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Sample records for confinement potential geometry

  1. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  2. Reactive collisions in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Jachymski, Krzysztof; Julienne, Paul S.

    2015-03-01

    We consider low energy threshold reactive collisions of particles interacting via a van der Waals potential at long range in the presence of external confinement and give analytic formulas for the confinement modified scattering in such circumstances. The reaction process is described in terms of the short range reaction probability. Quantum defect theory is used to express elastic and inelastic or reaction collision rates analytically in terms of two dimensionless parameters representing phase and reactivity. We discuss the modifications to Wigner threshold laws for quasi-one-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional geometries. Confinement-induced resonances are suppressed due to reactions and are completely absent in the universal limit where the short-range loss probability approaches unity.

  3. PREFACE: Water in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Mauro

    2004-11-01

    The study of water confined in complex systems in solid or gel phases and/or in contact with macromolecules is relevant to many important processes ranging from industrial applications such as catalysis and soil chemistry, to biological processes such as protein folding or ionic transport in membranes. Thermodynamics, phase behaviour and the molecular mobility of water have been observed to change upon confinement depending on the properties of the substrate. In particular, polar substrates perturb the hydrogen bond network of water, inducing large changes in the properties upon freezing. Understanding how the connected random hydrogen bond network of bulk water is modified when water is confined in small cavities inside a substrate material is very important for studies of stability and the enzymatic activity of proteins, oil recovery or heterogeneous catalysis, where water-substrate interactions play a fundamental role. The modifications of the short-range order in the liquid depend on the nature of the water-substrate interaction, hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as well as on its spatial range and on the geometry of the substrate. Despite extensive study, both experimentally and by computer simulation, there remain a number of open problems. In the many experimental studies of confined water, those performed on water in Vycor are of particular interest for computer simulation and theoretical studies since Vycor is a porous silica glass characterized by a quite sharp distribution of pore sizes and a strong capability to absorb water. It can be considered as a good candidate for studying the general behaviour of water in hydrophilic nanopores. But there there have been a number of studies of water confined in more complex substrates, where the interpretation of experiments and computer simulation is more difficult, such as in zeolites or in aerogels or in contact with membranes. Of the many problems to consider we can mention the study of supercooled water. It is particularly important to understand whether the glass transition temperature could be experimentally accessible for confined water. In this respect the modifications induced by the confinement on the dynamics of water on supercooling are of extreme interest and a number of experimental and computer simulation studies have been devoted in recent years to this topic. This special section contains papers from different groups which have contributed with various experimental and computer simulation techniques to the progress made in the study of water in confined geometry. I thank all of the authors for their stimulating contributions. I am very pleased in particular that Sow-Hsin Chen agreed to contribute since he has done pioneering experimental work on the dynamical properties of confined water upon supercooling, and he is still very active in the field. The work presented by the group of J Swenson concerns also the glass transition of confined water. The Messina group (Crupi et al) is very active in the study of dynamical properties of confined water and they present their results on water in zeolites. From the experimental side there is also a contribution from J Dore's group, one of the first to perform neutron scattering studies on confined water. The work of J Klein looks at the mobility of water molecules confined in subnanometre films. Important contributions on the computer simulation side come from the Geiger group (Brovchenko et al). They performed very accurate simulations of water in nanopores, exploring a large portion of the phase space. Puibasset et al were able to build a very realistic model to simulate water inside Vycor. Zangi et al review the extensive work performed on confined water. Jedlovszky is an expert on the model potential for water and studied how the hydrogen bond network of water can be modified by the presence of an interface. The special issue is intended to stimulate interest and future work on this important subject.

  4. Viral nematics in confined geometries.

    PubMed

    Manyuhina, O V; Lawlor, K B; Marchetti, M C; Bowick, M J

    2015-08-14

    Motivated by recent experiments on the rod-like virus bacteriophage fd, confined to circular and annular domains, we present a theoretical study of structural transitions in these geometries. Using the continuum theory of nematic liquid crystals, we examine the competition between bulk elasticity and surface anchoring, mediated by the formation of topological defects. We show analytically that bulk defects are unstable with respect to defects sitting at the boundary. In the case of an annulus, whose topology does not require the presence of topological defects, we find that nematic textures with boundary defects are stable compared to defect-free configurations when the anchoring is weak. Our simple approach, with no fitting parameters, suggests a possible symmetry breaking mechanism responsible for the formation of one-, two- and three-fold textures under annular confinement. PMID:26135676

  5. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M.; Hu, W.-F.; Farutin, A.; Rafaï, S.; Lai, M.-C.; Peyla, P.; Misbah, C.

    2015-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  6. Dynamics of ultracold molecules in confined geometry and electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Quemener, Goulven; Bohn, John L.

    2011-01-15

    We present a time-independent quantum formalism to describe the dynamics of molecules with permanent electric dipole moments in a two-dimensional confined geometry such as a one-dimensional optical lattice, in the presence of an electric field. Bose versus Fermi statistics and selection rules play a crucial role in the dynamics. As examples, we compare the dynamics of confined fermionic and bosonic polar KRb molecules under different confinements and electric fields. We show how chemical reactions can be suppressed, either by a 'statistical suppression' which applies for fermions at small electric fields and confinements, or by a 'potential energy suppression', which applies for both fermions and bosons at high electric fields and confinements. We also explore collisions that transfer molecules from one state of the confining potential to another. Although these collisions can be significant, we show that they do not play a role in the loss of the total number of molecules in the gas.

  7. Planar geometry inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    In the classic gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion reactor, ion bombardment of the grid leads to heating, thermionic electron emission, significant power loss, and ultimately melting of the grid. Gridless IEC devices have sought to overcome these limitations. Klein reported a gridless device in which ions are circulated as a linear beam in an electrostatic analogue of an optical resonator. To overcome limits of stored ions due to space charge effects at the turning regions, the device employed multiple overlapping traps. The work reported here seeks to further increase the turning region space in a gridless trap by employing a planar geometry. Ion trapping in the planar device was examined by simulating trajectories of 2H+ ions with SIMION 8.1 software. Simulations were carried out using multiple potentials as in Klein's device and for a single potential trap as a planar analogue of the anharmonic ion trap. Scattering by background gas was simulated using a hard sphere collision model, and the results suggested the device will require operation at low pressure with a separate ion source.

  8. Compaction of granular material inside confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Benjy; Sandnes, Bjornar; Dumazer, Guillaume; Eriksen, Jon Alm; Måløy, Knut Jørgen

    2015-06-01

    In both nature and the laboratory, loosely packed granular materials are often compacted inside confined geometries. Here, we explore such behaviour in a quasi-two dimensional geometry, where parallel rigid walls provide the confinement. We use the discrete element method to investigate the stress distribution developed within the granular packing as a result of compaction due to the displacement of a rigid piston. We observe that the stress within the packing increases exponentially with the length of accumulated grains, and show an extension to current analytic models which fits the measured stress. The micromechanical behaviour is studied for a range of system parameters, and the limitations of existing analytic models are described. In particular, we show the smallest sized systems which can be treated using existing models. Additionally, the effects of increasing piston rate, and variations of the initial packing fraction, are described.

  9. Confinement of nonneutral plasma in unconventional geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.

    1990-01-01

    Our interest in efficient storage of cold, nonneutral plasma has been motivated by the elegant studies on cryogenic nonneutral electron plasmas at UCSD and by the remarkable results obtained from the laser-cooled ion plasmas at the NIST, Boulder, Colorado. Also motivating our study is the perceived need to develop the most expedient means of storing antimatter, whether it be antiprotons for gravitational studies or positrons for a variety of physics experiments and diagnostic purposes. One of the most explored technologies of confining nonneutral plasmas is the Penning trap. The maximum number density of cold nonneutral plasma that can be stored in such a trap is B{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0}mc{sup 2}, in which B{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0} is the (homogeneous) magnetic energy density and mc{sup 2} is the rest energy of the stored charges. In this paper, we shall present a synopsis of the results of our theoretical exploration of the effect on this hydrostatic limit, the so-called Brillouin'' limit, of altering the geometry of the confining vacuum magnetic field while maintaining the field's azimuthal symmetry. In particular, we shall analyze equilibrium confinement by, first, a poloidal magnetic field, B{sub 4}(r,z){cflx r} + B{sub z}(r,z){cflx z}, and second, a toroidal magnetic field, along with the concomitant electrostatic fields.

  10. Scanning gate imaging in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacher, R.; Kozikov, A. A.; Rössler, C.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on tunable electron backscattering investigated with the biased tip of a scanning force microscope. Using a channel defined by a pair of Schottky gates, the branched electron flow of ballistic electrons injected from a quantum point contact is guided by potentials of a tunable height well below the Fermi energy. The transition from injection into an open two-dimensional electron gas to a strongly confined channel exhibits three experimentally distinct regimes: one in which branches spread unrestrictedly, one in which branches are confined but the background conductance is affected very little, and one where the branches have disappeared and the conductance is strongly modified. Classical trajectory-based simulations explain these regimes at the microscopic level. These experiments allow us to understand under which conditions branches observed in scanning gate experiments do or do not reflect the flow of electrons.

  11. Limiting Spectra from Confining Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Simmons, L. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The author explains that, for confining potentials and large quantum numbers, the bound-state energies rise more rapidly as a function of n the more rapidly the potential rises with distance. However, the spectrum can rise no faster than n squared in the nonrelativistic case, or n in the relativistic case. (Author/GA)

  12. Thermodynamic Properties of Alkanes in Confined Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Joseph F., III

    1995-11-01

    Reported are the results of two related investigations. The first is a theoretical study of the thermal response of a model differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) yielding insights into proper techniques for sample preparation, instrument calibration, and interpretation of phase transition data. This is followed by a calorimetric study of the melting and freezing behavior of cyclohexane ( rm C_6H_{12}), cyclooctane (rm C_8H_{16}), and n-octane (rm C_8H_{18 }), confined within the pore spaces of a series of porous silica glasses with mean pore radii r between 4.1 +/- 0.3 and 64 +/- 5 nm. The melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of the pore alkanes were found to be increasingly depressed from the bulk values with decreasing pore size r. Unlike previous studies of phase transitions of confined organic substances, we have observed melting temperature depressions which are stronger than r^{ -1}. These temperature depressions can be expressed by the empirical cluster equation rm T_{m} = T_{o} - A/(r - r_{rm o}). The latent heats were found to vary approximately linearly with the inverse pore radius. The transition data from incompletely filled pores indicate that the alkanes are not layering the pore walls evenly, but are gathering as plugs at the pore necks. Studies using glasses in which the silica surface was modified using a standard derivatization technique suggest that the replacement ligands are not forming a complete monolayer. We have also observed cyclooctane supercools by 10-15 K below the expected freezing point, both in bulk and confined within the porous glass.

  13. Temperature-resonant cyclotron spectra in confined geometries.

    PubMed

    Pototsky, A; Hänggi, P; Marchesoni, F; Savel'ev, S

    2011-07-01

    We consider a two-dimensional gas of colliding charged particles confined to finite size containers of various geometries and subjected to a uniform orthogonal magnetic field. The gas spectral densities are characterized by a broad peak at the cyclotron frequency. Unlike for infinitely extended gases, where the amplitude of the cyclotron peak grows linearly with temperature, here confinement causes such a peak to go through a maximum for an optimal temperature. In view of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the reported resonance effect has a direct counterpart in the electric susceptibility of the confined magnetized gas. PMID:21867113

  14. Target Finding Mechanism of Microtubules in a Confined Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    2007-03-01

    Discovery of a non-equilibrium dynamic of microtubules, called dynamic instability, raised this question: is stochastic polymerization dynamic of microtubules an advantage in the process of finding a chromosome as a target? Previous studies showed that compared to usual reversible polymerization, dynamic instability of microtubules with decreasing length distribution reduced the time required to find a target by several order of magnitude [1]. Dynamic Equations for growing and shrinking microtubules in a confined geometry is theoretically modeled by Govinden and Spillman [2]. This work calculates the target finding time for microtubules with exponentially increasing length distribution in a confined geometry. The efficiency of target finding mechanism based upon different dynamical parameters is discussed. [1] Holy TE, Leibler S. 1994, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 5682. [2] Govindan B, Spillman W. 2004, Phys. Rev. E 70, 032901.

  15. Schwinger effect and entanglement entropy in confining geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodrati, Mahdis

    2015-09-01

    By using AdS /CFT , we study the critical electric field, the Schwinger pair creation rate and the potential phase diagram for the quark and antiquark in four confining supergravity backgrounds which are the Witten QCD (WQCD), the Maldacena-Nunez (MN), the Klebanov-Tseytlin (KT) and the Klebanov-Strassler (KS) models. We compare the rate of phase transition in these models and compare it also with the conformal case. We then present the phase diagrams of the entanglement entropy of a strip in these geometries and find the predicted butterfly shape in the diagrams. We found that the phase transitions have a higher rate in WQCD and KT relative to MN and KS. Finally we show the effect of turning on an additional magnetic field on the rate of pair creation by using the imaginary part of the Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian. The result is increasing the parallel magnetic field would increase the pair creation rate and increasing the perpendicular magnetic field would decrease the rate.

  16. Multiple patterns of diblock copolymer confined in irregular geometries with soft surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Sun, Min-Na; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Pan, Jun-Xing; Guo, Yu-Qi; Wang, Bao-Feng; Wu, Hai-Shun

    2015-12-01

    The different confinement shapes can induce the formation of various interesting and novel morphologies, which might inspire potential applications of materials. In this paper, we study the directed self-assembly of diblock copolymer confined in irregular geometries with a soft surface by using self-consistent field theory. Two types of confinement geometries are considered, namely, one is the concave pore with one groove and the other is the concave pore with two grooves. We obtain more novel and different structures which could not be produced in other two-dimensional (2D) confinements. Comparing these new structures with those obtained in regular square confinement, we find that the range of ordered lamellae is enlarged and the range of disordered structure is narrowed down under the concave pore confinement. We also compare the different structures obtained under the two types of confinement geometries, the results show that the effect of confinement would increase, which might induce the diblock copolymer to form novel structures. We construct the phase diagram as a function of the fraction of B block and the ratio of h/L of the groove. The simulation reveals that the wetting effect of brushes and the shape of confinement geometries play important roles in determining the morphologies of the system. Our results improve the applications in the directed self-assembly of diblock copolymer for fabricating the irregular structures. Project supported by the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20121404110004), the Research Foundation for Excellent Talents of Shanxi Provincial Department of Human Resources and Social Security, China, and the Scientific and Technological Innovation Programs of Higher Education Institutions in Shanxi Province, China.

  17. Confinement-dependent localization of diffusing aggregates in cellular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keramati, Mahdi Rezaei; Wasnik, Vaihbav; Ping, Liyan; Das, Dibyendu; Emberly, Eldon

    2015-01-01

    Confinement has a strong influence on diffusing nano-sized clusters. In particular, biomolecular aggregates within the shell-like confining space of a bacterial cell have been shown to display a variety of localization patterns, from being midcell to the poles. How does the confining space determine where the aggregate will localize? Here, using Monte Carlo simulations we have calculated the equilibrium spatial distribution of fixed-sized clusters diffusing in spherocylindrical shells. We find that localization to the poles depends strongly on shell thickness and the size of the cluster. Compared to being at midcell, polar clusters can be more bent and hence have higher energy, but they also can have a greater number of defects and hence have more entropy. Under certain conditions this can lead to polar clusters having a lower free energy than at midcell, favoring localization to the poles. Our findings suggest possible localization selection mechanisms within shell-like geometries that can arise purely from cluster confinement.

  18. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  19. Binding of two helium atoms in confined geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, S.; Krotscheck, E.; Zillich, R.

    1999-08-01

    The authors carry out a comprehensive study of the binding of two helium atoms in unrestricted and, in particular, in restricted geometries in both two and three dimensions. Besides the well known binding of the {sup 4}He dimer in unrestricted geometry in two and three dimensions, the authors also find weakly bound states of the {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He molecule and the {sup 3}He dimer in 2 dimensions. Furthermore, any combination of two {sup 4}He or {sup 3}He atoms can form a molecule if their motion is sufficiently confined. The calculations are carried out by numerically solving the Schroedinger equation as well as by constructing a suitable variational wave function.

  20. Clustering of branching Brownian motions in confined geometries.

    PubMed

    Zoia, A; Dumonteil, E; Mazzolo, A; de Mulatier, C; Rosso, A

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of a collection of individuals subject to Brownian diffusion, reproduction, and disappearance. In particular, we focus on the case where the individuals are initially prepared at equilibrium within a confined geometry. Such systems are widespread in physics and biology and apply for instance to the study of neutron populations in nuclear reactors and the dynamics of bacterial colonies, only to name a few. The fluctuations affecting the number of individuals in space and time may lead to a strong patchiness, with particles clustered together. We show that the analysis of this peculiar behavior can be rather easily carried out by resorting to a backward formalism based on the Green's function, which allows the key physical observables, namely, the particle concentration and the pair correlation function, to be explicitly derived. PMID:25375449

  1. Investigation of properties of lithium niobate crystals in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenhuizen, Keith; Stone, Greg; Knabe, Bastian; McAnany, Sean; Buse, Karsten; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar

    The properties of ferroelectric materials in confined geometries, specifically lithium niobate nanocrystals and crystal lines in glass, were studied. Batches of LiNbO3 nanocrystals have been synthesized from various initial ratios of lithium to niobium using the sol-gel method. The batches were analyzed via Raman spectroscopy and SEM imaging to gain information about their size, morphology, stoichiometry, and defect content. The nanocrystals are very sensitive to the initial stoichiometric ratio in the synthesis step. Raman spectra reveal the resultant nanocrystal stoichiometry depends on the initial stoichiometry of the batch, the spectra also reveal an extra phase is present besides LiNbO3 in some batches, and high quality spherical nanocrystals can be synthesized at certain initial stoichiometric ratios. In addition, lines of LiNbO3 were crystallized in lithium-niobo-silica glass systems with varying amounts of silica to understand and control the nucleation and crystallization of the crystals in glass.

  2. Clustering of branching Brownian motions in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoia, A.; Dumonteil, E.; Mazzolo, A.; de Mulatier, C.; Rosso, A.

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of a collection of individuals subject to Brownian diffusion, reproduction, and disappearance. In particular, we focus on the case where the individuals are initially prepared at equilibrium within a confined geometry. Such systems are widespread in physics and biology and apply for instance to the study of neutron populations in nuclear reactors and the dynamics of bacterial colonies, only to name a few. The fluctuations affecting the number of individuals in space and time may lead to a strong patchiness, with particles clustered together. We show that the analysis of this peculiar behavior can be rather easily carried out by resorting to a backward formalism based on the Green's function, which allows the key physical observables, namely, the particle concentration and the pair correlation function, to be explicitly derived.

  3. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  4. Colloidal electrodynamics, electrohydrodynamics and thermodynamics in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yilong

    We use digital video microscopy and liquid structure theory to measure pair potentials of charged stabilized colloidal spheres in an equilibrium monolayer. Anomalous attraction is founded between like-charged spheres in different degree of confinement, different composition of spheres or substrates, at high ionic strength, or for larger spheres. Error analysis is developed to rule out artifacts. We show that one wall is enough to induce the attraction and gold substrate can enhance such effect. The recently derived configuration temperature is generalized to a hierarchy of hyperconfigurational temperatures. We show their relation to the hypervirial theorem. These temperature definitions are successfully tested experimentally for the first time via colloidal systems. The results confirmed our anomalous attractions measured in the previous chapter. As a set of constrains, hyperconfigurational temperatures are used to determine free parameters in an unknown potential. Other applications and thermodynamic considerations are discussed. The complicate electrohydrodynamic interplay of microions' fluxes and macroions in an electric field can induce many instabilities. A zoo of self-organized colloidal patterns are discovered in electrolysis of a horizontal layer of aqueous colloid. At low voltage, spheres cooperatively form various quasi-stationary microscopic clusters. At higher bias, spheres passively trace the electroconvection which is more nonlinear than its thermal analogy, the Raleigh-Benard convection. Explaining these patterns provides new challenge in pattern formation, electrokinetic of colloid and electrochemistry.

  5. Random Matrices in Non-confining Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allez, Romain; Dumaz, Laure

    2015-08-01

    We consider invariant matrix processes diffusing in non-confining cubic potentials of the form . We construct the trajectories of such processes for all time by restarting them whenever an explosion occurs, from a new (well chosen) initial condition, insuring continuity of the eigenvectors and of the non exploding eigenvalues. We characterize the dynamics of the spectrum in the limit of large dimension and analyze the stationary state of this evolution explicitly. We exhibit a sharp phase transition for the limiting spectral density at a critical value . If , then the potential presents a well near deep enough to confine all the particles inside, and the spectral density is supported on a compact interval. If however, the steady state is in fact dynamical with a macroscopic stationary flux of particles flowing across the system. We prove that this flux displays a second order phase transition at the critical value such that when where is an explicit constant. In the subcritical regime, the eigenvalues allocate according to a stationary density profile with full support in , flanked with heavy tails such that as . Our method applies to other non-confining potentials and we further investigate a family of quartic potentials, which were already studied in (Brezin et al. in Commun Math Phys 59:35-51, 1978) to count planar diagrams.

  6. Yukawa particles in a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Girotto, Matheus Levin, Yan; Santos, Alexandre P. dos; Colla, Thiago

    2014-07-07

    We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.

  7. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mökkönen, Harri; Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík ; Ikonen, Timo; VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT ; Jónsson, Hannes; Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík; Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843 ; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843

    2014-02-07

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  8. Spin probe dynamics of n-hexadecane in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukešová, Miroslava; Švajdlenková, Helena; Sippel, Pit; Macová, Eva; Berek, Dušan; Loidl, Alois; Bartoš, Josef

    2015-02-01

    A combined study of the rotational dynamics of the stable free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and the phase behavior of n-hexadecane (n-HXD) in the bulk and the confined states in a series of silica gels (SG) by means of ESR and DSC is presented. A slow to fast motion transition of the spin probe TEMPO in the bulk n-HXD occurs at T50 G,bulk ≪ Tm,bulk, i.e., well below the melting temperature due to its trapping and localized mobility in the interlamellar gap of the crystallites [J. Bartoš, H. Švajdlenková, M. Zaleski, M. Edelmann, M. Lukešová, Physica B 430, 99 (2013)]. On the other hand, the dynamics of the TEMPO in the confined systems is strongly slowing down with T50 G (Dpore) >Tm(Dpore) and slightly increases with the pore size Dpore = 60, 100 and 300 Å of the SG's. At the same time, both the corresponding melting temperature, Tm (Dpore), and melting enthalpy, ΔHm (Dpore), decrease with Dpore together with the mutual anti-correlation between T50 G and Tm as a function of the inverse of pore diameter, 1/Dpore. Moreover, the dynamic heterogeneity of the TEMPO in the confined state below T50 G (Dpore) is closely related to the phase transformation. The strong slowing down of the spin probe motion likely results from its preferential localization at the interface layer of the matrix pore due to specific interaction of TEMPO molecules with the polar silanol groups of the SG matrix. This is supported by special study on a series of the variously filled n-HXD/SG systems, other similar experimental findings as well as by theoretical spectral argument.

  9. Beam-ion confinement for different injection geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Murakami, M.; Park, J. M.; Petty, C. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Yu, J. H.; McKee, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    The DIII-D tokamak is equipped with neutral beam sources that inject in four different directions; in addition, the plasma can be moved up or down to compare off-axis with on-axis injection. Fast-ion data for eight different conditions have been obtained: co/counter, near-tangential/near-perpendicular and on-axis/off-axis. Neutron measurements during short beam pulses assess prompt and delayed losses under low-power conditions. As expected, co-injection has fewer losses than counter, tangential fewer than perpendicular and on-axis fewer than off-axis; the differences are greater at low current than at higher current. The helicity of the magnetic field has a weak effect on the overall confinement. Fast-ion Dα (FIDA) and neutron measurements diagnose the confinement at higher power. The basic trends are the same as in low-power plasmas but, even in plasmas without long wavelength Alfvén modes or other MHD, discrepancies with theory are observed, especially in higher temperature plasmas. At modest temperature, two-dimensional images of the FIDA light are in good agreement with the simulations for both on-axis and off-axis injection. Discrepancies with theory are more pronounced at low fast-ion energy and at high plasma temperature, suggesting that fast-ion transport by microturbulence is responsible for the anomalies.

  10. Dynamics of laser-blow-off induced Li plume in confined geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R K; Kumar, Ajai

    2013-08-15

    Dynamics of Li plasma plume created by laser-blow-off technique in air ambient is reported. Plasma plume dynamics and its optical emission are investigated in planar and confined geometries using time resolved shadowgraph imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Significant differences in the plasma characteristics in confined geometry are quantitatively investigated by comparing the plasma parameters (temperature and density) in free expansion and confined geometry configurations. Dynamics and physical parameters of the primary as well as the reflected shock waves (in confined geometry) and their interactions with expanding plasma are briefly addressed. A large enhancement in the emission intensities of Li I 610.3 nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}← 3d {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,5/2}) and 670.8 nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}← 2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}) is correlated with the shock wave dynamics in the two geometries. Strong self reversal in the neutral emission infers an increase in the population density of neutrals within the confined plasma plume.

  11. Brownian dynamics in a confined geometry. Experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, N.; Ostrowsky, N.

    1991-10-01

    The Brownian dynamics of a colloidal suspension is measured in the immediate vicinity of a rigid surface by the Evanescent Quasielastic Light Scattering Technique. A net decrease of the measured diffusion coefficient is observed, due to the hydrodynamic slowing down of the particles very close to the wall. This effect is all the more important when the particles are allowed to get closer to the wall, i.e. when the range of the static wall/particle repulsive interaction decreases. It thus provides a mean for testing the particle/wall static interactions via a dynamic light scattering measurement. The data are analysed by a Brownian dynamic simulation which is proven to be quite valuable to interpret light scattering data from “hindered" scatterers, such as particles confined in the neighbourhood of a wall or trapped in a porous media or a gel. La dynamique brownienne de particules colloïdales au voisinage immédiat d'une paroi rigide est mesurée par la technique de diffusion quasi-élastique de la lumière en onde évanescente. On observe un net décroissement du coefficient de diffusion, dû au ralentissement hydrodynamique des particules très proches de la paroi. Cet effet est d'autant plus marqué que les particules peuvent se rapprocher très près de la paroi, c'est-à-dire que la portée de la répulsion statique paroi/particule est faible. Il est donc possible de tester les interactions statiques paroi/particules via une expérience de diffusion dynamique de la lumière. Les données sont analysées par une simulation de dynamique Brownienne, particulièrement adaptée à l'interprétation des résultats de diffusion de la lumière par des diffuseurs “ gênés ", tels que des particules confinées au voisinage d'une paroi, ou piégées dans des milieux poreux ou des gels.

  12. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study of Characteristic Features of Water Dynamics in Confined Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Souleymane; Osti, Naresh; Cote, Alexandra; Mamontov, Eugene; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal; Wesolowski, David

    Water trapped in restricted environments is ubiquitous in nature and known to influence many biochemical and geophysical processes. Understanding the structural and dynamical properties of nano-confined water (very different than those of the bulk phase) is thus of key fundamental interests. We present a survey of various quasi-elastic neutron (QENS) studies of nano-confined water, which we further analyzed in the context of a proposed universal scaling law. Using this predictive law, we specifically investigate how the diffusive behavior of water changes with changing hydration level, confinement size, or geometry. Finally, we present our recent QENS results of water in nanoporous media evaluated using this scaling law.

  13. Deformable cells in confined geometries: From hemolysis to hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Faivre, Magalie; Stone, Howard A.

    2004-11-01

    Recent developments in microfluidics allow a wide range of possibilities for studying cellular-scale hydrodynamics. Here we use microfluidic technology to address several open questions in the blood flow literature where cell deformation and hydrodynamic interactions are significant. In particular, we investigate the pressure-driven flow of a dilute suspension in a channel and characterize the transition from steady axisymmetric cell shapes (for which numerical calculations exist) to asymmetric, highly extended shapes, which are precursors to hemolysis (i.e. destruction of the cell). In addition, we examine the influence of geometry on hydrodynamic interactions of deformable cells by contrasting one-dimensional motion of a train of particles in a channel with two-dimensional motions in a Hele-Shaw cell. This study can help to understand flow of cells in microcirculation from the unidirectional flow in capillaries to the two-dimensional flow in the lung alveoli and provides the basic steps to understand certain aspects of microcirculatory deseases like sickle cell anemia for example.

  14. Equilibrium partitioning of macromolecules in confining geometries: improved universality with a new molecular size parameter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanwei; Peters, Günther H; Hansen, Flemming Y; Hassager, Ole

    2008-03-28

    We present a new framework for the description of macromolecules subject to confining geometries. The two main ingredients are a new computational method and the definition of a new molecular size parameter. The computational method, hereafter referred to the confinement analysis from bulk structures (CABS), allows the computation of equilibrium partition coefficients as a function of confinement size solely based on a single sampling of the configuration space of a macromolecule in bulk. Superior in computational speed to previous computational methods, CABS is capable of handling slits, channels, and box confining geometries for all molecular architectures. The new molecular size parameter, hereafter referred to the steric exclusion radius R(s), is explicitly defined and computed for a number of rigid objects and flexible polymers. We suggest that R(s) is the relevant molecular size parameter for characterization of spatial confinement effects on macromolecules. Results for the equilibrium partition coefficient in the weak confinement regime depend only on the ratio of R(s) to the confinement size regardless of molecular details. PMID:18376970

  15. The capillarity of nanometric water menisci confined inside closed-geometry viral cages

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, C.; Douas, M.; Miranda, R.; Castellanos, M.; Serena, P. A.; Carrascosa, J. L.; Mateu, M. G.; Marqus, M. I.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    We present an investigation of water menisci confined in closed geometries by studying the structural effects of their capillary forces on viruses during the final stage of desiccation. We used individual particles of the bacteriophage ?29 and the minute virus of mice. In both cases the genomic DNA was ejected from the capsid. However, although the structural integrity of the minute virus of mice was essentially preserved, the ?29 capsid underwent a wall-to-wall collapse. We provide evidence that the capillary forces of water confined inside the viruses are mainly responsible for these effects. Moreover, by performing theoretical simulations with a lattice gas model, we found that some structural differences between these 2 viruses may be crucial to explain the different ways in which they are affected by water menisci forces confined at the nanoscale. PMID:19307554

  16. Dynamics of ultracold dipolar particles in a confined geometry and tilted fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéméner, Goulven; Lepers, Maxence; Dulieu, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    We develop a collisional formalism adapted for the dynamics of ultracold dipolar particles in a confined geometry and in fields tilted relative to the confinement axis. Using tesseral harmonics instead of the usual spherical harmonics to expand the scattering wave function, we recover a good quantum number ξ =±1 which is conserved during the collision. We derive the general expression of the dipole-dipole interaction in this convenient basis set as a function of the polar and azimuthal angles of the fields. We apply the formalism to the collision of fermionic and bosonic polar KRb molecules in a tilted electric field and in a one-dimensional optical lattice. The presence of a tilted field drastically changes the magnitude of the reactive and inelastic rates as well as the inelastic threshold properties at vanishing collision energies. Setting an appropriate strength of the confinement for the fermionic system, we show that the ultracold particles can even further reduce their kinetic energy by inelastic excitation to higher states of the confinement trap.

  17. Degeneracies and fluctuations of Néel skyrmions in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesman, Rick; Leonov, A. O.; van Dieten, P.; Buhrandt, Stefan; Barkema, G. T.; Fritz, Lars; Duine, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    The recent discovery of tunable Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions in layered magnetic materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy makes them promising candidates for stabilization and manipulation of skyrmions at elevated temperatures. In this article, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the robustness of skyrmions in these materials against thermal fluctuations and finite-size effects. We find that in confined geometries and at finite temperatures skyrmions are present in a large part of the phase diagram. Moreover, we find that the confined geometry favors the skyrmion over the spiral phase when compared to infinitely large systems. Upon tuning the magnetic field through the skyrmion phase, the system undergoes a cascade of transitions in the magnetic structure through states of different number of skyrmions, elongated and half-skyrmions, and spiral states. We consider how quantum and thermal fluctuations lift the degeneracies that occur at these transitions, and find that states with more skyrmions are typically favored by fluctuations over states with less skyrmions. Finally, we comment on electrical detection of the various phases through the topological and anomalous Hall effects.

  18. Kelvin-Helmhotz instability and Bénard-Von Karman vortex street in a confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Luc; Boniface, Paul; Receveur, Mathieu; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the appearance of Kelvin-Helmhotz vortices in a confined geometry: in a closed rectangular tank a tape is pulled at high speed on the water surface. This induces a flow in the same direction as the tape, and by conservation a backward flow in the opposite direction. With an appropriate choose of the experiment parameters (water height, tape speed) the backward flow takes place on the sides of the tank: this creates a strong shear that can induces a Kelvin-Helmhotz instability on each side of the tank. As long as the tape width stays small enough compared to the tank width, we can observe the appearance of well organized vortex rows on each sides of the tank. In this case, the vortex rows are coupled like a Bénard-Von Karman vortex street, but without the classical forcing of a wake behind an obstacle. All our experiments are in agreement with a theoretical prediction by Rosenhead which extended the Bénard-Von Karman vortex street stability calculation to a confined geometry. Our work seems to be one of the first experimental verification of this 80 years old model.

  19. Transient and asymptotic dispersion in confined sphere packings with cylindrical and non-cylindrical conduit geometries.

    PubMed

    Khirevich, Siarhei; Hltzel, Alexandra; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2011-06-28

    We study the time and length scales of hydrodynamic dispersion in confined monodisperse sphere packings as a function of the conduit geometry. By a modified Jodrey-Tory algorithm, we generated packings at a bed porosity (interstitial void fraction) of ?=0.40 in conduits with circular, rectangular, or semicircular cross section of area 100?d(p)(2) (where d(p) is the sphere diameter) and dimensions of about 20d(p) (cylinder diameter) by 6553.6d(p) (length), 25d(p) by 12.5d(p) (rectangle sides) by 8192d(p) or 14.1d(p) (radius of semicircle) by 8192d(p), respectively. The fluid-flow velocity field in the generated packings was calculated by the lattice Boltzmann method for Pclet numbers of up to 500, and convective-diffusive mass transport of 410(6) inert tracers was modelled with a random-walk particle-tracking technique. We present lateral porosity and velocity distributions for all packings and monitor the time evolution of longitudinal dispersion up to the asymptotic (long-time) limit. The characteristic length scales for asymptotic behaviour are explained from the symmetry of each conduit's velocity field. Finally, we quantify the influence of the confinement and of a specific conduit geometry on the velocity dependence of the asymptotic dispersion coefficients. PMID:21576163

  20. Effects of confinement for single-well potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannot, Oran

    2016-02-01

    We study bound states generated by a unique potential minimum in the situation where the system is strongly confined to a bounded region containing the minimum (by imposing Dirichlet boundary conditions). In this case, the eigenvalues of the confined system differ from those of the unconfined system by an exponentially small quantity in the semiclassical limit. An asymptotic expansion for this shift is established. The formulas are evaluated explicitly for the harmonic oscillator and an application to the Coulomb potential at a fixed angular momentum is given.

  1. Modelling the role of surface stress on the kinetics of tissue growth in confined geometries.

    PubMed

    Gamsjäger, E; Bidan, C M; Fischer, F D; Fratzl, P; Dunlop, J W C

    2013-03-01

    In a previous paper we presented a theoretical framework to describe tissue growth in confined geometries based on the work of Ambrosi and Guillou [Ambrosi D, Guillou A. Growth and dissipation in biological tissues. Cont Mech Thermodyn 2007;19:245-51]. A thermodynamically consistent eigenstrain rate for growth was derived using the concept of configurational forces and used to investigate growth in holes of cylindrical geometries. Tissue growing from concave surfaces can be described by a model based on this theory. However, an apparently asymmetric behaviour between growth from convex and concave surfaces has been observed experimentally, but is not predicted by this model. This contradiction is likely to be due to the presence of contractile tensile stresses produced by cells near the tissue surface. In this contribution we extend the model in order to couple tissue growth to the presence of a surface stress. This refined growth model is solved for two geometries, within a cylindrical hole and on the outer surface of a cylinder, thus demonstrating how surface stress may indeed inhibit growth on convex substrates. PMID:23099300

  2. Taboo search by successive confinement: Surveying a potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekmarev, Sergei F.

    2001-09-01

    A taboo search for minima on a potential energy surface (PES) is performed by means of confinement molecular dynamics: the molecular dynamics trajectory of the system is successively confined to various basins on the PES that have not been sampled yet. The approach is illustrated for a 13-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. It is shown that the taboo search radically accelerates the process of surveying the PES, with the probability of finding a new minimum defined by a propagating Fermi-like distribution.

  3. Advancing Edge Speeds of Epithelial Monolayers Depend on Their Initial Confining Geometry.

    PubMed

    Kollimada, Somanna A; Kulkarni, Ankur H; Ravan, Aniket; Gundiah, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migrations are essential in several physiological processes and are driven by both chemical and mechanical cues. The roles of substrate stiffness and confinement on collective migrations have been investigated in recent years, however few studies have addressed how geometric shapes influence collective cell migrations. Here, we address the hypothesis that the relative position of a cell within the confinement influences its motility. Monolayers of two types of epithelial cells-MCF7, a breast epithelial cancer cell line, and MDCK, a control epithelial cell line-were confined within circular, square, and cross-shaped stencils and their migration velocities were quantified upon release of the constraint using particle image velocimetry. The choice of stencil geometry allowed us to investigate individual cell motility within convex, straight and concave boundaries. Cells located in sharp, convex boundaries migrated at slower rates than those in concave or straight edges in both cell types. The overall cluster migration occurred in three phases: an initial linear increase with time, followed by a plateau region and a subsequent decrease in cluster speeds. An acto-myosin contractile ring, present in the MDCK but absent in MCF7 monolayer, was a prominent feature in the emergence of leader cells from the MDCK clusters which occurred every ~125 μm from the vertex of the cross. Further, coordinated cell movements displayed vorticity patterns in MDCK which were absent in MCF7 clusters. We also used cytoskeletal inhibitors to show the importance of acto-myosin bounding cables in collective migrations through translation of local movements to create long range coordinated movements and the creation of leader cells within ensembles. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of how bounding shapes influence long-term migratory behaviours of epithelial cell monolayers. These results are important for tissue engineering and may also enhance our understanding of cell movements during developmental patterning and cancer metastasis. PMID:27078632

  4. Advancing Edge Speeds of Epithelial Monolayers Depend on Their Initial Confining Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kollimada, Somanna A.; Kulkarni, Ankur H.; Ravan, Aniket; Gundiah, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migrations are essential in several physiological processes and are driven by both chemical and mechanical cues. The roles of substrate stiffness and confinement on collective migrations have been investigated in recent years, however few studies have addressed how geometric shapes influence collective cell migrations. Here, we address the hypothesis that the relative position of a cell within the confinement influences its motility. Monolayers of two types of epithelial cells—MCF7, a breast epithelial cancer cell line, and MDCK, a control epithelial cell line—were confined within circular, square, and cross-shaped stencils and their migration velocities were quantified upon release of the constraint using particle image velocimetry. The choice of stencil geometry allowed us to investigate individual cell motility within convex, straight and concave boundaries. Cells located in sharp, convex boundaries migrated at slower rates than those in concave or straight edges in both cell types. The overall cluster migration occurred in three phases: an initial linear increase with time, followed by a plateau region and a subsequent decrease in cluster speeds. An acto-myosin contractile ring, present in the MDCK but absent in MCF7 monolayer, was a prominent feature in the emergence of leader cells from the MDCK clusters which occurred every ~125 μm from the vertex of the cross. Further, coordinated cell movements displayed vorticity patterns in MDCK which were absent in MCF7 clusters. We also used cytoskeletal inhibitors to show the importance of acto-myosin bounding cables in collective migrations through translation of local movements to create long range coordinated movements and the creation of leader cells within ensembles. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of how bounding shapes influence long-term migratory behaviours of epithelial cell monolayers. These results are important for tissue engineering and may also enhance our understanding of cell movements during developmental patterning and cancer metastasis. PMID:27078632

  5. Effects of self-heating and phase change on the thermal profile of hydrogen isotopes in confined geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, S. Field, J.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; Suratwala, T.; Sater, J.

    2014-03-28

    Growth of high-quality single-crystal hydrogen in confined geometries relies on the in situ formation of seed crystals. Generation of deuterium-tritium seed crystals in a confined geometry is governed by three effects: self-heating due to tritium decay, external thermal environment, and latent heat of phase change at the boundary between hydrogen liquid and vapor. A detailed computation of the temperature profile for liquid hydrogen inside a hollow shell, as is found in inertial confinement fusion research, shows that seeds are likely to form at the equatorial plane of the shell. Radioactive decay of tritium to helium slowly alters the composition of the hydrogen vapor, resulting in a modified temperature profile that encourages seed formation at the top of the shell. We show that the computed temperature profile is consistent with a variety of experimental observations.

  6. Multipole electrodynamic ion trap geometries for microparticle confinement under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M.; Giurgiu, Liviu C.; Stan, Cristina; Vişan, Gina T.; Ganciu, Mihai; Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry; Deputatova, Lidiya; Syrovatka, Roman

    2016-03-01

    Trapping of microparticles and aerosols is of great interest for physics and chemistry. We report microparticle trapping in case of multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions. An 8- and 12-electrode linear trap geometries have been designed and tested with an aim to achieve trapping for larger number of particles and to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. We report emergence of planar and volume ordered structures of microparticles, depending on the a.c. trapping frequency and particle specific charge ratio. The electric potential within the trap is mapped using the electrolytic tank method. Particle dynamics is simulated using a stochastic Langevin equation. We emphasize extended regions of stable trapping with respect to quadrupole traps, as well as good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations.

  7. Effective Confining Potential of Quantum States in Disordered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Douglas N.; David, Guy; Jerison, David; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    The amplitude of localized quantum states in random or disordered media may exhibit long-range exponential decay. We present here a theory that unveils the existence of an effective potential which finely governs the confinement of these states. In this picture, the boundaries of the localization subregions for low energy eigenfunctions correspond to the barriers of this effective potential, and the long-range exponential decay characteristic of Anderson localization is explained as the consequence of multiple tunneling in the dense network of barriers created by this effective potential. Finally, we show that Weyl's formula based on this potential turns out to be a remarkable approximation of the density of states for a large variety of one-dimensional systems, periodic or random.

  8. Effective Confining Potential of Quantum States in Disordered Media.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Douglas N; David, Guy; Jerison, David; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    The amplitude of localized quantum states in random or disordered media may exhibit long-range exponential decay. We present here a theory that unveils the existence of an effective potential which finely governs the confinement of these states. In this picture, the boundaries of the localization subregions for low energy eigenfunctions correspond to the barriers of this effective potential, and the long-range exponential decay characteristic of Anderson localization is explained as the consequence of multiple tunneling in the dense network of barriers created by this effective potential. Finally, we show that Weyl's formula based on this potential turns out to be a remarkable approximation of the density of states for a large variety of one-dimensional systems, periodic or random. PMID:26894725

  9. Gauss-Bonnet brane gravity with a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari-Fard, M.; Sepangi, H. R.

    2007-03-15

    A brane scenario is envisaged in which the m-dimensional bulk is endowed with a Gauss-Bonnet term and localization of matter on the brane is achieved by means of a confining potential. The resulting Friedmann equations on the brane are modified by various extra terms that may be interpreted as the X-matter, providing a possible phenomenological explanation for the accelerated expansion of the Universe. The age of the Universe in this scenario is studied and shown to be consistent with the present observational data.

  10. Heavy quarks, gluons and the confinement potential in Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Popovici, Carina; Watson, Peter; Reinhardt, Hugo

    2011-05-23

    We consider the heavy quark limit of Coulomb gauge QCD, with the truncation of the Yang-Mills sector to include only (dressed) two-point functions. We find that the rainbow-ladder approximation to the gap and Bethe-Salpeter equations is nonperturbatively exact and moreover, we provide a direct connection between the temporal gluon propagator and the quark confinement potential. Further, we show that only bound states of color singlet quark-antiquark (meson) and quark-quark (SU(2) baryon) pairs are physically allowed.

  11. Potentials for Spatial Geometry Curriculum Development with Three-Dimensional Dynamic Geometry Software in Lower Secondary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyazaki, Mikio; Kimiho, Chino; Katoh, Ryuhei; Arai, Hitoshi; Ogihara, Fumihiro; Oguchi, Yuichi; Morozumi, Tatsuo; Kon, Mayuko; Komatsu, Kotaro

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional dynamic geometry software has the power to enhance students' learning of spatial geometry. The purpose of this research is to clarify what potential using three-dimensional dynamic geometry software can offer us in terms of how to develop the spatial geometry curriculum in lower secondary schools. By focusing on the impacts the…

  12. States of the Dirac Equation in Confining Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Giachetti, Riccardo; Sorace, Emanuele

    2008-11-07

    We study the Dirac equation in confining potentials with pure vector coupling, proving the existence of metastable states with longer and longer lifetimes as the nonrelativistic limit is approached and eventually merging with continuity into the Schroedinger bound states. The existence of these states could concern high energy models and possible resonant scattering effects in systems like graphene. We present numerical results for the linear and the harmonic cases and we show that the density of the states of the continuous spectrum is well described by a sum of Breit-Wigner lines. The width of the line with lowest positive energy well reproduces the Schwinger pair production rate for a linear potential: this gives an explanation of the Klein paradox for bound states and a new concrete way to get information on pair production in unbounded, nonuniform electric fields, where very little is known.

  13. Influence of particle shape on bending rigidity of colloidal monolayer membranes and particle deposition during droplet evaporation in confined geometries.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Peter J; Gratale, Matthew; Lohr, Matthew A; Still, Tim; Lubensky, T C; Yodh, A G

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the influence of particle shape on the bending rigidity of colloidal monolayer membranes (CMMs) and on evaporative processes associated with these membranes. Aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles are confined between glass plates and allowed to evaporate. Confinement creates ribbonlike air-water interfaces and facilitates measurement and characterization of CMM geometry during drying. Interestingly, interfacial buckling events occur during evaporation. Extension of the description of buckled elastic membranes to our quasi-2D geometry enables the determination of the ratio of CMM bending rigidity to its Young's modulus. Bending rigidity increases with increasing particle anisotropy, and particle deposition during evaporation is strongly affected by membrane elastic properties. During drying, spheres are deposited heterogeneously, but ellipsoids are not. Apparently, increased bending rigidity reduces contact line bending and pinning and induces uniform deposition of ellipsoids. Surprisingly, suspensions of spheres doped with a small number of ellipsoids are also deposited uniformly. PMID:23003662

  14. Spectral singularity in confined PT symmetric optical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Anjana; Roychoudhury, R.

    2013-11-15

    We present an analytical study for the scattering amplitudes (Reflection ‖R‖ and Transmission ‖T‖), of the periodic PT symmetric optical potential V(x)=W{sub 0}cos{sup 2}x+iV{sub 0}sin2x confined within the region 0 ⩽x⩽L, embedded in a homogeneous medium having uniform potential W{sub 0}. The confining length L is considered to be some integral multiple of the period π. We give some new and interesting results. Scattering is observed to be normal (‖T‖{sup 2}⩽ 1, ‖R‖{sup 2}⩽ 1) for V{sub 0}⩽ 0.5, when the above potential can be mapped to a Hermitian potential by a similarity transformation. Beyond this point (V{sub 0} > 0.5) scattering is found to be anomalous (‖T‖{sup 2}, ‖R‖{sup 2} not necessarily ⩽1). Additionally, in this parameter regime of V{sub 0}, one observes infinite number of spectral singularities E{sub SS} at different values of V{sub 0}. Furthermore, for L= 2nπ, the transition point V{sub 0}= 0.5 shows unidirectional invisibility with zero reflection when the beam is incident from the absorptive side (Im[V(x)] < 0) but with finite reflection when the beam is incident from the emissive side (Im[V(x)] > 0), transmission being identically unity in both cases. Finally, the scattering coefficients ‖R‖{sup 2} and ‖T‖{sup 2} always obey the generalized unitarity relation : ‖T|{sup 2}−1|=√(|R{sub R}|{sup 2}|R{sub L}|{sup 2}), where subscripts R and L stand for right and left incidence, respectively.

  15. Protection from Potential Exposure for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, Dillard B.; Rudko, Vladimir; Batiy, Valeriy; Timmins, Douglas C.; Brothers, Alan J.; Schmidt, John P.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2004-03-24

    The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed developing the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an analysis was performed to determine the degree of protection to be provided during the construction and 100-year operation period for expected upsets and lower-probability events that would occur from errors, procedures, other human factors, and equipment failures, i.e., ''potential exposures'' other than normal operations. The analysis was based on results of the Preliminary Hazards Analysis. The potential exposure analysis was performed in accordance with existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures in place at the Shelter Object. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium), a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium, performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that potential exposures, outside of those expected during normal operations, would be acceptable and that design criteria and features, and preventative and mitigative measures currently in place at the Shelter would be sufficient to meet operating exposure limits.

