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Sample records for conformable flexible large-area

  1. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2011-03-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  2. Flexible and mechanical strain resistant large area SERS active substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. P.; Chu, Hsiaoyun; Abell, Justin; Tripp, Ralph A.; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-05-01

    We report a cost effective and facile way to synthesize flexible, uniform, and large area surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates using an oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique. The flexible SERS substrates consist of 1 μm long, tilted silver nanocolumnar films deposited on flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets using OAD. The SERS enhancement activity of these flexible substrates was determined using 10-5 M trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl) ethylene (BPE) Raman probe molecules. The in situ SERS measurements on these flexible substrates under mechanical (tensile/bending) strain conditions were performed. Our results show that flexible SERS substrates can withstand a tensile strain (ε) value as high as 30% without losing SERS performance, whereas the similar bending strain decreases the SERS performance by about 13%. A cyclic tensile loading test on flexible PDMS SERS substrates at a pre-specified tensile strain (ε) value of 10% shows that the SERS intensity remains almost constant for more than 100 cycles. These disposable and flexible SERS substrates can be integrated with biological substances and offer a novel and practical method to facilitate biosensing applications.

  3. Scaling Up Nature: Large Area Flexible Biomimetic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinyong; John, Jacob; Kolewe, Kristopher W; Schiffman, Jessica D; Carter, Kenneth R

    2015-10-28

    The fabrication and advanced function of large area biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) and slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) are reported. The use of roll-to-roll nanoimprinting techniques enabled the continuous fabrication of SHS and SLIPS based on hierarchically wrinkled surfaces. Perfluoropolyether hybrid molds were used as flexible molds for roll-to-roll imprinting into a newly designed thiol-ene based photopolymer resin coated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate films. The patterned surfaces exhibit feasible superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle around 160° without any further surface modification. The SHS can be easily converted into SLIPS by roll-to-roll coating of a fluorinated lubricant, and these surfaces have outstanding repellence to a variety of liquids. Furthermore, both SHS and SLIPS display antibiofouling properties when challenged with Escherichia coli K12 MG1655. The current article describes the transformation of artificial biomimetic structures from small, lab-scale coupons to low-cost, large area platforms. PMID:26423494

  4. Conformational flexibility of mephenesin.

    PubMed

    Écija, Patricia; Evangelisti, Luca; Vallejo, Montserrat; Basterretxea, Francisco J; Lesarri, Alberto; Castaño, Fernando; Caminati, Walther; Cocinero, Emilio J

    2014-05-22

    The mephenesin molecule (3-(2-methylphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol) serves as a test bank to explore several structural and dynamical issues, such as conformational flexibility, the orientation of the carbon linear chain relative to the benzene plane, or the effect of substituent position on the rotational barrier of a methyl group. The molecule has been studied by rotational spectroscopy in the 4-18 GHz frequency range by Fourier-transform methods in a supersonic expansion. The experiment has been backed by a previous conformational search plus optimization of the lowest energy structures by ab initio and density functional quantum calculations. The three lowest-lying conformers that can interconvert to each other by simple bond rotations have been detected in the jet. Rotational parameters for all structures have been obtained, and methyl torsional barriers have been determined for the two lowest-lying rotamers. The lowest-lying structure of mephenesin is highly planar, with all carbon atoms lying nearly in the benzene ring plane, and is stabilized by the formation of cooperative intramolecular hydrogen bonding. An estimation of the relative abundance of the detected conformers indicates that the energetically most stable conformer will have an abundance near 80% at temperatures relevant for biological activity. PMID:24754523

  5. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  6. Highly Flexible and High-Performance Complementary Inverters of Large-Area Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Funahashi, Kazuma; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Takenobu, Taishi

    2016-06-01

    Complementary inverters constructed from large-area monolayers of WSe2 and MoS2 achieve excellent logic swings and yield an extremely high gain, large total noise margin, low power consumption, and good switching speed. Moreover, the WSe2 complementary-like inverters built on plastic substrates exhibit high mechanical stability. The results provide a path toward large-area flexible electronics. PMID:27007295

  7. Synthesis of Large Area Graphene for High Performance in Flexible Optoelectronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Emre O.; Balci, Osman; Kakenov, Nurbek; Uzlu, Hasan Burkay; Kocabas, Coskun; Dahiya, Ravinder

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates an attractive low-cost route to obtain large area and high-quality graphene films by using the ultra-smooth copper foils which are typically used as the negative electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. We first compared the electronic transport properties of our new graphene film with the one synthesized by using commonly used standard copper foils in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We observed a stark improvement in the electrical performance of the transistors realized on our graphene films. To study the optical properties on large area, we transferred CVD based graphene to transparent flexible substrates using hot lamination method and performed large area optical scanning. We demonstrate the promise of our high quality graphene films for large areas with ~400 cm2 flexible optical modulators. We obtained a profound light modulation over a broad spectrum by using the fabricated large area transparent graphene supercapacitors and we compared the performance of our devices with the one based on graphene from standard copper. We propose that the copper foils used in the lithium-ion batteries could be used to obtain high-quality graphene at much lower-cost, with the improved performance of electrical transport and optical properties in the devices made from them. PMID:26578425

  8. Synthesis of Large Area Graphene for High Performance in Flexible Optoelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Polat, Emre O; Balci, Osman; Kakenov, Nurbek; Uzlu, Hasan Burkay; Kocabas, Coskun; Dahiya, Ravinder

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates an attractive low-cost route to obtain large area and high-quality graphene films by using the ultra-smooth copper foils which are typically used as the negative electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. We first compared the electronic transport properties of our new graphene film with the one synthesized by using commonly used standard copper foils in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We observed a stark improvement in the electrical performance of the transistors realized on our graphene films. To study the optical properties on large area, we transferred CVD based graphene to transparent flexible substrates using hot lamination method and performed large area optical scanning. We demonstrate the promise of our high quality graphene films for large areas with ~400 cm(2) flexible optical modulators. We obtained a profound light modulation over a broad spectrum by using the fabricated large area transparent graphene supercapacitors and we compared the performance of our devices with the one based on graphene from standard copper. We propose that the copper foils used in the lithium-ion batteries could be used to obtain high-quality graphene at much lower-cost, with the improved performance of electrical transport and optical properties in the devices made from them. PMID:26578425

  9. Synthesis of Large Area Graphene for High Performance in Flexible Optoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Emre O.; Balci, Osman; Kakenov, Nurbek; Uzlu, Hasan Burkay; Kocabas, Coskun; Dahiya, Ravinder

    2015-11-01

    This work demonstrates an attractive low-cost route to obtain large area and high-quality graphene films by using the ultra-smooth copper foils which are typically used as the negative electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. We first compared the electronic transport properties of our new graphene film with the one synthesized by using commonly used standard copper foils in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We observed a stark improvement in the electrical performance of the transistors realized on our graphene films. To study the optical properties on large area, we transferred CVD based graphene to transparent flexible substrates using hot lamination method and performed large area optical scanning. We demonstrate the promise of our high quality graphene films for large areas with ~400 cm2 flexible optical modulators. We obtained a profound light modulation over a broad spectrum by using the fabricated large area transparent graphene supercapacitors and we compared the performance of our devices with the one based on graphene from standard copper. We propose that the copper foils used in the lithium-ion batteries could be used to obtain high-quality graphene at much lower-cost, with the improved performance of electrical transport and optical properties in the devices made from them.

  10. [100] or [110] aligned, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2015-03-24

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, [100] or [110] textured, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  11. Large-area, uniform white light LED source on a flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Sher, Chin-Wei; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Lin, Chien-Chung; Han, Hau-Vei; Lin, Huang-Yu; Tu, Zong-Yi; Tu, Hsien-Hao; Honjo, Keiji; Jiang, Hsin-Yi; Ou, Sin-Liang; Horng, Ray-Hua; Li, Xiuling; Fu, Chien-Chung; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2015-09-21

    This study demonstrates the flexible white LED structure with high lumen efficiency and uniform optical performance for neutral white and warm white CCT. Flip-chip LEDs were attached on a polyimide substrate with copper strips as electrical and thermal conduction paths. Yellow phosphors are mixed with polydimenthysiloxane (PDMS) to provide mechanical support and flexibility. The light efficiency of this device can reach 120 lm/W and 85% of light output uniformity of the emission area can be achieved. Moreover, the optical simulation is employed to evaluate various designs of this flexible film in order to obtain uniform output. Both the pitch between the individual devices and the thickness of the phosphor film are calculated for optimization purpose. This flexible white LED with high lumen efficiency and good reliability is suitable for the large area fixture in the general lighting applications. PMID:26406747

  12. Method of making large area conformable shape structures for detector/sensor applications using glass drawing technique and postprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.

    2012-01-24

    A method of making a large area conformable shape structure comprises drawing a plurality of tubes to form a plurality of drawn tubes, and cutting the plurality of drawn tubes into cut drawn tubes of a predetermined shape. The cut drawn tubes have a first end and a second end along the longitudinal direction of the cut drawn tubes. The method further comprises conforming the first end of the cut drawn tubes into a predetermined curve to form the large area conformable shape structure, wherein the cut drawn tubes contain a material.

  13. Large-area, flexible imaging arrays constructed by light-charge organic memories

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wu, Ti; Guo, Yunlong; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Xiangnan; Wen, Yugeng; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-01-01

    Existing organic imaging circuits, which offer attractive benefits of light weight, low cost and flexibility, are exclusively based on phototransistor or photodiode arrays. One shortcoming of these photo-sensors is that the light signal should keep invariant throughout the whole pixel-addressing and reading process. As a feasible solution, we synthesized a new charge storage molecule and embedded it into a device, which we call light-charge organic memory (LCOM). In LCOM, the functionalities of photo-sensor and non-volatile memory are integrated. Thanks to the deliberate engineering of electronic structure and self-organization process at the interface, 92% of the stored charges, which are linearly controlled by the quantity of light, retain after 20000 s. The stored charges can also be non-destructively read and erased by a simple voltage program. These results pave the way to large-area, flexible imaging circuits and demonstrate a bright future of small molecular materials in non-volatile memory. PMID:23326636

  14. Large-area flexible 3D optical negative index metamaterial formed by nanotransfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, Debashis; Shigeta, Kazuki; Gupta, Sidhartha; Cain, Tyler; Carlson, Andrew; Mihi, Agustin; Baca, Alfred J.; Bogart, Gregory R.; Braun, Paul; Rogers, John A.

    2011-07-01

    Negative-index metamaterials (NIMs) are engineered structures with optical properties that cannot be obtained in naturally occurring materials. Recent work has demonstrated that focused ion beam and layer-by-layer electron-beam lithography can be used to pattern the necessary nanoscale features over small areas (hundreds of µm2) for metamaterials with three-dimensional layouts and interesting characteristics, including negative-index behaviour in the optical regime. A key challenge is in the fabrication of such three-dimensional NIMs with sizes and at throughputs necessary for many realistic applications (including lenses, resonators and other photonic components). We report a simple printing approach capable of forming large-area, high-quality NIMs with three-dimensional, multilayer formats. Here, a silicon wafer with deep, nanoscale patterns of surface relief serves as a reusable stamp. Blanket deposition of alternating layers of silver and magnesium fluoride onto such a stamp represents a process for `inking' it with thick, multilayer assemblies. Transfer printing this ink material onto rigid or flexible substrates completes the fabrication in a high-throughput manner. Experimental measurements and simulation results show that macroscale, three-dimensional NIMs (>75 cm2) nano-manufactured in this way exhibit a strong, negative index of refraction in the near-infrared spectral range, with excellent figures of merit.

  15. Design and fabrication of a flexible large area fabric transducer for bone healing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidian, Bahram

    The electromechanical transducers have found applications in their either passive or active modes. These applications include hydrophone, medical imaging, nondestructive evaluation, motors, sensors, actuators, civil and aerospace engineering. Other medical applications for ultrasonic transducers include therapeutics, osteosynthesis, lithotripsy, thrombolysis, and transdermal drug administration. During the past few decades, lead zirconate titanate (PZT), has been utilized in transducer applications in the form of a bulk piezoelectric ceramic and/or ceramic-polymer composites because of its high piezoelectric charge coefficient d33. The usage of piezoelectric ceramic/polymer composites allows designers to overcome some of the problems dealing with either monolithic piezoceramics or piezopolymers in transducer applications. In this work, a variety of composites with different connectivity patterns were formed. Composites with 1-3 connectivity were fabricated using bundling and collimating methods. Sized and unsized fibers were woven to form fabric. The fabric was used to form 3-3 composites and spiral structures. Square sheets of the fabric were laminated on top of each other, heat treated, and embedded in different types of polymer. The effect of applied pressure on the stack during heat treatment was studied. Plane fabric was formed in the spiral manner and used to construct piezocomposites. A piezoelectric transducer with high thickness coupling coefficient and its matching layer were exploited for bone healing application. One of the structures with the highest electromechanical properties, developed in this work, was chosen for the array fabrication. The spiral composite elements, with the best properties, were arranged in a 3 x 4 format embedded in a flexible polymer. The mechanical endurance of the elements and the array was studied. A large area flexible matching layer with low attenuation was developed. An extensive study was performed to determine the

  16. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M.; Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D.; Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P.; Zergioti, I.

    2016-06-01

    To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm2. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications.

  17. A large-area, flexible pressure sensor matrix with organic field-effect transistors for artificial skin applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Takao; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Iba, Shingo; Kato, Yusaku; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Takayasu

    2004-07-01

    It is now widely accepted that skin sensitivity will be very important for future robots used by humans in daily life for housekeeping and entertainment purposes. Despite this fact, relatively little progress has been made in the field of pressure recognition compared to the areas of sight and voice recognition, mainly because good artificial "electronic skin" with a large area and mechanical flexibility is not yet available. The fabrication of a sensitive skin consisting of thousands of pressure sensors would require a flexible switching matrix that cannot be realized with present silicon-based electronics. Organic field-effect transistors can substitute for such conventional electronics because organic circuits are inherently flexible and potentially ultralow in cost even for a large area. Thus, integration of organic transistors and rubber pressure sensors, both of which can be produced by low-cost processing technology such as large-area printing technology, will provide an ideal solution to realize a practical artificial skin, whose feasibility has been demonstrated in this paper. Pressure images have been taken by flexible active matrix drivers with organic transistors whose mobility reaches as high as 1.4 cm2/V·s. The device is electrically functional even when it is wrapped around a cylindrical bar with a 2-mm radius.

  18. Flexible, transparent and ultra-broadband photodetector based on large-area WSe2 film for wearable devices.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Zhang, Tanmei; Yao, Jiandomg; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Jiarui; Yang, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    Although two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted considerable research interest for use in the development of innovative wearable optoelectronic systems, the integrated optoelectronic performance of 2D materials photodetectors, including flexibility, transparency, broadband response and stability in air, remains quite low to date. Here, we demonstrate a flexible, transparent, high-stability and ultra-broadband photodetector made using large-area and highly-crystalline WSe2 films that were prepared by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD). Benefiting from the 2D physics of WSe2 films, this device exhibits excellent average transparency of 72% in the visible range and superior photoresponse characteristics, including an ultra-broadband detection spectral range from 370 to 1064 nm, reversible photoresponsivity approaching 0.92 A W(-1), external quantum efficiency of up to 180% and a relatively fast response time of 0.9 s. The fabricated photodetector also demonstrates outstanding mechanical flexibility and durability in air. Also, because of the wide compatibility of the PLD-grown WSe2 film, we can fabricate various photodetectors on multiple flexible or rigid substrates, and all these devices will exhibit distinctive switching behavior and superior responsivity. These indicate a possible new strategy for the design and integration of flexible, transparent and broadband photodetectors based on large-area WSe2 films, with great potential for practical applications in the wearable optoelectronic devices. PMID:27109239

  19. Flexible, transparent and ultra-broadband photodetector based on large-area WSe2 film for wearable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Zhang, Tanmei; Yao, Jiandomg; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Jiarui; Yang, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    Although two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted considerable research interest for use in the development of innovative wearable optoelectronic systems, the integrated optoelectronic performance of 2D materials photodetectors, including flexibility, transparency, broadband response and stability in air, remains quite low to date. Here, we demonstrate a flexible, transparent, high-stability and ultra-broadband photodetector made using large-area and highly-crystalline WSe2 films that were prepared by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD). Benefiting from the 2D physics of WSe2 films, this device exhibits excellent average transparency of 72% in the visible range and superior photoresponse characteristics, including an ultra-broadband detection spectral range from 370 to 1064 nm, reversible photoresponsivity approaching 0.92 A W‑1, external quantum efficiency of up to 180% and a relatively fast response time of 0.9 s. The fabricated photodetector also demonstrates outstanding mechanical flexibility and durability in air. Also, because of the wide compatibility of the PLD-grown WSe2 film, we can fabricate various photodetectors on multiple flexible or rigid substrates, and all these devices will exhibit distinctive switching behavior and superior responsivity. These indicate a possible new strategy for the design and integration of flexible, transparent and broadband photodetectors based on large-area WSe2 films, with great potential for practical applications in the wearable optoelectronic devices.

  20. Nanostructured electrochromic films by inkjet printing on large area and flexible transparent silver electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layani, Michael; Darmawan, Peter; Foo, Wan Ling; Liu, Liang; Kamyshny, Alexander; Mandler, Daniel; Magdassi, Schlomo; Lee, Pooi See

    2014-04-01

    Printed electrochromic flexible films were obtained by combining transparent silver grid electrodes formed by self-assembly and inkjet printed WO3 nanoparticles. Concentrated dispersions of WO3 nanoparticles were inkjet printed on transparent plastic silver grid electrodes with a high transparency of 83% in the spectral range of 400-800 nm, and a low sheet resistance in the range of 1-5 Ω sq-1. These electrodes were used for electrochromic applications for the first time. The resultant patterned nanostructured electrochromic films maintained their coloring and bleaching performance after bending of the flexible films.Printed electrochromic flexible films were obtained by combining transparent silver grid electrodes formed by self-assembly and inkjet printed WO3 nanoparticles. Concentrated dispersions of WO3 nanoparticles were inkjet printed on transparent plastic silver grid electrodes with a high transparency of 83% in the spectral range of 400-800 nm, and a low sheet resistance in the range of 1-5 Ω sq-1. These electrodes were used for electrochromic applications for the first time. The resultant patterned nanostructured electrochromic films maintained their coloring and bleaching performance after bending of the flexible films. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06890k

  1. Flexible and printable paper-based strain sensors for wearable and large-area green electronics.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xinqin; Zhang, Zheng; Liao, Qingliang; Liang, Qijie; Ou, Yang; Xu, Minxuan; Li, Minghua; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-07-14

    Paper-based (PB) green electronics is an emerging and potentially game-changing technology due to ease of recycling/disposal, the economics of manufacture and the applicability to flexible electronics. Herein, new-type printable PB strain sensors (PPBSSs) from graphite glue (graphite powder and methylcellulose) have been fabricated. The graphite glue is exposed to thermal annealing to produce surface micro/nano cracks, which are very sensitive to compressive or tensile strain. The devices exhibit a gauge factor of 804.9, response time of 19.6 ms and strain resolution of 0.038%, all performance indicators attaining and even surpassing most of the recently reported strain sensors. Due to the distinctive sensing properties, flexibility and robustness, the PPBSSs are suitable for monitoring of diverse conditions such as structural strain, vibrational motion, human muscular movements and visual control. PMID:27314505

  2. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices on {110}<100> oriented substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2014-08-05

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices on {110}<100> textured substrates are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  3. Flexible and printable paper-based strain sensors for wearable and large-area green electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xinqin; Zhang, Zheng; Liao, Qingliang; Liang, Qijie; Ou, Yang; Xu, Minxuan; Li, Minghua; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Paper-based (PB) green electronics is an emerging and potentially game-changing technology due to ease of recycling/disposal, the economics of manufacture and the applicability to flexible electronics. Herein, new-type printable PB strain sensors (PPBSSs) from graphite glue (graphite powder and methylcellulose) have been fabricated. The graphite glue is exposed to thermal annealing to produce surface micro/nano cracks, which are very sensitive to compressive or tensile strain. The devices exhibit a gauge factor of 804.9, response time of 19.6 ms and strain resolution of 0.038%, all performance indicators attaining and even surpassing most of the recently reported strain sensors. Due to the distinctive sensing properties, flexibility and robustness, the PPBSSs are suitable for monitoring of diverse conditions such as structural strain, vibrational motion, human muscular movements and visual control.Paper-based (PB) green electronics is an emerging and potentially game-changing technology due to ease of recycling/disposal, the economics of manufacture and the applicability to flexible electronics. Herein, new-type printable PB strain sensors (PPBSSs) from graphite glue (graphite powder and methylcellulose) have been fabricated. The graphite glue is exposed to thermal annealing to produce surface micro/nano cracks, which are very sensitive to compressive or tensile strain. The devices exhibit a gauge factor of 804.9, response time of 19.6 ms and strain resolution of 0.038%, all performance indicators attaining and even surpassing most of the recently reported strain sensors. Due to the distinctive sensing properties, flexibility and robustness, the PPBSSs are suitable for monitoring of diverse conditions such as structural strain, vibrational motion, human muscular movements and visual control. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02172g

  4. On the use of organic transistors in flexible large-area sensor arrays (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Brian; Kumar, Abhishek

    2015-10-01

    While much of the OTFT activity has been display-centric there is no doubt that as the OTFT technology matures the number of applications will continue to increase. Using our most recent flexible X-ray detectors we will discuss the prospect and challenges of organic transistors in sensor backplanes. For these application, the current mobility of ~0.1-2 cm2/Vs of OTFTs is currently not a problem. Their low leakage currents give them a distinct advantage over competing technologies, such as amorphous silicon TFT. Yet, challenges remain and these will be discussed.

  5. Functionalization of nanomaterials by non-thermal large area atmospheric pressure plasmas: application to flexible dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heesoo; Park, Jaeyoung; Yoo, Eun Sang; Han, Gill-Sang; Jung, Hyun Suk; Ko, Min Jae; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho

    2013-09-01

    A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of non-thermal radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film properties can be obtained by the non-thermal APP method when compared with the thermal sintering process operating at 450 °C. The crystallinity of the anatase TiO2 nanoparticles is significantly improved without thermal agglomeration, while the surface defects such as Ti(3+) ions are eliminated, thus providing efficient charge collecting properties for solar cells. Finally, we successfully fabricated a flexible DSSC with an energy conversion efficiency of 4.2% using a transparent plastic substrate. This work demonstrates the potential of non-thermal APP technology in the area of device-level, nano-enabled material manufacturing. PMID:23831925

  6. Conformational Flexibility in the Transmembrane Protein TSPO.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Łukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-11-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) is an integral membrane protein that interacts with a wide variety of endogenous ligands, such as cholesterol and porphyrins, and is also the target for several small molecules with substantial in vivo efficacy. When complexed with the TSPO-specific radioligand (R)-PK11195, TSPO folds into a rigid five-helix bundle. However, little is known about the structure and dynamics of TSPO in the absence of high-affinity ligands. By means of NMR spectroscopy, we show that TSPO exchanges between multiple conformations in the absence of (R)-PK11195. Extensive motions on time scales from pico- to microseconds occur all along the primary sequence of the protein, leading to a loss of stable tertiary interactions and local unfolding of the helical structure in the vicinity of the ligand-binding site. The flexible nature of TSPO highlights the importance of conformational plasticity in integral membrane proteins. PMID:26394723

  7. Ambient fabrication of flexible and large-area organic light-emitting devices using slot-die coating

    PubMed Central

    Sandström, Andreas; Dam, Henrik F.; Krebs, Frederik C.; Edman, Ludvig

    2012-01-01

    The grand vision of manufacturing large-area emissive devices with low-cost roll-to-roll coating methods, akin to how newspapers are produced, appeared with the emergence of the organic light-emitting diode about 20 years ago. Today, small organic light-emitting diode displays are commercially available in smartphones, but the promise of a continuous ambient fabrication has unfortunately not materialized yet, as organic light-emitting diodes invariably depend on the use of one or more time- and energy-consuming process steps under vacuum. Here we report an all-solution-based fabrication of an alternative emissive device, a light-emitting electrochemical cell, using a slot-die roll-coating apparatus. The fabricated flexible sheets exhibit bidirectional and uniform light emission, and feature a fault-tolerant >1-μm-thick active material that is doped in situ during operation. It is notable that the initial preparation of inks, the subsequent coating of the constituent layers and the final device operation all could be executed under ambient air. PMID:22893126

  8. Femtosecond laser rapid fabrication of large-area rose-like micropatterns on freestanding flexible graphene films.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuesong; Li, Xin; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti; Zhao, Yang; Ran, Peng; Wang, Qingsong; Cao, Qiang; Ma, Tianbao; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    We developed a simple, scalable and high-throughput method for fabrication of large-area three-dimensional rose-like microflowers with controlled size, shape and density on graphene films by femtosecond laser micromachining. The novel biomimetic microflower that composed of numerous turnup graphene nanoflakes can be fabricated by only a single femtosecond laser pulse, which is efficient enough for large-area patterning. The graphene films were composed of layer-by-layer graphene nanosheets separated by nanogaps (~10-50 nm), and graphene monolayers with an interlayer spacing of ~0.37 nm constituted each of the graphene nanosheets. This unique hierarchical layering structure of graphene films provides great possibilities for generation of tensile stress during femtosecond laser ablation to roll up the nanoflakes, which contributes to the formation of microflowers. By a simple scanning technique, patterned surfaces with controllable densities of flower patterns were obtained, which can exhibit adhesive superhydrophobicity. More importantly, this technique enables fabrication of the large-area patterned surfaces at centimeter scales in a simple and efficient way. This study not only presents new insights of ultrafast laser processing of novel graphene-based materials but also shows great promise of designing new materials combined with ultrafast laser surface patterning for future applications in functional coatings, sensors, actuators and microfluidics. PMID:26615800

  9. Femtosecond laser rapid fabrication of large-area rose-like micropatterns on freestanding flexible graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xuesong; Li, Xin; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti; Zhao, Yang; Ran, Peng; Wang, Qingsong; Cao, Qiang; Ma, Tianbao; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-11-01

    We developed a simple, scalable and high-throughput method for fabrication of large-area three-dimensional rose-like microflowers with controlled size, shape and density on graphene films by femtosecond laser micromachining. The novel biomimetic microflower that composed of numerous turnup graphene nanoflakes can be fabricated by only a single femtosecond laser pulse, which is efficient enough for large-area patterning. The graphene films were composed of layer-by-layer graphene nanosheets separated by nanogaps (~10-50 nm), and graphene monolayers with an interlayer spacing of ~0.37 nm constituted each of the graphene nanosheets. This unique hierarchical layering structure of graphene films provides great possibilities for generation of tensile stress during femtosecond laser ablation to roll up the nanoflakes, which contributes to the formation of microflowers. By a simple scanning technique, patterned surfaces with controllable densities of flower patterns were obtained, which can exhibit adhesive superhydrophobicity. More importantly, this technique enables fabrication of the large-area patterned surfaces at centimeter scales in a simple and efficient way. This study not only presents new insights of ultrafast laser processing of novel graphene-based materials but also shows great promise of designing new materials combined with ultrafast laser surface patterning for future applications in functional coatings, sensors, actuators and microfluidics.

  10. Femtosecond laser rapid fabrication of large-area rose-like micropatterns on freestanding flexible graphene films

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuesong; Li, Xin; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti; Zhao, Yang; Ran, Peng; Wang, Qingsong; Cao, Qiang; Ma, Tianbao; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    We developed a simple, scalable and high-throughput method for fabrication of large-area three-dimensional rose-like microflowers with controlled size, shape and density on graphene films by femtosecond laser micromachining. The novel biomimetic microflower that composed of numerous turnup graphene nanoflakes can be fabricated by only a single femtosecond laser pulse, which is efficient enough for large-area patterning. The graphene films were composed of layer-by-layer graphene nanosheets separated by nanogaps (~10–50 nm), and graphene monolayers with an interlayer spacing of ~0.37 nm constituted each of the graphene nanosheets. This unique hierarchical layering structure of graphene films provides great possibilities for generation of tensile stress during femtosecond laser ablation to roll up the nanoflakes, which contributes to the formation of microflowers. By a simple scanning technique, patterned surfaces with controllable densities of flower patterns were obtained, which can exhibit adhesive superhydrophobicity. More importantly, this technique enables fabrication of the large-area patterned surfaces at centimeter scales in a simple and efficient way. This study not only presents new insights of ultrafast laser processing of novel graphene-based materials but also shows great promise of designing new materials combined with ultrafast laser surface patterning for future applications in functional coatings, sensors, actuators and microfluidics. PMID:26615800

  11. Next Generation Non-Vacuum, Maskless, Low Temperature Nanoparticle Ink Laser Digital Direct Metal Patterning for a Large Area Flexible Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Junyeob; Hong, Sukjoon; Lee, Daehoo; Hotz, Nico; Lee, Ming-Tsang; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible electronics opened a new class of future electronics. The foldable, light and durable nature of flexible electronics allows vast flexibility in applications such as display, energy devices and mobile electronics. Even though conventional electronics fabrication methods are well developed for rigid substrates, direct application or slight modification of conventional processes for flexible electronics fabrication cannot work. The future flexible electronics fabrication requires totally new low-temperature process development optimized for flexible substrate and it should be based on new material too. Here we present a simple approach to developing a flexible electronics fabrication without using conventional vacuum deposition and photolithography. We found that direct metal patterning based on laser-induced local melting of metal nanoparticle ink is a promising low-temperature alternative to vacuum deposition– and photolithography-based conventional metal patterning processes. The “digital” nature of the proposed direct metal patterning process removes the need for expensive photomask and allows easy design modification and short turnaround time. This new process can be extremely useful for current small-volume, large-variety manufacturing paradigms. Besides, simple, scalable, fast and low-temperature processes can lead to cost-effective fabrication methods on a large-area polymer substrate. The developed process was successfully applied to demonstrate high-quality Ag patterning (2.1 µΩ·cm) and high-performance flexible organic field effect transistor arrays. PMID:22900011

  12. Integrating anti-reflection and superhydrophobicity of moth-eye-like surface morphology on a large-area flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Hsing; Niu, Pei-Lun; Sung, Cheng-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) roll-to-roll (R2R) process with argon and oxygen (Ar-O2) plasma ashing and coating of a dilute perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS) layer to fabricate the large-area moth-eye-like surface morphology on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate. By using Maxwell-Garnett's effective medium theory, the optimal dimensions of the moth-eye-like surface morphology was designed and fabricated with UV-NIL R2R process to obtain maximum transmittance ratio. In addition, the base angle (θ = 30.1°) of the moth-eye-like surface morphology was modified with Ar-O2 plasma ashing and coated with a dilute FDTS layer to possess both superhydrophobic and air-retention properties. This increases both the transmittance ratio of 4% and contact angle to 153°.

  13. Large area in situ fabrication of poly(pyrrole)-nanowires on flexible thermoplastic films using nanocontact printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Cruz, Alvaro; Lee, Michael; Marote, Pedro; Zine, Nadia; Sigaud, Monique; Bonhomme, Anne; Pruna, Raquel; Lopez, Manuel; Bausells, Joan; Jaffrezic, Nicole; Errachid, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    Highly efficient nano-engineering tools will certainly revolutionize the biomedical and sensing devices research and development in the years to come. Here, we present a novel high performance conducting poly(pyrrole) nanowires (PPy-NW) patterning technology on thermoplastic surfaces (poly(ethylene terephthalate (PETE), poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate (PEN), polyimide (PI), and cyclic olefin copolymer) using nanocontact printing and controlled chemical polymerization (nCP-CCP) technique. The technique uses a commercial compact disk as a template to produce nanopatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps. The PDMS nanopatterned stamp was applied to print the PPy-NWs and the developed technology of nCP-CCP produced 3D conducting nanostructures. This new and very promising nanopatterning technology was achieved in a single step and with a low cost of fabrication over large areas.

  14. Large-Area Monolayer MoS2 for Flexible Low-Power RF Nanoelectronics in the GHz Regime.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Yu; Yogeesh, Maruthi Nagavalli; Ghosh, Rudresh; Rai, Amritesh; Sanne, Atresh; Yang, Shixuan; Lu, Nanshu; Banerjee, Sanjay Kumar; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-03-01

    Flexible synthesized MoS2 transistors are advanced to perform at GHz speeds. An intrinsic cutoff frequency of 5.6 GHz is achieved and analog circuits are realized. Devices are mechanically robust for 10 000 bending cycles. PMID:26707841

  15. {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100>, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100> oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  16. Large Area Nano-transfer Printing of Sub-50-nm Metal Nanostructures Using Low-cost Semi-flexible Hybrid Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Robin D.; Haeberle, Tobias; Schmidt, Morten; Lugli, Paolo; Scarpa, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present a method for printing metal micro- and nanopatterns down to sub-50-nm feature sizes using replicated, defect-tolerant stamps made out of OrmoStamp®; material. The relevant parameters for a successful transfer over large areas were investigated and yields above 99 % have been achieved. Comparing our results to conventional nano-transfer printing using PDMS stamps, we find that the more rigid hybrid polymer used here prevents unintended transfer from interspaces between structures of large distance due to roof collapse and deformation of nano-sized structures due to lateral collapse. Yet, our stamps are flexible enough to ensure intimate contact with the underlying substrate over large areas even in the presence of defect particles. Additionally, the presented patterning technique is resist-, solvent-, and chemical-free and is therefore ideally suited for applications in organic nanoelectronics where standard nanostructuring methods can harm or destroy the organic material.

  17. Large Area Nano-transfer Printing of Sub-50-nm Metal Nanostructures Using Low-cost Semi-flexible Hybrid Templates.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Robin D; Haeberle, Tobias; Schmidt, Morten; Lugli, Paolo; Scarpa, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we present a method for printing metal micro- and nanopatterns down to sub-50-nm feature sizes using replicated, defect-tolerant stamps made out of OrmoStamp®; material. The relevant parameters for a successful transfer over large areas were investigated and yields above 99 % have been achieved. Comparing our results to conventional nano-transfer printing using PDMS stamps, we find that the more rigid hybrid polymer used here prevents unintended transfer from interspaces between structures of large distance due to roof collapse and deformation of nano-sized structures due to lateral collapse. Yet, our stamps are flexible enough to ensure intimate contact with the underlying substrate over large areas even in the presence of defect particles. Additionally, the presented patterning technique is resist-, solvent-, and chemical-free and is therefore ideally suited for applications in organic nanoelectronics where standard nanostructuring methods can harm or destroy the organic material. PMID:26976429

  18. Synthesis and self-assembly of large-area Cu nanosheets and their application as an aqueous conductive ink on flexible electronics.

    PubMed

    Dang, Rui; Song, Lingling; Dong, Wenjun; Li, Chaorong; Zhang, Xiaobo; Wang, Ge; Chen, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Large-area Cu nanosheets are synthesized by a strategy of Cu nanocrystal self-assembly, and then aqueous conductive Cu nanosheet ink is successfully prepared for direct writing on the conductive circuits of flexible electronics. The Cu nanocrystals, as building blocks, self-assemble along the [111] direction and grow into large-area nanosheets approximately 30-100 μm in diameter and a few hundred nanometers in thickness. The laminar stackable patterns of the Cu nanosheet circuits increase the contact area of the Cu nanosheets and improve the stability of the conductor under stress, the result being that the Cu nanosheet circuits display excellent conductive performance during repeated folding and unfolding. Moreover, heterostructures of Ag nanoparticle-coated Cu nanosheets are created to improve the thermal stability of the nanosheet circuits at high temperatures. PMID:24313540

  19. A KINETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CONFORMATIONAL FLEXIBILITY OF STEROID HORMONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a set of 10 androgen steroids and estradiol (E2), the kinetic feasibility of conformation flexibility of the cyclic moieties was studied under the constraint of maintaining the B/C trans and C/D trans ring fusion of the natural and biologically active enantiomer. To this end,...

  20. Distal histidine conformational flexibility in dehaloperoxidase from Amphitrite ornata

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zuxu; de Serrano, Vesna; Betts, Laurie; Franzen, Stefan

    2009-01-28

    The enzyme dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from the terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata is a heme protein which has a globin fold but can function as both a hemoglobin and a peroxidase. As a peroxidase, DHP is capable of converting 2,4,6-trihalophenols to the corresponding 2,6-dihaloquinones in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. As a hemoglobin, DHP cycles between the oxy and deoxy states as it reversibly binds oxygen for storage. Here, it is reported that the distal histidine, His55, exhibits conformational flexibility in the deoxy form and is consequently observed in two solvent-exposed conformations more than 9.5 {angstrom} away from the heme. These conformations are analogous to the open conformation of sperm whale myoglobin. The heme iron in deoxy ferrous DHP is five-coordinate and has an out-of-plane displacement of 0.25 {angstrom} from the heme plane. The observation of five-coordinate heme iron with His55 in a remote solvent-exposed conformation is consistent with the hypothesis that His55 interacts with heme iron ligands through hydrogen bonding in the closed conformation. Since His55 is also displaced by the binding of 4-iodophenol in an internal pocket, these results provide new insight into the correlation between heme iron ligation, molecular binding in the distal pocket and the conformation of the distal histidine in DHP.

  1. Flexible polyelectrolyte conformation in the presence of oppositely charged surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, P S; Diehl, A

    2007-10-01

    Conformational behavior of flexible polyelectrolytes in the presence of monovalent cationic surfactants is examined. A simple model is presented for the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes in salt-free solutions in the framework of the Debye-Hückel-Bjerrum-Manning and Flory theories, including explicitly the hydrophobic interactions between the associated surfactant molecules on the polyelectrolyte. The distribution of complexes is calculated as a function of the surfactant concentration and a discrete conformational transition between an elongated coil and a compact globule was found, in agreement with experimental observations. PMID:17995019

  2. Inherent conformational flexibility of F1-ATPase α-subunit.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Herrera, Otto; Salcedo, Guillermo; Barril, Xavier; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The core of F1-ATPase consists of three catalytic (β) and three noncatalytic (α) subunits, forming a hexameric ring in alternating positions. A wealth of experimental and theoretical data has provided a detailed picture of the complex role played by catalytic subunits. Although major conformational changes have only been seen in β-subunits, it is clear that α-subunits have to respond to these changes in order to be able to transmit information during the rotary mechanism. However, the conformational behavior of α-subunits has not been explored in detail. Here, we have combined unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calorimetrically measured thermodynamic signatures to investigate the conformational flexibility of isolated α-subunits, as a step toward deepening our understanding of its function inside the α3β3 ring. The simulations indicate that the open-to-closed conformational transition of the α-subunit is essentially barrierless, which is ideal to accompany and transmit the movement of the catalytic subunits. Calorimetric measurements of the recombinant α-subunit from Geobacillus kaustophilus indicate that the isolated subunit undergoes no significant conformational changes upon nucleotide binding. Simulations confirm that the nucleotide-free and nucleotide-bound subunits show average conformations similar to that observed in the F1 crystal structure, but they reveal an increased conformational flexibility of the isolated α-subunit upon MgATP binding, which might explain the evolutionary conserved capacity of α-subunits to recognize nucleotides with considerable strength. Furthermore, we elucidate the different dependencies that α- and β-subunits show on Mg(II) for recognizing ATP. PMID:27137408

  3. Investigation of robust flexible conformal THz perfect metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Hyung; Hokmabadi, Mohammad P.; Balci, Soner; Rivera, Elmer; Wilbert, David; Kung, Patrick; Kim, Seongsin Margaret

    2016-04-01

    The flexible metamaterials have promised to greatly expand our ability to realize a wide range of novel applications including new methods of sensing and cloaking. In this work, flexible metamaterial absorbers, targeted to operate at terahertz frequencies, have been designed, simulated, and fabricated. The absorber structure consisted of a conducting ground plane, a dielectric spacer, and a frequency selective surface which was composed of two layers of nonconcentric, differently sized, single-ring arrays. Absorber structure was designed and simulated such that absorbers exhibited two distinct resonance frequencies with the strength of absorption for both sensitive to the center-to-center spacing of the rings and polarization. The functionality of the absorbers was seen to be similar both in planar and deformed positions, which promises robustness of the conformal flexible metamaterials device under the deformation and uneven surfaces.

