on substrates. Moreover, contact area between polymer and substrates also affect the transfer behavior. The CNT/polymer composite films showed high electrical conductivity, despite the nonconductivity of polymer components, because CNTs in the films were interconnected. The electrical conductivity of the composite films increased as CNT content in the film became higher; as a result, the composite patternings showed almost as high electrical conductivity as previously reported CNT/polymer bulk composites. PMID:22900673

  7. Semiquantitative Performance and Mechanism Evaluation of Carbon Nanomaterials as Cathode Coatings for Microbial Fouling Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiaoying; Nghiem, Joanne; Silverberg, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examine bacterial attachment and survival on a titanium (Ti) cathode coated with various carbon nanomaterials (CNM): pristine carbon nanotubes (CNT), oxidized carbon nanotubes (O-CNT), oxidized-annealed carbon nanotubes (OA-CNT), carbon black (CB), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The carbon nanomaterials were dispersed in an isopropyl alcohol-Nafion solution and were then used to dip-coat a Ti substrate. Pseudomonas fluorescens was selected as the representative bacterium for environmental biofouling. Experiments in the absence of an electric potential indicate that increased nanoscale surface roughness and decreased hydrophobicity of the CNM coating decreased bacterial adhesion. The loss of bacterial viability on the noncharged CNM coatings ranged from 22% for CB to 67% for OA-CNT and was dependent on the CNM dimensions and surface chemistry. For electrochemical experiments, the total density and percentage of inactivation of the adherent bacteria were analyzed semiquantitatively as functions of electrode potential, current density, and hydrogen peroxide generation. Electrode potential and hydrogen peroxide generation were the dominant factors with regard to short-term (3-h) bacterial attachment and inactivation, respectively. Extended-time electrochemical experiments (12 h) indicated that in all cases, the density of total deposited bacteria increased almost linearly with time and that the rate of bacterial adhesion was decreased 8- to 10-fold when an electric potential was applied. In summary, this study provides a fundamental rationale for the selection of CNM as cathode coatings and electric potential to reduce microbial fouling. PMID:25956770

  8. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  9. The superior cycling performance of the hydrothermal synthesized carbon-coated ZnO as anode material for zinc-nickel secondary cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhaobin; Yang, Zhanhong; Huang, Jianhang; Xie, Xiaoe; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    Carbon-coated ZnO is synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) tests indicate that carbon is uniformly coated on the surface of the ZnO particle. And the crystal form of ZnO isn't changed. The effects of carbon layer on the electrochemical performances of ZnO have also been investigated by the charge/discharge cycling test, cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscope (EIS) tests. The CV curves at different scan rates exhibit that carbon-coated ZnO has the superior reversibility at high scan rate. The charge/discharge cycling tests under different charge/discharge rates show, even if at high-rate, the cycling performance and specific discharge capacity of carbon-coated ZnO are also superior to that of bare ZnO. The Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscope (EIS) verify that the carbon layer can improve the anti-corrosion and charge-transfer performances of ZnO. The different rate experiments indicate that, compared with the increase of the conductivity, the effect of carbon layer on improving the anti-corrosion performance of ZnO plays a more dominating role in improving the electrochemical performances of ZnO at low charge/discharge rate.

  10. TEM Studies of Carbon Coated LiFePO4 after Charge DischargeCycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrisch, H.; Wilcox, J.; Doeff, M.

    2006-11-30

    Carbon coating has proven to be a successful approach toimprove the rate capability of LiFePO4 used in rechargeable Li-ionbatteries. Investigations of the microstructure of carbon coated LiFePO4after charge discharge cycling shows that the carbon surface layerremains intact over 100 cycles. We find micro cracks in the cycledmaterial that extend parallel to low indexed lattice planes. Ourobservations differ from observations made by other authors. However thedifferences between the orientations of crack surfaces in both studiescan be reconciled considering the location of weak bonds in the unit celland specimen geometry as well as elastic stress fields ofdislocation.

  11. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. X.; Lv, J. C.; Ren, Y.; Zhi, T.; Chen, J. Y.; Zhou, Q. Q.; Lu, Z. Q.; Gao, D. W.; Jin, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O2 plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N2 or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics also increased with the increasing SWCNT concentration, curing time and curing temperature in the range studied. Plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters had signally influence on the antistatic property of plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics. Therefore, adequate parameters should be carefully selected for the optimum antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics.