  16. Magnetic properties of electrons confined in an anisotropic cylindrical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Petreska, Irina

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper a theoretical model, describing the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on an electron confined in an anisotropic parabolic potential, is considered. The exact wave functions are used to calculate electron current and orbital magnetic dipole momentum for the single electron. Exact expressions, giving the force and energy of the dipole-dipole interaction, are also determined. Further, the system is coupled to a heat bath, and mean values and fluctuations of the magnetic dipole momentum, utilizing the canonical ensemble are calculated. Influences of the temperature, as well as the external magnetic field, expressed via the Larmor frequency are analyzed. We also include the dependencies of the magnetic dipole momentum and its fluctuations on the effective mass of the electron, considering some experimental values for low-dimensional systems, that are extensively studied for various applications in electronics. Our results suggest that the average momentum or its fluctuations are strongly related to the effective mass of the electron. Having on mind that parabolically shaped potentials have very wide area of application in the low-dimensional systems, such as quantum dots and rings, carbon nanotubes, we believe that the proposed model and the consequent analysis is of general importance, since it offers exact analytical approach.

  17. Unusual large-pitch banding in poly(L-lactic acid): Effects of composition and geometry confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Eamor M.; Lugito, Graecia; Hsieh, Ya-Ting; Nurkhamidah, Siti

    2014-02-24

    Lamellar patterns and orientations in blends of two crystalline polymers: poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and low-molecular-weight poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) were investigated using polarizing light optical microscopy (POM), and atomic and scanning electron microscopy (AFM, SEM). Specific etching off of PEO was used to reveal the complex earlier-grown PLLA lamellae patterns with various PEO content in blends. Banding of extremely long pitch (50 μm) in crystallized PLLA spherulites was induced by two kinetic factors: geometry confinement by top cover and introduction of diluent such as PEO. The mechanisms and correlation among the lamellar assembly, ring bands, and cracks are exemplified. Lamellar patterns and ring-band types in blends were found to vary with respect to not only blend compositions, but also confinement of top-cover.

  18. Spectroscopic results in helium from the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma. [ion heating by Penning discharge in confinement geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements were carried out on the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus experiment in which a steady state ion heating method based on the modified Penning discharge is applied in a bumpy torus confinement geometry. Electron temperatures in pure helium are measured from the ratio of spectral line intensities. Measured electron temperatures range from 10 to 100 eV. Relative electron densities are also measured over the range of operating conditions. Radial profiles of temperature and relative density are measured in the two basic modes of operation of the device called the low and high pressure modes. The electron temperatures are used to estimate particle confinement times based on a steady state particle balance.

  19. Dynamics and statistics of wave-particle interactions in a confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilet, Tristan

    2014-11-01

    A walker is a droplet bouncing on a liquid surface and propelled by the waves that it generates. This macroscopic wave-particle association exhibits behaviors reminiscent of quantum particles. This article presents a toy model of the coupling between a particle and a confined standing wave. The resulting two-dimensional iterated map captures many features of the walker dynamics observed in different configurations of confinement. These features include the time decomposition of the chaotic trajectory in quantized eigenstates and the particle statistics being shaped by the wave. It shows that deterministic wave-particle coupling expressed in its simplest form can account for some quantumlike behaviors.

  20. An x-ray setup to investigate the atomic order of confined liquids in slit geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.; Ehnes, A.; Seeck, O. H.

    2014-01-15

    A setup has been designed to investigate thin films of confined liquids with the use of X-ray scattering methods. The confinement is realized between the flat culets of a pair of diamonds by positioning and orienting the lower diamond with nanometer and micro radian accuracy. We routinely achieve gaps between 5 and 50 nm at culet diameters of 200 μm. With this setup and a micro focused X-ray beam we have investigated the in-plane and the out-off-plane atomic order of benzene with atomic resolution.

  1. Macromolecular crowding and confinement: biochemical, biophysical, and potential physiological consequences*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Rivas, Germn; Minton, Allen P.

    2009-01-01

    Expected and observed effects of volume exclusion on the free energy of rigid and flexible macromolecules in crowded and confined systems, and consequent effects of crowding and confinement on macromolecular reaction rates and equilibria are summarized. Findings from relevant theoretical/simulation and experimental literature published from 2004 onward are reviewed. Additional complexity arising from the heterogeneity of local environments in biological media, and the presence of nonspecific interactions between macromolecules over and above steric repulsion are discussed. Theoretical and experimental approaches to the characterization of crowding- and confinement-induced effects in systems approaching the complexity of living organisms are suggested. PMID:18573087

  2. Correlation studies in weakly confining quantum dot potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimani, Peter; Jones, Preston; Winkler, Peter

    We investigate the electron correlation in few-electron closed-shell atomic systems and similarly in few-electron quantum dots under weak confinement. As usual we start with restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations and add electron correlation in steps in a series of approximations based on the single particle Green's function approach: (i) second-order Green function (GF); (ii) 2ph-Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA); and (iii) an extended version thereof which introduces ground-state correlation into the TDA. Our studies exhibit similarities and differences between weakly confined quantum dots and standard atomic systems. The calculations support the application of HF, GF, and TDA techniques in the modeling of three-dimensional quantum dot systems. The observed differences emphasize the significance of confinement and electronic features unique to quantum dots, such as the increased binding of electrons with higher angular momentum and thus - compared to atomic systems - modified shell-filling sequences.

  3. Non-Newtonian flow of an ultralow-melting chalcogenide liquid in strongly confined geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Siyuan; Jain, Chhavi; Wondraczek, Katrin; Kobelke, Jens; Wondraczek, Lothar; Troles, Johann; Caillaud, Celine; Schmidt, Markus A.

    2015-05-18

    The flow of high-viscosity liquids inside micrometer-size holes can be substantially different from the flow in the bulk, non-confined state of the same liquid. Such non-Newtonian behavior can be employed to generate structural anisotropy in the frozen-in liquid, i.e., in the glassy state. Here, we report on the observation of non-Newtonian flow of an ultralow melting chalcogenide glass inside a silica microcapillary, leading to a strong deviation of the shear viscosity from its value in the bulk material. In particular, we experimentally show that the viscosity is radius-dependent, which is a clear indication that the microscopic rearrangement of the glass network needs to be considered if the lateral confinement falls below a certain limit. The experiments have been conducted using pressure-assisted melt filling, which provides access to the rheological properties of high-viscosity melt flow under previously inaccessible experimental conditions. The resulting flow-induced structural anisotropy can pave the way towards integration of anisotropic glasses inside hybrid photonic waveguides.

  4. Experimentally validated 3-D simulation of shock waves generated by dense explosives in confined complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Rigas, Fotis; Sklavounos, Spyros

    2005-05-20

    Accidental blast wave generation and propagation in the surroundings poses severe threats for people and property. The prediction of overpressure maxima and its change with time at specified distances can lead to useful conclusions in quantitative risk analysis applications. In this paper, the use of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX-5.6 on dense explosive detonation events is described. The work deals with the three-dimensional simulation of overpressure wave propagation generated by the detonation of a dense explosive within a small-scale branched tunnel. It also aids at validating the code against published experimental data as well as to study the way that the resulting shock wave propagates in a confined space configuration. Predicted overpressure histories were plotted and compared versus experimental measurements showing a reasonably good agreement. Overpressure maxima and corresponding times were found close to the measured ones confirming that CFDs may constitute a useful tool in explosion hazard assessment procedures. Moreover, it was found that blast wave propagates preserving supersonic speed along the tunnel accompanied by high overpressure levels, and indicating that space confinement favors the formation and maintenance of a shock rather than a weak pressure wave. PMID:15885402

  5. Non-Newtonian flow of an ultralow-melting chalcogenide liquid in strongly confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siyuan; Jain, Chhavi; Wondraczek, Lothar; Wondraczek, Katrin; Kobelke, Jens; Troles, Johann; Caillaud, Celine; Schmidt, Markus A.

    2015-05-01

    The flow of high-viscosity liquids inside micrometer-size holes can be substantially different from the flow in the bulk, non-confined state of the same liquid. Such non-Newtonian behavior can be employed to generate structural anisotropy in the frozen-in liquid, i.e., in the glassy state. Here, we report on the observation of non-Newtonian flow of an ultralow melting chalcogenide glass inside a silica microcapillary, leading to a strong deviation of the shear viscosity from its value in the bulk material. In particular, we experimentally show that the viscosity is radius-dependent, which is a clear indication that the microscopic rearrangement of the glass network needs to be considered if the lateral confinement falls below a certain limit. The experiments have been conducted using pressure-assisted melt filling, which provides access to the rheological properties of high-viscosity melt flow under previously inaccessible experimental conditions. The resulting flow-induced structural anisotropy can pave the way towards integration of anisotropic glasses inside hybrid photonic waveguides.

  6. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. III. Molecules with partial charges at bulk phases, confined geometries and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2014-09-01

    In Paper I [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 139(23), 234104 (2013)], we showed that how a third-order Weeks-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) Thermodynamic Perturbation Theory and molecular simulation can be integrated to characterize the repulsive and dispersive contributions to the Helmholtz free energy for realistic molecular conformations. To this end, we focused on n-alkanes to develop a theory for fused and soft chains. In Paper II [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 141(2), 024708 (2014)], we adapted the classical Density Functional Theory and studied the microstructure of the realistic molecular fluids in confined geometries and vapor-liquid interfaces. We demonstrated that a detailed consistency between molecular simulation and theory can be achieved for both bulk and inhomogeneous phases. In this paper, we extend the methodology to molecules with partial charges such as carbon dioxide, water, 1-alkanols, nitriles, and ethers. We show that the electrostatic interactions can be captured via an effective association potential in the framework of Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT). Implementation of the resulting association contribution in assessing the properties of these molecules at confined geometries and interfaces presents satisfactory agreement with molecular simulation and experimental data. For example, the predicted surface tension deviates less than 4% comparing to full potential simulations. Also, the theory, referred to as SAFT-γ WCA, is able to reproduce the specific orientation of hydrophilic head and hydrophobic tail of 1-alkanols at the vapor-liquid interface of water.

  7. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. III. Molecules with partial charges at bulk phases, confined geometries and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2014-09-07

    In Paper I [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 139(23), 234104 (2013)], we showed that how a third-order Weeks–Chandler–Anderson (WCA) Thermodynamic Perturbation Theory and molecular simulation can be integrated to characterize the repulsive and dispersive contributions to the Helmholtz free energy for realistic molecular conformations. To this end, we focused on n-alkanes to develop a theory for fused and soft chains. In Paper II [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 141(2), 024708 (2014)], we adapted the classical Density Functional Theory and studied the microstructure of the realistic molecular fluids in confined geometries and vapor-liquid interfaces. We demonstrated that a detailed consistency between molecular simulation and theory can be achieved for both bulk and inhomogeneous phases. In this paper, we extend the methodology to molecules with partial charges such as carbon dioxide, water, 1-alkanols, nitriles, and ethers. We show that the electrostatic interactions can be captured via an effective association potential in the framework of Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT). Implementation of the resulting association contribution in assessing the properties of these molecules at confined geometries and interfaces presents satisfactory agreement with molecular simulation and experimental data. For example, the predicted surface tension deviates less than 4% comparing to full potential simulations. Also, the theory, referred to as SAFT-γ WCA, is able to reproduce the specific orientation of hydrophilic head and hydrophobic tail of 1-alkanols at the vapor-liquid interface of water.

  8. Hybrid Lattice Boltzmann/Finite Difference simulations of viscoelastic multicomponent flows in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Sbragaglia, M.; Scagliarini, A.

    2015-06-01

    We propose numerical simulations of viscoelastic fluids based on a hybrid algorithm combining Lattice-Boltzmann models (LBM) and Finite Differences (FD) schemes, the former used to model the macroscopic hydrodynamic equations, and the latter used to model the polymer dynamics. The kinetics of the polymers is introduced using constitutive equations for viscoelastic fluids with finitely extensible non-linear elastic dumbbells with Peterlin's closure (FENE-P). The numerical model is first benchmarked by characterizing the rheological behavior of dilute homogeneous solutions in various configurations, including steady shear, elongational flows, transient shear and oscillatory flows. As an upgrade of complexity, we study the model in presence of non-ideal multicomponent interfaces, where immiscibility is introduced in the LBM description using the "Shan-Chen" interaction model. The problem of a confined viscoelastic (Newtonian) droplet in a Newtonian (viscoelastic) matrix under simple shear is investigated and numerical results are compared with the predictions of various theoretical models. The proposed numerical simulations explore problems where the capabilities of LBM were never quantified before.

  9. On the generation of nonlinear travelling waves in confined geometries using electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Cimpeanu, R; Papageorgiou, D. T

    2014-01-01

    We investigate electrostatically induced interfacial instabilities and subsequent generation of nonlinear coherent structures in immiscible, viscous, dielectric multi-layer stratified flows confined in small-scale channels. Vertical electric fields are imposed across the channel to produce interfacial instabilities that would normally be absent in such flows. In situations when the imposed vertical fields are constant, interfacial instabilities emerge due to the presence of electrostatic forces, and we follow the nonlinear dynamics via direct numerical simulations. We also propose and illustrate a novel pumping mechanism in microfluidic devices that does not use moving parts. This is achieved by first inducing interfacial instabilities using constant background electric fields to obtain fully nonlinear deformations. The second step involves the manipulation of the imposed voltage on the lower electrode (channel wall) to produce a spatio-temporally varying voltage there, in the form of a travelling wave with pre-determined properties. Such travelling wave dielectrophoresis methods are shown to generate intricate fluid–surface–structure interactions that can be of practical value since they produce net mass flux along the channel and thus are candidates for microfluidic pumps without moving parts. We show via extensive direct numerical simulations that this pumping phenomenon is a result of an externally induced nonlinear travelling wave that forms at the fluid–fluid interface and study the characteristics of the generated velocity field inside the channel. PMID:24936019

  10. Characterisation of blast loading in complex, confined geometries using quarter symmetry experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthistle, T.; Fletcher, D. I.; Tyas, A.

    2016-03-01

    Explosions in confined spaces lead to complicated patterns of shock wave reflection and interactions which are best investigated by use of experimental tests or numerical simulations. This paper describes the design and outcome of a series of experiments using a test cell to measure the pressures experienced when structures were placed inside to alter the propagation of shock waves, utilising quarter symmetry to reduce the size of the required test cell and charge. An 80 g charge of PE4 (a conventional RDX-based plastic explosive) was placed at half height in one corner of the test cell, which represents the centre of a rectangular enclosure when symmetry is taken into consideration. Steel cylinders and rectangular baffles were placed within the test cell at various locations. Good reproducibility was found between repeated tests in three different arrangements, in terms of both the recorded pressure data and the calculated cumulative impulse. The presence of baffles within the test cell made a small difference to the pressures and cumulative impulse experienced compared to tests with no baffles present; however, the number and spacing of baffles was seen to make minimal difference to the experienced pressures and no noticeable difference to the cumulative impulse history. The paper presents useful experimental data that may be used for three-dimensional code validation.

  11. Structure and rheology of star polymers in confined geometries: a mesoscopic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feiwo; Goujon, Florent; Mendonça, Ana C F; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2015-11-28

    Mesoscopic simulations of star polymer melts adsorbed onto solid surfaces are performed using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. A set of parameters is developed to study the low functionality star polymers under shear. The use of a new bond-angle potential between the arms of the star creates more rigid chains and discriminates between different functionalities at equilibrium, but still allows the polymers to deform appropriately under shear. The rheology of the polymer melts is studied by calculating the kinetic friction and viscosity and there is good agreement with experimental properties of these systems. The study is completed with predictive simulations of star polymer solutions in an athermal solvent. PMID:26435466

  12. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup −4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  13. Edge-mediated skyrmion chain and its collective dynamics in a confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Haifeng; Che, Renchao; Kong, Lingyao; Zhao, Xuebing; Jin, Chiming; Wang, Chao; Yang, Jiyong; Ning, Wei; Li, Runwei; Jin, Changqing; Chen, Xianhui; Zang, Jiadong; Zhang, Yuheng; Tian, Mingliang

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of a topologically nontrivial vortex-like magnetic structure, the magnetic skyrmion, has launched new concepts for memory devices. Extensive studies have theoretically demonstrated the ability to encode information bits by using a chain of skyrmions in one-dimensional nanostripes. Here, we report experimental observation of the skyrmion chain in FeGe nanostripes by using high-resolution Lorentz transmission electron microscopy. Under an applied magnetic field, we observe that the helical ground states with distorted edge spins evolve into individual skyrmions, which assemble in the form of a chain at low field and move collectively into the interior of the nanostripes at elevated fields. Such a skyrmion chain survives even when the width of the nanostripe is much larger than the size of single skyrmion. This discovery demonstrates a way of skyrmion formation through the edge effect, and might, in the long term, shed light on potential applications.

  14. Edge-mediated skyrmion chain and its collective dynamics in a confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Haifeng; Che, Renchao; Kong, Lingyao; Zhao, Xuebing; Jin, Chiming; Wang, Chao; Yang, Jiyong; Ning, Wei; Li, Runwei; Jin, Changqing; Chen, Xianhui; Zang, Jiadong; Zhang, Yuheng; Tian, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of a topologically nontrivial vortex-like magnetic structure, the magnetic skyrmion, has launched new concepts for memory devices. Extensive studies have theoretically demonstrated the ability to encode information bits by using a chain of skyrmions in one-dimensional nanostripes. Here, we report experimental observation of the skyrmion chain in FeGe nanostripes by using high-resolution Lorentz transmission electron microscopy. Under an applied magnetic field, we observe that the helical ground states with distorted edge spins evolve into individual skyrmions, which assemble in the form of a chain at low field and move collectively into the interior of the nanostripes at elevated fields. Such a skyrmion chain survives even when the width of the nanostripe is much larger than the size of single skyrmion. This discovery demonstrates a way of skyrmion formation through the edge effect, and might, in the long term, shed light on potential applications. PMID:26446692

  15. Edge-mediated skyrmion chain and its collective dynamics in a confined geometry

    PubMed Central

    Du, Haifeng; Che, Renchao; Kong, Lingyao; Zhao, Xuebing; Jin, Chiming; Wang, Chao; Yang, Jiyong; Ning, Wei; Li, Runwei; Jin, Changqing; Chen, Xianhui; Zang, Jiadong; Zhang, Yuheng; Tian, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of a topologically nontrivial vortex-like magnetic structure, the magnetic skyrmion, has launched new concepts for memory devices. Extensive studies have theoretically demonstrated the ability to encode information bits by using a chain of skyrmions in one-dimensional nanostripes. Here, we report experimental observation of the skyrmion chain in FeGe nanostripes by using high-resolution Lorentz transmission electron microscopy. Under an applied magnetic field, we observe that the helical ground states with distorted edge spins evolve into individual skyrmions, which assemble in the form of a chain at low field and move collectively into the interior of the nanostripes at elevated fields. Such a skyrmion chain survives even when the width of the nanostripe is much larger than the size of single skyrmion. This discovery demonstrates a way of skyrmion formation through the edge effect, and might, in the long term, shed light on potential applications. PMID:26446692

  16. Microscopic Theory of the Tube Confinement Potential for Liquids of Topologically Entangled Rigid Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Daniel M.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2011-08-01

    We formulate and apply a microscopic self-consistent theory for the dynamic transverse confinement field in solutions of zero-excluded-volume rods based solely on topological entanglements. In agreement with the phenomenological tube model, an infinitely deep potential is predicted. However, strong anharmonicities are found to qualitatively soften localization, in quantitative agreement with experiments on heavily entangled biopolymer solutions. Predictions are also made for the effect of rod alignment on the transverse diffusion constant, tube diameter, and confinement force.

  17. Ligand-Mediated Control of the Confinement Potential in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Victor

    This thesis describes the mechanisms by which organic surfactants, particularly thiophenols and phenyldithiocarbamates, reduce the confinement potential experienced by the exciton of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The reduction of the confinement potential is enabled by the creation of interfacial electronic states near the band edge of the QD upon ligand adsorption. In the case of thiophenols, we find that this ligand adsorbs in two distinct binding modes, (i) a tightly bound mode capable of exciton delocalization, and (ii) a more weakly bound mode that has no discernable effect on exciton confinement. Both the adsorption constant and reduction in confinement potential are tunable by para substitution and are generally anticorrelated. For tightly bound thiophenols and other moderately delocalizing ligands, the degree of delocalization induced in the QD is approximately linearly proportional to the fractional surface area occupied by the ligand for all sizes of QDs. In the case of phenyldithiocarbamates, the reduction in the confinement potential is much greater, and ligand adjacency must be accounted for to model exciton delocalization. We find that at high surface coverages, exciton delocalization by phenyldithiocarbamates and other highly delocalizing ligands is dominated by ligand packing effects. Finally, we construct a database of electronic structure calculations on organic molecules and propose an algorithm that combines experimental and computational screening to find novel delocalizing ligands.

  18. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to cubic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka P.; Belfaqih, Idrus H.; Prayitno, T. B.

    2015-09-01

    Carnot cycle consists of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Using analogy in quantum mechanics, these processes can be well explained by replacing variables in classical process with a quantum system. Quantum system which is shown in this paper is a particle that moves under the influence of a cubic potential which is restricted only to the state of the two energy levels. At the end, the efficiency of the system is shown as a function of the width ratio between the initial conditions and the farthest wall while expanding. Furthermore, the system efficiency will be considered 1D and 2D cases. The providing efficiencies are different due to the influence of the degeneration of energy and the degrees of freedom of the system.

  19. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to cubic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka P. Belfaqih, Idrus H. Prayitno, T. B.

    2015-09-30

    Carnot cycle consists of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Using analogy in quantum mechanics, these processes can be well explained by replacing variables in classical process with a quantum system. Quantum system which is shown in this paper is a particle that moves under the influence of a cubic potential which is restricted only to the state of the two energy levels. At the end, the efficiency of the system is shown as a function of the width ratio between the initial conditions and the farthest wall while expanding. Furthermore, the system efficiency will be considered 1D and 2D cases. The providing efficiencies are different due to the influence of the degeneration of energy and the degrees of freedom of the system.

  20. Time resolved interferometric study of the plasma plume induced shock wave in confined geometry: Two-dimensional mapping of the ambient and plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Kaushik; Singh, R. K.; Narayan, Surya; Srivastava, Atul; Kumar, Ajai

    2016-04-01

    An experimental investigation of the laser produced plasma induced shock wave in the presence of confining walls placed along the axial as well as the lateral direction has been performed. A time resolved Mach Zehnder interferometer is set up to track the primary as well as the reflected shock waves and its effect on the evolving plasma plume has been studied. An attempt has been made to discriminate the electronic and medium density contributions towards the changes in the refractive index of the medium. Two dimensional spatial distributions for both ambient medium density and plasma density (electron density) have been obtained by employing customised inversion technique and algorithm on the recorded interferograms. The observed density pattern of the surrounding medium in the presence of confining walls is correlated with the reflected shock wave propagation in the medium. Further, the shock wave plasma interaction and the subsequent changes in the shape and density of the plasma plume in confined geometry are briefly described.

  1. A particle-in-mesh method for Brownian Dynamics simulation of many-particle systems with hydrodynamics interactions in a confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xujun; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan; Karpeyev, Dmitry; de Pablo, Juan; Smith, Barry

    In this work, we present an efficient parallel particle-in-mesh method for Brownian Dynamics simulations of many-particle systems confined in micro- and nano-fluidic devices. A general geometry Ewald-like method (GGEM) combined with finite element method is used to account for the hydrodynamic interaction. A fast parallel Krylov-type iterative solver with hybrid preconditioning techniques is developed for solving the large sparse systems of equations arising from finite element discretization of the Stokes equations. In addition, the current computer code is developed based on PETSc, a scalable library of numerical algorithms developed at Argonne, SLEPc - Scalable Library for Eigenvalue Problem Computations, and libMesh, a finite element library for numerical solution of PDEs built on top of PETSc, which allows for direct simulation of large scale systems with arbitrary confined geometries. This scheme is applied to Brownian dynamics simulations of flowing confined polymer solutions and colloidal dispersions in micro-fluid channels. The effects of hydrodynamics interactions and geometric confinement on the migration phenomena are illustrated.

  2. Electronic structure and electron correlation in weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimani, Peter Borgia Ndungu

    The electronic structure and electron correlations in weakly confining spherical quantum dots potentials are investigated. Following a common practice, the investigation starts with the restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. Then electron correlation is added in steps in a series of approximations based on the single particle Green's function approach: (i) Second-order Green function (GF) (ii) 2ph-Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) and (iii) an extended version thereof (XTDA) which introduces ground-state correlation into the TDA. The study includes as well Hartree-Fock V (N-1) potential approximation in which framework the Hartree-Fock virtual orbitals are calculated in the field of the N-1 electrons as opposed to the regular but unphysical N-electron field Hartree-Fock calculation of virtual orbitals. For contrast and comparison, the same approximation techniques are applied to few-electron closed-shell atoms and few-electron negative ions for which pertinent data is readily available. The results for the weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials and the standard atomic systems exhibit fundamental similarities as well as significant differences. For the most part the results of these calculations are in favor of application of HF, GF, and TDA techniques in the modeling of three-dimensional weakly confining quantum dot potentials. The observed differences emphasize the significance of confinement and electronic features unique to quantum dots such as the increased binding of electrons with higher angular momentum and the modified shell filling sequences.

  3. Resonant tunneling of 1-dimensional electrons across an array of 3-dimensionally confined potential wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allee, D. R.; Chou, S. Y.; Harris, J. S.; Pease, R. F. W.

    A lateral resonant tunneling field effect transistor has been fabricated with a gate electrode in the form of a railway such that the two rails form a lateral double barrier potential at the GaAs/AlGaAs interface. The ties confine the electrons in the third dimension forming an array of potential boxes or three dimensionally confined potential wells. The width of the ties and rails is 50nm; the spacings between the ties and between the two rails are 230nm and 150nm respectively. The ties are 750nm long and extend beyond the the two rails forming one dimensional wires on either side. Conductance oscillations are observed in the drain current at 4.2K as the gate voltage is scanned. Comparison with devices with a solid gate, and with a monorail gate with ties fabricated on the same wafer suggest that these conductance oscillations are electron resonant tunneling from one dimensional wires through the quasi-bound states of the three dimensionally confined potential wells. Comparison with a device with a two rail gate without ties (previously published) indicates that additional confinement due to the ties enhances the strength of the conductance oscillations.

  4. Optical probing of MgZnO/ZnO heterointerface confinement potential energy levels

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyev, V. V.; Van'kov, A. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Falson, J.; Kozuka, Y.; Zhang, D.; Smet, J. H.; Maryenko, D.; Tsukazaki, A.; Kawasaki, M.

    2015-02-23

    Low-temperature photoluminescence and reflectance measurements were employed to study the optical transitions present in two-dimensional electron systems confined at Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1–x}O/ZnO heterojunctions. Transitions involving A- and B-holes and electrons from the two lowest subbands formed within the confinement potential are detected. In the studied density range of 2.0–6.5 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}, the inter-subband splitting is measured and the first excited electron subband is shown to be empty of electrons.

  5. Perfect Abelian dominance of confinement in quark-antiquark potential in SU(3) lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Hideo; Sakumichi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the dual superconductor picture for the confinement mechanism, we study maximally Abelian (MA) projection of quark confinement in SU(3) quenched lattice QCD with 324 at β=6.4 (i.e., a ≃ 0.058 fm). We investigate the static quark-antiquark potential V(r), its Abelian part VAbel(r) and its off-diagonal part Voff(r), respectively, from the on-axis lattice data. As a remarkable fact, we find almost perfect Abelian dominance for quark confinement, i.e., σAbel ≃ σ for the string tension, on the fine and large-volume lattice. We find also a nontrivial summation relation of V (r) ≃ VAbel(r)+Voff(r).

  6. Dielectric confinement influenced screened Coulomb potential for a semiconductor quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonyan, K. H.; Margaryan, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    A formalism of the Thomas-Fermi method has been applied for studying the screening effect due to quasi-one-dimensional electron gas in a semiconductor cylindrical quantum wire embedded in the barrier environment. With taking into account of strongly low dielectric properties of the barrier material, an applicability of the quantum wire effective interaction potential of the confined charge carriers has been revealed. Both screened quasi- one-dimensional interaction potential and effective screening length analytical expressions are derived in the first time. It is shown that in the long wavelength moderate limit dielectric confinement effect enhances strength of the screening potential depending on the both radius of the wire and effective screening length, whereas in the long wavelength strong limit the screening potential solely is determined by barrier environment dielectric properties.

  7. Persistent currents in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates confined in annular potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Malet, F.; Reimann, S. M.; Kavoulakis, G. M.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an annular potential, with all the dipoles being aligned along some arbitrary direction. In addition to the dipole-dipole interaction, we also assume a zero-range hard-core potential. We investigate the stability of the system against collapse, as well as the stability of persistent currents as a function of the orientation of the dipoles and of the strength of the hard-core interaction.

  8. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to 2D symmetric potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfaqih, Idrus Husin; Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka Putra; Prayitno, T. B.; Sulaksono, Anto

    2015-09-01

    Carnot model of heat engine is the most efficient cycle consisting of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Although ideal gas usually used as a working fluid in the Carnot engine, Bender used quantum particle confined in 1D potential well as a working fluid. In this paper, by following Bender we generalize the situation to 2D symmetric potential well. The efficiency is express as the ratio of the initial length of the system to the final length of the compressed system. The result then is shown that for the same ratio, 2D potential well is more efficient than 1D potential well.

  9. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to 2D symmetric potential well

    SciTech Connect

    Belfaqih, Idrus Husin Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka Putra Prayitno, T. B.; Sulaksono, Anto

    2015-09-30

    Carnot model of heat engine is the most efficient cycle consisting of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Although ideal gas usually used as a working fluid in the Carnot engine, Bender used quantum particle confined in 1D potential well as a working fluid. In this paper, by following Bender we generalize the situation to 2D symmetric potential well. The efficiency is express as the ratio of the initial length of the system to the final length of the compressed system. The result then is shown that for the same ratio, 2D potential well is more efficient than 1D potential well.

  10. Theoretical study of a potential ultraviolet avalanching detector based on impact ionization out of confined quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Brennan, Kevin F.; Ruden, P. Paul

    1991-02-01

    A detailed analysis is given of a possible new ultraviolet photodetector based on impact ionization out of confined quantum states using a GaN-AlxGa1-xN multiple quantum well array. The GaN-AlGaN materials system is continuously gradeable in composition and has a large conduction-band-edge discontinuity, which makes it an attractive candidate for asymmetric confined quantum state photomultipliers. The impact-excitation rate is determined for various device geometries and doping concentrations. As the carrier concentration increases in a quantum confined structure, the excitation probability increases. The ionization rate increase is due in part to the increase in the number of carriers within the high-energy subbands of the well with the resulting reduction of the carrier ionization threshold energy. The presence of significant carriers in energy levels near the top of the well, however, acts to increase the thermionic dark current and therefore reduce performance of the device. Hence, an interesting tradeoff in the design of the structure exists; a large carrier concentration in the well is favorable in terms of of device gain but at the potential risk of increased dark current. The calculated total impact-ionization rate, thermionic, and tunneling dark currents are presented for various asymmetric multiple-quantum-well arrays. It is predicted that an appreciable ionization rate, about 10 to the 10th/s, can be realized in a device with a 200/400-A (well/well and barrier) width and a free carrier concentration of 5.0 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm within the well region.

  11. Structural orderings of anisotropically confined colloids interacting via a quasi-square-well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. Q. Costa; Apolinario, S. W. S.

    2015-01-01

    We implement Brownian dynamics to investigate the static properties of colloidal particles confined anisotropically and interacting via a potential which can be tailored in a repulsive-attractive-respulsive fashion as the interparticle distance increases. A diverse number of structural phases are self-assembled, which were classified according to two aspects, that is, their macroscopic and microscopic patterns. Concerning the microscopic phases we found the quasicrystalline, triangular, square, and mixed orderings, where this latter is a combination of square and triangular cells in a 3 ×2 proportion, i.e., the so-called (33,42) Archimedian lattice. On the macroscopic level the system could self-organize in a compact or perforated single cluster surrounded or not by fringes. All the structural phases are summarized in detailed phases diagrams, which clearly show that the different phases are extended as the confinement potential becomes more anisotropic.

  12. Dielectric constant of liquids confined in the extended nanospace measured by a streaming potential method.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Kyojiro; Kazoe, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2015-02-01

    Understanding liquid structure and the electrical properties of liquids confined in extended nanospaces (10-1000 nm) is important for nanofluidics and nanochemistry. To understand these liquid properties requires determination of the dielectric constant of liquids confined in extended nanospaces. A novel dielectric constant measurement method has thus been developed for extended nanospaces using a streaming potential method. We focused on the nonsteady-state streaming potential in extended nanospaces and successfully measured the dielectric constant of liquids within them without the use of probe molecules. The dielectric constant of water was determined to be significantly reduced by about 3 times compared to that of the bulk. This result contributes key information toward further understanding of the chemistry and fluidics in extended nanospaces. PMID:25569302

  13. Deep sub-nanosecond reversal of vortex cores confined in a spin-wave potential well

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xinwei; Wang, Zhenyu; Wang, Ruifang

    2014-03-17

    A spin-wave potential well is created in a permalloy nanodisk by setting up a cylindrical cavity in the center of the sample. We then apply a single-harmonic external magnetic field perpendicular to the disk plane to switch the vortex polarity of the sample. Our micromagnetic numerical studies establish that the effective spin-wave confinement by the potential well leads to much stronger magnetization oscillation in the sample. Therefore, the vortex core can be reversed well below 200 ps and over a wide range of field frequency. Our findings present an additional efficient means for ultrafast switching of magnetic vortices.

  14. The influence of divertor geometry on access to high confinement regimes on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. W.; Labombard, B.; Hubbard, A.; Marmar, E.; Terry, J.; Rice, J.; Walk, J.; Whyte, D.; Ma, Y.; Cziegler, I.; Edlund, E.; Theiler, C.

    2014-10-01

    The placement of X-point and strike points in a diverted tokamak can have a remarkable impact on properties of the discharge, including thermal and particle confinement. The distinctive divertor of Alcator C-Mod allows us to demonstrate these effects experimentally, as we vary equilibrium shaping to obtain substantial variation of divertor leg length, field line attack angle and divertor baffling. In response to these changes, we observe differences in both L-mode confinement and access to high-confinement regimes (i.e. ELMy H-mode and I-mode). With the ion grad-B drift directed toward the divertor, scanning the strike point can induce ~2× reductions in H-mode power threshold, and can produce a window for I-mode operation with H98 > 1. Recent experiments seek to explore these effects using improved diagnostics, and to extend them to the case with ion grad-B drift directed away from the divertor. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  15. Heterogeneous dynamics and stretched exponential decay of spatio-temporal correlations for Coulomb-interacting particles in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Amit; Ash, Biswarup; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of Coulomb-interacting confined particles over a range of temperatures capturing the crossover from a Wigner molecule to a liquid-like phase. Dynamical signatures, derived from the Van-Hove correlations, develop pivotal understanding of the phases as well as the intervening crossover, which are inaccessible from the study of static correlations alone. The motion of the particles shows frustrations, produces heterogeneities depending on the observation time-scales and temperatures and results into a non-Gaussian behavior. The extent and nature of the departure of the behavior of spatio-temporal correlations from the conventional wisdom depends crucially on the symmetry of the confinements. In particular, we find that the decay of correlations follow a stretched-exponential form in traps that lack any symmetry. Our data offers a broad support to a theoretical model that integrates the non-Gaussian behavior arising from the convolution of Gaussian fluctuations weighted by appropriate diffusivities, consistent with local dynamics. The richness of information from the dynamic correlation will be shown to improve the understanding of melting in confined systems in a powerful manner.

  16. Transforming potential and matrix stiffness co-regulate confinement sensitivity of tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    It is now well established that tumor cell invasion through tissue is strongly regulated by the microstructural and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, it remains unclear how these physical microenvironmental inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic lesions to drive invasion. In this study, we address this open question by combining a microfabricated polyacrylamide channel (μPAC) platform that enables independent control of ECM stiffness and confinement with an isogenically-matched breast tumor progression series in which the oncogenes ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ are overexpressed independently or in tandem. We find that increasing channel confinement and overexpressing ErbB2 both promote cell migration to a similar degree when other parameters are kept constant. In contrast, 14-3-3ζ overexpression slows migration speed, and does so in a fashion that dwarfs effects of ECM confinement and stiffness. We also find that ECM stiffness dramatically enhances cell motility when combined with ErbB2 overexpression, demonstrating that biophysical cues and cell-intrinsic parameters promote cell invasion in an integrative manner. Morphometric analysis of cells inside the μPAC platform reveals that the rapid cell migration induced by narrow channels and ErbB2 overexpression are both accompanied by increased cell polarization. Disruption of this polarization occurs by pharmacological inhibition of Rac GTPase phenocopies 14-3-3ζ overexpression by reducing cell polarization and slowing migration. By systematically measuring migration speed as a function of matrix stiffness and confinement, we also quantify for the first time the sensitivity of migration speed to microchannel properties and transforming potential. These results demonstrate that oncogenic lesions and ECM biophysical properties can synergistically interact to drive invasive migration, and that both inputs may act through common molecular mechanisms to enhance migration speed. PMID:23832051

  17. Finite-geometry models of electric field noise from patch potentials in ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Guang Hao; Herskind, Peter F.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2011-11-15

    We model electric field noise from fluctuating patch potentials on conducting surfaces by taking into account the finite geometry of the ion trap electrodes to gain insight into the origin of anomalous heating in ion traps. The scaling of anomalous heating rates with surface distance d is obtained for several generic geometries of relevance to current ion trap designs, ranging from planar to spheroidal electrodes. The influence of patch size is studied both by solving Laplace's equation in terms of the appropriate Green's function as well as through an eigenfunction expansion. Scaling with surface distance is found to be highly dependent on the choice of geometry and the relative scale between the spatial extent of the electrode, the ion-electrode distance, and the patch size. Our model generally supports the d{sup -4} dependence currently found by most experiments and models, but also predicts geometry-driven deviations from this trend.

  18. Rotational properties of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates confined in anisotropic harmonic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Malet, F.; Reimann, S. M.; Kristensen, T.; Kavoulakis, G. M.

    2011-03-15

    We study the rotational properties of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a quasi-two-dimensional anisotropic trap for an arbitrary orientation of the dipoles with respect to their plane of motion. Within the mean-field approximation, we find that the lowest-energy state of the system depends strongly on the relative strength between the dipolar and the contact interactions, as well as on the size and the orientation of the dipoles and the size and the orientation of the deformation of the trapping potential.

  19. Impurity with two electrons in the spherical quantum dot with Unite confinement potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. A.; Ghaltaghchyan, H. Ts; Kazaryan, E. M.; Sarkisyan, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Two-electron states in a spherical QD with the hydrogenic impurity located in the center and with a finite height confinement potential barrier are investigated. The effective mass mismatch have been taken into account. The dependence of ground state energy and Coulomb electron-electron interaction energy correction on the QD size is studied. The problem of the state exchange time control in QD is discussed, taking into account the spins of the electrons in the Russell-Saunders approximation. The effect of quantum emission has been shown.

  20. Access to high-confinement regimes on Alcator C-Mod and the complex influence of divertor geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. W.; Labombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Hubbard, A.; Terry, J.; Rice, J.; Walk, J.; Cziegler, I.; Edlund, E.; Theiler, C.

    2015-11-01

    Placement of X-points and strike points in a diverted tokamak can have a remarkable impact on plasma properties, including thermal and particle confinement. The distinctive divertor of Alcator C-Mod allows substantial variation of divertor leg length, field line attack angle and divertor baffling, allowing us to induce changes in both L-mode confinement and access to both H-mode and I-mode. With the ion ∇B drift directed toward the divertor, scanning the strike point can induce ~ 2 × reductions in H-mode power threshold, and can produce a window for I-mode operation with H98 > 1 . Detailed high-resolution measurements, spanning the last closed flux surface, provide profiles of key quantities (n, T, ϕ) and their gradients, which are of likely importance in determining whether a discharge evolves an edge transport barrier, or remains in an L-mode state. Advances in Langmuir probes have enabled characterization of both radial profiles and fast (< 1 MHz) fluctuations in L-mode as the L-H threshold power is approached. These data allow new tests of models for H-mode access, especially those attempting to explain the non-monotonic density dependence of the H-mode power threshold through changes in transport and/or turbulence. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy award DE-FC02-99ER54512, using Alcator C-Mod, a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  1. On PT-Symmetric Periodic Potential, Quark Confinement, and Other Impossible Pursuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianto, V.; Smarandache, Florentin

    2009-04-01

    As we know, it has been quite common nowadays for particle physicists to think of six impossible things before breakfast, just like what their cosmology fellows used to do. In the present paper, we discuss a number of those impossible things, including PT-symmetric periodic potential, its link with condensed matter nuclear science, and possible neat link with Quark confinement theory. In recent years, the PT-symmetry and its related periodic potential have gained considerable interests among physicists. We begin with a review of some results from a preceding paper discussing derivation of PT-symmetric periodic potential from biquaternion Klein-Gordon equation and proceed further with the remaining issues. Further observation is of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  2. Prediction of potential well structure formed in spherical inertial electrostatic confinement fusion devices with various parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, M.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.; Amrollahi

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the theoretical analysis regarding potential structure on the inertial electrostatic confinement fusion devices has been carried out. Negatively biased grid as cathode placed at the center of the device surrounded by anode is assumed. The device is an ion-injection system and electrons may be emitted from the surface of the cathode. So the existence of both ion and electron currents inside the cathode is considered. Dependence of radial potential well structure on some important parameters as the spreads in the normalized total and angular electron and ion energies, the ratio of ion circulating current to electron circulating current, ion perveance, and grid transparency are investigated by solving Poisson equation.

  3. Monte Carlo study of one-dimensional confined fluids with Gay-Berne intermolecular potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, M.; Hashemi, S.

    2011-11-01

    The thermodynamic quantities of a one dimensional system of particles with Gay-Berne model potential confined between walls have been obtained by means of Monte Carlo computer simulations. For a number of temperatures, the systems were considered and their density profiles, order parameter, pressure, configurational temperature and average potential energy per particle are reported. The results show that by decreasing the temperature, the soft particles become more ordered and they align to the walls and also they don't show any tendency to be near the walls at very low temperatures. We have also changed the structure of the walls by embedding soft ellipses in them, this change increases the total density near the wall whereas, increasing or decreasing the order parameter depend on the angle of embedded ellipses.

  4. Foraging on the potential energy surface: A swarm intelligence-based optimizer for molecular geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehmeyer, Christoph; Falk von Rudorff, Guido; Wolf, Sebastian; Kabbe, Gabriel; Schärf, Daniel; Kühne, Thomas D.; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    We present a stochastic, swarm intelligence-based optimization algorithm for the prediction of global minima on potential energy surfaces of molecular cluster structures. Our optimization approach is a modification of the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm which is inspired by the foraging behavior of honey bees. We apply our modified ABC algorithm to the problem of global geometry optimization of molecular cluster structures and show its performance for clusters with 2-57 particles and different interatomic interaction potentials.

  5. Spin–orbit-coupled Bose–Einstein-condensed atoms confined in annular potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, E. Ö.; Malet, F.; Fetter, A. L.; Kavoulakis, G. M.; Reimann, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    A spin–orbit-coupled Bose–Einstein-condensed cloud of atoms confined in an annular trapping potential shows a variety of phases that we investigate in the present study. Starting with the non-interacting problem, the homogeneous phase that is present in an untrapped system is replaced by a sinusoidal density variation in the limit of a very narrow annulus. In the case of an untrapped system there is another phase with a striped-like density distribution, and its counterpart is also found in the limit of a very narrow annulus. As the width of the annulus increases, this picture persists qualitatively. Depending on the relative strength between the inter- and the intra-components, interactions either favor the striped phase, or suppress it, in which case either a homogeneous, or a sinusoidal-like phase appears. Interactions also give rise to novel solutions with a nonzero circulation.

  6. Exploring the potential high energy locations and intensities in confined work spaces of waveguide dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ricardo; Lewis, Winston G.

    2014-07-01

    Adequately identifying and managing hazards at the workplace can be a tedious task which extends into the realm of uncertainty, probability and prediction models in order to fully comprehend the nature of the hazard. As such, organizations cannot be blamed for knowledge gaps in the training of personnel they contract to ensure a safe and healthy work environment, especially where there are latent hazards. Electromagnetic wave propagation at frequencies in the SAR (specific absorption rate) region is a special concern to authorities involved in setting RF (radiofrequency) and microwave exposure guidelines. Despite that there is no conclusive evidence to suggest that non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation causes adverse health effects other than thermal, no effort should be lost to ensure that workers and the public at large are adequately protected from unnecessary exposure to radiation. Standards however set exposure limits for free space, plane wave propagation but fall short in compiling information on intensities of these waves after they undergo reflection and diffraction from wall surfaces. Waveguide technology has managed to constrain microwaves to remain within set boundaries, with fixed frequencies that force the waves to behave differently to if they were moving in free space. This technology has offered the ability to transport more energy for communication purposes other than transmission lines. The size of a waveguide may be to the order of a few centimetres and can guide RF of wavelengths of the order of centimetres also but what if spaces of larger dimensions are capable of being waveguides and can guide waves of larger wavelengths such as those that correspond to frequencies between 30MHz to 300MHz? Such RF waves belong to the SAR region of the spectrum where strict exposure limits are set for health and safety protection since a standing man acts as a dipole antenna for this radiation and can absorb maximum energy from propagating RF waves. This review visits the likelihood for potential energy build-up due to RF propagation in confined spaces that are of waveguide design but with larger dimensions. Such confined spaces include silos, tanks, pipes, manholes, air-condition ducts, tunnels, wells, engine rooms and operator rooms on board vessels. In these confined spaces waves reflect off of the walls and combine constructively or destructively with incident waves producing reinforcement or cancellation respectively. Where there is reinforcement, the intensity of the wave for a particular distance in accordance with the standard, may exceed the exposure limit for this distance from the source thereby exposing the worker to larger intensities than the accepted limit and presenting a potential health and safety threat.

  7. Bent waveguides for matter-waves: supersymmetric potentials and reflectionless geometries

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Adolfo del; Boshier, Malcolm G.; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-01-01

    Non-zero curvature in a waveguide leads to the appearance of an attractive quantum potential which crucially affects the dynamics in matter-wave circuits. Using methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, pairs of bent waveguides are found whose geometry-induced potentials share the same scattering properties. As a result, reflectionless waveguides, dual to the straight waveguide, are identified. Strictly isospectral waveguides are also found by modulating the depth of the trapping potential. Numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the efficiency of these approaches in tailoring and controlling curvature-induced quantum-mechanical effects. PMID:24919423

  8. Application of a full potential method for analysis of complex aircraft geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth M.; Talcott, Noel A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A supersonic potential flow solver was developed to analyze the flow over complex realistic aircraft geometries. Enhancements to the method were made to accommodate regions of subsonic flow, the effect of trailing wakes on other aircraft components, and the modeling/gridding of complete configurations. Validation of the method was demonstrated by comparisons with experimental aerodynamic force and surface pressure measurements. The predicted results are in very good agreement with the experimental data. The bibliography contains additional information on the use of the potential flow code to predict the aerodynamics of high-speed wing/body configurations, waverider concepts, TAV, and the Space Shuttle orbiter package.

  9. Charges derived from electrostatic potentials: Exploring dependence on theory and geometry optimization levels for dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Glauciete S.; Garcia, Edgardo

    2005-06-01

    Three procedures based on the charges derived by fitting the ESP were examined, the charge from electrostatic potential (CHELP), charge from ESP grid based (CHELPG) by Breneman and Wiberg and the method of Merz and Kollman (MK). The ability of these charges to reproduce SCF and experimental dipole moments was evaluated for 89 molecules among hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, aromatics, oxygen and nitrogen compounds. It is shown that accuracy for dipole moments depends more on the theory level and geometry optimization than on the charge models used. From a computational viewpoint, the DFT methods with AM1 geometry optimization provide the best accuracy/cost ratio for the calculation of molecular dipole moments with respect to experimental data, with mean absolute deviation smaller than 0.19 D for total database. All three methods reproduce well SCF dipole moments, but charges derived from CHELP fit have deviations as much as twice than CHELPG and MK methods.

  10. Confinement effects on excitation energies and regioselectivity as probed by the Fukui function and the molecular electrostatic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgoo, Alex; Tozer, David; Geerlings, Paul; de Proft, Frank

    2009-03-01

    When a molecule is placed as a guest inside a zeolite pore, its electronic structure will be altered, among others by the effect of the so-called ``confinement". It has been established that the compression of the molecular orbitals influences a system's reactivity. In this work we use a simple potential barrier method to quantify the importance of confinement effects on chemical reactivity. In the first part, excitation energies and molecular orbital energy gaps are evaluated for molecules placed in cavities of different sizes. Our results for ethylene and formaldehyde reveal an increase in excitation energy and the gap between the occupied and the unoccupied levels. In the case of the larger molecules naphthalene and anthracene, the HOMO-LUMO gap shows very little sensitivity to the confinement. To investigate the role of confinement effects on local aspects of chemical reactivity and on regioselectivity, we evaluated its effect on the Fukui function and the molecular electrostatic potential, reactivity indices that are central in the description of orbital and charge controlled reactions. The results indicate that confinement can influence the regioselectivity and that the reactivity of anions is expected to change, due to the artificial binding of the exess electron.