  4. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-11-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations. PMID:8580316

  5. A chemical chaperone induces inhomogeneous conformational changes in flexible proteins.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Djemel; Velours, Christophe; Cornu, David; Nicaise, Magali; Lombard, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-07-27

    Organic osmolytes also known as chemical chaperones are major cellular compounds that favor, by an unclear mechanism, protein's compaction and stabilization of the native state. Here, we have examined the chaperone effect of the naturally occurring trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) osmolyte on a loosely packed protein (LPP), known to be a highly flexible form, using an apoprotein mutant of the flavin-dependent RNA methyltransferase as a model. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments showed that TMAO stabilizes the structural integrity of the apoprotein dramatically. The denaturation reaction is irreversible indicating that the stability of the apoprotein is under kinetic control. This result implies that the stabilization is due to a TMAO-induced reconfiguration of the flexible LPP state, which leads to conformational limitations of the apoprotein likely driven by favorable entropic contribution. Evidence for the conformational perturbation of the apoprotein had been obtained through several biophysical approaches notably analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, labelling experiments and proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, TMAO promotes an overall elongation or asymmetrical changes of the hydrodynamic shape of the apoprotein without alteration of the secondary structure. The modulation of the hydrodynamic properties of the protein is associated with diverse inhomogenous conformational changes: loss of the solvent accessible cavities resulting in a dried protein matrix; some side-chain residues initially buried become solvent exposed while some others become hidden. Consequently, the TMAO-induced protein state exhibits impaired capability in the flavin binding process. Our study suggests that the nature of protein conformational changes induced by the chemical chaperones may be specific to protein packing and plasticity. This could be an efficient mechanism by which the cell controls and finely tunes the

  6. Investigation of the interfacial adhesion of the transparent conductive oxide films to large-area flexible polymer substrates using laser-induced thermo-mechanical stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Lee, Seung-Ho; Yang, Chan-Woo

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the interfacial adhesion strength (σint) of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coatings on polymer substrates using a nanosecond Nd:YAG pulsed laser. We compared our results with those achieved using conventional testing methods such as bending and fragmentation tests as well as theoretical calculations. In the fragmentation and bending tests, mechanical compressive stress is induced in the film due to mismatches in Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus between the substrate and film. But, the incident laser makes the film under compression due to the mismatch in thermal expansion between the TCO and the polymer substrate. With a pulse incident to the substrate, the TCO rapidly expands by laser-induced instant heating while the transparent polymer does little, which causes the TCO to buckle and delaminate over the critical pulse energy. The critical compressive stress that scales with σint was calculated using simple equations, which agreed well with the results from previous theoretical calculations. Because the films preferentially delaminate at the defects and grain boundaries, this technique also provided useful information regarding the interface microstructures. Moreover, because the laser can scan over large areas, this method is suitable for flexible substrates that are produced by a roll-to-roll process. Nevertheless, the mechanical stress introduced by the bending and fragmentation tests causes the TCO to buckle without interfacial delamination. Hence, the stresses at the buckling disagreed with the results obtained from the laser test and the theoretical calculations.

  7. Large-area flexible monolithic ITO/WO3/Nb2O5/NiVOχ/ITO electrochromic devices prepared by using magnetron sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chien-Jen; Ye, Jia-Ming; Yang, Yueh-Ting; He, Ju-Liang

    2016-05-01

    Electrochromic devices (ECDs) have been applied in smart windows to control the transmission of sunlight in green buildings, saving up to 40-50% electricity consumption and ultimately reducing carbon dioxide emissions. However, the high manufacturing costs and difficulty of transportation of conventional massive large area ECDs has limited widespread applications. A unique design replacing the glass substrate commonly used in the ECD windows with inexpensive, light-weight and flexible polymeric substrate materials would accelerate EC adoption allowing them to be supplemented for regular windows without altering window construction. In this study, an ITO/WO3/Nb2O5/NiVOχ/ITO all-solid-state monolithic ECD with an effective area of 24 cm × 18 cm is successfully integrated on a PET substrate by using magnetron sputter deposition. The electrochromic performance and bending durability of the resultant material are also investigated. The experimental results indicate that the ultimate response times for the prepared ECD is 6 s for coloring at an applied voltage of -3 V and 5 s for bleaching at an applied voltage of +3 V, respectively. The optical transmittances for the bleached and colored state at a wavelength of 633 nm are 53% and 11%, respectively. The prepared ECD can sustain over 8000 repeated coloring and bleaching cycles, as well as tolerate a bending radius of curvature of 7.5 cm.

  8. Enhanced prediction of conformational flexibility and phosphorylation in proteins.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Karthikeyan; Adamczak, Rafal; Porollo, Aleksey; Meller, Jarosław

    2010-01-01

    Many sequence-based predictors of structural and functional properties of proteins have been developed in the past. In this study, we developed new methods for predicting measures of conformational flexibility in proteins, including X-ray structure-derived temperature (B-) factors and the variance within NMR structural ensemble, as effectively measured by the solvent accessibility standard deviations (SASDs). We further tested whether these predicted measures of conformational flexibility in crystal lattices and solution, respectively, can be used to improve the prediction of phosphorylation in proteins. The latter is an example of a common post-translational modification that modulates protein function, e.g., by affecting interactions and conformational flexibility of phosphorylated sites. Using robust epsilon-insensitive support vector regression (ε-SVR) models, we assessed two specific representations of protein sequences: one based on the position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) derived from multiple sequence alignments, and an augmented representation that incorporates real-valued solvent accessibility and secondary structure predictions (RSA/SS) as additional measures of local structural propensities. We showed that a combination of PSSMs and real-valued SS/RSA predictions provides systematic improvements in the accuracy of both B-factors and SASD prediction. These intermediate predictions were subsequently combined into an enhanced predictor of phosphorylation that was shown to significantly outperform methods based on PSSM alone. We would like to stress that to the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of using predicted from sequence NMR structure-based measures of conformational flexibility in solution for the prediction of other properties of proteins. Phosphorylation prediction methods typically employ a two-class classification approach with the limitation that the set of negative examples used for training may include some sites that are

  9. Conformational flexibility and protein folding: rigid structural fragments connected by flexible joints in subtilisin BPN.

    PubMed Central

    Honig, B; Ray, A; Levinthal, C

    1976-01-01

    Conformational energy calculations are used to analyze the interactions of structural substructures in subtilisin BPN. These substructures are kept fixed or "rigid" so that the only variables in the calculations are the backbone segments that separate them. The flexible segments are assumed to be free turns. Using this representation of the protein it is possible to predict both a likely order of events along a folding pathway and preferred modes of conformational changes of the native protein. Moreover, when the native structure has been perturbed by moving the substructures apart, it is possible to assess the range of interactions that return the protein, upon energy minimization, to its original conformation. These results suggest an approach to the folding problem based on the piecemeal formation of tertiary structure from smaller prefolded fragments. PMID:1064867

  10. Flexible conformable hydrophobized surfaces for turbulent flow drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Joseph C.; Geraldi, Nicasio R.; Morris, Robert H.; Fairhurst, David J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years extensive work has been focused onto using superhydrophobic surfaces for drag reduction applications. Superhydrophobic surfaces retain a gas layer, called a plastron, when submerged underwater in the Cassie-Baxter state with water in contact with the tops of surface roughness features. In this state the plastron allows slip to occur across the surface which results in a drag reduction. In this work we report flexible and relatively large area superhydrophobic surfaces produced using two different methods: Large roughness features were created by electrodeposition on copper meshes; Small roughness features were created by embedding carbon nanoparticles (soot) into Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both samples were made into cylinders with a diameter under 12 mm. To characterize the samples, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and confocal microscope images were taken. The confocal microscope images were taken with each sample submerged in water to show the extent of the plastron. The hydrophobized electrodeposited copper mesh cylinders showed drag reductions of up to 32% when comparing the superhydrophobic state with a wetted out state. The soot covered cylinders achieved a 30% drag reduction when comparing the superhydrophobic state to a plain cylinder. These results were obtained for turbulent flows with Reynolds numbers 10,000 to 32,500.

  11. Flexible conformable hydrophobized surfaces for turbulent flow drag reduction.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Joseph C; Geraldi, Nicasio R; Morris, Robert H; Fairhurst, David J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    In recent years extensive work has been focused onto using superhydrophobic surfaces for drag reduction applications. Superhydrophobic surfaces retain a gas layer, called a plastron, when submerged underwater in the Cassie-Baxter state with water in contact with the tops of surface roughness features. In this state the plastron allows slip to occur across the surface which results in a drag reduction. In this work we report flexible and relatively large area superhydrophobic surfaces produced using two different methods: Large roughness features were created by electrodeposition on copper meshes; Small roughness features were created by embedding carbon nanoparticles (soot) into Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both samples were made into cylinders with a diameter under 12 mm. To characterize the samples, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and confocal microscope images were taken. The confocal microscope images were taken with each sample submerged in water to show the extent of the plastron. The hydrophobized electrodeposited copper mesh cylinders showed drag reductions of up to 32% when comparing the superhydrophobic state with a wetted out state. The soot covered cylinders achieved a 30% drag reduction when comparing the superhydrophobic state to a plain cylinder. These results were obtained for turbulent flows with Reynolds numbers 10,000 to 32,500. PMID:25975704

  12. Flexible conformable hydrophobized surfaces for turbulent flow drag reduction

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Joseph C; Geraldi, Nicasio R; Morris, Robert H; Fairhurst, David J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    In recent years extensive work has been focused onto using superhydrophobic surfaces for drag reduction applications. Superhydrophobic surfaces retain a gas layer, called a plastron, when submerged underwater in the Cassie-Baxter state with water in contact with the tops of surface roughness features. In this state the plastron allows slip to occur across the surface which results in a drag reduction. In this work we report flexible and relatively large area superhydrophobic surfaces produced using two different methods: Large roughness features were created by electrodeposition on copper meshes; Small roughness features were created by embedding carbon nanoparticles (soot) into Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both samples were made into cylinders with a diameter under 12 mm. To characterize the samples, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and confocal microscope images were taken. The confocal microscope images were taken with each sample submerged in water to show the extent of the plastron. The hydrophobized electrodeposited copper mesh cylinders showed drag reductions of up to 32% when comparing the superhydrophobic state with a wetted out state. The soot covered cylinders achieved a 30% drag reduction when comparing the superhydrophobic state to a plain cylinder. These results were obtained for turbulent flows with Reynolds numbers 10,000 to 32,500. PMID:25975704

  13. The incorporation of protein flexibility and conformational energy penalties in docking screens to improve ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marcus; Coleman, Ryan G.; Fraser, James S.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins fluctuate between alternative conformations, which presents a challenge for ligand discovery because such flexibility is difficult to treat computationally owing to problems with conformational sampling and energy weighting. Here, we describe a flexible-docking method that samples and weights protein conformations using experimentally-derived conformations as a guide. The crystallographically refined occupancies of these conformations, which are observable in an apo receptor structure, define energy penalties for docking. In a large prospective library screen, we identified new ligands that target specific receptor conformations of a cavity in Cytochrome c Peroxidase, and we confirm both ligand pose and associated receptor conformation predictions by crystallography. The inclusion of receptor flexibility led to ligands with new chemotypes and physical properties. By exploiting experimental measures of loop and side chain flexibility, this method can be extended to the discovery of new ligands for hundreds of targets in the Protein Data Bank where similar experimental information is available. PMID:24950326

  14. A molecular dynamics description of the conformational flexibility of the L-iduronate ring in glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Jesús; Nieto, Pedro M; Martín-Lomas, Manuel

    2003-07-01

    For a synthetic hexasaccharide model it is shown that the conformational flexibility of the L-iduronate ring in glycosaminoglycans can be adequately described by using the PME methodology together with simulation protocols suitable for highly charged systems. PMID:12868729

  15. Wormlike micelle assisted rod coating: a general method for facile fabrication of large-area conductive nanomaterial thin layer onto flexible plastics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingyi; Wang, Huan; Bai, Huadong; Yang, Peng; Shi, Mengxue; Guo, Peng; Wang, Chen; Yang, Wantai; Song, Huaihe

    2012-06-27

    Through combined application of wormlike-micelle and rod-coating technique, a general method was demonstrated for the facile reparation of thin transparent conductive films (TCF) of various nanomaterials and their hybrids on flexible plastics. The cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide (CTAOH)/p-toluenesulfonic acid (CTAT) wormlike micelle system was selected for both the dispersion of different nanomaterials and the enhancement of viscosities of the coating fluids. With the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/wormlike micelle aqueous dispersions as coating fluid, TCFs of SWNTs on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates made by rod-coating method were demonstrated. After doping by immersion into thionyl chloride solution, the sheet resistance of SWNTs thin films, which had a transmittance of about 78%, was as low as 480Ω/sq. This coating method was extended to the preparation of thin films or networks of other materials such as reduced graphene oxide and Ag nanowires. The obtained TCF from Ag nanowire networks has a low sheet resistance of 17Ω/sq, which is comparable to the value of best indium tin oxide (ITO) coating on plastic substrates. Finally, hybrid thin films of different nanomaterials were demonstrated by this method. PMID:22551382

  16. Consequences of conformational flexibility in hydrogen-bond-driven self-assembly processes.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, José Augusto; Di Meo, Florent; García-Iglesias, Miguel; Gosens, Ronald P J; Meijer, E W; Linares, Mathieu; Palmans, Anja R A

    2016-09-18

    We report the synthesis and self-assembly of chiral, conformationally flexible C3-symmetrical trisamides. A strong Cotton effect is observed for the supramolecular polymers in linear alkanes but not in cyclic alkanes. MD simulations suggest 2 : 1 conformations of the amides within the aggregates in both types of solvents, but a chiral bias in only linear alkanes. PMID:27525556

  17. Large area LED package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goullon, L.; Jordan, R.; Braun, T.; Bauer, J.; Becker, F.; Hutter, M.; Schneider-Ramelow, M.; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    Solid state lighting using LED-dies is a rapidly growing market. LED-dies with the needed increasing luminous flux per chip area produce a lot of heat. Therefore an appropriate thermal management is required for general lighting with LEDdies. One way to avoid overheating and shorter lifetime is the use of many small LED-dies on a large area heat sink (down to 70 μm edge length), so that heat can spread into a large area while at the same time light also appears on a larger area. The handling with such small LED-dies is very difficult because they are too small to be picked with common equipment. Therefore a new concept called collective transfer bonding using a temporary carrier chip was developed. A further benefit of this new technology is the high precision assembly as well as the plane parallel assembly of the LED-dies which is necessary for wire bonding. It has been shown that hundred functional LED-dies were transferred and soldered at the same time. After the assembly a cost effective established PCB-technology was applied to produce a large-area light source consisting of many small LED-dies and electrically connected on a PCB-substrate. The top contacts of the LED-dies were realized by laminating an adhesive copper sheet followed by LDI structuring as known from PCB-via-technology. This assembly can be completed by adding converting and light forming optical elements. In summary two technologies based on standard SMD and PCB technology have been developed for panel level LED packaging up to 610x 457 mm2 area size.

  18. Cyclic Constraints on Conformational Flexibility in γ-PEPTIDES: Conformation-Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Kusaka, Ryoji; Zwier, Timothy S.; Fisher, Brian F.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopic studies of flexible peptides in the gas phase can provide insight to their inherent structural preferences in the absence of solvent. Recently, there has been increased attention paid to synthetic foldamers containing non-natural residues that can be specifically engineered to robustly form particular secondary structures. These engineered peptides have potential in therapeutic drug design because they are resistant to enzymatic degradation. Specifically, the Gellman group has synthesized a γ-peptide with a six membered cyclic constraint in the γ^{4}-γ^{3} position and an ethyl group at the γ^{2} position (γ_{ACHC}). The three stereocenters have a well-defined chirality [S,S,S]. These two features constrain the relative orientation of adjacent amide groups, thereby favoring a particular "pitch" to the turn. Solution phase results indicate that constrained γ-peptides induce the formation of a 14-helix. Ac-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz, its monohydrate and Ac-γ_{ACHC}-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz have been studied using ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) double-resonance methods to obtain conformation-specific spectra under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. IR spectra in the hydride stretch (3300-3750 cm^{-1}), amide I/II and OH bend (1400-1800 cm^{-1}) were recorded and compared to predictions using density functional methods (DFT) and harmonic frequency calculations. We will compare the present results on constrained γ-peptides with corresponding results on unconstrained analogs. Data obtained for the monohydrated water cluster of Ac-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz will also be presented, including assignment of the water bend fundamental, which appears in the midst of transitions due to the amide II vibrations. L. Guo, W. Zhang, A. G. Reidenbach, M. W. Giuliano, I. A. Guzei, L. C. Spencer and S. H. Gellman Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 5843-5846

  19. Flexible Near-Field Nanopatterning with Ultrathin, Conformal Phase Masks on Nonplanar Substrates for Biomimetic Hierarchical Photonic Structures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Woo; Park, Junyong; Kim, Taehoon; Kang, Seok Hee; Kim, Hyowook; Shin, Jonghwa; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Suck Won

    2016-04-26

    Multilevel hierarchical platforms that combine nano- and microstructures have been intensively explored to mimic superior properties found in nature. However, unless directly replicated from biological samples, desirable multiscale structures have been challenging to efficiently produce to date. Departing from conventional wafer-based technology, new and efficient techniques suitable for fabricating bioinspired structures are highly desired to produce three-dimensional architectures even on nonplanar substrates. Here, we report a facile approach to realize functional nanostructures on uneven microstructured platforms via scalable optical fabrication techniques. The ultrathin form (∼3 μm) of a phase grating composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) makes the material physically flexible and enables full-conformal contact with rough surfaces. The near-field optical effect can be identically generated on highly curved surfaces as a result of superior conformality. Densely packed nanodots with submicron periodicity are uniformly formed on microlens arrays with a radius of curvature that is as low as ∼28 μm. Increasing the size of the gratings causes the production area to be successfully expanded by up to 16 in(2). The "nano-on-micro" structures mimicking real compound eyes are transferred to flexible and stretchable substrates by sequential imprinting, facilitating multifunctional optical films applicable to antireflective diffusers for large-area sheet-illumination displays. PMID:26981613

  20. Flexibility unleashed in acyclic monoterpenes: conformational space of citronellal revealed by broadband rotational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Sérgio R; Pérez, Cristóbal; Medcraft, Chris; Pinacho, Pablo; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-06-22

    Conformational flexibility is intrinsically related to the functionality of biomolecules. Elucidation of the potential energy surface is thus a necessary step towards understanding the mechanisms for molecular recognition such as docking of small organic molecules to larger macromolecular systems. In this work, we use broadband rotational spectroscopy in a molecular jet experiment to unravel the complex conformational space of citronellal. We observe fifteen conformations in the experimental conditions of the molecular jet, the highest number of conformers reported to date for a chiral molecule of this size using microwave spectroscopy. Studies of relative stability using different carrier gases in the supersonic expansion reveal conformational relaxation pathways that strongly favour ground-state structures with globular conformations. This study provides a blueprint of the complex conformational space of an important biosynthetic precursor and gives insights on the relation between its structure and biological functionality. PMID:27298210

  1. The Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Michelson, Peter F.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL

    2007-11-13

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy pair-conversion telescope, covering the energy range from {approx}20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT is being built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. The scientific objectives the LAT will address include resolving the high-energy gamma-ray sky and determining the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources and the origin of the apparently isotropic diffuse emission observed by EGRET; understanding the mechanisms of particle acceleration in celestial sources, including active galactic nuclei, pulsars, and supernovae remnants; studying the high-energy behavior of gamma-ray bursts and transients; using high-energy gamma-rays to probe the early universe to z {ge} 6; and probing the nature of dark matter. The components of the LAT include a precision silicon-strip detector tracker and a CsI(Tl) calorimeter, a segmented anticoincidence shield that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large field-of-view and ensuring that nearly all pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. This paper includes a description of each of these LAT subsystems as well as a summary of the overall performance of the telescope.

  2. Large area Czochralski silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Gleim, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall cost effectiveness of the Czochralski process for producing large-area silicon was determined. The feasibility of growing several 12 cm diameter crystals sequentially at 12 cm/h during a furnace run and the subsequent slicing of the ingot using a multiblade slurry saw were investigated. The goal of the wafering process was a slice thickness of 0.25 mm with minimal kerf. A slice + kerf of 0.56 mm was achieved on 12 cm crystal using both 400 grit B4C and SiC abrasive slurries. Crystal growth experiments were performed at 12 cm diameter in a commercially available puller with both 10 and 12 kg melts. Several modifications to the puller hoz zone were required to achieve stable crystal growth over the entire crystal length and to prevent crystallinity loss a few centimeters down the crystal. The maximum practical growth rate for 12 cm crystal in this puller design was 10 cm/h, with 12 to 14 cm/h being the absolute maximum range at which melt freeze occurred.

  3. Thermodynamic signatures in macromolecular interactions involving conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Anja; Neumann, Piotr; Schwieger, Christian; Stubbs, Milton T

    2014-07-01

    The energetics of macromolecular interactions are complex, particularly where protein flexibility is involved. Exploiting serendipitous differences in the plasticity of a series of closely related trypsin variants, we analyzed the enthalpic and entropic contributions accompanying interaction with L45K-eglin C. Binding of the four variants show significant differences in released heat, although the affinities vary little, in accordance with the principle of enthalpy-entropy compensation. Binding of the most disordered variant is almost entirely enthalpically driven, with practically no entropy change. As structures of the complexes reveal negligible differences in protein-inhibitor contacts, we conclude that solvent effects contribute significantly to binding affinities. PMID:25003391

  4. A Structure-free Method for Quantifying Conformational Flexibility in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Virginia M.; Arenas, Daniel J.; Stultz, Collin M.

    2016-01-01

    All proteins sample a range of conformations at physiologic temperatures and this inherent flexibility enables them to carry out their prescribed functions. A comprehensive understanding of protein function therefore entails a characterization of protein flexibility. Here we describe a novel approach for quantifying a protein’s flexibility in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data. The method calculates an effective entropy that quantifies the diversity of radii of gyration that a protein can adopt in solution and does not require the explicit generation of structural ensembles to garner insights into protein flexibility. Application of this structure-free approach to over 200 experimental datasets demonstrates that the methodology can quantify a protein’s disorder as well as the effects of ligand binding on protein flexibility. Such quantitative descriptions of protein flexibility form the basis of a rigorous taxonomy for the description and classification of protein structure. PMID:27358108

  5. Delineating the conformational flexibility of trisaccharides from NMR spectroscopy experiments and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingjun; Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault; Säwén, Elin; Jana, Madhurima; Widmalm, Göran; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2016-07-28

    The conformation of saccharides in solution is challenging to characterize in the context of a single well-defined three-dimensional structure. Instead, they are better represented by an ensemble of conformations associated with their structural diversity and flexibility. In this study, we delineate the conformational heterogeneity of five trisaccharides via a combination of experimental and computational techniques. Experimental NMR measurements target conformationally sensitive parameters, including J couplings and effective distances around the glycosidic linkages, while the computational simulations apply the well-calibrated additive CHARMM carbohydrate force field in combination with efficient enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulation methods. Analysis of conformational heterogeneity is performed based on sampling of discreet states as defined by dihedral angles, on root-mean-square differences of Cartesian coordinates and on the extent of volume sampled. Conformational clustering, based on the glycosidic linkage dihedral angles, shows that accounting for the full range of sampled conformations is required to reproduce the experimental data, emphasizing the utility of the molecular simulations in obtaining an atomic detailed description of the conformational properties of the saccharides. Results show the presence of differential conformational preferences as a function of primary sequence and glycosidic linkage types. Significant differences in conformational ensembles associated with the anomeric configuration of a single glycosidic linkage reinforce the impact of such changes on the conformational properties of carbohydrates. The present structural insights of the studied trisaccharides represent a foundation for understanding the range of conformations adopted in larger oligosaccharides and how these molecules encode their conformational heterogeneity into the monosaccharide sequence. PMID:27346493

  6. Inspection des pieces flexibles sans gabarit de conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidibe, Ali

    In this thesis, we focus on the automation of the fixtureless geometric inspection of non-rigid (or compliant) parts. The primary objective of this project is to handle virtually this type of component and their point cloud, which represents a scan taken in a Free State condition, by eliminating the use of very expensive and complicated specialized fixtures posing productivity problems for manufacturing companies. This topic is a very high interest in the transport sector and, more specifically, in the aerospace one in order to significantly improve its productivity and its degree of competitiveness. The thesis is organized by articles. The study is divided over four phases. The first three phases will be represented by three journal papers and the fourth phase is presented as an appendix. The first phase of this work is intended to improve the identification module of an existing inspection mathematical tool " IDI: The Iterative Displacement Inspection " which has been developed by the research team working under the supervision of professor Tahan at ETS. The identification module aims to distinguish between defects that are due to the manufacturing process and deformations that are due to the flexibility of the part (gravity and residual stress effects). We propose to replace the original module with a new one which is based on the extreme value statistical analysis. We demonstrate that the new module remarkably reduces the type I and type II errors. In addition, unlike the identification method of the IDI, the proposed one does not require a user-specified threshold based on a trial and error process. In the second phase of this study, we propose an original approach to measure the flexibility/rigidity of the mechanical components. We introduce a factor that represents the ratio between the maximum displacement resulting from the deformation of the part and its profile tolerance and we present the results in a logarithmic scale. Three different regions were

  7. Conformational flexibility of fused tetracenedione propellers obtained from one-pot reductive dimerization of acetylenic quinones.

    PubMed

    Vasilevsky, Sergei F; Baranov, Denis S; Mamatyuk, Victor I; Fadeev, Dmitry S; Gatilov, Yurii V; Stepanov, Aleksandr A; Vasilieva, Nadezhda V; Alabugin, Igor V

    2015-02-01

    Reductive dimerization of acetylenic anthraquinones provides synthetic access to flexible nonplanar polyaromatics with a tetracenedione core. In solution, these nonplanar, contorted polycycles exist as equilibrating mixtures of two symmetric conformers. The fused tetracenediones are easily reduced and exhibit rich electrochemical behavior. PMID:25575160

  8. Conformational flexibility and structural dynamics in GPCR-mediated G protein activation: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Preininger, Anita M.; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of G proteins and their cognate receptors, both alone and in complex, are becoming increasingly accessible to experimental techniques. Understanding the conformational changes and timelines which govern these changes can lead to new insights into the processes of ligand binding and associated G protein activation. Experimental systems may involve the use of, or otherwise stabilize, non-native environments. This can complicate our understanding of structural and dynamical features of processes such as the ionic lock, Tryptophan toggle, and G protein flexibility. While elements in the receptor’s transmembrane helices and the C-terminal α5 helix of Gα undergo well defined structural changes, regions subject to conformational flexibility may be important in fine-tuning the interactions between activated receptors and G proteins. The pairing of computational and experimental approaches will continue to provide powerful tools to probe the conformation and dynamics of receptor-mediated G protein activation. PMID:23602809

  9. The Role of Flexibility and Conformational Selection in the Binding Promiscuity of PDZ Domains

    PubMed Central

    Münz, Márton; Hein, Jotun; Biggin, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    In molecular recognition, it is often the case that ligand binding is coupled to conformational change in one or both of the binding partners. Two hypotheses describe the limiting cases involved; the first is the induced fit and the second is the conformational selection model. The conformational selection model requires that the protein adopts conformations that are similar to the ligand-bound conformation in the absence of ligand, whilst the induced-fit model predicts that the ligand-bound conformation of the protein is only accessible when the ligand is actually bound. The flexibility of the apo protein clearly plays a major role in these interpretations. For many proteins involved in signaling pathways there is the added complication that they are often promiscuous in that they are capable of binding to different ligand partners. The relationship between protein flexibility and promiscuity is an area of active research and is perhaps best exemplified by the PDZ domain family of proteins. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the relationship between flexibility and promiscuity in five PDZ domains: the human Dvl2 (Dishevelled-2) PDZ domain, the human Erbin PDZ domain, the PDZ1 domain of InaD (inactivation no after-potential D protein) from fruit fly, the PDZ7 domain of GRIP1 (glutamate receptor interacting protein 1) from rat and the PDZ2 domain of PTP-BL (protein tyrosine phosphatase) from mouse. We show that despite their high structural similarity, the PDZ binding sites have significantly different dynamics. Importantly, the degree of binding pocket flexibility was found to be closely related to the various characteristics of peptide binding specificity and promiscuity of the five PDZ domains. Our findings suggest that the intrinsic motions of the apo structures play a key role in distinguishing functional properties of different PDZ domains and allow us to make predictions that can be experimentally tested. PMID:23133356

  10. Photocatalytically Active Oligomeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride: Conformational Flexibility, Electronic Levels, Carrier Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker; Lau, Vincent; Botari, Tiago; Huhn, William; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-03-01

    Polymers consisting of bridged heptazine units (often called ``graphitic carbon nitride'' or ``g-C3N4'') show considerable promise as photocatalysts for solar hydrogen evolution. Recent experimental evidence suggests that oligomeric rather than fully polymerized ``g-C3N4'' exhibits increased intrinsic photocatalytic activity. Using density-functional theory (DFT; van der Waals corrected PBE functional for conformers, hybrid DFT and GW for electronic levels), we show that considerable conformational flexibility exists for the heptazine trimers and tetramers. Analysis of HOMO and LUMO locations as well as trends in photocatalytic activity among heptazine oligomers and polymers reveals the NH2 groups of the oligomers as potential charge-transfer sites. We show that conformational variations of the oligomers can lead to significant, electrostatically motivated carrier localization effects. We suggest that NH2 side groups and the intrinsic conformational variations of the oligomeric species lead to the observed enhanced catalytic activity.

  11. Conformation specific spectroscopy in the complexity gap: beta-peptides and flexible bichromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baquero, Esteban Edwin

    Flexible biomolecules with many degrees of freedom have the ability to sample a great number of structural minima. The intrinsic structural preferences of these molecules are driven by stabilizations due to intramolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding and interatomic attractive forces. These interactions become increasingly important as the atoms in the molecule come in close proximity to one another. The present work describes the conformational preferences of several model bio-relevant molecules of different sizes where different kinds of intramolecular interactions can occur. Conformation specific ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopies were utilized to obtain the spectroscopic signatures of different conformations of the jet cooled biomolecules. These experiments allowed for the assignment of conformational families and the development of a general protocol to identify the infrared signatures of amide NH stretches, which were found to vary in frequency due to their immediate chemical and structural environment. Specific examples of systems studied include molecules containing unnatural polypeptide chains and a flexible bichromophore. The unnatural polypetides (Ac-beta3-hPhe-NHMe, Ac-beta 3-hTyr-NHMe Ac-beta3-hPhe-beta3-hAla-NHMe and Ac-beta3-hAla-beta3-hPhe-NHMe) were found to have a rich conformational potential energy landscape that contained many kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded minima. The flexible bichromophore (HNBPA), containing two spectroscopically distinguishable chromophores (Phenol and Phenyl), was found to be an interesting case study for conformational specific electronic energy transfer and testing how well different theoretical methods manage non-covalent interactions, such as those between side-chain atoms and aromatic pi-clouds.

  12. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Mingsen; Ye, Gui; Jiang, Jun; Cai, Shaohong; Sun, Guangyu

    2015-01-15

    The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl)-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  13. Structure of a mutant [beta] toxin from Staphylococcus aureus reveals domain swapping and conformational flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Huseby, Medora J.; Shi, Ke; Digre, Jeff; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Earhart, Cathleen A.

    2011-09-16

    The 3.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mutant form of the staphylococcal sphingomyelinase {beta} toxin in which a conserved hydrophobic {beta}-hairpin has been deleted is reported. It is shown that this mutation induces domain swapping of a C-terminal {beta}-strand, leading to the formation of dimers linked by a conformationally flexible hinge region. Eight dimers are seen in the asymmetric unit, exhibiting a broad spectrum of conformations trapped in place by intermolecular contacts within the crystal lattice. Furthermore, the 16 monomers within each asymmetric unit exhibit a remarkable heterogeneity in thermal factors, which can be accounted for by the varying degrees to which each monomer interacts with other molecules in the crystal. This structure provides a unique example of the challenges associated with crystallographic study of flexible proteins.

  14. Conformational flexibility in 2,2'-Dioxybiphenyl-chloro-cyclotetraphosphazenes and its relevance to polyphosphazene analogues.

    PubMed

    Ainscough, Eric W; Brodie, Andrew M; Chaplin, Adrian B; Derwahl, Andreas; Harrison, John A; Otter, Carl A

    2007-04-01

    The reaction of the cyclotetraphosphazene, [N4P4Cl8], with the difunctional reagent, 2,2'-biphenol, in the presence of potassium carbonate in acetone produced the spiro-substituted derivatives, 2,2'-dioxybiphenylhexachlorocyclotetraphosphazene, bis(2,2'-dioxybiphenyl)tetrachloro-cyclotetraphosphazene, and tris(2,2'-dioxybiphenyl)dichlorocyclotetraphosphazene. Both cis and trans geometrical isomers of the bis compound are observed. Although chromatographic separation of these was unsuccessful, a sample of the trans isomer was obtained by fractional crystallization. The compounds all show non-first-order 31P NMR spectra which were simulated to extract the spectral parameters. Single-crystal X-ray structures of both the trans bis and the tris compounds show that the cyclophosphazene rings exhibit conformational flexibility which gives rise to different crystalline forms being obtained from the same solvent systems. Crystals of trans-bis(2,2'-dioxybiphenyl)tetrachloro-cyclotetraphosphazene were obtained in two different space groups: Pnna (orthorhombic) and P21/n (monoclinic). In the orthorhombic structure, the dominant (72%) conformation of one phosphazene ring is a chair form, and the other (28%) resembles a boat. While for the monoclinic structure, the ring is virtually flat with an oval shape. In both cases the dioxybiphenyl groups are found in R and S configurations in the same molecule and are pi stacked in columns (Pnna) or involved in pi-pi or pi-H interactions (P21/n), thus anchoring the phosphorus atoms of the cyclotetraphosphazenes but still allowing flexibility in the ring conformations. Three crystalline modifications of tris(2,2'-dioxybiphenyl)dichloro-cyclotetraphosphazene were obtained: two in space group P (triclinic), which contained two molecules of dichloromethane in the unit cell, and one solvent-free form in space group P21/n (monoclinic). The cyclophosphazene rings exhibit puckered conformations with the trans-dioxybiphenyl moieties having

  15. Decoupling optical function and geometrical form using conformal flexible dielectric metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Arbabi, Amir; Arbabi, Ehsan; Horie, Yu; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Physical geometry and optical properties of objects are correlated: cylinders focus light to a line, spheres to a point and arbitrarily shaped objects introduce optical aberrations. Multi-functional components with decoupled geometrical form and optical function are needed when specific optical functionalities must be provided while the shapes are dictated by other considerations like ergonomics, aerodynamics or aesthetics. Here we demonstrate an approach for decoupling optical properties of objects from their physical shape using thin and flexible dielectric metasurfaces which conform to objects' surface and change their optical properties. The conformal metasurfaces are composed of silicon nano-posts embedded in a polymer substrate that locally modify near-infrared (λ=915 nm) optical wavefronts. As proof of concept, we show that cylindrical lenses covered with metasurfaces can be transformed to function as aspherical lenses focusing light to a point. The conformal metasurface concept is highly versatile for developing arbitrarily shaped multi-functional optical devices.

  16. Decoupling optical function and geometrical form using conformal flexible dielectric metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Arbabi, Amir; Arbabi, Ehsan; Horie, Yu; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Physical geometry and optical properties of objects are correlated: cylinders focus light to a line, spheres to a point and arbitrarily shaped objects introduce optical aberrations. Multi-functional components with decoupled geometrical form and optical function are needed when specific optical functionalities must be provided while the shapes are dictated by other considerations like ergonomics, aerodynamics or aesthetics. Here we demonstrate an approach for decoupling optical properties of objects from their physical shape using thin and flexible dielectric metasurfaces which conform to objects' surface and change their optical properties. The conformal metasurfaces are composed of silicon nano-posts embedded in a polymer substrate that locally modify near-infrared (λ=915 nm) optical wavefronts. As proof of concept, we show that cylindrical lenses covered with metasurfaces can be transformed to function as aspherical lenses focusing light to a point. The conformal metasurface concept is highly versatile for developing arbitrarily shaped multi-functional optical devices. PMID:27193141

  17. Decoupling optical function and geometrical form using conformal flexible dielectric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Arbabi, Amir; Arbabi, Ehsan; Horie, Yu; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Physical geometry and optical properties of objects are correlated: cylinders focus light to a line, spheres to a point and arbitrarily shaped objects introduce optical aberrations. Multi-functional components with decoupled geometrical form and optical function are needed when specific optical functionalities must be provided while the shapes are dictated by other considerations like ergonomics, aerodynamics or aesthetics. Here we demonstrate an approach for decoupling optical properties of objects from their physical shape using thin and flexible dielectric metasurfaces which conform to objects' surface and change their optical properties. The conformal metasurfaces are composed of silicon nano-posts embedded in a polymer substrate that locally modify near-infrared (λ=915 nm) optical wavefronts. As proof of concept, we show that cylindrical lenses covered with metasurfaces can be transformed to function as aspherical lenses focusing light to a point. The conformal metasurface concept is highly versatile for developing arbitrarily shaped multi-functional optical devices. PMID:27193141

  18. Decoupling optical function and geometrical form using conformal flexible dielectric metasurfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Arbabi, Amir; Arbabi, Ehsan; Horie, Yu; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-05-19

    Physical geometry and optical properties of objects are correlated: cylinders focus light to a line, spheres to a point and arbitrarily shaped objects introduce optical aberrations. Multifunctional components with decoupled geometrical form and optical function are needed when specific optical functionalities must be provided while the shapes are dictated by other considerations like ergonomics, aerodynamics or aesthetics. Here we demonstrate an approach for decoupling optical properties of objects from their physical shape using thin and flexible dielectric metasurfaces which conform to objects' surface and change their optical properties. The conformal metasurfaces are composed of silicon nano-posts embedded in a polymermore » substrate that locally modify near-infrared (λ = 915 nm) optical wavefronts. As proof of concept, we show that cylindrical lenses covered with metasurfaces can be transformed to function as aspherical lenses focusing light to a point. Lastly, the conformal metasurface concept is highly versatile for developing arbitrarily shaped multi-functional optical devices.« less

  19. Substrate Binding Tunes Conformational Flexibility and Kinetic Stability of an Amino Acid Antiporter*

    PubMed Central

    Bippes, Christian A.; Zeltina, Antra; Casagrande, Fabio; Ratera, Merce; Palacin, Manuel; Muller, Daniel J.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    We used single molecule dynamic force spectroscopy to unfold individual serine/threonine antiporters SteT from Bacillus subtilis. The unfolding force patterns revealed interactions and energy barriers that stabilized structural segments of SteT. Substrate binding did not establish strong localized interactions but appeared to be facilitated by the formation of weak interactions with several structural segments. Upon substrate binding, all energy barriers of the antiporter changed thereby describing the transition from brittle mechanical properties of SteT in the unbound state to structurally flexible conformations in the substrate-bound state. The lifetime of the unbound state was much shorter than that of the substrate-bound state. This leads to the conclusion that the unbound state of SteT shows a reduced conformational flexibility to facilitate specific substrate binding and a reduced kinetic stability to enable rapid switching to the bound state. In contrast, the bound state of SteT showed an increased conformational flexibility and kinetic stability such as required to enable transport of substrate across the cell membrane. This result supports the working model of antiporters in which alternate substrate access from one to the other membrane surface occurs in the substrate-bound state. PMID:19419962

  20. Evaluation of flexible and rigid (class solution) radiation therapy conformal prostate planning protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, Natalie; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Westling, Jelene; Trovato, Jenny; Gebski, Val

    2012-04-01

    Protocols commonly implemented in radiotherapy work areas may be classified as being either rigid (class solution) or flexible. Because formal evaluation of these protocol types has not occurred within the literature, we evaluated the efficiency of a rigid compared with flexible prostate planning protocol by assessing a series of completed 3D conformal prostate plans. Twenty prostate cancer patients with an average age of 70 years (range, 52-77) and sizes comprising 8 small, 10 medium, and 2 large were planned on the Phillips Pinnacle treatment planning system 6 times by radiation therapists with <2 years, 2-5 years, and >5 years of experience using a rigid and flexible protocol. Plans were critiqued using critical organ doses, confirmation numbers, and conformity index. Plans were then classified as being acceptable or not. Plans produced with the flexible protocol were 53% less likely to require modification (OR 0.47, 95% CI: 0.26, 0.84, p = 0.01). Planners with >5 years of experience were 78% more likely to produce plans requiring modification (OR 1.78, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.83, P = 0.02). Plans according to the flexible protocol took longer (112 min) compared with the time taken using a rigid protocol (68 min) (p < 0.001). The results suggest that further studies are needed; however, we propose that all radiation therapy planners should start with the same limitations, and if an acceptable plan is not reached, then flexibility should be given to improve the plan to meet the desired results.