  12. Coated or doped carbon nanotube network sensors as affected by environmental parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  13. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  14. Degradation of modified carbon black/epoxy nanocomposite coatings under ultraviolet exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-10-01

    Degradation of epoxy coatings with and without Carbon Black (CB) nanoparticles under ultraviolet (UV) radiation were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to obtain a good dispersion of CB nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. TEM analysis proved a uniform dispersion of modified CB nanoparticles in epoxy coating. The coatings were subjected to UV radiation to study the degradation behavior and then immersed in 3.5 wt% NaCl. The results showed that the electrochemical behavior of neat epoxy coating was related to the formation and development of microcracks on the surface. The occurrence of microcracks on the surface of the coatings and consequently the penetration of ionic species reduced by adding CB nanoparticles into the formulation of the coatings. CB nanoparticles decreased degradation of CB coatings by absorbing UV irradiation. The ATR-FTIR results showed that decrease in the intensity of methyl group as main peak in presence of 2.5 wt% CB was lower than neat epoxy. In addition, the reduction in impedance of neat epoxy coating under corrosive environment was larger than CB coatings. The CB coating with 2.5 wt% nanoparticles had the highest impedance to corrosive media after 2000 h UV irradiation and 24 h immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl.

  15. Erosion and Modifications of Tungsten-Coated Carbon and Copper Under High Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; S, Tamura; K, Tokunaga; N, Yoshida; Zhang, Fu; Xu, Zeng-yu; Ge, Chang-chun; N, Noda

    2003-08-01

    Tungsten-coated carbon and copper was prepared by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) and inert gas plasma spraying (IPS), respectively. W/CFC (Tungsten/Carbon Fiber-Enhanced material) coating has a diffusion barrier that consists of W and Re multi-layers pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition on carbon fiber-enhanced materials, while W/Cu coating has a graded transition interface. Different grain growth processes of tungsten coatings under stable and transient heat loads were observed, their experimental results indicated that the recrystallizing temperature of VPS-W coating was about 1400 °C and a recrystallized columnar layer of about 30 μm thickness was formed by cyclic heat loads of 4 ms pulse duration. Erosion and modifications of W/CFC and W/Cu coatings under high heat load, such as microstructure changes of interface, surface plastic deformations and cracks, were investigated, and the erosion mechanism (erosion products) of these two kinds of tungsten coatings under high heat flux was also studied.

  16. Thermal contact conductance of metallic coated BiCaSrCuO superconductor/copper interfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ochterbeck, J.M.; Peterson, G.P.; Fletcher, L.S. )

    1992-02-01

    The effects of vapor deposited coatings on the thermal contact conductance of cold pressed, normal state BiCaSrCuO superconductor/oxygen-free copper interfaces were experimentally investigated over a pressure range of 200 to 2,000 kPa. Using traditional vapor deposition processes, thin coatings of indium or lead were applied to the superconductor material to determine the effect on the heat transfer occurring at the interface. The test data indicate that the contact conductance can be enhanced using these coatings, with indium providing the greater enhancement. The experimental program revealed the need for a better understanding and control of the vapor deposition process when using soft metallic coatings. Also, the temperature-dependent microhardness of copper was experimentally determined and found to increase by approximately 35 percent as the temperature decreased from 300 to 85 K. An empirical model was developed to predict the effect of soft coatings on the thermal contact conductance of the superconductor/copper interfaces. When applied, the model agreed well with the data obtained in this investigation at low coating thicknesses but overpredicted the data as the thickness increased. In addition, the model agreed very well with data obtained in a previous investigation for silvercoated nickel substrates at all coating thicknesses.

  17. Microstructure and thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings processed by plasma spray and physical vapor deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, K.S.; An, K.; Dutton, R.E.; Semiatin, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Improvements in the efficiency of gas turbine require the highest operating temperatures possible. Because the Ni-base superalloys used as turbine materials rapidly lose strength and oxidize above 1,000 C, a reduction in service temperature is often accomplished by the use of thermal barrier coatings. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of multilayer coatings made by a plasma spray technique as well as some coatings made by physical vapor deposition (PVD) was investigated. The multilayer coatings consisted of a varying number of layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} stabilized by 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Plasma sprayed coatings exhibited a large reduction in thermal conductivity at all temperatures when compared to the bulk monolithic materials. This reduction was found to be due to porosity as well as thermal resistance brought about by interfaces in the coatings. A comparable reduction in thermal conductivity was achieved in monolithic ZrO{sub 2} as well as in a composite coating deposited by the PVD technique. Microstructural factors that may be responsible for this reduction are discussed.