  11. Phase Sensitivity of Atomic Josephson Junctions with a Bosonic Species Confined by a Double-Well Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hua-Gui; Huang, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Cui-Lan

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the reciprocal of the mean quantum Fisher information per particle (RMQFIP) and phase sensitivity of atomic Josephson junctions with a bosonic species confined by a double-well potential. Here we are focus on the Rabi oscillation energy's influence on RMQFIP and phase sensitivity. The better quantum entanglement and phase sensitivity may be achieved by decreasing the Rabi oscillation energy.

  12. Optimizing the geometry of implantable leads for recording the monophasic action potential with fractally coated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lang, V; Merkely, B; Gellér, L; Kiss, O; Ströbel, J P; Schaldach, M

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of various lead geometry on intracardial signals like the monophasic action potential (MAP) to optimize the geometry of implantable MAP leads. The experimental results were compared with a field theoretical approach to the origin of MAP from the transmembrane potential (TAP). During the experiments several lead geometries (tip surface: 1.3 to 12 mm2; tip-ring distance: 0.8 mm to 25 cm; ring surface: 1.8 mm2 to 40 mm2) were investigated in endo- and epicardial positions in 12 dogs (17 +/- 9 kg). The electrodes were fixed passively (tines) or actively (screws). MAP was recorded during several interventions and correlated with MAP measured using an Ag-AgCl MAP catheter. The experimental results showed that small tips provided high MAP amplitudes with less pressure. No difference was observed using active and passive fixations. A tip-ring distance smaller than 5 mm with a ring surface smaller than the tip (< 5 mm2) avoided artifacts in the repolarization course. For the theoretical approach the quasistatic, anisotropic bidomain model was calculated in small unity volumes Vi where the TAP phi mi was constant and represented by the current density Ji. Two solutions for electrode positions at and outside the heart were achieved. By superposition of each solution phi ei the summed potential at the electrode position was calculated. The theoretical findings show in good correlation with the experimental results that a larger distance than 10 mm leads to distortions in repolarization course by signals proportional to phi out. PMID:9474677

  13. QCD string tension curve, the ferromagnetic magnetization, and the quark-antiquark confining potential at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bicudo, P.

    2010-08-01

    We study the string tension as a function of temperature, fitting the SU(3) lattice QCD finite temperature free energy potentials computed by the Bielefeld group. We compare the string tension points with order parameter curves of ferromagnets, superconductors, or string models, all related to confinement. We also compare the SU(3) string tension with the one of SU(2) lattice QCD. With the curve providing the best fit to the finite temperature string tensions, the spontaneous magnetization curve, we then show how to include finite temperature, in the state of the art confining and chiral invariant quark models.

  14. Classical and Mexican hat-type potential energy curve for the hydrogen molecule from a confined Kratzer oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooydonk, G.

    2016-03-01

    We review harmonic oscillator theory for closed, stable quantum systems. The H2 potential energy curve (PEC) of Mexican hat-type, calculated with a confined Kratzer oscillator, is better than the Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) H2 PEC. Compared with QM, the theory of chemical bonding is simplified, since a confined Kratzer oscillator can also lead to the long sought for universal function, once called the Holy Grail of Molecular Spectroscopy. This is validated by reducing PECs for different bonds H2, HF, I2, N2 and O2 to a single one. The equal probability for H2, originating either from HA + HB or HB + HA, is quantified with a Gauss probability density function. At the Bohr scale, a confined harmonic oscillator behaves properly at the extremes of bound two-nucleon quantum systems.

  15. Patterned time-orbiting potentials for the confinement and assembly of magnetic dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, A.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present an all-magnetic scheme for the assembly and study of magnetic dipoles within designed confinement profiles that are activated on micro-patterned permalloy films through a precessing magnetic field. Independent control over the confinement and dipolar interactions is achieved by tuning the strength and orientation of the revolving field. The technique is demonstrated with superparamagnetic microspheres field-driven to assemble into closely packed lattice sheets, quasi-1D and other planar structures expandable into dipolar arrays that mirror the patterned surface motifs. PMID:24185093

  16. Thermodynamics of confined gallium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrachud, Prachi

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of Ga13 and Ga17 clusters confined inside carbon nanotubes with different diameters. The cluster-tube interaction is simulated by the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. We discuss the geometries, the nature of the bonding and the thermodynamics under confinement. The geometries as well as the isomer spectra of both the clusters are significantly affected. The degree of confinement decides the dimensionality of the clusters. We observe that a number of low-energy isomers appear under moderate confinement while some isomers seen in the free space disappear. Our finite-temperature simulations bring out interesting aspects, namely that the heat capacity curve is flat, even though the ground state is symmetric. Such a flat nature indicates that the phase change is continuous. This effect is due to the restricted phase space available to the system. These observations are supported by the mean square displacement of individual atoms, which are significantly smaller than in free space. The nature of the bonding is found to be approximately jellium-like. Finally we note the relevance of the work to the problem of single file diffusion for the case of the highest confinement.

  17. POTENTIAL OF CONFINED ANIMAL FEED OPERATIONS (CAFOS) TO CONTRIBUTE ESTROGENS TO THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFOs) are a growing industry, with a trend towards fewer operations with higher concentrations of animals. Animals are either fed and/or treated with many different types of pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics and hormones, which can end up in...

  18. Hovering rotor airload prediction using a full potential flow analysis with realistic wake geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Sparks, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional, full potential flow analysis with realistic hover wake geometry is presented for the prediction of hovering rotor airloads. The method of analysis is based on the concept of matching inner and outer domain solutions in three dimensions. The inner domain nonlinear solution is obtained using a finite difference analysis and the outer domain solution is based on prescribed wake methodology. This formulation which includes three-dimensional wake influence, was initially validated using a fixed-wing analysis, and has been extended to hovering rotor flight. Detailed chordwise and spanwise loading results are compared with subsonic and transonic test results from two rotor configurations to illustrate the predictive capabilities of the analysis. The extension of the method to steady-level forward flight is also discussed.

  19. Exploiting individual primary visual cortex geometry to boost steady state visual evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, M. Isabel; Blangero, Annabelle; Kelly, Simon P.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is an electroencephalographic response to flickering stimuli generated partly in primary visual area V1. The typical ‘cruciform’ geometry and retinotopic organization of V1 is such that certain neighboring visual regions project to neighboring cortical regions of opposite orientation. Here, we explored ways to exploit this organization in order to boost scalp SSVEP amplitude via oscillatory summation. Approach. We manipulated flicker-phase offsets among angular segments of a large annular stimulus in three ways, and compared the resultant SSVEP power to a conventional condition with no temporal phase offsets. (1) We divided the annulus into standard octants for all subjects, and flickered upper horizontal octants with opposite temporal phase to the lower horizontal ones, and left vertical octants opposite to the right vertical ones; (2) we individually adjusted the boundaries between the eight contiguous segments of the standard octants condition to coincide with cruciform-consistent, early-latency topographical shifts in pattern-pulse multifocal visual-evoked potentials (PPMVEP) derived for each of 32 equal-sized segments; (3) we assigned phase offsets to stimulus segments following an automatic algorithm based on the relative amplitudes of vertically- and horizontally-oriented PPMVEP components. Main results. The three flicker-phase manipulations resulted in a significant enhancement of normalized SSVEP power of (1) 202%, (2) 383%, and (3) 300%, respectively. Significance. We have thus demonstrated a means to obtain more reliable measures of visual evoked activity purely through consideration of cortical geometry. This principle stands to impact both basic and clinical research using SSVEPs.

  20. Effect of conductivity variations within the electric double layer on the streaming potential estimation in narrow fluidic confinements.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Chakraborty, Suman

    2010-07-01

    In this article, we investigate the implications of ionic conductivity variations within the electrical double layer (EDL) on the streaming potential estimation in pressure-driven fluidic transport through narrow confinements. Unlike the traditional considerations, we do not affix the ionic conductivities apriori by employing preset values of dimensionless parameters (such as the Dukhin number) to estimate the streaming potential. Rather, utilizing the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame model for estimating the electric potential and charge density distribution within the Stern layer, we first quantify the Stern layer electrical conductivity as a function of the zeta potential and other pertinent parameters quantifying the interaction of the ionic species with the charged surface. Next, by invoking the Boltzmann model for cationic and anionic distribution within the diffuse layer, we obtain the diffuse layer electrical conductivity. On the basis of these two different conductivities pertaining to the two different portions of the EDL as well as the bulk conductivity, we define two separate Dukhin numbers that turn out to be functions of the dimensionless zeta potential and the channel height to Debye length ratio. We derive analytical expressions for the streaming potential as a function of the fundamental governing parameters, considering the above. The results reveal interesting and significant deviations between the streaming potential predictions from the present considerations against the corresponding predictions from the classical considerations in which electrochemically consistent estimates of variable EDL conductivity are not traditionally accounted for. In particular, it is revealed that the variations of streaming potential with zeta potential are primarily determined by the competing effects of EDL electromigration and ionic advection. Over low and high zeta potential regimes, the Stern layer and diffuse layer conductivities predominantly dictate the streaming potential variations whereas ionic advection governs the streaming potential characteristics over intermediate zeta potential regimes. It is also inferred that traditional considerations may grossly overpredict the magnitude of streaming potential for narrow confinements in which significant conductivity gradients may prevail across the EDL. PMID:20476752

  1. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2014-12-01

    Semiconducting quantum dots - more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms - are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement - or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) - in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level transitions are seen to be forbidden. The spherical quantum dots have an edge over the strictly two-dimensional quantum dots in that the additional (magnetic) quantum number makes the physics richer (but complex). A deeper grasp of the Coulomb blockade, quantum coherence, and entanglement can lead to a better insight into promising applications involving lasers, detectors, storage devices, and quantum computing.

  2. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2014-12-15

    Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level transitions are seen to be forbidden. The spherical quantum dots have an edge over the strictly two-dimensional quantum dots in that the additional (magnetic) quantum number makes the physics richer (but complex). A deeper grasp of the Coulomb blockade, quantum coherence, and entanglement can lead to a better insight into promising applications involving lasers, detectors, storage devices, and quantum computing.

  3. Observing the Confinement Potential of Bacterial Pore-Forming Toxin Receptors Inside Rafts with Nonblinking Eu3+-Doped Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Türkcan, Silvan; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Casanova, Didier; Mialon, Geneviève; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Popoff, Michel R.; Alexandrou, Antigoni

    2012-01-01

    We track single toxin receptors on the apical cell membrane of MDCK cells with Eu-doped oxide nanoparticles coupled to two toxins of the pore-forming toxin family: α-toxin of Clostridium septicum and ε-toxin of Clostridium perfringens. These nonblinking and photostable labels do not perturb the motion of the toxin receptors and yield long uninterrupted trajectories with mean localization precision of 30 nm for acquisition times of 51.3 ms. We were thus able to study the toxin-cell interaction at the single-molecule level. Toxins bind to receptors that are confined within zones of mean area 0.40 ± 0.05 μm2. Assuming that the receptors move according to the Langevin equation of motion and using Bayesian inference, we determined mean diffusion coefficients of 0.16 ± 0.01 μm2/s for both toxin receptors. Moreover, application of this approach revealed a force field within the domain generated by a springlike confining potential. Both toxin receptors were found to experience forces characterized by a mean spring constant of 0.30 ± 0.03 pN/μm at 37°C. Furthermore, both toxin receptors showed similar distributions of diffusion coefficient, domain area, and spring constant. Control experiments before and after incubation with cholesterol oxidase and sphingomyelinase show that these two enzymes disrupt the confinement domains and lead to quasi-free motion of the toxin receptors. Our control data showing cholesterol and sphingomyelin dependence as well as independence of actin depolymerization and microtubule disruption lead us to attribute the confinement of both receptors to lipid rafts. These toxins require oligomerization to develop their toxic activity. The confined nature of the toxin receptors leads to a local enhancement of the toxin monomer concentration and may thus explain the virulence of this toxin family. PMID:22677383

  4. Making Conjectures in Dynamic Geometry: The Potential of a Particular Way of Dragging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariotti, Maria Alessandra; Baccaglini-Frank, Anna

    2011-01-01

    When analyzing what has changed in the geometry scenario with the advent of dynamic geometry systems (DGS), one can notice a transition from the traditional graphic environment made of paper-and-pencil, and the classical construction tools like the ruler and compass, to a virtual graphic space, made of a computer screen, graphical tools that are…

  5. Consistent prediction of streaming potential in non-Newtonian fluids: the effect of solvent rheology and confinement on ionic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-21

    By considering an ion moving inside an imaginary sphere filled with a power-law fluid, we bring out the implications of the fluid rheology and the influence of the proximity of the other ions towards evaluating the conduction current in an ionic solution. We show that the variation of the conductivity as a function of the ionic concentration is both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that predicted by the Kohlrausch law. We then utilize this consideration for estimating streaming potentials developed across narrow fluidic confinements as a consequence of the transport of ions in a convective medium constituting a power-law fluid. These estimates turn out to be in sharp contrast to the classical estimates of streaming potential for non-Newtonian fluids, in which the effect of rheology of the solvent is merely considered to affect the advection current, disregarding its contributions to the conduction current. Our results have potential implications of devising a new paradigm of consistent estimation of streaming potentials for non-Newtonian fluids, with combined considerations of the confinement effect and fluid rheology in the theoretical calculations. PMID:25693753

  6. Pore Diameter Dependence and Segmental Dynamics of Poly-Z-L-lysine and Poly-L-alanine Confined in 1D Nanocylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, Eylul; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Iossifidis, Agathaggelos; Steinhart, Martin; Butt, Hans-Jurgen; Floudas, George; Duran, Hatice

    Structure formation, thermodynamic stability, phase and dynamic behaviors of polypeptides are strongly affected by confinement. Since understanding the changes in these behaviors will allow their rational design as functional devices with tunable properties, herein we investigated Poly-Z-L-lysine (PZLL) and Poly-L-alanine (PAla) homopolypeptides confined in nanoporous alumina containing aligned cylindrical nanopores as a function of pore size by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Solid-state NMR, X-ray diffraction, Dielectric spectroscopy(DS). Bulk PZLL exhibits a glass transition temperature (Tg) at about 301K while PZLL nanorods showed slightly lower Tg (294K). The dynamic investigation by DS also revealed a decrease (4K) in Tg between bulk and PZLL nanorods. DS is a very sensitive probe of the local and global secondary structure relaxation through the large dipole to study effect of confinement. The results revealed that the local segmental dynamics, associated with broken hydrogen bonds, and segmental dynamics speed-up on confinement.

  7. Steric-effect induced alterations in streaming potential and energy transfer efficiency of non-newtonian fluids in narrow confinements.

    PubMed

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we explore the possibilities of utilizing the combined consequences of interfacial electrokinetics and rheology toward augmenting the energy transfer efficiencies in narrow fluidic confinements. In particular, we consider the exploitation of steric effects (i.e., effect of finite size of the ionic species) in non-Newtonian fluids over small scales, to report dramatic augmentations in the streaming potential, for shear-thickening fluids. We first derive an expression for the streaming potential considering strong electrical double layer interactions in the confined flow passage and the consequences of the finite conductance of the Stern layer, going beyond the Debye-Hückel limit. With a detailed accounting for the excluded volume effects of the ionic species and their interaction with pertinent interfacial phenomena of special type of rheological fluids such as the power law fluids in the above-mentioned formalism, we demonstrate that a confluence of the steric interactions with the non-Newtonian transport characteristics may result in giant augmentations in the energy transfer efficiency for shear-thickening fluids under appropriate conditions. PMID:21863830

  8. Generalized Scaling Laws of the Formation and Effects of Plasma-Confining Potentials for Tandem-Mirror Operations in GAMMA 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Numakura, T.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ichimura, M.; Ishii, K.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Nakashima, Y.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Minami, R.; Nagashima, S.; Yoshida, M.; Tamano, T.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.

    2001-05-01

    The main operations from 1979 to 2000 in the GAMMA 10 tandem-mirror, characterized in terms of the high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials and the hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures, are summarized and generalized as a result of scalings of the formation and the effects of the potentials. The wide validity of potential-formation physics from Cohen's theory and the validity of the generalized Pastukhov's theory for the effects of thermal-barrier potentials on electron confinement are verified and consolidated through electron-energy balance.

  9. Confining Dirac electrons on a topological insulator surface using potentials and a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Ranjani; Sen, Diptiman

    2014-06-01

    We study the effects of extended and localized potentials and a magnetic field on the Dirac electrons residing at the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator like Bi2Se3. We use a lattice model to numerically study the various states; we show how the potentials can be chosen in a way which effectively avoids the problem of fermion doubling on a lattice. We show that extended potentials of different shapes can give rise to states which propagate freely along the potential but decay exponentially away from it. For an infinitely long potential barrier, the dispersion and spin structure of these states are unusual and these can be varied continuously by changing the barrier strength. In the presence of a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the surface, these states become separated from the gapless surface states by a gap, thereby giving rise to a quasi-one-dimensional system. Similarly, a magnetic field along with a localized potential can give rise to exponentially localized states which are separated from the surface states by a gap and thereby form a zero-dimensional system. Finally, we show that a long barrier and an impurity potential can produce bound states which are localized at the impurity, and an "L"-shaped potential can have both bound states at the corner of the L and extended states which travel along the arms of the potential. Our work opens the way to constructing wave guides for Dirac electrons.

  10. Near-surface, marine seismic-reflection data defines potential hydrogeologic confinement bypass in a tertiary carbonate aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Walker, Cameron; Westcott, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 210 km of near-surface, high-frequency, marine seismic-reflection data were acquired on the southeastern part of the Florida Platform between 2007 and 2011. Many high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles, interpretable to a depth of about 730 m, were collected on the shallow-marine shelf of southeastern Florida in water as shallow as 1 m. Landward of the present-day shelf-margin slope, these data image middle Eocene to Pleistocene strata and Paleocene to Pleistocene strata on the Miami Terrace. This high-resolution data set provides an opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that cut across confining units of the Paleocene to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that form the Floridan aquifer system.Seismic profiles image two structural systems, tectonic faults and karst collapse structures, which breach confining beds in the Floridan aquifer system. Both structural systems may serve as pathways for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability rocks in the Floridan aquifer system. The tectonic faults occur as normal and reverse faults, and collapse-related faults have normal throw. The most common fault occurrence delineated on the reflection profiles is associated with karst collapse structures. These high-frequency seismic data are providing high quality structural analogs to unprecedented depths on the southeastern Florida Platform. The analogs can be used for assessment of confinement of other carbonate aquifers and the sealing potential of deeper carbonate rocks associated with reservoirs around the world.

  11. The potentiation of geometry by features in human children: Evidence against modularity in the domain of navigation.

    PubMed

    Lourenco, Stella F; Cabrera, Janine

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that humans and other animals use geometric information, such as the shape of a surrounding space, to recover from disorientation. Less clear is to what extent human children integrate geometry with featural cues, such as the color of walls within an enclosed space, for this purpose. One view holds that reorientation relies on a cognitive module that processes geometric information independently of features. Here we provide evidence against this position by demonstrating that prior exposure to features within a kite-shaped space facilitated the use of geometry in 3- and 4-year-old children, as has been shown with nonhuman animals. Children were tasked with localizing a hidden object within a kite space following disorientation. Their performance was compared across two blocks of trials. We found that children first exposed to features (two black walls and two white walls) within the kite space (first block) were subsequently better at relying on the space's geometry to localize the target object (second block) than children not previously exposed to features. Follow-up experiments ruled out nonspecific effects of practice and attention. Not only did featural cues interact with the processing of geometry, but also features specifically enhanced children's representations of the space's geometry, which they used for reorientation. We suggest that this potentiation of geometry was possible because the placement of wall colors highlighted the major axis of the kite space, which may be critical for aiding the encoding of global shape or for maintaining the representation of a complex geometry in memory. PMID:26254274

  12. Oscillatory and fluctuating terms in energies of assemblies of equicharged particles subject to spherically symmetric power-law confining potentials.

    PubMed

    Cioslowski, Jerzy; Albin, Joanna

    2013-09-14

    Energies E(N) of assemblies of equicharged particles subject to spherically symmetric power-law confining potentials vary in a convoluted fashion with the particle totalities N. Accurate rigorous upper bounds to these energies, which are amenable to detailed mathematical analysis, are found to comprise terms with smooth, oscillatory, and fluctuating dependences on N. The smooth energy component is obtained as a power series in N(-2/3) with the first two terms corresponding to the bulk and Madelung energies. The oscillatory component possesses the large-N asymptotics given by a product of N(1/(λ + 1)), where λ is the power-law exponent, and a function periodic in N(1/3). The amplitude of the fluctuating component, which originates mostly from the irregular dependence of the Thomson energy E(Th)(n) on n, also scales like N(1/(λ + 1)). PMID:24050343

  13. Hysteresis and metastability of Bose-Einstein-condensed clouds of atoms confined in ring potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussou, A.; Tsibidis, G. D.; Smyrnakis, J.; Magiropoulos, M.; Efremidis, Nikolaos K.; Jackson, A. D.; Kavoulakis, G. M.

    2015-02-01

    We consider a Bose-Einstein-condensed cloud of atoms which rotate in a toroidal or annular potential. Assuming one-dimensional motion, we evaluate the critical frequencies associated with the effect of hysteresis and the critical coupling for stability of the persistent currents. We perform these calculations using both the mean-field approximation and the method of numerical diagonalization of the many-body Hamiltonian which includes corrections due to the finiteness of the atom number.

  14. Preliminary potential-field constraints on the geometry of the San Fernando basin, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Griscom, Andrew; Jachens, R.C.; Hildenbrand, T.G.

    2000-01-01

    Gravity and magnetic data provide new insights on the structural underpinnings of the San Fernando Basin region, which may be important to ground motion models. Gravity data indicate that a deep basin (>5 km) underlies the northern part of the San Fernando Valley; this deep basin is required to explain the lowest gravity values over the Mission Hills thrust fault. Gravity modeling, constrained by well data and density information, shows that the basin may reach a thickness of 8 km, coinciding with the upper termination of the 1994 Northridge earthquake mainshock rupture. The basin is deeper than previous estimates by 2 to 4 km; this estimate is the result of high densities for the gravels of the Pliocene-Pleisocene Saugus Formation. The geometry of the southern margin of the deep basin is not well-constrained by the gravity data, but may dip to the south. Recently acquired seismic data along the LARSE (Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment) II profile may provide constraints to determine the location and attitude of the basin edge. Gravity and aeromagnetic models across the eastern margin of the San Fernando Valley indicate that the Verdugo fault may dip to the southwest along its southern extent and therefore have a normal fault geometry whereas it clearly has a thrust fault geometry along its northern strand.

  15. Overdamped motion of interacting particles in general confining potentials: time-dependent and stationary-state analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Nobre, F. D.; Curado, E. M. F.

    2012-12-01

    By comparing numerical and analytical results, it is shown that a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion is very well described by a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation, which can be associated with nonextensive statistical mechanics. The particle-particle interactions considered are repulsive, motivated by three different physical situations: (i) modified Bessel function, commonly used in vortex-vortex interactions, relevant for the flux-front penetration in disordered type-II superconductors; (ii) Yukawa-like forces, useful for charged particles in plasma, or colloidal suspensions; (iii) derived from a Gaussian potential, common in complex fluids, like polymer chains dispersed in a solvent. Moreover, the system is subjected to a general confining potential, ?( x) = ( ?| x| z )/ z ( ? > 0 , z > 1), so that a stationary state is reached after a sufficiently long time. Recent numerical and analytical investigations, considering interactions of type (i) and a harmonic confining potential ( z = 2), have shown strong evidence that a q-Gaussian distribution, P( x,t), with q = 0, describes appropriately the particle positions during their time evolution, as well as in their stationary state. Herein we reinforce further the connection with nonextensive statistical mechanics, by presenting numerical evidence showing that: (a) in the case z = 2, different particle-particle interactions only modify the diffusion parameter D of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation; (b) for z ? 2, all cases investigated fit well the analytical stationary solution P st( x), given in terms of a q-exponential (with the same index q = 0) of the general external potential ?( x). In this later case, we propose an approximate time-dependent P( x,t) (not known analytically for z ? 2), which is in very good agreement with the simulations for a large range of times, including the approach to the stationary state. The present work suggests that a wide variety of physical phenomena, characterized by repulsive interacting particles under overdamped motion, present a universal behavior, in the sense that all of them are associated with the same entropic form and nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation.

  16. Mapping of diffusion in confined systems (beyond the concept of entropic potential)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinay, Pavol

    2010-12-01

    Typical biological structures, like pores or fibers, are quasi one-dimensional (1D). We have to solve 3+1 dimensional differential equations to describe correctly transport through them or along them, but only the transport in the longitudinal direction is interesting in general. The question is to get rid of the transverse degrees of freedom in a mathematically correct way and to arrive at a pure 1D description of the system. We study this mathematical problem in the case of diffusion in a channel of varying cross section. We start with the simplest concept of entropic potential, logarithm of the number of states at some longitudinal position x, leading to the Fick-Jacobs equation. We present a rigorous mapping technique generating systematically corrections to the spatial operator of this equation in a small parameter ɛ, representing the ratio of the typical transverse and longitudinal lengths of the channel. Based on the result of this mapping, we discuss a hierarchy of various approximations, which can be applied to describe diffusion in the channel as purely one-dimensional. Finally, we give an outlook of possible extension of this mapping.

  17. Asymptotic equivalence of the shell-model and local-density descriptions of Coulombic systems confined by radially symmetric potentials in two and three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Cioslowski, Jerzy; Albin, Joanna

    2013-09-21

    Asymptotic equivalence of the shell-model and local-density (LDA) descriptions of Coulombic systems confined by radially symmetric potentials in two and three dimensions is demonstrated. Tight upper bounds to the numerical constants that enter the LDA expressions for the Madelung energy are derived and found to differ by less than 0.5% from the previously known approximate values. Thanks to the variational nature of the shell-model approximate energies, asymptotic expressions for other properties, such as mean radial positions of the particles and number densities, are also obtained. A conjecture that generalizes the present results to confining potentials with arbitrary symmetries is formulated. PMID:24070281

  18. Duplex structures and imbricate thrust systems: geometry, structural position, and hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.

    1986-09-01

    Duplexes and imbricate thrust systems form some of the most complex hydrocarbon traps in overthrust belts. The geometry of a duplex is controlled by the ramp angle (theta) and height (h/sub r/), the final spacing between adjacent thrusts (a'), and the relative displacements on them (d/sub 1/-d/sub 2/). For constant theta and h/sub r/, three different classes are recognized: (1) independent ramp anticlines and hinterland sloping duplexes, (2) true duplexes, and (3) overlapping ramp anticlines. Several types of duplexes and imbricate thrust systems form important hydrocarbon traps. Examples include the system of independent anticlines of the Turner Valley and Highwood oil and gas fields, the hinterland sloping duplex consisting of the Chestnut Ridge-Sandy Ridge system of the Ben Hur oil field, the partly overlapping anticlines of the Waterton and Savanna Creek gas fields, and the completely overlapping anticlines of the Rose Hill oil field. 27 figures.

  19. Influence of the radial profile of the electric potential on the confinement of a high-{beta} two-component plasma in a gas-dynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatkina, E. I.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Solomakhin, A. L.

    2008-04-15

    One of the most important problems to be studied in the gas-dynamic trap (GDT) facility is the investigation of MHD stability and cross-field transport in a plasma with a relatively high value of {beta} = {pi}p/B{sup 2}. Recent experiments demonstrated that the radial electric field produced in the plasma by using radial limiters and coaxial end plasma collectors improves plasma stability in axisymmetric magnetic mirror systems without applying special MHD stabilizers. The experimental data presented in this work show that stable plasma confinement can be achieved by producing a radial potential drop across a narrow region near the plasma boundary. Creating radial electric fields of strength 15-40 V/cm causes a shear plasma flow, thereby substantially increasing the plasma confinement time. When all the radial electrodes were grounded, the confinement was unstable and the plasma confinement time was much shorter than the characteristic time of plasma outflow through the magnetic mirrors. Measurements of cross-field plasma fluxes with the use of a specially designed combined probe show that, in confinement modes with differential plasma rotation, transverse particle losses are negligibly small as compared to longitudinal ones and thus can be ignored. It is also shown that, when the GDT plasma is in electric contact with the radial limiters and end collectors, the growth rate of interchange instability decreases considerably; such a contact, however, does not ensure complete MHD stability when the electrodes are at the same potential.

  20. Potential effect of geometry on wall shear stress distribution across scaffold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Ronald A; Crumpler, Eric T

    2008-01-01

    Bioreactors are used as cell culture systems for growth and maintenance of tissue-engineered scaffolds that serve as three-dimensional (3D) templates for initial cell attachment and subsequent tissue formation. The bioreactors' fluid dynamic environment is known to play a crucial role in the synthesis of cellular components via flow-mediated mechanical stimuli. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models in the slow turning lateral vessel (STLV Synthecon, Inc.) were simulated under Couette flow conditions. Systematic research of the wall shear stress (WSS) effects on the scaffold's geometry has been limited. Therefore, direct qualitative and quantitative correlations for WSS values were performed by analyzing and comparing WSS value distributions of two scaffold shapes. Under experimental flow conditions, the disc and prolate spheroid shapes exhibited dissimilar WSS distribution. Nonetheless, when compared to the disc models, the high pressure stagnation region of the spheroid was reduced between 60% and 95%. In the spheroid shape, approximately 40% increase in the shear stress surface exposure to flow ranged from 2 to 3 dyn/cm(2). These values suggest that WSSs are likely affected by scaffold shape and vary little with location within the Synthecon STLV. The proposed simulation studies evidenced the CFD model's flexibility to characterize and quantify forces affecting tissue-engineered scaffold design. PMID:17963042

  1. Anomalous magnetotransport properties of a ballistic non-interacting three-dimensional electron gas confined to narrow potential wells with corrugated barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Sotomayor, N. M.; Davila, L. Y. D.; Lima, B. C.; Gusev, G. M.

    2013-12-04

    The classical dynamics of ballistic non-interacting electrons confined to a narrow electrostatic potential well with corrugated barriers in uniform magnetic field was numerically studied. Trajectories in phase space were analyzed and longitudinal and transversal resistivities were calculated. Commensurability oscillations and negative magnetoresistance similar to those found in antidot lattice devices were observed.

  2. Using Transmural Regularization and Dynamic Modeling for Non-Invasive Cardiac Potential Imaging of Endocardial Pacing with Imprecise Thoracic Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Erem, Burak; Coll-Font, Jaume; Orellana, Ramon Martinez; Štóvíček, Petr; Brooks, Dana H.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac electrical imaging from body surface potential measurements is increasingly being seen as a technology with the potential for use in the clinic, for example for pre-procedure planning or during-treatment guidance for ventricular arrhythmia ablation procedures. However several important impediments to widespread adoption of this technology remain to be effectively overcome. Here we address two of these impediments: the difficulty of reconstructing electric potentials on the inner (endocardial) as well as outer (epicardial) surfaces of the ventricles, and the need for full anatomical imaging of the subject’s thorax to build an accurate subject-specific geometry. We introduce two new features in our reconstruction algorithm: a non-linear low-order dynamic parameterization derived from the measured body surface signals, and a technique to jointly regularize both surfaces. With these methodological innovations in combination, it is possible to reconstruct endocardial activation from clinically acquired measurements with an imprecise thorax geometry. In particular we test the method using body surface potentials acquired from three subjects during clinical procedures where the subjects’ hearts were paced on their endocardia using a catheter device. Our geometric models were constructed using a set of CT scans limited in axial extent to the immediate region near the heart. The catheter system provides a reference location to which we compare our results. We compare our estimates of pacing site localization, in terms of both accuracy and stability, to those reported in a recent clinical publication [1], where a full set of CT scans were available and only epicardial potentials were reconstructed. PMID:24595345

  3. Computation of action potential propagation and presynaptic bouton activation in terminal arborizations of different geometries.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, H R; Shiner, J S

    1990-12-01

    Action potential propagation in axons with bifurcations involving short collaterals with synaptic boutons has been simulated using SPICE, a general purpose electrical circuit simulation program. The large electrical load of the boutons may lead to propagation failure at otherwise uncritical geometric ratios. Because the action potential gradually fails while approaching the branch point, the electrotonic spread of the failing action potential cannot depolarize the terminal boutons above an assumed threshold of 20 mV (Vrest = 0 mV) for the presynaptic calcium inflow, and therefore fails to evoke transmitter release even for boutons attached at short collaterals. For even shorter collaterals the terminal boutons can again be activated by the spread of passive current reflected at the sealed end of the bouton which increases the membrane potential above firing threshold. The action potential is then propagated in anterograde fashion into the main axon and may activate the terminal bouton on the other collateral. Differential activation of the synaptic boutons can be observed without repetitive activation of the main axon and with the assumption of uniform membrane properties. Axon enlargements above a critical size at branch points can increase the safety factor for propagation significantly and may serve a double function: they can act both as presynaptic boutons and as boosters, facilitating invasion of the action potential into the terminal arborizations. The architecture of the terminal arborizations has a profound effect on the activation pattern of synapses, suggesting that terminal arborizations not only distribute neural information to postsynaptic cells but may also be able to process neural information presynaptically. PMID:2275958

  4. Quasi-exactly-solvable confining solutions for spin-1 and spin-0 bosons in (1+1)-dimensions with a scalar linear potential

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Luis B.; Castro, Antonio S. de

    2014-12-15

    We point out a misleading treatment in the recent literature regarding confining solutions for a scalar potential in the context of the Duffin–Kemmer–Petiau theory. We further present the proper bound-state solutions in terms of the generalized Laguerre polynomials and show that the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions depend on the solutions of algebraic equations involving the potential parameter and the quantum number.

  5. NASA Ames potential flow analysis (POTFAN) geometry program (POTGEM), version 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medan, R. T.; Bullock, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program known as POTGEM is reported which has been developed as an independent segment of a three-dimensional linearized, potential flow analysis system and which is used to generate a panel point description of arbitrary, three-dimensional bodies from convenient engineering descriptions consisting of equations and/or tables. Due to the independent, modular nature of the program, it may be used to generate corner points for other computer programs.

  6. Race, poverty, and potential exposure of middle-school students to air emissions from confined swine feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Wing, Steve; Marshall, Stephen W; Wilcosky, Timothy C

    2006-04-01

    Previous studies suggest that airborne effluent from swine confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) may affect the health and quality of life of adults and the prevalence of asthma symptoms among children. To investigate the extent to which public school students may be exposed to airborne effluent from swine CAFOs and to evaluate the association between schools' demographic characteristics and swine CAFO exposures, we assessed the proximity of 226 schools to the nearest swine CAFO and conducted a survey of school employees to identify schools with noticeable livestock odor. We used publicly available information describing the enrollment of each school to assess the association between race and socioeconomic status (SES) and swine CAFO exposure. Odor from livestock was noticeable outside (n = 47, 21%) and inside (n = 19, 8%) school buildings. Schools with < 63% enrollment of white students and > or = 47% of students receiving subsidized lunches at school were located closer to swine CAFOs (mean = 4.9 miles) than were the remaining schools (mean = 10.8 miles) and were more likely to be located within 3 miles of an operation than were schools with high-white/high-SES enrollment (prevalence ratio = 2.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-4.33). The prevalence of reported livestock odor varied with SES (low SES, 25%; high SES, 17%). These analyses indicate that the potential for in-school exposure to pollution arising from swine CAFOs in North Carolina and the environmental health risks associated with such exposures vary according to the racial and economic characteristics of enrolled students. PMID:16581551

  7. Analyzing total optical absorption coefficient of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise with special emphasis on electric field, magnetic field and confinement potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Arkajit; Sarkar, Sucharita; Ghosh, Arghya Pratim; Ghosh, Manas

    2015-12-01

    We make an extensive investigation of total optical absorption coefficient (TOAC) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. The TOAC profiles have been monitored against incident photon energy with special emphasis on the roles played by the electric field, magnetic field, and the dot confinement potential. Presence of impurity also influences the TOAC profile. In general, presence of noise causes enhancement of TOAC over that of noise-free condition. However, the interplay between the noise and the quantities like electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential and impurity potential bring about rich subtleties in the TOAC profiles. The said subtleties are often manifested by the alterations in TOAC peak intensity, extent of TOAC peak bleaching, and value of saturation intensity. The findings reveal some technologically relevant aspects of TOAC for the doped QD systems, specially in presence of noise.

  8. Single-Particle Tracking of Membrane Protein Diffusion in a Potential: Simulation, Detection, and Application to Confined Diffusion of CFTR Cl− Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Songwan; Haggie, Peter M.; Verkman, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    Confined diffusion of membrane receptors and lipids can result from intramembrane barriers, skeletal interactions, rafts, and other phenomena. We simulated single-particle diffusion in two dimensions in an arbitrary potential, V(r), based on summation of random and potential gradient-driven motions. Algorithms were applied and verified for detection of potential-driven diffusion, and for determination of V(r) from radial particle density distributions, taking into account experimental uncertainties in particle position and finite trajectory recording. Single-particle tracking (SPT) analysis of the diffusion of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channels in mammalian cells revealed confined diffusion with diffusion coefficient ∼0.004 μm2/s. SPT data fitted closely to a springlike attractive potential, V(r) = kr2, but not to other V(r) forms such as hard-wall or viscoelastic-like potentials. The “spring constant”, k, determined from SPT data was 2.6 ± 0.8 pN/μm, and not altered significantly by modulation of skeletal protein architecture by jasplakinolide. However, k was reduced by a low concentration of latrunculin, supporting the involvement of actin in the springlike tethering of CFTR. Confined diffusion of membrane proteins is likely a general phenomenon suitable for noninvasive V(r) analysis of force-producing mechanisms. Our data provide the first measurement of actin elasticity, to the best of our knowledge, that does not involve application of an external force. PMID:17483157

  9. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequence of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technical state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  10. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, David E.; Logan, B. Grant

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequency of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technological state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  11. System of fermions confined in a harmonic potential and subject to a magnetic field or a rotational motion

    SciTech Connect

    Naiedja, H.; Quentin, P.; Bartel, J.

    2011-05-15

    Making use of the Bloch density matrix technique, we derive exact analytical expressions for the density profile in Fourier space, for the current density and the so-called integrated current for fermionic systems confined by a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, in the presence of a magnetic field or in a rotating trap of arbitrary strength. We present numerical, illustrative examples with or without magnetic field (with or without rotation).

  12. Edge states in confined active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souslov, Anton; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    Recently, topologically protected edge modes have been proposed and realized in both mechanical and acoustic metamaterials. In one class of such metamaterials, Time-Reversal Symmetry is broken, and, to achieve this TRS breaking in mechanical and acoustic systems, an external energy input must be used. For example, motors provide a driving force that uses energy and, thus, explicitly break TRS. As a result, motors have been used as an essential component in the design of topological metamaterials. By contrast, we explore the design of topological metamaterials that use a class of far-from-equilibrium liquids, called polar active liquids, that spontaneously break TRS. We thus envision the confinement of a polar active liquid to a prescribed geometry in order to realize topological order with broken time-reversal symmetry. We address the design of the requisite geometries, for example a regular honeycomb lattice composed of annular channels, in which the active liquid may be confined. We also consider the physical character of the active liquid that, when introduced into the prescribed geometry, will spontaneously form the flow pattern of a metamaterial with topologically protected edge states. Finally, we comment on potential experimental realizations of such metamaterials.

  13. Seismic-Reflection Technology Defines Potential Vertical Bypass in Hydrogeologic Confinement within Tertiary Carbonates of the Southeastern Florida Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K. J.; Walker, C.; Westcott, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Continuous improvements in shallow-focused, high-resolution, marine seismic-reflection technology has provided the opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that breach confining units of the Floridan aquifer system within the southeastern Florida Platform. The Floridan aquifer system is comprised mostly of Tertiary platform carbonates. In southeastern Florida, hydrogeologic confinement is important to sustainable use of the Floridan aquifer system, where the saline lower part is used for injection of wastewater and the brackish upper part is an alternative source of drinking water. Between 2007 and 2011, approximately 275 km of 24- and 48-channel seismic-reflection profiles were acquired in canals of peninsular southeastern Florida, Biscayne Bay, present-day Florida shelf margin, and the deeply submerged Miami Terrace. Vertical to steeply dipping offsets in seismic reflections indicate faults, which range from Eocene to possible early Pliocene age. Most faults are associated with karst collapse structures; however, a few tectonic faults of early Miocene to early Pliocene age are present. The faults may serve as a pathway for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability in the Floridan aquifer system. The faults may collectively produce a regional confinement bypass system. In early 2011, twenty seismic-reflection profiles were acquired near the Key Biscayne submarine sinkhole located on the seafloor of the Miami Terrace. Here the water depth is about 365 m. A steeply dipping (eastward) zone of mostly deteriorated quality of seismic-reflection data underlies the sinkhole. Correlation of coherent seismic reflections within and adjacent to the disturbed zone indicates a series of faults occur within the zone. It is hypothesized that upward movement of groundwater within the zone contributed to development of a hypogenic karst system and the resultant overlying sinkhole. Study of this modern seafloor sinkhole may provide clues to the genesis of the more deeply buried Tertiary karst collapse structures. Three-dimensional geomodeling of the seismic-reflection data from the Key Biscayne sinkhole further aids visualization of the seismic stratigraphy and structural system that underlies the sinkhole.

  14. A Fortran 90 program to solve the Hartree-Fock equations for interacting spin- 1/2 > fermions confined in harmonic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Hridis Kumar; Shukla, Alok

    2008-08-01

    A set of weakly interacting spin- 1/2 > Fermions, confined by a harmonic oscillator potential, and interacting with each other via a contact potential, is a model system which closely represents the physics of a dilute gas of two-component fermionic atoms confined in a magneto-optic trap. In the present work, our aim is to present a Fortran 90 computer program which, using a basis set expansion technique, solves the Hartree-Fock (HF) equations for spin- 1/2 > Fermions confined by a three-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential, and interacting with each other via pair-wise delta-function potentials. Additionally, the program can also account for those anharmonic potentials which can be expressed as a polynomial in the position operators x, y, and z. Both the restricted-HF (RHF), and the unrestricted-HF (UHF) equations can be solved for a given number of Fermions, with either repulsive or attractive interactions among them. The option of UHF solutions for such systems also allows us to study possible magnetic properties of the physics of two-component confined atomic Fermi gases, with imbalanced populations. Using our code we also demonstrate that such a system exhibits shell structure, and follows Hund's rule. Program summaryProgram title: trap.x Catalogue identifier: AEBB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 750 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 205 138 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: mostly Fortran 90 Computer: PCs—SUN, HP Alpha, IBM Operating system: Linux, Solaris, Tru64, AIX Classification: 7.7 Nature of problem: The simplest description of a spin 1/2 >; trapped system at the mean field level is given by the Hartree-Fock method. This program presents an efficient approach to solving these equations. Additionally, this program can solve for time-independent Gross-Pitaevskii and Hartree-Fock equations for bosonic atoms confined in a harmonic trap. Thus the combined program can handle mean-field equations for both the Fermi and the Bose particles. Solution method: The solutions of the Hartree-Fock equation corresponding to the Fermi systems in atomic traps are expanded as linear combinations of simple-harmonic oscillator eigenfunctions. Thus, the Hartree-Fock equations which comprise a set of nonlinear integro-differential equations, are transformed into a matrix eigenvalue problem. Thereby, solutions are obtained in a self-consistent manner, using methods of computational linear algebra. Running time: The run times of example jobs are from a few seconds to a few minutes. For jobs involving very large basis sets, the run time can extend into hours.

  15. Preliminary identification of potentially disruptive scenarios at the Greater Confinement Disposal Facility, Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, R.V.; Newman, G.

    1993-12-01

    The Greater Confinement Disposal location is being evaluated to determine whether defense-generated transuranic waste buried at this location complies with the Containment Requirements established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One step in determining compliance is to identify those combinations of events and processes (scenarios) that define possible future states of the disposal system for which performance assessments must be performed. An established scenario-development procedure was used to identify a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios. To assure completeness, 761 features, events, processes, and other listings (FEPS) were compiled from 11 references. This number was reduced to 205 primarily through the elimination of duplications. The 205 FEPs were screened based on site-specific, goal-specific, and regulatory criteria. Four events survived screening and were used in preliminary scenario development: (1) exploratory drilling penetrates a GCD borehole, (2) drilling of a withdrawal/injection well penetrates a GCD borehole, (3) subsidence occurs at the RWMS, and (4) irrigation occurs at the RWMS. A logic diagram was used to develop 16 scenarios from the four events. No screening of these scenarios was attempted at this time. Additional screening of the currently retained events and processes will be based on additional data and information from site-characterization activities. When screening of the events and processes is completed, a final set of scenarios will be developed and screened based on consequence and probability of occurrence.

  16. Alterations in streaming potential in presence of time periodic pressure-driven flow of a power law fluid in narrow confinements with nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Jayabrata; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    We study the coupled effect of electrokinetic phenomena and fluid rheology in altering the induced streaming potential in narrow fluidic confinements, which is manifested by establishing a time periodic pressure-driven flow in presence of electrical double layer phenomenon. However, in sharp contrast with reported literature, we take into account nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions toward estimating the same in addition to electrostatic interactions and steric effects. We employ power law based rheological model for estimating the induced streaming potential. We bring out an intricate interaction between nonelectrostatic interactions and fluid rheology on the concerned electrokinetic phenomena, bearing immense consequences toward designing of integrated lab-on-a-chip-based microdevices and nanodevices. PMID:24132646

  17. Relativistic scalar particle subject to a confining potential and Lorentz symmetry breaking effects in the cosmic string space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belich, H.; Bakke, K.

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of a relativistic scalar particle subject to a scalar potential under the effects of the violation of the Lorentz symmetry in the cosmic string space-time is discussed. It is considered two possible scenarios of the Lorentz symmetry breaking in the CPT-even gauge sector of the Standard Model Extension defined by a tensor (KF)μναβ. Then, by introducing a scalar potential as a modification of the mass term of the Klein-Gordon equation, it is shown that the Klein-Gordon equation in the cosmic string space-time is modified by the effects of the Lorentz symmetry violation backgrounds and bound state solution to the Klein-Gordon equation can be obtained.

  18. Anisotropic de Gennes Narrowing in Confined Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2016-04-01

    The collective diffusion of dense fluids in spatial confinement is studied by combining high-energy (21 keV) x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering from colloid-filled microfluidic channels. We find the structural relaxation in confinement to be slower compared to the bulk. The collective dynamics is wave vector dependent, akin to the de Gennes narrowing typically observed in bulk fluids. However, in stark contrast to the bulk, the structure factor and de Gennes narrowing in confinement are anisotropic. These experimental observations are essential in order to develop a microscopic theoretical description of collective diffusion of dense fluids in confined geometries.

  19. A reactive transport model for the geochemical response, detection and potential mitigation of CO2 leakage into a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K.; Druhan, J. L.; Vialle, S.; Benson, S. M.; Agarwal, A.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface generally assumes that caprock formations will serve as physical barriers to upward migration of CO2. Stability and coherence of the caprocks are thus important criteria for site selection, but caprock integritycannot be guaranteed with total certainty over the lifetime of the project. As a result, carbon capture and storage projects require reliable techniques to monitor geologic storage sites for newly formed leaks, and the ability to rapidly deploy mitigation measures should leakage occur. Here, we present two-dimensional reactive transport simulations to evaluate the hydrogeochemical characteristics of a newly formed CO2 leak into an overlying reservoir. Simulations use the ToughReact multi-component reactive transport code and hypothetical reservoir characteristics. We focus on the comparatively short time period of days to months following formation of the leak to consider (1) geochemical shifts in formation water indicative of the leak, (2) hydrodynamics of pumping wells in the vicinity of the leak, and (3) delivery of a sealant to the leak through an adjacent well bore. Our results suggest that characteristic shifts in pH and dissolved inorganic carbon might be detected in down-gradient mentoring wells prior to the breakthrough of CO2, and could offer a potential means of identifying small and newly formed leaks. Injecting water into the aquifer through pumping wells in the vicinity of the leak provides a hydrodynamic control that can prevent CO2 from reaching the top of the reservoir, but this action will likely have only minor influence on the rate of leakage through the caprock defect. Injection of a hypothetical sealant through an adjacent pumping well is considered using an aqueous solute with pH-dependent equilibrium constraints such that the species is soluble in the basic pH range but forms a precipitate at neutral to acidic pH conditions associated with CO2-rich water. Injection of this species in an alkaline fluid allows for delivery of the sealant to the edge of the CO2 plume where the sharp decrease in pH is leveraged to facilitate precipitation. Our results indicate that the solubilized sealant can be delivered to the edge of the plume and high rates of precipitation are achieved. However, the sealant is not able to reach the interior of the plume unless the leakage rate is extremely small, thus delivery to the precise location of the caprock defect within the plume is significantly more challenging.

  20. Diffusing Polymers in Confined Microdomains and Estimation of Chromosomal Territory Sizes from Chromosome Capture Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, A.; Holcman, D.

    2013-06-01

    Is it possible to extract the size and structure of chromosomal territories (confined domain) from the encounter frequencies of chromosomal loci? To answer this question, we estimate the mean time for two monomers located on the same polymer to encounter, which we call the mean first encounter time in a confined microdomain (MFETC). We approximate the confined domain geometry by a harmonic potential well and obtain an asymptotic expression that agrees with Brownian simulations for the MFETC as a function of the polymer length, the radius of the confined domain, and the activation distance radius ɛ at which the two searching monomers meet. We illustrate the present approach using chromosome capture data for the encounter rate distribution of two loci depending on their distances along the DNA. We estimate the domain size that restricts the motion of one of these loci for chromosome II in yeast.