  1. Ultraflexible, large-area, physiological temperature sensors for multipoint measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Yusuke; Terakawa, Yuki; Reeder, Jonathan; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Ware, Taylor; Yang, Kejia; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Sekino, Masaki; Voit, Walter; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We report a fabrication method for flexible and printable thermal sensors based on composites of semicrystalline acrylate polymers and graphite with a high sensitivity of 20 mK and a high-speed response time of less than 100 ms. These devices exhibit large resistance changes near body temperature under physiological conditions with high repeatability (1,800 times). Device performance is largely unaffected by bending to radii below 700 µm, which allows for conformal application to the surface of living tissue. The sensing temperature can be tuned between 25 °C and 50 °C, which covers all relevant physiological temperatures. Furthermore, we demonstrate flexible active-matrix thermal sensors which can resolve spatial temperature gradients over a large area. With this flexible ultrasensitive temperature sensor we succeeded in the in vivo measurement of cyclic temperatures changes of 0.1 °C in a rat lung during breathing, without interference from constant tissue motion. This result conclusively shows that the lung of a warm-blooded animal maintains surprising temperature stability despite the large difference between core temperature and inhaled air temperature. PMID:26554008

  2. Buckling assisted and lithographically micropatterned fully flexible sensors for conformal integration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Debashis; Das, Debanjan; Wala, Jyoti; Das, Soumen

    2015-12-01

    Development of flexible sensors/electronics over substrates thicker than 100 μm is of immense importance for its practical feasibility. However, unlike over ultrathin films, large bending stress hinders its flexibility. Here we have employed a novel technique of fabricating sensors over a non-planar ridge topology under pre-stretched condition which not only helps in spontaneous generation of large and uniform parallel buckles upon release, but also acts as stress reduction zones thereby preventing Poisson’s ratio induced lateral cracking. Further, we propose a complete lithography compatible process to realize flexible sensors over pre-stretched substrates thicker than 100 μm that are released through dissolution of a water soluble sacrificial layer of polyvinyl alcohol. These buckling assisted flexible sensors demonstrated superior performance along different flexible modalities. Based on the above concept, we also realized a micro thermal flow sensor, conformally wrapped around angiographic catheters to detect flow abnormalities for potential applications in interventional catheterization process.

  3. Buckling assisted and lithographically micropatterned fully flexible sensors for conformal integration applications

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Debashis; Das, Debanjan; Wala, Jyoti; Das, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    Development of flexible sensors/electronics over substrates thicker than 100 μm is of immense importance for its practical feasibility. However, unlike over ultrathin films, large bending stress hinders its flexibility. Here we have employed a novel technique of fabricating sensors over a non-planar ridge topology under pre-stretched condition which not only helps in spontaneous generation of large and uniform parallel buckles upon release, but also acts as stress reduction zones thereby preventing Poisson’s ratio induced lateral cracking. Further, we propose a complete lithography compatible process to realize flexible sensors over pre-stretched substrates thicker than 100 μm that are released through dissolution of a water soluble sacrificial layer of polyvinyl alcohol. These buckling assisted flexible sensors demonstrated superior performance along different flexible modalities. Based on the above concept, we also realized a micro thermal flow sensor, conformally wrapped around angiographic catheters to detect flow abnormalities for potential applications in interventional catheterization process. PMID:26640124

  4. Conformational flexibility and subunit arrangement of the modular yeast Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase complex.

    PubMed

    Setiaputra, Dheva; Ross, James D; Lu, Shan; Cheng, Derrick T; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yip, Calvin K

    2015-04-17

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex is a highly conserved, 19-subunit histone acetyltransferase complex that activates transcription through acetylation and deubiquitination of nucleosomal histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because SAGA has been shown to display conformational variability, we applied gradient fixation to stabilize purified SAGA and systematically analyzed this flexibility using single-particle EM. Our two- and three-dimensional studies show that SAGA adopts three major conformations, and mutations of specific subunits affect the distribution among these. We also located the four functional modules of SAGA using electron microscopy-based labeling and transcriptional activator binding analyses and show that the acetyltransferase module is localized in the most mobile region of the complex. We further comprehensively mapped the subunit interconnectivity of SAGA using cross-linking mass spectrometry, revealing that the Spt and Taf subunits form the structural core of the complex. These results provide the necessary restraints for us to generate a model of the spatial arrangement of all SAGA subunits. According to this model, the chromatin-binding domains of SAGA are all clustered in one face of the complex that is highly flexible. Our results relate information of overall SAGA structure with detailed subunit level interactions, improving our understanding of its architecture and flexibility. PMID:25713136

  5. Conformational Flexibility and Subunit Arrangement of the Modular Yeast Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Setiaputra, Dheva; Ross, James D.; Lu, Shan; Cheng, Derrick T.; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yip, Calvin K.

    2015-01-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex is a highly conserved, 19-subunit histone acetyltransferase complex that activates transcription through acetylation and deubiquitination of nucleosomal histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because SAGA has been shown to display conformational variability, we applied gradient fixation to stabilize purified SAGA and systematically analyzed this flexibility using single-particle EM. Our two- and three-dimensional studies show that SAGA adopts three major conformations, and mutations of specific subunits affect the distribution among these. We also located the four functional modules of SAGA using electron microscopy-based labeling and transcriptional activator binding analyses and show that the acetyltransferase module is localized in the most mobile region of the complex. We further comprehensively mapped the subunit interconnectivity of SAGA using cross-linking mass spectrometry, revealing that the Spt and Taf subunits form the structural core of the complex. These results provide the necessary restraints for us to generate a model of the spatial arrangement of all SAGA subunits. According to this model, the chromatin-binding domains of SAGA are all clustered in one face of the complex that is highly flexible. Our results relate information of overall SAGA structure with detailed subunit level interactions, improving our understanding of its architecture and flexibility. PMID:25713136

  6. Ensemble refinement shows conformational flexibility in crystal structures of human complement factor D

    SciTech Connect

    Forneris, Federico; Burnley, B. Tom; Gros, Piet

    2014-03-01

    Ensemble-refinement analysis of native and mutant factor D (FD) crystal structures indicates a dynamical transition in FD from a self-inhibited inactive conformation to a substrate-bound active conformation that is reminiscent of the allostery in thrombin. Comparison with previously observed dynamics in thrombin using NMR data supports the crystallographic ensembles. Human factor D (FD) is a self-inhibited thrombin-like serine proteinase that is critical for amplification of the complement immune response. FD is activated by its substrate through interactions outside the active site. The substrate-binding, or ‘exosite’, region displays a well defined and rigid conformation in FD. In contrast, remarkable flexibility is observed in thrombin and related proteinases, in which Na{sup +} and ligand binding is implied in allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity through protein dynamics. Here, ensemble refinement (ER) of FD and thrombin crystal structures is used to evaluate structure and dynamics simultaneously. A comparison with previously published NMR data for thrombin supports the ER analysis. The R202A FD variant has enhanced activity towards artificial peptides and simultaneously displays active and inactive conformations of the active site. ER revealed pronounced disorder in the exosite loops for this FD variant, reminiscent of thrombin in the absence of the stabilizing Na{sup +} ion. These data indicate that FD exhibits conformational dynamics like thrombin, but unlike in thrombin a mechanism has evolved in FD that locks the unbound native state into an ordered inactive conformation via the self-inhibitory loop. Thus, ensemble refinement of X-ray crystal structures may represent an approach alternative to spectroscopy to explore protein dynamics in atomic detail.

  7. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  8. Combining conformational flexibility and continuum electrostatics for calculating pK(a)s in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Alexov, Emil G; Gunner, Marilyn R

    2002-01-01

    Protein stability and function relies on residues being in their appropriate ionization states at physiological pH. In situ residue pK(a)s also provides a sensitive measure of the local protein environment. Multiconformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) combines continuum electrostatics and molecular mechanics force fields in Monte Carlo sampling to simultaneously calculate side chain ionization and conformation. The response of protein to charges is incorporated both in the protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot)) of four and by explicit conformational changes. The pK(a) of 166 residues in 12 proteins was determined. The root mean square error is 0.83 pH units, and >90% have errors of <1 pH units whereas only 3% have errors >2 pH units. Similar results are found with crystal and solution structures, showing that the method's explicit conformational sampling reduces sensitivity to the initial structure. The outcome also changes little with protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot) 4-20). Multiconformation continuum electrostatics titrations show coupling of conformational flexibility and changes in ionization state. Examples are provided where ionizable side chain position (protein G), Asn orientation (lysozyme), His tautomer distribution (RNase A), and phosphate ion binding (RNase A and H) change with pH. Disallowing these motions changes the calculated pK(a). PMID:12324397

  9. Combining conformational flexibility and continuum electrostatics for calculating pK(a)s in proteins.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Alexov, Emil G; Gunner, Marilyn R

    2002-10-01

    Protein stability and function relies on residues being in their appropriate ionization states at physiological pH. In situ residue pK(a)s also provides a sensitive measure of the local protein environment. Multiconformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) combines continuum electrostatics and molecular mechanics force fields in Monte Carlo sampling to simultaneously calculate side chain ionization and conformation. The response of protein to charges is incorporated both in the protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot)) of four and by explicit conformational changes. The pK(a) of 166 residues in 12 proteins was determined. The root mean square error is 0.83 pH units, and >90% have errors of <1 pH units whereas only 3% have errors >2 pH units. Similar results are found with crystal and solution structures, showing that the method's explicit conformational sampling reduces sensitivity to the initial structure. The outcome also changes little with protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot) 4-20). Multiconformation continuum electrostatics titrations show coupling of conformational flexibility and changes in ionization state. Examples are provided where ionizable side chain position (protein G), Asn orientation (lysozyme), His tautomer distribution (RNase A), and phosphate ion binding (RNase A and H) change with pH. Disallowing these motions changes the calculated pK(a). PMID:12324397

  10. Flexible polyelectrolyte conformation in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, C. B.; Kuhn, P. S.; Diehl, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we have studied the conformation of flexible polyelectrolyte chains in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactant molecules. We developed a simple theoretical model for the formation of the polyelectrolyte-cationic surfactant complexes and mixed micelles formed by cationic and anionic surfactant molecules, in the framework of the Debye-Hückel-Bjerrum-Manning and Flory theories, with the hydrophobic interaction included explicitly as an effective short-ranged attraction between the surfactant hydrocarbon tails. This simple model allows us to calculate the extension of the polyelectrolyte-cationic surfactant complexes as a function of the anionic surfactant concentration, for different types of cationic and anionic surfactant molecules. A discrete conformational transition from a collapsed state to an elongated coil was found, for all surfactant chain lengths we have considered, in agreement with the experimental observations for the unfolding of ​DNA-cationic surfactant complexes.

  11. 3D conformation of a flexible fiber in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhille, Gautier; Bartoli, Adrien

    2016-07-01

    A growing number of studies is devoted to anisotropic particles in turbulent flows. In most cases, the particles are assumed to be rigid and their deformations are neglected. We present an adaptation of classical computer vision tools to reconstruct from two different images the 3D conformation of a fiber distorted by the turbulent fluctuations in a von Kármán flow. This technique allows us notably to characterize the fiber deformation by computing the correlation function of the orientation of the tangent vector. This function allows us to tackle the analogy between polymers and flexible fibers proposed by Brouzet et al. (Phys Rev Lett 112(7):074501, 2014). We show that this function depends on an elastic length ℓ _e which characterizes the particle flexibility, as is the case for polymers, but also on the fiber length L, contrary to polymers.

  12. Step-Controllable Electric-Field-Assisted Nanoimprint Lithography for Uneven Large-Area Substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhui; Shao, Jinyou; Tian, Hongmiao; Li, Xiangming; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Ben Q

    2016-04-26

    Large-area nanostructures are widely used in various fields, but fabrication on large-area uneven substrates poses a significant challenge. This study demonstrates a step-controllable electric-field-assisted nanoimprint lithography (e-NIL) method that can achieve conformal contact with uneven substrates for high fidelity nanostructuring. Experiments are used to demonstrate the method where a substrate coated with liquid resist is brought into contact with a flexible template driven by the applied electric field. Theoretical analysis based on the elasticity theory and electro-hydrodynamic theory is carried out. Effective voltage range and the saturation voltage are also discussed. A step-controllable release of flexible template is proposed and demonstrated to ensure the continuous contact between the template and an uneven substrate. This prevents formation of air traps and allows large area conformal contact to be achieved. A combination of Vacuum-electric field assisted step-controllable e-NIL is implemented in the developed prototype. Finally, photonic crystal nanostructures are successfully fabricated on a 4 in., 158 μm bow gallium nitride light-emitting diode epitaxial wafer using the proposed method, which enhance the light extraction property. PMID:27015525

  13. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  14. Large Area Printing of Organic Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Graciela B.; Rogers, J. A.; Lefenfeld, M.; Fincher, C. R.; Loo, Jueh-Lin

    2003-03-01

    Organic electronic systems offer the advantage of lightweight, mechanical flexibility and large area coverage at potentially lower manufacturing cost. Although the production of functioning plastic transistors using approaches such as ink jet, screen printing and stamping, has been described in the literature, no one-transistor layer has yet been fabricated using a technique appropriate for their commercial ization. The solution processability of many organics may ultimately allow for the printing of electronic devices in a printing press at high speeds and in a reel to reel configuration. However, designing chemically compatible solutions to be printed sequentially represents a significant technical barrier to achieving all-printed plastic electronic systems. The work presented here represents a step change in the fabrication of organic electronic devices. We introduce thermal transfer, a non-lithographic technique that enables printing multi-layer electronics devices via a dry (i.e. solvent-less) additive process. This high-speed method is capable of patterning a range of organic materials over large areas ( 1 m2 ) with micron dimensions and excellent electrical performance. The 0.5 m2 transistor array backplane printed via thermal transfer represent the most advanced demonstration of a novel printing technology applied to the fabrication of large area integrated electronic devices. Dry transfer printing may provide a practical route to realizing the benefits of plastic materials for electronics.

  15. Progress on large area GEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Marco; Duarte Pinto, Serge; Alfonsi, Matteo; Brock, Ian; Croci, Gabriele; David, Eric; de Oliveira, Rui; Ropelewski, Leszek; Taureg, Hans; van Stenis, Miranda

    2011-02-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) manufacturing technique has recently evolved to allow the production of large area GEMs. A novel approach based on single mask photolithography eliminates the mask alignment issue, which limits the dimensions in the traditional double mask process. Moreover, a splicing technique overcomes the limited width of the raw material. Stretching and handling issues in large area GEMs have also been addressed. Using the new improvements it was possible to build a prototype triple-GEM detector of ˜2000 cm2 active area, aimed at an application for the TOTEM T1 upgrade. Further refinements of the single mask technique allow great control over the shape of the GEM holes and the size of the rims, which can be tuned as needed. In this framework, simulation studies can help to understand the GEM behavior depending on the hole shape.

  16. Calcium Binding Promotes Conformational Flexibility of the Neuronal Ca2+ Sensor Synaptotagmin

    PubMed Central

    Bykhovskaia, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) is a synaptic vesicle protein that serves as a calcium sensor of neuronal secretion. It is established that calcium binding to Syt1 triggers vesicle fusion and release of neuronal transmitters, however, the dynamics of this process is not fully understood. To investigate how Ca2+ binding affects Syt1 conformational dynamics, we performed prolonged molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Ca2+-unbound and Ca2+-bound forms of Syt1. MD simulations were performed at a microsecond scale and combined with Monte Carlo sampling. We found that in the absence of Ca2+ Syt1 structure in the solution is represented by an ensemble of conformational states with tightly coupled domains. To investigate the effect of Ca2+ binding, we used two different strategies to generate a molecular model of a Ca2+-bound form of Syt1. First, we employed subsequent replacements of monovalent cations transiently captured within Syt1 Ca2+-binding pockets by Ca2+ ions. Second, we performed MD simulations of Syt1 at elevated Ca2+ levels. All the simulations produced Syt1 structures bound to four Ca2+ ions, two ions chelated at the binding pocket of each domain. MD simulations of the Ca2+-bound form of Syt1 revealed that Syt1 conformational flexibility drastically increased upon Ca2+ binding. In the presence of Ca2+, the separation between domains increased, and interdomain rotations became more frequent. These findings suggest that Ca2+ binding to Syt1 may induce major changes in the Syt1 conformational state, which in turn may initiate the fusion process. PMID:25992729

  17. Glutamate Racemase Dimerization Inhibits Dynamic Conformational Flexibility and Reduces Catalytic Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Guo, Liang; Fu, Wentao; Mittal, Anuradha; Yau, Tiffany; Truong, Kent; Johlfs, Mary; Long, Fei; Fung, Leslie W.-M.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Glutamate racemase (RacE) is a bacterial enzyme that converts L-glutamate to D-glutamate, an essential precursor for peptidoglycan synthesis. In prior work, we have shown that both isoforms cocrystallize with D-glutamate as dimers, and the enzyme is in a closed conformation with limited access to the active site [May, M., et al. (2007) J. Mol. Biol. 371, 1219-1237]. The active site of RacE2 is especially restricted. We utilize several computational and experimental approaches to understand the overall conformational dynamics involved during catalysis when the ligand enters and the product exits the active site. Our steered molecular dynamics simulations and normal-mode analysis results indicate that the monomeric form of the enzyme is more flexible than the native dimeric form. These results suggest that the monomeric enzyme might be more active than the dimeric form. We thus generated site-specific mutations that disrupt dimerization and find that the mutants exhibit significantly higher catalytic rates in the D-Glu to L-Glu reaction direction than the native enzyme. Low-resolution models restored from solution X-ray scattering studies correlate well with the first six normal modes of the dimeric form of the enzyme, obtained from NMA. Thus, along with the local active site residues, global domain motions appear to be implicated in the catalytically relevant structural dynamics of this enzyme and suggest that increased flexibility may accelerate catalysis. This is a novel observation that residues distant from the catalytic site restrain catalytic activity through formation of the dimer structure.

  18. Investigation of the conformational flexibility of DGAT1 peptides using tryptophan fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Jose L. S.; Araujo, Ana P. U.; Jameson, David M.

    2015-06-01

    The conformational behavior of synthetic peptides corresponding to the putative binding sites of the diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 enzyme (a polytopic integral membrane protein) was investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Three small linear peptides with 13, 15 and 22 amino acid residues, containing one, two and three Trp residues, respectively, were studied in aqueous solution, in the absence and presence of model membranes. The high flexibility and unordered conformation of the peptides in solution were confirmed by the low Trp polarization values, the high accessibility to water-soluble quencher, and the fast rotational correlation times of the Trp residues. However, upon binding to the lipid systems, the Trp residues were incorporated within the acyl hydrophobic core and their lifetimes and rotational correlation times increased. Phasor plots were employed to analyze intensity decay of peptide-lipid binding and provided a trajectory, in phasor space, that lies along a line connecting the points of the free and bound peptide. This trajectory was analyzed to determine the association constant of the peptide to the model membrane.

  19. Conformational and stereochemical flexibility in cadmium(II) complexes of aza-thioether macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Mark W; van de Water, Leon G A; Driessen, Willem L; Reedijk, Jan; Blake, Alexander J; Wilson, Claire; Schröder, Martin

    2004-07-01

    The synthesis and crystal structures of four CdII macrocyclic complexes containing mixed N-, O- and S-donors, [Cd(NO3)2([12]aneN2S2)] (1), [Cd(NO3)2([12]aneNS3)] (2), [Cd(NO3)2([15]aneNO2S2)] (3) and [Cd(NO3)([15]aneN2O2S)]NO3 (4), are presented. The metal ion is coordinated outside of the macrocyclic cavity in the complexes of the smaller macrocycles ([12]aneN2S2 and [12]aneNS3) while the flexibility of the larger macrocycles in and allows very different conformations to be adopted with a 'butterfly' geometry in and a flattened geometry in. No correlation between the number of sulfur donors and Cd-S bond distance in these types of complexes is observed, although the number and binding mode of the nitrato ligands is determined by the conformation and binding mode of the macrocycle. The position of the nitrato ligand also influences, through steric conflicts with the macrocyclic donor atoms, the bond distances in both ligand systems. PMID:15252582

  20. The Catalytic Activity of Protein-Disulfide Isomerase Requires a Conformationally Flexible Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, G.; Kober, F; Lewandrowski, U; Sickmann, A; Lennarz, W; Schindelin, H

    2008-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the formation of the correct pattern of disulfide bonds in secretory proteins. A low resolution crystal structure of yeast PDI described here reveals large scale conformational changes compared with the initially reported structure, indicating that PDI is a highly flexible molecule with its catalytic domains, a and a?, representing two mobile arms connected to a more rigid core composed of the b and b? domains. Limited proteolysis revealed that the linker between the a domain and the core is more susceptible to degradation than that connecting the a? domain to the core. By restricting the two arms with inter-domain disulfide bonds, the molecular flexibility of PDI, especially that of its a domain, was demonstrated to be essential for the enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo. The crystal structure also featured a PDI dimer, and a propensity to dimerize in solution and in the ER was confirmed by cross-linking experiments and the split green fluorescent protein system. Although sedimentation studies suggested that the self-association of PDI is weak, we hypothesize that PDI exists as an interconvertible mixture of monomers and dimers in the endoplasmic reticulum due to its high abundance in this compartment.

  1. Multiple disulfide bridges modulate conformational stability and flexibility in hyperthermophilic archaeal purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Bagarolo, Maria Libera; Porcelli, Marina; Martino, Elisa; Feller, Georges; Cacciapuoti, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    5'-Deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is a hexameric hyperthermophilic protein containing in each subunit two pairs of disulfide bridges, a CXC motif, and one free cysteine. The contribution of each disulfide bridge to the protein conformational stability and flexibility has been assessed by comparing the thermal unfolding and the limited proteolysis of the wild-type enzyme and its variants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the seven cysteine residues. All variants catalyzed efficiently MTA cleavage with specific activity similar to the wild-type enzyme. The elimination of all cysteine residues caused a substantial decrease of ΔHcal (850 kcal/mol) and Tmax (39°C) with respect to the wild-type indicating that all cysteine pairs and especially the CXC motif significantly contribute to the enzyme thermal stability. Disulfide bond Cys200-Cys262 and the CXC motif weakly affected protein flexibility while the elimination of the disulfide bond Cys138-Cys205 lead to an increased protease susceptibility. Experimental evidence from limited proteolysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions also allowed to propose a stabilizing role for the free Cys164. PMID:26116147

  2. A relational database of protein structures designed for flexible enquiries about conformation.

    PubMed

    Islam, S A; Sternberg, M J

    1989-03-01

    A relational database of protein structure has been developed to enable rapid and flexible enquiries about the occurrence of many aspects of protein architecture. The coordinates of 294 proteins from the Brookhaven Data Bank have been processed by standard computer programs to generate many additional terms that quantify aspects of protein structure. These terms include solvent accessibility, main-chain and side-chain dihedral angles, and secondary structure. In a relational database, the information is stored in tables with columns holding the different terms and rows holding the different entries for the terms. The different relational base tables store the information about the protein coordinate set, the different chains in the protein, the amino acid residues and ligands, the atomic coordinates, the salt bridges, the hydrogen bonds, the disulphide bridges and the close tertiary contacts. The database was established under ORACLE management system. Enquiries are constructed in ORACLE using SQL (structured query language) which is simple to use and alleviates the need for extensive computer programs. A single table can be searched for entries that meet various criteria, e.g. all protein solved to better than a given resolution. The power of the database occurs when several tables, or the entries in a single table, are cross-correlated. For example the dihedral angles of proline in the fourth position in an alpha-helix in high resolution structures can be rapidly obtained. The structural database provides a powerful tool to obtain empirical rules about protein conformation. This database of protein structures is part of a joint project between Birkbeck College and Leeds University to establish an integrated data resource of protein sequences and structures (ISIS) that encodes the complex patterns of residues and coordinates that define protein conformation. The entire data resource (ISIS) will provide a system to guide all areas of protein modelling including

  3. Biophysical exploration of protein-flavonol recognition: effects of molecular properties and conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui

    2016-04-28

    The current work explores the biomolecular recognition of a series of flavonols by a protein and then uncovers the influences of the structural features of flavonols and the protein's own characteristics, e.g. the dynamics and flexibility, on the bioavailability of flavonols by using the pivotal biomacromolecule hemoglobin as a model. The experimental results revealed that flavonol may lead to a notable decrease in the steady-state fluorescence intensity of the β-37 Trp residue, and in the meantime the R-T transition of the protein transpired. Such noncovalent recognition forms the ground-state adduct, with an association intensity of 3.991 × 10(4) M(-1) in the reaction process, which has already been authenticated by the detailed analysis of time-resolved fluorescence and UV/vis absorption spectra. Furthermore, flavonol can form hydrogen bonds and π-conjugation effects with several amino acid residues on the polypeptide chain, for example, Trp-37, Arg-40, Asp-99 and Asn-102, and this event would induce self-regulation of the compact, regular conformation of the protein to a certain extent, which explicitly corroborates the results of circular dichroism. According to the study of molecular docking and structure-activity relationships, we could see that the recognition capacities of the protein-flavonols are inversely interrelated with the C log P values of the flavonol molecules. Moreover, the properties of the substituents in the structural B-ring unit of flavonols, i.e. polarity, position and number, will also prominently affect the degree of affinity and bioavailability of the protein-flavonol complexes. The analytical results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation testified that the discussions of the structure-activity relationships are entirely logical, and the conformations of the amino acid residues forming noncovalent interactions tend to be stable in the MD simulation, as further elucidated from the dynamics data. Plainly, molecular recognition of

  4. Anion directed structural diversity in zinc complexes with conformationally flexible quinazoline ligand: structural, spectral and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Nidhi; Panja, Sumit Kumar; Monika; Saha, Satyen; Sunkari, Sailaja S

    2016-08-14

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, structure and photophysical studies of four new complexes of conformationally flexible 6-chloro-4-phenyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinazoline ligand (L) with Zn(ii). The coordinating ability of the ligand and geometrical preferences of the resultant complexes are tuned by varying the anion of the metal salt as confirmed by structural and DFT studies. The choice of the metal salt (especially anion) directs the stabilisation of different conformations of the ligand arising out of twisting of the pyridyl ring with respect to the quinazoline ring, resulting in complexes with different nuclearity (monomer/dimer) as well as different coordination geometries (tetrahedral/trigonal bipyramidal/octahedral). Photophysical properties are also found to be tuned due to conformational changes on complexation. DFT studies on the ligand establish the conformationally stable forms as observed in the reported structures. PMID:27397771

  5. Substrate-free self-assembly approach toward large-area nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Seo, Jung-Hun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Wang, Xudong

    2012-03-27

    Free-standing two-dimensional nanostrucutures, such as graphene and semiconductor nanomembranes (NMs) featuring their integration with flexible polymer substrates, address applications in which electronic devices need to be stretchable or conformally positioned to nonplanar surfaces. We report a surfactant-directed surface assembly approach to producing large-area NMs at the water-air interface. The NMs were produced by employing the surfactants as templates as well as incorporating them in the crystal structures. By using excess amount of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), a tightly packed monolayer of dodecylsulfate (DS) ion was formed and directed the crystallization of submillimeter-sized zinc hydroxy dodecylsulfate (ZHDS) single-crystalline NMs over the entire water surface. This free-standing NM can be readily transferred to an arbitrary substrate and converted to ZnO via heat treatment. A flexible thin-film transistor was also fabricated using the transferred NMs and demonstrated reasonably good n-type transport properties. This approach circumvented the needs of single-crystalline substrates for making large-area NMs from materials that do not possess a laminate structure. It is a low-cost and large-scale synthesis technique and has great potential in developing NMs and flexible devices from various functional materials that are not feasible by conventional selective etching or delamination approaches. PMID:22299624

  6. Conformational flexibility of a model protein upon immobilization on self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, Saharnaz; Talasaz, AmirAli H; Ståhl, Patrik; Persson, Henrik H J; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Davis, Ronald W; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2008-05-01

    The present study reports on the retention of conformational flexibility of a model allosteric protein upon immobilization on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold. Organothiolated SAMs of different compositions were utilized for adsorptive and covalent attachment of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a well-characterized allosteric enzyme. Sensitive fluorimetric assays were developed to determine immobilization capacity, specific activity, and allosteric properties of the immobilized preparations as well as the potential for repeated use and continuous catalytic transformations. The allosteric response of the free and immobilized forms towards ADP, L-leucine and high concentrations of NAD(+), some of the well-known activators for this enzyme, were determined and compared. The enzyme immobilized by adsorption or chemical binding responded similarly to the activators with a greater degree of activation, as compared to the free form. Also loss of activity involving the two immobilization procedures were similar, suggesting that residues essential for catalytic activity or allosteric properties of GDH remained unchanged in the course of chemical modification. A recently established method was used to predict GDH orientation upon immobilization, which was found to explain some of the experimental results presented. The general significance of these observations in connection with retention of native properties of protein structures upon immobilization on SAMs is discussed. PMID:18078298

  7. Torsional flexibility of B-DNA as revealed by conformational analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhurkin, V B; Lysov, Y P; Florentiev, V L; Ivanov, V I

    1982-01-01

    The thermal fluctuations of a regular double helix belonging to the B-family were studied by means of atom-atomic potentials method. The winding angle fluctuation was found to be 2.4 degrees for poly(dA):poly(dT) and 3.0 degrees for poly(dG):poly(dC). The reasonable agreement of these estimations with those obtained experimentally reveals the essential role of the small-amplitude torsional vibrations of atoms in the mechanism of the double helix flexibility. The calculated equilibrium winding angle, tau 0, essentially depends on the degree of neutralization of phosphate groups, being about 35.5 degrees for the full neutralization. The deoxyribose pucker is closely related to the tau angle: while tau proceeds from 30 degrees to 45 degrees the pseudorotation phase angle, P, increases from 126 degrees to 164 degrees. Fluctuations of the angles TL and TW, which specify inclination of the bases to the helix axis, were evaluated to be 5 degrees-10 degrees. Possible correlation between conformational changes in the adjacent nucleotides is discussed. PMID:7071023

  8. Conformational Flexibility Determines Selectivity and Antibacterial, Antiplasmodial, and Anticancer Potency of Cationic α-Helical Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Louic S.; Lan, Yun; Abbate, Vincenzo; Ruh, Emrah; Bui, Tam T.; Wilkinson, Louise J.; Kanno, Tokuwa; Jumagulova, Elmira; Kozlowska, Justyna; Patel, Jayneil; McIntyre, Caitlin A.; Yam, W. C.; Siu, Gilman; Atkinson, R. Andrew; Lam, Jenny K. W.; Bansal, Sukhvinder S.; Drake, Alex F.; Mitchell, Graham H.; Mason, A. James

    2012-01-01

    We used a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopies in conjunction with size exclusion chromatography to help rationalize the relative antibacterial, antiplasmodial, and cytotoxic activities of a series of proline-free and proline-containing model antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in terms of their structural properties. When compared with proline-free analogs, proline-containing peptides had greater activity against Gram-negative bacteria, two mammalian cancer cell lines, and intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum, which they were capable of killing without causing hemolysis. In contrast, incorporation of proline did not have a consistent effect on peptide activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In membrane-mimicking environments, structures with high α-helix content were adopted by both proline-free and proline-containing peptides. In solution, AMPs generally adopted disordered structures unless their sequences comprised more hydrophobic amino acids or until coordinating phosphate ions were added. Proline-containing peptides resisted ordering induced by either method. The roles of the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids and the positioning of the proline residues were also investigated. Careful positioning of proline residues in AMP sequences is required to enable the peptide to resist ordering and maintain optimal antibacterial activity, whereas varying the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids can attenuate hemolytic potential albeit with a modest reduction in potency. Maintaining conformational flexibility improves AMP potency and selectivity toward bacterial, plasmodial, and cancerous cells while enabling the targeting of intracellular pathogens. PMID:22869378

  9. Large-area Overhead Manipulator for Access of Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-axis, cable-driven manipulators have evolved over many years providing large area suspended platform access, programmability, relatively rigid and flexibly-positioned platform control and full six degree of freedom (DOF) manipulation of sensors and tools. We describe innovations for a new six...

  10. Ion conduction and conformational flexibility of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; Allen, Toby W

    2014-03-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels play an essential role in electrical signaling in the nervous system and are key pharmacological targets for a range of disorders. The recent solution of X-ray structures for the bacterial channel NavAb has provided an opportunity to study functional mechanisms at the atomic level. This channel's selectivity filter exhibits an EEEE ring sequence, characteristic of mammalian Ca(2+), not Na(+), channels. This raises the fundamentally important question: just what makes a Na(+) channel conduct Na(+) ions? Here we explore ion permeation on multimicrosecond timescales using the purpose-built Anton supercomputer. We isolate the likely protonation states of the EEEE ring and observe a striking flexibility of the filter that demonstrates the necessity for extended simulations to study conduction in this channel. We construct free energy maps to reveal complex multi-ion conduction via knock-on and "pass-by" mechanisms, involving concerted ion and glutamate side chain movements. Simulations in mixed ionic solutions reveal relative energetics for Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) within the pore that are consistent with the modest selectivity seen experimentally. We have observed conformational changes in the pore domain leading to asymmetrical collapses of the activation gate, similar to proposed inactivated structures of NavAb, with helix bending involving conserved residues that are critical for slow inactivation. These structural changes are shown to regulate access to fenestrations suggested to be pathways for lipophilic drugs and provide deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms connecting drug activity and slow inactivation. PMID:24550503

  11. An engineered scorpion toxin analogue with improved Kv1.3 selectivity displays reduced conformational flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Bartok, Adam; Fehér, Krisztina; Bodor, Andrea; Rákosi, Kinga; Tóth, Gábor K.; Kövér, Katalin E.; Panyi, Gyorgy; Varga, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.3 K+ channel plays a key role in the activation of T lymphocytes. Kv1.3 blockers selectively suppress immune responses mediated by effector memory T cells, which indicates the great potential of selective Kv1.3 inhibitors in the therapy of certain autoimmune diseases. Anuroctoxin (AnTx), a 35-amino-acid scorpion toxin is a high affinity blocker of Kv1.3, but also blocks Kv1.2 with similar potency. We designed and produced three AnTx variants: ([F32T]-AnTx, [N17A]-AnTx, [N17A/F32T]-AnTx) using solid-phase synthesis with the goal of improving the selectivity of the toxin for Kv1.3 over Kv1.2 while keeping the high affinity for Kv1.3. We used the patch-clamp technique to determine the blocking potency of the synthetic toxins on hKv1.3, mKv1.1, hKv1.2 and hKCa3.1 channels. Of the three variants [N17A/F32T]-AnTx maintained the high affinity of the natural peptide for Kv1.3 but became more than 16000-fold selective over Kv1.2. NMR data and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the more rigid structure with restricted conformational space of the double substituted toxin compared to the flexible wild-type one is an important determinant of toxin selectivity. Our results provide the foundation for the possibility of the production and future therapeutic application of additional, even more selective toxins targeting various ion channels. PMID:26689143

  12. The membrane anchor of the transcriptional activator SREBP is characterized by intrinsic conformational flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Linser, Rasmus; Salvi, Nicola; Briones, Rodolfo; Rovó, Petra; de Groot, Bert L.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) is a conserved mechanism crucial for numerous cellular processes, including signaling, transcriptional regulation, axon guidance, cell adhesion, cellular stress responses, and transmembrane protein fragment degradation. Importantly, it is relevant in various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Even though a number of structures of different intramembrane proteases have been solved recently, fundamental questions concerning mechanistic underpinnings of RIP and therapeutic interventions remain. In particular, this includes substrate recognition, what properties render a given substrate amenable for RIP, and how the lipid environment affects the substrate cleavage. Members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors are critical regulators of genes involved in cholesterol/lipid homeostasis. After site-1 protease cleavage of the inactive SREBP transmembrane precursor protein, RIP of the anchor intermediate by site-2 protease generates the mature transcription factor. In this work, we have investigated the labile anchor intermediate of SREBP-1 using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, NMR chemical shifts, site-resolved solvent exposure, and relaxation studies show that the cleavage site of the lipid-signaling protein intermediate bears rigid α-helical topology. An evolutionary conserved motif, by contrast, interrupts the secondary structure ∼9–10 residues C-terminal of the scissile bond and acts as an inducer of conformational flexibility within the carboxyl-terminal transmembrane region. These results are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Topology, stability, and site-resolved dynamics data suggest that the cleavage of the α-helical substrate in the case of RIP may be associated with a hinge motion triggered by the molecular environment. PMID:26392539

  13. Conformational variety of flexible mono-dentate ligands in coordination compounds: influence of π-involving interactions.