  18. Design and synthesis of ternary Co3O4/carbon coated TiO2 hybrid nanocomposites for asymmetric supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeongjin; Choi, Jaeho; Oh, Ilgeun; Kim, Jooheon

    2016-07-20

    Recently, attention has been focused on the synthesis and application of nanocomposites for supercapacitors, which can have superior electrochemical performance than single structured materials. Here, we report a carbon-coated TiO2/Co3O4 ternary hybrid nanocomposite (TiO2@C/Co) electrode for supercapacitors. A carbon layer was directly introduced onto the TiO2 surface via thermal vapor deposition. The carbon layer provides anchoring sites for the deposition of Co3O4, which was introduced onto the carbon-coated TiO2 surface by hydrazine and the thermal oxidation method. The TiO2@C/Co electrode exhibits much higher charge storage capacity relative to pristine TiO2, carbon-coated TiO2, and pristine Co3O4, showing a specific capacitance of 392.4 F g(-1) at a scan rate of 5 mV s(-1) with 76.2% rate performance from 5 to 500 mV s(-1) in 1 M KOH aqueous solution electrolyte. This outstanding electrochemical performance can be attributed to the high conductivity and high pseudo-capacitive contributions of the nanoscale particles. To evaluate the capacitive performance of a supercapacitor device employing the TiO2@C/Co electrode, we have successfully assembled TiO2@C/Co//activated carbon (AC) asymmetric supercapacitors. The optimized TiO2@C/Co//AC supercapacitor could be cycled reversibly in the voltage range from 0 to 1.5 V, and it exhibits a specific capacitance of 59.35 F g(-1) at a scan rate of 5 mV s(-1) with a specific capacitance loss of 15.4% after 5000 charge-discharge cycles. These encouraging results show great potential in terms of developing high-capacitive energy storage devices for practical applications. PMID:27381559

  19. Black Carbon Aging from SOA Coatings and Coagulation with Diesel BC Emissions during SAAS at the PNNL Environmental Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Zaveri, R. A.; Shilling, J. E.; Gourihar, K.; Pekour, M. S.; Subramanian, R.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is considered to be potentially the 2nd most important global warming factor behind CO2 (Bond et al., 2013). Uncertainties exist due to BC morphology and mixing state on the extent of the warming that it causes, e.g. Cappa et al., 2012. Core-shell BC is expected to enhance absorption by up to a factor of 2, but has yet to be observed to this extent from ambient data. Experiments were conducted during the Soot Aerosol Aging Study (SAAS) Laboratory Campaign at Pactific Northwest National Laboratory's Environmental Chamber in the winter of 2013-2014 to investigate the relationship between coatings and enhancements from diesel emissions. Direct on-line measurements were made with the single particle soot photometer (SP2) from fresh and aged BC from coating and coagulation experiments with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed in the chamber. BC measurements are coupled with photoactoustic measurements spanning the visible region to probe BC enhancements when mixed with SOA. Here we focus on the enhancements at 781 nm, that are tracked throughout SOA growth on BC, as determined from SP2 coating thicknesses. Thermal denuder (TD) experiments are conducted and enhancements are calculated from two different methods that agree well with each other, confirming the observed results. BC measurements are also compared with co-located measurements from SPLAT-II and filter analysis using SEM and TEM. BC coagulated with SOA produces minimal absorption enhancement values, whereas coatings are observed to have significant enhancement values at 300 degrees C, e.g. 1.3 for thickly coated BC. BC particles were coagulated with SOA in the chamber since this morphology has been observed in wildfire emissions (Sedlacek et al., 2012). Since we did not observe appreciable enhancements for the coagulated BC, we expect that ambient emissions dominated by this particle type to have enhancements due to other sources, such as brown carbon (BrC) that is often co-emitted (Saleh et

  20. Flexible, Transparent and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Aerogels /PEDOT:PSS Electrodes created by Top-bottom Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Patricia M.; Cerdan Pasaran, Andrea; Zakhidov, Anvar; University of Guanajuato, Mexico Collaboration

    The sheets of Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have proven to be a good substitute for ITO. To improve their conductivity and increase optical transparency we have created composites which incorporate silver nanowires or other evaporated metals. Coating CNT/metals with PEDOT:PSS is important for creating hole transport/electron barrier layer functionality, but it is not easy to achieve using PEDOT:PSS solutions due to the hydrophobicity of CNT. We report a new top-to-bottom approach for the fabrication of highly flexible, transparent and conductive carbon nanotube-based electrodes using PDMS as a substrate. A uniform and smooth layer of approximately 50 nm of PEDOT:PSS was spin coated on top of a PDMS stamp followed by the deposition of vapor densified freestanding Multiwall Carbon Nanotube (MWNT) aerogels. An incorporation of silver nanowires, silver or Aluminum thin layer can be sprayed or evaporated on top of the freestanding MWNT aerogels in order to lower the sheet resistance even further. The PDMS substrate is drop cast on top of the configuration then the PDMS stamp is lifted-up. The PEDOT:PSS layer is selectively deposited on top of the MWNT only. The composite electrodes can be laminated on photovoltaic devices and on LEDs.