  1. Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device

    DOEpatents

    Owen, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

  2. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results. PMID:25732054

  3. Effects of confinement on the thermodynamics of supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekalova, Elena G.

    The main focus of this thesis is to understand how confinement alters the phase diagram of supercooled liquid water by employing methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations. Water is very complex and anomalous when compared to simple liquids. For example, experimental data for liquid water reveals the presence of a temperature of maximum density (TMD) below which the density decreases under isobaric cooling. Another anomaly is the hypothesized liquid--liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two types of liquid water with different densities. In this thesis we study how confinement affects such anomalies as TMD and LLPT in supercooled liquid water. This thesis is separated into three parts: (i) Monte Carlo simulations of a 2D coarse-grained model of a water layer confined in a fixed disordered matrix of hydrophobic nanoparticles, (ii) molecular dynamics simulations of a Jagla ramp model of liquid confined in fixed ordered and disordered matrices of hydrophobic nanoparticles, and (iii) all-atom simulations of trehalose and maltose in aqueous solution of lysozyme. In Part (i), we perform Monte Carlo simulations and find that a nanoparticle concentration as small as 2.4% is enough to destroy the LLPT for pressure P > 0.14 GPa. Moreover, we find a substantial (more than 90%) decrease of compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat at high P and low temperature T upon increase of nanoparticle concentration from 0% to 25%. In Part (ii), we ask how, for single component systems interacting via a soft-core isotropic potential with two characteristic length scales, the geometry of hydrophobic confinement affects the phase diagram. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study particles interacting through a ramp potential and a shoulder potential, each confined in a fixed matrix of nanoscopic particles with a fixed volume fraction. We find a substantial weakening of the LLPT and the disappearance of TMD upon the increase of disorder in the confining geometry. In Part (iii), we study aqueous systems with all-atom simulations. We are currently investigating the mechanism of water-trehalose-protein and water-maltose-protein interaction upon supercooling for its relevance to bioprotection.

  4. Gaspé belt subsurface geometry in the northern Québec Appalachians as revealed by an integrated geophysical and geological study: 1 — Potential field mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas; Lavoie, Denis; Keating, Pierre; Brouillette, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Together, recent gravity and high-resolution aeromagnetic datasets are used to qualitatively investigate the upper- and middle-crustal geometry of the Middle Paleozoic Gaspé belt in the northern Appalachians. Long-wavelength potential field anomalies define two sub-basins that are divided by northeast trending gravity highs. For each sub-basins, gravity lows correlate with the youngest rock units. Maps that highlight anomalies associated with near surface features, at the expense of those related to deeper sources, provide an important supplement to the spatially discrete observations derived from bedrock mapping. Analysis of such maps indicates that the sub-basins are characterized by different structural patterns and that faults trending obliquely compared to the main structural grain have been previously underestimated. The geometry of the Gaspé belt as revealed by this integrated geophysical and geological study bears similarities with orogens exhibiting lateral extrusion. This geometry is interpreted as the result of a heterogeneous strain regime in front of an indenter corresponding to the Early Paleozoic Gander/Dunnage crustal block. The indentation tectonic model is supported by: 1) the various strike and kinematic of faults that suggest a strongly heterogeneous strain regime; 2) the greater geological complexity and the occurrence of faults with a significant thrust component in front of the indenter; 3) the predominance of dextral strike-slip faults in the eastern Gaspé Peninsula that result in lateral material transport away from the indenter; 4) the location of abundant Devonian magmatic dykes, sills and stocks in a fault-bounded zone that experienced local extension; 5) the occurrence of block rotation.

  5. Development of empirical potential functions for the study of molecular geometry, and applications to chlorophyll a dimers. [Dissertation

    SciTech Connect

    Oie, Tetsuro

    1980-01-01

    A purpose of the present studies is twofold: (1) development of an empirical potential function (EPF) and (2) application of it to the studies of photoreaction center chlorophyll a dimer. The reliable estimate of geometric structures and energies of large molecules by quantum mechanical methods is not possible at the present time. An alternative method is, therefore, needed for the studies of large molecular systems, and Chapter I is dedicated to the development of this tool, i.e., an empirical potential function, which could suffice this purpose. Because of a large number of variable chemical compositions and functional groups characteristically present in a large molecule, it is important to include a large number of structurally diverse molecules in the development of the EPF. In Chapter II, the EPF is applied to study the geometrical structure of a chlorophyll a (Chl a) dimer, which is believed to exist at the photoreaction center of green plants and is known to play an essential role in photosynthetic energy conversion. Although various models have been proposed for this dimer structure, there is still a great need for information concerning the detailed geometric structure of this dimer. Therefore, in this chapter the structural stabilities of various dimer models are examined by the EPF, and detailed and quantitative information on the structure and stability of these models is provided.

  6. Development of empirical potential functions for the study of molecular geometry, and applications to chlorophyll a dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Oie, Tetsuro

    1980-07-28

    A purpose of the present studies is twofold: (1) development of an empirical potential function (EDF) and (2) application of it to the studies of photoreaction center chlorophyll a dimer. The reliable estimate of geometric structures and energies of large molecules by quantum mechanical methods is not possible at the present time. An alternative method is, therefore, needed for the studies of large molecular systems, and Chapter I is dedicated to the development of this tool, i.e., an empirical potential function, which could suffice this purpose. Because of a large number of variable chemical compositions and functional groups characteristically present in a large molecule, it is important to include a large number of structurally diverse molecules in the development of the EPF. In Chapter II, the EPF is applied to study the geometrical structure of a chlorophyll a (Ch1 a) dimer, which is believed to exist at the photoreaction center of green plants and is known to play an essential role in photosynthetic energy conversion. Although various models have been proposed for this dimer structure, there is still a great need for information concerning the detailed geometric structure of this dimer. Therefore, in this chapter the structural stabilities of various dimer models are examined by the EPF, and detailed and quantitative information on the structure and stability of these models is provided.

  7. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The potential applications of fusion reactors, the desirable properties of reactors intended for various applications, and the limitations of the Tokamak concept are discussed. The principles and characteristics of 20 distinct alternative confinement concepts are described, each of which may be an alternative to the Tokamak. The devices are classed as Tokamak-like, stellarator-like, mirror machines, bumpy tori, electrostatically assisted, migma concept, and wall-confined plasma.

  8. Particle Segregation and Dynamics in Confined Flows

    PubMed Central

    Di Carlo, Dino; Edd, Jon F.; Humphry, Katherine J.; Stone, Howard A.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinearity in finite-Reynolds-number flow results in particle migration transverse to fluid streamlines, producing the well-known “tubular pinch effect” in cylindrical pipes. Here we investigate these nonlinear effects in highly confined systems where the particle size approaches the channel dimensions. Experimental and numerical results reveal distinctive dynamics, including complex scaling of lift forces with channel and particle geometry. The unique behavior described in this Letter has broad implications for confined particulate flows. PMID:19392526

  9. Reducing Blinking in Small Core-Multishell Quantum Dots by Carefully Balancing Confinement Potential and Induced Lattice Strain: The "Goldilocks" Effect.

    PubMed

    Omogo, Benard; Gao, Feng; Bajwa, Pooja; Kaneko, Mizuho; Heyes, Colin D

    2016-04-26

    Currently, the most common way to reduce blinking in quantum dots (QDs) is accomplished by using very thick and/or perfectly crystalline CdS shells on CdSe cores. Ideally, a nontoxic material such as ZnS is preferred to be the outer material in order to reduce environmental and cytotoxic effects. Blinking suppression with multishell configurations of CdS and ZnS has been reported only for "giant" QDs of 15 nm or more. One of the main reasons for the limited progress is that the role that interfacial trap states play in blinking in these systems is not very well understood. Here, we show a "Goldilocks" effect to reduce blinking in small (∼7 nm) QDs by carefully controlling the thicknesses of the shells in multishell QDs. Furthermore, by correlating the fluorescence lifetime components with the fraction of time that a QD spends in the on-state, both with and without applying a threshold, we found evidence for two types of blinking that separately affect the average fluorescence lifetime of a single QD. A thorough characterization of the time-resolved fluorescence at the ensemble and single-particle level allowed us to propose a detailed physical model involving both short-lived interfacial trap states and long-lived surface trap states that are coupled. This model highlights a strategy of reducing QD blinking in small QDs by balancing the magnitude of the induced lattice strain, which results in the formation of interfacial trap states between the inner shell and the outer shell, and the confinement potential that determines how accessible the interfacial trap states are. The combination of reducing blinking while maintaining a small overall QD size and using a Cd-free outer shell of ZnS will be useful in a wide array of applications, particularly for advanced bioimaging. PMID:27058120

  10. Cyclofructins with six to ten beta-(1-->2)-linked fructofuranose units: geometries, electrostatic profiles, lipophilicity patterns, and potential for inclusion complexation.

    PubMed

    Immel, S; Schmitt, G E; Lichtenthaler, F W

    1998-12-01

    Cyclofructins composed of six (1, "CF6") to ten (5, "CF10") beta-(1-->2)-linked fructofuranose units were subjected to conformational analysis using Monte Carlo simulations based on the PIMM91 force-field. Breaking the molecular symmetry partially by alternating inclination of the spiro-type anellated fructofuranoses relative to the crown ether ring core, i.e. the 3-OH groups pointing either towards or away from the molecular center, substantially lowers the strain energy of the cyclofructins. The global energy-minimum geometries of CF6, CF8, and CF10 exhibit Cn/2 rotational symmetry, whilst the odd-membered macrocycles in CF7 and CF9 adopt C1 symmetry. Identical conformations of the solid-state geometry of CF6 (1) and its computer-generated form manifest the reliability of the computational analysis. The molecular surfaces calculated for the energy-minimum structures establish a disk-type shape for CF6 (1), CF7 (2), and CF8 (3), whereas further ring enlargement to CF9 (4) and CF10 (5) leads to torus-shaped molecules with through-going cavities. Color-coded projection of the molecular lipophilicity patterns (MLPs) and the electrostatic potential profiles (MEPs) onto these surfaces cogently displays the crown ether-like properties, favoring the complexation of metal cations via strong electrostatic interactions through the 3-OH groups located on the hydrophilic molecular side. The central cavities of CF9 and CF10 are characterized not only by significantly enhanced hydrophobicity, but also by highly negative electrostatic potentials around the narrow aperture of the tori made up by the 3-OH/4-OH groups, and positive potentials on the opposite rim. Accordingly, CF9 and CF10 are capable to form inclusion complexes, the cavity of the latter being approximately as large as the one of alpha-cyclodextrin. Calculation of the inclusion complex geometries of CF9 with beta-alanine and of CF10 with p-aminobenzoic acid revealed the guest to be deeply incorporated into the respective cavities, masking the guest's hydrophobic parts. Analysis of the electrostatic interactions at the interface of the zwitter-ionic guests with the oppositely polarized hosts predicts a high degree of regiospecificity for complex formation. PMID:9880905

  11. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  12. CCSD(T) calculations of stabilities and properties of confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holka, F.; Urban, M.; Melicherčík, M.; Neogrády, P.; Paldus, J.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze energies, electron affinities and polarizabilities of small anions exposed to an external confinement. The second electron in free O2- and S2- anions is unbound. We investigate the stabilizing effect of the spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω. on these anions employing the Hartree-Fock stability analysis as introduced by Čížek and Paldus. With increasing strength of the external harmonic-oscillator confinement potential ω the broken symmetry (BS) solutions are systematically eliminated. For ω larger than 0.1 all BS solutions for O2- disappear. For ω larger than 0.13 the CCSD(T) energy of O2- becomes more negative than the energy of the singly charged O- anion. We relate the harmonic-oscillator confining potential to a crystalline environment in which the O2- and S2- anions are stable. We also present a model allowing calculations of the in-crystal polarizabilities of anions. The model is based on CCSD(T) calculations of static polarizabilities of selected anions exposed to the spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω This artificial confinement potential ω is then related to the ionic radii of the cation in representative crystal lattices. We investigate the polarizability of O2- and S2- anions in MgO, MgS, CaO, CaS, SrO, SrS, BaO and BaS crystals. We compare our results with alternative models for in-crystal polarizabilities. External confinement also stabilizes the uracil anion U-, as is shown by calculations with a stepwise micro-hydration of U-. Upon hydration is the CCSD(T) adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of uracil enhanced by about 250 up to 570 meV in comparison with AEA of the isolated molecule, depending on the geometry of the hydrated uracil anion complex. We tried to find an analogy of the stabilization effect of the external confinement on the otherwise unstable anions. In uracil and its anion is the external confinement represented by the polarized continuum solvation model with dielectric constant as a variational parameter. The physical behavior of ions exposed to an artificial external, spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω, the environment represented by a crystal structure and the confinement represented by the solvent, all have considerable stabilizing effect on the otherwise unstable free anion.

  13. CCSD(T) calculations of stabilities and properties of confined systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holka, F.; Urban, M.; Melicherčík, M.; Neogrády, P.; Paldus, J.

    2015-01-22

    We analyze energies, electron affinities and polarizabilities of small anions exposed to an external confinement. The second electron in free O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions is unbound. We investigate the stabilizing effect of the spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω. on these anions employing the Hartree-Fock stability analysis as introduced by Čížek and Paldus. With increasing strength of the external harmonic-oscillator confinement potential ω the broken symmetry (BS) solutions are systematically eliminated. For ω larger than 0.1 all BS solutions for O{sup 2−} disappear. For ω larger than 0.13 the CCSD(T) energy of O{sup 2−} becomes more negative than the energy of the singly charged O{sup −} anion. We relate the harmonic-oscillator confining potential to a crystalline environment in which the O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions are stable. We also present a model allowing calculations of the in-crystal polarizabilities of anions. The model is based on CCSD(T) calculations of static polarizabilities of selected anions exposed to the spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω This artificial confinement potential ω is then related to the ionic radii of the cation in representative crystal lattices. We investigate the polarizability of O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions in MgO, MgS, CaO, CaS, SrO, SrS, BaO and BaS crystals. We compare our results with alternative models for in-crystal polarizabilities. External confinement also stabilizes the uracil anion U{sup −}, as is shown by calculations with a stepwise micro-hydration of U{sup −}. Upon hydration is the CCSD(T) adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of uracil enhanced by about 250 up to 570 meV in comparison with AEA of the isolated molecule, depending on the geometry of the hydrated uracil anion complex. We tried to find an analogy of the stabilization effect of the external confinement on the otherwise unstable anions. In uracil and its anion is the external confinement represented by the polarized continuum solvation model with dielectric constant as a variational parameter. The physical behavior of ions exposed to an artificial external, spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω, the environment represented by a crystal structure and the confinement represented by the solvent, all have considerable stabilizing effect on the otherwise unstable free anion.

  14. Dark Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.

    Extra-dimensional theories contain additional degrees of freedom related to the geometry of the extra space which can be interpreted as new particles. Such theories allow to reformulate most of the fundamental problems of physics from a completely different point of view. In this essay, we concentrate on the brane fluctuations which are present in brane-worlds, and how such oscillations of the own space-time geometry along curved extra dimensions can help to resolve the Universe missing mass problem. The energy scales involved in these models are low compared to the Planck scale, and this means that some of the brane fluctuations distinctive signals could be detected in future colliders and in direct or indirect dark matter searches.

  15. Current-induced skyrmion dynamics in constricted geometries.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Junichi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic skyrmions--vortex-like swirling spin structures with a quantized topological number that are observed in chiral magnets--are appealing for potential applications in spintronics because it is possible to control their motion with ultralow current density. To realize skyrmion-based spintronic devices, it is essential to understand skyrmion motions in confined geometries. Here we show by micromagnetic simulations that the current-induced motion of skyrmions in the presence of geometrical boundaries is very different from that in an infinite plane. In a channel of finite width, transverse confinement results in steady-state characteristics of the skyrmion velocity as a function of current that are similar to those of domain walls in ferromagnets, whereas the transient behaviour depends on the initial distance of the skyrmion from the boundary. Furthermore, we show that a single skyrmion can be created by an electric current in a simple constricted geometry comprising a plate-shaped specimen of suitable size and geometry. These findings could guide the design of skyrmion-based devices in which skyrmions are used as information carriers. PMID:24013132

  16. Quantum confined nanocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Tianyuan; Kendrick, Chito; Theingi, San; Bagolini, Luigi; Riskey, Kory; Vitti, Lauren; Klafehn, Grant; Taylor, Craig; Lusk, Mark; Gorman, Brain; Collins, Reuben; Fields, Jeremy; Stradins, Pauls

    2014-03-01

    Quantum confined (QC) semiconductors have drawn much attention in photovoltaics due to their tunable optoelectronic properties and potential for efficiency improvements. Here, we report a study of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H), consisting of silicon nano-particles (SiNPs) embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) matrix. Films were grown by depositing the SiNPs and a-Si:H sequentially from separate plasma reactors in a common deposition chamber. Several characterizations were used to ensure the material had low defect density and that the SiNPs were highly crystalline and well within the QC regime. Optical properties of hybrid SiNP/a-Si:H films were explored using visible to near infrared photoluminescence (PL). At low temperature, PL revealed two primary emission features, one from conventional a-Si:H ~ 1.3 eV and a second peak which can be attributed to recombination in SiNPs. The energy of this peak is higher than the bulk c-Si bandgap (~ 1.2 eV), and with decreasing SiNP size, it increases to ~ 1.7 eV. This quantum confinement effect agrees with Density Functional Theory predictions. In addition, we also see that the PL peak for SiNPs surrounded by a-Si:H shifts to lower energy relative to the isolated SiNPs. This shift is also consistent with the modeling results which show that surrounding SiNPs with a-Si:H leads to a softening of the confinement barrier and a redshift in the optical gap.

  17. Anisotropic de Gennes Narrowing in Confined Fluids.

    PubMed

    Nygård, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2016-04-22

    The collective diffusion of dense fluids in spatial confinement is studied by combining high-energy (21 keV) x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering from colloid-filled microfluidic channels. We find the structural relaxation in confinement to be slower compared to the bulk. The collective dynamics is wave vector dependent, akin to the de Gennes narrowing typically observed in bulk fluids. However, in stark contrast to the bulk, the structure factor and de Gennes narrowing in confinement are anisotropic. These experimental observations are essential in order to develop a microscopic theoretical description of collective diffusion of dense fluids in confined geometries. PMID:27152823

  18. Regional-scale geometry of the central Skellefte district, northern Sweden—results from 2.5D potential field modeling along three previously acquired seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Saman; Bauer, Tobias E.; Elming, Sten-Åke; Thunehed, Hans; Weihed, Pär

    2012-10-01

    The Skellefte district in northern Sweden is one of the most important mining districts in Europe hosting approximately 80 volcanic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. Due to its economical importance, geological and geophysical studies were carried out in order to create an image of the geometry of the upper crustal structure and integral geological elements and to evaluate their relationship to mineral deposits. Consequently, seismic reflection data along three sub-parallel profiles were acquired during 2009-2010 to map the spatial relationships between the geological structures down to a depth of ~ 4.5 km. Although these seismic studies helped researchers understand the regional relationship between geologic units in the central Skellefte district (CSD), the seismic reflection data did not succeed entirely in mapping the lithological contacts in the area. In this study, the model derived from the seismic reflection data was examined by using 2.5D modeling of potential field data (down to a 5 km depth) constrained by physical properties of the rocks and surface geology. Moreover, we modeled gravity and magnetic data along the non-reflective or poorly reflective parts of the seismic profiles to identify major lithological contacts and shear zones in the CSD, which could not be modeled on the basis of the seismic reflection data. Gravity and magnetic data helped reveal the spatial relationship between the Skellefte volcanic rocks, Vargfors group meta-sedimentary rocks and two meta­intrusive complexes. Results suggest a maximum depth extent of 2.1 km for the tectonic contact at the southern border of the Jörn granitoid. Furthermore, this north-dipping Skellefte-Jörn contact coincides closely with magnetic lows and gravity highs, which implies that the Jörn intrusive rocks have a greater thickness than the underlying basalt. Further to the NW, gravity and magnetic data suggest a depth extent of 2 km for the Gallejaur complex, which coincides with a set of gently dipping reflectors. In addition, this study supports previous concepts of fault geometries and fault patterns as a result of upper-crustal extension and subsequent inversion during crustal shortening. In the final model interpretations of the IP data were included, thus relating indications of mineralization to the geological structures.

  19. QUIESCENT H-MODE, AN ELM-FREE HIGH-CONFINEMENT MODE ON DIII-D WITH POTENTIAL FOR STATIONARY STATE OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    WEST,WP; BURRELL,KH; deGRASSIE,JS; DOYLE,EJ; GREENFIELD,CM; LASNIER,CJ; SNYDER,PB; ZENG,L

    2003-08-01

    OAK-B135 The quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) is an ELM-free and stationary state mode of operation discovered on DIII-D. This mode achieves H-mode levels of confinement and pedestal pressure while maintaining constant density and radiated power. The elimination of edge localized modes (ELMs) and their large divertor loads while maintaining good confinement and good density control is of interest to next generation tokamaks. This paper reports on the correlations found between selected parameters in a QH-mode database developed from several hundred DIII-D counter injected discharges. Time traces of key plasma parameters from a QH-mode discharge are shown. On DIII-D the negative going plasma current (a) indicates that the beam injection direction is counter to the plasma current direction, a common feature of all QH-modes. The D{sub {alpha}} time behavior (c) shows that soon after high powered beam heating (b) is applied, the discharge makes a transition to ELMing H-mode, then the ELMs disappear, indicating the start of the QH period that lasts for the remainder of the high power beam heating (3.5 s). Previously published work showing density and temperature profiles indicates that long-pulse, high-triangularity QH discharges develop an internal transport barrier in combination with the QH edge barrier. These discharges are known as quiescent, double-barrier discharges (QDB). The H-factor (d) and stored energy (c) rise then saturate at a constant level and the measured axial and minimum safety factors remain above 1.0 for the entire QH duration. During QDB operation the performance of the plasma can be very good, with {beta}{sub N}*H{sub 89L} product reaching 7 for > 10 energy confinement times. These discharges show promise that a stationary state can be achieved.

  20. Center Vortices and Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarawneh, Derar; Engelhardt, Michael

    2013-04-01

    A promising picture of confinement in QCD can be obtained based on a condensate of thick vortices with fluxes in the center of the gauge group (center vortices). A number of studies of this picture have been made and specific models have been formulated to obtain a concrete realization of the vortex picture. In our model, vortices are represented by closed random lines in 2+1 dimensional space-time. These random lines are modeled as being piece-wise linear and an ensemble is generated by Monte Carlo methods. The physical space on which the vortex lines are defined is a cube with periodic boundary conditions, and I have developed the necessary algorithms which implement those boundary conditions as the vortex lines evolve across the boundaries. When two vortices become close to each other, it is possible that they connect to one another. Also the inverse process, that a vortex separates at a bottleneck, is allowed. My ensemble therefore will contain not a fixed, but a variable number of closed vortex lines. This is expected to be important for realizing the deconfining phase transition. After all processes have been implemented, I will be ready to start calculating Wilson loops and from that, the potential between quarks and anti-quarks. We can study quark confinement and also ha

  1. Note: Light output enhanced fast response and low afterglow {sup 6}Li glass scintillator as potential down-scattered neutron diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Arikawa, Yasunobu; Yamanoi, Kohei; Nagai, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kozue; Kouno, Masahiro; Sakai, Kohei; Nakazato, Tomoharu; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Cadatal, Marilou Raduban; Estacio, Elmer Surat; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Nakai, Mitsuo; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Azechi, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahiro; Fujino, Shigeru; Yoshida, Hideki; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Satoh, Nakahiro; Kan, Hirofumi

    2010-10-15

    The characteristics of an APLF80+3Ce scintillator are presented. Its sufficiently fast decay profile, low afterglow, and an improved light output compared to the recently developed APLF80+3Pr, were experimentally demonstrated. This scintillator material holds promise for applications in neutron imaging diagnostics at the energy regions of 0.27 MeV of DD fusion down-scattered neutron peak at the world's largest inertial confinement fusion facilities such as the National Ignition Facility and the Laser Megajoule.

  2. On the applicability of entropy potentials in transport problems

    PubMed Central

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2015-01-01

    Transport in confined structures of varying geometry has become the subject of growing attention in recent years since such structures are ubiquitous in biology and technology. In analyzing transport in systems of this type, the notion of entropy potentials is widely used. Entropy potentials naturally arise in one-dimensional description of equilibrium distributions in multidimensional confined structures. However, their application to transport problems requires some caution. In this article we discuss such applications and summarize the results of recent studies exploring the limits of applicability. We also consider an example of a transport problem in a system of varying geometry, where the conventional approach is inapplicable since the geometry changes abruptly. In addition, we demonstrate how the entropy potential can be used to analyze optimal transport through a tree-dimensional cosine-shaped channel. PMID:26339466

  3. Bifurcated equilibria in centrifugally confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, I.; Teodorescu, C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Hassam, A. B.; Clary, R.; Ellis, R.; Lunsford, R.

    2008-12-15

    A bifurcation theory and associated computational model are developed to account for abrupt transitions observed recently on the Maryland Centrifugal eXperiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al. Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)], a supersonically rotating magnetized plasma that relies on centrifugal forces to prevent thermal expansion of plasma along the magnetic field. The observed transitions are from a well-confined, high-rotation state (HR-mode) to a lower-rotation, lesser-confined state (O-mode). A two-dimensional time-dependent magnetohydrodynamics code is used to simulate the dynamical equilibrium states of the MCX configuration. In addition to the expected viscous drag on the core plasma rotation, a momentum loss term is added that models the friction of plasma on the enhanced level of neutrals expected in the vicinity of the insulators at the throats of the magnetic mirror geometry. At small values of the external rotation drive, the plasma is not well-centrifugally confined and hence experiences the drag from near the insulators. Beyond a critical value of the external drive, the system makes an abrupt transition to a well-centrifugally confined state in which the plasma has pulled away from the end insulator plates; more effective centrifugal confinement lowers the plasma mass near the insulators allowing runaway increases in the rotation speed. The well-confined steady state is reached when the external drive is balanced by only the viscosity of the core plasma. A clear hysteresis phenomenon is shown.

  4. Nonequilibrium melting of icy soil in confined geometries on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    While applicable to natural phenomena such as landslides, the study reported here was motivated by concerns about radioactive power sources (RPS) that might be emplaced just below the martian surface as a result of a landing "anomaly." Mars is best described as a cold, dry desert in the sense that water (in any form) is not circulated by precipitation or other means. Thus, while the phase diagram supports liquid water in many places, over time it would all migrate to the coldest locations, primarily at the poles or just beneath the surface at high latitudes. Transient water can be formed, however, when this equilibrium is disturbed by introduction of a heat source. Since the crash of a spacecraft might deposit a halo of microbial contamination in the vicinity of an RPS, such transient sources of water could provide breeding areas that would violate planetary protection treaties. The Mars Odyssey spacecraft has identified vast stretches of high latitude terrain as zones where liquid water could easily be formed in this scenario. To address both the extent and the duration of wet soil, certain scenarios have been modeled in two dimensions using both a finite difference time-marching method and by one dimensional analytical approximation. Considered in the analysis are the diffusion of both heat and water vapor, capillary forces on liquid water, latent heat exchange, surface processes such as radiation, evaporation, and convection, and continuous equilibration between the liquid, vapor, and solid phases. Results indicate that the initial ice content of the soil, a proxy for thermal conductivity, exerts the greatest influence on the progress of the wetting and drying cycle. Ice can be melted at distances of almost a meter from a 250W power source and may, under certain circumstances, persist for months. It is not yet clear, however, whether the result suggests a planetary protection risk.

  5. Simulations of Coulomb systems with slab geometry using an efficient 3D Ewald summation method.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Girotto, Matheus; Levin, Yan

    2016-04-14

    We present a new approach to efficiently simulate electrolytes confined between infinite charged walls using a 3d Ewald summation method. The optimal performance is achieved by separating the electrostatic potential produced by the charged walls from the electrostatic potential of electrolyte. The electric field produced by the 3d periodic images of the walls is constant inside the simulation cell, with the field produced by the transverse images of the charged plates canceling out. The non-neutral confined electrolyte in an external potential can be simulated using 3d Ewald summation with a suitable renormalization of the electrostatic energy, to remove a divergence, and a correction that accounts for the conditional convergence of the resulting lattice sum. The new algorithm is at least an order of magnitude more rapid than the usual simulation methods for the slab geometry and can be further sped up by adopting a particle-particle particle-mesh approach. PMID:27083704

  6. Simulations of Coulomb systems with slab geometry using an efficient 3D Ewald summation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Alexandre P.; Girotto, Matheus; Levin, Yan

    2016-04-01

    We present a new approach to efficiently simulate electrolytes confined between infinite charged walls using a 3d Ewald summation method. The optimal performance is achieved by separating the electrostatic potential produced by the charged walls from the electrostatic potential of electrolyte. The electric field produced by the 3d periodic images of the walls is constant inside the simulation cell, with the field produced by the transverse images of the charged plates canceling out. The non-neutral confined electrolyte in an external potential can be simulated using 3d Ewald summation with a suitable renormalization of the electrostatic energy, to remove a divergence, and a correction that accounts for the conditional convergence of the resulting lattice sum. The new algorithm is at least an order of magnitude more rapid than the usual simulation methods for the slab geometry and can be further sped up by adopting a particle-particle particle-mesh approach.

  7. Diffusion of micrometer-sized soft particles in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Benjamin; Aptowicz, Kevin

    We investigate the diffusion of micrometer sized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) gel particles in confinement. The influence of confinement on the transport of small particles is becoming increasingly important for microfluidics and bio-fluidics. Analytical solutions to this problem are limited to very unique geometries or gross approximations. Computational methods have provided more insight into the problem as well as experimental investigations. However, most research has focused on the hard-sphere problem. In this work, we will explore the diffusion of soft particles in confinement. The dynamics of the particles confined between two parallel walls is captured with video-microscopy. In addition, we use a recently developed technique to measurement confinement of particles in-situ with a precision of 1%. This poster will present some preliminary results of how confinement affects the diffusion of these soft particles. We acknowledge support from Grant DMR-1206231.

  8. Computer simulations of charged colloids in confinement.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Antonio M; de las Nieves, F Javier; Cuetos, Alejandro

    2015-02-15

    We study by computer simulations the interaction between two similarly charged colloidal particles confined between parallel planes, in salt free conditions. Both the colloids and ions are simulated explicitly, in a fine-mesh lattice, and the electrostatic interaction is calculated using Ewald summation in two dimensions. The internal energy is measured by setting the colloidal particles at a given position and equilibrating the ions, whereas the free energy is obtained introducing a bias (attractive) potential between the colloids. Our results show that upon confining the system, the internal energy decreases, resulting in an attractive contribution to the interaction potential for large charges and strong confinement. However, the loss of entropy of the ions is the dominant mechanism in the interaction, irrespective of the confinement of the system. The interaction potential is therefore repulsive in all cases, and is well described by the DLVO functional form, but effective values have to be used for the interaction strength and Debye length. PMID:25460717

  9. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using

  10. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using…

  11. Geometry of thermodynamic control.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; Sivak, David A; Crooks, Gavin E; DeWeese, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    A deeper understanding of nonequilibrium phenomena is needed to reveal the principles governing natural and synthetic molecular machines. Recent work has shown that when a thermodynamic system is driven from equilibrium then, in the linear response regime, the space of controllable parameters has a Riemannian geometry induced by a generalized friction tensor. We exploit this geometric insight to construct closed-form expressions for minimal-dissipation protocols for a particle diffusing in a one-dimensional harmonic potential, where the spring constant, inverse temperature, and trap location are adjusted simultaneously. These optimal protocols are geodesics on the Riemannian manifold and reveal that this simple model has a surprisingly rich geometry. We test these optimal protocols via a numerical implementation of the Fokker-Planck equation and demonstrate that the friction tensor arises naturally from a first-order expansion in temporal derivatives of the control parameters, without appealing directly to linear response theory. PMID:23214570

  12. Engaging All Students with "Impossible Geometry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Lynda R.; Ayebo, Abraham; Dornoo, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Geometry is an area in which Australian students performed particularly poorly on the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). One innovative area of recreational geometry that has rich potential to engage and challenge a wide variety of students is "impossible geometry." An impossible geometric object is a…

  13. Hydrodynamic fluctuations in confined particle-laden fluids.

    PubMed

    Desreumaux, Nicolas; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Jeanneret, Raphael; Lauga, Eric; Bartolo, Denis

    2013-09-13

    We address the collective dynamics of non-Brownian particles cruising in a confined microfluidic geometry and provide a comprehensive characterization of their spatiotemporal density fluctuations. We show that density excitations freely propagate at all scales, and in all directions even though the particles are neither affected by potential forces nor by inertia. We introduce a kinetic theory which quantitatively accounts for our experimental findings, demonstrating that the fluctuation spectrum of this nonequilibrium system is shaped by the combination of truly long-range hydrodynamic interactions and local collisions. We also demonstrate that the free propagation of density waves is a generic phenomenon which should be observed in a much broader range of hydrodynamic systems. PMID:24074122

  14. Behavior of the potential antitumor V(IV)O complexes formed by flavonoid ligands. 1. Coordination modes and geometry in solution and at the physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Ugone, Valeria; Lubinu, Giuseppe; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2014-11-01

    The coordination modes and geometry assumed in solution by the potent antitumor oxidovanadium(IV) complexes formed by different flavonoids were studied by spectroscopic (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, EPR) and computational (Density Functional Theory, DFT) methods. A series of bidentate flavonoid ligands (L) with increasing structural complexity was examined, which can involve (CO, O(-)) donors and formation of five- and six-membered chelate rings, or (O(-), O(-)) donors and five-membered chelate rings. The geometry corresponding to these coordination modes can be penta-coordinated, [VOL2], or cis-octahedral, cis-[VOL2(H2O)]. The results show that, at physiological pH, ligands provided with (CO, O(-)) donor set yield cis-octahedral species with "maltol-like" coordination when five-membered chelate rings are formed (as with 3-hydroxyflavone), while penta-coordinated structures with "acetylacetone-like" coordination are preferred when the chelate rings are six-membered (as with chrysin). When both the binding modes are possible, as with morin, the "acetylacetone-like" coordination is observed. For the ligands containing a catecholic donor set, such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein, fisetin, quercetin and rutin, the formation of square pyramidal complexes with (O(-), O(-)) "catechol-like" coordination and five-membered chelate rings is preferred at physiological pH. The determination of the different coordination modes and geometry is important to define the biotransformation in the blood and the interaction of these complexes with the biological membranes. PMID:25127230

  15. [In situ FTIR reflection spectroscopy of molecule probe studies of enhanced IR adsorbtion and response rate to potential on Pd nanoparticles confined].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan-xia; Chen, Zuo-feng; Ding, Nan; Sun, Shi-gang

    2004-04-01

    Palladium nanoparticles (nm-Pd) were synthesized in the supercages of Y-zeolite via "ship-in-a-bottle". Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Nafion were used as bonds respectively to prepare zeolite-modified electrode loading nm-Pd by mixed coat and steped coat. IR optical properties of adsorbed CO (COad) were studied by in situ electrochemical FTIR spectrum on zeolite-modified electrode surface prepared by different bond and coating method. Results display the same enhanced IR absorption of COad and different response rate to potential as well as the ability of electron transfer on PVC and Nafion film. Time-dependent vCOB shift was studied for obtaining the information of response rate to potential and electron transfer ability of PVC and Nafion coating. A larger potential lag on PVC coating electrode and a very small potential lag on Nafion coating film were found, showing that different bond and prepared method affect response rate to potential of zeolite-modified electrode. These findings are significant in understanding special optical performance and the electron transfer mechanism of zeolite-modified electrode. PMID:15766147

  16. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2015-05-15

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over {sup 4}He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  17. Mechanism of Diffusion Slowdown in Confined Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Pichierri, Fabio; Kurihara, Kazue

    2012-11-01

    With the aid of molecular dynamics simulation, we consider why the diffusivity of liquid becomes slower as the liquid is confined to a narrower space. The diffusion coefficient of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane liquid confined between two mica surfaces was calculated for a range of surface separations from 64 to 23 Å. The resulting separation dependence of the diffusion coefficient can be explained by considering that the molecular diffusion is an activated process. In particular, we find that the increase in the activation energy is closely correlated with the decrease of the potential energy per molecule, from which we propose a molecular-level mechanism of this confined-induced diffusion slowdown.

  18. Mechanism of diffusion slowdown in confined liquids.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Pichierri, Fabio; Kurihara, Kazue

    2012-11-01

    With the aid of molecular dynamics simulation, we consider why the diffusivity of liquid becomes slower as the liquid is confined to a narrower space. The diffusion coefficient of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane liquid confined between two mica surfaces was calculated for a range of surface separations from 64 to 23 Å. The resulting separation dependence of the diffusion coefficient can be explained by considering that the molecular diffusion is an activated process. In particular, we find that the increase in the activation energy is closely correlated with the decrease of the potential energy per molecule, from which we propose a molecular-level mechanism of this confined-induced diffusion slowdown. PMID:23215427

  19. Spectral properties of endohedrally confined helium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shuai-Shuai; Hao-Xue, Qiao

    2015-08-01

    Based on the B-spline basis method, the properties of the helium atom confined inside an endohedral environment, such as buckminster fullerene, are studied. In our calculations, the endohedral environment is a parabolic potential well. In this situation, the phenomenon of “mirror collapse” is exhibited for energy levels of a confined helium atom. The “giant resonance” of oscillator strength of the dipole transition emerges with the variation of depth of the confining well. The physical mechanisms of these phenomena are analyzed in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274246.)

  20. Effects of confinement on nanoparticle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jacinta

    The transport properties of nanoparticles that are dispersed in complex fluids and flowed through narrow confining geometries affect a wide range of materials shaping and forming processes, including three-dimensional printing and nanocomposite processing. Here, I will describe two sets of experiments in which we use optical microscopy to probe the structure and transport properties of suspensions of particles that are confined geometrically. First, we investigate the structure and flow properties of dense suspensions of submicron particles, in which the particles interact via an entropic depletion attraction, that are confined in thin films and microchannels. Second, we characterize the transport properties of nanoparticles, dispersed at low concentration in water or in aqueous solutions of high-molecular weight polymers, that are confined in regular arrays of nanoposts or in disordered porous media. I will discuss our results and their practical implications for materials processing as well as for other applications that require confined transport of nanomaterials through complex media. Welch Foundation (E-1869) and NSF (CBET-1438204).

  1. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, Franois; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrck, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the membrane size for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrck M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:31113113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrck to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous SaffmanDelbrck theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  2. Programmed environment management of confined microsocieties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emurian, Henry H.

    1988-01-01

    A programmed environment is described that assists the implementation and management of schedules governing access to all resources and information potentially available to members of a confined microsociety. Living and work schedules are presented that were designed to build individual and group performance repertoires in support of study objectives and sustained adaptation by participants. A variety of measurement requirements can be programmed and standardized to assure continuous assessment of the status and health of a confined microsociety.

  3. Thermodynamics of water structural reorganization due to geometric confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroberg, Wylie; Lichter, Seth

    2015-03-01

    Models of aqueous solvation have successfully quantified the behavior of water near convex bodies. However, many important processes occurring in aqueous solution involve interactions between solutes and surfaces with complicated non-convex geometries. Examples include the folding of proteins, hydrophobic association of solutes, ligand-receptor binding, and water confined within nanotubes and pores. For these geometries, models for solvation of convex bodies fail to account for the added interactions associated with structural confinement. Due to water's propensity to form networks of hydrogen bonds, small alterations to the confining geometry can induce large structural rearrangement within the water. We perform systematic Monte Carlo simulations of water confined to cylindrical cavities of varying aspect ratio to investigate how small geometric changes to the confining geometry may cause large changes to the structure and thermodynamic state of water. Using the Wang-Landau algorithm, we obtain free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities across a broad range of temperatures, and show how these quantities are influenced by the structural rearrangement of water molecules due to geometric perturbations.

  4. Critical and near-critical phase behavior and interplay between the thermodynamic Casimir and van der Waals forces in a confined nonpolar fluid medium with competing surface and substrate potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study, using general scaling arguments and mean-field type calculations, the behavior of the critical Casimir force and its interplay with the van der Waals force acting between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining some fluctuating fluid medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. The surfaces of the slabs are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. The slabs, on the other hand, influence the fluid by long-range competing dispersion potentials, which represent irrelevant interactions in renormalization-group sense. Under such conditions, one usually expects attractive Casimir force governed by universal scaling function, pertinent to the extraordinary surface universality class of Ising type systems, to which the dispersion potentials provide only corrections to scaling. We demonstrate, however, that below a given threshold thickness of the system Lcrit for a suitable set of slabs-fluid and fluid-fluid coupling parameters the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the slabs can result in sign change of the Casimir force acting between the surfaces confining the fluid when one changes the temperature T , the chemical potential of the fluid μ , or L . The last implies that by choosing specific materials for the slabs, coatings, and the fluid for L ≲Lcrit one can realize repulsive Casimir force with nonuniversal behavior which, upon increasing L , gradually turns into an attractive one described by a universal scaling function, depending only on the relevant scaling fields related to the temperature and the excess chemical potential, for L ≫Lcrit . We present arguments and relevant data for specific substances in support of the experimental feasibility of the predicted behavior of the force. It can be of interest, e.g., for designing nanodevices and for governing behavior of objects, say colloidal particles, at small distances. We formulate the corresponding criterion for determination of Lcrit. The universality is regained for L ≫Lcrit . We also show that for systems with L ≲Lcrit , the capillary condensation phase diagram suffers modifications which one does not observe in systems with purely short-ranged interactions.

  5. Critical and near-critical phase behavior and interplay between the thermodynamic Casimir and van der Waals forces in a confined nonpolar fluid medium with competing surface and substrate potentials.

    PubMed

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study, using general scaling arguments and mean-field type calculations, the behavior of the critical Casimir force and its interplay with the van der Waals force acting between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining some fluctuating fluid medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. The surfaces of the slabs are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. The slabs, on the other hand, influence the fluid by long-range competing dispersion potentials, which represent irrelevant interactions in renormalization-group sense. Under such conditions, one usually expects attractive Casimir force governed by universal scaling function, pertinent to the extraordinary surface universality class of Ising type systems, to which the dispersion potentials provide only corrections to scaling. We demonstrate, however, that below a given threshold thickness of the system L(crit) for a suitable set of slabs-fluid and fluid-fluid coupling parameters the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the slabs can result in sign change of the Casimir force acting between the surfaces confining the fluid when one changes the temperature T, the chemical potential of the fluid μ, or L. The last implies that by choosing specific materials for the slabs, coatings, and the fluid for L≲L(crit) one can realize repulsive Casimir force with nonuniversal behavior which, upon increasing L, gradually turns into an attractive one described by a universal scaling function, depending only on the relevant scaling fields related to the temperature and the excess chemical potential, for L≫L(crit). We present arguments and relevant data for specific substances in support of the experimental feasibility of the predicted behavior of the force. It can be of interest, e.g., for designing nanodevices and for governing behavior of objects, say colloidal particles, at small distances. We formulate the corresponding criterion for determination of L(crit). The universality is regained for L≫L(crit). We also show that for systems with L≲L(crit), the capillary condensation phase diagram suffers modifications which one does not observe in systems with purely short-ranged interactions. PMID:26274136

  6. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  7. Dynamic Geometry on WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Gilles

    The first section of this paper on World Wide Web applications related to dynamic geometry addresses dynamic geometry and teaching, including the relationship between dynamic geometry and direct manipulation, key features of dynamic geometry environments, the importance of direct engagement of the learner using construction software for…

  8. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  9. Structural and electronic properties of sodium clusters under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, Balasaheb J.; Kanhere, Dilip G.; Chacko, Sajeev

    2015-02-01

    Using real-space density functional theory, electronic structure and equilibrium geometries of sodium clusters in the size range of 2-20 atoms have been calculated as a function of confinement. We have examined the evolution of the five lowest isomers as a function of volume for six different compressions. The minimum volume considered is about 1 /15 to 1 /10 of the free-space box volume. We observe a strong tendency for isomeric transitions in many cases, with the higher isomers evolving into the ground state under confinement. In general the clusters tend to become more spherical. The changes in the total energies and the geometries are not significant until the volume gets reduced beyond the 1/3 of the original volume. In this sense, the clusters are not easy to compress. Once the critical volume is reached, the changes in the total energies and geometries are rapid. It turns out that the increase in the total energy is mainly due to the ion-ion and Hartree energies of electrons. We also address how anisotropic confinement affects the geometry of clusters. We further show that geometries obtained with anisotropic confinement are strongly supported by the simulation of clusters inside a carbon nanotube using a hybrid quantum-mechanical and molecular-mechanics approach.

  10. Hot electron confinement in a microwave heated spindle cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelas, M. A.

    1991-08-01

    The Plasma Research Laboratory at the University of Missouri-Columbia was established with awards from the McDonnell Douglas Foundation, ARMCO, Union Electric, Black and Vetch, Kansas City Power and Light, the National Science Foundation, and DOE. The Plasma Research Lab's major effort is the Missouri Magnetic Mirror (MMM or M(exp 3)) Project. The technical goals of MMM have been (1) Diagnostic Development, (2) Plasma Physics in the Cusp geometry, (3) plasma-wall interactions, (4) impurity effects in a steady-state plasma, and (5) Development of Diagnostics for use in harsh plasma processing environments. The other major goal of MMM has remained providing a facility for hands-on training in experimental plasma physics. The major experimental facility of MMM is the MMM Modified Experiment (M4X). Other research efforts in the Plasma Research Laboratory include small efforts in cold fusion, toroidal magnetic confinement, and inertial confinement and a potentially major effort in direct conversion of nuclear energy.

  11. Hot electron confinement in a microwave heated spindle cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Prelas, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Plasma Research Laboratory at the University of Missouri-Columbia was established with awards from the McDonnel Douglas Foundation, ARMCO, Union Electric, Black and Vetch, Kansas City Power and Light, the National Science Foundation, and DOE. The Plasma Research Lab's major effort is the Missouri Magnetic Mirror (MMM or M{sup 3}) Project. The technical goals of MMM have been (1) Diagnostic Development, (2) Plasma Physics in the Cusp geometry, (3) plasma-wall interactions, (4) impurity effects in a steady-state plasma, and (5) Development of Diagnostics for use in harsh plasma processing environments. The other major goal of MMM has remained providing a facility for hands-on training in experimental plasma physics. The major experimental facility of MMM is the MMM Modified Experiment (M4X). Other research efforts in the Plasma Research Laboratory include small efforts in cold fusion, toroidal magnetic confinement, and inertial confinement and a potentially major effort in direct conversion of nuclear energy.

  12. The development of a laterally confined laboratory fan delta under sediment supply reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Siqiang; Wu, Xi; Xu, Shun; Li, Zhangyong

    2016-03-01

    In previous fan delta experiments, the effect of lateral confinement was generally ignored as these fans were usually unconfined with semiconical geometries. However, in gorge areas, fan development is usually laterally confined by valley walls. This study investigates autogenic processes of fan deltas in a laterally confined experimental tank. The experiment is divided into three phases. The sediment supply is held constant within each phase, so the autogenic processes of the fan are separated from the allogenic forcings. Results indicate that laterally confined fan deltas have higher progradation and aggradation potential, more regular channel braiding, and more even transverse sedimentation than unconfined fans. Besides, responses of fan deltas to sediment supply reduction are investigated in this research. At the initiation of the second and third phases, sediment feed rates are instantaneously reduced so that the allogenic forcings are predominant. Observations show that under sediment supply reduction, channelization on fan deltas are more pronounced and durations of the fluvial cycles are longer. The adjustment of fan morphology becomes slower as the self-regulation capacity of the fan decreases with reduced sediment supply.

  13. Energy confinement in Doublet III with high-Z limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, F.B.; Adcock, S.J.; Baker, D.R.; Blau, F.P.; Brooks, N.H.; Chase, R.P.; DeBoo, J.C.; Ejima, S.; Fairbanks, E.S.; Fisher, R.K.

    1980-02-01

    This report describes the experimental measurements and data analysis techniques used to evaluate the energy confinement in noncircular plasmas produced in Doublet III. Major aspects of the confinement measurements and analysis techniques are summarized. Machine parameters, diagnostic systems and discharge parameters relavent to the confinement measurements are given. Magnetic analysis techniques used to determine the plasma shape are reviewed. Scaling of the on-axis values of electron temperature, confinement time and Z/sub eff/ with plasma density is presented. Comparison with scaling results from other circular tokamaks is discussed. Numerical and analytic techniques developed for calculating the plasma energy confinement time and self-consistent profiles of density, temperature, current, and flux in non-circular geometries are described. These techniques are applied to the data and used to determine the central and global electron energy confinement time for a typical doublet plasma. Additional aspects of the confinement such as the radial dependence of the electron thermal conductivity and the estimated ion temperature are explored with the aid of a non-circular transport simulation code. The results of the confinement measurements are summarized and discussed. A brief summary of the theoretically expected effects of noncircularity on plasma confinement is included for reference as Appendix I.

  14. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A; Zhou, Guofu G F

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it's potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films. PMID:27221211

  15. Investigation of failure mode transition in ceramics under confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, G.; Chen, W.; Ortiz, M.