    PubMed

    Khavasi, Hamid Reza; Kavand, Sima

    2016-06-28

    The effect of intermolecular interactions on the conformational variety of flexible mono-dentate ligands in coordination compounds has been investigated through the preparation of two series of mercury(ii) complexes. In this regard, the molecular and structural architecture of eight complexes, [HgCl2(L(amide-Cl))2] (), [HgCl2(L(amide-Br))2] (), [HgBr2(L(amide-Br))2] (), and [HgI2(L(amide-Br))2] (), as the first series and [HgBr2(L(imine-Cl))2] (), [HgBr2(L(imine-Br))2] (), [HgI2(L(imine-Cl))]n (), and [HgI2(L(imine-Br))]n (), as the second series, using two kind of flexible ligands, N-(1-halonaphthalen-4-yl)nicotinamide, L(amide-X), and 4-halo-N-((pyridin-3-yl)methylene)naphthalen-1-amine, L(imine-X), has been studied. Inspection of the packing of these compounds clearly shows the presence of conformational changes in the arrangement of the ligands in each series. Although there are slight differences between the crystal packing of these compounds, it seems that π-involving intermolecular interactions including πnaphπnaph in the first series and πimineπpy/naph in the second series with the cooperation of Hgπpy can lock the ligand conformational variety to a single conformer. PMID:27293034

  14. Mixed Cyclic Constraints on Conformational Flexibility in β/γ-PEPTIDES: Conformation Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gord, Joseph R.; Walsh, Patrick S.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Fisher, Brian F.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2013-06-01

    In order to further understand the intramolecular forces governing secondary structure formation in peptides and to provide benchmarks for the computational community, conformation-specific spectroscopy techniques have been applied to several model systems provided by Dr. Sam Gellman's research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In the present work, two model β/γ-peptides, Ac-β_{ACPC}-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz and Ac-γ_{ACHC}-β_{ACPC}-NHBz have been investigated using single and double resonance ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy to elucidate their intrinsic folding propensities. The β-peptide is constrained by a five-membered ring spanning the β^{3}-β^{2} positions (β_{ACPC}) and the γ-peptide is constrained by a six-membered ring spanning the γ^{4}-γ^{3} positions with an additional ethyl group at γ^{2} (γ_{ACHC}). Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectra from 37250 to 37750 cm^{-1} were obtained and subsequently interrogated using UV-UV hole-burning to reveal the presence of three conformations for Ac-β_{ACPC}-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz, and a single conformation for Ac-γ_{ACHC}-β_{ACPC}-NHBz. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectra were obtained in the NH stretch region from 3300 to 3500 cm^{-1} and in both the amide I and II regions from 1400 to 1800 cm^{-1}. These spectra were compared to computational predictions given by DFT calculations using the M05-2X functional with a 6-31G+(d) basis set revealing two slightly varied iterations of a bifurcated C-8/13 double ring structure for Ac-β_{ACPC}-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz and one bifurcated C-9/13 double ring structure for Ac-γ_{ACHC}-β_{ACPC}-NHBz. The appearance of C-13 rings was also seen in solution phase studies. This work is a complement to studies performed on pure γ-peptides and α/γ-peptides. L. Guo, A. M. Almeida, W. Zhang, A. G. Reidenbach, S. H. Choi, I.. A. Guzei, and S. H. Gellman J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 7868-7869

  15. Modular hyperthermostable bacterial endo-β-1,4-mannanase: molecular shape, flexibility and temperature-dependent conformational changes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Viviam M; Colussi, Francieli; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Braz, Antonio S K; Squina, Fabio M; Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Garcia, Wanius

    2014-01-01

    Endo-β-1,4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a hyperthermostable enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-mannoside linkages in various mannan-containing polysaccharides. A recent study reported that TpMan is composed of a GH5 catalytic domain joined by a linker to a carbohydrate-binding domain. However, at this moment, there is no three-dimensional structure determined for TpMan. Little is known about the conformation of the TpMan as well as the role of the length and flexibility of the linker on the spatial arrangement of the constitutive domains. In this study, we report the first structural characterization of the entire TpMan by small-angle X-ray scattering combined with the three-dimensional structures of the individual domains in order to shed light on the low-resolution model, overall dimensions, and flexibility of this modular enzyme at different temperatures. The results are consistent with a linker with a compact structure and that occupies a small volume with respect to its large number of amino acids. Furthermore, at 20°C the results are consistent with a model where TpMan is a molecule composed of three distinct domains and that presents some level of molecular flexibility in solution. Even though the full enzyme has some degree of molecular flexibility, there might be a preferable conformation, which could be described by the rigid-body modeling procedure. Finally, the results indicate that TpMan undergoes a temperature-driven transition between conformational states without a significant disruption of its secondary structure. Our results suggest that the linker can optimize the geometry between the other two domains with respect to the substrate at high temperatures. These studies should provide a useful basis for future biophysical studies of entire TpMan. PMID:24671161

  16. Modular Hyperthermostable Bacterial Endo-β-1,4-Mannanase: Molecular Shape, Flexibility and Temperature-Dependent Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Braz, Antonio S. K.; Squina, Fabio M.; Oliveira, Cristiano L. P.; Garcia, Wanius

    2014-01-01

    Endo-β-1,4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a hyperthermostable enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-mannoside linkages in various mannan-containing polysaccharides. A recent study reported that TpMan is composed of a GH5 catalytic domain joined by a linker to a carbohydrate-binding domain. However, at this moment, there is no three-dimensional structure determined for TpMan. Little is known about the conformation of the TpMan as well as the role of the length and flexibility of the linker on the spatial arrangement of the constitutive domains. In this study, we report the first structural characterization of the entire TpMan by small-angle X-ray scattering combined with the three-dimensional structures of the individual domains in order to shed light on the low-resolution model, overall dimensions, and flexibility of this modular enzyme at different temperatures. The results are consistent with a linker with a compact structure and that occupies a small volume with respect to its large number of amino acids. Furthermore, at 20°C the results are consistent with a model where TpMan is a molecule composed of three distinct domains and that presents some level of molecular flexibility in solution. Even though the full enzyme has some degree of molecular flexibility, there might be a preferable conformation, which could be described by the rigid-body modeling procedure. Finally, the results indicate that TpMan undergoes a temperature-driven transition between conformational states without a significant disruption of its secondary structure. Our results suggest that the linker can optimize the geometry between the other two domains with respect to the substrate at high temperatures. These studies should provide a useful basis for future biophysical studies of entire TpMan. PMID:24671161

  17. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  18. Emulsifying and interfacial properties of vicilins: role of conformational flexibility at quaternary and/or tertiary levels.

    PubMed

    Liang, Han-Ni; Tang, Chuan-He

    2013-11-20

    Although the functionality of plant proteins (and soy proteins in particular) has been widely investigated in the last decades, the importance of conformational characteristics to their functionalities is still far away from being understood. The aim of the present work was to unravel the role of conformational flexibility at the quaternary and/or tertiary levels in the emulsifying and interfacial properties of phaseolin, an ideal vicilin (or 7S globulin) from red kidney bean. The conformational flexibility at quaternary and tertiary levels of phaseolin was modulated by urea with increasing concentrations from 0 to 8 M, as characterized by using dynamic light scattering (DLS), intrinsic fluorescence and derivative UV spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The emulsifying and interfacial properties, including emulsifying ability, flocculated state of oil droplets (in fresh emulsions), emulsion stability against creaming, and adsorption dynamics at the oil-water interface, were characterized at a specific protein concentration of 0.5% (w/v). The results indicated that increasing the urea concentration resulted in a progressive dissociation of trimeric phaseolin molecules into monomeric subunits, and even a structural unfolding of dissociated subunits; the urea-induced conformational changes at quaternary and/or tertiary levels were reversible, and the molecules at high urea concentrations shared similar structural features to the "molten globule state". On the other hand, increasing the urea concentration progressively improved the emulsifying ability of the protein, and flocculated extent of oil droplets in the fresh emulsions, but led to a progressive decrease in interfacial protein concentration. The improvement of the emulsifying ability was not related to diffusion (during initial adsorption) and penetration at the interface, but highly dependent on ease of structural rearrangement of the adsorbed proteins. These observations clearly

  19. Atomic structure of recombinant thaumatin II reveals flexible conformations in two residues critical for sweetness and three consecutive glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito

    2014-11-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein used as a sweetener, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although two major variants designated thaumatin I and thaumatin II exist in plants, there have been few dedicated thaumatin II structural studies and, to date, data beyond atomic resolution had not been obtained. To identify the detailed structural properties explaining why thaumatin elicits a sweet taste, the structure of recombinant thaumatin II was determined at the resolution of 0.99 Å. Atomic resolution structural analysis with riding hydrogen atoms illustrated the differences in the direction of the side-chains more precisely and the electron density maps of the C-terminal regions were markedly improved. Though it had been suggested that the three consecutive glycine residues (G142-G143-G144) have highly flexible conformations, G143, the central glycine residue was successfully modelled in two conformations for the first time. Furthermore, the side chain r.m.s.d. values for two residues (R67 and R82) critical for sweetness exhibited substantially higher values, suggesting that these residues are highly disordered. These results demonstrated that the flexible conformations in two critical residues favoring their interaction with sweet taste receptors are prominent features of the intensely sweet taste of thaumatin. PMID:25066915

  20. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) flexibly adjust their behaviour in order to maximize payoffs, not to conform to majorities.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Edwin J C; Cronin, Katherine A; Schütte, Sebastian; Call, Josep; Haun, Daniel B M

    2013-01-01

    Chimpanzees have been shown to be adept learners, both individually and socially. Yet, sometimes their conservative nature seems to hamper the flexible adoption of superior alternatives, even to the extent that they persist in using entirely ineffective strategies. In this study, we investigated chimpanzees' behavioural flexibility in two different conditions under which social animals have been predicted to abandon personal preferences and adopt alternative strategies: i) under influence of majority demonstrations (i.e. conformity), and ii) in the presence of superior reward contingencies (i.e. maximizing payoffs). Unlike previous nonhuman primate studies, this study disentangled the concept of conformity from the tendency to maintain one's first-learned strategy. Studying captive (n=16) and semi-wild (n=12) chimpanzees in two complementary exchange paradigms, we found that chimpanzees did not abandon their behaviour in order to match the majority, but instead remained faithful to their first-learned strategy (Study 1a and 1b). However, the chimpanzees' fidelity to their first-learned strategy was overridden by an experimental upgrade of the profitability of the alternative strategy (Study 2). We interpret our observations in terms of chimpanzees' relative weighing of behavioural options as a function of situation-specific trade-offs. More specifically, contrary to previous findings, chimpanzees in our study abandoned their familiar behaviour to maximize payoffs, but not to conform to a majority. PMID:24312252

  1. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) Flexibly Adjust Their Behaviour in Order to Maximize Payoffs, Not to Conform to Majorities

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, Edwin J. C.; Cronin, Katherine A.; Schütte, Sebastian; Call, Josep; Haun, Daniel B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Chimpanzees have been shown to be adept learners, both individually and socially. Yet, sometimes their conservative nature seems to hamper the flexible adoption of superior alternatives, even to the extent that they persist in using entirely ineffective strategies. In this study, we investigated chimpanzees’ behavioural flexibility in two different conditions under which social animals have been predicted to abandon personal preferences and adopt alternative strategies: i) under influence of majority demonstrations (i.e. conformity), and ii) in the presence of superior reward contingencies (i.e. maximizing payoffs). Unlike previous nonhuman primate studies, this study disentangled the concept of conformity from the tendency to maintain one’s first-learned strategy. Studying captive (n=16) and semi-wild (n=12) chimpanzees in two complementary exchange paradigms, we found that chimpanzees did not abandon their behaviour in order to match the majority, but instead remained faithful to their first-learned strategy (Study 1a and 1b). However, the chimpanzees’ fidelity to their first-learned strategy was overridden by an experimental upgrade of the profitability of the alternative strategy (Study 2). We interpret our observations in terms of chimpanzees’ relative weighing of behavioural options as a function of situation-specific trade-offs. More specifically, contrary to previous findings, chimpanzees in our study abandoned their familiar behaviour to maximize payoffs, but not to conform to a majority. PMID:24312252

  2. Influence of conformational flexibility on self-assembly and luminescence properties of lanthanide coordination polymers with flexible exo-bidentate biphenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanling; Dou, Wei; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Zang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Hongrui; Wang, Daqi

    2009-04-20

    To explore how nonplanar conformational distortions affect supramolecular self-assembly and properties of lanthanide complexes, we have designed and synthesized two new flexible exo-bidentate ligands derived from biphenol featuring two salicylamide pendant arms, 2,2'-bis{[(2'-benzylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]ethoxyl}-1,1'-biphenylene (L(I)) and 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-bis{[(2'-benzylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]ethoxyl}-1,1'-biphenylene (L(II)). These two structurally related ligands can have different conformations and are used for constructing diverse lanthanide polymers with interesting luminescence properties. Among two series of lanthanide nitrate complexes which have been characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, and IR spectroscopy, four new coordination polymers have been determined using X-ray diffraction analysis. The coordination polymer type {Ln(2)(NO(3))(6)(L(I))(3).3H(2)O}(infinity) (Ln = Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb or Dy) displays a two-dimensional honeycomb-like framework in the ab plane, which can be regarded as a (6,3) topological network with neodymium atoms acting as "three-connected" centers. In contrast, the coordination polymer types {[Nd(NO(3))(3)(L(II))(CH(3)OH)] x CH(3)OH}(infinity) and [Ln(NO(3))(3)(L(II))(C(2)H(5)OH)](infinity) (Ln = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb or Dy) possess single-stranded helix chains which can be further connected through intermolecular hydrogen bonds to form two-dimensional supramolecular sheets. The photophysical properties of trivalent Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy complexes at room temperature were investigated. The present work substantiates the claim that the supramolecular structure as well as the luminescence properties of the coordination polymer can be tuned by controlling the conformational distortion of a nonplanar flexible ligand in the supramolecular self-assembly. PMID:19290612

  3. Flexibility in the insulin receptor ectodomain enables docking of insulin in crystallographic conformation observed in a hormone-bound microreceptor.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Harish

    2014-01-01

    Insulin binding to the insulin receptor (IR) is the first key step in initiating downstream signaling cascades for glucose homeostasis in higher organisms. The molecular details of insulin recognition by IR are not yet completely understood, but a picture of hormone/receptor interactions at one of the epitopes (Site 1) is beginning to emerge from recent structural evidence. However, insulin-bound structures of truncated IR suggest that crystallographic conformation of insulin cannot be accommodated in the full IR ectodomain due to steric overlap of insulin with the first two type III fibronectin domains (F1 and F2), which are contributed to the insulin binding-pocket by the second subunit in the IR homodimer. A conformational change in the F1-F2 pair has thus been suggested. In this work, we present an all-atom structural model of complex of insulin and the IR ectodomain, where no structural overlap of insulin with the receptor domains (F1 and F2) is observed. This structural model was arrived at by flexibly fitting parts of our earlier insulin/IR all-atom model into the simulated density maps of crystallized constructs combined with conformational sampling from apo-IR solution conformations. Importantly, our experimentally-consistent model helps rationalize yet unresolved Site. PMID:25309993

  4. Protein Disorder: Conformational Distribution of the Flexible Linker in a Chimeric Double Cellulase

    PubMed Central

    von Ossowski, Ingemar; Eaton, Julian T.; Czjzek, Mirjam; Perkins, Stephen J.; Frandsen, Torben P.; Schülein, Martin; Panine, Pierre; Henrissat, Bernard; Receveur-Bréchot, Veronique

    2005-01-01

    The structural properties of the linker peptide connecting the cellulose-binding module to the catalytic module in bimodular cellulases have been investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering. Since the linker and the cellulose-binding module are relatively small and cannot be readily detected separately, the conformation of the linker was studied by means of an artificial fusion protein, Cel6BA, in which an 88-residue linker connects the large catalytic modules of the cellulases Cel6A and Cel6B from Humicola insolens. Our data showed that Cel6BA is very elongated with a maximum dimension of 178 Å, but could not be described by a single conformation. Modeling of a series of Cel6BA conformers with interdomain separations ranging between 10 Å and 130 Å showed that good Guinier and P(r) profile fits were obtained by a weighted average of the scattering curves of all the models where the linker follows a nonrandom distribution, with a preference for the more compact conformers. These structural properties are likely to be essential for the function of the linker as a molecular spring between the two functional modules. Small-angle x-ray scattering therefore provides a unique tool to quantitatively analyze the conformational disorder typical of proteins described as natively unfolded. PMID:15653742

  5. Donor-driven conformational flexibility in a real-life catalytic dicopper(ii) peroxo complex.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, A; Herres-Pawlis, S

    2016-03-01

    The conformers of the real-life tyrosinase model [Cu2O2{HC(3-tBuPz)2(Py)}2](2+) which displays catalytic hydroxylation reactivity were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) studies including second-order perturbation theory and charge decomposition analysis (CDA). We elucidated the donor competition between pyrazolyl and pyridinyl moieties and found that pyrazolyl units are the stronger donors in bis(pyrazolyl)pyridinylmethane copper complexes. Geometry optimisations and TD-DFT calculations on all conformers proved to be robust in the prediction of the experimental data: the XAS distances and both charge-transfer bands are well reproduced. The CDA analyses gave insights into the electronic structure of the real-life peroxo dicopper species. The donor interplay as well as the multitude of interactions within two prototypical conformers have now been dissected in detail for the first time for a catalytic real-life system without simplifications. We find that the N donor interactions to the core are extremely stabilising and that in the conformer with both pyrazolyl units in equatorial position, these interactions are more stabilising than the axial ones. In the conformer with pyridinyl/pyrazolyl equator, the picture is more mixed but the general trend keeps consistent. We relate the extraordinary catalytic activity of the [Cu2O2{HC(3-tBuPz)2(Py)}2](2+) system to the subtle interplay of the different donor moieties. PMID:26688471

  6. Drug-nucleic acid interactions: conformational flexibility at the intercalation site.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, H M; Neidle, S; Stodola, R K

    1978-01-01

    The conformational features of the intercalation site in polynucleotides were examined. We found that, for all the crystal structures of drug-dinucleoside complexes studied thus far, two torsion angles differ from those found in A RNA (phi and chi) and that alternate sugar puckering is not a prerequisite for intercalation. This intercalation geometry, which is the basis of helix axis displacement in a polymer, would necessitate conformational changes in the adjacent nucleotides. The base-turn angle is less sensitive to the conformation of the backbone than it is to small alterations in the base-pairing geometry. We postulate that this angle is dependent on the nature of the intercalating drug. PMID:273246

  7. Conformational flexibility of PPII-helix: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ping; Lei, Xiaoling; Gao, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Poly-proline fragments form the distinctive PPII-helix in a high percentage in proteins and peptides, which plays an important role in signal transduction and protein complex assembly. But why and how this helical structure works is still unknown. In this work, we applied the density functional calculations to investigate the different preferences of prolines on Cγ-endo and Cγ-exo conformers, in which non-covalent interactions play important roles. As a result, Cγ-exo conformers are favored for short-oligomers with stronger n → π* interaction formed by the backbone, while Cγ-endo conformers are favored for longer oligomers with stronger dipole interactions between side groups.

  8. Conformational Flexibility in the Flap Domains of Ligand-Free HIV Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Heaslet, H.; Rosenfeld, R.; Giffin, M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Tam, K.; Torbett, B.E.; Elder, J.H.; Stout, C.D.

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structures of wild-type HIV protease (HIV PR) in the absence of substrate or inhibitor in two related crystal forms at 1.4 and 2.15 {angstrom} resolution are reported. In one crystal form HIV PR adopts an 'open' conformation with a 7.7 {angstrom} separation between the tips of the flaps in the homodimer. In the other crystal form the tips of the flaps are 'curled' towards the 80s loop, forming contacts across the local twofold axis. The 2.3 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a sixfold mutant of HIV PR in the absence of substrate or inhibitor is also reported. The mutant HIV PR, which evolved in response to treatment with the potent inhibitor TL-3, contains six point mutations relative to the wild-type enzyme (L24I, M46I, F53L, L63P, V77I, V82A). In this structure the flaps also adopt a 'curled' conformation, but are separated and not in contact. Comparison of the apo structures to those with TL-3 bound demonstrates the extent of conformational change induced by inhibitor binding, which includes reorganization of the packing between twofold-related flaps. Further comparison with six other apo HIV PR structures reveals that the 'open' and 'curled' conformations define two distinct families in HIV PR. These conformational states include hinge motion of residues at either end of the flaps, opening and closing the entire {beta}-loop, and translational motion of the flap normal to the dimer twofold axis and relative to the 80s loop. The alternate conformations also entail changes in the {beta}-turn at the tip of the flap. These observations provide insight into the plasticity of the flap domains, the nature of their motions and their critical role in binding substrates and inhibitors.

  9. Comprehensive Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry Reveals Parallel Orientation and Flexible Conformations of Plant HOP2-MND1.

    PubMed

    Rampler, Evelyn; Stranzl, Thomas; Orban-Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Hollenstein, David Maria; Hudecz, Otto; Schloegelhofer, Peter; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-12-01

    The HOP2-MND1 heterodimer is essential for meiotic homologous recombination in plants and other eukaryotes and promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We investigated the conformational flexibility of HOP2-MND1, important for understanding the mechanistic details of the heterodimer, with chemical cross-linking in combination with mass spectrometry (XL-MS). The final XL-MS workflow encompassed the use of complementary cross-linkers, quenching, digestion, size exclusion enrichment, and HCD-based LC-MS/MS detection prior to data evaluation. We applied two different homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linkers (DSS and BS(2)G) and one zero-length heterobifunctional cross-linker (EDC). Cross-linked peptides of four biological replicates were analyzed prior to 3D structure prediction by protein threading and protein-protein docking for cross-link-guided molecular modeling. Miniaturization of the size-exclusion enrichment step reduced the required starting material, led to a high amount of cross-linked peptides, and allowed the analysis of replicates. The major interaction site of HOP2-MND1 was identified in the central coiled-coil domains, and an open colinear parallel arrangement of HOP2 and MND1 within the complex was predicted. Moreover, flexibility of the C-terminal capping helices of both complex partners was observed, suggesting the coexistence of a closed complex conformation in solution. PMID:26535604

  10. Conformational Flexibility of Soluble Cellulose Oligomers: Chain Length and Temperature Dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structures, dynamics, and stabilities of different sized cellulosic oligomers need to be considered when designing enzymatic cocktails for the conversion of biomass to biofuels since they can be both productive substrates and inhibitors of the overall process. In the present work, the conformational...

  11. Conformer-specific vibronic spectroscopy and vibronic coupling in a flexible bichromophore: Bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Chirantha P.; Müller, Christian W.; Pillsbury, Nathan R.; James, William H.; Plusquellic, David F.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2011-04-01

    The vibronic spectroscopy of jet-cooled bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)methane has been explored using fluorescence excitation, dispersed fluorescence (DFL), UV-UV hole-burning, UV depletion, and fluorescence-dip infrared spectroscopies. Calculations predict the presence of three nearly isoenergetic conformers that differ in the orientations of the two OH groups in the para positions on the two aromatic rings (labeled uu, dd, and ud). In practice, two conformers (labeled A and B) are observed, with S0-S1 origins at 35 184 and 35 209 cm-1, respectively. The two conformers have nearly identical vibronic spectra and hydride stretch infrared spectra. The low-frequency vibronic structure is assigned to bands involving the phenyl torsions (T and bar T), ring-flapping (R and bar R), and butterfly (β) modes. Symmetry arguments lead to a tentative assignment of the two conformers as the C2 symmetric uu and dd conformers. The S0-S2 origins are assigned to bands located 132 cm-1 above the S0-S1 origins of both conformers. DFL spectra from the S2 origin of the two conformers display extensive evidence for vibronic coupling between the two close-lying electronic states. Near-resonant coupling from the S2 origin occurs dominantly to S1 bar R^1 and S1 bar R^1 β ^1 levels, which are located -15 and +31 cm-1 from it. Unusual vibronic activity in the ring-breathing (ν1) and ring-deformation (ν6a) modes is also attributed to vibronic coupling involving these Franck-Condon active modes. A multimode vibronic coupling model is developed based on earlier theoretical descriptions of molecular dimers [Fulton and Gouterman, J. Chem. Phys. 35, 1059 (1961)] and applied here to flexible bichromophores. The model is able to account for the ring-mode activity under conditions in which the S2 origin is strongly mixed (60%/40%) with S1 overline {6a} ^1 and bar 1^1 levels. The direct extension of this model to the T /bar T and R /bar R inter-ring mode pairs is only partially successful and required some

  12. Pax-3-DNA interaction: flexibility in the DNA binding and induction of DNA conformational changes by paired domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chalepakis, G; Wijnholds, J; Gruss, P

    1994-01-01

    The mouse Pax-3 gene encodes a protein that is a member of the Pax family of DNA binding proteins. Pax-3 contains two DNA binding domains: a paired domain (PD) and a paired type homeodomain (HD). Both domains are separated by 53 amino acids and interact synergistically with a sequence harboring an ATTA motif (binding to the HD) and a GTTCC site (binding to the PD) separated by 5 base pairs. Here we show that the interaction of Pax-3 with these two binding sites is independent of their angular orientation. In addition, the protein spacer region between the HD and the PD can be shortened without changing the spatial flexibility of the two DNA binding domains which interact with DNA. Furthermore, by using circular permutation analysis we determined that binding of Pax-3 to a DNA fragment containing a specific binding site causes conformational changes in the DNA, as indicated by the different mobilities of the Pax-3-DNA complexes. The ability to change the conformation of the DNA was found to be an intrinsic property of the Pax-3 PD and of all Pax proteins that we tested so far. These in vitro studies suggest that interaction of Pax proteins with their specific sequences in vivo may result in an altered DNA conformation. Images PMID:8065927

  13. Anthrax Edema Factor: An Ion-Adaptive Mechanism of Catalysis with Increased Transition-State Conformational Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Jara, Gabriel E; Martínez, Leandro

    2016-07-14

    Edema Factor (EF) is one of three major toxins of anthrax. EF is an adenylyl cyclase that disrupts cell signaling by accelerating the conversion of ATP into cyclic-AMP. EF has a much higher catalytic rate than that of mammalian adenylyl cyclases (mACs). Crystal structures were obtained for mACs and EF, but the molecular basis for different catalytic activities remained poorly understood. In particular, the arrangement of the active site in EF is unclear in what concerns the number of ions present and the conformation of the substrate. Here, we use quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the free-energy profiles for the reaction catalyzed by EF and a mAC. We found that EF catalysis is possible, and faster than that of mACs, in both one and two Mg(2+)-ion-binding modes, providing adaptive plasticity to host-cell environments. In both enzymes, the reaction mechanisms are highly associative. However, mechanistic differences exist. In the mAC, the nucleophile oxygen (ATP-O3') is consistently coordinated to one of the Mg(2+) ions, increasing its acidity. In EF, on the other hand, this coordination is eventual and not essential for the reaction to proceed. The persistent coordination of O3' to the ion is favored in mACs by a greater ion partial charge. In EF, the reduced acidity of the O3' oxygen is compensated by the presence of the His351 residue for proton abstraction. As proton transfer in EF does not require persistent attachment of the substrate to an ion, the substrate (ATP) and transition state display greater conformational flexibilities. These greater flexibilities allow the sampling of lower-energy conformations and might represent an entropic advantage for catalytic efficiency. PMID:27260163

  14. Ultra-flexible multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber for conformal geometry applications.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Riad; Guillet, Jean Paul; de Miollis, Frédérick; Mounaix, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Standard optical lithography relying on clean room and microelectronic facilities is used to fabricate a thin-flexible metamaterial absorber, designed to operate at submillimeter wavelengths over the 0.1-1 THz frequency band. Large terahertz absorption has been demonstrated numerically and through experimental measurements with a maximum level of about 80%. We put emphasis in this present work on the use of single-sized "meta-cells" to achieve multiple absorption peaks. Furthermore, the use of a thin-flexible dielectric spacer makes it promising for stealth technology applications in order to disguise objects and make them less visible to radar and other detection methods. PMID:24281490

  15. Crystal structure and conformational flexibility of the unligated FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; LeMaster, David M.; Li, Zhong; Héroux, Annie; Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda

    2014-03-01

    Two crystal forms of unligated FKBP12.6 exhibit multiple conformations in the active site and in the 80s loop, the primary site for known protein-recognition interactions. The previously unreported NMR backbone assignment of FKBP12.6 revealed extensive doubling of amide resonances, which reflects a slow conformational transition centered in the 80s loop. The primary known physiological function of FKBP12.6 involves its role in regulating the RyR2 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} channels in cardiac muscle, pancreatic β islets and the central nervous system. With only a single previously reported X-ray structure of FKBP12.6, bound to the immunosuppressant rapamycin, structural inferences for this protein have been drawn from the more extensive studies of the homologous FKBP12. X-ray structures at 1.70 and 1.90 Å resolution from P2{sub 1} and P3{sub 1}21 crystal forms are reported for an unligated cysteine-free variant of FKBP12.6 which exhibit a notable diversity of conformations. In one monomer from the P3{sub 1}21 crystal form, the aromatic ring of Phe59 at the base of the active site is rotated perpendicular to its typical orientation, generating a steric conflict for the immunosuppressant-binding mode. The peptide unit linking Gly89 and Val90 at the tip of the protein-recognition ‘80s loop’ is flipped in the P2{sub 1} crystal form. Unlike the >30 reported FKBP12 structures, the backbone conformation of this loop closely follows that of the first FKBP domain of FKBP51. The NMR resonances for 21 backbone amides of FKBP12.6 are doubled, corresponding to a slow conformational transition centered near the tip of the 80s loop, as recently reported for 31 amides of FKBP12. The comparative absence of doubling for residues along the opposite face of the active-site pocket in FKBP12.6 may in part reflect attenuated structural coupling owing to increased conformational plasticity around the Phe59 ring.

  16. Conformational diversity of flexible ligand in metal-organic frameworks controlled by size-matching mixed ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Xiu-Ni; Qin, Lan; Yan, Xiao-Zhi; Yu, Lei; Xie, Yi-Xin; Han, Lei

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of N-auxiliary flexible exo-bidentate ligand 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (bpp) and carboxylates ligands naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H2ndc) or 4,4‧-(hydroxymethylene)dibenzoic acid (H2hmdb), in the presence of cadmium(II) salts have given rise to two novel metal-organic frameworks based on flexible ligands (FL-MOFs), namely, [Cd2(2,6-ndc)2(bpp)(DMF)]·2DMF (1) and [Cd3(hmdb)3(bpp)]·2DMF·2EtOH (2) (DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compound 1 exhibits a three-dimensional self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster second building unit. Compound 2 displays an infinite three-dimensional 'Lucky Clover' shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster and V-shaped organic linkers. The flexible bpp ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which are successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process.

  17. Structure of inorganic pyrophosphatase from Staphylococcus aureus reveals conformational flexibility of the active site.

    PubMed

    Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Zhang, Xinyi; Wei, Yinan; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPiase) is an enzyme essential for survival of organisms, from bacteria to human. PPiases are divided into two structurally distinct families: family I PPiases are Mg(2+)-dependent and present in most archaea, eukaryotes and prokaryotes, whereas the relatively less understood family II PPiases are Mn(2+)-dependent and present only in some archaea, bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a dangerous pathogen and a frequent cause of hospital infections, contains a family II PPiase (PpaC), which is an attractive potential target for development of novel antibacterial agents. We determined a crystal structure of SA PpaC in complex with catalytic Mn(2+) at 2.1Å resolution. The active site contains two catalytic Mn(2+) binding sites, each half-occupied, reconciling the previously observed 1:1 Mn(2+):enzyme stoichiometry with the presence of two divalent metal ion sites in the apo-enzyme. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of the substrate or products in the active site, the two domains of SA PpaC form a closed active site, a conformation observed in structures of other family II PPiases only in complex with substrate or product mimics. A region spanning residues 295-298, which contains a conserved substrate binding RKK motif, is flipped out of the active site, an unprecedented conformation for a PPiase. Because the mutant of Arg295 to an alanine is devoid of activity, this loop likely undergoes an induced-fit conformational change upon substrate binding and product dissociation. This closed conformation of SA PPiase may serve as an attractive target for rational design of inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:25576794

  18. Photo-induced conformational flexibility in single solution-phase peridinin-chlorophyll-proteins.

    PubMed

    Bockenhauer, Samuel D; Moerner, W E

    2013-09-01

    The peridinin-chlorophyll-protein (PCP) is an accessory light-harvesting complex found in red-tide dinoflagellates. PCP absorbs photons primarily in the blue-green spectral region via peridinin (Per) carotenoid pigments which then transfer excitations to chlorophyll (Chl) and ultimately downstream to photosystem II (PSII). Whereas the ultrafast dynamics of PCP are well-studied, much less is known about slower protein dynamics on time scales of milliseconds and seconds. Previous single-molecule studies of spectral emission and intensity have attached PCP to surfaces, but the native environment of PCP is in the lumen, meaning that a surface-attached environment could perturb its native conformations. To address this concern, we use the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap to study single PCP monomers in solution for several seconds each. We measure, for the first time, simultaneous single-molecule intensity, lifetime, and spectral emission shifts for each trapped PCP monomer. The rate of reversible spectral redshifts depends linearly on irradiance over a factor of 30, indicating a light-induced mechanism which we attribute to a protein conformational change. Independent of these spectral shifts, our measurements of intensity and lifetime show reversible Chl quenching. In contrast to previous work, we show that this quenching cannot result from isolated photobleaching of Chl. These independent mechanisms arise from distinct conformational changes which maintain relatively stable fluorescence emission. PMID:23919352

  19. Molecular structure and pronounced conformational flexibility of doxorubicin in free and conjugated state within a drug-peptide compound.

    PubMed

    Tsoneva, Yana; Jonker, Hendrik R A; Wagner, Manfred; Tadjer, Alia; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Ivanova, Anela

    2015-02-19

    The search for targeted drug delivery systems requires the design of drug-carrier complexes, which could both reach the malignant cells and preserve the therapeutic substance activity. A promising strategy aimed at enhancing the uptake and reducing the systemic toxicity is to bind covalently the drug to a cell-penetrating peptide. To understand the structure-activity relationship in such preparations, the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin was investigated by unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations, supported by NMR, which yielded its molecular geometry in aqueous environment. Furthermore, the structure and dynamics of a conjugate of the drug with a cell-penetrating peptide was obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution. The geometries of the unbound compounds were characterized at different temperatures, as well as the extent to which they change after covalent binding and whether/how they influence each other in the drug-peptide conjugate. The main structural fragments that affect the conformational ensemble of every molecule were found. The results show that the transitions between different substructures of the three compounds require a modest amount of energy. At increased temperature, either more conformations become populated as a result of the thermal fluctuations or the relative shares of the various conformers equalize at the nanosecond scale. These frequent structural interconversions suggest expressed conformational freedom of the molecules. Conjugation into the drug-peptide compound partially immobilizes the molecules of the parent compounds. Nevertheless, flexibility still exists, as well as an effective intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding that stabilizes the structures. We observe compact packing of the drug within the peptide that is also based on stacking interactions. All this outlines the drug-peptide conjugate as a prospective building block of a more complex drug-carrier system. PMID:25603129

  20. Method of Making Large Area Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, Alvin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method which enables the high speed formation of nanostructures on large area surfaces is described. The method uses a super sub-micron beam writer (Supersebter). The Supersebter uses a large area multi-electrode (Spindt type emitter source) to produce multiple electron beams simultaneously scanned to form a pattern on a surface in an electron beam writer. A 100,000 x 100,000 array of electron point sources, demagnified in a long electron beam writer to simultaneously produce 10 billion nano-patterns on a 1 meter squared surface by multi-electron beam impact on a 1 cm squared surface of an insulating material is proposed.

  1. Conformational Flexibility and Peptide Interaction of the Translocation ATPase SecA

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jochen; Rapoport, Tom A.; Harvard-Med

    2010-09-21

    The SecA ATPase forms a functional complex with the protein-conducting SecY channel to translocate polypeptides across the bacterial cell membrane. SecA recognizes the translocation substrate and catalyzes its unidirectional movement through the SecY channel. The recent crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima SecA-SecYEG complex shows the ATPase in a conformation where the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) have closed around a bound ADP-BeFx complex and SecA's polypeptide-binding clamp is shut. Here, we present the crystal structure of T. maritima SecA in isolation, determined in its ADP-bound form at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. SecA alone has a drastically different conformation in which the nucleotide-binding pocket between NBD1 and NBD2 is open and the preprotein cross-linking domain has rotated away from both NBDs, thereby opening the polypeptide-binding clamp. To investigate how this clamp binds polypeptide substrates, we also determined a structure of Bacillus subtilis SecA in complex with a peptide at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. This structure shows that the peptide augments the highly conserved {beta}-sheet at the back of the clamp. Taken together, these structures suggest a mechanism by which ATP hydrolysis can lead to polypeptide translocation.

  2. Structure analysis and catalytic property of a microporous framework based on a flexible tripodal ligand with novel conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xianju; Zhang, Xinhai; Li, Xiaoxia; Hou, Hongwei; Fan, Yaoting

    2011-06-01

    A microporous metal-organic framework {[Cu 3Cl 6(ttmb) 4]·6H 2O} n ( 1) (ttmb = 1,3,5-tris(1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)-benzene) with tetranodal (3,4)-connected topological type was prepared by the self-assembly reaction of the flexible tripodal ligand ttmb with CuCl 2·2H 2O. The ligand exhibits two infrequent coordination conformations in complex 1, and the framework has a large pore volume (remove the solvent molecules) of 1781.6 Å 3 (36.3% of the total). The test of 1 as the catalyst in the oxidative coupling reaction of 2,6-dimethylphenol indicates that it is catalytically active by showing high conversion of DMP under the optimized reaction condition.

  3. Large area space solar cell assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Nowlan, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a large area space solar cell assembly is presented. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are (1) use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and (2) integration of coverglass application and call fabrication.

  4. The Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    A Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE) was undertaken to prove out an economically important application of remote sensing from space. The experiment focused upon determination of wheat acreages in the U.S. Great Plains and upon the development and testing of yield models. The results and conclusions are presented.

  5. PEDOT-CNT-Coated Low-Impedance, Ultra-Flexible, and Brain-Conformable Micro-ECoG Arrays.

    PubMed

    Castagnola, Elisa; Maiolo, Luca; Maggiolini, Emma; Minotti, Antonio; Marrani, Marco; Maita, Francesco; Pecora, Alessandro; Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Ansaldo, Alberto; Boffini, Massimiliano; Fadiga, Luciano; Fortunato, Guglielmo; Ricci, Davide

    2015-05-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG) is becoming a common tool for clinical applications, such as preparing patients for epilepsy surgery or localizing tumor boundaries, as it successfully balances invasiveness and information quality. Clinical ECoG arrays use millimeter-scale electrodes and centimeter-scale pitch and cannot precisely map neural activity. Higher-resolution electrodes are of interest for both current clinical applications, providing access to more precise neural activity localization and novel applications, such as neural prosthetics, where current information density and spatial resolution is insufficient to suitably decode signals for a chronic brain-machine interface. Developing such electrodes is not trivial because their small contact area increases the electrode impedance, which seriously affects the signal-to-noise ratio, and adhering such an electrode to the brain surface becomes critical. The most straightforward approach requires increasing the array conformability with flexible substrates while improving the electrode performance using materials with superior electrochemical properties. In this paper, we propose an ultra-flexible and conformable polyimide-based micro-ECoG array of submillimeter recording sites electrochemically coated with high surface area conductive polymer-carbon nanotube composites to improve their brain-electrical coupling capabilities. We characterized our devices both electrochemically and by recording from rat somatosensory cortex in vivo. The performance of the coated and uncoated electrodes was directly compared by simultaneously recording the same neuronal activity during multiwhisker deflection stimulation. Finally, we assessed the effect of electrode size on the extraction of somatosensory evoked potentials and found that in contrast to the normal high-impedance microelectrodes, the recording capabilities of our low-impedance microelectrodes improved upon reducing their size from 0.2 to 0.1 mm. PMID:25073174

  6. Body conformal antennas for superficial hyperthermia: the impact of bending contact flexible microstrip applicators on their electromagnetic behavior.

    PubMed

    Correia, Davi; Kok, H Petra; de Greef, Martijn; Bel, Arjan; van Wieringen, Niek; Crezee, Johannes

    2009-12-01

    Hyperthermia is a powerful radiosensitizer for treatment of superficial tumors. This requires body conformal antennas with a power distribution as homogeneous as possible over the skin area. The contact flexible microstrip applicators (CFMA) operating at 434 MHz exist in several sizes, including the large size 3H and 5H. This paper investigates the behavior of the electromagnetic fields for the 3H and 5H CFMA in both flat and curved configurations, and the impact on performance parameters like the penetration depth (PD) and the effective heating depth (EHD). The underlying theory behind the electromagnetic behavior in curved situations is presented as well as numerical simulations of both flat and curved configurations. The results are compared to measurements of the electromagnetic field distributions in a cylindrical patient model. Due to their large size multimode solutions may exist, and our results confirm their existence. These multimode solutions affect both the power distribution and PD/EHD, with a dependence on applicator curvature. Therefore, the performance parameters like PD and EHD need to be carefully assessed when bending large size CFMA applicators to conform to the patient body. This conclusion also holds for other types of large size surface current applicators. PMID:19695983

  7. Kalata B8, a novel antiviral circular protein, exhibits conformational flexibility in the cystine knot motif.

    PubMed

    Daly, Norelle L; Clark, Richard J; Plan, Manuel R; Craik, David J

    2006-02-01

    The cyclotides are a family of circular proteins with a range of biological activities and potential pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. The biosynthetic mechanism of cyclization is unknown and the discovery of novel sequences may assist in achieving this goal. In the present study, we have isolated a new cyclotide from Oldenlandia affinis, kalata B8, which appears to be a hybrid of the two major subfamilies (Möbius and bracelet) of currently known cyclotides. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of kalata B8 and observed broadening of resonances directly involved in the cystine knot motif, suggesting flexibility in this region despite it being the core structural element of the cyclotides. The cystine knot motif is widespread throughout Nature and inherently stable, making this apparent flexibility a surprising result. Furthermore, there appears to be isomerization of the peptide backbone at an Asp-Gly sequence in the region involved in the cyclization process. Interestingly, such isomerization has been previously characterized in related cyclic knottins from Momordica cochinchinensis that have no sequence similarity to kalata B8 apart from the six conserved cysteine residues and may result from a common mechanism of cyclization. Kalata B8 also provides insight into the structure-activity relationships of cyclotides as it displays anti-HIV activity but lacks haemolytic activity. The 'uncoupling' of these two activities has not previously been observed for the cyclotides and may be related to the unusual hydrophilic nature of the peptide. PMID:16207177

  8. Stabilizing a flexible interdomain hinge region harboring the SMB binding site drives uPAR into its closed conformation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai; Luo, Zhipu; Li, Rui; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Sidenius, Nicolai; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael

    2015-03-27

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a multidomain glycolipid-anchored membrane protein, which facilitates extracellular matrix remodeling by focalizing plasminogen activation to cell surfaces via its high-affinity interaction with uPA. The modular assembly of its three LU (Ly6/uPAR-like) domains is inherently flexible and binding of uPA drives uPAR into its closed conformation, which presents the higher-affinity state for vitronectin thus providing an allosteric regulatory mechanism. Using a new class of epitope-mapped anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), we now demonstrate that the reciprocal stabilization is indeed also possible. By surface plasmon resonance studies, we show that these mAbs and vitronectin have overlapping binding sites on uPAR and that they share Arg91 as hotspot residue in their binding interfaces. The crystal structure solved for one of these uPAR·mAb complexes at 3.0Å clearly shows that this mAb preselects the closed uPAR conformation with an empty but correctly assembled large hydrophobic binding cavity for uPA. Accordingly, these mAbs inhibit the uPAR-dependent lamellipodia formation and migration on vitronectin-coated matrices irrespective of the conformational status of uPAR and its occupancy with uPA. This is the first study to the best of our knowledge, showing that the dynamic assembly of the three LU domains in uPARwt can be driven toward the closed form by an external ligand, which is not engaging the hydrophobic uPA binding cavity. As this binding interface is also exploited by the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin, therefore, this relationship should be taken into consideration when exploring uPAR-dependent cell adhesion and migration in vitronectin-rich environments. PMID:25659907

  9. Probing the ATP-induced conformational flexibility of the PcrA helicase protein using molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Mhashal, Anil R; Choudhury, Chandan Kumar; Roy, Sudip

    2016-03-01

    Helicases are enzymes that unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into its single-stranded components. It is important to understand the binding and unbinding of ATP from the active sites of helicases, as this knowledge can be used to elucidate the functionality of helicases during the unwinding of dsDNA. In this work, we investigated the unbinding of ATP and its effect on the active-site residues of the helicase PcrA using molecular dynamic simulations. To mimic the unbinding process of ATP from the active site of the helicase, we simulated the application of an external force that pulls ATP from the active site and computed the free-energy change during this process. We estimated an energy cost of ~85 kJ/mol for the transformation of the helicase from the ATP-bound state (1QHH) to the ATP-free state (1PJR). Unbinding led to conformational changes in the residues of the protein at the active site. Some of the residues at the ATP-binding site were significantly reoriented when the ATP was pulled. We observed a clear competition between reorientation of the residues and energy stabilization by hydrogen bonds between the ATP and active-site residues. We also checked the flexibility of the PcrA protein using a principal component analysis of domain motion. We found that the ATP-free state of the helicase is more flexible than the ATP-bound state. PMID:26860503

  10. Heteroligand molecular "stirrups" using conformationally flexible ditopic pyridyl-pyrazolyl ligands.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinzhen; Turner, David R; Harding, Lindsay P; Batten, Stuart R

    2009-08-17

    Heteroligand molecular "stirrups" form by the self-assembly of flexible ditopic ligands in combination with 4,4'-bipyridine and [(dppp)Pd)](2+). Crystallographic analysis shows that the ligands, bis[3-(4-pyridyl)pyrazolyl]-m-xylene (mXy(4py3pz)) and bis[4-(4-pyridyl)pyrazolyl]-p-xylene (pXy(4py4pz)) form complexes of the type [{(dppp)Pd}(2)(4,4'-bipy)(L)].4OTf (1.4OTf and 2.4OTf, respectively) in the solid state, with remarkably similar structures considering the differences in substitution patterns between the two ligands. The self-assembly of both 1(4+) and 2(4+) is assisted by face-to-face pi interactions on the exterior of the macrocycle between the phenyl rings of the dppp ligands and the pyridyl groups of the ditopic ligands. PMID:19594137

  11. Conformational flexibility in designing peptides for immunology: the molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Stavrakoudis, Athanassios

    2010-09-01

    Computational modeling techniques and computer simulations have become a routine in biological sciences and have gained great attention from researchers. Molecular dynamics simulation is a valuable tool towards an understanding of the complex structure of biological systems, especially in the study of the flexibility of the biological molecules such as peptides or proteins. Peptides play a very important role in human physiology and control many of the processes involved in the immune system response. Designing new and optimal peptide vaccines is one of the hottest challenges of the 21(st) century science and it brings together researchers from different fields. Molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be a helpful tool assisting laboratory work, saving financial sources and opening possibilities for exploring properties of the molecular systems that are hardly accessible by conventional experimental methods. Present review is dedicated to the recent contributions in applications of molecular dynamics simulations in peptide design for immunological purposes, such as B or T cell epitopes. PMID:20412039

  12. Large area nanostructured arrays: optical properties of metallic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Katja; Hojati-Talemi, Pejman; Bishop, Matthew; Zuber, Kamil; Murphy, Peter; Evans, Drew

    2013-05-01

    In this study, large area metallic nanotube arrays on flexible plastic substrates are produced by templating the growth of a cosputtered alloy using anodized aluminum oxide membranes. These nanotube arrays are prepared over large areas (ca. squared centimeters) by reducing the residual stress within the thin multilayered structure. The nanotubes are approximately 20 nm in inner diameter, having walls of <10 nm in thickness, and are arranged in a close packed configuration. Optically the nanotube arrays exhibit light trapping behavior (not plasmonic), where the reflectivity is less than 15% across the visible spectra compared to >40% for a flat sample using the same alloy. When the nanotubes are exposed to high relative humidity, they spontaneously fill, with a concomitant change in their visual appearance. The filling of the nanotubes is confirmed using contact angle measurements, with the nanotubes displaying a strong hydrophilic character compared to the weak behavior of the flat sample. The ability to easily fabricate large area nanotube arrays which display exotic behavior paves the way for their uptake in real world applications such as sensors and solar energy devices. PMID:23582083

  13. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P.F.; Cameron, R.A.; Digel, S.W.; Thompson, D.J.; Wood, K.S.

    2007-01-03

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  14. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P. F.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  15. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Wood, K. S.

    2006-01-01

    Because gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies, the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority needs include: (1) radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar flare measurements; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for unidentified gamma-ray sources. Work on the first three of these activities is needed before launch. The GLAST Large Area Telescope is an international effort, with U.S. funding provided by the Department of Energy and NASA.

  16. Large area damage testing of optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, L.; Kozlowski, M.; Stolz, C.

    1996-04-26

    The damage threshold specifications for the National Ignition Facility will include a mixture of standard small-area tests and new large-area tests. During our studies of laser damage and conditioning processes of various materials we have found that some damage morphologies are fairly small and this damage does not grow with further illumination. This type of damage might not be detrimental to the laser performance. We should therefore assume that some damage can be allowed on the optics, but decide on a maximum damage allowance of damage. A new specification of damage threshold termed {open_quotes}functional damage threshold{close_quotes} was derived. Further correlation of damage size and type to system performance must be determined in order to use this measurement, but it is clear that it will be a large factor in the optics performance specifications. Large-area tests have verified that small-area testing is not always sufficient when the optic in question has defect-initiated damage. This was evident for example on sputtered polarizer and mirror coatings where the defect density was low enough that the features could be missed by standard small- area testing. For some materials, the scale-length at which damage non-uniformities occur will effect the comparison of small-area and large-area tests. An example of this was the sub-aperture tests on KD*P crystals on the Beamlet test station. The tests verified the large-area damage threshold to be similar to that found when testing a small-area. Implying that for this KD*P material, the dominate damage mechanism is of sufficiently small scale-length that small-area testing is capable of determining the threshold. The Beamlet test station experiments also demonstrated the use of on-line laser conditioning to increase the crystals damage threshold.

  17. Large-area thin-film modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyan, Y. S.; Perez-Albuerne, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    The low cost potential of thin film solar cells can only be fully realized if large area modules can be made economically with good production yields. This paper deals with two of the critical challenges. A scheme is presented which allows the simple, economical realization of the long recognized, preferred module structure of monolithic integration. Another scheme reduces the impact of shorting defects and, as a result, increases the production yields. Analytical results demonstrating the utilization and advantages of such schemes are discussed.

  18. The Structural Basis for Peptidomimetic Inhibition of Eukaryotic Ribonucleotide Reductase: A Conformationally Flexible Pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hai; Fairman, James W.; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; Kreischer, Nathan R.; LaMacchia, John; Helmbrecht, Elizabeth; Cooperman, Barry S.; Dealwis, Chris

    2008-08-19

    Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductase (RR) catalyzes nucleoside diphosphate conversion to deoxynucleoside diphosphate. Crucial for rapidly dividing cells, RR is a target for cancer therapy. RR activity requires formation of a complex between subunits R1 and R2 in which the R2 C-terminal peptide binds to R1. Here we report crystal structures of heterocomplexes containing mammalian R2 C-terminal heptapeptide, P7 (Ac-{sup 1}FTLDADF{sup 7}) and its peptidomimetic P6 ({sup 1}Fmoc(Me)PhgLDChaDF{sup 7}) bound to Saccharomyces cerevisiae R1 (ScR1). P7 and P6, both of which inhibit ScRR, each bind at two contiguous sites containing residues that are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Such binding is quite distinct from that reported for prokaryotes. The Fmoc group in P6 peptide makes several hydrophobic interactions that contribute to its enhanced potency in binding to ScR1. Combining all of our results, we observe three distinct conformations for peptide binding to ScR1. These structures provide pharmacophores for designing highly potent nonpeptide class I RR inhibitors.

  19. Cwp84, a Clostridium difficile cysteine protease, exhibits conformational flexibility in the absence of its propeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, William J.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2015-02-19

    Two structures of Cwp84, a cysteine protease from the S-layer of C. difficile, are presented after propeptide cleavage. They reveal the movement of three loops, two in the active-site groove and one on the surface of the lectin-like domain, exposing a hydrophobic pocket. In recent decades, the global healthcare problems caused by Clostridium difficile have increased at an alarming rate. A greater understanding of this antibiotic-resistant bacterium, particularly with respect to how it interacts with the host, is required for the development of novel strategies for fighting C. difficile infections. The surface layer (S-layer) of C. difficile is likely to be of significant importance to host–pathogen interactions. The mature S-layer is formed by a proteinaceous array consisting of multiple copies of a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight S-layer protein. These components result from the cleavage of SlpA by Cwp84, a cysteine protease. The structure of a truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant has recently been reported and the key features have been identified, providing the first structural insights into the role of Cwp84 in the formation of the S-layer. Here, two structures of Cwp84 after propeptide cleavage are presented and the three conformational changes that are observed are discussed. These changes result in a reconfiguration of the active site and exposure of the hydrophobic pocket.

  20. The Role of Conformational Flexibility on Protein Supercharging in Native Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Harry J.; Cassou, Catherine A.; Trnka, Michael J.; Burlingame, A. L.; Krantz, Bryan A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of covalent intramolecular bonds, either native disulfide bridges or chemical crosslinks, on ESI supercharging of proteins from aqueous solutions were investigated. Chemically modifying cytochrome c with up to seven crosslinks or ubiquitin with up to two crosslinks did not affect the average or maximum charge states of these proteins in the absence of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), but the extent of supercharging induced by m-NBA increased with decreasing numbers of crosslinks. For the model random coil polypeptide reduced/alkylated RNase A, a decrease in charging with increasing m-NBA concentration attributable to reduced surface tension of the ESI droplet was observed, whereas native RNase A electrosprayed from these same solutions exhibited enhanced charging. The inverse relationship between the extent of supercharging and the number of intramolecular crosslinks for folded proteins, as well as the absence of supercharging for proteins that are random coils in aqueous solution, indicate that conformational restrictions induced by the crosslinks reduce the extent of supercharging. These results provide additional evidence that protein and protein complex supercharging from aqueous solution is primarily due to partial or significant unfolding that occurs as a result of chemical and/or thermal denaturation induced by the supercharging reagent late in the ESI droplet lifetime. PMID:21399817

  1. Incorporating protein conformational flexibility into the calculation of pH-dependent protein properties.

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, E G; Gunner, M R

    1997-01-01

    A method for combining calculations of residue pKa's with changes in the position of polar hydrogens has been developed. The Boltzmann distributions of proton positions in hydroxyls and neutral titratable residues are found in the same Monte Carlo sampling procedure that determines the amino acid ionization states at each pH. Electrostatic, Lennard-Jones potentials, and torsion angle energies are considered at each proton position. Many acidic and basic residues are found to have significant electrostatic interactions with either a water- or hydroxyl-containing side chain. Protonation state changes are coupled to reorientation of the neighboring hydroxyl dipoles, resulting in smaller free energy differences between neutral and ionized residues than when the protein is held rigid. Multiconformation pH titration gives better agreement with the experimental pKa's for triclinic hen egg lysozyme than conventional rigid protein calculations. The hydroxyl motion significantly increases the protein dielectric response, making it sensitive to the composition of the local protein structure. More than one conformer per residue is often found at a given pH, providing information about the distribution of low-energy lysozyme structures. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 PMID:9129810

  2. Conformation of a flexible polymer in explicit solvent: Accurate solvation potentials for Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark P; Ye, Yuting; Adhikari, Shishir R

    2015-11-28

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solution is coupled to the local structure of the surrounding solvent and can undergo large changes in response to variations in solvent density and temperature. The many-body effects of solvent on the structure of an n-mer polymer chain can be formally mapped to an exact n-body solvation potential. Here, we use a pair decomposition of this n-body potential to construct a set of two-body potentials for a Lennard-Jones (LJ) polymer chain in explicit LJ solvent. The solvation potentials are built from numerically exact results for 5-mer chains in solvent combined with an approximate asymptotic expression for the solvation potential between sites that are distant along the chain backbone. These potentials map the many-body chain-in-solvent problem to a few-body single-chain problem and can be used to study a chain of arbitrary length, thereby dramatically reducing the computational complexity of the polymer chain-in-solvent problem. We have constructed solvation potentials at a large number of state points across the LJ solvent phase diagram including the vapor, liquid, and super-critical regions. We use these solvation potentials in single-chain Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with n ≤ 800 to determine the size, intramolecular structure, and scaling behavior of chains in solvent. To assess our results, we have carried out full chain-in-solvent MC simulations (with n ≤ 100) and find that our solvation potential approach is quantitatively accurate for a wide range of solvent conditions for these chain lengths. PMID:26627969

  3. Small-angle X-ray scattering- and nuclear magnetic resonance-derived conformational ensemble of the highly flexible antitoxin PaaA2.

    PubMed

    Sterckx, Yann G J; Volkov, Alexander N; Vranken, Wim F; Kragelj, Jaka; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Buts, Lieven; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Jové, Thomas; Van Melderen, Laurence; Blackledge, Martin; van Nuland, Nico A J; Loris, Remy

    2014-06-10

    Antitoxins from prokaryotic type II toxin-antitoxin modules are characterized by a high degree of intrinsic disorder. The description of such highly flexible proteins is challenging because they cannot be represented by a single structure. Here, we present a combination of SAXS and NMR data to describe the conformational ensemble of the PaaA2 antitoxin from the human pathogen E. coli O157. The method encompasses the use of SAXS data to filter ensembles out of a pool of conformers generated by a custom NMR structure calculation protocol and the subsequent refinement by a block jackknife procedure. The final ensemble obtained through the method is validated by an established residual dipolar coupling analysis. We show that the conformational ensemble of PaaA2 is highly compact and that the protein exists in solution as two preformed helices, connected by a flexible linker, that probably act as molecular recognition elements for toxin inhibition. PMID:24768114

  4. Controlled synthesis of linear and cyclic liquid crystals containing conformationally flexible structural units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asandei, Alexandru Dragos

    This thesis decribes the design, synthesis and characterization of a large variety of molecular, macromolecular and supramolecular liquid crystalline (LC) systems with linear, cyclic, and combinations of linear and cyclic architectures. These structures are based on mesogens that display conformational isomerism. Several series of macrocyclics based on 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-methyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethane (MBPE) and various alpha,omega-dibromoalkanes were synthesized and characterized. These macrocyclics display more stable and broader LC phases than the corresponding linear polymers. Relatively minor modifications in the structure of the mesogen, spacer or microstructure of polymeric chains have a strong effect on the phase behavior of main chain polyethers. This is demonstrated for polymers based on 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxy-4'-biphenylyl)butane (TPB') and alpha,omega-dibromoalkanes containing from 4 to 19 methylenic units. A stepwise synthetic procedure is described for the synthesis of a series of LC macrocyclics based of TPB' and 1,10-dibromodecane. Large increases in the yields by comparison with the one-pot method are obtained, and the procedure is also illustrated by the synthesis of the first example of a liquid crystalline bicyclic compound. The stepwise synthesis and characterization of macrocyclic monomers and of the first examples of side chain and main chain LC polymers containing supramolecular mesogens based on collapsed macrocyclics building blocks are described and discussed. An iterative stepwise procedure that allows for an exponential 2spn growth in molecular weight after n synthetic cycles is presented and applied to the synthesis of linear polyethers based on 1-(4-hydroxy-4'-biphenylyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butane (TPB) and 1,10-dibromodecane. A library of linear monodisperse oligomers and polymers with a degree of polymerization (DP) up to 33 and with a variety of chain ends was generated, and the dependence of the phase behavior of

  5. Substrate Specificities and Conformational Flexibility of 3-Ketosteroid 9α-Hydroxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Penfield, Jonathan S.; Worrall, Liam J.; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2014-01-01

    KshA is the oxygenase component of 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase, a Rieske oxygenase involved in the bacterial degradation of steroids. Consistent with its role in bile acid catabolism, KshA1 from Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM43269 had the highest apparent specificity (kcat/Km) for steroids with an isopropyl side chain at C17, such as 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorcholesta-1,4-diene-22-oate (1,4-BNC). By contrast, the KshA5 homolog had the highest apparent specificity for substrates with no C17 side chain (kcat/Km >105 s−1 m−1 for 4-estrendione, 5α-androstandione, and testosterone). Unexpectedly, substrates such as 4-androstene-3,17-dione (ADD) and 4-BNC displayed strong substrate inhibition (KiS ∼100 μm). By comparison, the cholesterol-degrading KshAMtb from Mycobacterium tuberculosis had the highest specificity for CoA-thioesterified substrates. These specificities are consistent with differences in the catabolism of cholesterol and bile acids, respectively, in actinobacteria. X-ray crystallographic structures of the KshAMtb·ADD, KshA1·1,4-BNC-CoA, KshA5·ADD, and KshA5·1,4-BNC-CoA complexes revealed that the enzymes have very similar steroid-binding pockets with the substrate's C17 oriented toward the active site opening. Comparisons suggest Tyr-245 and Phe-297 are determinants of KshA1 specificity. All enzymes have a flexible 16-residue “mouth loop,” which in some structures completely occluded the substrate-binding pocket from the bulk solvent. Remarkably, the catalytic iron and α-helices harboring its ligands were displaced up to 4.4 Å in the KshA5·substrate complexes as compared with substrate-free KshA, suggesting that Rieske oxygenases may have a dynamic nature similar to cytochrome P450. PMID:25049233

  6. Excimer lasers drive large-area microprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Tapié, Jean-Luc

    2012-09-01

    Excimer lasers emitting in the UV to far UV region are by nature the laser sources enabling the highest optical resolution and strongest material-photon interaction. At the same time, excimer lasers deliver unmatched UV pulse energies and output powers up to the kilowatt range. Thus, they are the key to fast and effective large area processing of smallest structures with micron precision. As a consequence, excimer lasers are the UV technology of choice when it comes to high-performance microstructuring with unsurpassed quality and process repeatability in applications such as drilling advanced ink jet nozzles or patterning biomedical sensor structures.

  7. Large Area X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission concept study continues to evolve strongly following the merging of the LAXS mission with the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White) into the re-named High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission. HTXS retains key elements of the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for risk-reduction and cost savings. A key achievement of the program has been the recommendation by the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEUS) (April 1997) for a new start for the HTXS mission in the 2000-2004 timeframe.

  8. Large area cold plasma applicator for decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesky, G. A.

    2008-04-01

    Cold plasma applicators have been used in the Medical community for several years for uses ranging from hemostasis ("stop bleeding") to tumor removal. An added benefit of this technology is enhanced wound healing by the destruction of infectious microbial agents without damaging healthy tissue. The beam is typically one millimeter to less than a centimeter in diameter. This technology has been adapted and expanded to large area applicators of potentially a square meter or more. Decontamination applications include both biological and chemical agents, and assisting in the removal of radiological agents, with minimal or no damage to the contaminated substrate material. Linear and planar multiemitter array plasma applicator design and operation is discussed.

  9. PELDOR measurements on a nitroxide-labeled Cu(II) porphyrin: orientation selection, spin-density distribution, and conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Bode, Bela E; Plackmeyer, Jörn; Prisner, Thomas F; Schiemann, Olav

    2008-06-12

    Metal ions are functionally or structurally important centers in metalloproteins or RNAs, which makes them interesting targets for spectroscopic investigations. In combination with site-directed spin labeling, pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR or DEER) could be a well-suited method to characterize and localize them. Here, we report on the synthesis, full characterization, and PELDOR study of a copper(II) porphyrin/nitroxide model system. The X-band PELDOR time traces contain besides the distance information a convolution of orientational selectivity, conformational flexibility, exchange coupling, and spin density distribution, which can be deconvoluted by experiments with different frequency offsets and simulations. The simulations are based on the known experimental and spin Hamiltonian parameters and make use of a geometric model as employed for structurally similar bis-nitroxides and spin density parameters as obtained from density functional theory calculations. It is found that orientation selection with respect to dipolar angles is only weakly resolvable at X-band frequencies due to the large nitrogen hyperfine coupling of the copper porphyrin. On the other hand, the PELDOR time traces reveal a much faster oscillation damping than observed for structurally similar bis-nitroxides, which is mainly assigned to a small distribution in exchange couplings J. Taking the effects of orientation selectivity, distribution in J, and spin density distribution into account leads finally to a narrow distance distribution caused solely by the flexibility of the structure, which is in agreement with distributions from known bis-nitroxides of similar structure. Thus, X-band PELDOR measurements at different frequency offsets in combination with explicit time trace simulations allow for distinguishing between structural models and quantitative interpretation of copper-nitroxide PELDOR data gives access to localization of copper(II) ions. PMID:18491846

  10. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled for launch this year. Because the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) has a huge field of view and the GLAST Observatory will be operated in scanning mode, it will survey the entire sky daily. The GLAST Mission and the LAT Collaboration invite cooperative efforts from theorists and observers at all wavelengths to help optimize the science. Possible topics include: (1) Blazars: These Active Galactic Nuclei are expected to be a major source class for LAT. Identifying new blazars, monitoring their variability, and joining programs to carry out planned or Target of Opportunity multiwavelength campaigns will all be important activities. The study of AGN gamma-ray jets can help link the accretion processes close to the black hole with the large-scale interaction of the AGN with its environment. (2) Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources: Modeling of possible gamma-ray sources is important to establish testable hypotheses. New gamma-ray sources need first to be identified with known objects by position, spectrum, or time variability, and then multiwavelength studies can be used to explore the astrophysical implications of high-energy radiation from these sources. The LAT team is committed to releasing a preliminary source list about six months after the start of science operations.

  11. Multi-Conformation Monte Carlo: A Method for Introducing Flexibility in Efficient Simulations of Many-Protein Systems.

    PubMed

    Prytkova, Vera; Heyden, Matthias; Khago, Domarin; Freites, J Alfredo; Butts, Carter T; Martin, Rachel W; Tobias, Douglas J

    2016-08-25

    We present a novel multi-conformation Monte Carlo simulation method that enables the modeling of protein-protein interactions and aggregation in crowded protein solutions. This approach is relevant to a molecular-scale description of realistic biological environments, including the cytoplasm and the extracellular matrix, which are characterized by high concentrations of biomolecular solutes (e.g., 300-400 mg/mL for proteins and nucleic acids in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli). Simulation of such environments necessitates the inclusion of a large number of protein molecules. Therefore, computationally inexpensive methods, such as rigid-body Brownian dynamics (BD) or Monte Carlo simulations, can be particularly useful. However, as we demonstrate herein, the rigid-body representation typically employed in simulations of many-protein systems gives rise to certain artifacts in protein-protein interactions. Our approach allows us to incorporate molecular flexibility in Monte Carlo simulations at low computational cost, thereby eliminating ambiguities arising from structure selection in rigid-body simulations. We benchmark and validate the methodology using simulations of hen egg white lysozyme in solution, a well-studied system for which extensive experimental data, including osmotic second virial coefficients, small-angle scattering structure factors, and multiple structures determined by X-ray and neutron crystallography and solution NMR, as well as rigid-body BD simulation results, are available for comparison. PMID:27063730

  12. Large area radiation detectors based on II VI thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The development of low temperature device technologies that have enabled flexible displays also present opportunities for flexible electronics and flexible integrated systems. Of particular interest are possible applications in flexible, low metal content, sensor systems for unattended ground sensors, smart medical bandages, electronic ID tags for geo-location, conformal antennas, neutron/gamma-ray/x-ray detectors, etc. In this talk, our efforts to develop novel CMOS integration schemes, circuits, memory, sensors as well as novel contacts, dielectrics and semiconductors for flexible electronics are presented. In particular, in this presentation we discuss fundamental materials properties including crystalline structure, interfacial reactions, doping, etc. defining performance and reliability of II-VI-based radiation sensors. We investigate the optimal thickness of a semiconductor diode for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors. Besides II-VI materials, we also evaluated several diode materials, Si, CdTe,GaAs, C (diamond), and ZnO, and two neutron converter materials,10B and 6LiF. We determine the minimum semiconductor thickness needed to achieve maximum neutron detection efficiency. By keeping the semiconductor thickness to a minimum, gamma rejection is kept as high as possible. In this way, we optimize detector performance for different thin-film semiconductor materials.

  13. The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    A Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) has been installed at JPL. It is primarily intended to be used to illuminate and measure the electrical performance of photovoltaic devices. The simulator, originally manufactured by Spectrolab, Sylmar, California, occupies an area measuring about 3 meters wide by 12 meters long. The data acquisition and data processing subsystems have been modernized. Tests on the LAPSS performance resulted in better than +/- 2 percent uniformity of irradiance at the test plane and better than +/- 0.3 percent measurement repeatability after warm-up. Glass absorption filters are used to reduce the level of ultraviolet light emitted from the xenon flash lamps. This provides a close match to standard airmass zero and airmass 1.5 spectral irradiance distributions. The 2 millisecond light pulse prevents heating of the device under test, resulting in more reliable temperature measurements. Overall, excellent electrical performance measurements have been made of many different types and sizes of photovoltaic devices.

  14. Timing characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. W.; Elagin, A.; Frisch, H. J.; Obaid, R.; Oberla, E.; Vostrikov, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Wang, J.; Wetstein, M.

    2015-09-01

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultrafast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub-picosecond laser. We observe single-photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm × 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 μm, and median gains higher than 107. The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with ± 1σ of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  15. The CLAS12 large area RICH detector

    SciTech Connect

    M. Contalbrigo, E. Cisbani, P. Rossi

    2011-05-01

    A large area RICH detector is being designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer as part of the 12 GeV upgrade program of the Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall-B. This detector is intended to provide excellent hadron identification from 3 GeV/c up to momenta exceeding 8 GeV/c and to be able to work at the very high design luminosity-up to 1035 cm2 s-1. Detailed feasibility studies are presented for two types of radiators, aerogel and liquid C6F14 freon, in conjunction with a highly segmented light detector in the visible wavelength range. The basic parameters of the RICH are outlined and the resulting performances, as defined by preliminary simulation studies, are reported.

  16. Large area position sensitive β-detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaintraub, S.; Hass, M.; Edri, H.; Morali, N.; Segal, T.

    2015-03-01

    A new conceptual design of a large area electron detector, which is position and energy sensitive, was developed. This detector is designed for beta decay energies up to 4 MeV, but in principle can be re-designed for higher energies. The detector incorporates one large plastic scintillator and, in general, a limited number of photomultipliers (7 presently). The current setup was designed and constructed after an extensive Geant4 simulation study. By comparison of a single hit light distribution between the various photomultipliers to a pre-measured accurate position-response map, the anticipated position resolution is around 5 mm. The first benchmark experiments have been conducted in order to calibrate and confirm the position resolution of the detector. The new method, results of the first test experiments and comparison to simulations are presented.

  17. Timing Characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Elagin, Andrey L.; Frisch, H.; Obaid, Razib; Oberla, E; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wagner, Robert G.; Wang, Jingbo; Wetstein, Matthew J.; Northrop, R

    2015-09-21

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultralast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub picosecond laser. We observe single photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm x 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 pm, and median gains higher than 10(7). The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with in of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  18. Large Area Sputter Coating on Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yoshihito

    Large glass has been used for commercial buildings, housings and vehicles for many years. Glass size for flat displays is getting larger and larger. The glass for the 8th generation is more than 5 m2 in area. Demand of the large glass is increasing not only in these markets but also in a solar cell market growing drastically. Therefore, large area coating is demanded to plus something else on glass more than ever. Sputtering and pyrolysis are the major coating methods on large glass today. Sputtering process is particularly popular because it can deposit a wide variety of materials in good coating uniformity on the glass. This paper describes typical industrial sputtering system and recent progress in sputtering technology. It also shows typical coated glass products in architectural, automotive and display fields and comments on their functions, film stacks and so on.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Patrick Nolan, who died on 2011 November 6. His career spanned much of the history of high-energy astronomy from space and his work on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) began nearly 20 years ago when it was just a concept. Pat was a central member in the operation of the LAT collaboration and he is greatly missed.

  20. Electrohydrodynamically driven large-area liquid ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Pregenzer, Arian L.

    1988-01-01

    A large-area liquid ion source comprises means for generating, over a large area of the surface of a liquid, an electric field of a strength sufficient to induce emission of ions from a large area of said liquid. Large areas in this context are those distinct from emitting areas in unidimensional emitters.

  1. Theory for the nonequilibrium dynamics of flexible chain molecules: Relaxation to equilibrium of pentadecane from an all-trans conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wilfred H.; Kostov, Konstantin S.; Freed, Karl F.

    1998-05-01

    We extend to nonequilibrium processes our recent theory for the long time dynamics of flexible chain molecules. While the previous theory describes the equilibrium motions for any bond or interatomic separation in (bio)polymers by time correlation functions, the present extension of the theory enables the prediction of the nonequilibrium relaxation that occurs in processes, such as T-jump experiments, where there are sudden transitions between, for example, different equilibrium states. As a test of the theory, we consider the "unfolding" of pentadecane when it is transported from a constrained all-trans conformation to a random-coil state at thermal equilibrium. The time evolution of the mean-square end-to-end distance noneq after release of the constraint is computed both from the theory and from Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations. The lack of time translational symmetry for nonequilibrium processes requires that the BD simulations of the relaxation of noneq be computed from an average over a huge number of independent trajectories, rather than over successive configurations from a single trajectory, which may be used to generate equilibrium time correlation functions. Adequate convergence ensues for the nonequilibrium simulations only after averaging 9000 trajectories, each of 0.8 ns duration. In contrast, the theory requires only equilibrium averages for the initial and final states, which may be readily obtained from a few Brownian dynamics trajectories. Therefore, the new method produces enormous savings in computer time. Moreover, since both theory and simulations use identical potentials and solvent models, the theory contains no adjustable parameters. The predictions of the theory for the relaxation of noneq agree very well with the BD simulations. This work is a starting point for the application of the new method to nonequilibrium processes with biological importance such as the helix-coil transition and protein folding.

  2. Conformation of a flexible chain in explicit solvent: exact solvation potentials for short Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark P; Adhikari, Shishir R

    2011-07-28

    The average conformation of a flexible chain molecule in solution is coupled to the local solvent structure. In a dense solvent, local chain structure often mirrors the pure solvent structure, whereas, in a dilute solvent, the chain can strongly perturb the solvent structure which, in turn, can lead to either chain expansion or compression. Here we use Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to study such solvent effects for a short Lennard-Lones (LJ) chain in monomeric LJ solvent. For an n-site chain molecule in solution these many-body solvent effects can be formally mapped to an n-body solvation potential. We have previously shown that for hard-sphere and square-well chain-in-solvent systems this n-body potential can be decomposed into a set of two-body potentials. Here, we show that this decomposition is also valid for the LJ system. Starting from high precision MC results for the n = 5 LJ chain-in-solvent system, we use a Boltzmann inversion technique to compute numerically exact sets of two-body solvation potentials which map the many-body chain-in-solvent problem to a few-body single-chain problem. We have carried out this mapping across the full solvent phase diagram including the dilute vapor, dense liquid, and supercritical regions and find that these sets of solvation potentials are able to encode the complete range of solvent effects found in the LJ chain-in-solvent system. We also show that these two-site solvation potentials can be used to obtain accurate multi-site intramolecular distribution functions and we discuss the application of these exact short chain potentials to the study of longer chains in solvent. PMID:21806157

  3. Evidence That GH115 α-Glucuronidase Activity, Which Is Required to Degrade Plant Biomass, Is Dependent on Conformational Flexibility*

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Baslé, Arnaud; Farinas, Cristiane S.; Solovyova, Alexandra; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial degradation of the plant cell wall is an important biological process that is highly relevant to environmentally significant industries such as the bioenergy and biorefining sectors. A major component of the wall is glucuronoxylan, a β1,4-linked xylose polysaccharide that is decorated with α-linked glucuronic and/or methylglucuronic acid (GlcA/MeGlcA). Recently three members of a glycoside hydrolase family, GH115, were shown to hydrolyze MeGlcA side chains from the internal regions of xylan, an activity that has not previously been described. Here we show that a dominant member of the human microbiota, Bacteroides ovatus, contains a GH115 enzyme, BoAgu115A, which displays glucuronoxylan α-(4-O-methyl)-glucuronidase activity. The enzyme is significantly more active against substrates in which the xylose decorated with GlcA/MeGlcA is flanked by one or more xylose residues. The crystal structure of BoAgu115A revealed a four-domain protein in which the active site, comprising a pocket that abuts a cleft-like structure, is housed in the second domain that adopts a TIM barrel-fold. The third domain, a five-helical bundle, and the C-terminal β-sandwich domain make inter-chain contacts leading to protein dimerization. Informed by the structure of the enzyme in complex with GlcA in its open ring form, in conjunction with mutagenesis studies, the potential substrate binding and catalytically significant amino acids were identified. Based on the catalytic importance of residues located on a highly flexible loop, the enzyme is required to undergo a substantial conformational change to form a productive Michaelis complex with glucuronoxylan. PMID:24214982

  4. The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) has been installed at JPL. It is primarily intended to be used to illuminate and measure the electrical performance of photovoltaic devices. The simulator, originally manufactured by Spectrolab, Sylmar, CA, occupies an area measuring about 3 m wide x 12 m long. The data acquisition and data processing subsystems have been modernized. Tests on the LAPSS performance resulted in better than plus or minus 2 percent uniformity of irradiance at the test plane and better than plus or minus 0.3 percent measurement repeatability after warm-up. Glass absorption filters reduce the ultraviolet light emitted from the xenon flash lamps. This results in a close match to three different standard airmass zero and airmass 1.5 spectral irradiances. The 2-ms light pulse prevents heating of the device under test, resulting in more reliable temperature measurements. Overall, excellent electrical performance measurements have been made of many different types and sizes of photovoltaic devices. Since the original printing of this publication, in 1993, the LAPSS has been operational and new capabilities have been added. This revision includes a new section relating to the installation of a method to measure the I-V curve of a solar cell or array exhibiting a large effective capacitance. Another new section has been added relating to new capabilities for plotting single and multiple I-V curves, and for archiving the I-V data and test parameters. Finally, a section has been added regarding the data acquisition electronics calibration.

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  6. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalejs, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Work carried out on the JPL Flat Plate Solar Array Project, for the purpose of developing a method for silicon ribbon production by Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EEG) for use as low-cost substrate material in terrestrial solar cell manufacture, is described. A multiple ribbon furnace unit that is designed to operate on a continuous basis for periods of at least one week, with melt replenishment and automatic ribbon width control, and to produce silicon sheet at a rate of one square meter per hour, was constructed. Program milestones set for single ribbon furnace operation to demonstrate basic EEG system capabilities with respect to growth speed, thickness and cell performance were achieved for 10 cm wide ribbon: steady-state growth at 4 cm/min and 200 micron thickness over periods of an hour and longer was made routine, and a small area cell efficiency of 13+% demonstrated. Large area cells of average efficiency of 10 to 11%, with peak values of 11 to 12% were also achieved. The integration of these individual performance levels into multiple ribbon furnace operation was not accomplished.

  7. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  8. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Babayan, Steve E.; Hicks, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  9. Large area QNDE inspection for airframe integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation (QNDE) technology is being developed to provide new options for cost effective inspection of airframes. An R&D effort based on five NDE technologies is addressing questions of structural bonding assessment, corrosion detection, multisite damage detection, and fatigue characterization. The research/applications are being conducted by prioritized focussing and staging of the following technologies: (1) thermal NDE; (2) ultrasonic NDE; (3) coherent optical NDE; (4) magnetic imaging NDE; and (5) radiographic NDE. The focus here is on the most recent applications of thermal NDE technology to large area inspection of lap-joint and stiffener bonds. The approach is based on pulsed radiant heating of the airframe and measurement of the surface temperature of the structure with an infrared imager. Several advantages of the technique are that it is noncontacting, inspects one square meter area in a period of less than 2 minutes and has no difficulty inspecting typical curvatures of the fuselage. Numerical models of heat flow in these geometries are used to determine appropriate techniques for reduction of the infrared images, thereby delineating regions of disbonds. These models are also used to determine the optimum heating and measurement times for maximizing the contrast between bonded and unbonded structures. Good agreement is found between these results and experimental measurements, and a comparison of the two are presented. Also presented are results of measurements on samples with fabricated defects which show the technique is able to clearly indicate regions of disbonds. Measurements on an airframe also clearly image subsurface structure.