    1995-12-31

    A newly developed experimental technique is used to investigate the failure behavior of ceramics in multi-axial compression. The axial loading is provided by a split Kolsky (Hopkinson) compression bar and the radial confinement is provided by shrink fit sleeves on the cylindrical specimens. Confinement pressures on the order of 1 GPa have been achieved. As the confinement is increased on the specimen, the failure mode changes from axial splitting under no confinement to conical faulting under moderate confinement. Experimental data have been obtained for several engineering ceramics in the strain rate range of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The peak or failure strength increases with increasing confinement. The increase in strength over its unconfined strength for a given level of confinement remains independent of the strain rate. The data from multiaxial loading experiments suggest that the engineering ceramics follow the Drucker-Prager model for pressure sensitive dilatant materials. This model is used to predict the localization modes in axi-symmetric geometries. The predictions are compared with experimental results for the limit load and the geometry of the fault. The implications of the proposed constitutive and failure model for the performance of engineering ceramics under multi-axial loading are discussed.

  16. Tomographic imaging of sub-basalt Mesozoic sediments and shallow basement geometry for hydrocarbon potential below the Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Laxmidhar; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2014-10-01

    We have derived a shallow subsurface 2-D tomographic P-wave velocity image of the Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) of India using first-arrival traveltime data along a 90-km-long N-S trending seismic profile in the Deccan Syneclise region. The tomographic image depicts smooth velocity variations of Quaternary and Tertiary (2.0-3.0 km s-1) sediments, basalts/traps (5.0-5.5 km s-1), sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments (4.3-4.5 km s-1) as well as the basement (5.9-6.1 km s-1) geometry down to a maximum depth of 5.0 km. Due to Late Cretaceous volcanism and outpouring of basaltic lava flows, this region is affected by numerous dyke intrusions and thick basaltic trap (2-3 km) exposed on the surface and surrounded by graben structures due to deep basinal faults forming a large igneous province. Although sub-basalt imaging is a major challenge for the oil industry, with the help of tomographic imaging technique of first-arrival seismic refraction data, we were able to image sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments (<0.75 km) deposited below the two sequences of thick basaltic flows above the basement. The imaged Mesozoic sediments are expected to contain hydrocarbon because of their wide extension in this sedimentary basin with suitable trapping mechanism due to basalts. The robustness of the velocity image is assessed through numerous tests like velocity perturbations, χ2 estimates, rms residuals of traveltime fit, uncertainty estimates through computation of ray-density or hits and series of checkerboard resolution tests with velocity anomalies having different cell size. The thickness of the basalt and the sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments along with the basement geometry obtained from tomography are constrained through ray-trace modelling and pre-stack depth migration (PSDM) of the wide-angle reflection phases for different shot gathers along the profile.

  17. Statics and dynamics of softly confined polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scagliarini, Andrea; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Sega, Marcello

    2015-03-01

    A variety of biological and technological problems where long chain molecules are constrained in spaces small compared to the molecule size (like membrane nanopores or nanofluidic slits) motivated recently a growing effort to understand the dynamics and structural scaling properties of polymers confined by solid walls. Our focus is, instead, on polymers confined in different geometries by soft interfaces, mimicking, e.g., DNA packaging inside cell nuclei or, mutatis mutandis, viral capsids. Soft-confinement is achieved by a proper choice of the solvation energies such that the polymer is trapped in one of the two phases of a binary mixture of immiscible liquids. We perform Molecular Dynamics simulations of polymers coupled with a fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method for the embedding matrix. Slab and droplet configurations are considered. In the former case we address the transition among various regimes of size scaling at changing the slab width. Under shear, the droplet is distorted from its equilibrium spherical shape and we explore how the transition from an isotropic geometry to a quasi-tube-like one affects polymer size scaling and knotting degree. Finally, we show how the feedback on the solvent induces viscoelastic rheology that can be related to polymer entanglement.

  18. Elementary framework for cold field emission: Incorporation of quantum-confinement effects

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2013-12-21

    Although the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) equation serves as the foundation of cold field emission theory, it may not be suitable for predicting the emitted current density (ECD) from emitters with a quantum-confined electron supply. This work presents an analytical framework for treating cold field emission from metals that includes the effects of a quantum-confined electron supply. Within the framework, quantum confinement in emitters is classified into transverse and normal quantum confinement based on the orientation of the confinement relative to the emission direction. The framework is used to generate equations predicting the ECD from rectangular and cylindrical emitter geometries comprised of electron supplies of reduced dimensionality. Transverse quantum confinement of the electron supply leads to a reduction in the total ECD as transverse emitter dimensions decrease and normal quantum confinement results in an oscillatory ECD as a function of the normal quantum well width. Incorporating a geometry-dependent field enhancement factor into the model reveals an optimal transverse well width for which quantum confinement of the electron supply and field enhancement equally affect the ECD and a maximum total ECD for the emitter geometry at a given applied field is obtained. As a result, the FN equation over-predicts the ECD from emitters with transverse dimensions under approximately 5 nm, and in those cases, geometry-specific ECD equations incorporating quantum-confinement effects should be employed instead.

  19. Criticality in confined ionic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mena, J. E.; Barbosa, Marcia C.; Levin, Yan

    2001-06-01

    A theory of a confined two-dimensional electrolyte is presented. The positive and negative ions, interacting by a 1/r potential, are constrained to move on an interface separating two solvents with dielectric constants {epsilon}{sub 1} and {epsilon}{sub 2}. It is shown that the Debye-Huckel type of theory predicts that this two-dimensional Coulomb fluid should undergo a phase separation into a coexisting liquid (high-density) and gas (low-density) phases. We argue, however, that the formation of polymerlike chains of alternating positive and negative ions can prevent this phase transition from taking place.

  20. Precision platform for convex lens-induced confinement microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berard, Daniel; McFaul, Christopher M. J.; Leith, Jason S.; Arsenault, Adriel K. J.; Michaud, François; Leslie, Sabrina R.

    2013-10-01

    We present the conception, fabrication, and demonstration of a versatile, computer-controlled microscopy device which transforms a standard inverted fluorescence microscope into a precision single-molecule imaging station. The device uses the principle of convex lens-induced confinement [S. R. Leslie, A. P. Fields, and A. E. Cohen, Anal. Chem. 82, 6224 (2010)], which employs a tunable imaging chamber to enhance background rejection and extend diffusion-limited observation periods. Using nanopositioning stages, this device achieves repeatable and dynamic control over the geometry of the sample chamber on scales as small as the size of individual molecules, enabling regulation of their configurations and dynamics. Using microfluidics, this device enables serial insertion as well as sample recovery, facilitating temporally controlled, high-throughput measurements of multiple reagents. We report on the simulation and experimental characterization of this tunable chamber geometry, and its influence upon the diffusion and conformations of DNA molecules over extended observation periods. This new microscopy platform has the potential to capture, probe, and influence the configurations of single molecules, with dramatically improved imaging conditions in comparison to existing technologies. These capabilities are of immediate interest to a wide range of research and industry sectors in biotechnology, biophysics, materials, and chemistry.

  1. Computer simulation studies of confined liquid-crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Greg D.; Cleaver, Douglas J.

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we present results from molecular dynamics simulations performed using a system of Gay-Berne particles confined between two substrates in a slab geometry. We use a nonseparable anisotropic molecule-substrate interaction potential and investigate weak and moderate molecule-substrate coupling strengths. We find that for both coupling strengths a well-defined, tilted molecular layer forms at each wall and that the pretilt angle and layer density are only weakly dependent on temperature as the central region is cooled through isotropiclike and nematiclike regions. The orientationally ordered fluid formed at the center of the film is tilted in sympathy with the surface layers. At low temperatures, however, where the central region adopts a layered arrangement, a sharp change is observed in the pretilt angle. This transition is more marked in the weak-coupling system where the high-temperature tilted surface layers adopt an approximately planar arrangement at low temperatures and the system resembles a bookshelf-geometry smectic film. In the moderate-coupling system, the surface layers maintain some tilt in the presence of the layered central region, leading to a smectic-stripe phase arrangement.

  2. Metal-organic frameworks as host materials of confined supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J. K. H.; Sippel, P.; Denysenko, D.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Volkmer, D.; Loidl, A.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we examine the use of metal-organic framework (MOF) systems as host materials for the investigation of glassy dynamics in confined geometry. We investigate the confinement of the molecular glass former glycerol in three MFU-type MOFs with different pore sizes (MFU stands for "Metal-Organic Framework Ulm-University") and study the dynamics of the confined liquid via dielectric spectroscopy. In accord with previous reports on confined glass formers, we find different degrees of deviations from bulk behavior depending on pore size, demonstrating that MOFs are well-suited host systems for confinement investigations.

  3. Morphology of diblock copolymers under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, David; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    The structure adopted by polymer chains is of particular intrest for materials design. In particular, a great deal of effort has been made to study diblock polymers due to the importance they have in industrial applications. The bulk structure of most systems has been the most widely studied. However, when under the effect of confinement, the polymer chains are forced to adopt structures differing from the familiar bulk phases. As many applications utilize polymers in sizes and shapes that lead to these non bulk structures, the confinement effects are important. A commonly used tool for computationally determining structures is the continuum self consistant field theory (SCFT). We discuss our highly scalable parallel framework for SCFT using real space methods (finite element) that is especially well suited to modelling complex geometries. This framework is capable of modeling both Gaussian and worm like chains. We illustate the use of the software framework in determining structures under varying degrees of confinement. We detail the method used and present selected results from a systematic study of confinement using arbitrary structures.

  4. Exploring Partially Confined Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, M.; Myers, J.

    Phases of SU(N) gauge theories in which the global Z(N) symmetry breaks spontaneously to a subgroup Z(L) can be realized by adding appropriate Wilson line terms to the gauge action. These phases are partially confining, in the sense that quarks are confined but bound states of L quarks are not. At temperatures large compared to the normal deconfinement temperature, the phase diagram, pressure, string tensions, and 't Hooft loop surface tensions can be calculated analytically. Approximate scaling laws emerge naturally for both string tensions and surface tensions.

  5. Order, Disorder and Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, M.; Di Giacomo, A.; Pica, C.

    2006-01-12

    Studying the order of the chiral transition for Nf = 2 is of fundamental importance to understand the mechanism of color confinement. We present results of a numerical investigation on the order of the transition by use of a novel strategy in finite size scaling analysis. The specific heat and a number of susceptibilities are compared with the possible critical behaviours. A second order transition in the O(4) and O(2) universality classes are excluded. Substantial evidence emerges for a first order transition. Results are in agreement with those found by studying the scaling properties of a disorder parameter related to the dual superconductivity mechanism of color confinement.

  6. Potential change in flaw geometry of an initially shallow finite-length surface flaw during a pressurized-thermal-shock transient

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1993-09-01

    This study presents preliminary estimates on whether an shallow, axially oriented, inner-surface finite-length flaw in a PWR-RPV would tend to elongate in the axial direction and/or deepen into the wall of the vessel during a postulated PTS transient. Analysis results obtained based on the assumptions of (1) linear-elastic material response, and (2) cladding with same toughness as the base metal, indicate that a nearly semicircular flaw would likely propagate in the axial direction followed by propagation into the wall of the vessel. Note that these results correspond to initiation within the lower-shelf fracture toughness temperature range, and that their general validity within the lower-transition temperature range remains to be determined. The sensitivity of the numerical results aid conclusions to the following analysis assumptions are evaluated: (1) reference flaw geometry along the entire crack front and especially within the cladding region; (2) linear-elastic vs elastic-plastic description of material response; and (3) base-material-only vs bimaterial cladding-base vessel-model assumption. The sensitivity evaluation indicates that the analysis results are very sensitive to the above assumptions.

  7. Physics as Spacetime Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, Vesselin

    As there have been no major advancements in fundamental physics in the past decades it seems reasonable to reexamine the major explicit and especially implicit assumptions in fundamental physics to ensure that all logically possible research directions are identified. The purpose of this chapter is to outline such a direction. Minkowski's program of regarding four-dimensional physics as spacetime geometry is rigorously and consistently employed to the already geometrized general relativity with the most stunning implication that gravitational phenomena are fully explained in the theory without the need to assume that they are caused by gravitational interaction. Then the real open question in gravitational physics seems to be how matter curves spacetime, not how to quantize the apparent gravitational interaction. In view of the difficulties encountered by quantum gravity, even the radical option that gravity is not a physical interaction deserves careful scrutiny due to its potential impact on fundamental physics as a whole. The chapter discusses the possible implications of this option for the physics of gravitational waves and for quantum gravity and ends with an example where regarding physics as spacetime geometry provides a straightforward explanation of a rather subtle issue in relativity - propagation of light in noninertial reference frames.

  8. Multiscale confining dynamics from holographic RG flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elander, Daniel; Faedo, Anton F.; Hoyos, Carlos; Mateos, David; Piai, Maurizio

    2014-05-01

    We consider renormalization group flows between conformal field theories in five (six) dimensions with a string (M-theory) dual. By compactifying on a circle (torus) with appropriate boundary conditions, we obtain continuous families of confining fourdimensional theories parametrized by the ratio Λflow/ΛQCD, with Λflow the scale at which the flow between fixed points takes place and ΛQCD the confinement scale. We construct the dual geometries explicitly and compute the spectrum of scalar bound states (glueballs). We find a `universal' subset of states common to all the models. We comment on the modifications of these models, and the corresponding fine-tuning, required for a parametrically light `dilaton' state to be present. We also comment on some aspects of these theories as probed by extended objects such as strings and branes.

  9. Spinorial Geometry and Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloane, Peter

    2007-09-01

    We adapt the spinorial geometry method introduced in [J. Gillard, U. Gran and G. Papadopoulos, "The spinorial geometry of supersymmetric backgrounds," Class. Quant. Grav. 22 (2005) 1033 [ arXiv:hep-th/0410155

  10. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERS,RICHARD; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; HEBRON,DAVID E.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; MATUSLKA,WALTER; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; NASH,THOMAS J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,BOB; PETERSON,DARRELL; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; STRUVE,KENNETH W.; VESEY,ROGER A.

    1999-11-01

    Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch magnet on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {approx}85 eV for a duration of {approx}10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approx}122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approx}150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation T{approx}(P/A){sup 1/4}. P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

  11. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sandord, T.W.L.; Olson, R.E.; Chandler, G.A.; Hebron, D.E.; Mock, R.C.; Leeper, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Simpson, W.W.; Struve, K.W.; Vesey, R.A.; Bowers, R.L.; Matuska, W.; Peterson, D.L.; Peterson, R.R.

    1999-08-25

    Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch target on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {minus}85 eV for a duration of {approximately} 10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approximately} 122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approximately} 150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation (T-(P/A){sup 1/4}). P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

  12. Materials self-assembly and fabrication in confined spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Ji, Dr. Qingmin; Hill, Dr. Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Molecular assemblies have been mainly researched in open spaces for long time. However, recent researches have revealed that there are many interesting aspects remained in self-assemblies in confined spaces. Molecular association within nanospaces such as mesoporous materials provide unusual phenomena based on highly restricted molecular motions. Current research endeavors in materials science and technology are focused on developing either new class of materials or materials with novel/multiple functionalities which is often achived via molecular assembly in confined spaces. Template synthesis and guided assemblies are distinguishable examples for molecular assembly in confined spaces. So far, different aspects of molecular confinements are discussed separately. In this review, the focus is specifically to bring some potential developments in various aspects of confined spaces for molecular self-assembly under one roof. We arrange the sections in this review based on the nature of the confinements; accordingly the topological/geometrical confinements, chemical and biological confinements, and confinements within thin film, respectively. Following these sections, molecular confinements for practical applications are shortly described in order to show connections of these scientific aspects with possible practical uses. One of the most important facts is that the self-assembly in confined spaces stands at meeting points of top-down and bottom-up fabrications, which would be an ultimate key to push the limits of nanotechnology and nanoscience.

  13. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; ">the JET Contributors, confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10‑5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is underway and JET has successfully achieved H 98(y,2)  =  1 for plasma currents up to 2.5 MA at moderate β N.

  14. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  15. Confined ring polymers as a model nucleoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Bae-Yeun; Jeon, C.; Kim, J.; Jeong, H.; Jun, S.; Jung, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial chromosome is tightly packed in an intracellular space called the nucleoid with its loci linearly and precisely positioned. Here we propose a model nucleoid: a ring polymer confined in a cylindrical space. When the cylinder-ring parameters are chosen properly, our model describes the observed locus distributions of the E. coli chromosome surprisingly well. Our results illustrate how the geometry and function of the nucleoid are interrelated. This work was supported by the collaborative research contract funded by Korea Institute of Science & Technology Information (KISTI, Korea) and NSERC (Canada).

  16. Magnetohydrodynamically generated velocities in confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jorge A.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate by numerical simulation the rotational flows in a toroid confining a conducting magnetofluid in which a current is driven by the application of externally supported electric and magnetic fields. The computation involves no microscopic instabilities and is purely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). We show how the properties and intensity of the rotations are regulated by dimensionless numbers (Lundquist and viscous Lundquist) that contain the resistivity and viscosity of the magnetofluid. At the magnetohydrodynamic level (uniform mass density and incompressible magnetofluids), rotational flows appear in toroidal, driven MHD. The evolution of these flows with the transport coefficients, geometry, and safety factor are described.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamically generated velocities in confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Jorge A. Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2015-04-15

    We investigate by numerical simulation the rotational flows in a toroid confining a conducting magnetofluid in which a current is driven by the application of externally supported electric and magnetic fields. The computation involves no microscopic instabilities and is purely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). We show how the properties and intensity of the rotations are regulated by dimensionless numbers (Lundquist and viscous Lundquist) that contain the resistivity and viscosity of the magnetofluid. At the magnetohydrodynamic level (uniform mass density and incompressible magnetofluids), rotational flows appear in toroidal, driven MHD. The evolution of these flows with the transport coefficients, geometry, and safety factor are described.

  18. Study of the Potential Earthquake Risk in the Western United States by the LURR Method Based on the Seismic Catalogue, Fault Geometry and Focal Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongxian; Yikilmaz, M. Burak; Rundle, John B.; Yin, Xiangchu; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Langping; Wang, Zijin

    2015-08-01

    Based on the load/unload response ratio (LURR) theory, spatial and temporal variation of Y/ Y c (value of LURR/critical value of LURR under 90 % confidence) in the western United States and its adjacent area (31°-44°N, -128° to -112°E) during the period from 1980 to 2011 was studied. The selected study area was zoned into 20 sub-regions, in each of which the fault geometry and the focal mechanisms were very similar such that the stress fields were almost uniform. The loading and unloading periods were determined by calculating perturbations in the Coulomb failure stress in each sub-regions induced by earth tides. Earthquakes occurring in these sub-regions were identified as a loading or unloading type, and the response rate was chosen as the Benioff strain that can be calculated from earthquake magnitude M. With a time window of 1 year, a time moving step of 1 month, a space window of a circle region with a radius of 100 km, and a space moving step of 0.5° latitudinally and longitudinally, snapshots of the evolution of Y/ Y c were generated. Scanning results show that obvious Y/ Y c anomalies can be detected near the epicenter of all big earthquakes larger than M6.5 in regions with reasonable seismic monitoring abilities. They also show Y/ Y c anomalies occurred several years prior to the big earthquakes and the lasting time of the anomaly is from one year to several years. For some LURR anomalous regions, however, no earthquakes occurred. According to the characteristics of LURR anomalies, two regions with a high risk of big earthquakes were detected. One is between the northern region of the Bay Area and the Mendocino triple junction (38°-40°N, -124° to -122°E) and the other is between Lake Tahoe and Mono Lake (37.5°-39.5°N, -120° to -118°E) along the border of California and Nevada.

  19. Totally confined explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  20. Confinement property in SU(3) gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zayakin, A. V.; Rafelski, J.

    2009-08-01

    We study the confinement property of the pure SU(3) gauge theory, combining in this effort the nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators obtained as solutions of Dyson-Schwinger equations with solutions of an integral ladder diagram summation type equation for the Wilson loop. We obtain the string potential and effective UV coupling.

  1. Energy confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, M.; Singer, C.

    1986-08-01

    A straightforward generalization is made of the ohmic heating energy confinement scalings of Pfeiffer and Waltz and Blackwell et. al. The resulting model is systematically calibrated to published data from limiter tokamaks with ohmic, electron cyclotron, and neutral beam heating. With considerably fewer explicitly adjustable free parameters, this model appears to give a better fit to the available data for limiter discharges than the combined ohmic/auxiliary heating model of Goldston.

  2. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A; Batista, Cristian D

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  3. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  4. Confined vortex scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards. This is to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber (CVS). The CVS consists of a cylindrical vortex chamber with tangential flue gas inlets. The clean gas exit is via tangent slots in a central tube. Liquid is introduced into the chamber and is confined with the vortex chamber by the centrifugal force generated by the gas flow itself. This confined liquid forms a layer through which the flue gas is then forced to bubble, producing a strong gas/liquid interaction, high inertial separation forces and efficient particulate cleanup. In effect, each of the sub-millimeter diameter gas bubbles in the liquid layer acts as a micro-cyclone, inertially separating particles into the surrounding liquid. The CVS thus obtains efficient particle removal by forcing intimate and vigorous interaction between the particle laden flue gas and the liquid scrubbing medium.

  5. On the Dirac Structure of Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Adam P. Szczepaniak; Eric S. Swanson

    1997-04-01

    The Dirac structure of confinement is shown to be of time like-vector nature in the heavy quark limit of QCD. This stands in contradiction with the phenomenological success of the Dirac scalar confining potential. A resolution is achieved through the demonstration that an effective scalar interaction is dynamically generated by nonperturbative mixing between ordinary and hybrid Q {bar Q} states. The resolution depends crucially on the collective nature of the gluonic degrees of freedom. This implies that dynamical gluonic effects are vital when attempting to incorporate fine structure in models of the Q {bar Q} interaction.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Liquid He-4 near the Superfluid Transition in Restricted Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuanming

    2003-01-01

    We present measurements of the thermal conductivity near the superfluid transition of He-4 in confined geometries. The confinements we have studied include: cylindrical geometries with radii L=.5 and 1.0 microns, and parallel plates with 5 micron spacing. For L=1.0 microns, measurements at six pressures were conducted, whereas only SVP measurements have been done for other geometries. For the 1-D confinement in cylinders, the data are consistent with a universal scaling for all pressures at and above T(sub lambda). There are indications of breakdown of scaling and universality below T(sub lambda). For the 2-D confinement between parallel plates, the preliminary results indicate that the thermal conductivity is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Further analyses are needed to compare the 2-D results with those in bulk and 1-D confinement.

  7. Isotopic Effects on Covalent Bond Confined in a Penetrable Sphere.

    PubMed

    Sarsa, Antonio; Alcaraz-Pelegrina, José M; Le Sech, Claude

    2015-11-12

    A model of confinement of the covalent bond by a finite potential beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is presented. A two-electron molecule is located at the center of a penetrable spherical cavity. The Schrödinger equation has been solved by using the diffusion Monte Carlo method. Total energies, internuclear distances, and vibrational frequencies of the confined molecular system have been obtained. Even for confining potentials of a few electronvolts, a noticeable increase in the bond energy and the nuclear vibrational frequency is observed, and the internuclear distance is lowered. The gap between the zero point energy of different molecular isotopes increases with confinement. The confinement of the electron pair might play a role in chemical reactivity, providing an alternative explanation for the tunnel effect, when large values of primary kinetic isotopic effect are observed. The Swain-Schaad relation is still verified when confinement changes the zero point energy. A semiquantitative illustration is proposed using the data relative to an hydrogen transfer involving a C-H cleavage catalyzed by the bovine serum amine oxidase. Changes on the confining conditions, corresponding to a confinement/deconfinement process, result in a significant decrease in the activation energy of the chemical transformation. It is proposed that confinement/deconfinement of the electron-pair bonding by external electrostatic forces inside the active pocket of an enzyme could be one of the basic mechanisms of the enzyme catalysis. PMID:26484576

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of the binding interactions of a membrane potential molecule in various supramolecular confined environments: contrasting behavior of surfactant molecules in relocation or release of the probe between nanocarriers and DNA surface.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surajit; Banik, Debasis; Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-12-01

    The fluorescence and optical properties of membrane potential probes are widely used to measure cellular transmembrane potentials. Hemicyanine dyes are also able to bind to membranes. The spectral properties of these molecules depend upon the charge shift from the donor moiety to the acceptor moiety. Changes in their spectral properties, i.e. absorption and emission maxima or intensities, are helpful in characterizing model membranes, microheterogeneous media, etc. In this article, we have demonstrated the binding interaction of a membrane potential probe, 1-ethyl-2-(4-(p-dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3-butadienyl)-pyridinium perchlorate (LDS 698), with various supramolecular confined environments. The larger dipole moment in the ground state compared to the excited state is a unique feature of hemicyanine dyes. Due to this unique feature, red shifts in the absorption maxima are observed in hydrophobic environments, compared with bulk solvent. On addition of surfactants and CT DNA to an aqueous solution containing LDS 698, significant increase in the emission intensity along with the quantum yield and lifetime indicate partition of the probe molecules into organized assemblies. In the case of the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-water system, due to interactions between the cationic LDS 698 and the anionic dodecyl sulfate moiety, the fluorescence intensity at ∼666 nm decreases and an additional peak at ∼590 nm appears at premicellar concentration (∼0.20 mM-4.50 mM). But at ∼5.50 mM SDS concentration, the absorbance in the higher wavelength region increases again, indicating encapsulation of the probe in micellar aggregates. This observation indicates that the premicellar aggregation behavior of SDS can also be judged by observing the changes in the UV-vis and fluorescence spectral patterns. The temperature dependent study also indicates that non-radiative deactivation of the dye molecules is highly restricted in the DNA micro-environment, compared with micelles. Besides, we have also investigated the specific interaction of surfactant micelles with DNA. Our observations reveal that, in the presence of CT DNA, LDS 698 interacts exclusively with SDS micelles, but that it preferentially releases from micelles and relocates to DNA surfaces in solutions containing TX-100 micelles. PMID:25327647

  9. Active nematics confined within a shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; de Pablo, Juan; dePablo Team

    Active fluids exhibit many striking flow patterns when confined within complex geometries. For example, recent work has demonstrated that when a thin film of extensile microtubules is confined within a vesicle, the four + 1 / 2 defects periodically oscillate between a tetrahedral and a planar configuration (Keber, et al. Science (2014). Here we employ hybrid lattice Boltzmann simulations to study the dynamics of active nematics confined between two concentric spherical surfaces. We find that in both extensile and contractile systems, the four defects are coupled with noticeable macroscopic velocities and they move along their symmetry axes, eventhough in different patterns. We observe that in extensile systems with moderate activity, defects repel each other due to elastic forces, and their collective motion leads to the same patterned dynamics as observed in the above experiment. We further show that this periodic dynamics is accompanied by oscillations of the defect velocity, system's elastic energy, and the emergence and annihilation of vortices. We also observe that with stronger activity, the extensile system evolves to chaos. In contrast, the contractile system remains passive for the entire activity range, with defects being attracted to each other in pairs.

  10. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevertz, Jana L.; Gillies, George T.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-09-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics.

  11. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Gevertz, Jana L; Gillies, George T; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics. PMID:18824788

  12. Inverted critical adsorption of polyelectrolytes in confinement.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Sidney J; Metzler, Ralf; Cherstvy, Andrey G

    2015-06-14

    What are the fundamental laws for the adsorption of charged polymers onto oppositely charged surfaces, for convex, planar, and concave geometries? This question is at the heart of surface coating applications, various complex formation phenomena, as well as in the context of cellular and viral biophysics. It has been a long-standing challenge in theoretical polymer physics; for realistic systems the quantitative understanding is however often achievable only by computer simulations. In this study, we present the findings of such extensive Monte-Carlo in silico experiments for polymer-surface adsorption in confined domains. We study the inverted critical adsorption of finite-length polyelectrolytes in three fundamental geometries: planar slit, cylindrical pore, and spherical cavity. The scaling relations extracted from simulations for the critical surface charge density σc-defining the adsorption-desorption transition-are in excellent agreement with our analytical calculations based on the ground-state analysis of the Edwards equation. In particular, we confirm the magnitude and scaling of σc for the concave interfaces versus the Debye screening length 1/κ and the extent of confinement a for these three interfaces for small κa values. For large κa the critical adsorption condition approaches the known planar limit. The transition between the two regimes takes place when the radius of surface curvature or half of the slit thickness a is of the order of 1/κ. We also rationalize how σc(κ) dependence gets modified for semi-flexible versus flexible chains under external confinement. We examine the implications of the chain length for critical adsorption-the effect often hard to tackle theoretically-putting an emphasis on polymers inside attractive spherical cavities. The applications of our findings to some biological systems are discussed, for instance the adsorption of nucleic acids onto the inner surfaces of cylindrical and spherical viral capsids. PMID:25940939

  13. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%-samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  14. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-02-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems.

  15. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  16. Electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth for dynamically configurable neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Honegger, Thibault; Scott, Mark A.; Yanik, Mehmet F.; Voldman, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Axons in the developing nervous system are directed via guidance cues, whose expression varies both spatially and temporally, to create functional neural circuits. Existing methods to create patterns of neural connectivity in vitro use only static geometries, and are unable to dynamically alter the guidance cues imparted on the cells. We introduce the use of AC electrokinetics to dynamically control axonal growth in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We find that the application of modest voltages at frequencies on the order of 105 Hz can cause developing axons to be stopped adjacent to the electrodes while axons away from the electric fields exhibit uninhibited growth. By switching electrodes on or off, we can reversibly inhibit or permit axon passage across the electrodes. Our models suggest that dielectrophoresis is the causative AC electrokinetic effect. We make use of our dynamic control over axon elongation to create an axon-diode via an axon-lock system that consists of a pair of electrode `gates' that either permit or prevent axons from passing through. Finally, we developed a neural circuit consisting of three populations of neurons, separated by three axon-locks to demonstrate the assembly of a functional, engineered neural network. Action potential recordings demonstrate that the AC electrokinetic effect does not harm axons, and Ca2+ imaging demonstrated the unidirectional nature of the synaptic connections. AC electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth has potential for creating configurable, directional neural networks. PMID:23314575

  17. Spatially confined assembly of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong; Lu, Nan; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-10-21

    The ability to assemble NPs into ordered structures that are expected to yield collective physical or chemical properties has afforded new and exciting opportunities in the field of nanotechnology. Among the various configurations of nanoparticle assemblies, two-dimensional (2D) NP patterns and one-dimensional (1D) NP arrays on surfaces are regarded as the ideal assembly configurations for many technological devices, for example, solar cells, magnetic memory, switching devices, and sensing devices, due to their unique transport phenomena and the cooperative properties of NPs in assemblies. To realize the potential applications of NP assemblies, especially in nanodevice-related applications, certain key issues must still be resolved, for example, ordering and alignment, manipulating and positioning in nanodevices, and multicomponent or hierarchical structures of NP assemblies for device integration. Additionally, the assembly of NPs with high precision and high levels of integration and uniformity for devices with scaled-down dimensions has become a key and challenging issue. Two-dimensional NP patterns and 1D NP arrays are obtained using traditional lithography techniques (top-down strategies) or interfacial assembly techniques (bottom-up strategies). However, a formidable challenge that persists is the controllable assembly of NPs in desired locations over large areas with high precision and high levels of integration. The difficulty of this assembly is due to the low efficiency of small features over large areas in lithography techniques or the inevitable structural defects that occur during the assembly process. The combination of self-assembly strategies with existing nanofabrication techniques could potentially provide effective and distinctive solutions for fabricating NPs with precise position control and high resolution. Furthermore, the synergistic combination of spatially mediated interactions between nanoparticles and prestructures on surfaces may play an increasingly important role in the controllable assembly of NPs. In this Account, we summarize our approaches and progress in fabricating spatially confined assemblies of NPs that allow for the positioning of NPs with high resolution and considerable throughput. The spatially selective assembly of NPs at the desired location can be achieved by various mechanisms, such as, a controlled dewetting process, electrostatically mediated assembly of particles, and confined deposition and growth of NPs. Three nanofabrication techniques used to produce prepatterns on a substrate are summarized: the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) patterning technique, e-beam lithography (EBL), and nanoimprint lithography (NPL). The particle density, particle size, or interparticle distance in NP assemblies strongly depends on the geometric parameters of the template structure due to spatial confinement. In addition, with smart design template structures, multiplexed NPs can be assembled into a defined structure, thus demonstrating the structural and functional complexity required for highly integrated and multifunction applications. PMID:25244100

  18. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  19. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  20. Aerofractures in Confined Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2015-04-01

    We will present the optical analysis of experimental aerofractures in confined granular media. The study of this generic process may have applications in industries involving hydraulic fracturing of tight rocks, safe construction of dams, tunnels and mines, and in earth science where phenomena such as mud volcanoes and sand injectites are results of subsurface sediment displacements driven by fluid overpressure. It is also interesting to increase the understanding the flow instability itself, and how the fluid flow impacts the solid surrounding fractures and in the rest of the sample. Such processes where previously studied numerically [Niebling 2012a, Niebling 2012b] or in circular geometries. We will here explore experimentally linear geometries. We study the fracturing patterns that form when air flows into a dense, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a Hele-Shaw cell - i.e. into a packing of dry 80 micron beads placed between two glass plates separated by ~1mm. The cell is rectangular and fitted with a semi-permeable boundary to the atmosphere - blocking beads but not air - on one short edge, while the other three edges are impermeable. The porous medium is packed inside the cell between the semi-permeable boundary and an empty volume at the sealed side where the air pressure can be set and kept at a constant overpressure (1-2bar). Thus, for the air trapped inside the cell to release the overpressure it has to move through the solid. At high enough overpressures the air flow deforms the solid and increase permeability in some regions along the air-solid interface, which results in unstable flow and aerofracturing. Aerofractures are thought to be an analogue to hydrofractures, and an advantage of performing aerofracturing experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell is that the fracturing process can easily be observed in the lab. Our experiments are recorded with a high speed camera with a framerate of 1000 frames per second. In the analysis, by using various image processing techniques, we segment out and study the aerofractures over time looking at growth dynamics, fractal dimension and characteristics such as average finger thickness as function of depth into the solid. Also, by performing image correlation on two subsequent frames we estimate displacement fields and investigate the surrounding stress and strain fields in the solid around the fractures. Several experiments are performed with various overpressures and packing densities, and we compare the results. In a directly related project, acoustic emissions are recorded on a cell plate during experiments, and one of our goals is to correlate acoustic events and observations. We will also compare the dependence of the patterns on the saturation of the initial deformable porous material, by comparing experiments performed by air injection in air saturated granular media, to some in liquid saturated granular media. References: MJ Niebling, R Toussaint, EG Flekkøy, KJ Måløy, 2012, Dynamic aerofracture of dense granular packings, 2012, Physical Review E 86 (6), 061315 M Niebling, R Toussaint, EG Flekkøy, KJ Måløy, 2012, Numerical studies of aerofractures in porous media, Revista Cubana de Fisica 29 (1E), pp. 1E66-1E70

  1. Geometry Dependence of Stellarator Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, P. Xanthopoulos and A.H. Boozer

    2009-08-10

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST, we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry-dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the 2D structure of the microturbulence over that surface, and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrodinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  2. Spontaneous ordering and vortex states of active fluids in circular confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theillard, Maxime; Ezhilan, Barath; Saintillan, David

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental, theoretical and simulation studies have shown that confinement can profoundly affect self-organization in active suspensions leading to striking features such as directed fluid pumping in planar confinement, formation of steady and spontaneous vortices in radial confinement. Motivated by this, we study the dynamics in a suspension of biologically active particles confined in spherical geometries using a mean-field kinetic theory for which we developed a novel numerical solver. In the case of circular confinement, we conduct a systematic exploration of the entire parameter space and distinguish 3 broad states: no-flow, stable vortex and chaotic and several interesting sub-states. Our efficient numerical framework is also employed to study 3D effects and dynamics in more complex geometries.

  3. Geometry of multihadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  4. Twistors to twisted geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Freidel, Laurent; Speziale, Simone

    2010-10-15

    In a previous paper we showed that the phase space of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph can be parametrized in terms of twisted geometries, quantities describing the intrinsic and extrinsic discrete geometry of a cellular decomposition dual to the graph. Here we unravel the origin of the phase space from a geometric interpretation of twistors.

  5. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  6. Want to Play Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Matthew L.; Bomer, Megan A.; Powell, Nancy Norem

    2009-01-01

    Students enter the geometry classroom with a strong concept of fairness and a sense of what it means to "play by the rules," yet many students have difficulty understanding the postulates, or rules, of geometry and their implications. Although they may never have articulated the properties of an axiomatic system, they have gained a practical…

  7. Geometry Professionalized for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christofferson, Halbert Carl

    Written in 1933, this book grew out of the author's concern that college matehmatics sequences of the day, although appropriate in algebra preparation, did not adequately prepare teachers of geometry. This book describes a course intended to remedy this by providing for both a comprehensive study of geometry as an axiomatically defined structure…

  8. Review of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, M. G.

    The physics of inertial confinement fusion is reviewed. The trend to short-wavelength lasers is argued, and the distinction between direct and indirect (soft X-ray) drive is made. Key present issues include the non-linear growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities, the seeding of this instability by the initial laser imprint, the relevance of self-generated magnetic fields, and the importance of parametric instabilities (stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering) in gas-filled hohlraums. Experiments are reviewed which explore the R-T instability in both planar and converging geometry. The employment of various optical smoothing techniques is contrasted with the overcoating of the capsule by gold coated plastic foams to reduce considerably the imprint problem. The role of spontaneously generated magnetic fields in non-symmetric plasmas is discussed. Recent hohlraum compression results are presented together with gas bag targets which replicate the long-scale-length low density plasmas expected in NIF gas filled hohlraums. The onset of first Brillouin and then Raman scattering is observed. The fast ignitor scheme is a proposal to use an intense short pulse laser to drill a hole through the coronal plasma and then, with laser excited fast electrons, create a propagating thermonuclear spark in a dense, relatively cold laser-compressed target. Some preliminary results of laser hole drilling and 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations of this and the > 10^8 Gauss self-generated magnetic fields are presented. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described.

  9. Enhancement of Persistent Currents due to Confinement in Metallic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, V. M.; Chiappe, G.; Sánchez, M. J.

    2000-11-01

    Confinement and surface roughness (SR) effects on the magnitude of the persistent current are analyzed for ballistic bidimensional metallic samples. Depending on the particular geometry, localized border states can show up at half-filling. These border states contribute coherently to the persistent current and its magnitude is enhanced with respect to their value in the absence of confinement. A linear scaling of the typical current Ityp with the number of conduction channels M is obtained. This result is robust with respect to changes in the relevant lengths of the samples and to the SR. Possible links of our results to experiments are also discussed.

  10. Confinement Induced Splay-to-Bend Transition of Colloidal Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammone, Oliver J.; Zacharoudiou, Ioannis; Dullens, Roel P. A.; Yeomans, Julia M.; Lettinga, M. P.; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.

    2012-09-01

    We study the nematic phase of rodlike fd-virus particles confined to channels with wedge-structured walls. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy we observe a splay-to-bend transition at the single particle level as a function of the wedge opening angle. Lattice Boltzmann simulations reveal the underlying origin of the transition and its dependence on nematic elasticity and wedge geometry. Our combined work provides a simple method to estimate the splay-to-bend elasticity ratios of the virus and offers a way to control the position of defects through the confining boundary conditions.

  11. The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

    2009-03-09

    This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

  12. Confined placental mosaicism.

    PubMed Central

    Kalousek, D K; Vekemans, M

    1996-01-01

    In most pregnancies the chromosomal complement detected in the fetus is also present in the placenta. The detection of an identical chromosomal complement in both the fetus and its placenta has always been expected as both develop from the same zygote. However, in approximately 2% of viable pregnancies studied by chorionic villus sampling (CVS) at 9 to 11 weeks of gestation, the cytogenetic abnormality, most often trisomy, is confined to the placenta. This phenomenon is known as confined placental mosaicism (CPM). It was first described by Kalousek and Dill in term placentas of infants born with unexplained intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Contrary to generalised mosaicism, which is characterised by the presence of two or more karyotypically different cell lines within both the fetus and its placenta, CPM represents tissue specific chromosomal mosaicism affecting the placenta only. The diagnosis of CPM is most commonly made when, after the diagnosis of chromosomal mosaicism in a CVS sample, the second prenatal testing (amniotic fluid culture or fetal blood culture analysis) shows a normal diploid karyotype. PMID:8818935

  13. Constraints on the magnetic field geometry of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, H.; Colaiuda, A.; Kokkotas, K. D.

    2008-04-01

    We study the effect of the magnetic field geometry on the oscillation spectra of strongly magnetized stars. We construct a configuration of magnetic field where a toroidal component is added to the standard poloidal one. We consider a star with a type I superconductor core so that both components of the magnetic field are expelled from the core and confined in the crust. Our results show that the toroidal contribution does not influence significantly the torsional oscillations of the crust. On the contrary, the confinement of the magnetic field in the crust drastically affects the torsional oscillation spectrum. A comparison with estimations for the magnetic field strength, from observations, excludes the possibility that magnetars will have a magnetic field solely confined in the crust, that is, our results suggest that the magnetic field in whatever geometry has to permeate the whole star.

  14. Partial spin polarization of a conductance in a bi-layer In0.52 Al0.48 As / In0.53 Ga0.47 As heterostructure based nanowire for the rectangular and the smooth lateral confinement potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-03-01

    We simulate the electron transport in a vertical bi-layer nanowire in order to study an influence of the lateral confinement's shape on a spin polarization of wire's conductance. The active part of considered quantum wire constitutes a double inverted heterojunction In0.52 Al0.48 As / In0.53 Ga0.47 As which nanostructure can be fabricated in molecular beam epitaxy process while the lateral confinement potential can be finally formed by means of cleaved overgrowth or surface oxidization methods giving the desired rectangular and smooth lateral confinement. In calculations we take into account interaction between charge carriers using DFT within local spin density approximation. We show that if the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wire axis, the pseudogaps are opened in energy dispersion relation E (k) what in conjunction with spin Zeeman shift of spin-up and spin-down subbands may enhance the spin polarization of conductance with reference to a single layer wire. For nanowire with rectangular lateral confinement potential we found that the electron density has two maximums localized at wire edges in each layers. This modificates strongly all magnetosubbands giving up to four energy minimums in lowest subband and considerably diminishes widths of pseudogaps what translates into low maximal spin polarization of conductance, not exceeding 40%. This drawback is absent in wire with smooth lateral confinement. However, in order to gain a large spin polarization simultaneous tuning of magnetic field as well as the Fermi energies in both layers of nanowire are required.

  15. CUSP Energetic Particles: Confinement, Acceleration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    The cusp energetic particle (CEP) event is a new magnetospheric phenomenon. The events were detected in the dayside cusp for hours, in which the measured helium ions had energies up to 8 MeV. All of these events were associated with a dramatic decrease and large fluctuations in the local magnetic field strength. During January 1999 - December 1999 covered by this report, I have studied the CEP events by analyzing the POLAR, GEOTAIL, and WIND particle and magnetic field data measured during the geomagnetic quiet periods in 1996 and one geomagnetic storm period in 1998. The simultaneous observations indicated that the ion fluxes in the CEP events were higher than that in both the upstream and the downstream from the bow shock. The pitch angle distribution of the helium ions in the CEP events was found to peak around 90 deg. It was found that the mirror parameter, defined as the ratio of the square root of the integration of the parallel turbulent power spectral component over the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges to the mean field in the cusp, is correlated with the intensity of the cusp MeV helium flux, which is a measure of the influence of mirroring interactions and an indication of local effect. It was also found that the turbulent power of the local magnetic field in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges is correlated with the intensity of the cusp energetic helium ions. Such ULF ranges correspond to periods of about 0.33-500 seconds that cover the gyroperiods, the bounce periods, and the drift periods of the tens keV to MeV charged particles when they are temporarily confined in the high-altitude dayside cusp. These observations represent a discovery that the high-altitude dayside cusp is a new acceleration and dynamic trapping region of the magnetosphere. The cusp geometry is connected via gradient and curvature drift of these energized ions to the equatorial plasma sheet as close as the geostationary orbit at local midnight. It implies that the dayside cusp is potentially an important source of magnetospheric particles. The discovery of the CEP events has been recognized as one of the most significant results from POLAR. I was invited to give a talk at 1999 IUGG meeting to interpret the CEP events. This discovery has also been written into the web-based Space Physics Text Book (http://www.oulu.fi/- spaceweb/textbook/cusp.html).

  16. Dynamics of Confined Water Molecules in Aqueous Salt Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Werhahn, Jasper C.; Pandelov, S.; Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Iglev, H.

    2011-04-01

    The unusual properties of water are largely dictated by the dynamics of the H bond network. A single water molecule has more H bonding sites than atoms, hence new experimental and theoretical investigations about this peculiar liquid have not ceased to appear. Confinement of water to nanodroplets or small molecular clusters drastically changes many of the liquids properties. Such confined water plays a major role in the solvation of macro molecules such as proteins and can even be essential to their properties. Despite the vast results available on bulk and confined water, discussions about the correlation between spectral and structural properties continue to this day. The fast relaxation of the OH stretching vibration in bulk water, and the variance of sample geometries in the experiments on confined water obfuscate definite interpretation of the spectroscopic results in terms of structural parameters. We present first time-resolved investigations on a new model system that is ideally suited to overcome many of the problems faced in spectroscopical investigation of the H bond network of water. Aqueous hydrates of inorganic salts provide water molecules in a crystal grid, that enables unambiguous correlations of spectroscopic and structural features. Furthermore, the confined water clusters are well isolated from each other in the crystal matrix, so different degrees of confinement can be achieved by selection of the appropriate salt.

  17. Modeling confined jet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yule, A. J.; Damou, M.; Kostopoulos, D.

    1993-03-01

    The prediction of confined jet mixing, which occurs in many processes from jet pumps to furnaces, is studied by testing and improving turbulence models. Numerical simulations of axisymmetric parabolic jet flows, with the two-equation k-epsilon eddy-viscosity model and the second-moment closure in its algebraic form, are compared with measurements. This leads to the identification of defects that cause high rates of mixing, similar to those shown in earlier work with free jets. Modifications to the dissipation rate equation, proposed for the free jet, are addressed by examining the effects of anisotropy-related proposals and the sensitization to irrotational strains. The involvement of large structures in transport phenomena is also considered via bulk-convection-based models. A combination of 20 percent gradient diffusion and 80 percent bulk convection appears to mimic the transport process for turbulent energy reasonably well.

  18. Confinement vessel analysis final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.B.

    1992-05-06

    The overall purpose of the confinement vessel analysis program was to aid Los Alamos in validation of a new confinement vessel configuration. This was done in two steps: First, we developed a finite element analysis model of the benchmark confinement vessel and compared the results against test results to verify the accuracy of the model and analysis technique. We then changed the finite element model to represent the new confinement vessel configuration and predicted the response of the new vessel for specified loading conditions. This report describes the work done to achieve the objective.

  19. Plasma confinement studies in open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsu, Kiyoshi

    1999-03-01

    Studies in open systems in the world are reviewed from viewpoints of the potential confinement and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability. The tandem mirror GAMMA 10 has shown the potential confinement of a high-ion-temperature plasma from an analysis of the time evolution of end-loss ion current and end-loss ion energy distributions. The central cell density was increased by 50% by the potential confinement. In the HIEI tandem mirror H-mode-like phenomena were observed with an increase in density and diamagnetic signal in a limiter biasing experiment. Potential formation phenomena in plasmas are studied by 0741-3335/41/3A/024/img1-like Upgrade under different magnetic field configurations and plasma conditions. The fully axisymmetric tandem mirror AMBAL-M is under construction and its end mirror system has been assembled. Heating experiments of a plasma gun produced plasma by neutral beam injection and ICRF heating are in progress. The gas dynamic trap (GDT) experiment has successfully produced an MHD-stable high-temperature, high-density plasma. In GOL-3-II, a high-density plasma with several 100 eV temperature is created by powerful relativistic electron beam injection. Construction of HANBIT has been completed and experiments on plasma production and ICRF heating have begun.

  20. Entropy, confinement, and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwall, John M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper studies the way in which confinement leads to chiral symmetry breaking (CSB) through a gap equation. We argue that a combination of entropic effects, related to fluctuations of Wilson loops with massless constituents, and an Abelian gauge invariance of the confinement action as expressed in terms of the usual confining effective propagator 8{pi}K{sub F{delta}{mu}{nu}}/k{sup 4}, in effect removes infrared singularities coming from use of this propagator in a standard gap equation (K{sub F} is the string tension). Beginning from an Abelian gauge-invariant description of CSB that differs from this standard gap equation, we show how to extract a corresponding gap equation that incorporates both entropic effects and Abelian gauge invariance by replacement of the confining propagator with 8{pi}K{sub F{delta}{mu}{nu}}/(k{sup 2}+m{sup 2}){sup 2}. Here the finite mass m turns out to be {approx_equal}M(0)[M(p{sup 2}) is the running quark mass], based on an extension of an old calculation of the author. This massive propagator gives semiquantitatively two critical properties of confinement: (1) a negative contribution to the confining potential coming from entropy; (2) an infrared cutoff required by Abelian gauge invariance. Entropic effects lead to a qq condensate and contribute a negative term {approx}-K{sub F}/M(0), essential for a massless pion, to the pion Hamiltonian. The resulting gap equation leads to M{sup 2}(0){approx_equal}K{sub F}/{pi}. We argue that one-gluon exchange is not strong enough in the IR to drive quark CSB, but in any case is necessary to get the correct renormalization-group ultraviolet behavior. We find the standard renormalization-group result with the improvement that the prefactor (related to ) can be calculated from the confining solution. Finally, we briefly point out the Minkowski-space virtues of using a principal-part propagator to describe confinement.

  1. Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connes, Alain

    2006-11-01

    In this very short essay we shall describe a "spectral" point of view on geometry which allows to start taking into account the lessons from both renormalization and of general relativity. We shall first do that for renormalization and explain in rough outline the content of our recent collaborations with Dirk Kreimer and Matilde Marcolli leading to the universal Galois symmetry of renormalizable quantum field theories provided by the renormalization group in its cosmic Galois group incarnation. As far as general relativity is concerned, since the functional integral cannot be treated in the traditional perturbative manner, it relies heavily as a "sum over geometries" on the chosen paradigm of geometric space. This will give us the occasion to discuss, in the light of noncommutative geometry, the issue of "observables" in gravity and our joint work with Ali Chamseddine on the spectral action, with a first attempt to write down a functional integral on the space of noncommutative geometries.

  2. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  3. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  4. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  5. Flyby Geometry Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    The Flyby Geometry Optimization Tool is a computer program for computing trajectories and trajectory-altering impulsive maneuvers for spacecraft used in radio relay of scientific data to Earth from an exploratory airplane flying in the atmosphere of Mars.

  6. Entropic stochastic resonance without external force in oscillatory confined space

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huai; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-05-21

    We have studied the dynamics of Brownian particles in a confined geometry of dumbbell-shape with periodically oscillating walls. Entropic stochastic resonance (ESR) behavior, characterizing by a maximum value of the coherent factor Q at some optimal level of noise, is observed even without external periodic force in the horizontal direction, which is necessary for conventional ESR where the wall is static and the particle is subjected to the force. Interestingly, the ESR can be remarkably enhanced by the particle gravity G, in contrast to the conventional case. In addition, Q decreases (increases) with G in the small (large) noise limit, respectively, while it non-monotonically changes with G for moderate noise levels. We have applied an effective 1D coarsening description to illustrate such a nontrivial dependence on G, by investigating the property of the 1D effective potential of entropic nature and paying special attention to the excess part resulting from the boundary oscillation. Dependences of the ESR strength with other related parameters are also discussed.

  7. Entropic stochastic resonance without external force in oscillatory confined space.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huai; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-05-21

    We have studied the dynamics of Brownian particles in a confined geometry of dumbbell-shape with periodically oscillating walls. Entropic stochastic resonance (ESR) behavior, characterizing by a maximum value of the coherent factor Q at some optimal level of noise, is observed even without external periodic force in the horizontal direction, which is necessary for conventional ESR where the wall is static and the particle is subjected to the force. Interestingly, the ESR can be remarkably enhanced by the particle gravity G, in contrast to the conventional case. In addition, Q decreases (increases) with G in the small (large) noise limit, respectively, while it non-monotonically changes with G for moderate noise levels. We have applied an effective 1D coarsening description to illustrate such a nontrivial dependence on G, by investigating the property of the 1D effective potential of entropic nature and paying special attention to the excess part resulting from the boundary oscillation. Dependences of the ESR strength with other related parameters are also discussed. PMID:26001449

  8. SOC and Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAteer, R. T. J.

    2013-06-01

    When Mandelbrot, the father of modern fractal geometry, made this seemingly obvious statement he was trying to show that we should move out of our comfortable Euclidean space and adopt a fractal approach to geometry. The concepts and mathematical tools of fractal geometry provides insight into natural physical systems that Euclidean tools cannot do. The benet from applying fractal geometry to studies of Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) are even greater. SOC and fractal geometry share concepts of dynamic n-body interactions, apparent non-predictability, self-similarity, and an approach to global statistics in space and time that make these two areas into naturally paired research techniques. Further, the iterative generation techniques used in both SOC models and in fractals mean they share common features and common problems. This chapter explores the strong historical connections between fractal geometry and SOC from both a mathematical and conceptual understanding, explores modern day interactions between these two topics, and discusses how this is likely to evolve into an even stronger link in the near future.

  9. Common Geometry Module

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  10. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  11. Experimental studies using a confined radial nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Stromblad, B.; Marongiu, M.J.; Cosley, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal management of high power electronic components with dissipation ratings of over 2--3 W/cm{sup 2} clearly demands non-traditional means to be successful. Many different approaches have been attempted in the past with varying degrees of success. In the last 8 years radial jet reattachment (RJR) has been proven in the laboratory to be a novel and effective mechanism for high surface heat removal rates with negligible downward force as compared with impinging open jets. These nozzles produce only positive forces on the impingement surface. Impinging jets in confined conditions (inside enclosures or between parallel plates) have also been proven to be highly effective with high heat removal rates, suggesting the use of radial nozzles in similar conditions. Thus, confined radial jet reattachment has the potential of achieving even higher rates than impinging jets. However, no data (pressures or heat transfer) are available using confined radial nozzles as explained above. The experiments reported herein were carried out using one radial nozzle discharging in confined conditions (air issuing inside two parallel plates, for example.) Surface pressure distributions over both plates are presented for different geometrical and operational conditions. Results indicate that for the cases tested the radial jet almost always reattaches to the bottom surface, and that the Reynolds number is an important parameter.

  12. Self-organizing human cardiac microchambers mediated by geometric confinement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Wang, Jason; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Koo, Sangmo; Svedlund, Felicia L.; Marks, Natalie C.; Hua, Ethan W.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis and organ formation are the consequences of biochemical and biophysical cues that lead to cellular spatial patterning in development. To model such events in vitro, we use PEG-patterned substrates to geometrically confine human pluripotent stem cell colonies and spatially present mechanical stress. Modulation of the WNT/?-catenin pathway promotes spatial patterning via geometric confinement of the cell condensation process during epithelialmesenchymal transition, forcing cells at the perimeter to express an OCT4+ annulus, which is coincident with a region of higher cell density and E-cadherin expression. The biochemical and biophysical cues synergistically induce self-organizing lineage specification and creation of a beating human cardiac microchamber confined by the pattern geometry. These highly defined human cardiac microchambers can be used to study aspects of embryonic spatial patterning, early cardiac development and drug-induced developmental toxicity. PMID:26172574

  13. Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching in Confined Polymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Laura A. G.; Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Priestley, Rodney D.

    Over the past twenty years many studies have shown a reduction in the glass transition temperature (Tg) of thin polymer films confined on the nanoscale when supported on non-attractive substrates or free-standing. The depth dependence of Tg has been measured using thin layers of fluorescently tagged polymer to localize the dye within a larger polymer film stack, revealing a decrease in local Tg tens of nanometers into the film. These results have been explained by the propagation of enhanced mobility from the free-surface into the polymer film. Fewer direct measurements of molecular mobility have been made in confined polymer systems. Here, we present the results of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments investigating the mobility of fluorescently doped and labeled methacrylate-based polymers confined in thin film geometries. Bleaching and recovery was monitored using a laser-scanning confocal microscope that enabled us to bleach arbitrary micron-sized shapes to monitor diffusion in polymer melts.

  14. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Hyltegren, Kristin; Chodankar, Shirish; Perret, Edith; Buitenhuis, Johan; van der Veen, J. Friso; Kjellander, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  15. Self-organizing human cardiac microchambers mediated by geometric confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhen; Wang, Jason; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Koo, Sangmo; Svedlund, Felicia L.; Marks, Natalie C.; Hua, Ethan W.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-07-01

    Tissue morphogenesis and organ formation are the consequences of biochemical and biophysical cues that lead to cellular spatial patterning in development. To model such events in vitro, we use PEG-patterned substrates to geometrically confine human pluripotent stem cell colonies and spatially present mechanical stress. Modulation of the WNT/β-catenin pathway promotes spatial patterning via geometric confinement of the cell condensation process during epithelial-mesenchymal transition, forcing cells at the perimeter to express an OCT4+ annulus, which is coincident with a region of higher cell density and E-cadherin expression. The biochemical and biophysical cues synergistically induce self-organizing lineage specification and creation of a beating human cardiac microchamber confined by the pattern geometry. These highly defined human cardiac microchambers can be used to study aspects of embryonic spatial patterning, early cardiac development and drug-induced developmental toxicity.

  16. Inertial confinement fusion method producing line source radiation fluence

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Ronald P.

    1984-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion method in which target pellets are imploded in sequence by laser light beams or other energy beams at an implosion site which is variable between pellet implosions along a line. The effect of the variability in position of the implosion site along a line is to distribute the radiation fluence in surrounding reactor components as a line source of radiation would do, thereby permitting the utilization of cylindrical geometry in the design of the reactor and internal components.

  17. Mass diffusion in a self-confined rotating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrance, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    The effectiveness of fluid containment near an interior stagnation point and within a self-confined stagnation region is determined by numerically solving the species conservation equation for a bi-component mixture. The flow geometry is that of a swirling fluid stream containing a stationary eddy on the axis of rotation. The base flow is axisymmetric, and the Reynolds number is equal to 50. Schmidt numbers range from 0.1 to 10.

  18. Ambipolar potential formation in TMX

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.L.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-05-05

    TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. New results on the radial dependence of the central-cell confining potential are given. Radial and axial particle losses as well as scaling of the central-cell axial confinement are discussed.

  19. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  20. Gaspé Belt subsurface geometry in the northern Québec Appalachians as revealed by an integrated geophysical and geological study: 2 — Seismic interpretation and potential field modelling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Geological information, seismic reflection profiles and potential field data are used to study the geometry of the Middle Paleozoic Gaspé Belt (eastern Canada) that has been interpreted in various ways in the past. On the western edge of the Gaspé Belt, in the Matapédia area, growth strata are imaged on seismic profiles and testify of normal (or transtensional) motion during the period spanning the Silurian (and possibly Late Ordovician) to earliest Devonian along several faults, including the Shickshock-Sud Fault. In this area, Acadian deformation during the Middle to Late Devonian is associated with relatively modest shortening (less than 20%) accommodated by broad open folds, steeply-dipping neo-formed faults and inversion of previously formed faults. Neo-formed faults cut the entire Middle Paleozoic succession and offset the Ordovician Taconian unconformity suggesting that no sedimentary interval acted as an efficient décollement level. Toward the SE, the Sainte-Florence Fault divides rock assemblages with different paleogeographic settings and structural styles. Increase in tectonic complexity and amount of shortening to the south of the fault is interpreted as resulting of a vise effect between two basement blocks.

  1. Inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, L.; Condouris, R.; Kotowski, M.; Murphy, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains seven articles that describe recent progress in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ICF program. The Department of Energy recently initiated an effort to design a 1--2 MJ glass laser, the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). These articles span various aspects of a program which is aimed at moving forward toward such a facility by continuing to use the Nova laser to gain understanding of NIF-relevant target physics, by developing concepts for an NIF laser driver, and by envisioning a variety of applications for larger ICF facilities. This report discusses research on the following topics: Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Nitrogen; A Maxwell Equation Solver in LASNEX for the Simulation of Moderately Intense Ultrashort Pulse Experiments; Measurements of Radial Heat-Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Plasmas; Laser-Seeded Modulation Growth on Directly Driven Foils; Stimulated Raman Scattering in Large-Aperture, High-Fluence Frequency-Conversion Crystals; Fission Product Hazard Reduction Using Inertial Fusion Energy; Use of Inertial Confinement Fusion for Nuclear Weapons Effects Simulations.

  2. Confined Selective Withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelio, Alvaro; Campo-Cortes, Francisco; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that the controlled production of monodisperse simple and composite emulsions possesses uncountable applications in medicine, pharmacy, materials science and industry. Here we present both experiments and slender-body theory regarding the generation of simple emulsions using a configuration that we have called Confined Selective Withdrawal, since it is an improved configuration of the classical Selective Withdrawal. We consider two different situations, namely, the cases when the outer flow Reynolds number is high and low, respectively. Several geometrical configurations and a wide range of viscosity ratios are analyzed so that the physics behind the phenomenon can be fully understood. In addition, we present both experiments and theory regarding the generation of composite emulsions. This phenomenon is only feasible when the outer flow Reynolds number is low enough. In this case, we propose a more complex theory which requires the simultaneous resolution of two interfaces in order to predict the shape of the jet and the sizes of the drops formed. The excellent agreement between our slender-body approximation and the experimental evidence fully validates our theories.

  3. A Phase Field Approach to No Slip Boundary Conditions in Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Other Particle Models for Fluid Flow in Geometrically Complex Confined Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Zhijie Xu

    2009-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an effective mesoscopic particle model with a lower computational cost than molecular dynamics because of the soft potentials that it employs. However, the soft potential is not strong enough to prevent the fluid DPD particles from penetrating solid boundaries represented by stationary DPD particles. A phase field variable, _(x,t) , is used to indicate the phase at point x and time t, with a smooth transition from -1 (phase 1) to +1 (phase 2) across the interface. We describe an efficient implementation of no-slip boundary conditions in DPD models that combine solid-liquid particle-particle interactions with reflection at a sharp boundary located with subgrid scale accuracy using the phase field. This approach can be used for arbitrarily complex flow geometries and other similar particle models (such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics), and the validity of the model is demonstrated by flow in confined systems with various geometries.

  4. Integrable Background Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderbank, David M. J.

    2014-03-01

    This work has its origins in an attempt to describe systematically the integrable geometries and gauge theories in dimensions one to four related to twistor theory. In each such dimension, there is a nondegenerate integrable geometric structure, governed by a nonlinear integrable differential equation, and each solution of this equation determines a background geometry on which, for any Lie group G, an integrable gauge theory is defined. In four dimensions, the geometry is selfdual conformal geometry and the gauge theory is selfdual Yang-Mills theory, while the lower-dimensional structures are nondegenerate (i.e., non-null) reductions of this. Any solution of the gauge theory on a k-dimensional geometry, such that the gauge group H acts transitively on an ℓ-manifold, determines a (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometry (k+ℓ≤4) fibering over the k-dimensional geometry with H as a structure group. In the case of an ℓ-dimensional group H acting on itself by the regular representation, all (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometries with symmetry group H are locally obtained in this way. This framework unifies and extends known results about dimensional reductions of selfdual conformal geometry and the selfdual Yang-Mills equation, and provides a rich supply of constructive methods. In one dimension, generalized Nahm equations provide a uniform description of four pole isomonodromic deformation problems, and may be related to the {SU}(∞) Toda and dKP equations via a hodograph transformation. In two dimensions, the {Diff}(S^1) Hitchin equation is shown to be equivalent to the hyperCR Einstein-Weyl equation, while the {SDiff}(Σ^2) Hitchin equation leads to a Euclidean analogue of Plebanski's heavenly equations. In three and four dimensions, the constructions of this paper help to organize the huge range of examples of Einstein-Weyl and selfdual spaces in the literature, as well as providing some new ! ones. The nondegenerate reductions have a long ancestry. More ! recently , degenerate or null reductions have attracted increased interest. Two of these reductions and their gauge theories (arguably, the two most significant) are also described.

  5. Spherical microwave confinement and ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, William Richard

    This dissertation presents the results of research done on unconventional energy technologies from 1995 to 2009. The present civilization depends on an infrastructure that was constructed and is maintained almost entirely using concentrated fuels and ores, both of which will run out. Diffuse renewable energy sources rely on this same infrastructure, and hence face the same limitations. I first examined sonoluminescence directed toward fusion, but demonstrated theoretically that this is impossible. I next studied Low Energy Nuclear Reactions and developed methods for improving results, although these have not been implemented. In 2000, I began Spherical Microwave Confinement (SMC), which confines and heats plasma with microwaves in a spherical chamber. The reactor was designed and built to provide the data needed to investigate the possibility of achieving fusion conditions with microwave confinement. A second objective was to attempt to create ball lightning (BL). The reactor featured 20 magnetrons, which were driven by a capacitor bank and operated in a 0.2 s pulse mode at 2.45 GHz. These provided 20 kW to an icosahedral array of 20 antennas. Video of plasmas led to a redesign of the antennas to provide better coupling of the microwaves to the plasma. A second improvement was a grid at the base of the antennas, which provided corona electrons and an electric field to aid quick formation of plasmas. Although fusion conditions were never achieved and ball lightning not observed, experience gained from operating this basic, affordable system has been incorporated in a more sophisticated reactor design intended for future research. This would use magnets that were originally planned. The cusp geometry of the magnetic fields is suitable for electron cyclotron resonance in the same type of closed surface that in existing reactors has generated high-temperature plasmas. Should ball lightning be created, it could be a practical power source with nearly ideal characteristics that could solve many of our current energy-production problems.

  6. Confinement from gluodynamics in curved space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Gaete, Patricio; Spallucci, Euro

    2008-01-15

    We determine the static potential for a heavy quark-antiquark pair from gluodynamics in curved space-time. Our calculation is done within the framework of the gauge-invariant, path-dependent, variables formalism. The potential energy is the sum of a Yukawa and a linear potential, leading to the confinement of static charges.

  7. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  8. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  9. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  10. Quantum confinement in self-assembled two-dimensional nanoporous honeycomb networks at close-packed metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kepčija, N.; Huang, T.-J.; Klappenberger, F. Barth, J. V.

    2015-03-14

    Quantum confinement of a two-dimensional electron gas by supramolecular nanoporous networks is investigated using the boundary elements method based on Green’s functions for finite geometries and electron plane wave expansion for periodic systems. The “particle in a box” picture was analyzed for cases with selected symmetries that model previously reported architectures constructed from organic and metal-organic scattering centers confining surface state electrons of Ag(111) and Cu(111). First, by analyzing a series of cases with systematically defined parameters (scattering geometry, potentials, and effective broadening), we demonstrate how the scattering processes affect the properties of the confined electrons. For the features of the local density of states reported by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we disentangle the contributions of lifetime broadening and splitting of quantum well states due to coupling of neighboring quantum dots. For each system, we analyze the local electron density distribution and relate it to the corresponding band structure as calculated within the plane-wave expansion framework. Then, we address two experimental investigations, where in one case only STS data and in the other case mainly angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data were reported. In both cases, the experimental findings can be successfully simulated. Furthermore, the missing information can be complemented because our approach allows to correlate the information obtained by STS with that of ARPES. The combined analysis of several observations suggests that the scattering potentials created by the network originate primarily from the adsorbate-induced changes of the local surface dipole barrier.

  11. Coronal electron confinement by double layers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2013-12-01

    In observations of flare-heated electrons in the solar corona, a longstanding problem is the unexplained prolonged lifetime of the electrons compared to their transit time across the source. This suggests confinement. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which explored the transport of pre-accelerated hot electrons through ambient cold plasma, showed that the formation of a highly localized electrostatic potential drop, in the form of a double layer (DL), significantly inhibited the transport of hot electrons. The effectiveness of confinement by a DL is linked to the strength of the DL as defined by its potential drop. In this work, we investigate the scaling of the DL strength with the hot electron temperature by PIC simulations and find a linear scaling. We demonstrate that the strength is limited by the formation of parallel shocks. Based on this, we analytically determine the maximum DL strength, and also find a linear scaling with the hot electron temperature. The DL strength obtained from the analytic calculation is comparable to that from the simulations. At the maximum strength, the DL is capable of confining a significant fraction of hot electrons in the source.

  12. Psychopathological effects of solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Grassian, S

    1983-11-01

    Psychopathological reactions to solitary confinement were extensively described by nineteenth-century German clinicians. In the United States there have been several legal challenges to the use of solitary confinement, based on allegations that it may have serious psychiatric consequences. The recent medical literature on this subject has been scarce. The author describes psychiatric symptoms that appeared in 14 inmates exposed to periods of increased social isolation and sensory restriction in solitary confinement and asserts that these symptoms form a major, clinically distinguishable psychiatric syndrome. PMID:6624990

  13. Alpha particle confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Mynick, H.E.

    1988-11-01

    An assessment of diffusive tokamak transport mechanisms of concern for alpha particles indicates that the ''stochastic regime'' is the only one which appears to pose a real danger for adequate alpha confinement. This fact, in conjunction with the threshold character of that mechanism, allows one to decide whether an alpha born at a given location will be lost or confined, according to a very simple criterion. Implementing this criterion numerically results in a new code for the assessment of alpha confinement, which is orders of magnitude faster than earlier codes used for this purpose. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Cooperative Length Scale and Fragility of Polystyrene under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuan; Guo, Yunlong; Priestley, Rodney

    2012-02-01

    While thin films are an attractive model system to investigate the impact of confinement on glassy behavior, extending studies beyond thin films to geometries of higher dimensionalities is vital from both scientific and technological viewpoints. In this talk, we present the impact of confinement on the characteristic length at the glass transition as well as the fragility for confined polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles under isochoric conditions. We measure the glass transition temperature (Tg), fictive temperature (Tf) and isochoric heat capacity of silica-capped PS nanoparticles as a function of diameter via differential scanning calorimetry. From the measurement of Tf, we obtain the isochoric fragility, and via the fluctuation formula, the characteristic length at the glass transition. We illustrate that confinement under isochoric conditions for PS nanoparticles leads to a significant increase in the isochoric fragility while the characteristic length is reduced with size. At the minimum the results demonstrate a relationship between fragility and the characteristics length of isochorically-confined polymer that is not intuitive from the Adam-Gibbs theory.

  15. Gate-defined Quantum Confinement in Suspended Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Monica

    2013-03-01

    Quantum confined devices in carbon-based materials offer unique possibilities for applications ranging from quantum computation to sensing. In particular, nanostructured carbon is a promising candidate for spin-based quantum computation due to the ability to suppress hyperfine coupling to nuclear spins, a dominant source of spin decoherence. Yet graphene lacks an intrinsic bandgap, which poses a serious challenge for the creation of such devices. We present a novel approach to quantum confinement utilizing tunnel barriers defined by local electric fields that break sublattice symmetry in suspended bilayer graphene. This technique electrostatically confines charges via band structure control, thereby eliminating the edge and substrate disorder that hinders on-chip etched nanostructures to date. We report clean single electron tunneling through gate-defined quantum dots in two regimes: at zero magnetic field using the energy gap induced by a perpendicular electric field and at finite magnetic fields using Landau level confinement. The observed Coulomb blockade periodicity agrees with electrostatic simulations based on local top-gate geometry, a direct demonstration of local control over the band structure of graphene. This technology integrates quantum confinement with pristine device quality and access to vibrational modes, enabling wide applications from electromechanical sensors to quantum bits. More broadly, the ability to externally tailor the graphene bandgap over nanometer scales opens a new unexplored avenue for creating quantum devices.

  16. Central cell confinement in MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1981-05-05

    The point code TANDEM has been used to survey the range of plasma parameters which can be attained in MFTF-B. The code solves for the electron and ion densities and temperatures in the central cell, yin-yang, barrier, and A-cell regions as well as the plasma potential in each region. In these studies, the A-cell sloshing ion beams were fixed while the neutral beams in the yin-yang and central cell, the gas feed in the central cell, and the applied ECRH power ..beta.., central cell ion density and temperature, and the confining potential are discussed.

  17. Structure and confinement of Coulomb balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, O.

    2005-10-01

    Coulomb balls [2] are spherical dust clouds of a few hundred micrometer sized particles embedded in a plasma environment. Due to their large negative charge these particles are strongly coupled and can form crystalline structures. Coulomb balls have an unusual crystal structure with nested spherical shells. This contribution presents experiments and simulations on structural properties and trapping of these Coulomb balls. By means of particle imaging velocimetry the contribution of different forces to the confinement is investigated. It is shown that a proper combination of gravity, thermophoresis and electric fields leads to a stable confinement potential. Further, a comparison of experiments with molecular dynamics simulations shows that the structural properties of Coulomb balls require a description based on Yukawa interaction of individual particles.[1] O. Arp et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 165004 (2004)

  18. Confinement of Fractional Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Robert; Manfra, Michael; West, Ken; Pfeiffer, Loren

    2008-03-01

    Confinement of small-gapped fractional quantum Hall states facilitates quasiparticle manipulation and is an important step towards quasiparticle interference measurements. Demonstrated here is conduction through top gate defined, narrow channels in high density, ultra-high mobility heterostructures. Transport evidence for the persistence of a correlated state at filling fraction 5/3 is shown in channels of 2μm length but gated to near 0.3μm in width. The methods employed to achieve this confinement hold promise for interference devices proposed for studying potential non-Abelian statistics at filling fraction 5/2. R.L. Willett, M.J. Manfra, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W. West, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 052105 (2007).

  19. Numerical Studies of Properties of Confined Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    2003-01-01

    We carry out state of the art simulations of properties of confined liquid helium near the superfluid transition to a degree of accuracy which allows to make predictions for the outcome of fundamental physics experiments in microgravity. First we report our results for the finite-size scaling behavior of heat capacity of superfluids for cubic and parallel-plate geometry. This allows us to study the crossover from zero and two dimensions to three dimensions. Our calculated scaling functions are in good agreement with recently measured specific heat scaling functions for the above mentioned geometries. We also present our results of a quantum simulation of submonolayer of molecular hydrogen deposited on an ideal graphite substrate using path-integral quantum Monte Carlo simulation. We find that the monolayer phase diagram is rich and very similar to that of helium monolayer. We are able to uncover the main features of the complex monolayer phase diagram, such as the commensurate solid phases and the commensurate to incommensurate transition, in agreement with the experiments and to find some features which are missing from the experimental analysis.

  20. Landau Diamagnetism in a Dissipative and Confined System

    SciTech Connect

    Dattagupta, S.; Singh, J.

    1997-08-01

    Starting from a quantum Langevin equation of a charged particle in a magnetic field we present a fully dynamical calculation of the orbital diamagnetism, from which the effect of dissipation on Landau diamagnetism can be assessed. The treatment throws light on subtle issues of confined boundaries and the approach to equilibrium of a quantum dissipative system. Additional results are presented for the diamagnetism in a confined parabolic potential. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Confinement induced by fermion damping in three-dimensional QED

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jing; Wang Jingrong; Li Wei; Liu Guozhu

    2010-09-15

    The three-dimensional noncompact QED is known to exhibit weak confinement when fermions acquire a finite mass via the mechanism of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. In this paper, we study the effect of fermion damping caused by elastic scattering on the classical potential between fermions. By calculating the vacuum polarization function that incorporates the fermion damping effect, we show that the fermion damping can induce a weak confinement even when the fermions are massless and the chiral symmetry is not broken.

  2. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  3. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  4. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  5. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS

  6. Teaching Geometry with Tangrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Dorothy S.; Bologna, Elaine M.

    1982-01-01

    Geometry is viewed as the most neglected area of the elementary school mathematics curriculum. Tangram activities provide numerous worthwhile mathematical experiences for children. A method of constructing tangrams through paper folding is followed by suggested spatial visualization, measurement, and additional activities. (MP)

  7. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  8. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including

  9. Geoff Giles and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielker, David

    2007-01-01

    Geoff Giles died suddenly in 2005. He was a highly original thinker in the field of geometry teaching. As early as 1964, when teaching at Strathallen School in Perth, he was writing in "MT27" about constructing tessellations by modifying the sides of triangles and (irregular) quadrilaterals to produce what he called "trisides" and "quadrisides".

  10. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  11. Towards relativistic quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridao, Luis Santiago; Bellini, Mauricio

    2015-12-01

    We obtain a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum geometry by using a Weylian-like manifold with a geometric scalar field which provides a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum theory in which the algebra of the Weylian-like field depends on observers. An example for a Reissner-Nordström black-hole is studied.

  12. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  13. Conics and Finite Geometries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shilgalis, Thomas W.

    1985-01-01

    The results of investigations into finite geometries, prompted by questions raised in a course for secondary school mathematics teachers, are presented. The discussion of points, lines, and incidences led to consideration of graphs of second-degree equations in finite projective planes. (MNS)

  14. Advanced geometries and regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  15. Geometry of spinor regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.; Lounesto, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Kustaanheimo theory of spinor regularization is given a new formulation in terms of geometric algebra. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel matrix and its subsidiary condition are put in a spinor form directly related to the geometry of the orbit in physical space. A physically significant alternative to the KS subsidiary condition is discussed. Derivations are carried out without using coordinates.

  16. Glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Metel, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    This review presents a unified treatment of glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons. These discharges include hollow cathode discharges, wire and cage discharges, reflect discharges with brush and multirod cathodes, and discharges in crossed electric and magnetic fields. Fast electrons bouncing inside electrostatic traps provide efficient ionization of gas at very low gas pressures. The electrostatic trap effect (ETE) was first observed by Paschen in hollow cathode discharges almost a century ago. The key parameters that define fundamental characteristics of ETE discharges are the ionization length λN, the penetration range, Λ, and the diffusion length λ of the fast electrons, and two universal geometric parameters of the traps: effective width a and length L. Peculiarities of electron kinetics and ion collection mechanism explain experimental observations for different trap geometries. The ETE is observed only at Λ > a, when the penetration range of the γ-electrons emitted by the cathode exceeds the trap width. In the optimal pressure range, when λN > a, and Λ < L, the cathode potential fall Uc is independent of gas pressure p. With increasing current, Uc tends to its upper limit W/eβγ, where β is the percentage of ions arriving at the cathode and W is the gas ionization cost. In the low-pressure range, Λ > L, Uc rises from hundreds to thousands of volts. The sign of the anode potential fall, Ua, depends on the anode surface Sa and its position. When Sa is large compared to a critical value S*, Ua is negative and small. At Sa < S*, the value of Ua becomes positive and rises up to 0.5-1 kV with decreasing p ultimately causing discharge extinction. Scaling laws indicate common physics between vacuum discharges and atmospheric pressure micro-discharges. We discuss peculiarities of electron kinetics under different conditions using semi-analytical models. Recent experimental results and applications of glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons are described.

  17. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  18. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  19. Confined flow of polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Tufano, C; Peters, G W M; Meijer, H E H

    2008-05-01

    The influence of confinement on the steady-state morphology of two different emulsions is investigated. The blends, made from polybutene (PB) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polybutadiene (PBD) in PDMS, are sheared between two parallel plates, mostly with a standard gap spacing of 40 microm, in the range of shear rates at which the transition from "bulk" behavior toward "confined" behavior is observed. For both cases, the influence of the concentration was systematically investigated, as well as the shear rate effects on the final steady-state morphology. By decreasing the shear rate, for each blend, the increasing droplets, i.e., increasing confinement for a fixed gap spacing, arrange themselves first into two layers, and when the degree of confinement reaches an even higher value, a single layer of droplets is formed. The ratio between the drop diameters and the gap spacing at which this transition occurs is always lower than 0.5. While decreasing the shear rate, the degree of confinement increases due to drop coalescence. Droplets arrange themselves in superstructures like ordered pearl necklaces and, at the lower shear rates, strings. The aspect ratio and the width of the droplet obtained from optical micrographs are compared to predictions of the single droplet Maffettone-Minale model (MM model(1)). It is found that the theory, meant for unconfined shear flow, is not able to predict the drop deformation when the degree of confinement is above a critical value that depends on the blends considered and the shear rate applied. A recently developed extension of the MM model is reported by Minale (M model(2)) where the effect of the confinement is included by using the Shapira-Haber correction.3 Further extending this M model, by incorporating an effective viscosity as originally proposed by Choi and Showalter,4 we arrive at the mM model that accurately describes the experiments of blends in confined flow. PMID:18348582

  20. Structures of cholesteric liquid crystals confined in rectangular micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi-Huo; Guo, Yubing; Xiang, Jie; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    When cholesteric liquid crystals are confined in various geometries, the interplays between the boundary conditions, the bulk structures and different length scales (pitch, penetration depth, and confinement size) may cause frustration and formation of intriguing topological defects and disclination lines. This paper presents our recent studies on the structures of cholesteric liquid crystals confined in rectangular microchannels with homeotropic alignments. The rectangular microchannels with various sizes and aspect ratios are made in glass substrates by using modern nanofabrication techniques. Detailed liquid crystal structures and their optical characterizations will be presented as a function of the channel depth and width. Work was supported by ACS PRF 53018-ND7.

  1. Scaling behaviour for the water transport in nanoconfined geometries

    PubMed Central

    Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Fasano, Matteo; Asinari, Pietro; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The transport of water in nanoconfined geometries is different from bulk phase and has tremendous implications in nanotechnology and biotechnology. Here molecular dynamics is used to compute the self-diffusion coefficient D of water within nanopores, around nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes and proteins. For almost 60 different cases, D is found to scale linearly with the sole parameter θ as D(θ)=DB[1+(DC/DB−1)θ], with DB and DC the bulk and totally confined diffusion of water, respectively. The parameter θ is primarily influenced by geometry and represents the ratio between the confined and total water volumes. The D(θ) relationship is interpreted within the thermodynamics of supercooled water. As an example, such relationship is shown to accurately predict the relaxometric response of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The D(θ) relationship can help in interpreting the transport of water molecules under nanoconfined conditions and tailoring nanostructures with precise modulation of water mobility. PMID:24699509

  2. The virial theorem for the smoothly and sharply, penetrably and impenetrably confined hydrogen atom.

    PubMed

    Katriel, Jacob; Montgomery, H E

    2012-09-21

    Confinement of atoms by finite or infinite boxes containing sharp (discontinuous) jumps has been studied since the fourth decade of the previous century, modelling the effect of external pressure. Smooth (continuous) counterparts of such confining potentials, that depend on a parameter such that in an appropriate limit they coincide with the sharp confining potentials, are investigated, with an emphasis on deriving the corresponding virial and Hellmann-Feynman theorems. PMID:22998251

  3. Shear behavior of squalane and tetracosane under extreme confinement. III. Effect of confinement on viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.A.; Cochran, H.D.; Cummings, P.T.

    1997-12-01

    This study uses nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation to explore the rheology of confined liquid alkanes. Two alkanes that differ in molecular structural complexity are examined: tetracosane (C{sub 24}H{sub 50}), which is a linear alkane, and squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}), which has six symmetrically placed methyl branches along a 24 carbon backbone. These model lubricants are confined between model walls that have short chains tethered to them, thus screening the wall details. This paper, the third of a three part series, compares the viscosities of the confined fluids to those of the bulk fluids. The alkanes are described by a well-documented potential model that has been shown to reproduce bulk experimental viscosity and phase equilibria measurements. Details of the simulation method, and structural information can be found in the preceding two papers of this series. The measured strain rates in these simulations range between 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 11} s{sup {minus}1}, which is typical of a number of practical applications. The confined fluids undergo extensive shear thinning, showing a power-law behavior. Comparison of results for the confined fluid to those for the bulk fluid reveal that, for the conditions examined, there is no difference between the bulk and confined viscosities for these alkanes. This observation is in contrast to experimental results at much lower strain rates (10{endash}10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}), which indicate the viscosities of the confined fluid to be much larger than the bulk viscosities. In making the comparison, we have carefully accounted for slip at the wall and have performed simulations of the bulk fluid at the same conditions of strain rate, temperature, and pressure as for the corresponding confined fluid. The viscosity is found to be independent of the wall spacing. The calculated power-law exponents are similar to experimentally observed values. We also note that the exponent increases with increasing density of the fluid. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. A hybrid ion trap in a three-dimensional geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Yum, Dahyun; Zhang, Kuan; An, Shuoming; Kim, Kihwan

    2015-05-01

    We develop a three-dimensional (3D) monolithic ion trap that has the advantages of both 3D geometry, i.e., having a deep confining potential and surface trap, i.e., containing multiple zones for scaling up, no uncertainty between design and manufacture. The trap is fabricated by gold coating on a single layer of alumina plate sculpted by laser-machining technology. The axial trap frequencies are in the range from 230 kHz to 850 kHz with the average dc voltages from 20 V to 75V and the radial frequencies lie in 3 MHz with 3.5W input power of 40 MHz radio-frequency, which is well in agreement with numerical simulations. We successfully load Yb and Ba ions together and report the progress of the hybrid quantum operation with them. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grants No. 2011CBA00300 (No. 2011CBA00301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178.

  5. Collective motion of squirmers in a quasi-2D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger

    2013-03-01

    Microorganisms like bacteria, algae or spermatozoa typically move in an aqueous environment where they interact via hydrodynamic flow fields. Recent experiments studied the collective motion of dense suspensions of bacteria where swarming and large-scale turbulence emerged. Moreover, spherical artificial microswimmers, so-called squirmers, have been constructed and studied in a quasi-2D geometry. Here we present a numerical study of the collective dynamics of squirmers confined in quasi-2D between two parallel walls. Because of their spherical shape the reorientation of squirmers is solely due to noise and hydrodynamic interactions via induced flow fields. This is in contrast to elongated swimmers like bacteria which locally align due to steric interactions. We study the collective motion of pushers, pullers and potential swimmers at different densities. At small densities the squirmers are oriented parallel to the walls and pairwise collisions determine the reorientation rate. In dense suspensions rotational diffusion is greatly enhanced and pushers, in particular, tend to orient perpendicular to the walls. This effects the dynamics of the emerging clusters. In very dense suspensions we observe active jamming and long-lived crystalline structures.

  6. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels.

  7. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-29

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels. PMID:26871357

  8. Intrinsic Electronic Confinement at Conducting Oxide Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danfeng; Gariglio, Stefano; Liu, Wei; Fête, Alexandre; Boselli, Margherita; Gabay, Marc; Triscone, Jean-Marc; DQMP Collaboration; LPS Collaboration

    The discovery of a two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL), confined at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO3 (LAO) and SrTiO3 (STO) has generated tremendous research interest. The 2DEL confinement lifts the degeneracy of Ti t2g orbitals and promotes exotic physical properties. A previous study has demonstrated that a 2DEL is also observed when LAO is alloyed with STO (La,Al)1- x (Sr,Ti)xO3 (LASTO: x) . The threshold thickness required for the onset of conductivity scales with x. We present here a study of magnetotransport and superconductivity at the (LASTO:0.5)/STO interface. The thickness of the 2DEL, measured using perpendicular and parallel critical fields is larger than the one at the LAO/STO interface. This change is due to a modification on the confining potential linked to a reduced charge transfer that is scaling as 1/x. This study supports an intrinsic origin to the formation of the 2DEL in the LAO/STO system

  9. Supergravity geometry in superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Pran; Arnowitt, R.

    1980-04-01

    Some aspects of the superspace geometry of supergravity are discussed. It is shown that all the relevant geometrical objects, i.e., connections, torsions and curvatures of the supergravity geometry can be deduced by a reduction procedure from the riemannian theory. This procedure allows one to obtain closed-form expressions for the superspace connections of supergravity in terms of the vierbein. The supergravity and the Yang-Mills connections, which are unconnected in the usual superspace formulations of supergravity, arise in a unified way in this picture. The non-vanishing supergravity torsion arises naturally as the O(3,1) × O(N) subgroup piece of the larger OSp(3,1/4N) riemannian tangent-space group in the -->0 limit. The spontaneous breaking of the riemannian theory is shown to predict precisely the vacuum values of the supergravity torsions which are assumed in the usual superspace formulations of supergravity.

  10. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  11. State Sums and Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Frank

    2011-02-01

    In this thesis I review the definition of topological quantum field theories through state sums on triangulated manifolds. I describe the construction of state sum invariants of 3-manifolds from a graphical calculus and show how to evaluate the invariants as boundary amplitudes. I review how to define such a graphical calculus through SU(2) representation theory. I then review various geometricity results for the representation theory of SU(2), Spin(4) and SL(2,C), and define coherent boundary manifolds for state sums based on these representations. I derive the asymptotic geometry of the SU(2) based Ponzano-Regge invariant in three dimensions, and the SU(2) based Ooguri models amplitude in four dimensions. As a corollary to the latter results I derive the asymptotic behaviour of various recently proposed spin foam models motivated from the Plebanski formulation of general relativity. Finally the asymptotic geometry of the SL(2,C) based model is derived.

  12. Puzzle geometry and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    We describe a new and robust method to prove rigidity results in complex dynamics. The new ingredient is the geometry of the critical puzzle pieces: under control of geometry and ``complex bounds'', two generalized polynomial-like maps which admit a topological conjugacy, quasiconformal outside the filled-in Julia set, are indeed quasiconformally conjugate. The proof uses a new abstract removability-type result for quasiconformal maps, following ideas of Heinonen and Koskela and of Kallunki and Koskela, optimized for applications in complex dynamics. We prove, as the first application of this new method, that, for even criticalities distinct from two, the period two cycle of the Fibonacci renormalization operator is hyperbolic with 1 -dimensional unstable manifold.

  13. Brane Universe: Global Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, Victor

    2010-06-23

    The global geometries of bulk vacuum space-times in the brane-universe models are investigated and classified in terms of geometrical invariants. The corresponding Carter-Penrose diagrams and embedding diagrams are constructed. It is shown that for a given energy-momentum induced on the brane there can be different types of global geometries depending on the signs of a bulk cosmological term and surface energy density of the brane (the sign of the latter does not influence the internal cosmological evolution). It is shown that in the Randall-Sundrum scenario it is possible to have an asymmetric hierarchy splitting even with a Z{sub 2}-symmetric matching of 'our' brane to the bulk.

  14. E 8 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederwall, Martin; Rosabal, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate exceptional generalised diffeomorphisms based on E 8(8) in a geometric setting. The transformations include gauge transformations for the dual gravity field. The surprising key result, which allows for a development of a tensor formalism, is that it is possible to define field-dependent transformations containing connection, which are covariant. We solve for the spin connection and construct a curvature tensor. A geometry for the Ehlers symmetry SL( n + 1) is sketched. Some related issues are discussed.

  15. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  16. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  17. Integral geometry and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Bartłomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-01

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts — points, distances and angles — are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  18. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  19. Emergent complex network geometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems. PMID:25985280

  20. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems. PMID:25985280

  1. Order-disorder structural transition in a confined fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Calleja-Mora, E. M.; Krott, Leandro B.; Barbosa, M. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we analyze the amorphous/solid to disordered liquid structural phase transitions of an anomalous confined fluid in terms of their fractal dimensions. The model studied is composed by particles interaction through a two-length scales potential confined by two infinite plates. This fluid that in the bulk exhibits water-like anomalies under confinement forms layers of particles. We show that the fluid at the contact layer forms at high densities structures and transitions that can be mapped into fractal dimensions. The multi-fractal singularity spectrum is obtained in all these cases and it is used as the order parameter to quantify the structural transitions for each stage on the confined liquid. This mapping shows that the fractal dimension increases with the density and with the temperature.

  2. Novel confinement of liquid crystals in Janus droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Jeong, Joonwoo; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we create and investigate Janus droplets composed of liquid crystal (LC) and polymer. The Janus droplets are formed when homogeneous droplets of LC-polymer-solvent phase separate into LC and polymer regions during solvent evaporation through aqueous continuous phase. This scheme enables us to realize unique confinement geometries for LCs such as spherical caps and bowls, which are difficult to be achieved via other systems. The morphologies and surface anchoring conditions can be controlled by changing the size of droplets, the volume ratio between LC and polymer, and the type/concentration of surfactants in aqueous background phase. We explore a variety of defects in these novel confined geometries including dislocations and focal conic defects of smectic LCs. Nematic and cholesteric LCs are also explored. Models that balance the energetics of bulk elasticity and surface anchoring determine the director configurations of confined liquid crystals (LCs). This work is funded by NSF Grant DMR-1205463, NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-1120901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  3. Landscape as a Model: The Importance of Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Holland, E. Penelope; Aegerter, James N; Dytham, Calvin; Smith, Graham C

    2007-01-01

    In all models, but especially in those used to predict uncertain processes (e.g., climate change and nonnative species establishment), it is important to identify and remove any sources of bias that may confound results. This is critical in models designed to help support decisionmaking. The geometry used to represent virtual landscapes in spatially explicit models is a potential source of bias. The majority of spatial models use regular square geometry, although regular hexagonal landscapes have also been used. However, there are other ways in which space can be represented in spatially explicit models. For the first time, we explicitly compare the range of alternative geometries available to the modeller, and present a mechanism by which uncertainty in the representation of landscapes can be incorporated. We test how geometry can affect cell-to-cell movement across homogeneous virtual landscapes and compare regular geometries with a suite of irregular mosaics. We show that regular geometries have the potential to systematically bias the direction and distance of movement, whereas even individual instances of landscapes with irregular geometry do not. We also examine how geometry can affect the gross representation of real-world landscapes, and again show that individual instances of regular geometries will always create qualitative and quantitative errors. These can be reduced by the use of multiple randomized instances, though this still creates scale-dependent biases. In contrast, virtual landscapes formed using irregular geometries can represent complex real-world landscapes without error. We found that the potential for bias caused by regular geometries can be effectively eliminated by subdividing virtual landscapes using irregular geometry. The use of irregular geometry appears to offer spatial modellers other potential advantages, which are as yet underdeveloped. We recommend their use in all spatially explicit models, but especially for predictive models that are used in decisionmaking. PMID:17967050

  4. Spin asymmetries for confined Dirac particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Paris; V.R. Pandharipande; Ingo Sick

    2004-06-01

    We study the Bjorken x (or equivalently Nachtmann {xi}) dependence of the virtual photon spin asymmetry in polarized deep inelastic scattering of electrons from hadrons. We use an exactly solved relativistic potential model of the hadron, treating the constituents as independent massless Dirac particles confined to an infinitely massive force center. The importance of including the p--wave components of the Dirac wave function is demonstrated. Comparisons are made to the observed data on the proton by taking into account the observed flavor dependence of the valence quark distribution functions.

  5. Perlite for permanent confinement of cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balencie, J.; Burger, D.; Rehspringer, J.-L.; Estournès, C.; Vilminot, S.; Richard-Plouet, M.; Boos, A.

    2006-06-01

    We present the potential use of expanded perlite, a metastable amorphous hydrated aluminium silicate, as a permanent medium for the long-term confinement of cesium. The method requires simply a loading by mixing an aqueous cesium nitrate solution and expanded perlite at 300 K followed by densification by sintering. The formation of pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, a naturally occurring mineral phase, upon careful heat treatment is demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. Leaching tests on the resulting glass-ceramics reveal a very low Cs departure of 0.5 mg m-2 d-1.

  6. Isolation and confinement - Considerations for colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses three types of isolation (sensory/perceptual, temporal, and social) that could adversely affect mankind in space. The literature dealing with laboratory and field experiments relevant to these areas is summarized and suggestions are given for dealing with these problems within the space colony community. Also, consideration is given to the potential effects of physical confinement and the need for usable space. Finally, a modification of Maslow's hierarchy of needs is proposed as a theoretical framework to understand and investigate mankind's psychological needs in space.

  7. Superparamagnetic colloids confined in narrow corrugated substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Velarde, S.; Castañeda-Priego, R.

    2008-04-01

    We report a Brownian dynamics simulation study of the structure and dynamics of superparamagnetic colloids subject to external substrate potentials and confined in narrow channels. Our study is motivated by the importance of phenomena like commensurable-incommensurable phase transitions, anomalous diffusion, and stochastic activation processes that are closely related to the system under investigation. We focus mainly on the role of the substrate in the order-disorder mechanisms that lead to a rich variety of commensurate and incommensurate phases, as well as its effect on the single-file diffusion in interacting systems and the depinning transition in one dimension.

  8. A confining quark model and new gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jong-Ping

    2014-07-01

    We discuss a confining model for quark-antiquark system with a new color SU3 gauge symmetry. New gauge transformations involve non-integrable phase factors and lead to the fourth-order gauge field equations and a linear potential. The massless gauge bosons have non-definite energies, which are not observable because they are permanently confined in quark systems by the linear potential. We use the empirical potentials of charmonium to determine the coupling strength of the color charge gs and find gs2/(4π ) ≈ 0.2. The rules for Feynman diagrams involve propagators with poles of order 2 associated with new gauge fields. The confining quark model may be renormalizable by power counting and compatible with perturbation theory.

  9. Weyl gravity and Cartan geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, J.; François, J.; Lazzarini, S.

    2016-04-01

    We point out that the Cartan geometry known as the second-order conformal structure provides a natural differential geometric framework underlying gauge theories of conformal gravity. We are concerned with two theories: the first one is the associated Yang-Mills-like Lagrangian, while the second, inspired by [1], is a slightly more general one that relaxes the conformal Cartan geometry. The corresponding gauge symmetry is treated within the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin language. We show that the Weyl gauge potential is a spurious degree of freedom, analogous to a Stueckelberg field, that can be eliminated through the dressing field method. We derive sets of field equations for both the studied Lagrangians. For the second one, they constrain the gauge field to be the "normal conformal Cartan connection.''Finally, we provide in a Lagrangian framework a justification of the identification, in dimension 4, of the Bach tensor with the Yang-Mills current of the normal conformal Cartan connection, as proved in [2].