  10. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Progress was made in improving ribbon flatness and reducing stress, and in raising cell performance for 10 cm wide ribbon grown in single cartridge EFG furnaces. Optimization of growth conditions resulted in improved ribbon thickness uniformity at a thickness of 200 micron, grown at 4 cm/minute, and growth at this target speed is routinely achieved over periods of the order of one hour or more. With the improved ribbon flatness, fabrication of large area (50 cm2) cells is now possible, and 10 to 11% efficiencies were demonstrated on ribbon grown at 3.5 to 4 cm/minute. Factors limiting performance of the existing multiple ribbon furnace were identified, and growth system improvements implemented to help raise throughput rates and the time percentage of simultaneous three-ribbon growth. However, it is evident that major redesign of this furnace would be needed to overcome shortfalls in its ability to achieve the Technical Features Demonstration goals of 1980. It was decided to start construction of a new multiple ribbon furnace and to incorporate the desired improvements into its design. The construction of this furnace is completed.

  11. Large-area lanthanum hexaboride electron emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, D.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Sketchley, T.A.

    1985-09-01

    A large-area cathode assembly which is capable of continuous, high-current electron emission is described. The cathode utilizes an indirectly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) disk as the thermionic electron emitter. The LaB/sub 6/ cathode emits over 600 A of electrons at an average of 20 A/cm/sup 2/ continuously with no observable lifetime limits to date after about 400 h of operation in a plasma discharge. Proper clasping of the LaB/sub 6/ disk is required to avoid impurity production from chemical reactions with the holder and to provide adequate support if the disk fractures during rapid thermal cycling. Modification of the LaB/sub 6/ surface composition due to preferential sputtering of boron by hydrogen and argon ions in the plasma discharge has been observed. The surface appearance is consistent with the formation of LaB/sub 4/ as a result of boron depletion. The electron emission capability of the cathode is not significantly altered by the surface change. This surface modification by preferential sputtering is not observed in hollow cathodes where the ion energy from the cathode sheath voltage is typically less than 50 V. The electron emission by the cathode has not been affected by exposure to both air and water during operation. Utilizing thick disks of this intermediate temperature cathode material results in reliable, high-current, long-lifetime electron emitter assemblies.

  12. Airbrushed Nickel Nanoparticles for Large-Area

    SciTech Connect

    Sarac, Mehmet; ANDERSON, BRYAN; Pearce, Ryan; Railsback, Justin; Oni, Adedapo; White, Ryan M.; Hensley, Dale K; Lebeau, James M; Melechko, Anatoli; Tracy, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using Ni nanoparticle (NP) catalysts that were deposited by airbrushing onto Si, Al, Cu, and Ti substrates. Airbrushing is a simple method for depositing catalyst NPs over large areas that is compatible with roll-to-roll processing. The distribution and morphology of VACNFs are affected by the airbrushing parameters and the composition of the metal foil. Highly concentrated Ni NPs in heptane give more uniform distributions than pentane and hexanes, resulting in more uniform coverage of VACNFs. For VACNF growth on metal foils, Si micropowder was added as a precursor for Si-enriched coatings formed in situ on the VACNFs that impart mechanical rigidity. Interactions between the catalyst NPs and the metal substrates impart control over the VACNF morphology. Growth of carbon nanostructures on Cu is particularly noteworthy because the miscibility of Ni with Cu poses challenges for VACNF growth, and carbon nanostructures anchored to Cu substrates are desired as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and for thermal interface materials.

  13. Conformational flexibility and absolute stereochemistry of (3R)-3-hydroxy-4-aryl-β-lactams investigated by chiroptical properties and TD-DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Daniele; Zanasi, Riccardo; Guerrini, Andrea; Bertucci, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    The effect of conformational flexibility on the chiroptical properties of a series of synthetic (3R)-3-hydroxy-4-aryl-β-lactams of known stereochemistry (1-6) was investigated by means of electronic circular dichroism (ECD) measurements and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. The application of the β-lactam sector rules allowed a correct stereochemical characterization of these compounds, with the exception of a thienyl-substituted derivative (cis-). TD-DFT calculations yielded accurate predictions of experimental ECD spectra and [α](D) values, allowing us to assign the correct absolute configuration to all the investigated compounds. A detailed analysis of the β-lactam ring equilibrium geometry on optimized conformers identified regular patterns for the arrangement of atoms around the amide chromophore, confirming the validity of the β-lactam sector rules. However, relevant variations in theoretical chiroptical properties were found for compounds bearing a heterocyclic substituent at C4 or a phenyl substituent at C3, whose conformers deviate from these regular geometric patterns. This behavior explains the failure of the β-lactam sector rules in cis-. This study showed the importance of conformational flexibility for the determination of chiroptical properties and highlighted the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods for the stereochemical characterization of chiral molecules in solution. PMID:22544665

  14. Ligand Docking to Intermediate and Close-To-Bound Conformers Generated by an Elastic Network Model Based Algorithm for Highly Flexible Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating receptor flexibility in small ligand-protein docking still poses a challenge for proteins undergoing large conformational changes. In the absence of bound structures, sampling conformers that are accessible by apo state may facilitate docking and drug design studies. For this aim, we developed an unbiased conformational search algorithm, by integrating global modes from elastic network model, clustering and energy minimization with implicit solvation. Our dataset consists of five diverse proteins with apo to complex RMSDs 4.7-15 Å. Applying this iterative algorithm on apo structures, conformers close to the bound-state (RMSD 1.4-3.8 Å), as well as the intermediate states were generated. Dockings to a sequence of conformers consisting of a closed structure and its "parents" up to the apo were performed to compare binding poses on different states of the receptor. For two periplasmic binding proteins and biotin carboxylase that exhibit hinge-type closure of two dynamics domains, the best pose was obtained for the conformer closest to the bound structure (ligand RMSDs 1.5-2 Å). In contrast, the best pose for adenylate kinase corresponded to an intermediate state with partially closed LID domain and open NMP domain, in line with recent studies (ligand RMSD 2.9 Å). The docking of a helical peptide to calmodulin was the most challenging case due to the complexity of its 15 Å transition, for which a two-stage procedure was necessary. The technique was first applied on the extended calmodulin to generate intermediate conformers; then peptide docking and a second generation stage on the complex were performed, which in turn yielded a final peptide RMSD of 2.9 Å. Our algorithm is effective in producing conformational states based on the apo state. This study underlines the importance of such intermediate states for ligand docking to proteins undergoing large transitions. PMID:27348230

  15. Ligand Docking to Intermediate and Close-To-Bound Conformers Generated by an Elastic Network Model Based Algorithm for Highly Flexible Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating receptor flexibility in small ligand-protein docking still poses a challenge for proteins undergoing large conformational changes. In the absence of bound structures, sampling conformers that are accessible by apo state may facilitate docking and drug design studies. For this aim, we developed an unbiased conformational search algorithm, by integrating global modes from elastic network model, clustering and energy minimization with implicit solvation. Our dataset consists of five diverse proteins with apo to complex RMSDs 4.7–15 Å. Applying this iterative algorithm on apo structures, conformers close to the bound-state (RMSD 1.4–3.8 Å), as well as the intermediate states were generated. Dockings to a sequence of conformers consisting of a closed structure and its “parents” up to the apo were performed to compare binding poses on different states of the receptor. For two periplasmic binding proteins and biotin carboxylase that exhibit hinge-type closure of two dynamics domains, the best pose was obtained for the conformer closest to the bound structure (ligand RMSDs 1.5–2 Å). In contrast, the best pose for adenylate kinase corresponded to an intermediate state with partially closed LID domain and open NMP domain, in line with recent studies (ligand RMSD 2.9 Å). The docking of a helical peptide to calmodulin was the most challenging case due to the complexity of its 15 Å transition, for which a two-stage procedure was necessary. The technique was first applied on the extended calmodulin to generate intermediate conformers; then peptide docking and a second generation stage on the complex were performed, which in turn yielded a final peptide RMSD of 2.9 Å. Our algorithm is effective in producing conformational states based on the apo state. This study underlines the importance of such intermediate states for ligand docking to proteins undergoing large transitions. PMID:27348230

  16. Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, Harvey

    1996-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission study concept has evolved strongly over the last year culminating in the merging of LAXS with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) proposal for a similar mission, the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White). The resulting merger, re-named the High Throughput X-rays Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission has also expanded by the inclusion of another SAO proposed new mission concept proposal, the Hard X-Ray Telescope (PI: Paul Gorenstein). The resultant multi-instrument mission retains much of heritage from the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for robustness. These mergers resulted from a series of contacts between various team members, via e-mail, telecons, and in-person meetings. The impetus for the mergers was the fundamental similarity between the missions, and the recognition that all three proposal teams had significant contributions to make in the effort to define the next stage in the X-ray exploration of the universe. We have enclosed four items that represent some of the work that has occurred during the first year of the study: first, a presentation at the Leicester meeting, second a presentation that was made to Dan Goldin following the merging of LAXS and NGXO, third a copy of the first announcement for the Workshop, and finally the interim report that was prepared by the HTXS study team towards the end of the first year. This last document provides the foundation for the HTXS Technology Roadmap that is being generated. The HTXS roadmap will define the near-term goals that the merged mission must achieve over the next few years. A web site has been developed and populated that contains much of the material that has been generated over the past year.

  17. Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

    2009-01-01

    The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (<10 micron) micrometeorite and secondary ejecta dust particles. To be delivered to the lunar surface, it must also be very low mass, rugged and stow compactly. The instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

  18. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeKlotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV-300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second Fermi LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4σ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. From source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ˜3% at 1 GeV.

  19. Large-area mapping of biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.M.; Jennings, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The age of discovery, description, and classification of biodiversity is entering a new phase. In responding to the conservation imperative, we can now supplement the essential work of systematics with spatially explicit information on species and assemblages of species. This is possible because of recent conceptual, technical, and organizational progress in generating synoptic views of the earth's surface and a great deal of its biological content, at multiple scales of thematic as well as geographic resolution. The development of extensive spatial data on species distributions and vegetation types provides us with a framework for: (a) assessing what we know and where we know it at meso-scales, and (b) stratifying the biological universe so that higher-resolution surveys can be more efficiently implemented, coveting, for example, geographic adequacy of specimen collections, population abundance, reproductive success, and genetic dynamics. The land areas involved are very large, and the questions, such as resolution, scale, classification, and accuracy, are complex. In this paper, we provide examples from the United States Gap Analysis Program on the advantages and limitations of mapping the occurrence of terrestrial vertebrate species and dominant land-cover types over large areas as joint ventures and in multi-organizational partnerships, and how these cooperative efforts can be designed to implement results from data development and analyses as on-the-ground actions. Clearly, new frameworks for thinking about biogeographic information as well as organizational cooperation are needed if we are to have any hope of documenting the full range of species occurrences and ecological processes in ways meaningful to their management. The Gap Analysis experience provides one model for achieving these new frameworks.

  20. Development of large Area Covering Height Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K.

    2014-04-01

    Height information is a basic part of topographic mapping. Only in special areas frequent update of height models is required, usually the update cycle is quite lower as for horizontal map information. Some height models are available free of charge in the internet; for commercial height models a fee has to be paid. Mostly digital surface models (DSM) with the height of the visible surface are given and not the bare ground height, as required for standard mapping. Nevertheless by filtering of DSM, digital terrain models (DTM) with the height of the bare ground can be generated with the exception of dense forest areas where no height of the bare ground is available. These height models may be better as the DTM of some survey administrations. In addition several DTM from national survey administrations are classified, so as alternative the commercial or free of charge available information from internet can be used. The widely used SRTM DSM is available also as ACE-2 GDEM corrected by altimeter data for systematic height errors caused by vegetation and orientation errors. But the ACE-2 GDEM did not respect neighbourhood information. With the worldwide covering TanDEM-X height model, distributed starting 2014 by Airbus Defence and Space (former ASTRIUM) as WorldDEM, higher level of details and accuracy is reached as with other large area covering height models. At first the raw-version of WorldDEM will be available, followed by an edited version and finally as WorldDEM-DTM a height model of the bare ground. With 12 m spacing and a relative standard deviation of 1.2 m within an area of 1° x 1° an accuracy and resolution level is reached, satisfying also for larger map scales. For limited areas with the HDEM also a height model with 6 m spacing and a relative vertical accuracy of 0.5 m can be generated on demand. By bathymetric LiDAR and stereo images also the height of the sea floor can be determined if the water has satisfying transparency. Another method of getting

  1. Backbone conformational flexibility of the lipid modified membrane anchor of the human N-Ras protein investigated by solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander; Reuther, Guido; Roark, Matthew B; Tan, Kui-Thong; Waldmann, Herbert; Feller, Scott E; Huster, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The lipid modified human N-Ras protein, implicated in human cancer development, is of particular interest due to its membrane anchor that determines the activity and subcellular location of the protein. Previous solid-state NMR investigations indicated that this membrane anchor is highly dynamic, which may be indicative of backbone conformational flexibility. This article aims to address if a dynamic exchange between three structural models exist that had been determined previously. We applied a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a Ras peptide that represents the terminal seven amino acids of the human N-Ras protein. Analysis of correlations between the conformations of individual amino acids revealed that Cys 181 and Met 182 undergo collective conformational exchange. Two major structures constituting about 60% of all conformations could be identified. The two conformations found in the simulation are in rapid exchange, which gives rise to low backbone order parameters and nuclear spin relaxation as measured by experimental NMR methods. These parameters were also determined from two 300 ns conventional MD simulations, providing very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19819220

  2. Graphene-based large area dye-sensitized solar cell modules.

    PubMed

    Casaluci, Simone; Gemmi, Mauro; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Di Carlo, Aldo; Bonaccorso, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate spray coating of graphene ink as a viable method for large-area fabrication of graphene-based dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) modules. A graphene-based ink produced by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite is spray coated onto a transparent conductive oxide substrate to realize a large area (>90 cm(2)) semi-transparent (transmittance 44%) counter-electrode (CE) replacing platinum, the standard CE material. The graphene-based CE is successfully integrated in a large-area (43.2 cm(2) active area) DSSC module achieving a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The approach demonstrated here paves the way to all-printed, flexible, and transparent graphene-based large-area and cost-effective photovoltaic devices on arbitrary substrates. PMID:26883743

  3. Graphene-based large area dye-sensitized solar cell modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaluci, Simone; Gemmi, Mauro; Pellegrini, Vittorio; di Carlo, Aldo; Bonaccorso, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate spray coating of graphene ink as a viable method for large-area fabrication of graphene-based dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) modules. A graphene-based ink produced by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite is spray coated onto a transparent conductive oxide substrate to realize a large area (>90 cm2) semi-transparent (transmittance 44%) counter-electrode (CE) replacing platinum, the standard CE material. The graphene-based CE is successfully integrated in a large-area (43.2 cm2 active area) DSSC module achieving a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The approach demonstrated here paves the way to all-printed, flexible, and transparent graphene-based large-area and cost-effective photovoltaic devices on arbitrary substrates.

  4. CC/DFT Route toward Accurate Structures and Spectroscopic Features for Observed and Elusive Conformers of Flexible Molecules: Pyruvic Acid as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Cimino, Paola; Penocchio, Emanuele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The structures and relative stabilities as well as the rotational and vibrational spectra of the three low-energy conformers of pyruvic acid (PA) have been characterized using a state-of-the-art quantum-mechanical approach designed for flexible molecules. By making use of the available experimental rotational constants for several isotopologues of the most stable PA conformer, Tc-PA, the semiexperimental equilibrium structure has been derived. The latter provides a reference for the pure theoretical determination of the equilibrium geometries for all conformers, thus confirming for these structures an accuracy of 0.001 Å and 0.1 deg for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Highly accurate relative energies of all conformers (Tc-, Tt-, and Ct-PA) and of the transition states connecting them are provided along with the thermodynamic properties at low and high temperatures, thus leading to conformational enthalpies accurate to 1 kJ mol(-1). Concerning microwave spectroscopy, rotational constants accurate to about 20 MHz are provided for the Tt- and Ct-PA conformers, together with the computed centrifugal-distortion constants and dipole moments required to simulate their rotational spectra. For Ct-PA, vibrational frequencies in the mid-infrared region accurate to 10 cm(-1) are reported along with theoretical estimates for the transitions in the near-infrared range, and the corresponding infrared spectrum including fundamental transitions, overtones, and combination bands has been simulated. In addition to the new data described above, theoretical results for the Tc- and Tt-PA conformers are compared with all available experimental data to further confirm the accuracy of the hybrid coupled-cluster/density functional theory (CC/DFT) protocol applied in the present study. Finally, we discuss in detail the accuracy of computational models fully based on double-hybrid DFT functionals (mainly at the B2PLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level) that avoid the use of very expensive CC

  5. Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope- GLAST Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), and the instrumentation that will be on the spacecraft: Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The presentation revierws in detail the LAT instrument.

  6. An examination of polymorphic stability and molecular conformational flexibility as a function of crystal size associated with the nucleation and growth of benzophenone.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Robert B; Pencheva, Klimentina; Roberts, Kevin J

    2007-01-01

    The polymorphic behaviour of the aromatic ketone, benzophenone, which is a conformationally flexible molecule and forms crystal structures dominated by van der Waals intermolecular interactions, is examined. Crystallization of this material from the undercooled molten state yields the two known polymorphic forms, i.e. the stable alpha-form and the metastable beta-form. The relative, energetic stabilities are examined using both crystal lattice and molecular conformational modelling techniques. Examination of nano-sized faceted molecular clusters of these forms, with cluster sizes ranging from 3 to 100 molecules, reveals that at very small cluster size (< 5 molecules) the relative energetic stability of clusters representative for the two forms become very similar, indicating that for high melting undercooling (i.e. small critical cluster size for nucleation) crystallization of the metastable beta-phase becomes more likely. Detailed analysis of the variation in molecular conformations within the simulated molecular clusters reveals more disordered three-dimensional structures at small compared to larger cluster sizes. The conformational disorder was found to be higher for the metastable beta-form. This observation, together with the lower stability of clusters for this form is indicative of the difficulty in achieving crystallization of the metastable beta-form from the melt, which requires a considerable undercooling. PMID:17955805

  7. On the role of the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid on the allosteric kinetics of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Horjales, Eduardo; Calcagno, Mario L

    2002-05-24

    The active site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) has a complex lid formed by two antiparallel beta-strands connected by a helix-loop segment (158-187). This motif contains Arg172, which is a residue involved in binding the substrate in the active-site, and three residues that are part of the allosteric site, Arg158, Lys160 and Thr161. This dual binding role of the motif forming the lid suggests that it plays a key role in the functional coupling between active and allosteric sites. Previous crystallographic work showed that the temperature coefficients of the active-site lid are very large when the enzyme is in its T allosteric state. These coefficients decrease in the R state, thus suggesting that this motif changes its conformational flexibility as a consequence of the allosteric transition. In order to explore the possible connection between the conformational flexibility of the lid and the function of the deaminase, we constructed the site-directed mutant Phe174-Ala. Phe174 is located at the C-end of the lid helix and its side-chain establishes hydrophobic interactions with the remainder of the enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the T state of Phe174-Ala deaminase, determined at 2.02 A resolution, shows no density for the segment 162-181, which is part of the active-site lid (PDB 1JT9). This mutant form of the enzyme is essentially inactive in the absence of the allosteric activator, N-acetylglucosamine-6-P although it recovers its activity up to the wild-type level in the presence of this ligand. Spectrometric and binding studies show that inactivity is due to the inability of the active-site to bind ligands when the allosteric site is empty. These data indicate that the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid critically alters the binding properties of the active site, and that the occupation of the allosteric site restores the lid conformational flexibility to a functional state. PMID

  8. The conformational flexibility of nucleic acid bases paired in gas phase: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shiyan; Liang, Haojun

    2012-05-01

    The flexibilities of pyrimidine and imidazole rings in the paired nucleobases are investigated using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation in gas phase. The pairing influence on the stiffness of rings is analyzed based on the molecular structure of the nucleobases and constraints caused by pairing. We prove that the flexibilities of pyrimidine rings in isolated state have subtle correlation with the degree of aromaticity of the rings. The pairings in nucleic base pairs cause the rings to be more rigid for G, T, and U but more flexible for A and the same for C.

  9. Fabrication of large area nanostructures with surface modified silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2014-03-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the CO stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  10. Correlated motion of protein subdomains and large-scale conformational flexibility of RecA protein filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Garmay; A, Shvetsov; D, Karelov; D, Lebedev; A, Radulescu; M, Petukhov; V, Isaev-Ivanov

    2012-02-01

    Based on X-ray crystallographic data available at Protein Data Bank, we have built molecular dynamics (MD) models of homologous recombinases RecA from E. coli and D. radiodurans. Functional form of RecA enzyme, which is known to be a long helical filament, was approximated by a trimer, simulated in periodic water box. The MD trajectories were analyzed in terms of large-scale conformational motions that could be detectable by neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. The analysis revealed that large-scale RecA monomer dynamics can be described in terms of relative motions of 7 subdomains. Motion of C-terminal domain was the major contributor to the overall dynamics of protein. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the MD trajectories in the atom coordinate space showed that rotation of C-domain is correlated with the conformational changes in the central domain and N-terminal domain, that forms the monomer-monomer interface. Thus, even though C-terminal domain is relatively far from the interface, its orientation is correlated with large-scale filament conformation. PCA of the trajectories in the main chain dihedral angle coordinate space implicates a co-existence of a several different large-scale conformations of the modeled trimer. In order to clarify the relationship of independent domain orientation with large-scale filament conformation, we have performed analysis of independent domain motion and its implications on the filament geometry.

  11. Structural reassignment, absolute configuration, and conformation of hypurticin, a highly flexible polyacyloxy-6-heptenyl-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Espinoza, José Alberto; López-Vallejo, Fabian; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M

    2009-04-01

    The structural reassignment, absolute configuration, and conformational behavior of the highly flexible natural product hypurticin (pectinolide E), 6S-[3'S,5'R,6'S-triacetoxy-1Z-heptenyl]-5S-acetoxy-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one (1), were ascertained by a molecular modeling protocol, which includes extensive conformational searching, geometry optimization by DFT B3LYP/DGDZVP calculations, and comparison between the theoretical (DFT) and experimental (1)H-(1)H NMR coupling constants. Hyptolide (2), a related cytotoxic 5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one that increased the S phase of the HeLa cell cycle, was employed as a reference substance to validate the theoretical protocol designed to characterize the 3D properties of compound 1. The related synthetic derivative, tri-O-acetyl-3,6-dideoxy-d-glucose diphenyldithioacetal (14), was prepared by a six-step reaction sequence starting from d-glucose and served as an enantiopure building block to reinforce the structural and configurational assignment of 1. This protocol proved to be an important tool for the structural characterization of highly flexible bioactive polyoxygenated natural products. PMID:19265396

  12. LARGE AREA LANDMARKS - DYNAMAP V.12.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    GDT Large Area Landmarks represents common landmark areas within United States including military areas, prisons, educational institutions, amusement centers, government centers, sport centers, golf courses, and cemeteries.

  13. Printable Solid-State Lithium-Ion Batteries: A New Route toward Shape-Conformable Power Sources with Aesthetic Versatility for Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hee; Choi, Keun-Ho; Cho, Sung-Ju; Choi, Sinho; Park, Soojin; Lee, Sang-Young

    2015-08-12

    Forthcoming flexible/wearable electronic devices with shape diversity and mobile usability garner a great deal of attention as an innovative technology to bring unprecedented changes in our daily lives. From the power source point of view, conventional rechargeable batteries (one representative example is a lithium-ion battery) with fixed shapes and sizes have intrinsic limitations in fulfilling design/performance requirements for the flexible/wearable electronics. Here, as a facile and efficient strategy to address this formidable challenge, we demonstrate a new class of printable solid-state batteries (referred to as "PRISS batteries"). Through simple stencil printing process (followed by ultraviolet (UV) cross-linking), solid-state composite electrolyte (SCE) layer and SCE matrix-embedded electrodes are consecutively printed on arbitrary objects of complex geometries, eventually leading to fully integrated, multilayer-structured PRISS batteries with various form factors far beyond those achievable by conventional battery technologies. Tuning rheological properties of SCE paste and electrode slurry toward thixotropic fluid characteristics, along with well-tailored core elements including UV-cured triacrylate polymer and high boiling point electrolyte, is a key-enabling technology for the realization of PRISS batteries. This process/material uniqueness allows us to remove extra processing steps (related to solvent drying and liquid-electrolyte injection) and also conventional microporous separator membranes, thereupon enabling the seamless integration of shape-conformable PRISS batteries (including letters-shaped ones) into complex-shaped objects. Electrochemical behavior of PRISS batteries is elucidated via an in-depth analysis of cell impedance, which provides a theoretical basis to enable sustainable improvement of cell performance. We envision that PRISS batteries hold great promise as a reliable and scalable platform technology to open a new concept of cell

  14. Use of cysteine-reactive crosslinkers to probe conformational flexibility of human DJ-1 demonstrates that Glu18 mutations are dimers

    PubMed Central

    Prahlad, Janani; Hauser, David N.; Milkovic, Nicole M.; Cookson, Mark R.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of a key cysteine residue (Cys106) in the parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1 regulates its ability to protect against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Cys106 interacts with a neighboring protonated Glu18 residue, stabilizing the Cys106-SO2− (sulfinic acid) form of DJ-1. To study this important post-translational modification, we previously designed several Glu18 mutations (E18N, E18D, E18Q) that alter the oxidative propensity of Cys106. However, recent results suggest these Glu18 mutations cause loss of DJ-1 dimerization, which would severely compromise the protein’s function. The purpose of this study was to conclusively determine the oligomerization state of these mutants using X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, thermal stability analysis, CD spectroscopy, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and crosslinking. We found that all of the Glu18 DJ-1 mutants were dimeric. Thiol crosslinking indicates that these mutant dimers are more flexible than the wild-type protein and can form multiple crosslinked dimeric species due to the transient exposure of cysteine residues that are inaccessible in the wild-type protein. The enhanced flexibility of Glu18 DJ-1 mutants provides a parsimonious explanation for their lower observed crosslinking efficiency in cells. In addition, thiol crosslinkers may have an underappreciated value as qualitative probes of protein conformational flexibility. PMID:24832775

  15. A large area cooled-CCD detector for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Andrews, H. N.; Raeburn, C.

    1994-09-01

    Large area cooled-CCDs are an excellent medium for (indirectly) recording electron images and electron diffraction patterns in real time and for use in electron tomography; real-time imaging is extremely useful in making rapid adjustments in the electron microscope. CCDs provide high sensitivity (useful for minimising dosage to radiation-sensitive biological specimen), good resolution, stable performance, excellent dynamic range and linearity and a reasonably fast readout. We have built an electron imaging device based on the EEV 1152 by 814 pixel CCD which is controlled from a unix based SUN Sparestation operating under X-Windows. The incident 100 kV electrons are converted to visible light in a 0.5 mm thick YAG single crystal which is imaged through a lens on to the CCD. The CCD electronics is designed to be as flexible as possible and allows a wide variation in the readout speed to cater for the relatively fast application where readout noise is less critical and low readout noise applications where the extra few seconds of readout time are not significant. The CCD electronics is built in VME format which is controlled through a S-bus to VME driver. With two parallel channels of readout the whole image can be read out in ˜ 1 s (using the faster readout speed) with 16 bit precision and the image is displayed under X-Windows in a few seconds. The present readout works at 500 kHz and has a noise of ˜ 30 e rms per pixel. With a Peltier cooling device we can operate the CCD at ˜ -40°C which reduces the dark current adequately to allow exposures of up to several minutes. Several examples of patterns collected with the system on a Philips CM12 microscope will be presented.

  16. Large area x-ray detectors for cargo radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, C.; Albagli, D.; Bendahan, J.; Castleberry, D.; Gordon, C.; Hopkins, F.; Ross, W.

    2007-04-01

    Large area x-ray detectors based on phosphors coupled to flat panel amorphous silicon diode technology offer significant advances for cargo radiologic imaging. Flat panel area detectors provide large object coverage offering high throughput inspections to meet the high flow rate of container commerce. These detectors provide excellent spatial resolution when needed, and enhanced SNR through low noise electronics. If the resolution is reduced through pixel binning, further advances in SNR are achievable. Extended exposure imaging and frame averaging enables improved x-ray penetration of ultra-thick objects, or "select-your-own" contrast sensitivity at a rate many times faster than LDAs. The areal coverage of flat panel technology provides inherent volumetric imaging with the appropriate scanning methods. Flat panel area detectors have flexible designs in terms of electronic control, scintillator selection, pixel pitch, and frame rates. Their cost is becoming more competitive as production ramps up for the healthcare, nondestructive testing (NDT), and homeland protection industries. Typically used medical and industrial polycrystalline phosphor materials such as Gd2O2S:Tb (GOS) can be applied to megavolt applications if the phosphor layer is sufficiently thick to enhance x-ray absorption, and if a metal radiator is used to augment the quantum detection efficiency and reduce x-ray scatter. Phosphor layers ranging from 0.2-mm to 1-mm can be "sandwiched" between amorphous silicon flat panel diode arrays and metal radiators. Metal plates consisting of W, Pb or Cu, with thicknesses ranging from 0.25-mm to well over 1-mm can be used by covering the entire area of the phosphor plate. In some combinations of high density metal and phosphor layers, the metal plate provides an intensification of 25% in signal due to electron emission from the plate and subsequent excitation within the phosphor material. This further improves the SNR of the system.

  17. Uniformity of large-area bilayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yuewen; Rong, Youmin; He, Zhengyu; Fan, Ye; Warner, Jamie H.

    2015-10-01

    Graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper foils is a viable method for large area films for transparent conducting electrode (TCE) applications. We examine the spatial uniformity of large area films on the centimeter scale when transferred onto both Si substrates with 300 nm oxide and flexible transparent polyethylene terephthalate substrates. A difference in the quality of graphene, as measured by the sheet resistance and transparency, is found for the areas at the edges of large sheets that depends on the supporting boat used for the CVD growth. Bilayer graphene is grown with uniform properties on the centimeter scale when a flat support is used for CVD growth. The flat support provides consistent delivery of precursor to the copper catalyst for graphene growth. These results provide important insights into the upscaling of CVD methods for growing high quality graphene and its transfer onto flexible substrates for potential applications as a TCE.

  18. High-performance conformal sensors employing single-crystal silicon nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochuan; Subbaraman, Harish; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate light-weight, conformal, and high-performance flexible sensors fabricated on a large area (>2 cm × 2 cm) silicon nanomembrane transferred onto a flexible substrate. Linear L13 photonic crystal microcavities are designed to provide high quality factors on the flexible platform. Subwavelength grating (SWG) couplers are employed in order to enable efficient light coupling to the device using a single mode fiber. Photonic crystal tapers are implemented at the strip-photonic crystal waveguide interfaces to minimize loss. Preliminary chemical sensing data suggests a sensitivity of 75nm/RIU. Bending tests are further performed in order to demonstrate sensitivityindependent operation.

  19. Protein Flexibility and Conformational State: A Comparison of Collective Vibrational Modes of Wild-Type and D96N Bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Whitmire, S. E.; Wolpert, D.; Markelz, A. G.; Hillebrecht, J. R.; Galan, J.; Birge, R. R.

    2003-01-01

    Far infrared (FIR) spectral measurements of wild-type (WT) and D96N mutant bacteriorhodopsin thin films have been carried out using terahertz time domain spectroscopy as a function of hydration, temperature, and conformational state. The results are compared to calculated spectra generated via normal mode analyses using CHARMM. We find that the FIR absorbance is slowly increasing with frequency and without strong narrow features over the range of 2–60 cm−1 and up to a resolution of 0.17 cm−1. The broad absorption shifts in frequency with decreasing temperature as expected with a strongly anharmonic potential and in agreement with neutron inelastic scattering results. Decreasing hydration shifts the absorption to higher frequencies, possibly resulting from decreased coupling mediated by the interior water molecules. Ground-state FIR absorbances have nearly identical frequency dependence, with the mutant having less optical density than the WT. In the M state, the FIR absorbance of the WT increases whereas there is no change for D96N. These results represent the first measurement of FIR absorbance change as a function of conformational state. PMID:12885670

  20. Conformational Flexibility and Dynamics of the Internal Loop and Helical Regions of the Kink-Turn Motif in the Glycine Riboswitch by Site-Directed Spin-Labeling.

    PubMed

    Esquiaqui, Jackie M; Sherman, Eileen M; Ye, Jing-Dong; Fanucci, Gail E

    2016-08-01

    Site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy provides a means for a solution state description of site-specific dynamics and flexibility of large RNAs, facilitating our understanding of the effects of environmental conditions such as ligands and ions on RNA structure and dynamics. Here, the utility and capability of EPR line shape analysis and distance measurements to monitor and describe site-specific changes in the conformational dynamics of internal loop nucleobases as well as helix-helix interactions of the kink-turn motif in the Vibrio cholerae (VC) glycine riboswitch that occur upon sequential K(+)-, Mg(2+)-, and glycine-induced folding were explored. Spin-labels were incorporated into the 232-nucleotide sequence via splinted ligation strategies. Thiouridine nucleobase labeling within the internal loop reveals unambiguous differential dynamics for two successive sites labeled, with varied rates of motion reflective of base flipping and base stacking. EPR-based distance measurements for nitroxide spin-labels incorporated within the RNA backbone in the helical regions of the kink-turn motif are reflective of helical formation and tertiary interaction induced by ion stabilization. In both instances, results indicate that the structural formation of the kink-turn motif in the VC glycine riboswitch can be stabilized by 100 mM K(+) where the conformational flexibility of the kink-turn motif is not further tightened by subsequent addition of divalent ions. Although glycine binding is likely to induce structural and dynamic changes in other regions, SDSL indicates no impact of glycine binding on the local dynamics or structure of the kink-turn motif as investigated here. Overall, these results demonstrate the ability of SDSL to interrogate site-specific base dynamics and packing of helices in large RNAs and demonstrate ion-induced stability of the kink-turn fold of the VC riboswitch. PMID:27427937

  1. Smooth, seamless, and structured grid generation with flexibility in resolution distribution on a sphere based on conformal mapping and the spring dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iga, Shin-ichi

    2015-09-01

    A generation method for smooth, seamless, and structured triangular grids on a sphere with flexibility in resolution distribution is proposed. This method is applicable to many fields that deal with a sphere on which the required resolution is not uniform. The grids were generated using the spring dynamics method, and adjustments were made using analytical functions. The mesh topology determined its resolution distribution, derived from a combination of conformal mapping factors: polar stereographic projection (PSP), Lambert conformal conic projection (LCCP), and Mercator projection (MP). Their combination generated, for example, a tropically fine grid that had a nearly constant high-resolution belt around the equator, with a gradual decrease in resolution distribution outside of the belt. This grid can be applied to boundary-less simulations of tropical meteorology. The other example involves a regionally fine grid with a nearly constant high-resolution circular region and a gradually decreasing resolution distribution outside of the region. This is applicable to regional atmospheric simulations without grid nesting. The proposed grids are compatible with computer architecture because they possess a structured form. Each triangle of the proposed grids was highly regular, implying a high local isotropy in resolution. Finally, the proposed grids were examined by advection and shallow water simulations.

  2. The Role of Active Site Flexible Loops in Catalysis and of Zinc in Conformational Stability of Bacillus cereus 569/H/9 β-Lactamase.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Caroline; Nigen, Michaël; Jacquin, Olivier; Willet, Nicolas; Dumoulin, Mireille; Karsisiotis, Andreas Ioannis; Roberts, Gordon C K; Damblon, Christian; Redfield, Christina; Matagne, André

    2016-07-29

    Metallo-β-lactamases catalyze the hydrolysis of most β-lactam antibiotics and hence represent a major clinical concern. The development of inhibitors for these enzymes is complicated by the diversity and flexibility of their substrate-binding sites, motivating research into their structure and function. In this study, we examined the conformational properties of the Bacillus cereus β-lactamase II in the presence of chemical denaturants using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. The apoenzyme was found to unfold cooperatively, with a Gibbs free energy of stabilization (ΔG(0)) of 32 ± 2 kJ·mol(-1) For holoBcII, a first non-cooperative transition leads to multiple interconverting native-like states, in which both zinc atoms remain bound in an apparently unaltered active site, and the protein displays a well organized compact hydrophobic core with structural changes confined to the enzyme surface, but with no catalytic activity. Two-dimensional NMR data revealed that the loss of activity occurs concomitantly with perturbations in two loops that border the enzyme active site. A second cooperative transition, corresponding to global unfolding, is observed at higher denaturant concentrations, with ΔG(0) value of 65 ± 1.4 kJ·mol(-1) These combined data highlight the importance of the two zinc ions in maintaining structure as well as a relatively well defined conformation for both active site loops to maintain enzymatic activity. PMID:27235401

  3. Construction of helical coordination polymers via flexible conformers of bis(3-pyridyl)cyclotetramethylenesilane: metal(ii) and halogen effects on luminescence, thermolysis and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeun; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Haeri; Jung, Ok-Sang

    2015-05-01

    Infinite rectangular-tubular helices, [MX2L] (M = Zn(ii), Hg(ii); X(-) = Cl(-), Br(-); L = bis(3-pyridyl)cyclotetramethylenesilane), have been efficiently constructed via the combined effects of the potential flexible conformers of L and the tetrahedral geometry of M(ii) ions. This helical molecular system affords a racemic mixture of P- and M-helices in a crystal. The helical pitches (7.8934(4)-8.1560(2) Å) that are sensitive to the nature of M(ii) ions and halide anions are attributable to subtle change in the flexible dihedral angles between the two pyridyl groups around Si and the M(ii) hinges. Their photoluminescence intensities, correspondingly, are in the order [ZnCl2L] > [ZnBr2L] ≫ [HgCl2L] > [HgBr2L]. Zinc(ii) complexes show recyclable catalytic effects on the transesterification reaction in the order [ZnCl2L] > [ZnBr2L]. Calcination of [ZnCl2L] and [ZnBr2L] at 500 °C produces uniform hexagonal tubular spire crystals of 1.2 × 1.2 × 4.0 μm(3) dimensions and spheres, respectively. PMID:25847863

  4. Laser processing system development of large area and high precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeongchan; Ryu, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Taesang

    2013-03-01

    As industry of PCB (Printed Circuit Board) and display growing, this industry requires an increasingly high-precision quality so current cutting process in industry is preferred laser machining than mechanical machining. Now, laser machining is used almost "step and repeat" method in large area, but this method has a problem such as cutting quality in the continuity of edge parts, cutting speed and low productivity. To solve these problems in large area, on-the-fly (stagescanner synchronized system) is gradually increasing. On-the-fly technology is able to process large area with high speed because of stage-scanner synchronized moving. We designed laser-based high precision system with on-the-fly. In this system, we used UV nano-second pulse laser, power controller and scanner with telecentric f-theta lens. The power controller is consisted of HWP(Half Wave Plate), thin film plate polarizer, photo diode, micro step motor and control board. Laser power is possible to monitor real-time and adjust precision power by using power controller. Using this machine, we tested cutting of large area coverlay and sheet type large area PCB by applying on-the-fly. As a result, our developed machine is possible to process large area without the problem of the continuity of edge parts and by high cutting speed than competitor about coverlay.

  5. Electronic sensor and actuator webs for large-area complex geometry cardiac mapping and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Lu, Nanshu; Wang, Shuodao; Lee, Stephen P.; Keum, Hohyun; D’Angelo, Robert; Klinker, Lauren; Su, Yewang; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Yun-Soung; Ameen, Abid; Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Yihui; de Graff, Bassel; Hsu, Yung-Yu; Liu, ZhuangJian; Ruskin, Jeremy; Xu, Lizhi; Lu, Chi; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Huang, Yonggang; Mansour, Moussa; Slepian, Marvin J.; Rogers, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Curved surfaces, complex geometries, and time-dynamic deformations of the heart create challenges in establishing intimate, nonconstraining interfaces between cardiac structures and medical devices or surgical tools, particularly over large areas. We constructed large area designs for diagnostic and therapeutic stretchable sensor and actuator webs that conformally wrap the epicardium, establishing robust contact without sutures, mechanical fixtures, tapes, or surgical adhesives. These multifunctional web devices exploit open, mesh layouts and mount on thin, bio-resorbable sheets of silk to facilitate handling in a way that yields, after dissolution, exceptionally low mechanical moduli and thicknesses. In vivo studies in rabbit and pig animal models demonstrate the effectiveness of these device webs for measuring and spatially mapping temperature, electrophysiological signals, strain, and physical contact in sheet and balloon-based systems that also have the potential to deliver energy to perform localized tissue ablation. PMID:23150574

  6. Conformational flexibility of the oncogenic protein LMO2 primes the formation of the multi-protein transcription complex

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, H.; Tanaka, T.; Omari, K. El; Mancini, E. J.; Cruz, A.; Fernandez-Fuentes, N.; Chambers, J.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    LMO2 was discovered via chromosomal translocations in T-cell leukaemia and shown normally to be essential for haematopoiesis. LMO2 is made up of two LIM only domains (thus it is a LIM-only protein) and forms a bridge in a multi-protein complex. We have studied the mechanism of formation of this complex using a single domain antibody fragment that inhibits LMO2 by sequestering it in a non-functional form. The crystal structure of LMO2 with this antibody fragment has been solved revealing a conformational difference in the positioning and angle between the two LIM domains compared with its normal binding. This contortion occurs by bending at a central helical region of LMO2. This is a unique mechanism for inhibiting an intracellular protein function and the structural contusion implies a model in which newly synthesized, intrinsically disordered LMO2 binds to a partner protein nucleating further interactions and suggests approaches for therapeutic targeting of LMO2. PMID:24407558

  7. Adjustment of local conformational flexibility and accessible surface area alterations of Serine128 and Valine183 in mnemiopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakiminia, Forough; Molakarimi, Maryam; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Jahani, Zohreh; Sajedi, Reza H.; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2016-08-01

    We used a combination of experimental and bioinformatic studies to elucidate the importance of Serine128 and Valine183 on the activity and thermal stability of mnemiopsin 1 by substitution of S128 and V183 with glycine and threonine, respectively (S128G and V183T mutants). Luminescence emissions of S128G and V183T were reduced to 71.6% and 46.6% with respect to the original activity of the wild type protein. According to circular dichroism (CD) measurements, compactness of mutants decreased in comparison with wild type (WT) protein. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicated that Tm values of thermal unfolding are not changed significantly upon mutation. Herein, we suggest that the protein variants unfold through molecular association and intermediate states. Bioinformatic studies revealed that local fluctuation of residues in S128G increased with respect to WT protein. However, S128G mutation leads to increment of the accessible surface area of lysine188. Therefore, this change is thermodynamically favorable. Finally, both experimental and theoretical studies showed a delicate balance between all structural alterations, determining total conformational stability of the protein.

  8. Optical nano-woodpiles: large-area metallic photonic crystals and metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibbotson, Lindsey A.; Demetriadou, Angela; Croxall, Stephen; Hess, Ortwin; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2015-02-01

    Metallic woodpile photonic crystals and metamaterials operating across the visible spectrum are extremely difficult to construct over large areas, because of the intricate three-dimensional nanostructures and sub-50 nm features demanded. Previous routes use electron-beam lithography or direct laser writing but widespread application is restricted by their expense and low throughput. Scalable approaches including soft lithography, colloidal self-assembly, and interference holography, produce structures limited in feature size, material durability, or geometry. By multiply stacking gold nanowire flexible gratings, we demonstrate a scalable high-fidelity approach for fabricating flexible metallic woodpile photonic crystals, with features down to 10 nm produced in bulk and at low cost. Control of stacking sequence, asymmetry, and orientation elicits great control, with visible-wavelength band-gap reflections exceeding 60%, and with strong induced chirality. Such flexible and stretchable architectures can produce metamaterials with refractive index near zero, and are easily tuned across the IR and visible ranges.

  9. Large-area functionalized CVD graphene for work function matched transparent electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Bointon, Thomas H.; Jones, Gareth F.; De Sanctis, Adolfo; Hill-Pearce, Ruth; Craciun, Monica F.; Russo, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of flexible photovoltaic and organic light emitting devices is heavily dependent on the availability of flexible and transparent conductors with at least a similar workfunction to that of Indium Tin Oxide. Here we present the first study of the work function of large area (up to 9 cm2) FeCl3 intercalated graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on Nickel, and demonstrate values as large as 5.1 eV. Upon intercalation, a charge density per graphene layer of 5 ⋅ 1013 ± 5 ⋅ 1012 cm−2 is attained, making this material an attractive platform for the study of plasmonic excitations in the infrared wavelength spectrum of interest to the telecommunication industry. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of this material for flexible electronics in a transparent circuit on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate. PMID:26548711

  10. Conformational flexibility and molecular interactions of an archaeal homologue of the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome protein

    PubMed Central

    Ng, C Leong; Waterman, David G; Koonin, Eugene V; Walters, Alison D; Chong, James PJ; Isupov, Michail N; Lebedev, Andrey A; Bunka, David HJ; Stockley, Peter G; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel; Antson, Alfred A

    2009-01-01

    Background Defects in the human Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS) protein-coding gene lead to the autosomal recessive disorder characterised by bone marrow dysfunction, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and skeletal abnormalities. This protein is highly conserved in eukaryotes and archaea but is not found in bacteria. Although genomic and biophysical studies have suggested involvement of this protein in RNA metabolism and in ribosome biogenesis, its interacting partners remain largely unknown. Results We determined the crystal structure of the SBDS orthologue from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mthSBDS). This structure shows that SBDS proteins are highly flexible, with the N-terminal FYSH domain and the C-terminal ferredoxin-like domain capable of undergoing substantial rotational adjustments with respect to the central domain. Affinity chromatography identified several proteins from the large ribosomal subunit as possible interacting partners of mthSBDS. Moreover, SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) experiments, combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) suggest that mthSBDS does not interact with RNA molecules in a sequence specific manner. Conclusion It is suggested that functional interactions of SBDS proteins with their partners could be facilitated by rotational adjustments of the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains with respect to the central domain. Examination of the SBDS protein structure and domain movements together with its possible interaction with large ribosomal subunit proteins suggest that these proteins could participate in ribosome function. PMID:19454024

  11. Large-area synthesis of high-quality and uniform monolayer WS2 on reusable Au foils.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Liu, Zhibo; Sun, Dong-Ming; Huang, Le; Ma, Lai-Peng; Yin, Li-Chang; Ma, Teng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Peng, Lian-Mao; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-01-01

    Large-area monolayer WS2 is a desirable material for applications in next-generation electronics and optoelectronics. However, the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with rigid and inert substrates for large-area sample growth suffers from a non-uniform number of layers, small domain size and many defects, and is not compatible with the fabrication process of flexible devices. Here we report the self-limited catalytic surface growth of uniform monolayer WS2 single crystals of millimetre size and large-area films by ambient-pressure CVD on Au. The weak interaction between the WS2 and Au enables the intact transfer of the monolayers to arbitrary substrates using the electrochemical bubbling method without sacrificing Au. The WS2 shows high crystal quality and optical and electrical properties comparable or superior to mechanically exfoliated samples. We also demonstrate the roll-to-roll/bubbling production of large-area flexible films of uniform monolayer, double-layer WS2 and WS2/graphene heterostructures, and batch fabrication of large-area flexible monolayer WS2 film transistor arrays. PMID:26450174

  12. Large-area synthesis of high-quality and uniform monolayer WS2 on reusable Au foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Liu, Zhibo; Sun, Dong-Ming; Huang, Le; Ma, Lai-Peng; Yin, Li-Chang; Ma, Teng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Peng, Lian-Mao; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-10-01

    Large-area monolayer WS2 is a desirable material for applications in next-generation electronics and optoelectronics. However, the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with rigid and inert substrates for large-area sample growth suffers from a non-uniform number of layers, small domain size and many defects, and is not compatible with the fabrication process of flexible devices. Here we report the self-limited catalytic surface growth of uniform monolayer WS2 single crystals of millimetre size and large-area films by ambient-pressure CVD on Au. The weak interaction between the WS2 and Au enables the intact transfer of the monolayers to arbitrary substrates using the electrochemical bubbling method without sacrificing Au. The WS2 shows high crystal quality and optical and electrical properties comparable or superior to mechanically exfoliated samples. We also demonstrate the roll-to-roll/bubbling production of large-area flexible films of uniform monolayer, double-layer WS2 and WS2/graphene heterostructures, and batch fabrication of large-area flexible monolayer WS2 film transistor arrays.

  13. Large-area synthesis of high-quality and uniform monolayer WS2 on reusable Au foils

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Liu, Zhibo; Sun, Dong-Ming; Huang, Le; Ma, Lai-Peng; Yin, Li-Chang; Ma, Teng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Peng, Lian-Mao; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-01-01

    Large-area monolayer WS2 is a desirable material for applications in next-generation electronics and optoelectronics. However, the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with rigid and inert substrates for large-area sample growth suffers from a non-uniform number of layers, small domain size and many defects, and is not compatible with the fabrication process of flexible devices. Here we report the self-limited catalytic surface growth of uniform monolayer WS2 single crystals of millimetre size and large-area films by ambient-pressure CVD on Au. The weak interaction between the WS2 and Au enables the intact transfer of the monolayers to arbitrary substrates using the electrochemical bubbling method without sacrificing Au. The WS2 shows high crystal quality and optical and electrical properties comparable or superior to mechanically exfoliated samples. We also demonstrate the roll-to-roll/bubbling production of large-area flexible films of uniform monolayer, double-layer WS2 and WS2/graphene heterostructures, and batch fabrication of large-area flexible monolayer WS2 film transistor arrays. PMID:26450174

  14. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of a ∼320 Å long protein fiber generated by in-frame extension of its repeated helical coiled-coil core. Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility.

  15. Preparation of large-area double-walled carbon nanotube films and application as film heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zi Ping; Wang, Jian Nong

    2009-11-01

    Large-area (larger than 30×30 cm 2) double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) films are prepared and application as a heating element for film heaters is demonstrated. A high heating efficiency is observed. Measurements indicate that the use of the DWCNT film heater would save energy consumption up to 20-30% when compared with a commercial film-like metal-based heater. Morphological analysis reveals that the special surface structure, appropriate electric and high thermal conductivities of the film formed by the network of entangled nanotube bundles may lead to the high heating performance. Considering large-area, shape flexibility, negligible weight and easy manipulation, the film exhibits promising potential applications as a film heater for thermal control in aircrafts, medical equipment, home appliances and other industrial fields at low temperature (below 400 °C).

  16. Large-area fabrication of 3D petal-like nanopattern for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weimin; Wang, Jinhe; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xiaoli; Min, Guoquan

    2014-06-01

    A very easy and flexible approach to fabricate large area, petal-like nanopattern for surface enhanced Raman scattering using soft imprint lithography are presented here. The morphology of the petal-like nanopattern can be transferred truly using the h-PDMS and diluted PMMA molding template. By means of Au metal deposition, a SERS substrate with high enhancement factor over large area, which is still a problem, was produced easily. The morphology and Raman enhancement effect of the 3D nanopattern are characterized by SEM, AFM and SERS. The results show that the petal-like 3D nanopattern has high SERS enhancement factor (order of 1.0 × 108) and could be a promising low cost and high performance SERS active substrate.

  17. Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using Nanosphere Photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Dey, Dibyendu; Memis, Omer G.; Katsnelson, Alex; Mohseni, Hooman

    2008-10-01

    Large area periodic nanostructures exhibit unique optical and electronic properties and have found many applications, such as photonic band-gap materials, high dense data storage, and photonic devices. We have developed a maskless photolithography method—Nanosphere Photolithography (NSP)—to produce a large area of uniform nanopatterns in the photoresist utilizing the silica micro-spheres to focus UV light. Here, we will extend the idea to fabricate metallic nanostructures using the NSP method. We produced large areas of periodic uniform nanohole array perforated in different metallic films, such as gold and aluminum. The diameters of these nanoholes are much smaller than the wavelength of UV light used and they are very uniformly distributed. The method introduced here inherently has both the advantages of photolithography and self-assembled methods. Besides, it also generates very uniform repetitive nanopatterns because the focused beam waist is almost unchanged with different sphere sizes.

  18. Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-02-28

    Efficient deposition of high-quality coatings often requires controlled application of excited or ionized particles. These particles are either condensing (film-forming) or assisting by providing energy and momentum to the film growth process, resulting in densification, sputtering/etching, modification of stress, roughness, texture, etc. In this review, the technical means are surveyed enabling large area application of ions and plasmas, with ion energies ranging from a few eV to a few keV. Both semiconductortype large area (single wafer or batch processing with {approx} 1000 cm{sup 2}) and in-line web and glass-coating-type large area (> 10{sup 7} m{sup 2} annually) are considered. Characteristics and differences between plasma and ion sources are explained. The latter include gridded and gridless sources. Many examples are given, including sources based on DC, RF, and microwave discharges, some with special geometries like hollow cathodes and E x B configurations.

  19. Developmental experiments on large-area silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silard, Andrei P.; Nani, Gabriel

    1989-05-01

    Practical ways of attenuating the severe limitations imposed by areal inhomogeneities on the performance of large-area solar cells fabricated on both p- and n-silicon wafers are described, and the results of tests are presented. The p(+)-n-n(+) and n(+)-p-p(+) cells were processed as bifacial devices and tested under both frontside and backside AM1 illumination. It is shown that the combination of a simple design and some of the technological approaches evaluated in this study result in low-cost high-efficiency large-area bifacial silicon solar cells that exhibit with good electrooptical performance.

  20. Large-area metallic photonic lattices for military applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    In this project we developed photonic crystal modeling capability and fabrication technology that is scaleable to large area. An intelligent optimization code was developed to find the optimal structure for the desired spectral response. In terms of fabrication, an exhaustive survey of fabrication techniques that would meet the large area requirement was reduced to Deep X-ray Lithography (DXRL) and nano-imprint. Using DXRL, we fabricated a gold logpile photonic crystal in the <100> plane. For the nano-imprint technique, we fabricated a cubic array of gold squares. These two examples also represent two classes of metallic photonic crystal topologies, the connected network and cermet arrangement.

  1. Coatings for large-area low-cost solar concentrators and reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Bennett, W.D.

    1994-07-01

    Seven years ago, Pacific Northwest Laboratory constructed a large-optics coating facility to develop and fabricate high-performance multilayer laser-mirror coatings on large substrates. With the reduction of DoD funding for the development of optical coatings for large optics, new applications for this chamber were sought. In addition to new DoD applications, the facility is now being used to fabricate multilayer enhanced-metal reflectors for low-cost large-area solar concentrators using both magnetron-sputtered metal and dielectric coatings, with future extension to vacuum-evaporated polymer coatings. Other new applications include: Ti/Ti:Al lamellar composites on flexible webs; EMI cladding for heater wire; EMI-shielding coatings on flexible webs; microwave-absorbing coatings on flexible webs; heat mirrors; bulk micromachining; and protective coatings on cylindrical substrates and webs. The facility has also been established as a DoD user facility for development and experimentation in large-area optical coatings. This paper describes important changes in the large-optics coating chamber and additional deposition equipment that has been added to pursue these new non-DoD technological areas. Solar reflectors and the resulting new coatings will be described. Future work and new technological areas being pursued will also be discussed.

  2. Large area, low cost solar cell development and production readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, D.

    1982-01-01

    A process sequence for a large area ( or = 25 sq. cm) silicon solar cell was investigated. Generic cell choice was guided by the expected electron fluence, by the packing factors of various cell envelope designs onto each panel to provide needed voltage as well as current, by the weight constraints on the system, and by the cost goals of the contract.

  3. Large-area cryocooling for far-infrared telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Triem T.; O'Connell, Tamara A.; Ku, Jentung; Butler, C. D.; Swanson, Theodore D.

    2003-10-01

    Requirements for cryocooling of large-area heat sources begin to appear in studies of future space missions. Examples are the cooling of (i) the entire structure/mirror of large Far Infrared space telescopes to 4-40K and (ii) cryogenic thermal bus to maintain High Temperature Superconductor electronics to below 75K. The cryocooling system must provide robust/reliable operation and not cause significant vibration to the optical components. But perhaps the most challenging aspect of the system design is the removal of waste heat over a very large area. A cryogenic Loop Heat Pipe (C-LHP)/ cryocooler cooling system was developed with the ultimate goal of meeting the aforementioned requirements. In the proposed cooling concept, the C-LHP collected waste heat from a large-area heat source and then transported it to the cryocooler coldfinger for rejection. A proof-of-concept C-LHP test loop was constructed and performance tested in a vacuum chamber to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed C-LHP to distribute the cryocooler cooling power over a large area. The test loop was designed to operate with any cryogenic working fluid such as Oxygen/Nitrogen (60-120K), Neon (28-40K), Hydrogen (18-30K), and Helium (2.5-4.5K). Preliminary test results indicated that the test loop had a cooling capacity of 4.2W in the 30-40K temperature range with Neon as the working fluid.

  4. Large area high-speed metrology SPM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapetek, P.; Valtr, M.; Picco, L.; Payton, O. D.; Martinek, J.; Yacoot, A.; Miles, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present a large area high-speed measuring system capable of rapidly generating nanometre resolution scanning probe microscopy data over mm2 regions. The system combines a slow moving but accurate large area XYZ scanner with a very fast but less accurate small area XY scanner. This arrangement enables very large areas to be scanned by stitching together the small, rapidly acquired, images from the fast XY scanner while simultaneously moving the slow XYZ scanner across the region of interest. In order to successfully merge the image sequences together two software approaches for calibrating the data from the fast scanner are described. The first utilizes the low uncertainty interferometric sensors of the XYZ scanner while the second implements a genetic algorithm with multiple parameter fitting during the data merging step of the image stitching process. The basic uncertainty components related to these high-speed measurements are also discussed. Both techniques are shown to successfully enable high-resolution, large area images to be generated at least an order of magnitude faster than with a conventional atomic force microscope.

  5. Toward large-area targets for “TRAKULA”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vascon, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Runke, J.

    2011-11-01

    TRAKULA ( Transmutationsrelevante kernphysikalische Untersuchungen langlebiger Aktinide, i.e., nuclear physical investigations of long-lived actinides with relevance to transmutation) is a joint research project of the German Federal Ministry of Science and Education (BMBF) on nuclear physics investigations with modern scientific, technological and numerical methods. Experiments concerning the transmutation of radioactive waste are a central topic of the project. For this, large-area samples (≥40 cm 2) of 235,238U and 239,242Pu compounds are required for the calibration of fission chambers and for fission yield measurements. Another topic within the project requires large-area targets for precise measurements of the half-life, t1/2, of very long-lived α-particle emitters like 144Nd ( t1/2≈2×10 15 y). Here, we report on electrodeposition tests with Gd and Nd (used as chemical homologs of the actinides), which were performed to find optimal deposition conditions for small-area targets that should be applicable to future large-area targets. The layers were produced by molecular plating. A new stirring technique, ultrasonic stirring, was adopted and found to be suitable for producing large-area targets. Moreover, two different current densities (namely 0.7 and 1.4 mA/cm 2) were studied and found appropriate for target preparation. Characterization of the layers with different analytical techniques played a major role in these studies to gain a deeper understanding of the deposition process itself: neutron activation analysis and γ-spectroscopy were used for yield measurements, radiographic imaging for homogeneity studies, scanning electron microscopy for morphology studies, and atomic force microscopy for roughness studies. According to the obtained results, a new electrochemical cell for the production of large-area targets was designed.

  6. Detection of Steel Fatigue Cracks with Strain Sensing Sheets Based on Large Area Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-01-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous monitoring over large areas of structure, and with sensors of high spatial resolution. Technologies based on Large Area Electronics (LAE) can enable direct sensing and can be scaled to the level required for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil structures and infrastructure. Sensing sheets based on LAE contain dense arrangements of thin-film strain sensors, associated electronics and various control circuits deposited and integrated on a flexible polyimide substrate that can cover large areas of structures. This paper presents the development stage of a prototype strain sensing sheet based on LAE for crack detection and localization. Two types of sensing-sheet arrangements with size 6 × 6 inch (152 × 152 mm) were designed and manufactured, one with a very dense arrangement of sensors and the other with a less dense arrangement of sensors. The sensing sheets were bonded to steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary, so the fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The sensors within the sensing sheet that were close to the notch tip successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The sensors that were away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue cracks based on the time history of the measured strain. The results of the tests have validated the general principles of the proposed sensing sheets for crack detection and identified advantages and challenges of the two tested designs. PMID:25853407

  7. Evolution of magnetically rotating arc into large area arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Wan-Wan; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Zha, Jun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2015-06-01

    An arc channel tends to shrink due to its conductivity increasing with the increase of temperature. In this study, to generate large area arc plasma, we construct a magnetically rotating arc plasma generator, which mainly consists of a lanthanide tungsten cathode (13 mm in diameter), a concentric cylindrical graphite anode chamber (60 mm in diameter) and a solenoid coil for producing an axial magnet field. By controlling the cold gas flow, the magnetically rotating arc evolves from constricted mode to diffuse mode, which almost fills the whole arc chamber cross section. Results show that the diffuse arc plasma has better uniformity and stability. The formation mechanism of large area arc plasma is discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11035005, 11475174, and 50876101) and the Science Instrument Foundation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y201162).

  8. Progress on large-area polarization grating fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskiewicz, Matthew N.; Kim, Jihwan; Li, Yanming; Komanduri, Ravi K.; Escuti, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    Over the last several years, we have pioneered liquid crystal polarization gratings (PGs), in both switchable and polymer versions. We have also introduced their use in many applications, including mechanical/non-mechanical laser beam steering and polarization imaging/sensing. Until now, conventional holographic congurations were used to create PGs where the diameter of the active area was limited to 1-2 inches. In this paper, we discuss a new holography setup to fabricate large area PGs using spherical waves as the diverging coherent beams. Various design parameters of this setup are examined for impact on the quality of the recorded PG profile. Using this setup, we demonstrate a large area polymer PG with approximately 66 inch square area, and present detailed characterization.

  9. High Energy Astrophysics with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Observatory. It includes information about the LAT, and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), detection of the quiet sun and the moon in gamma rays, Pulsars observed by the observatory, Globular Star Clusters, Active Galactic Nucleus, and Gamma-Ray Bursts, with specific information about GRB 080916C.

  10. Characterization of Large Area APDs for the EXO-200 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, R.; LePort, F.; Pocar, A.; Kumar, K.; Odian, A.; Prescott, C.Y.; Tenev, V.; Ackerman, N.; Akimov, D.; Auger, M.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Cook, S.; deVoe, R.; Dolinski, M.J.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Fierlinger, P.; Flatt, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bern U., LHEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Alabama U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Carleton U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bern U., LHEP /SLAC /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2011-12-02

    EXO-200 uses 468 large area avalanche photodiodes (LAAPDs) for detection of scintillation light in an ultra-low-background liquid xenon (LXe) detector. We describe initial measurements of dark noise, gain and response to xenon scintillation light of LAAPDs at temperatures from room temperature to 169 K - the temperature of liquid xenon. We also describe the individual characterization of more than 800 LAAPDs for selective installation in the EXO-200 detector.

  11. Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

    2008-02-05

    The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

  12. Wearable light management system for light stimulated healing of large area chronic wounds (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallweit, David; Mayer, Jan; Fricke, Sören; Schnieper, Marc; Ferrini, Rolando

    2016-03-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals, and health care systems, affecting over 40 million patients and creating costs of approximately 40 billion € annually. We will present a medical device for photo-stimulated wound care based on a wearable large area flexible and disposable light management system consisting of a waveguide with incorporated micro- and nanometer scale optical structures for efficient light in-coupling, waveguiding and homogeneous illumination of large area wounds. The working principle of this innovative device is based on the therapeutic effects of visible light to facilitate the self-healing process of chronic wounds. On the one hand, light exposure in the red (656nm) induces growth of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in deeper layers of the skin. On the other hand, blue light (453nm) is known to have antibacterial effects predominately at the surface layers of the skin. In order to be compliant with medical requirements the system will consist of two elements: a disposable wound dressing with embedded flexible optical waveguides for the light management and illumination of the wound area, and a non-disposable compact module containing the light sources, a controller, a rechargeable battery, and a data transmission unit. In particular, we will report on the developed light management system. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, a demonstrator will be presented and its performances will be reported to demonstrate the potential of this innovative device.

  13. Laser-assisted reduction of graphene oxide for paper based large area flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balliu, E.; Andersson, H.; Engholm, M.; Forsberg, S.; Olin, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present a promising method for fabrication of conductive tracks on paper based substrates by laser assisted reduction of Graphene Oxide (GO). Printed electronics on paper based substrates is be coming more popular due to lower cost and recyclability. Fabrication of conductive tracks is of great importance where metal, carbon and polymer inks are commonly used. An emerging option is reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), which can be a good conductor. Here we have evaluated reduction of GO by using a 532 nm laser source, showing promising results with a decrease of sheet resistance from >100 M Ω/Sqr for unreduced GO down to 126 Ω/Sqr. without any observable damage to the paper substrates.

  14. Development of CIGS2 Thin Films on Ultralightweight Flexible Large Area Foil Sunstrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Gade, Vivek S.; Kadam, Ankur A.; Jahagirdar, Anant H.; Kulkarni, Sachin S.; Bet, Sachin M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of thin film solar cells is aimed at reducing the costs for photovoltaic systems. Use of thin film technology and thin foil substrate such as 5-mil thick stainless steel foil or 1-mil thick Ti would result in considerable costs savings. Another important aspect is manufacturing cost. Current single crystal technology for space power can cost more than $ 300 per watt at the array level and weigh more than 1 kg/sq m equivalent to specific power of approx. 65 W/kg. Thin film material such as CuIn1-xGaxS2 (CIGS2), CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se(2-y)S(y) (CIGSS) or amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) may be able to reduce both the cost and mass per unit area by an order of magnitude. Manufacturing costs for solar arrays are an important consideration for total spacecraft budget. For a medium sized 5kW satellite for example, the array manufacturing cost alone may exceed $ 2 million. Moving to thin film technology could reduce this expense to less than $ 500K. Earlier publications have demonstrated the potential of achieving higher efficiencies from CIGSS thin film solar cells on 5-mil thick stainless steel foil as well as initial stages of facility augmentation for depositing thin film solar cells on larger (6 in x 4 in) substrates. This paper presents the developmental study of achieving stress free Mo coating; uniform coatings of Mo back contact and metallic precursors. The paper also presents the development of sol gel process, refurbishment of selenization/sulfurization furnace, chemical bath deposition (CBD) for n-type CdS and scrubber for detoxification of H2S and H2Se gases.

  15. Large area photodetector based on microwave cavity perturbation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Braggio, C. Carugno, G.; Sirugudu, R. K.; Lombardi, A.; Ruoso, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a preliminary study to develop a large area photodetector, based on a semiconductor crystal placed inside a superconducting resonant cavity. Laser pulses are detected through a variation of the cavity impedance, as a consequence of the conductivity change in the semiconductor. A novel method, whereby the designed photodetector is simulated by finite element analysis, makes it possible to perform pulse-height spectroscopy on the reflected microwave signals. We measure an energy sensitivity of 100 fJ in the average mode without the employment of low noise electronics and suggest possible ways to further reduce the single-shot detection threshold, based on the results of the described method.

  16. Large area nuclear particle detectors using ET materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this SBIR Phase 1 feasibility effort was to demonstrate the usefulness of Quantex electron-trapping (ET) materials for spatial detection of nuclear particles over large areas. This demonstration entailed evaluating the prompt visible scintillation as nuclear particles impinged on films of ET materials, and subsequently detecting the nuclear particle impingement information pattern stored in the ET material, by means of the visible-wavelength luminescence produced by near-infrared interrogation. Readily useful levels of scintillation and luminescence outputs are demonstrated.

  17. Position reconstruction in large-area scintillating fibre detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, K.; Johansson, H. T.; Paschalis, S.; Simon, H.; Aumann, T.

    2009-09-01

    A new analysis procedure has been developed for the large-area scintillating fibre detectors with position-sensitive photomultiplier (PSPM) readout used for heavy ions in the LAND set-up at GSI. It includes gain matching of the PSPM, calibration of the PSPM fibre mask and hit reconstruction. This procedure allows for a quasi-online calibration of this tracking device. It also allows for a precise determination of the position close to the intrinsic detector resolution of 1 mm pitch together with careful treatment of individual event accuracies.

  18. Application issues for large-area electrochromic windows incommercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    Projections of performance from small-area devices to large-area windows and enterprise marketing have created high expectations for electrochromic glazings. As a result, this paper seeks to precipitate an objective dialog between material scientists and building-application scientists to determine whether actual large-area electrochromic devices will result in significant performance benefits and what material improvements are needed, if any, to make electrochromics more practical for commercial building applications. Few in-situ tests have been conducted with large-area electrochromic windows applied in buildings. This study presents monitored results from a full-scale field test of large-area electrochromic windows to illustrate how this technology will perform in commercial buildings. The visible transmittance (Tv) of the installed electrochromic ranged from 0.11 to 0.38. The data are limited to the winter period for a south-east-facing window. The effect of actual device performance on lighting energy use, direct sun control, discomfort glare, and interior illumination is discussed. No mechanical system loads were monitored. These data demonstrate the use of electrochromics in a moderate climate and focus on the most restrictive visual task: computer use in offices. Through this small demonstration, we were able to determine that electrochromic windows can indeed provide unmitigated transparent views and a level of dynamic illumination control never before seen in architectural glazing materials. Daily lighting energy use was 6-24 percent less compared to the 11 percent-glazing, with improved interior brightness levels. Daily lighting energy use was 3 percent less to 13 percent more compared to the 38 percent-glazing, with improved window brightness control. The electrochromic window may not be able to fulfill both energy-efficiency and visual comfort objectives when low winter direct sun is present, particularly for computer tasks using cathode-ray tube (CRT

  19. Large area, dense silicon nanowire array chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Talin, A. Alec; Hunter, Luke L.; Leonard, Francois; Rokad, Bhavin

    2006-10-09

    The authors present a simple top-down approach based on nanoimprint lithography to create dense arrays of silicon nanowires over large areas. Metallic contacts to the nanowires and a bottom gate allow the operation of the array as a field-effect transistor with very large on/off ratios. When exposed to ammonia gas or cyclohexane solutions containing nitrobenzene or phenol, the threshold voltage of the field-effect transistor is shifted, a signature of charge transfer between the analytes and the nanowires. The threshold voltage shift is proportional to the Hammett parameter and the concentration of the nitrobenzene and phenol analytes.

  20. Method of manufacturing a large-area segmented photovoltaic module

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl

    2013-11-05

    One embodiment of the invention relates to a segmented photovoltaic (PV) module which is manufactured from laminate segments. The segmented PV module includes rectangular-shaped laminate segments formed from rectangular-shaped PV laminates and further includes non-rectangular-shaped laminate segments formed from rectangular-shaped and approximately-triangular-shaped PV laminates. The laminate segments are mechanically joined and electrically interconnected to form the segmented module. Another embodiment relates to a method of manufacturing a large-area segmented photovoltaic module from laminate segments of various shapes. Other embodiments relate to processes for providing a photovoltaic array for installation at a site. Other embodiments and features are also disclosed.

  1. Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE), completed June 30, 1978, has met the USDA at-harvest goals (90% accuracy with a 90% confidence level) in the US Great Plains and U.S.S.R. for two consecutive years. In addition, in the U.S.S.R., LACIE indicated a shortfall in the '76-'77 wheat crop about two months prior to harvest, thus demonstrating the capability of LACIE to make accurate preharvest estimates.

  2. High-Throughput Dry Processes for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect

    BUSS,RICHARD J.; HEBNER,GREGORY A.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.; YANG,PIN

    1999-11-01

    In October 1996, an interdisciplinary team began a three-year LDRD project to study the plasma processes of reactive ion etching and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on large-area silicon devices. The goal was to develop numerical models that could be used in a variety of applications for surface cleaning, selective etching, and thin-film deposition. Silicon solar cells were chosen as the experimental vehicle for this project because an innovative device design was identified that would benefit from immediate performance improvement using a combination of plasma etching and deposition processes. This report presents a summary of the technical accomplishments and conclusions of the team.

  3. LACIE large area acreage estimation. [United States of America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chhikara, R. S.; Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A sample wheat acreage for a large area is obtained by multiplying its small grains acreage estimate as computed by the classification and mensuration subsystem by the best available ratio of wheat to small grains acreages obtained from historical data. In the United States, as in other countries with detailed historical data, an additional level of aggregation was required because sample allocation was made at the substratum level. The essential features of the estimation procedure for LACIE countries are included along with procedures for estimating wheat acreage in the United States.

  4. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  5. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Quigley, Gerard P.

    1996-01-01

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  6. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOEpatents

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  7. Lattice thermal transport in large-area polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksamija, Z.; Knezevic, I.

    2014-07-01

    We study lattice thermal transport in large-area polycrystalline graphene, such as the samples grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of carbon on Cu. These systems are composed of single-crystalline grains with a broad range of sizes and crystal orientations, separated by atomically rough grain boundaries. We solve the phonon Boltzmann transport equation and calculate the thermal conductivity in each grain, including scattering from the grain boundary roughness. Thermal transport in the large-area sample is considered in the Corbino-membrane geometry, with heat flowing through a network of thermal resistors and away from a pointlike heat source. The thermal transport in polycrystalline graphene is shown to be highly anisotropic, depending on the individual properties of the grains (their size and boundary roughness), as well as on grain connectivity. Strongest heat conduction occurs along large-grain filaments, while the heat flow is blocked through regions containing predominantly small grains. We discuss how thermal transport in CVD graphene can be tailored by controlling grain disorder.

  8. Exfoliation of large-area transition metal chalcogenide single layers

    PubMed Central

    Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Pető, János; Dobrik, Gergely; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P.; Tapasztó, Levente

    2015-01-01

    Isolating large-areas of atomically thin transition metal chalcogenide crystals is an important but challenging task. The mechanical exfoliation technique can provide single layers of the highest structural quality, enabling to study their pristine properties and ultimate device performance. However, a major drawback of the technique is the low yield and small (typically < 10 μm) lateral size of the produced single layers. Here, we report a novel mechanical exfoliation technique, based on chemically enhanced adhesion, yielding MoS2 single layers with typical lateral sizes of several hundreds of microns. The idea is to exploit the chemical affinity of the sulfur atoms that can bind more strongly to a gold surface than the neighboring layers of the bulk MoS2 crystal. Moreover, we found that our exfoliation process is not specific to MoS2, but can be generally applied for various layered chalcogenides including selenites and tellurides, providing an easy access to large-area 2D crystals for the whole class of layered transition metal chalcogenides. PMID:26443185

  9. Development of a Large-Area Ultracold Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffel, Jenna; Liu, Chen-Yu; UCN Tau Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    To improve our knowledge in particle physics and cosmology, including big-bang nucleosynthesis, we need a more precise and accurate measurement of the lifetime of free neutrons. Though there have been many attempts to measure the neutron lifetime, discrepancies exist between the two major experimental techniques of the beam and the bottle methods. To resolve this discrepancy, the UCN τ experiment will trap ultracold neutrons (UCNs) to perform lifetime measurements to the 1-second level. To accomplish this goal, we are developing a large-area, high-efficiency UCN detector. We construct a scintillating UCN detector by evaporating a thin film of boron-10 onto an airbrushed layer of zinc sulfide (ZnS); the 10B-coated ZnS scintillating film is then glued to wavelength-shifting plastic, which acts as a light guide to direct photons into modern silicon photomultipliers. This new detector has similar efficiency and background noise as the previously-used ion gas detectors, but can be easily scaled up to cover large areas for many applications. The new detector opens up exciting new ways to study systematic effects, as they hold the key to the interpretation of neutron lifetime.

  10. Characterization and Calibration of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösel, Philipp; ATLAS Muon Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Resistive strip Micromegas detectors have been tested extensively as small detectors of about 10×10 cm2 in size and they work reliably at high rates of 100 kHz/cm2 and above. Tracking resolution well below 100 μm has been observed for 100 GeV muons and pions. Micromegas detectors are meanwhile proposed as large area muon precision trackers of 2-3 m2 in size. To investigate possible differences between small and large detectors, a 1 m2 detector with 2048 resistive strips at a pitch of 450 μm was studied in the LMU Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility (CRMF) using two 4×2.2 m2 large Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for cosmic muon reference tracking. A segmentation of the resistive strip anode plane in 57.6 mm×93 mm large areas has been realized by the readout of 128 strips with one APV25 chip each and by eleven 93 mm broad trigger scintillators placed along the readout strips. This allows for mapping of homogeneity in pulse height and efficiency, determination of signal propagation along the 1 m long anode strips and calibration of the position of the anode strips.

  11. Simulations of Large-Area Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Friedman, M.; Ludeking, L.; Smithe, D.; Obenschain, S. P.

    1999-11-01

    Large area electron beam diodes are typically used to pump the amplifiers of KrF lasers. Simulations of large-area electron beam diodes using the particle-in-cell code MAGIC3D have shown the electron flow in the diode to be unstable. Since this instability can potentially produce a non-uniform current and energy distribution in the hibachi structure and lasing medium it can be detrimental to laser efficiency. These results are similar to simulations performed using the ISIS code.(M.E. Jones and V.A. Thomas, Proceedings of the 8^th) International Conference on High-Power Particle Beams, 665 (1990). We have identified the instability as the so called ``transit-time" instability(C.K. Birdsall and W.B. Bridges, Electrodynamics of Diode Regions), (Academic Press, New York, 1966).^,(T.M. Antonsen, W.H. Miner, E. Ott, and A.T. Drobot, Phys. Fluids 27), 1257 (1984). and have investigated the role of the applied magnetic field and diode geometry. Experiments are underway to characterize the instability on the Nike KrF laser system and will be compared to simulation. Also some possible ways to mitigate the instability will be presented.