  10. Neuronal activity controls transsynaptic geometry.

    PubMed

    Glebov, Oleg O; Cox, Susan; Humphreys, Lawrence; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal synapse is comprised of several distinct zones, including presynaptic vesicle zone (SVZ), active zone (AZ) and postsynaptic density (PSD). While correct relative positioning of these zones is believed to be essential for synaptic function, the mechanisms controlling their mutual localization remain unexplored. Here, we employ high-throughput quantitative confocal imaging, super-resolution and electron microscopy to visualize organization of synaptic subdomains in hippocampal neurons. Silencing of neuronal activity leads to reversible reorganization of the synaptic geometry, resulting in a increased overlap between immunostained AZ and PSD markers; in contrast, the SVZ-AZ spatial coupling is decreased. Bayesian blinking and bleaching (3B) reconstruction reveals that the distance between the AZ-PSD distance is decreased by 30 nm, while electron microscopy shows that the width of the synaptic cleft is decreased by 1.1 nm. Our findings show that multiple aspects of synaptic geometry are dynamically controlled by neuronal activity and suggest mutual repositioning of synaptic components as a potential novel mechanism contributing to the homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26951792

  11. Neuronal activity controls transsynaptic geometry

    PubMed Central

    Glebov, Oleg O.; Cox, Susan; Humphreys, Lawrence; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal synapse is comprised of several distinct zones, including presynaptic vesicle zone (SVZ), active zone (AZ) and postsynaptic density (PSD). While correct relative positioning of these zones is believed to be essential for synaptic function, the mechanisms controlling their mutual localization remain unexplored. Here, we employ high-throughput quantitative confocal imaging, super-resolution and electron microscopy to visualize organization of synaptic subdomains in hippocampal neurons. Silencing of neuronal activity leads to reversible reorganization of the synaptic geometry, resulting in a increased overlap between immunostained AZ and PSD markers; in contrast, the SVZ-AZ spatial coupling is decreased. Bayesian blinking and bleaching (3B) reconstruction reveals that the distance between the AZ-PSD distance is decreased by 30 nm, while electron microscopy shows that the width of the synaptic cleft is decreased by 1.1 nm. Our findings show that multiple aspects of synaptic geometry are dynamically controlled by neuronal activity and suggest mutual repositioning of synaptic components as a potential novel mechanism contributing to the homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26951792

  12. Density functional approximations for confined classical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Tai-Heui; Kim, Soon-Chul

    1998-10-01

    A density functional approximation, which is based on both the density functional Taylor series expansion of the one-particle direct correlation function and the exact contact value theorem for a hard wall, has been proposed to study the structural properties of confined classical fluids. The approximation has been applied to calculate the density profiles of sticky hard-sphere fluids confined in structureless hard walls. The calculated density profiles have shown that the present approximation compares very well with the results from the computer simulation. Furthermore, a density functional perturbative approximation, which is based on both the weighted-density approximation for the repulsive part of potential and the present approximation for the attractive part of potential, has been developed to predict the density profiles of model fluids with the attractive part of potential and has been applied to calculate the density profiles of hard-sphere Yukawa fluids near a planar slit. The calculated results also show that the proposed perturbative approximation is a significant improvement upon those of the modified version of the Lovett-Mou-Buff-Wertheim, and compares very well with the computer simulation.

  13. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  14. Spatial Variations in Carbon Storage along Headwater Fluvial Networks with Differing Valley Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E. E.; Dwire, K. A.; Polvi, L. E.; Sutfin, N. A.; Bazan, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    We distinguish multiple valley types along headwater fluvial networks in the Colorado Front Range based on valley geometry (downstream gradient and valley-bottom width relative to active channel width) and the presence of biotic drivers (beaver dams or channel-spanning logjams associated with old-growth forest) capable of creating a multi-thread channel pattern. Valley type influences storage of fine sediment, organic matter, and carbon. Deep, narrow valleys have limited storage potential, whereas wide, shallow valleys with multi-thread channels have substantial storage potential. Multi-thread channels only occur in the presence of a biotic driver. Given the importance of headwater streams in the global carbon cycle, it becomes important to understand the spatial distribution and magnitude of carbon storage along these streams, as well as the processes governing patterns of storage. We compare carbon stored in three reservoirs: riparian vegetation (live, dead, and litter), instream and floodplain large wood, and floodplain soils for 100-m-long valley segments in seven different valley types. The valley types are (i) laterally confined valleys in old-growth forest, (ii) partly confined valleys in old-growth forest, (iii) laterally unconfined valleys with multi-thread channels in old-growth forest, (iv) laterally unconfined valleys with single-thread channels in old-growth forest, (v) laterally confined valleys in younger forest, (vi) recently abandoned beaver-meadow complexes with multi-thread channels and willow thickets, and (vii) longer abandoned beaver-meadow complexes with single-thread channels and very limited woody vegetation. Preliminary results suggest that, although multi-thread channel segments driven by beavers or logjams cover less than 25 percent of the total length of headwater river networks in the study area, they account for more than three-quarters of the carbon stored along the river network. Historical loss of beavers and old-growth forest has thus likely resulted in continuing loss of carbon storage in these headwater river networks.

  15. Geometry for the Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moalem, D.

    1977-01-01

    A sequential but non-axiomatic high school geometry course which includes Euclidean, transformation, and analytic geometry and vectors and matrices, and emphasizes the invariance property of transformations, is outlined. Sample problems, solutions, and comments are included. (MN)

  16. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  17. Special topics in plasma confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. B.; Newton, S. L.

    2015-10-01

    > These notes are based on lectures given by one of us (J.B.T.) at the University of Texas in Austin in 1991. Part I concerns some basic features of plasma confinement by magnetic fields as an introduction to an account of plasma relaxation in Part II. Part III discusses confinement by magnetic mirrors, especially minimum- systems. It also includes a general discussion of adiabatic invariants and of the principle of maximal ordering in perturbation theory. Part IV is devoted to the analysis of perturbations in toroidal plasmas and the stability of ballooning modes.

  18. Confined Visible Optical Tamm States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, F.; Ouaret, K.; Portalupi, S.; Lafosse, X.; Nasilovski, M.; de Marcillac, W. Daney; Frigerio, J.-M.; Schwob, C.; Dubertret, B.; Maître, A.; Senellart, P.; Coolen, L.

    2016-05-01

    Optical Tamm states are two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic modes propagating at the interface between a Bragg mirror and a metallic film. When a thin (a few tens of nm) metallic micron-radius disk is deposited on a Bragg mirror, optical Tamm states can be confined below the disk surface, creating a Tamm-states cavity. We describe here the photoluminescence properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in a Tamm cavity. Tamm states confinement effects are demonstrated and analysed as a function of the disk diameter, and compared with finite-elements simulations.

  19. Engineering tube shapes to control confined transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reguera, D.; Rubi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Transport of particles in confined structures can be modeled by means of diffusion in a potential of entropic nature. The entropic transport model proposes a drift-diffusion kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability density in which the diffusion coefficient depends on position and the drift term contains an entropic force. The model has been applied to analyze transport in single cavities and through periodic structures of different shape, and to investigate the nature of non-equilibrium fluctuations as well. The transport characteristics depends strongly on the contour of the region through which particles move, which defines the entropic potential. We show that the form of the entropic potential can be properly designed to optimize and govern how molecules diffuse and get drifted in tortuous channels. The shape of a tube or channel can be smartly engineered to control transport for the desired application.

  20. Supercoset space geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppe, A. F.; Wainwright, Chris

    2007-05-15

    Supercoset spaces play an important role in the formulation of supersymmetric theories. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the geometry of supercoset spaces with particular focus on the way the geometrical structures of the supercoset space G/H are inherited from the super-Lie group G. The isometries of the supercoset space are discussed and a definition of Killing supervectors--the supervectors associated with infinitesimal isometries--is given that can be easily extended to spaces other than coset spaces.

  1. Geometry dependence of stellarator turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Boozer, A. H.

    2009-11-15

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST[F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000); P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, ibid. 16, 082303 (2009)], we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the two-dimensional structure of the microturbulence over that surface and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schroedinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  2. Geometry dependence of stellarator turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Boozer, A. H.

    2009-11-01

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST [F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000); P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Phys. Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009)], we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the two-dimensional structure of the microturbulence over that surface and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrödinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  3. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  4. Twistor Geometry and Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, R. S.; Wells, Raymond O., Jr.

    1991-08-01

    Part I. Geometry: 1. Klein correspondence; 2. Fibre bundles; 3. Differential geometry; 4. Integral geometry; Part II. Field Theory: 5. Linear field theory; 6. Gauge theory; 7. General relativity; Part III. The Penrose Transform: 8. Massless free fields; 9. Self-dual gauge fields; 10. Self-dual space-times; 11. General gauge fields; 12. Stationary axisymmetric space-times; Special topics.

  5. Geometry: Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    Behavioral objectives, each accompanied by six sample test items, for secondary school geometry are presented. Objectives were determined by surveying the most widely used secondary school geometry textbooks, and cover 14 major categories of geometry, with sections on set theory and introductory trigonometry. Answers are provided. Categories…

  6. Graded geometry and Poisson reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, A. S.; Zambon, M.

    2009-02-02

    The main result extends the Marsden-Ratiu reduction theorem in Poisson geometry, and is proven by means of graded geometry. In this note we provide the background material about graded geometry necessary for the proof. Further, we provide an alternative algebraic proof for the main result.

  7. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  8. Defect topologies in chiral liquid crystals confined to mesoscopic channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schlotthauer, Sergej Skutnik, Robert A.; Stieger, Tillmann; Schoen, Martin

    2015-05-21

    We present Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical and canonical ensembles of a chiral liquid crystal confined to mesochannels of variable sizes and geometries. The mesochannels are taken to be quasi-infinite in one dimension but finite in the two other directions. Under thermodynamic conditions chosen and for a selected value of the chirality coupling constant, the bulk liquid crystal exhibits structural characteristics of a blue phase II. This is established through the tetrahedral symmetry of disclination lines and the characteristic simple-cubic arrangement of double-twist helices formed by the liquid-crystal molecules along all three axes of a Cartesian coordinate system. If the blue phase II is then exposed to confinement, the interplay between its helical structure, various anchoring conditions at the walls of the mesochannels, and the shape of the mesochannels gives rise to a broad variety of novel, qualitative disclination-line structures that are reported here for the first time.

  9. 5D non-symmetric gravity and geodesic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suman; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2013-09-01

    This work focuses on an unexplored aspect of non-symmetric geometry where only the off-diagonal metric components along the extra dimension, in a 5-dimensional spacetime, are non-symmetric. We show that the energy densities of the stationary non-symmetric models are similar to that of brane models thereby mimicking the thick-brane scenario. We find that the massive test particles are confined near the location of the brane for both growing and decaying warp factors. This feature is unique to the non-symmetric nature of our model. We have also studied the dynamical models where standard 4D FLRW brane is embedded. Our analysis shows that the non-symmetric terms deconfine energy density at the early universe while automatically confine at late times.

  10. Defect topologies in chiral liquid crystals confined to mesoscopic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotthauer, Sergej; Skutnik, Robert A.; Stieger, Tillmann; Schoen, Martin

    2015-05-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical and canonical ensembles of a chiral liquid crystal confined to mesochannels of variable sizes and geometries. The mesochannels are taken to be quasi-infinite in one dimension but finite in the two other directions. Under thermodynamic conditions chosen and for a selected value of the chirality coupling constant, the bulk liquid crystal exhibits structural characteristics of a blue phase II. This is established through the tetrahedral symmetry of disclination lines and the characteristic simple-cubic arrangement of double-twist helices formed by the liquid-crystal molecules along all three axes of a Cartesian coordinate system. If the blue phase II is then exposed to confinement, the interplay between its helical structure, various anchoring conditions at the walls of the mesochannels, and the shape of the mesochannels gives rise to a broad variety of novel, qualitative disclination-line structures that are reported here for the first time.

  11. An electrostatically and a magnetically confined electron gun lens system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernius, Mark T.; Man, Kin F.; Chutjian, Ara

    1988-01-01

    Focal properties, electron trajectory calculations, and geometries are given for two electron 'gun' lens systems that have a variety of applications in, for example, electron-neutral and electron-ion scattering experiments. One nine-lens system utilizes only electrostatic confinement and is capable of focusing electrons onto a fixed target with extremely small divergence angles, over a range of final energies 1-790 eV. The second gun lens system is a simpler three-lens system suitable for use in a uniform, solenoidal magnetic field. While the focusing properties of such a magnetically confined lens systenm are simpler to deal with, the system does illustrate features of electron extraction and Brillouin flow that have not been suitably emphasized in the literature.

  12. Simulation of confined magnetohydrodynamic flows with Dirichlet boundary conditions using a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Jorge A.; Leroy, Matthieu; Bos, Wouter J.T.; Schneider, Kai

    2014-10-01

    A volume penalization approach to simulate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in confined domains is presented. Here the incompressible visco-resistive MHD equations are solved using parallel pseudo-spectral solvers in Cartesian geometries. The volume penalization technique is an immersed boundary method which is characterized by a high flexibility for the geometry of the considered flow. In the present case, it allows to use other than periodic boundary conditions in a Fourier pseudo-spectral approach. The numerical method is validated and its convergence is assessed for two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic (HD) and MHD flows, by comparing the numerical results with results from literature and analytical solutions. The test cases considered are two-dimensional TaylorCouette flow, the z-pinch configuration, three dimensional OrszagTang flow, Ohmic-decay in a periodic cylinder, three-dimensional TaylorCouette flow with and without axial magnetic field and three-dimensional Hartmann-instabilities in a cylinder with an imposed helical magnetic field. Finally, we present a magnetohydrodynamic flow simulation in toroidal geometry with non-symmetric cross section and imposing a helical magnetic field to illustrate the potential of the method.

  13. Core geometry in perspective.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Moira R; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2015-11-01

    Research on animals, infants, children, and adults provides evidence that distinct cognitive systems underlie navigation and object recognition. Here we examine whether and how these systems interact when children interpret 2D edge-based perspectival line drawings of scenes and objects. Such drawings serve as symbols early in development, and they preserve scene and object geometry from canonical points of view. Young children show limits when using geometry both in non-symbolic tasks and in symbolic map tasks that present 3D contexts from unusual, unfamiliar points of view. When presented with the familiar viewpoints in perspectival line drawings, however, do children engage more integrated geometric representations? In three experiments, children successfully interpreted line drawings with respect to their depicted scene or object. Nevertheless, children recruited distinct processes when navigating based on the information in these drawings, and these processes depended on the context in which the drawings were presented. These results suggest that children are flexible but limited in using geometric information to form integrated representations of scenes and objects, even when interpreting spatial symbols that are highly familiar and faithful renditions of the visual world. PMID:25441089

  14. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that are coupled to generalized Navier–Stokes equations for fluid dynamics, Newton's equation for molecular dynamics, and potential and surface driving geometric flows for the micro-macro interface. For excessively large aqueous macromolecular complexes in chemistry and biology, we further develop differential geometry based multiscale fluid-electro-elastic models to replace the expensive molecular dynamics description with an alternative elasticity formulation. PMID:20169418

  15. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are coupled to generalized Navier-Stokes equations for fluid dynamics, Newton's equation for molecular dynamics, and potential and surface driving geometric flows for the micro-macro interface. For excessively large aqueous macromolecular complexes in chemistry and biology, we further develop differential geometry based multiscale fluid-electro-elastic models to replace the expensive molecular dynamics description with an alternative elasticity formulation. PMID:20169418

  16. Topological superconductivity, topological confinement, and the vortex quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Diamantini, M. Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2011-09-01

    Topological matter is characterized by the presence of a topological BF term in its long-distance effective action. Topological defects due to the compactness of the U(1) gauge fields induce quantum phase transitions between topological insulators, topological superconductors, and topological confinement. In conventional superconductivity, because of spontaneous symmetry breaking, the photon acquires a mass due to the Anderson-Higgs mechanism. In this paper we derive the corresponding effective actions for the electromagnetic field in topological superconductors and topological confinement phases. In topological superconductors magnetic flux is confined and the photon acquires a topological mass through the BF mechanism: no symmetry breaking is involved, the ground state has topological order, and the transition is induced by quantum fluctuations. In topological confinement, instead, electric charge is linearly confined and the photon becomes a massive antisymmetric tensor via the Stueckelberg mechanism. Oblique confinement phases arise when the string condensate carries both magnetic and electric flux (dyonic strings). Such phases are characterized by a vortex quantum Hall effect potentially relevant for the dissipationless transport of information stored on vortices.

  17. Confining the scalar field of the Kaluza-Klein wormhole soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Gérard

    1989-08-01

    The Maison five-to-three dimensional reduction, generalized to the case of five-dimensional general relativity with sources, is applied to the problem of confining the scalar field of the Kaluza-Klein wormhole soliton by a very weak perfect fluid source, without affecting the spatial geometry of this localized solution.

  18. Momentum Confinement at Low Torque

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Burrell, K H; deGrassie, J S; Budny, R; Groebner, R J; Heidbrink, W W; Kinsey, J E; Kramer, G J; Makowski, M A; Mikkelsen, D; Nazikian, R; Petty, C C; Politzer, P A; Scott, S D; Van Zeeland, M A; Zarnstorff, M C

    2007-06-26

    Momentum confinement was investigated on DIII-D as a function of applied neutral beam torque at constant normalized {beta}{sub N}, by varying the mix of co (parallel to the plasma current) and counter neutral beams. Under balanced neutral beam injection (i.e. zero total torque to the plasma), the plasma maintains a significant rotation in the co-direction. This 'intrinsic' rotation can be modeled as being due to an offset in the applied torque (i.e. an 'anomalous torque'). This anomalous torque appears to have a magnitude comparable to one co-neutral beam source. The presence of such an anomalous torque source must be taken into account to obtain meaningful quantities describing momentum transport, such as the global momentum confinement time and local diffusivities. Studies of the mechanical angular momentum in ELMing H-mode plasmas with elevated q{sub min} show that the momentum confinement time improves as the torque is reduced. In hybrid plasmas, the opposite effect is observed, namely that momentum confinement improves at high torque/rotation. The relative importance of E x B shearing between the two is modeled using GLF23 and may suggest a possible explanation.

  19. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

    1996-03-01

    During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

  20. Mirror Confinement Systems: project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This report contains descriptions of the projects supported by the Mirror Confinement Systems (MCS) Division of the Office of Fusion Energy. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators, in collaboration with MCS staff office, and include objectives and milestones for each project. In addition to project summaries, statements of Division objectives and budget summaries are also provided.

  1. Open-ended magnetic confinement systems for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1995-05-01

    Magnetic confinement systems that use externally generated magnetic fields can be divided topologically into two classes: ``closed`` and `open``. The tokamak, the stellarator, and the reversed-field-pinch approaches are representatives of the first category, while mirror-based systems and their variants are of the second category. While the recent thrust of magnetic fusion research, with its emphasis on the tokamak, has been concentrated on closed geometry, there are significant reasons for the continued pursuit of research into open-ended systems. The paper discusses these reasons, reviews the history and the present status of open-ended systems, and suggests some future directions for the research.

  2. Magnetospheric vortex formation: self-organized confinement of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Z; Saitoh, H; Morikawa, J; Yano, Y; Watanabe, S; Ogawa, Y

    2010-06-11

    A magnetospheric configuration gives rise to various peculiar plasma phenomena that pose conundrums to astrophysical studies; at the same time, innovative technologies may draw on the rich physics of magnetospheric plasmas. We have created a "laboratory magnetosphere" with a levitating superconducting ring magnet. Here we show that charged particles (electrons) self-organize a stable vortex, in which particles diffuse inward to steepen the density gradient. The rotating electron cloud is sustained for more than 300 s. Because of its simple geometry and self-organization, this system will have wide applications in confining single- and multispecies charged particles. PMID:20867249

  3. First-order Dyson coordinates and geometry.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2013-08-15

    The mathematical constructs of the Dyson coordinates and geometry are introduced. The former are a unitary transformation of the normal coordinates and the anharmonic vibrational counterpart of the Dyson orbitals in electronic structure theory. The first-order Dyson coordinates bring the sums of the harmonic force constants and their first-order diagrammatic perturbation corrections (the first-order Dyson self-energy) to a diagonal form. The first-order Dyson geometry has no counterpart in electronic structure theory. It is the point on the potential energy surface at which the sums of the energy gradients and their first-order diagrammatic perturbation corrections vanish. It agrees with the vibrationally averaged geometry of vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) theory in the bulk limit. These constructs provide a unified view of the relationship of VSCF and its diagrammatically size-consistent modifications as well as the self-consistent phonon method widely used in solid-state physics. PMID:23577671

  4. Optically defined mechanical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.; Müller, Tina; Sankey, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of optomechanics, radiation forces have provided a particularly high level of control over the frequency and dissipation of mechanical elements. Here we propose a class of optomechanical systems in which light exerts a similarly profound influence over two other fundamental parameters: geometry and mass. By applying an optical trap to one lattice site of an extended phononic crystal, we show it is possible to create a tunable, localized mechanical mode. Owing to light's simultaneous and constructive coupling with the structure's continuum of modes, we estimate that a trap power at the level of a single intracavity photon should be capable of producing a significant effect within a realistic, chip-scale device.

  5. Emergent geometry of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Badyn, Mathias Hudoba; Karczmarek, Joanna L.; Sabella-Garnier, Philippe; Yeh, Ken Huai-Che

    2015-11-01

    In work [1], a surface embedded in flat ℝ 3 is associated to any three hermitian matrices. We study this emergent surface when the matrices are large, by constructing coherent states corresponding to points in the emergent geometry. We find the original matrices determine not only shape of the emergent surface, but also a unique Poisson structure. We prove that commutators of matrix operators correspond to Poisson brackets. Through our construction, we can realize arbitrary noncommutative membranes: for example, we examine a round sphere with a non-spherically symmetric Poisson structure. We also give a natural construction for a noncommutative torus embedded in ℝ 3. Finally, we make remarks about area and find matrix equations for minimal area surfaces.

  6. Critique of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skilling, John

    2014-12-05

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  7. Stochastic geometry of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkovich, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    Geometric statistics open the window into the most fundamental aspect of turbulence flows, their symmetries, both broken and emerging. On one hand, the study of the stochastic geometry of multi-point configurations reveals the statistical conservation laws which are responsible for the breakdown of scale invariance in direct turbulence cascades. On the other hand, the numerical and experimental studies of inverse cascade reveal that some families of isolines can be mapped to a Brownian walk (i.e. belong to the so-called SLE class) and are thus not only scale invariant but conformally invariant. That means that some aspects of turbulence statistics can be probably described by a conformal field theory. The talk is a review of broken and emerging symmetries in turbulence statistics.

  8. Influence of Geometry and Flow Variation on Jet Mixing and NO Formation in a Model Staged Combustor Mixer with Eight Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Hatch, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of non-reacting parametric experiments was conducted to investigate the effect of geometric and flow variations on mixing of cold jets in an axis-symmetric, heated cross flow. The confined, cylindrical geometries tested represent the quick mix region of a Rich-Burn/Quick-Mix/Lean-Burn (RQL) combustor. The experiments show that orifice geometry and jet to mainstream momentum-flux ratio significantly impact the mixing characteristic of jets in a cylindrical cross stream. A computational code was used to extrapolate the results of the non-reacting experiments to reacting conditions in order to examine the nitric oxide (NO) formation potential of the configurations examined. The results show that the rate of NO formation is highest immediately downstream of the injection plane. For a given momentum-flux ratio, the orifice geometry that mixes effectively in both the immediate vicinity of the injection plane, and in the wall regions at downstream locations, has the potential to produce the lowest NO emissions. The results suggest that further study may not necessarily lead to a universal guideline for designing a low NO mixer. Instead, an assessment of each application may be required to determine the optimum combination of momentum-flux ratio and orifice geometry to minimize NO formation. Experiments at reacting conditions are needed to verify the present results.

  9. Complex Plasmas in Narrow Channels: Impact of Confinement on the Local Order

    SciTech Connect

    Klumov, B. A.

    2008-10-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) quasi-equilibrium configurations of a complex (dusty) plasma in narrow channels are investigated using the molecular dynamics simulations for various confining potentials (confinements). The dynamics of the microparticles is described within the framework of a Langevin thermostat with allowance for the pair interaction between charged particles, which is described by a screened Coulomb potential (Yukawa potential). Two types of confinement: the parabolic electrostatic potential and hard elastic wall are considered. It is shown that the confinement strongly affects the crystallization and the local order of the microparticles in the system under consideration; in particular, the appearance of a new quasicrystalline phase induced by the hard wall confinement is revealed in 3D case.

  10. ‘Square root’ of the Maxwell Lagrangian versus confinement in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Halilsoy, M.

    2012-04-01

    We employ the 'square root' of the Maxwell Lagrangian (i.e. √{FμνFμν }), coupled with gravity to search for the possible linear potentials which are believed to play role in confinement. It is found that in the presence of magnetic charge no confining potential exists in such a model. Confining field solutions are found for radial geodesics in pure electrically charged Nariai-Bertotti-Robinson (NBR)-type spacetime with constant scalar curvature. Recently, Guendelman, Kaganovich, Nissimov and Pacheva (2011) [7] have shown that superposed square root with standard Maxwell Lagrangian yields confining potentials in spherically symmetric spacetimes with new generalized Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter/anti-de Sitter black hole solutions. In NBR spacetimes we show that confining potentials exist even when the standard Maxwell Lagrangian is relaxed.

  11. Studies in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Brandon D.

    The geometric defects associated with open strings have become a mainstay in the arsenal of the string theorist. These objects are intimately tied to the properties of spacetime. D-branes have been well studied in the nineties and orientifolds are only now been thoroughly investigated. This thesis is built on two different studies. The first, done with Koenraad Schalm and Chuck Doran attempts to analyze the possible Orientifolds and their moduli, starting from Gepner models of the spacetime. The main focus was on elliptical compactifications, as this could be used as building block for more complex geometries. It is noteworthy that the orientifolds place constraints on the possible spacetime geometries, whilst also being characterized by the geometrical nature of the involutions defining them. The second study of this thesis, which was done with Frederik Denef, is on the low energy manifestations of D-branes as supergravity attractor solutions. Four dimensional N = 2 supergravity has regular, stationary, asymptotically flat BPS solutions with intrinsic angular momentum, describing bound states of separate extremal black holes with mutually nonlocal charges. Though the existence and some properties of these solutions were established some time ago, fully explicit analytic solutions were lacking thus far. In this study this gap is filled. We found that in general explicit solutions can be constructed whenever an explicit formula is known in the theory at hand for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of a single black hole as a function of its charges, and illustrated this with some simple examples. We also found an example of moduli-dependent black hole entropy.

  12. Simulation of spheromak evolution and energy confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Cohen, R.H.; Hill, D.N.; McLean, H.S.; Wood, R.D.; Woodruff, S.; Sovinec, C.R.; Cone, G.A.

    2005-05-15

    Simulation results are presented that illustrate the formation and decay of a spheromak plasma driven by a coaxial electrostatic plasma gun, and model the plasma energy confinement. The physics of magnetic reconnection during formation is also illuminated. The simulations are performed with the three-dimensional, time-dependent, resistive magnetohydrodynamic NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec, A. H. Glasser, T. A. Gianakon, D. C. Barnes, R. A. Nebel, S. E. Kruger, D. D. Schnack, S. J. Plimpton, A. Tarditi, and M. S. Chu, J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The simulation results are compared to data from the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. The simulation results are tracking SSPX with increasing fidelity (e.g., improved agreement with measured magnetic fields, fluctuation amplitudes, and electron temperature) as the simulation has been improved in its representations of the experimental geometry, the magnetic bias coils, and the detailed time dependence of the current source driving the plasma gun, and uses realistic parameters. The simulations confirm that controlling the magnetic fluctuations is influenced by the current drive history and by matching the gun current in sustainment approximately to the value corresponding to the eigenvalue in the flux-conserver for the parallel current in a force-free equilibrium.

  13. Simulation of Spheromak Evolution and Energy Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B; Hooper, E; Cohen, R; Hill, D; McLean, H; Wood, R; Woodruff, S

    2004-11-12

    Simulation results are presented that illustrate the formation and decay of a spheromak plasma driven by a coaxial electrostatic plasma gun, and that model the energy confinement of the plasma. The physics of magnetic reconnection during spheromak formation is also illuminated. The simulations are performed with the three-dimensional, time-dependent, resistive magnetohydrodynamic NIMROD code. The dimensional, simulation results are compared to data from the SSPX spheromak experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The simulation results are tracking the experiment with increasing fidelity (e.g., improved agreement with measurements of the magnetic field, fluctuation amplitudes, and electron temperature) as the simulation has been improved in its representations of the geometry of the experiment (plasma gun and flux conserver), the magnetic bias coils, and the detailed time dependence of the current source driving the plasma gun, and uses realistic parameters. The simulations are providing a better understanding of the dominant physics in SSPX, including when the flux surfaces close and the mechanisms limiting the efficiency of electrostatic drive.

  14. Simulation of Spheromak Evolution and Energy Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B; Hooper, E; Cohen, R; Hill, D; McLean, H; Wood, R; Woodruff, S; Sovinec, C; Cone, G

    2004-11-09

    Simulation results are presented that illustrate the formation and decay of a spheromak plasma driven by a coaxial electrostatic plasma gun, and that model the energy confinement of the plasma. The physics of magnetic reconnection during spheromak formation is also illuminated. The simulations are performed with the three-dimensional, time-dependent, resistive magnetohydrodynamic NIMROD code. The simulation results are compared to data from the SSPX spheromak experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The simulation results are tracking the experiment with increasing fidelity (e.g., improved agreement with measurements of the magnetic field, fluctuation amplitudes, and electron temperature) as the simulation has been improved in its representations of the geometry of the experiment (plasma gun and flux conserver), the magnetic bias coils, and the detailed time dependence of the current source driving the plasma gun, and uses realistic parameters. The simulations are providing a better understanding of the dominant physics in SSPX, including when the flux surfaces close and the mechanisms limiting the efficiency of electrostatic drive.

  15. Droplet microfluidics driven by gradients of confinement.

    PubMed

    Dangla, Rémi; Kayi, S Cagri; Baroud, Charles N

    2013-01-15

    The miniaturization of droplet manipulation methods has led to drops being proposed as microreactors in many applications of biology and chemistry. In parallel, microfluidic methods have been applied to generate monodisperse emulsions for applications in the pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and food industries. To date, microfluidic droplet production has been dominated by a few designs that use hydrodynamic forces, resulting from the flowing fluids, to break drops at a junction. Here we present a platform for droplet generation and manipulation that does not depend on the fluid flows. Instead, we use devices that incorporate height variations to subject the immiscible interfaces to gradients of confinement. The resulting curvature imbalance along the interface causes the detachment of monodisperse droplets, without the need for a flow of the external phase. Once detached, the drops are self-propelled due to the gradient of surface energy. We show that the size of the drops is determined by the device geometry; it is insensitive to the physical fluid properties and depends very weakly on the flow rate of the dispersed phase. This allows us to propose a geometric theoretical model that predicts the dependence of droplet size on the geometric parameters, which is in agreement with experimental measurements. The approach presented here can be applied in a wide range of standard applications, while simplifying the device operations. We demonstrate examples for single-droplet operations and high-throughput generation of emulsions, all of which are performed in simple and inexpensive devices. PMID:23284169

  16. Swimming of Vorticella in two-dimensional confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo, Luz; Park, Young-Gil; Jung, Sunghwan; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-03-01

    Vorticellais a ciliate observed in the stalked sessile form (trophont), which consists of an inverted bell-shaped cell body (zooid) and a slender stalk attaching the zooid to a substrate. Having circular cilia bands around the oral part, the stalkless zooid of Vorticella can serve as a model system for microorganism swimming. Here we present how the stalkess trophont zooid of Vorticella swims in two-dimensional confined geometries which are similar to the Hele-Shaw cell. Having harvested stalkless Vorticella zooids, we observed their swimming in water between two glass surfaces using video microscopy. Based on measured swimming trajectories and distributions of zooid orientation and swimming velocity, we analyzed how Vorticella's swimming mobility was influenced by the geometry constraints. Supported by First Award grant from Nebraska EPSCoR.

  17. Many-electron atom confinement by a penetrable spherical box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-García, C.; Cruz, S. A.

    A confinement model for many-electron atoms enclosed by a spherical boundary with finite-barrier potential height is presented. The model is based on the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Weizsäcker (TFDlambdaW) functional formalism using known properties of the orbital electron densities and constitutes a natural extension of a previously published report for the case of infinitely hard walls [Cruz et al., Int J Quantum Chem, 2005, 102, 897]. The confining barrier potential is considered as a step-like function of finite height V0. This assumption demands of the appropriate description of the TFDlambdaW energy functional for both the interior and exterior regions together with corresponding ansatz orbital density representations, subject to continuity boundary conditions at the wall. For a given cage radius R and confining barrier height V0, the total ground-state energy is variationally optimized with respect to the characteristic parameters defining the interior and exterior orbital densities. The total ground-state energy and corresponding electronic density are obtained as function of barrier height and cage radius for many-electron atoms and ions. The model is explicitly applied to He, Li, C, and Ne and various ionic species for barrier heights (atomic units) V0 = 0, 5, and infin. Given a barrier height V0, the results are presented for the critical cage size to produce one or more unbound electrons - yet, confined by the box - until reaching threshold size values for which electron escape from the confinement region take place.

  18. Influence of confinement on polymer-electrolyte relaxational dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, J.-M.; Smith, L. J.; Price, D. L.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Lab. Leon Brillouin; Clark Univ.; CRMHT; CRMD

    2004-01-01

    Conception and industrial production of viable high specific energy/power batteries is a central issue for the development of non-polluting vehicles. In terms of stored energy and safety, solid-state devices using polymer electrolytes are highly desirable. One of the most studied systems is PEO (polyethylene oxide) complexed by Li salts. Polymer segmental motions and ionic conductivity are closely related. Bulk PEO is actually a biphasic system where an amorphous and a crystalline state (Tm 335 K) coexist. To improve ionic conduction in those systems requires a significant increase of the amorphous phase fraction where lithium conduction is known to mainly take place. Confinement strongly affects properties of condensed matter and in particular the collective phenomena inducing crystallization. Confinement of the polymer matrix is therefore a possible alternative route to the unpractical use of high temperature. Results of a quasi-elastic incoherent neutron scattering study of the influence of confinement on polyethylene oxide (PEO) and (PEO)8Li+[(CF3SO2)2N]- (or (POE)8LiTFSI) dynamics are presented. The nano-confining media is Vycor, a silica based hydrophilic porous glass (characteristic size of the 3D pore network 50 {angstrom}). As expected, the presence of Li salt slows down the bulk polymer dynamics. The confinement also affects dramatically the apparent mean-square displacement of the polymer. Local relaxational PEO dynamics is described KWW model. We also present an alternate model and show how the detailed polymer dynamics (correlation times and local geometry of the motions) can be described without the use of such stretched exponentials so as to access a rheology-related meaningful physical quantity: the monomeric friction coefficient.

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Instabilities in a confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, A. H.

    1999-05-01

    This is a large and important work by one of the leading Russian contributors to this subject. It covers topics of central importance to magnetic fusion energy research with a breadth, depth and clarity not found elsewhere. It is intended as a reference book and guide to the original literature for serious practitioners of the field. The book is divided into 8 large parts, listed below, and further subdivided into 31 chapters. The preface states, ``A need was identified to summarize the large amount of information on the topic of instabilities. This information is scattered throughout many papers on certain special subjects on the theory of toroidal-plasma instabilities. This book aims to treat it from a unified point of view.'' This is a good description of the aims and approach. The range of topics is large and the treatment deep and thorough. This is often accomplished by assuming considerable knowledge on the part of the reader, most appropriate for mature researchers in the field. The pace is fast. The requisite background includes extensive knowledge of a wide range of physics, ordinary and partial differential equations, integral equations, differential geometry and special functions. The preface also states, ``The author starts with the fundamental principles, so that no special knowledge of plasma physics is necessary before reading the book. It will therefore be useful for researchers, postgraduates, high-school teachers and students specializing in plasma physics and controlled fusion.'' In the opinion of this reviewer, that may be overly ambitious. The terse approach, characteristic of the whole book, as well as the steep price, would make it rather challenging for such an audience. For example, in the opening chapter, `General results of equilibrium theory', the properties of non-orthogonal, curvilinear co-ordinates are stated tersely without much explanation or derivation, more as a review than a first presentation. It is common for physics students, at least in the USA, to encounter this material first in a course on general relativity, which they might not have taken previously when specializing in plasma physics. While good efforts are made by the author to provide an intuitive understanding of the many analytical results, this is often done with such brevity that a substantial level of maturity is required to comprehend the ideas. Another quote from the preface is, ``The book is based on analytical approaches and should therefore be useful for everybody who is interested in the topic.'' In a field where complex geometry and dynamics and the importance of practical results have required much novel and creative computational work over the past 25 years, there is no mention, no acknowledgment, no hint of its importance. The analytical approach presented here certainly fills an important need, and there is no need for the same work to cover numerical work in depth, but some recognition of the importance of numerical work and its relationship with the analytical side of the theory might have been justified. Despite these shortcomings, this book is a major and welcome addition to the literature on plasma instabilities which I heartily recommend. Contents: 1. Equilibrium of a plasma in toroidal confinement systems; 2. Internal magnetohydrodynamic modes in the cylindrical approximation; 3. Small-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in toroidal confinement systems; 4. Magnetohydrodynamic internal kink modes in toroidal geometry; 5. Magnetohydrodynamic modes in collisionless and neoclassical regimes; 6. Drift-magnetohydrodynamic modes; 7. External kink modes; 8. Alfvén eigenmodes and their interaction with high-energy particles; References; Index.

  20. Motion, relaxation dynamics, and diffusion processes in two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined between walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Dorothea; Virnau, Peter; Snook, Ian K.; Binder, Kurt

    2012-11-01

    The dynamical behavior of single-component two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined in a slit geometry is studied by Langevin dynamics simulation of a simple model. The colloids are modeled as pointlike particles, interacting with the repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones potential, and the fluid molecules in the colloidal suspension are not explicitly considered. Considering a crystalline strip of triangular lattice structure with n=30 rows, the (one-dimensional) walls confining the strip are chosen as two rigidly fixed crystalline rows at each side, commensurate with the lattice structure and, thus, stabilizing long-range order. The case when the spacing between the walls is incommensurate with the ideal triangular lattice is also studied, where (due to a transition in the number of rows, n→n-1) the confined crystal is incommensurate with the confining boundaries, and a soliton staircase forms along the walls. It is shown that mean-square displacements (MSDs) of particles as a function of time show an overshoot and then saturate at a horizontal plateau in the commensurate case, the value of the plateau being largest in the center of the strip. Conversely, when solitons are present, MSDs are largest in the rows containing the solitons, and all MSDs do not settle down at well-defined plateaus in the direction parallel to the boundaries, due to the lack of positional long-range order in ideal two-dimensional crystals. The MSDs of the solitons (which can be treated like quasiparticles at very low temperature) have also been studied and their dynamics are found to be about an order of magnitude slower than that of the colloidal particles themselves. Finally, transport of individual colloidal particles by diffusion processes is studied: both standard vacancy-interstitial pair formation and cooperative ring rotation processes are identified. These processes require thermal activation, with activation energies of the order of 10Tm (Tm being the melting temperature of the crystal), while the motions due to long-wavelength phonons decrease only linearly in temperature.

  1. Towards assessing the violence of reaction during cookoff of confined energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Kipp, M.E.; Schmitt, R.G.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1996-11-01

    An analysis of post-ignition events in a variable confinement cookoff test (VCCT) geometry is presented aimed toward predicting the level of violence during cookoff of confined thermally-degraded energetic materials. This study focuses on the dynamic events following thermal initiation whereby accelerated combustion interacts with confinement. Numerical simulations, based on a model of reactive multiphase mixtures, indicate that the response of energetic material is highly dependent upon thermal/mechanical damage states prior to ignition. These damaged states affect the rate of pressurization, dynamic compaction behavior and subsequent growth to detonation. Variations of the specific surface area and porosity produced by decomposition of the energetic material causes different responses ranging from pressure burst to detonation. Calculated stress histories are used in estimating breakup of the VCCT confinement based on Grady-Kipp fragmentation theory.

  2. Radial guiding-center drifts and omnigenity in bumpy-torus confinement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Catto, P. J.

    1982-07-01

    Collisional transport of a high temperature plasma across the confining field of a bumpy torus magnetic confinement system which depends sensitively upon the functional form of the radial quiding center drift, and thus upon details of the confinement geometry is discussed. A general and relatively explicit formula for the radial drift is derived, using the large aspect-ratio results of a previous equilibrium study. Allowance is made for: (1) arbitrary toroidal variation of the confining field; (2) field distortion due to plasma currents; (3) noncircular deformation of the toroidal field coils. The analysis pertains only to the plasma core, and not to the high beta annuli (electron rings) which are usually present in experiments. The question of bumpy torus omnigenity whether any bumpy torus field configuration is consistent with a vanishing, or nearly vanishing, radial drift, is also investigated. It is found that omnigenity does not occur in the vicinity of the magnetic axis.

  3. Theory of rheology in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerov, Artem A.; Krüger, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The viscosity of fluids is generally understood in terms of kinetic mechanisms, i.e., particle collisions, or thermodynamic ones as imposed through structural distortions upon, e.g., applying shear. Often the latter are more relevant, which allows a simpler theoretical description, and, e.g., (damped) Brownian particles can be considered good fluid model systems. We formulate a general theoretical approach for rheology in confinement, based on microscopic equations of motion and classical density functional theory. Specifically, we discuss the viscosity for the case of two parallel walls in relative motion as a function of the wall-to-wall distance, analyzing its relation to the slip length found for a single wall. The previously observed [A. A. Aerov and M. Krüger, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094701 (2014)., 10.1063/1.4866450] deficiency of inhomogeneous (unphysical) stresses under naive application of shear in confinement is healed when hydrodynamic interactions are included.

  4. Permit-required confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Turk, A R

    1993-10-01

    The focus of the new Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standard: Permit-Required Confined Spaces (29 CFR 1910.146) is to protect workers who enter and work in areas with immediate health or safety risk from toxic, explosive, and/or asphyxiating atmospheres. The rule mandates that employers identify all permit-required confined spaces in their workplaces, prevent unauthorized entry into them, and develop a program to protect workers during authorized entry. Included in this standard are requirements for the content, issuance, and retention of entry permits; the provision of standby attendants; arrangements for rescue and other emergency services; the communication of hazards to workers (including contractors' employees); and appropriate training and equipment for authorized entrants, attendants, and entry supervisors. PMID:10132470

  5. Theory of rheology in confinement.

    PubMed

    Aerov, Artem A; Krüger, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The viscosity of fluids is generally understood in terms of kinetic mechanisms, i.e., particle collisions, or thermodynamic ones as imposed through structural distortions upon, e.g., applying shear. Often the latter are more relevant, which allows a simpler theoretical description, and, e.g., (damped) Brownian particles can be considered good fluid model systems. We formulate a general theoretical approach for rheology in confinement, based on microscopic equations of motion and classical density functional theory. Specifically, we discuss the viscosity for the case of two parallel walls in relative motion as a function of the wall-to-wall distance, analyzing its relation to the slip length found for a single wall. The previously observed [A. A. Aerov and M. Krüger, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094701 (2014).] deficiency of inhomogeneous (unphysical) stresses under naive application of shear in confinement is healed when hydrodynamic interactions are included. PMID:26565234

  6. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems. PMID:27146955

  7. Physics of magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.

    2013-06-01

    Fusion is the energy source of the universe. The local conditions in the core of the Sun allow the transfer of mass into energy, which is finally released in the form of radiation. Technical fusion melts deuterons and tritons to helium releasing large amounts of energy per fusion process. Because of the conditions for fusion, which will be deduced, the fusion fuel is in the plasma state. Here we report on the confinement of fusion plasmas by magnetic fields. Different confinement concepts — tokamaks and stellarators — will be introduced and described. The first fusion reactor, ITER, and the most modern stellarator, Wendelstein 7-X, are under construction. Their basic features and objectives will be presented.

  8. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  9. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A Java wrapper around the library allows parts of it to be used from Java code (via a native JNI interface). Future conversions of all or part of the library to Java are contemplated.

  10. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  11. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-11-16

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  12. Generalized Kähler Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Generalized Kähler geometry is the natural analogue of Kähler geometry, in the context of generalized complex geometry. Just as we may require a complex structure to be compatible with a Riemannian metric in a way which gives rise to a symplectic form, we may require a generalized complex structure to be compatible with a metric so that it defines a second generalized complex structure. We prove that generalized Kähler geometry is equivalent to the bi-Hermitian geometry on the target of a 2-dimensional sigma model with (2, 2) supersymmetry. We also prove the existence of natural holomorphic Courant algebroids for each of the underlying complex structures, and that these split into a sum of transverse holomorphic Dirac structures. Finally, we explore the analogy between pre-quantum line bundles and gerbes in the context of generalized Kähler geometry.

  13. Trapping ultracold atoms in a time-averaged adiabatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Gildemeister, M.; Nugent, E.; Sherlock, B. E.; Kubasik, M.; Sheard, B. T.; Foot, C. J.

    2010-03-15

    We report an experimental realization of ultracold atoms confined in a time-averaged, adiabatic potential (TAAP). This trapping technique involves using a slowly oscillating ({approx}kHz) bias field to time-average the instantaneous potential given by dressing a bare magnetic potential with a high-frequency ({approx}MHz) magnetic field. The resultant potentials provide a convenient route to a variety of trapping geometries with tunable parameters. We demonstrate the TAAP trap in a standard time-averaged orbiting potential trap with additional Helmholtz coils for the introduction of the radio frequency dressing field. We have evaporatively cooled 5x10{sup 4} atoms of {sup 87}Rb to quantum degeneracy and observed condensate lifetimes of longer than 3 s.

  14. Nanoparticle Order through Entropic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Lee, Bongjoon; Stafford, Christopher; Douglas, Jack; Bockstaller, Michael; Karim, Alamgir

    As has been addressed in colloidal science, visual order transitions can be achieved with entropy contributions alone. Herein, entropy-driven ordering of nanoparticle (NP) structures is generated where entropy increase and visual order are achieved simultaneously. We study an ``athermal'' NP-polymer blends where NPs are densely grafted with polymer brush of the same chemical composition as the polymer matrix. Visual order of the NPs is induced by geometrically confining the thin film blends with meso-scale topographic patterns. When the residual layer thickness of the patterned blend films approaches the nanoparticle dimension, exclusive segregation of NPs to less confining imprinted mesa region occurs. This preferential segregation of NPs, defined by partition coefficient K = 0, is attributed to purely entropic penalty, where K denotes the particle density ratio at highly confined residual layer to that at mesa region. We further demonstrate K is fully tunable and even invertible with increasing matrix chain dimension. The associated entropic free energy change (ΔF = - ln K) is calculated to explain NP segregation preference. Accordingly, variation of residual layer thickness and polymer matrix molecule size can both affect NP distribution among patterned thick and thin regions.

  15. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W.; Saleem, Zain H.

    2015-06-01

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  16. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    PubMed

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries. PMID:26196789

  17. Deuterium anions in inertial electrostatic confinement devices.

    PubMed

    Boris, D R; Alderson, E; Becerra, G; Donovan, D C; Egle, B; Emmert, G A; Garrison, L; Kulcinski, G L; Santarius, J F; Schuff, C; Zenobia, S J

    2009-09-01

    A magnetic deflection-energy analyzer and Faraday trap diagnostic have been used to make measurements of divergent deuterium anion flow in the inertial electrostatic confinement experiment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-IEC) [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, I. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)], a device to confine high-energy light ions in a spherically symmetric electrostatic potential well. Deuterium anion current densities as high as 8.5 microA/cm2 have been measured at the wall of the UW-IEC device, 40 cm from the surface of the device cathode with a detector assembly of admittance area 0.7 cm2. Energy spectra obtained using a magnetic deflection-energy analyzer diagnostic indicate the presence of D2(-), and D- ions produced through thermal electron attachment near the device cathode, as well as D- ions produced via charge-transfer processes between the anode and cathode of the device. PMID:19905231

  18. Deuterium anions in inertial electrostatic confinement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, D. R.; Alderson, E.; Becerra, G.; Donovan, D. C.; Egle, B.; Emmert, G. A.; Garrison, L.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.; Schuff, C.; Zenobia, S. J.

    2009-09-01

    A magnetic deflection-energy analyzer and Faraday trap diagnostic have been used to make measurements of divergent deuterium anion flow in the inertial electrostatic confinement experiment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-IEC) [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, I. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)], a device to confine high-energy light ions in a spherically symmetric electrostatic potential well. Deuterium anion current densities as high as 8.5μA/cm2 have been measured at the wall of the UW-IEC device, 40 cm from the surface of the device cathode with a detector assembly of admittance area 0.7cm2 . Energy spectra obtained using a magnetic deflection-energy analyzer diagnostic indicate the presence of D2- , and D- ions produced through thermal electron attachment near the device cathode, as well as D- ions produced via charge-transfer processes between the anode and cathode of the device.

  19. Confinement of Non-neutral Plasmas in Stellarator Magnetic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Paul

    2011-12-01

    The Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT) is the first experiment designed to create and study small Debye length non-neutral plasmas confined by magnetic surfaces. This thesis describes experimental confinement studies of non-neutral plasmas on magnetic surfaces in CNT. Open orbits exist in CNT resulting in electron loss rates that are much faster than initially predicted. For this reason a conforming boundary was designed and installed to address what is believed to be the primary cause of open orbits: the existence of a sizable mismatch between the electrostatic potential surfaces and the magnetic surfaces. After installation a record confinement time of 337 ms was measured, more than an order of magnitude improvement over the previous 20 ms record. This improvement was a combination of the predicted improvement in orbit quality, a reduced Debye length that resulted in decreased transport due to the perturbing insulated rods, and improved operating parameters not indicative of any new physics. The perturbation caused by the insulated rods that hold emitters on axis in CNT is a source of electron transport and would provide a loss mechanism for positrons in future positron-electron plasma experiments. For these reasons an emitter capable of creating plasmas then being removed faster than the confinement time was built and installed. Measurements of plasma decay after emitter retraction indicate that ion accumulation reduces the length of time that plasmas are confined. Plasmas have been measured after retraction with decay times as long as 92 ms after the emitter has left the last closed flux surface. Experimental observations show that obstructing one side of an emitting filament with a nearby insulator substantially improves confinement. As a result, experiments have been performed to determine whether a two stream instability affects confinement in CNT. Results indicate that the improvement is not caused by reducing a two stream instability. Instead, the improvement is a result of altering the sheath of the emitting filament which allows the plasma to reach an equilibrium state with improved confinement. These measurements agree with confinement times for plasmas created by unobstructed emission that are in the same improved confinement state.

  20. Investigating Fractal Geometry Using LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses dimensionality in Euclidean geometry. Presents methods to produce fractals using LOGO. Uses the idea of self-similarity. Included are program listings and suggested extension activities. (MVL)

  1. On a holographic model for confinement/deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Bayona, C. A. Ballon; Boschi-Filho, Henrique; Braga, Nelson R. F.; Zayas, Leopoldo A. Pando

    2008-02-15

    We study the thermodynamics of the hard wall model, which consists of the introduction of an infrared cutoff in asymptotically AdS spaces. This is a toy model for confining backgrounds in the context of the gauge/gravity correspondence. We use holographic renormalization and reproduce the existence of a Hawking-Page phase transition recently discussed by Herzog. We also show that the entropy jumps from N{sup 0} to N{sup 2}, which reinforces the interpretation of this transition as the gravity dual of confinement/deconfinement. We also show that similar results hold for the phenomenologically motivated soft wall model, underlining the potential universality of our analysis.

  2. On a holographic model for confinement/deconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayona, C. A. Ballon; Boschi-Filho, Henrique; Braga, Nelson R. F.; Zayas, Leopoldo A. Pando

    2008-02-01

    We study the thermodynamics of the hard wall model, which consists of the introduction of an infrared cutoff in asymptotically AdS spaces. This is a toy model for confining backgrounds in the context of the gauge/gravity correspondence. We use holographic renormalization and reproduce the existence of a Hawking-Page phase transition recently discussed by Herzog. We also show that the entropy jumps from N0 to N2, which reinforces the interpretation of this transition as the gravity dual of confinement/deconfinement. We also show that similar results hold for the phenomenologically motivated soft wall model, underlining the potential universality of our analysis.

  3. Electron-Hole Confinement Symmetry in Silicon Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Filipp; Konstantaras, Georgios; Spruijtenburg, Paul C; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Zwanenburg, Floris A

    2015-08-12

    We report electrical transport measurements on a gate-defined ambipolar quantum dot in intrinsic silicon. The ambipolarity allows its operation as either an electron or a hole quantum dot of which we change the dot occupancy by 20 charge carriers in each regime. Electron-hole confinement symmetry is evidenced by the extracted gate capacitances and charging energies. The results demonstrate that ambipolar quantum dots offer great potential for spin-based quantum information processing, since confined electrons and holes can be compared and manipulated in the same crystalline environment. PMID:26134900

  4. Confinement Driven by Scalar Field in 4d Non Abelian Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Chabab, Mohamed

    2007-01-12

    We review some of the most recent work on confinement in 4d gauge theories with a massive scalar field (dilaton). Emphasis is put on the derivation of confining analytical solutions to the Coulomb problem versus dilaton effective couplings to gauge terms. It is shown that these effective theories can be relevant to model quark confinement and may shed some light on confinement mechanism. Moreover, the study of interquark potential, derived from Dick Model, in the heavy meson sector proves that phenomenological investigation of tmechanism is more than justified and deserves more efforts.

  5. Competition between confinement potential fluctuations and band-gap renormalization effects in In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.525Ga0.235Al0.25As single and double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, José Leonil; Poças, Luiz Carlos; Laureto, Edson; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Lopes, Élder Mantovani; Lourenço, Sidney Alves; Harmand, J. C.

    2008-04-01

    We present the results of our studies on the emission properties of In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.525Ga0.235Al0.25As single and coupled double quantum wells (CDQWs) with different degrees of potential fluctuation. We have verified that the curve of the temperature (T) dependence of the emission peak energy (EPL) is significantly influenced by the potential fluctuations (which are magnified by the presence of the internal barrier in the CDQW) as well as by the excitation density used in the photoluminescence (PL) measurements. As the excitation power increases, two effects occur simultaneously: the filling of the band-tail states related to potential fluctuations and the band-gap renormalization (BGR) caused by the increase in the density of photogenerated carriers. As the optical density increases, the EPL can shift to either higher (blueshift) or lower (redshift) energies, depending on the temperature at which the measurements are carried out. The temperature at which the displacement changes from a blueshift to a redshift is governed by the magnitude of the potential fluctuations and by the variation of BGR with excitation density.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHODOLOGY FOR REGIONAL EVALUATION OF CONFINING BED INTEGRITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    For safe underground injection of liquid waste, confining formations must be thick, extensive, and have low permeability. Recognition of faults that extend from the potential injection zone to underground sources of drinking water is critical for evaluation of confining-bed integ...

  7. Detection of confinement and jumps in single-molecule membrane trajectories.

    PubMed

    Meilhac, N; Le Guyader, L; Salomé, L; Destainville, N

    2006-01-01

    We propose a variant of the algorithm by [R. Simson, E. D. Sheets, and K. Jacobson, Biophys. 69, 989 (1995)]. Their algorithm was developed to detect transient confinement zones in experimental single-particle tracking trajectories of diffusing membrane proteins or lipids. We show that our algorithm is able to detect confinement in a wider class of confining potential shapes than that of Simson et al. Furthermore, it enables to detect not only temporary confinement but also jumps between confinement zones. Jumps are predicted by membrane skeleton fence and picket models. In the case of experimental trajectories of mu-opioid receptors, which belong to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors involved in a signal transduction pathway, this algorithm confirms that confinement cannot be explained solely by rigid fences. PMID:16486193

  8. Detection of confinement and jumps in single-molecule membrane trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilhac, N.; Le Guyader, L.; Salomé, L.; Destainville, N.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a variant of the algorithm by [R. Simson, E. D. Sheets, and K. Jacobson, Biophys. 69, 989 (1995)]. Their algorithm was developed to detect transient confinement zones in experimental single-particle tracking trajectories of diffusing membrane proteins or lipids. We show that our algorithm is able to detect confinement in a wider class of confining potential shapes than that of Simson Furthermore, it enables to detect not only temporary confinement but also jumps between confinement zones. Jumps are predicted by membrane skeleton fence and picket models. In the case of experimental trajectories of μ -opioid receptors, which belong to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors involved in a signal transduction pathway, this algorithm confirms that confinement cannot be explained solely by rigid fences.

  9. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, Jon

    1999-01-01

    An Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device was assembled at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) to study the possibility of using EEC technology for deep space propulsion and power. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement is capable of containing a nuclear fusion plasma in a series of virtual potential wells. These wells would substantially increase plasma confinement, possibly leading towards a high-gain, breakthrough fusion device. A one-foot in diameter IEC vessel was borrowed from the Fusion Studies Laboratory at the University of Illinois@Urbana-Champaign for the summer. This device was used in initial parameterization studies in order to design a larger, actively cooled device for permanent use at the PRC.

  10. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion For Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, Jon

    1999-01-01

    An Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device was assembled at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) to study the possibility of using IEC technology for deep space propulsion and power. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement is capable of containing a nuclear fusion plasma in a series of virtual potential wells. These wells would substantially increase plasma confinement, possibly leading towards a high-gain, breakthrough fusion device. A one-foot in diameter IEC vessel was borrowed from the Fusion Studies Laboratory at the University of Illinois @ Urbana-Champaign for the summer. This device was used in initial parameterization studies in order to design a larger, actively cooled device for permanent use at the PRC.

  11. Life-testing oxide confined VCSELs: Too good to last?

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Nevers, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    The use of native oxides (selective oxidation) in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers has produced dramatic improvements in these laser diodes but has also been suspected of causing poor reliability because of incidental reports of short lifetimes and physical considerations. Here we discuss the results of thousands of hours life-tests for oxide confined and implant confined devices at current densities from 1 to 12 kA/cm{sup 2}. There was a single infant mortality failure from a sample of 14 oxide confined lasers with the remainder showing relatively stable operation. The failed device is analyzed in terms of light current characteristics and near-field electroluminescence images, and potential screening criteria are proposed.

  12. Theory of Activated Relaxation in Nanoscale Confined Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    We extend the recently developed Elastically Cooperative Nonlinear Langevin Equation(ECNLE) theory of activated relaxation in supercooled liquids to treat the case of geometrically confined liquids. Generically, confinement of supercooled liquids leads to a speeding up of the dynamics(with a consequent depression of the glass transition temperature) extending on the order of tens of molecular diameters away from a free surface. At present, this behavior is not theoretically well understood. Our theory interprets the speed up in dynamics in terms of two coupled effects. First, a direct surface effect, extending two to three molecular diameters from a free surface, and related to a local rearrangement of molecules with a single cage. The second is a longer ranged ``confinement'' effect, extending tens of molecular diameters from a free surface and related to the long range elastic penalty necessary for a local rearrangement. The theory allows for the calculation of relaxation time and Tg profiles within a given geometry and first principles calculations of relevant length scales. Comparison to both dynamic and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements shows reasonable agreement to experiment with no adjustable parameters.

  13. Universal behavior of hydrogels confined to narrow capillaries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sarıyer, Ozan S; Ramachandran, Arun; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Flow of soft matter objects through one-dimensional environments is important in industrial, biological and biomedical systems. Establishing the underlying principles of the behavior of soft matter in confinement can shed light on its performance in many man-made and biological systems. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study of translocation of micrometer-size hydrogels (microgels) through microfluidic channels with a diameter smaller than an unperturbed microgel size. For microgels with different dimensions and mechanical properties, under a range of applied pressures, we established the universal principles of microgel entrance and passage through microchannels with different geometries, as well as the reduction in microgel volume in confinement. We also show a non-monotonic change in the flow rate of liquid through the constrained microgel, governed by its progressive confinement. The experimental results were in agreement with the theory developed for non-linear biaxial deformation of unentangled polymer gels. Our work has implications for a broad range of phenomena, including occlusion of blood vessels by thrombi and needle-assisted hydrogel injection in tissue engineering. PMID:26596468

  14. Universal behavior of hydrogels confined to narrow capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Sarıyer, Ozan S.; Ramachandran, Arun; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-11-01

    Flow of soft matter objects through one-dimensional environments is important in industrial, biological and biomedical systems. Establishing the underlying principles of the behavior of soft matter in confinement can shed light on its performance in many man-made and biological systems. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study of translocation of micrometer-size hydrogels (microgels) through microfluidic channels with a diameter smaller than an unperturbed microgel size. For microgels with different dimensions and mechanical properties, under a range of applied pressures, we established the universal principles of microgel entrance and passage through microchannels with different geometries, as well as the reduction in microgel volume in confinement. We also show a non-monotonic change in the flow rate of liquid through the constrained microgel, governed by its progressive confinement. The experimental results were in agreement with the theory developed for non-linear biaxial deformation of unentangled polymer gels. Our work has implications for a broad range of phenomena, including occlusion of blood vessels by thrombi and needle-assisted hydrogel injection in tissue engineering.

  15. Universal behavior of hydrogels confined to narrow capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Sarıyer, Ozan S.; Ramachandran, Arun; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Flow of soft matter objects through one-dimensional environments is important in industrial, biological and biomedical systems. Establishing the underlying principles of the behavior of soft matter in confinement can shed light on its performance in many man-made and biological systems. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study of translocation of micrometer-size hydrogels (microgels) through microfluidic channels with a diameter smaller than an unperturbed microgel size. For microgels with different dimensions and mechanical properties, under a range of applied pressures, we established the universal principles of microgel entrance and passage through microchannels with different geometries, as well as the reduction in microgel volume in confinement. We also show a non-monotonic change in the flow rate of liquid through the constrained microgel, governed by its progressive confinement. The experimental results were in agreement with the theory developed for non-linear biaxial deformation of unentangled polymer gels. Our work has implications for a broad range of phenomena, including occlusion of blood vessels by thrombi and needle-assisted hydrogel injection in tissue engineering. PMID:26596468

  16. Understanding nanorheology and surface forces of confined thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Yan, Bin; Faghihnejad, Ali; Xu, Haolan; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the nanorheology and associated intermolecular/surface forces of fluids in confined geometries or porous media is of both fundamental and practical importance, providing significant insights into various applications such as lubrication and micro/nanoelectromechanical systems. In this work, we briefly reviewed the fundamentals of nanoreheolgy, advances in experimental techniques and theoretical simulation methods, as well as important progress in the nanorheology of confined thin films. The advent of advanced experimental techniques such as surface forces apparatus (SFA), X-ray surface forces apparatus (XSFA) and atomic force microscope (AFM) and computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulations provides powerful tools to study a wide range of rheological phenomena at molecular level and nano scale. One of the most challenging issues unresolved is to elucidate the relationship between the rheological properties and structural evolution of the confined fluid films and particles suspensions. Some of the emerging research areas in the nanorheology field include, but are not limited to, the development of more advanced characterization techniques, design of multifunctional rheological fluids, bio-related nanorheology, and polymer brushes.

  17. Comparison of reach-scale morphologic adjustment in confined and unconfined alluvial mountain rivers, Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletty, P. D.; Goode, J.; Pierce, J. L.; Buffington, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Over human time scales (10-1 - 102 yr), alluvial mountain rivers respond to changes in sediment input and discharge through adjustments in reach-scale morphology (width, depth, grain size, and, to some degree, slope). Channel confinement (valley-width relative to the bankfull channel width) in these systems can strongly influence the magnitude of channel response. We compared channel responsiveness to flood events (50-100 yr) within the last 5 years in unconfined and confined valley segments on the Olympic Peninsula, western Washington. Field measurements of cross-sectional averaged width and depth in 20 confined and 20 unconfined valleys are compared to the bankfull dimensions predicted from established downstream hydraulic geometry relationships for the region. We expect that measured bankfull geometry of confined reaches will be significantly greater than the predicted bankfull dimensions, which would suggest that the morphology of confined channels is more responsive to flood events. In unconfined channels floodplains are large enough to disperse over-bank flows, which can limit the effect of peak discharges on channel morphology, whereas confined channels are forced to disperse the extra energy exerted by peak flows into increased shear stress along their bed and banks. Results from this study can aid modeling efforts to predict future changes in channel geometry and aquatic habitat in response to climate change or land use at the basin scale.

  18. Hessian geometry and the holomorphic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, G. L.; Mohaupt, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present a geometrical framework which incorporates higher derivative corrections to the action of N = 2 vector multiplets in terms of an enlarged scalar manifold which includes a complex deformation parameter. This enlarged space carries a deformed version of special Kähler geometry which we characterise. The holomorphic anomaly equation arises in this framework from the integrability condition for the existence of a Hesse potential.

  19. Analytic Coleman-de Luccia Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Harlow, Daniel; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-02-16

    We present the necessary and sufficient conditions for a Euclidean scale factor to be a solution of the Coleman-de Luccia equations for some analytic potential V ({psi}), with a Lorentzian continuation describing the growth of a bubble of lower-energy vacuum surrounded by higher-energy vacuum. We then give a set of explicit examples that satisfy the conditions and thus are closed-form analytic examples of Coleman-de Luccia geometries.

  20. Effect of Aluminium Confinement on ANFO Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Mark; Jackson, Scott; Kiyanda, Charles; Shinas, Mike; Hare, Steve; Briggs, Matt

    2013-06-01

    Detonations in confined non-ideal high explosives often have velocities below the confiner sound speed. The effect on detonation propagation of the resulting subsonic flow in the confiner (such as confiner stress waves traveling ahead of the main detonation front or upstream wall deflection into the HE) has yet to be fully understood. Previous work by Sharpe and Bdzil (J. Eng. Math, 2006) has shown that for subsonic confiner flow, there is no limiting thickness for which the detonation dynamics are uninfluenced by further increases in wall thickness. The critical parameters influencing detonation behavior are the wall thickness relative to the HE reaction zone size, and the difference in the detonation velocity and confiner sound speed. Additional possible outcomes of subsonic flow are that for increasing thickness, the confiner is increasingly deflected into the HE upstream of the detonation, and that for sufficiently thick confiners, the detonation speed could be driven up to the sound speed in the confiner. We report here on a further series of experiments in which a mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) is detonated in aluminum confiners with varying HE charge diameter and confiner thickness, and compare the results with the outcomes suggested by Sharpe and Bdzil.

  1. GPS: Geometry, Probability, and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Mike

    2012-01-01

    It might be said that for most occupations there is now less of a need for mathematics than there was say fifty years ago. But, the author argues, geometry, probability, and statistics constitute essential knowledge for everyone. Maybe not the geometry of Euclid, but certainly geometrical ways of thinking that might enable us to describe the world

  2. Linguistic geometry for autonomous navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Stilman, B.

    1995-09-01

    To discover the inner properties of human expert heuristics, which were successful in a certain class of complex control systems, we develop a formal theory, the Linguistic Geometry. This paper reports two examples of application of Linguistic Geometry to autonomous navigation of aerospace vehicles that demonstrate dramatic search reduction.

  3. Modeling of asymmetric compensator geometries.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D M; Scrimger, J W

    1991-01-01

    Dose distributions arising from the use of near unit density retracted missing tissue compensators in symmetric geometries have been successfully modeled on the basis of primary and first-order scattered radiation. This method of analysis has been extended to both low- and high-density materials in asymmetric geometries. Good agreement is achieved between theory and experiment. PMID:1921883

  4. On Learning Geometry for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchemann, Dietmar; Rodd, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The title is that of a course with the same name, designed for teachers of mathematics. The rational for a course specifically on geometry was that "many of those currently teaching mathematics in school had little geometrical education". Teachers on the course experience geometry through problem solving, and learning to pose geometrical problems.…

  5. Analytic Geometry, A Tentative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helwig, G. Alfred; And Others

    This teacher's guide for a semester course in analytic geometry is based on the text "Analytic Geometry" by W. K. Morrill. Included is a daily schedule of suggested topics and homework assignments. Specific teaching hints are also given. The content of the course includes point and plane vectors, straight lines, point and space vectors, planes,…

  6. GPS: Geometry, Probability, and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Mike

    2012-01-01

    It might be said that for most occupations there is now less of a need for mathematics than there was say fifty years ago. But, the author argues, geometry, probability, and statistics constitute essential knowledge for everyone. Maybe not the geometry of Euclid, but certainly geometrical ways of thinking that might enable us to describe the world…

  7. Effect of confinement during cookoff of TATB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, M. L.; Kaneshige, M. J.

    2014-05-01

    In practical scenarios, cookoff of explosives is a three-dimensional transient phenomenon where the rate limiting reactions may occur either in the condensed or gas phase. The effects of confinement are more dramatic when the rate-limiting reactions occur in the gas phase. Explosives can be self-confined, where the decomposing gases are contained within non-permeable regions of the explosive, or confined by a metal or composite container. In triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based explosives, self-confinement is prevalent in plastic bonded explosives at full density. The time-to-ignition can be delayed by orders of magnitude if the reactive gases leave the confining apparatus. Delays in ignition can also occur when the confining apparatus has excess gas volume or ullage. Understanding the effects of confinement is required to accurately model explosive cookoff at various scales ranging from small laboratory experiments to large real systems.

  8. Simulations of artificial swimmers in confined flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Luca; Zhu, Lailai; Gjølberg, Eerik

    2012-11-01

    Miniature swimmming robots are potentially powerful for microobject manipulation, such as flow control in lab-on-a-chip, localized drug delivery and screening for diseases. Magnetically driven artificial bacterial flagella (ABF) performing helical motion is advantegous due to high swimming speed and accurate control. Using boundary element method, we numerically investigate the propulsion of ABF in free space and near solid boundaries. Step-out at high actuation frequencies, wobbling and near-wall drifting are documented, in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. We aim to explore the effect of swimmer shape on the performance, thus benefiting design of efficient microswimmers. Propulsion of ABF confined by a solid wall with and without background shear flow is also studied, with a focus on wall-induced hydrodynamic interaction and its influence on the stability of the motion. Funding by VR (the Swedish Research Council) and Linne flow centre at KTH is acknowledged.

  9. Ion separation effects in mixed-species ablators for inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Bellei, Claudio; Ross, J. Steven; Salmonson, Jay

    2015-02-01

    Recent efforts to demonstrate significant self-heating of the fuel and eventual ignition at the National Ignition Facility make use of plastic (CH) ablators [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014), 10.1063/1.4874330]. Mainline simulation techniques for modeling CH capsule implosions treat the ablator as an average-atom fluid and neglect potential species separation phenomena. The mass-ablation process for a mixture is shown to lead to the potential for species separation, parasitic energy loss according to thermodynamic arguments, and reduced rocket efficiency. A generalized plasma barometric formula for a multispecies concentration gradient that includes collisionality and steady flows in spherical geometry is presented. A model based on plasma expansion into a vacuum is used to interpret reported experimental evidence for ablator species separation in an inertial-confinement-fusion target [J. S. Ross et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E323 (2012)]. The possibility of "runaway" hydrogen ions in the thermoelectric field of the ablation front is conjectured.

  10. Ion separation effects in mixed-species ablators for inertial-confinement-fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Amendt, Peter; Bellei, Claudio; Ross, J Steven; Salmonson, Jay

    2015-02-01

    Recent efforts to demonstrate significant self-heating of the fuel and eventual ignition at the National Ignition Facility make use of plastic (CH) ablators [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)]. Mainline simulation techniques for modeling CH capsule implosions treat the ablator as an average-atom fluid and neglect potential species separation phenomena. The mass-ablation process for a mixture is shown to lead to the potential for species separation, parasitic energy loss according to thermodynamic arguments, and reduced rocket efficiency. A generalized plasma barometric formula for a multispecies concentration gradient that includes collisionality and steady flows in spherical geometry is presented. A model based on plasma expansion into a vacuum is used to interpret reported experimental evidence for ablator species separation in an inertial-confinement-fusion target [J. S. Ross et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E323 (2012)]. The possibility of "runaway" hydrogen ions in the thermoelectric field of the ablation front is conjectured. PMID:25768614

  11. Limits of downstream hydraulic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2004-10-01

    Adjustments to flow width, depth, and velocity in response to changes in discharge are commonly characterized by using downstream hydraulic geometry relationships. The spatial limits of these relationships within a drainage basin have not been systematically quantified. Where the erosional resistance of the channel substrate is sufficiently large, hydraulic driving forces presumably will be unable to adjust channel form. Data sets from 10 mountain rivers in the United States, Panama, Nepal, and New Zealand are used in this study to explore the limits of downstream hydraulic geometry relationships. Where the ratio of stream power to sediment size (Ω/D84) exceeds 10,000 kg/s3, downstream hydraulic geometry is well developed; where the ratio falls below 10,000 kg/s3, downstream hydraulic geometry relationships are poorly developed. These limitations on downstream hydraulic geometry have important implications for channel engineering and simulations of landscape change.

  12. Cylindrical confinement of semiflexible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo; McDargh, Zachary; Deserno, Markus; Guven, Jemal

    2015-06-01

    Equilibrium states of a closed semiflexible polymer binding to a cylinder are described. This may be either by confinement or by constriction. Closed completely bound states are labeled by two integers: the number of oscillations, n , and the number of times it winds the cylinder, p , the latter being a topological invariant. We examine the behavior of these states as the length of the loop is increased by evaluating the energy, the conserved axial torque, and the contact force. The ground state for a given p is the state with n =1 ; a short loop with p =1 is an elliptic deformation of a parallel circle; as its length increases it elongates along the cylinder axis with two hairpin ends. Excited states with n ≥2 and p =1 possess n -fold axial symmetry. Short (long) loops possess energies ≈p E0 (n E0 ), with E0 the energy of a circular loop with same radius as the cylinder; in long loops the axial torque vanishes. Confined bound excited states are initially unstable; however, above a critical length each n -fold state becomes stable: The folded hairpin cannot be unfolded. The ground state for each p is also initially unstable with respect to deformations rotating the loop off the surface into the interior. A closed planar elastic curve aligned along the cylinder axis making contact with the cylinder on its two sides is identified as the ground state of a confined loop. Exterior bound states behave very differently, if free to unbind, as signaled by the reversal in the sign of the contact force. If p =1 , all such states are unstable. If p ≥2 , however, a topological obstruction to complete unbinding exists. If the loop is short, the bound state with p =2 and n =1 provides a stable constriction of the cylinder, partially unbinding as the length is increased. This motif could be relevant to an understanding of the process of membrane fission mediated by dynamin rings.

  13. Nano-confined Polymer Crystallization in Self-assembled Block Copolymers*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, S. Z. D.; Zhu, L.; Huang, P.; Calhoun, B. H.; Ge, Q.; Quirk, R. P.; Thomas, E. L.; Hsiao, B. S.; Yeh, F.; Liu, L.; Lotz, B.

    2001-03-01

    A convenient and effective method to study nano-confined polymer crystallization is to use self-assembled block copolymers as templates. Various confined geometries can be achieved using diblock copolymers on a nanometer length scale, such as lamellae, cylinders, spheres, double gyroids, and perforated layers. In this research, nano-confined polymer crystallization is studied in a poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polystyrene (PEO-b-PS) diblock copolymer system. PEO crystal orientations within various confined geometries have been found to be dependent upon the crystallization temperatures (Tc). In addition to a lamellar confined environment, a cylinder-forming PEO-b-PS/PS blend shows that the PEO crystal c-axis changes from inclined to perpendicular to the cylinder axis with increasing Tc. In a hexagonal-perforated-layer (HPL) sample, the orientation of the PEO crystal c-axis changes from parallel to inclined to the layers with increasing Tc. At high Tcs in the HPL phase, the PEO lamellar crystals grow specifically along the (100) planes of the hexagonal lattice. These specific crystal orientations have been found in early stages of the PEO crystal growth.

  14. Combinatorics, geometry, and mathematical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.Y.C.; Louck, J.D.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Combinatorics and geometry have been among the most active areas of mathematics over the past few years because of newly discovered inter-relations between them and their potential for applications. In this project, the authors set out to identify problems in physics, chemistry, and biology where these methods could impact significantly. In particular, the experience suggested that the areas of unitary symmetry and discrete dynamical systems could be brought more strongly under the purview of combinatorial methods. Unitary symmetry deals with the detailed description of the quantum mechanics of many-particle systems, and discrete dynamical systems with chaotic systems. The depth and complexity of the mathematics in these physical areas of research suggested that not only could significant advances be made in these areas, but also that here would be a fertile feedback of concept and structure to enrich combinatorics itself by setting new directions. During the three years of this project, the goals have been realized beyond expectation, and in this report the authors set forth these advancements and justify their optimism.

  15. Controlling defects in nematic and smectic liquid crystals through boundary geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, Daniel A.

    Liquid crystals (LCs), presently the basis of the dominant electronics display technology, also hold immense potential for the design of new self-assembling, self-healing, and "smart" responsive materials. Essential to many of these novel materials are liquid crystalline defects, places where the liquid crystalline order is forced to break down, replacing the LC locally with a higher-symmetry phase. Despite the energetic cost of this local melting, defects are often present at equilibrium when boundary conditions frustrate the material order. These defects provide micron-scale tools for organizing colloids, focusing light, and generating micropatterned materials. Manipulating the shapes of the boundaries thus offers a route to obtaining new and desirable self-assembly outcomes in LCs, but each added degree of complexity in the boundary geometry increases the complexity of the liquid crystal's response. Therefore, conceptually minimal changes to boundary geometry are investigated for their effects on the self-assembled defect arrangements that result in nematic and smectic-A LCs in three dimensions as well as two-dimensional smectic LCs on curved substrates. In nematic LCs, disclination loops are studied in micropost confining environments and in the presence of sharp-edged colloidal inclusions, using both numerical modeling and topological reasoning. In both scenarios, sharp edges add new possibilities for the shape or placement of disclinations, permitting new types of colloidal self-assembly beyond simple chains and hexagonal lattices. Two-dimensional smectic LCs on curved substrates are examined in the special cases where the substrate curvature is confined to points or curves, providing an analytically tractable route to demonstrate how Gaussian curvature is associated with disclinations and grain boundaries, as well as these defects' likely experimental manifestations. In three-dimensional smectic-A LCs, novel self-assembled arrangements of focal conic domains (FCDs) are shown to arise from geometric patterning or curvature in boundaries exhibiting so-called hybrid anchoring. These new arrangements allow control over both the packing of the FCDs and their eccentricities. In general, defect self-assembly behavior in LCs is shown to depend sensitively on the shapes of confining boundaries, colloidal inclusions, and substrates, and several broad, new geometrical principles for directing the assembly of nontrivial defect configurations are presented.

  16. Order in very cold confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P. |

    1995-12-31

    The study of the structure and dynamic properties of classical systems of charged particles confined by external forces, and cooled to very low internal energies, is the subject of this talk. An infinite system of identical charged particles has been known for some time to form a body-centered cubic lattice and is a simple classical prototype for condensed matter. Recent technical developments in storage rings, ion traps, and laser cooling of ions, have made it possible to produce such systems in the laboratory, though somewhat modified because of their finite size. I would like to discuss what one may expect in such systems and also show some examples of experiments. If we approximate the potential of an ion trap with an isotropic harmonic force F = {minus}Kr then the Hamiltonian for this collection of ions is the same as that for J. J. Thomson`s ``plum pudding`` model of the atom, where electrons were thought of as discrete negative charges imbedded in a larger, positive, uniformly charged sphere. The harmonic force macroscopically is canceled by the average space-charge forces of the plasma-, and this fixes the overall radius of the distribution. What remains, are the residual two-body Coulomb interactions that keep the particles within the volume as nearly equidistant as possible in order to minimize the potential energy. The configurations obtained for the minimum energy of small ionic systems [2] in isotropic confinement are shown in figure 1. Indeed this is an `Exotic Atom` and fits well into the subject of this symposium honoring the 60th birthday of Professor Toshi Yamazaki.

  17. Liquid Spreading under Nanoscale Confinement.

    PubMed

    Checco, Antonio

    2009-03-13

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy in the noncontact regime is used to study the morphology of a nonvolatile liquid (squalane) as it spreads along wettable nanostripes embedded in a nonwettable surface. Results show that the liquid profile depends on the amount of lateral confinement imposed by the nanostripes, and it is truncated at the microscopic contact line in good qualitative agreement with classical mesoscale hydrodynamics. However, the width of the contact line is found to be significantly larger than expected theoretically. This behavior may originate from small chemical inhomogeneity of the patterned stripes as well as from thermal fluctuations of the contact line. PMID:19392130

  18. Liquid Spreading under Nanoscale Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checco, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy in the noncontact regime is used to study the morphology of a nonvolatile liquid (squalane) as it spreads along wettable nanostripes embedded in a nonwettable surface. Results show that the liquid profile depends on the amount of lateral confinement imposed by the nanostripes, and it is truncated at the microscopic contact line in good qualitative agreement with classical mesoscale hydrodynamics. However, the width of the contact line is found to be significantly larger than expected theoretically. This behavior may originate from small chemical inhomogeneity of the patterned stripes as well as from thermal fluctuations of the contact line.

  19. How may confinement affect technicolour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doff, A.; Machado, F. A.; Natale, A. A.

    2012-10-01

    Confinement has been introduced into the quark gap equation, as proposed by Cornwall, as a possible solution to the problem of chiral symmetry breaking in quantum chromodynamics with dynamically massive gluons. We argue that the same mechanism can be applied for technicolour with dynamically massive technigluons. Within this approach both theories develop a hard self-energy dynamic, resulting from an effective four-fermion interaction, which does not lead to the known technicolour phenomenological problems. We outline a quite general type of technicolour model within this proposal that may naturally explain the masses of different fermion generations.

  20. Confined Space Imager (CSI) Software

    SciTech Connect

    Karelilz, David

    2013-07-03

    The software provides real-time image capture, enhancement, and display, and sensor control for the Confined Space Imager (CSI) sensor system The software captures images over a Cameralink connection and provides the following image enhancements: camera pixel to pixel non-uniformity correction, optical distortion correction, image registration and averaging, and illumination non-uniformity correction. The software communicates with the custom CSI hardware over USB to control sensor parameters and is capable of saving enhanced sensor images to an external USB drive. The software provides sensor control, image capture, enhancement, and display for the CSI sensor system. It is designed to work with the custom hardware.

  1. A double-layer based model of ion confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D. Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria ; Sorbello, G.; Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania

    2014-02-15

    The paper proposes a new model of ion confinement in ECRIS, which can be easily generalized to any magnetic configuration characterized by closed magnetic surfaces. Traditionally, ion confinement in B-min configurations is ascribed to a negative potential dip due to superhot electrons, adiabatically confined by the magneto-static field. However, kinetic simulations including RF heating affected by cavity modes structures indicate that high energy electrons populate just a thin slab overlapping the ECR layer, while their density drops down of more than one order of magnitude outside. Ions, instead, diffuse across the electron layer due to their high collisionality. This is the proper physical condition to establish a double-layer (DL) configuration which self-consistently originates a potential barrier; this “barrier” confines the ions inside the plasma core surrounded by the ECR surface. The paper will describe a simplified ion confinement model based on plasma density non-homogeneity and DL formation.

  2. Pattern formation in confined chemical gardens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wit, Anne; Haudin, Florence; Brau, Fabian; Cartwright, Julyan

    2014-05-01

    Chemical gardens are plant-like mineral structures first described in the seventeenth century and popularly known from chemistry sets for children. They are classically grown in three-dimensional containers by placing a solid metal-salt seed into a silicate solution. When the metal salt starts dissolving in the silicate solution, a semi-permeable membrane forms by precipitation across which water is pumped by osmosis from the silicate solution into the metal salt solution, further dissolving the salt. Above a given pressure, the membrane breaks. The dissolved metal salt solution being generally less dense than the reservoir silicate solution, it rises as a buoyant jet through the broken membrane and further precipitates in contact with the silicate solution, producing a collection of mineral forms that resemble a garden. Such gardens are the subject of increased interest as a model system to understand pattern formation in sea-ice brinicles and hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, among others. All these self-organized precipitation structures at the interface between chemistry, fluid dynamics and mechanics share indeed common chemical, mechanical and electrical properties. In this framework, we study experimentally spatial patterns resulting from the growth of chemical gardens in confined quasi-two-dimensional (2D) geometries upon radial injection of a metallic salt solution into a silicate solution in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. We find a large variety of patterns including spirals, fingers, worms, filiform tubes, and flower-like patterns. By exploring the phase space of reactant concentrations and injection flow rates, we observe transitions between these spatio-temporal structures resulting from a coupling between the precipitation reaction, mechanical effects and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  3. Proton radiography of PBX 9502 detonation shock dynamics confinement sandwich test

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq D; Jackson, Scott I; Morris, John S

    2009-01-01

    Recent results utilizing proton radiography (P-Rad) during the detonation of the high explosive PBX 9502 are presented. Specifically, the effects of confinement of the detonation are examined in the LANL detonation confinement sandwich geometry. The resulting detonation velocity and detonation shock shape are measured. In addition, proton radiography allows one to image the reflected shocks through the detonation products. Comparisons are made with detonation shock dynamics (DSD) and reactive flow models for the lead detonation shock and detonation velocity. In addition, predictions of reflected shocks are made with the reactive flow models.

  4. Photonic bandgap confinement in an all-solid tellurite-glass photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Lousteau, Joris; Scarpignato, Gerardo; Athanasiou, Giorgos S; Mura, Emanuele; Boetti, Nadia; Olivero, Massimo; Benson, Trevor; Sewell, Phillip; Abrate, Silvio; Milanese, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    We report on the fabrication and optical assessment of an all-solid tellurite-glass photonic bandgap fiber. The manufacturing process via a preform drawing approach and the fiber characterization procedures are described and discussed. The fiber exhibits some minor morphological deformations that do not prevent the observation of optical confinement within the fiber by bandgap effects. The experimental fiber attenuation spectrum displays clear bandgap confinement regions whose positions are confirmed by modeling the guiding properties of the ideal geometry using a plane-wave expansion method. The model identifies the bound modes of the structure and provides confirmation of experimentally observed mode field profiles. PMID:23202091

  5. Are polymers glassier upon confinement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Simone; Spiece, Jean; Martinez-Tong, Daniel E.; Sferrazza, Michele; Nogales, Aurora

    Glass forming systems are characterized by a stability against crystallization upon heating and by the easiness with which their liquid phase can be transformed into a solid lacking of long-range order upon cooling (glass forming ability). Here, we discuss on the the thickness dependence of the thermal phase transition temperatures of poly(L-lactide acid) thin films supported onto solid substrates. The determination of the glass transition (Tg), cold crystallization (TCC) and melting (Tm) temperatures down to a thickness of 6 nm via ellipsometry, permitted us to build up parameters describing glass stability and glass forming ability. We observed a strong influence of the film thickness on the latter, while the former is not affected by 1D confinement. Remarkably, the increase in Tg/Tm ratio, a parameter related to glass forming ability, is not accompanied by an increase in TCC-Tg, as observed on the contrary, in bulk metallic glasses. We explained this peculiar behavior of soft matter in confinement considering the impact of irreversible adsorption on local free volume content.

  6. Soft confinement for polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yutaka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    2014-07-01

    As a model of soft confinement for polymers, we investigated equilibrium shapes of a flexible vesicle that contains a phase-separating polymer solution. To simulate such a system, we combined the phase field theory (PFT) for the vesicle and the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) for the polymer solution. We observed a transition from a symmetric prolate shape of the vesicle to an asymmetric pear shape induced by the domain structure of the enclosed polymer solution. Moreover, when a non-zero spontaneous curvature of the vesicle is introduced, a re-entrant transition between the prolate and the dumbbell shapes of the vesicle is observed. This re-entrant transition is explained by considering the competition between the loss of conformational entropy and that of translational entropy of polymer chains due to the confinement by the deformable vesicle. This finding is in accordance with the recent experimental result reported by Terasawa et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 5249).

  7. Real AlphaBeta-geometries and Walker geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Peter R.; Matsushita, Yasuo

    2013-03-01

    By a real αβ-geometry we mean a four-dimensional manifold M equipped with a neutral metric h such that (M,h) admits both an integrable distribution of α-planes and an integrable distribution of β-planes. We obtain a local characterization of the metric when at least one of the distributions is parallel (i.e., is a Walker geometry) and the three-dimensional distribution spanned by the α- and β-distributions is integrable. The case when both distributions are parallel, which has been called two-sided Walker geometry, is obtained as a special case. We also study real αβ-geometries for which the corresponding spinors are both multiple Weyl principal spinors. All these results have natural analogues in the context of the hyperheavens of complex general relativity.

  8. Electrokinetic ion transport in confined micro-nanochannel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junyao; Liu, Chong; Xu, Zheng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a confined micronanochannel is presented to concentrate ions in a restricted zone. A general model exploiting the Poisson-Nernst-Plank equations coupled with the Navier-Stokes equation is employed to simulate the electrokinetic ion transport. The influences of the micronanochannel dimension and the surface charge density on the potential distribution, the ion concentration, and the fluid flow are investigated. The numerical results show that the potential drop depends mainly on the nanochannel, instead of the confined channel. Both decreasing the width and increasing the length enhance the ion enrichment performance. For a given nanochannel, ultimate value of ion concentration may be determined by the potential at the center point of the nanochannel. The study also shows that the enrichment stability can be improved by increasing the micronanochannel width, decreasing the micronanochannel length and reducing the surface charge density. PMID:26995194

  9. Mixed confinement regimes during equilibrium confinement spectroscopy of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Damini; Sheats, Julian; Muralidhar, Abhiram; Miller, Jeremy J.; Huang, Derek E.; Mahshid, Sara; Dorfman, Kevin D.; Reisner, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We have used a combination of fluorescence microscopy experiments and Pruned Enriched Rosenbluth Method simulations of a discrete wormlike chain model to measure the mean extension and the variance in the mean extension of ?-DNA in 100 nm deep nanochannels with widths ranging from 100 nm to 1000 nm in discrete 100 nm steps. The mean extension is only weakly affected by the channel aspect ratio. In contrast, the fluctuations of the chain extension qualitatively differ between rectangular channels and square channels with the same cross-sectional area, owing to the mixing of different confinement regimes in the rectangular channels. The agreement between experiment and simulation is very good, using the extension due to intercalation as the only adjustable parameter. PMID:24908035

  10. CATIA-GDML geometry builder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogurov, S.; Berchun, Yu; Chernogorov, A.; Malzacher, P.; Ovcharenko, E.; Semennikov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Due to conceptual difference between geometry descriptions in Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems and particle transport Monte Carlo (MC) codes direct conversion of detector geometry in either direction is not feasible. An original set of tools has been developed for building a GEANT4/ROOT compatible geometry in the CATIA CAD system and exchanging it with mentioned MC packages using GDML file format. A Special structure of a CATIA product tree, a wide range of primitives, different types of multiple volume instantiation, and supporting macros have been implemented.

  11. Inertial Confinement Fusion R&D and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28

    In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R&D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

  12. Fractal geometry in quantum mechanics, field theory and spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krger, H.

    The goal of this article is to review the role of fractal geometry in quantum physics. There are two aspects: (a) The geometry of underlying space (space-time in relativistic systems) is fractal and one studies the dynamics of the quantum system. Example: percolation. (b) The underlying space-time is regular, and fractal geometry which shows up in particular observables is generated by the dynamics of the quantum system. Example: Brownian motion (imaginary time quantum mechanics), zig-zag paths of propagation in quantum mechanics (Feynman's path integral). Historically, the first example of fractal geometry in quantum mechanics was invoked by Feynman and Hibbs describing the self-similarity (fractal behavior) of paths occurring in the path integral. We discuss the geometry of such paths. We present analytical as well as numerical results, yielding Hausdorff dimension dH=2. Velocity-dependent interactions (propagation in a solid, Brueckner's theory of nuclear matter) allow for dH<2. Next, we consider quantum field theory. We discuss the relation of self-similarity, the renormalization group equation, scaling laws and critical behavior, also violation of scale invariance, like logarithmic scaling corrections in hadron structure functions. We discuss the fractal geometry of paths of the path integral in field theory. We present numerical results for the length of propagation and fractal dimension for the free fermion propagator which is relevant for the geometry of quark propagation in QCD. Then we look at order parameters for the confinement phase in QCD. The fractal dimension of closed monopole current loops is such an order parameter. We discuss properties of a fractal Wilson loop. We look at critical phenomena, in particular at critical exponents and its relation to non-integer dimension of space-time by use of an underlying fractal geometry with the purpose to determine lower or upper critical dimensions. As an example we consider the U(1) model of lattice gauge theory. As another topic we discuss fractal geometry and Hausdorff dimension of quantum gravity and also for gravity coupled to matter, like to the Ising model or to the 3-state Potts model. Finally, we study the role that fractal geometry plays in spin physics, in particular for the purpose to describe critical clusters.

  13. Structural Dynamics of a Confined Rectangular Jet in Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusano, D. M.; Plesniak, M. W.

    1997-11-01

    (Supported by Procter & Gamble) The applications for jets in crossflow are extraordinarily varied, resulting in a wide range of flow parameters and geometries. The interaction among various parameters and the details of the resulting flow structures must be better understood to enable advances in predictive and design capabilities. This study involves an unusual geometry with a confined rectangular jet in crossflow. The parameters studied include six injection angles (18, 24, 30, 48, 60, 90 degrees), three velocity ratios (0.5, 1.0, 1.5) and five downstream distances corresponding to (3, 6, 9, 12, 15) jet diameters. A 2-D planar Mie scattering technique was used to evaluate the relative mixing effectiveness of the various configurations. In addition, a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was used to map velocity fields corresponding to the scalar concentration data for several conditions. Large-scale secondary flow patterns and asymmetries in the scalar concentration are the signatures of prominent vortic! al! flow structures. These results are compared to others from a wide variety of different geometries to characterize the critical structural features in this flow which control its behavior.

  14. Dynamics of a Gaussian chain in the gas phase and in a confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md Sayed

    This dissertation involves a study of the dynamics of a Gaussian chain in different environments. In the first part, the dynamics of polymers in the gas phase are studied at the theta temperature. Since the mean free path in a gas is large, the collisions of the gas particles with the monomers are ballistic. This ballistic nature of collision can be combined with the probability distribution of a Gaussian chain to determine the correlation of random forces, and this correlation can be exploited to evaluate the friction constant zetap. The second part considers the internal friction of a Gaussian chain placed in a vacuum. The dynamics of a single chain can be described by the Langevin equation, where the random force terms arise from the random collisions of monomers with each other. To find the moment of these random forces, a Gaussian distribution of chain conformation is used. We show that this same mechanism of internal friction is also applicable in solutions. In the third part, the dynamics of polymer melts near a corrugated boundary are examined. Since the volume interaction is screened in melts, polymers can be treated as Gaussian chains. When a polymer melt flows near a smooth surface, there may exist a nonzero slip velocity. The velocity field for a perturbed boundary is derived using a slip boundary condition. As a chain moves near this boundary, it experiences an oscillatory shear and the frequency of the strain rate depends on the slip velocity. The dissipation rates for different slip velocities are evaluated.

  15. Resonant entrainment of a confined pulsed jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Moffat, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports the discovery of a new resonant entrainment phenomenon associated with a confined, pulsed jet flow. It was found that a confined jet, when pulsed at an organ-pipe resonant frequency of the confinement tube, experiences greatly enhanced entrainment and mixing near the exit end of the confinement tube compared to a steady confined jet. The mixing and entrainment rates for the resonantly pulsed confined jet approach, and in some cases slightly exceed, those for an unconfined pulsed jet. Both visual and quantitative evidence of this phenomenon is presented. The new effect should be of considerable interest in ejector and combustor design, both of which benefit from any enhancement in mixing between a primary and a secondary flow

  16. Cylindrical confinement of semiflexible polymers.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo; McDargh, Zachary; Deserno, Markus; Guven, Jemal

    2015-06-01

    Equilibrium states of a closed semiflexible polymer binding to a cylinder are described. This may be either by confinement or by constriction. Closed completely bound states are labeled by two integers: the number of oscillations, n, and the number of times it winds the cylinder, p, the latter being a topological invariant. We examine the behavior of these states as the length of the loop is increased by evaluating the energy, the conserved axial torque, and the contact force. The ground state for a given p is the state with n=1; a short loop with p=1 is an elliptic deformation of a parallel circle; as its length increases it elongates along the cylinder axis with two hairpin ends. Excited states with n≥2 and p=1 possess n-fold axial symmetry. Short (long) loops possess energies ≈pE(0)(nE(0)), with E(0) the energy of a circular loop with same radius as the cylinder; in long loops the axial torque vanishes. Confined bound excited states are initially unstable; however, above a critical length each n-fold state becomes stable: The folded hairpin cannot be unfolded. The ground state for each p is also initially unstable with respect to deformations rotating the loop off the surface into the interior. A closed planar elastic curve aligned along the cylinder axis making contact with the cylinder on its two sides is identified as the ground state of a confined loop. Exterior bound states behave very differently, if free to unbind, as signaled by the reversal in the sign of the contact force. If p=1, all such states are unstable. If p≥2, however, a topological obstruction to complete unbinding exists. If the loop is short, the bound state with p=2 and n=1 provides a stable constriction of the cylinder, partially unbinding as the length is increased. This motif could be relevant to an understanding of the process of membrane fission mediated by dynamin rings. PMID:26172814

  17. Emergent geometry from quantized spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hyun Seok; Sivakumar, M.

    2010-08-15

    We examine the picture of emergent geometry arising from a mass-deformed matrix model. Because of the mass deformation, a vacuum geometry turns out to be a constant curvature spacetime such as d-dimensional sphere and (anti-)de Sitter spaces. We show that the mass-deformed matrix model giving rise to the constant curvature spacetime can be derived from the d-dimensional Snyder algebra. The emergent geometry beautifully confirms all the rationale inferred from the algebraic point of view that the d-dimensional Snyder algebra is equivalent to the Lorentz algebra in (d+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. For example, a vacuum geometry of the mass-deformed matrix model is completely described by a G-invariant metric of coset manifolds G/H defined by the Snyder algebra. We also discuss a nonlinear deformation of the Snyder algebra.

  18. An Introduction to Projective Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    1987-01-01

    Presents an introduction to the study of projective geometry, including a definition and some analagous examples using the overhead projector. Illustrates the principle of duality, Desargues' theorem, Poppus' theorem, and Pascal's theorem. (TW)

  19. The Dilemma of Descriptive Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boleslavski, Moshe

    1977-01-01

    Proposes that engineering students undergo a preparatory summer school training program in fundamentals of engineering drawing, descriptive geometry, and mathematics prior to being admitted to regular engineering studies. (SL)

  20. Direct experimental test of scalar confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Theodore J.; Olsson, M. G.; Yuan, Yu; Schmidt, Jeffrey R.; Veseli, Sinisa

    2004-09-01

    The concept of Lorentz scalar quark confinement has a long history and is still widely used despite its well-known theoretical faults. We point out here that the predictions of scalar confinement also conflict directly with experiment. We investigate the dependence of heavy-light meson mass differences on the mass of the light quark. In particular, we examine the strange and nonstrange D mesons. We find that the predictions of scalar confinement are in considerable conflict with measured values.