  12. Electronic hybridization of large-area stacked graphene films.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeremy T; Schmucker, Scott W; Diaconescu, C Bogdan; Long, James P; Culbertson, James C; Ohta, Taisuke; Friedman, Adam L; Beechem, Thomas E

    2013-01-22

    Direct, tunable coupling between individually assembled graphene layers is a next step toward designer two-dimensional (2D) crystal systems, with relevance for fundamental studies and technological applications. Here we describe the fabrication and characterization of large-area (>cm(2)), coupled bilayer graphene on SiO(2)/Si substrates. Stacking two graphene films leads to direct electronic interactions between layers, where the resulting film properties are determined by the local twist angle. Polycrystalline bilayer films have a "stained-glass window" appearance explained by the emergence of a narrow absorption band in the visible spectrum that depends on twist angle. Direct measurement of layer orientation via electron diffraction, together with Raman and optical spectroscopy, confirms the persistence of clean interfaces over large areas. Finally, we demonstrate that interlayer coupling can be reversibly turned off through chemical modification, enabling optical-based chemical detection schemes. Together, these results suggest that 2D crystals can be individually assembled to form electronically coupled systems suitable for large-scale applications. PMID:23240977

  13. Large areas elemental mapping by ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Curado, J. F.; Allegro, P.; Moro, M. V.; Campos, P. H. O. V.; Santos, S. B.; Kajiya, E. A. M.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    The external beam line of the Laboratory for Material Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI) is a versatile setup for multi-technique analysis. X-ray detectors for Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) measurements, a Gamma-ray detector for Particle Induced Gamma- ray Emission (PIGE), and a particle detector for scattering analysis, such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), were already installed. In this work, we present some results, using a large (60-cm range) XYZ computer controlled sample positioning system, completely developed and build in our laboratory. The XYZ stage was installed at the external beam line and its high spacial resolution (better than 5 μm over the full range) enables positioning the sample with high accuracy and high reproducibility. The combination of a sub-millimeter beam with the large range XYZ robotic stage is being used to produce elemental maps of large areas in samples like paintings, ceramics, stones, fossils, and all sort of samples. Due to its particular characteristics, this is a unique device in the sense of multi-technique analysis of large areas. With the continuous development of the external beam line at LAMFI, coupled to the robotic XYZ stage, it is becoming a robust and reliable option for regular analysis of trace elements (Z > 5) competing with the traditional in-vacuum ion-beam-analysis with the advantage of automatic rastering.

  14. Development of LAMBDA: Large Area Medipix-Based Detector Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, David; Lange, Sabine; Smoljanin, Sergej; Becker, Julian; Hirsemann, Helmut; Epple, Michael; Graafsma, Heinz

    2011-11-01

    The Medipix3 photon counting readout chip has a range of features — small pixel size, high readout rate and inter-pixel communication — which make it attractive for X-ray scattering and imaging at synchrotrons. DESY have produced a prototype large-area detector module that can carry a 6 by 2 array of Medipix3 chips (1536 by 512 pixels), which can be used with a single large silicon sensor (85mm by 28mm) or two ``hexa'' high-Z sensors. The detector head is designed to be tilable and compatible with low temperatures, and will allow high speed parallel readout of the Medipix3 chips. It consists of a ceramic board, on which the sensor assembly is mounted, and a secondary board for signal routing and voltage regulators. A prototype DAQ board using USB2 readout has also been produced. A ``quad'' Medipix3 sensor assembly has been mounted on the detector head, and successfully configured and read out by the DAQ board. Development has begun on a high-speed readout board, and large-area silicon assemblies are in production.

  15. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-09

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/{Delta}E = 700[1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/{Delta}E = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  16. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A.W.; Charles, E.; /SLAC

    2007-10-16

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  17. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class; pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  18. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered p ulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsar s will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar s, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for e lucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric partic le acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theo retical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all un identified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geming a-like pulsars.

  19. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  20. Cold adaptation of zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family from deep sea and arctic sea ice bacteria revealed by catalytic and structural properties and molecular dynamics: new insights into relationship between conformational flexibility and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Bian, Fei; Chen, Xiu-Lan; He, Hai-Lun; Guo, Jun; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Yin-Xin; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-04-01

    Increased conformational flexibility is the prevailing explanation for the high catalytic efficiency of cold-adapted enzymes at low temperatures. However, less is known about the structural determinants of flexibility. We reported two novel cold-adapted zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family, vibriolysin MCP-02 from a deep sea bacterium and vibriolysin E495 from an Arctic sea ice bacterium, and compared them with their mesophilic homolog, pseudolysin from a terrestrial bacterium. Their catalytic efficiencies, k(cat)/K(m) (10-40 degrees C), followed the order pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495 with a ratio of approximately 1:2:4. MCP-02 and E495 have the same optimal temperature (T(opt), 57 degrees C, 5 degrees C lower than pseudolysin) and apparent melting temperature (T(m) = 64 degrees C, approximately 10 degrees C lower than pseudolysin). Structural analysis showed that the slightly lower stabilities resulted from a decrease in the number of salt bridges. Fluorescence quenching experiments and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the flexibilities of the proteins were pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495, suggesting that optimization of flexibility is a strategy for cold adaptation. Molecular dynamics results showed that the ordinal increase in flexibility from pseudolysin to MCP-02 and E495, especially the increase from MCP-02 to E495, mainly resulted from the decrease of hydrogen-bond stability in the dynamic structure, which was due to the increase in asparagine, serine, and threonine residues. Finally, a model for the cold adaptation of MCP-02 and E495 was proposed. This is the first report of the optimization of hydrogen-bonding dynamics as a strategy for cold adaptation and provides new insights into the structural basis underlying conformational flexibility. PMID:19181663

  1. Piezoelectric fibers for conformal acoustics.

    PubMed

    Chocat, Noémie; Lestoquoy, Guillaume; Wang, Zheng; Rodgers, Daniel M; Joannopoulos, John D; Fink, Yoel

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound transducers have many important applications in medical, industrial, and environmental settings. Large-active-area piezoelectric fibers are presented here, which can be woven into extended and flexible ultrasound transducing fabrics. This work opens significant opportunities for large-area, flexible and adjustable acoustic emission and sensing for a variety of emerging applications. PMID:22836955

  2. Large-area thermoelectric high-aspect-ratio nanostructures by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoho, Mikko; Juntunen, Taneli; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of large-area high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. We fabricate the structures by atomic layer deposition of conformal ZnO thin films on track-etched polycarbonate substrate. The resulting structure consists of ZnO tubules which continue through the full thickness of the substrate. The electrical and thermal properties of the structures are studied both in-plane and out-of-plane. They exhibit very low out-of-plane thermal conductivity down to 0.15 W m‑1 K‑1 while the in-plane sheet resistance of the films was found to be half that of the same film on glass substrate, allowing material-independent doubling of output power of any planar thin-film thermoelectric generator. The wall thickness of the fabricated nanotubes was varied within a range of up to 100 nm. The samples show polycrystalline nature with (002) preferred crystal orientation.

  3. Large area orientation films based on graphene oxide self-assembly and low-temperature thermal reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yongan; Zhao, Jiupeng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Xianjie; Wu, Jie; Li, Yang; Li, Yao

    2012-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have many outstanding physical and mechanical properties. Uniform and thickness controllable RGO films with large area were prepared by evaporation-induced self-assembly at a liquid/air interface on glass substrates in combination with low temperature thermal reduction at 200 °C. This process has the advantage of good compatibility with flexible and non-flexible substrates. The films are of centimeter scale and their thickness can be controlled. The structural evolution was characterized. The obtained thermal RGO films exhibit excellent optical properties, a high elastic modulus of 76.18 GPa, and a hardness of 6.89 GPa.

  4. Metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petti, Luisa; Münzenrieder, Niko; Vogt, Christian; Faber, Hendrik; Büthe, Lars; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Bottacchi, Francesca; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Tröster, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The field of flexible electronics has rapidly expanded over the last decades, pioneering novel applications, such as wearable and textile integrated devices, seamless and embedded patch-like systems, soft electronic skins, as well as imperceptible and transient implants. The possibility to revolutionize our daily life with such disruptive appliances has fueled the quest for electronic devices which yield good electrical and mechanical performance and are at the same time light-weight, transparent, conformable, stretchable, and even biodegradable. Flexible metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) can fulfill all these requirements and are therefore considered the most promising technology for tomorrow's electronics. This review reflects the establishment of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs, from the development of single devices, large-area circuits, up to entirely integrated systems. First, an introduction on metal oxide semiconductor TFTs is given, where the history of the field is revisited, the TFT configurations and operating principles are presented, and the main issues and technological challenges faced in the area are analyzed. Then, the recent advances achieved for flexible n-type metal oxide semiconductor TFTs manufactured by physical vapor deposition methods and solution-processing techniques are summarized. In particular, the ability of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs to combine low temperature fabrication, high carrier mobility, large frequency operation, extreme mechanical bendability, together with transparency, conformability, stretchability, and water dissolubility is shown. Afterward, a detailed analysis of the most promising metal oxide semiconducting materials developed to realize the state-of-the-art flexible p-type TFTs is given. Next, the recent progresses obtained for flexible metal oxide semiconductor-based electronic circuits, realized with both unipolar and complementary technology, are reported. In particular

  5. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. With its upcoming launch in 2008, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the collaboration between particle physicists and astrophysicists, the opportunities for guest observers, and the mission status.

  6. A three dimensionally position sensitive large area detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochodzalla, J.; Butsch, R.; Heck, B.; Hlawatsch, G.; Miczaika, A.; Rabe, H. J.; Rosner, G.

    1985-01-01

    A large area detector consisting of a parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC) and a trapezohedral ionization chamber (TIC) is described. Its active area is 184 cm 2. The time resolution of the PPAC is 175 ps. The energy resolution of the TIC is 0.4%, the energy loss resolution 2.8%, the nuclear charge resolution 2.3%. The TIC is position sensitive in three dimensions. The position x is measured via a saw-tooth anode with a resolution of 0.7 mm; the drift time coordinate shows a resolution of δy ≅ mm. The range z is determined by a new technique, a graded density Frisch grid. It enlarges the dynamic range of the charge measurement down to the Bragg maximum at E/ A ˜ 1 MeV. The resolution is δZ/ Z ≅ 3.5%

  7. Large area nuclear particle detectors using ET materials, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Charles Y.; Storti, George M.; Walter, Lee; Mathews, Scott

    1990-01-01

    This report presents work done under a Phase 2 SBIR contract for demonstrating large area detector planes utilizing Quantex electron trapping materials as a film medium for storing high-energy nuclide impingement information. The detector planes utilize energy dissipated by passage of the high-energy nuclides to produce localized populations of electrons stored in traps. Readout of the localized trapped electron populations is effected by scanning the ET plane with near-infrared, which frees the trapped electrons and results in optical emission at visible wavelengths. The effort involved both optimizing fabrication technology for the detector planes and developing a readout system capable of high spatial resolution for displaying the recorded nuclide passage tracks.

  8. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce large-area (5.9 x 5.9 cm) space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/watt is descibed. Five cell types under investigation include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm-cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover-glass simultaneously is being developed. A description of cell developments by Applied Solar Energy Corp., Spectrolab and Spire is included. Results are given for cell and array tests, performed by Lockheed, TRW and NASA. Future large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  9. Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Phase 2 evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Documentation of the activities of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment during the 1976 Northern Hemisphere crop year is presented. A brief overview of the experiment is included as well as phase two area, yield, and production estimates for the United States Great Plains, Canada, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics spring winter wheat regions. The accuracies of these estimates are compared with independent government estimates. Accuracy assessment of the United States Great Plains yardstick region based on a through blind sight analysis is given, and reasons for variations in estimating performance are discussed. Other phase two technical activities including operations, exploratory analysis, reporting, methods of assessment, phase three and advanced system design, technical issues, and developmental activities are also included.

  10. Large-area Kapton x-ray windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antimonov, M.; Khounsary, A.; Weigand, S.; Rix, J.; Keane, D.; Grudzinski, J. J.; Johnson, A.; Zhou, Z.; Jansma, W.

    2015-09-01

    Some X-ray instruments require the utilization of large-area windows to provide vacuum barriers. The necessary attributes of the window material include transparency to X-rays, low scattering, and possession of suitable mechanical properties for reliable long-term performance. Kapton is one such material except that it is a polymer and a large window made from Kapton with a pressure differential of one atmosphere across it can undergo substantial deformation at room temperature. In this paper, we report on the mechanical testing of Kapton samples including creep measurements, and comparison with published data. We use of these data together with analytical / numerical models to predict the changes in the profile of Kapton vacuum windows over time, and show good agreement with experimental measurements.

  11. Ultrahigh conductivity of large area suspended few layer graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi, Nima; Wang, Yung Yu; Burke, Peter J.

    2012-12-01

    Room-temperature (atmospheric-pressure) electrical conductivity measurements of wafer-scale, large-area suspended (few layer) graphene membranes with areas up to 1000 μm2 (30 μm × 30 μm) are presented. Multiple devices on one wafer can be fabricated with high yield from the same chemical vapor deposition grown graphene sheet, transferred from a nickel growth substrate to large opening in a suspended silicon nitride support membrane. This represents areas two to orders of magnitude larger than prior transport studies on any suspended graphene device (single or few layer). We find a sheet conductivity of ˜2500 e2/h (or about 10 Ω/sq) of the suspended graphene, which is an order of magnitude higher than any previously reported sheet conductance of few layer graphene.

  12. Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Phase 1: Evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    It appears that the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment over the Great Plains, can with a reasonable expectation, be a satisfactory component of a 90/90 production estimator. The area estimator produced more accurate area estimates for the total winter wheat region than for the mixed spring and winter wheat region of the northern Great Plains. The accuracy does appear to degrade somewhat in regions of marginal agriculture where there are small fields and abundant confusion crops. However, it would appear that these regions tend also to be marginal with respect to wheat production and thus increased area estimation errors do not greatly influence the overall production estimation accuracy in the United States. The loss of segments resulting from cloud cover appears to be a random phenomenon that introduces no significant bias into the estimates. This loss does increase the variance of the estimates.

  13. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H.; Fan Yizhong

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

  14. Broadband quasi-optical SIS mixers with large area junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pance, Gordana; Wengler, Micheal J.

    1994-04-01

    A broadband quasi-optical superconducting tunnel junction (SIS) mixer with integrated tuning elements was designed and tested. We are able to achieve very low noise performance using commercially available niobium integrated circuit (IC) technology. The low critical current density (980 A/sq cm) and large area (12 sq micron) of the commercial SIS's is compensated by the ability to fabricate accurate integrated tuning structures in the mature niobium IC process available from Hypres, Inc. Noise measurements were made in the frequency range from 70 to 105 GHz. The best uncorrected double sideband receiver noise is 38 K at 77 GHz, with receiver noise temperatures less than 100 K from 75 to 102 GHz.

  15. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  16. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Gorbatkin, Steven M.; Berry, Lee A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  17. SPLASH: A Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Joanne; Caswell, James; Gomez, Jose F.; Mcclure-Griffiths, Naomi; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Dickey, John; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Carretti, Ettore; Ellingsen, Simon; Walsh, Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Hennebelle, Patrick; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Gibson, Steven; Brown, Courtney; Krishnan, Vasaant

    2014-04-01

    The OH 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. The survey is answering critical questions on the global distribution of diffuse OH, the degree to which it traces ‘hidden’ material caught between the regimes probed by traditional tracers of the neutral ISM, and its role as a probe of molecular cloud formation. As a blind survey for all four ground-state transitions, SPLASH is also detecting many new OH masers, facilitating a broad range of astrophysical studies. This proposal requests 250 hours to complete Phase 1 of the SPLASH project, which is mapping 152 square degrees in the inner Galactic Plane, including the Galactic Centre.

  18. Accuracy assessment in the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, A. G.; Pitts, D. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Badhwar, G.; Ferguson, M.; Hsu, E.; Potter, J.; Chhikara, R.; Rader, M.; Ahlers, C.

    1979-01-01

    The Accuracy Assessment System (AAS) of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE) was responsible for determining the accuracy and reliability of LACIE estimates of wheat production, area, and yield, made at regular intervals throughout the crop season, and for investigating the various LACIE error sources, quantifying these errors, and relating them to their causes. Some results of using the AAS during the three years of LACIE are reviewed. As the program culminated, AAS was able not only to meet the goal of obtaining accurate statistical estimates of sampling and classification accuracy, but also the goal of evaluating component labeling errors. Furthermore, the ground-truth data processing matured from collecting data for one crop (small grains) to collecting, quality-checking, and archiving data for all crops in a LACIE small segment.

  19. LAMBDA — Large Area Medipix3-Based Detector Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Lange, S.; Smoljanin, S.; Hirsemann, H.; Graafsma, H.

    2012-11-01

    Medipix3 is a photon-counting readout chip for X-ray detection. It has a small pixel size (55 μm) and a high frame rate with zero dead time, which makes it attractive for experiments at synchrotrons. Using Medipix3, DESY are developing the LAMBDA (Large Area Medipix3-Based Detector Array) system. A single LAMBDA module carries either a single large silicon sensor of 1536 by 512 pixels, or two smaller high-Z sensors. The sensor is bonded to 12 Medipix3 chips, and mounted on a ceramic carrier board. The readout system for the module then provides a fast FPGA, a large RAM and four 10 Gigabit Ethernet links to allow operation at high frame rates. Multiple modules may then be tiled together a larger area. Currently, the first large silicon modules have been constructed and tested at low speed, and the firmware for fast readout is being developed.

  20. Large area high efficiency multicrystalline silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasawa, Katsuhiko; Yamashita, Hironori; Fukui, Kenji; Takayama, Michihiro; Okada, Kenichi

    A high-efficiency, low-cost large-area multicrystalline silicon solar cell having a cell size of 15 cm x 15 cm and a substrate made by the casting method has been developed. The bifacial silicon nitride solar cell (BSNSC) fabrication process was used to construct the cell. By incorporating a new structure at the cell surface, an optimized back-surface field (BSF) process, and an electrode with a ratio of 5.2 percent into the BSNSC fabrication process, a conversion efficiency of 15.1 percent (global, AM1.5, 100 mW/sq cm, 25 C) has been obtained. The uniformity of the electrical performance of the cell has been studied by measuring the distribution of the spectral response at various points on the cell. The results of uniformity testing are presented.

  1. Large area radiation source for water and wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael T.; Lee, Seungwoo; Kloba, Anthony; Hellmer, Ronald; Kumar, Nalin; Eaton, Mark; Rambo, Charlotte; Pillai, Suresh

    2011-06-01

    There is a strong desire for processes that improve the safety of water supplies and that minimize disinfection byproducts. Stellarray is developing mercury-free next-generation x-ray and UV-C radiation sources in flat-panel and pipe form factors for water and wastewater treatment applications. These new radiation sources are designed to sterilize sludge and effluent, and to enable new treatment approaches to emerging environmental concerns such as the accumulation of estrogenic compounds in water. Our UV-C source, based on cathodoluminescent technology, differs significantly from traditional disinfection approaches using mercury arc lamps or UV LEDs. Our sources accelerate electrons across a vacuum gap, converting their energy into UV-C when striking a phosphor, or x-rays when striking a metallic anode target. Stellarray's large area radiation sources for wastewater treatment allow matching of the radiation source area to the sterilization target area for maximum coverage and improved efficiency.

  2. PROSPECTS FOR GRB SCIENCE WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D. L.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Bissaldi, E.; Bogaert, G.; Chiang, J.; Do Couto e Silva, E.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; De Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Fishman, G.

    2009-08-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi mission will reveal the rich spectral and temporal gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena in the >100 MeV band. The synergy with Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detectors will link these observations to those in the well explored 10-1000 keV range; the addition of the >100 MeV band observations will resolve theoretical uncertainties about burst emission in both the prompt and afterglow phases. Trigger algorithms will be applied to the LAT data both onboard the spacecraft and on the ground. The sensitivity of these triggers will differ because of the available computing resources onboard and on the ground. Here we present the LAT's burst detection methodologies and the instrument's GRB capabilities.

  3. Satellite image collection modeling for large area hazard emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shufan; Hodgson, Michael E.

    2016-08-01

    Timely collection of critical hazard information is the key to intelligent and effective hazard emergency response decisions. Satellite remote sensing imagery provides an effective way to collect critical information. Natural hazards, however, often have large impact areas - larger than a single satellite scene. Additionally, the hazard impact area may be discontinuous, particularly in flooding or tornado hazard events. In this paper, a spatial optimization model is proposed to solve the large area satellite image acquisition planning problem in the context of hazard emergency response. In the model, a large hazard impact area is represented as multiple polygons and image collection priorities for different portion of impact area are addressed. The optimization problem is solved with an exact algorithm. Application results demonstrate that the proposed method can address the satellite image acquisition planning problem. A spatial decision support system supporting the optimization model was developed. Several examples of image acquisition problems are used to demonstrate the complexity of the problem and derive optimized solutions.

  4. Large Area Printing of 3D Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James J.; Beaulieu, Michael R.; Hendricks, Nicholas R.; Kothari, Rohit

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a readily scalable print, lift, and stack approach for producing large area, 3D photonic crystal (PC) structures. UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) was used to pattern grating structures comprised of highly filled nanoparticle polymer composite resists with tune-able refractive indices (RI). The gratings were robust and upon release from a support substrate were oriented and stacked to yield 3D PCs. The RI of the composite resists was tuned between 1.58 and 1.92 at 800 nm while maintaining excellent optical transparency. The grating structure dimensions, line width, depth, and pitch, were easily varied by simply changing the imprint mold. For example, a 6 layer log-pile stack was prepared using a composite resist a RI of 1.72 yielding 72 % reflection at 900 nm. The process is scalable for roll-to-roll (R2R) production. Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing - an NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.

  5. The calorimeter of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, J. Eric; Johnson, W. Neil

    2010-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has been making revolutionary observations of the high-energy (20 MeV - 300 GeV) gamma-ray sky since its launch in June 2008. The LAT calorimeter is a modular array of 1536 CsI(Tl) crystals supported within 16 carbon fiber structures and read out at each crystal end with silicon PIN photodiodes to provide both energy and position information. The hodoscopic crystal stack allows imaging of electromagnetic showers and cosmic rays for improved energy measurement and background rejection. Signals from the array of photodiodes are processed by custom ASICs and commercial ADCs. We describe the calorimeter design and the primary factors that led those design choices.

  6. A large-area gamma-ray imaging telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The concept definition of using the External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle as the basis for constructing a large area gamma ray imaging telescope in space is detailed. The telescope will be used to locate and study cosmic sources of gamma rays of energy greater than 100 MeV. Both the telescope properties and the means whereby an ET is used for this purpose are described. A parallel is drawn between those systems that would be common to both a Space Station and this ET application. In addition, those systems necessary for support of the telescope can form the basis for using the ET as part of the Space Station. The major conclusions of this concept definition are that the ET is ideal for making into a gamma ray telescope, and that this telescope will provide a substantial increase in collecting area.

  7. Large-area wide-angle spectrally selective plasmonic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chihhui; Neuner, Burton, III; Shvets, Gennady; John, Jeremy; Milder, Andrew; Zollars, Byron; Savoy, Steve

    2011-08-01

    A simple metamaterial-based wide-angle plasmonic absorber is introduced, fabricated, and experimentally characterized using angle-resolved infrared spectroscopy. The metamaterials are prepared by nano-imprint lithography, an attractive low-cost technology for making large-area samples. The matching of the metamaterial’s impedance to that of vacuum is responsible for the observed spectrally selective “perfect” absorption of infrared light. The impedance is theoretically calculated in the single-resonance approximation, and the responsible resonance is identified as a short-range surface plasmon. The spectral position of the absorption peak (which is as high as 95%) is experimentally shown to be controlled by the metamaterial’s dimensions. The persistence of “perfect” absorption with variable metamaterial parameters is theoretically explained. The wide-angle nature of the absorber can be utilized for subdiffraction-scale infrared pixels exhibiting spectrally selective absorption/emissivity.

  8. Optical Distortion Evaluation in Large Area Windows using Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Skow, Miles; Nurge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    It is important that imagery seen through large area windows, such as those used on space vehicles, not be substantially distorted. Many approaches are described in the literature for measuring the distortion of an optical window, but most suffer from either poor resolution or processing difficulties. In this paper a new definition of distortion is presented, allowing accurate measurement using an optical interferometer. This new definition is shown to be equivalent to the definitions provided by the military and the standards organizations. In order to determine the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach the distortion of an acrylic window is measured using three different methods; image comparison, Moiré interferometry, and phase-shifting interferometry.

  9. A new approach for defect inspection on large area masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, Gerd; Döbereiner, Stefan; Hillmann, Frank; Falk, Günther; Brück, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-02-01

    Besides the mask market for IC manufacturing, which mainly uses 6 inch sized masks, the market for the so called large area masks is growing very rapidly. Typical applications of these masks are mainly wafer bumping for current packaging processes, color filters on TFTs, and Flip Chip manufacturing. To expose e.g. bumps and similar features on 200 mm wafers under proximity exposure conditions 9 inch masks are used, while in 300 mm wafer bumping processes (Fig. 1) 14 inch masks are handled. Flip Chip manufacturing needs masks up to 28 by 32 inch. This current maximum mask dimension is expected to hold for the next 5 years in industrial production. On the other hand shrinking feature sizes, just as in case of the IC masks, demand enhanced sensitivity of the inspection tools. A defect inspection tool for those masks is valuable for both the mask maker, who has to deliver a defect free mask to his customer, and for the mask user to supervise the mask behavior conditions during its lifetime. This is necessary because large area masks are mainly used for proximity exposures. During this process itself the mask is vulnerable by contacting the resist on top of the wafers. Therefore a regular inspection of the mask after 25, 50, or 100 exposures has to be done during its whole lifetime. Thus critical resist contamination and other defects, which lead to yield losses, can be recognized early. In the future shrinking feature dimensions will require even more sensitive and reliable defect inspection methods than they do presently. Besides the sole inspection capability the tools should also provide highly precise measurement capabilities and extended review options.

  10. Large-Area Epitaxial Monolayer MoS2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional semiconductors such as MoS2 are an emerging material family with wide-ranging potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and energy harvesting. Large-area growth methods are needed to open the way to applications. Control over lattice orientation during growth remains a challenge. This is needed to minimize or even avoid the formation of grain boundaries, detrimental to electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of MoS2 and other 2D semiconductors. Here, we report on the growth of high-quality monolayer MoS2 with control over lattice orientation. We show that the monolayer film is composed of coalescing single islands with limited numbers of lattice orientation due to an epitaxial growth mechanism. Optical absorbance spectra acquired over large areas show significant absorbance in the high-energy part of the spectrum, indicating that MoS2 could also be interesting for harvesting this region of the solar spectrum and fabrication of UV-sensitive photodetectors. Even though the interaction between the growth substrate and MoS2 is strong enough to induce lattice alignment via van der Waals interaction, we can easily transfer the grown material and fabricate devices. Local potential mapping along channels in field-effect transistors shows that the single-crystal MoS2 grains in our film are well connected, with interfaces that do not degrade the electrical conductivity. This is also confirmed by the relatively large and length-independent mobility in devices with a channel length reaching 80 μm. PMID:25843548

  11. Spatially explicit shallow landslide susceptibility mapping over large areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellugi, Dino; Dietrich, William E.; Stock, Jonathan D.; McKean, Jim; Kazian, Brian; Hargrove, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in downscaling climate model precipitation predictions now yield spatially explicit patterns of rainfall that could be used to estimate shallow landslide susceptibility over large areas. In California, the United States Geological Survey is exploring community emergency response to the possible effects of a very large simulated storm event and to do so it has generated downscaled precipitation maps for the storm. To predict the corresponding pattern of shallow landslide susceptibility across the state, we have used the model Shalstab (a coupled steady state runoff and infinite slope stability model) which susceptibility spatially explicit estimates of relative potential instability. Such slope stability models that include the effects of subsurface runoff on potentially destabilizing pore pressure evolution require water routing and hence the definition of upslope drainage area to each potential cell. To calculate drainage area efficiently over a large area we developed a parallel framework to scale-up Shalstab and specifically introduce a new efficient parallel drainage area algorithm which produces seamless results. The single seamless shallow landslide susceptibility map for all of California was accomplished in a short run time, and indicates that much larger areas can be efficiently modelled. As landslide maps generally over predict the extent of instability for any given storm. Local empirical data on the fraction of predicted unstable cells that failed for observed rainfall intensity can be used to specify the likely extent of hazard for a given storm. This suggests that campaigns to collect local precipitation data and detailed shallow landslide location maps after major storms could be used to calibrate models and improve their use in hazard assessment for individual storms.

  12. Large-Area Epitaxial Monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Marinov, Kolyo; Lazić, Predrag; Gibertini, Marco; Marzari, Nicola; Lopez Sanchez, Oriol; Kung, Yen-Cheng; Krasnozhon, Daria; Chen, Ming-Wei; Bertolazzi, Simone; Gillet, Philippe; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Kis, Andras

    2015-04-28

    Two-dimensional semiconductors such as MoS2 are an emerging material family with wide-ranging potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and energy harvesting. Large-area growth methods are needed to open the way to applications. Control over lattice orientation during growth remains a challenge. This is needed to minimize or even avoid the formation of grain boundaries, detrimental to electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of MoS2 and other 2D semiconductors. Here, we report on the growth of high-quality monolayer MoS2 with control over lattice orientation. We show that the monolayer film is composed of coalescing single islands with limited numbers of lattice orientation due to an epitaxial growth mechanism. Optical absorbance spectra acquired over large areas show significant absorbance in the high-energy part of the spectrum, indicating that MoS2 could also be interesting for harvesting this region of the solar spectrum and fabrication of UV-sensitive photodetectors. Even though the interaction between the growth substrate and MoS2 is strong enough to induce lattice alignment via van der Waals interaction, we can easily transfer the grown material and fabricate devices. Local potential mapping along channels in field-effect transistors shows that the single-crystal MoS2 grains in our film are well connected, with interfaces that do not degrade the electrical conductivity. This is also confirmed by the relatively large and length-independent mobility in devices with a channel length reaching 80 μm. PMID:25843548

  13. Development of a large-area chip network with multidevice integration using a stretchable electroplated copper spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Wei-Lun; Chen, Chih-Chung; Huang, Kevin; Fang, Weileun

    2016-02-01

    This study designed and implemented the multidevice integration of a flexible large-area chip network using a stretchable electroplated copper spring. The functional devices are directly implemented and integrated on the nodes of a 2D chip network distribution, and the nodes are mechanically and electrically connected to surrounding nodes by stretchable copper springs. The springs can stretch and expand the distance between functional devices by several orders of magnitude to construct a large-area chip network with interconnected devices. The advantages of this approach are that (1) the existing and mature process technologies and materials for semiconductors in large-area applications are used, (2) stretchable electroplated copper springs with larger failure strain and good conductivity act as both mechanical and electrical connections between nodes, (3) rigid nodes act as hubs for device implementation and integration with microfabrication processes, and (4) the chip network can be applied to 2D curved (spherical) surfaces for flexible electronics. In application, the proposed expandable chip network using stretchable springs with integration of various devices (such as proximity and temperature sensors and light-emitting diode (LED) chips) has been successfully implemented and tested. The results show the chip network with integrated sensors performs as expected on a 2D plane distribution as verified by measurements. Moreover, LED chips have been integrated as an example to show that the proposed design can be used for flexible electronics applications.

  14. Optical nano-woodpiles: large-area metallic photonic crystals and metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ibbotson, Lindsey A.; Demetriadou, Angela; Croxall, Stephen; Hess, Ortwin; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic woodpile photonic crystals and metamaterials operating across the visible spectrum are extremely difficult to construct over large areas, because of the intricate three-dimensional nanostructures and sub-50 nm features demanded. Previous routes use electron-beam lithography or direct laser writing but widespread application is restricted by their expense and low throughput. Scalable approaches including soft lithography, colloidal self-assembly, and interference holography, produce structures limited in feature size, material durability, or geometry. By multiply stacking gold nanowire flexible gratings, we demonstrate a scalable high-fidelity approach for fabricating flexible metallic woodpile photonic crystals, with features down to 10 nm produced in bulk and at low cost. Control of stacking sequence, asymmetry, and orientation elicits great control, with visible-wavelength band-gap reflections exceeding 60%, and with strong induced chirality. Such flexible and stretchable architectures can produce metamaterials with refractive index near zero, and are easily tuned across the IR and visible ranges. PMID:25660667

  15. Sensing sheets based on large area electronics for fatigue crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-03-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous structural health monitoring (SHM) over large areas of structure, and with high spatial resolution of sensors. This paper presents the development stage of prototype strain sensing sheets based on Large Area Electronics (LAE), in which thin-film strain gauges and control circuits are integrated on the flexible electronics and deposited on a polyimide sheet that can cover large areas. These sensing sheets were applied for fatigue crack detection on small-scale steel plates. Two types of sensing-sheet interconnects were designed and manufactured, and dense arrays of strain gauge sensors were assembled onto the interconnects. In total, four (two for each design type) strain sensing sheets were created and tested, which were sensitive to strain at virtually every point over the whole sensing sheet area. The sensing sheets were bonded to small-scale steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary so that fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The fatigue tests were carried out at the Carleton Laboratory of Columbia University, and the steel plates were attached through a fixture to the loading machine that applied cyclic fatigue load. Fatigue cracks then occurred and propagated across the steel plates, leading to the failure of these test samples. The strain sensor that was close to the notch successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The strain sensor that was away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue crack based on the time history of measured strain. Overall, the results of the fatigue tests validated general principles of the strain sensing sheets for crack detection.

  16. A DFT study of the Karplus-type dependence of vicinal (3)J(Sn-C-X-C), X=N,O,S, in organotin(iv) compounds: application to conformationally flexible systems.

    PubMed

    Casella, Girolamo; Ferrante, Francesco; Saielli, Giacomo

    2010-06-21

    ZORA relativistic and non-relativistic DFT protocols have been used to investigate vicinal coupling constants, (3)J(Sn-C-X-C), in several organotin(iv) compounds, with particular emphasis on cyclic alpha-aminoorganostannanes. The dependence of the coupling constant on the heteroatom X (X = N,O,S) in the coupling path, and, for X = N, its substituents, has been studied in detail. The electron-withdrawing strength of the N-substituents has been found to strongly affect the magnitude and shape of the Karplus-type curve. The results obtained for the simple model systems, having no or little conformational flexibility, have helped in rationalizing the data concerning real flexible cyclic systems recently investigated in the literature. For these intricate cases a population analysis of various conformers has allowed to obtain a very good agreement between calculated and experimental data. It is therefore established that NMR J couplings, together with DFT calculations, are a very useful tool to investigate conformational issues in solution by comparison of experimental and weighted average calculated values. PMID:20390147

  17. Investigation of welded interconnection of large area wraparound contacted silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lott, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the welding and temperature cycle testing of large area 5.9 x 5.9 wraparound silicon solar cells utilizing printed circuit substrates with SSC-155 interconnect copper metals and the LMSC Infrared Controlled weld station. An initial group of 5 welded modules containing Phase 2 developmental 5.9 x 5.9 cm cells were subjected to cyclical temperatures of + or 80 C at a rate of 120 cycles per day. Anomalies were noted in the adhesion of the cell contact metallization; therefore, 5 additional modules were fabricated and tested using available Phase I cells with demonstrated contact integrity. Cycling of the later module type through 12,000 cycles indicated the viability of this type of lightweight flexible array concept. This project demonstrated acceptable use of an alternate interconnect copper in combination with large area wraparound cells and emphasized the necessity to implement weld pull as opposed to solder pull procedures at the cell vendors for cells that will be interconnected by welding.

  18. A large area tactile sensor patch based on commercial force sensors.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Barquero, Maria Jose; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Navas-González, Rafael; Sánchez, Jose Antonio; Serón, Javier; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the design of a tactile sensor patch to cover large areas of robots and machines that interact with human beings. Many devices have been proposed to meet such a demand. These realizations are mostly custom-built or developed in the lab. The sensor of this paper is implemented with commercial force sensors. This has the benefit of a more foreseeable response of the sensor if its behavior is understood as the aggregation of readings from all the individual force sensors in the array. A few reported large area tactile sensors are also based on commercial sensors. However, the one in this paper is the first of this kind based on the use of polymeric commercial force sensing resistors (FSR) as unit elements of the array or tactels, which results in a robust sensor. The paper discusses design issues related to some necessary modifications of the force sensor, its assembly in an array, and the signal conditioning. The patch has 16 × 9 force sensors mounted on a flexible printed circuit board with a spatial resolution of 18.5 mm. The force range of a tactel is 6 N and its sensitivity is 0.6 V/N. The array is read at a rate of 78 frames per second. Finally, two simple application examples are also carried out with the sensor mounted on the forearm of a rescue robot that communicates with the sensor through a CAN bus. PMID:22163910

  19. Efficient transfer of large-area graphene films onto rigid substrates by hot pressing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junmo; Hwang, Soonhwi; Kim, Jae Hwan; Kim, Min Hyeok; Ryu, Jaechul; Seo, Sang Jae; Hong, Byung Hee; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae-Boong

    2012-06-26

    Graphene films grown on metal substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method have to be safely transferred onto desired substrates for further applications. Recently, a roll-to-roll (R2R) method has been developed for large-area transfer, which is particularly efficient for flexible target substrates. However, in the case of rigid substrates such as glass or wafers, the roll-based method is found to induce considerable mechanical damages on graphene films during the transfer process, resulting in the degradation of electrical property. Here we introduce an improved dry transfer technique based on a hot-pressing method that can minimize damage on graphene by neutralizing mechanical stress. Thus, we enhanced the transfer efficiency of the large-area graphene films on a substrate with arbitrary thickness and rigidity, evidenced by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) images, Raman spectra, and various electrical characterizations. We also performed a theoretical multiscale simulation from continuum to atomic level to compare the mechanical stresses caused by the R2R and the hot-pressing methods, which also supports our conclusion. Consequently, we believe that the proposed hot-pressing method will be immediately useful for display and solar cell applications that currently require rigid and large substrates. PMID:22631604

  20. Electrically tunable terahertz metamaterials with embedded large-area transparent thin-film transistor arrays

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei-Zong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Ye, Jiandong; Lu, Hai; Liang, Lanju; Huang, Xiaoming; Liu, Mingkai; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Powell, David A.; Yu, Guang; Jin, Biaobing; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2016-01-01

    Engineering metamaterials with tunable resonances are of great importance for improving the functionality and flexibility of terahertz (THz) systems. An ongoing challenge in THz science and technology is to create large-area active metamaterials as building blocks to enable efficient and precise control of THz signals. Here, an active metamaterial device based on enhancement-mode transparent amorphous oxide thin-film transistor arrays for THz modulation is demonstrated. Analytical modelling based on full-wave techniques and multipole theory exhibits excellent consistent with the experimental observations and reveals that the intrinsic resonance mode at 0.75 THz is dominated by an electric response. The resonant behavior can be effectively tuned by controlling the channel conductivity through an external bias. Such metal/oxide thin-film transistor based controllable metamaterials are energy saving, low cost, large area and ready for mass-production, which are expected to be widely used in future THz imaging, sensing, communications and other applications. PMID:27000419

  1. Large area planar fiber optic accelerometers for measurement of acoustic velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Bucaro, J.A.; Lagakos, N.; Houston, B.H.; Kraus, L.

    1996-04-01

    Large area, flexible planar fiber optic accelerometers have been developed for use as acoustic velocity sensors in underwater applications. The devices use a specially designed optical fiber with specific jackets which suppress the fiber sensor{close_quote}s response to acoustic pressure. The sensor has been subjected to a variety of tests including direct acceleration response, direct pressure response, and response to flexural wave excitation when mounted to a {open_quote}{open_quote}hull simulator{close_quote}{close_quote} backing structure. A thorough analysis has been carried out to understand the dynamic responses and limitations of these sensor types. This work is motivated by the desire to measure spatially averaged acoustic velocity while suppressing higher wavenumber mechanical excitations. In conjunction with existing large area pressure sensors (or with suitable structural models), these devices would provide a powerful capability for the measurement and detection of acoustic fields near structures having general impedance properties. This would allow, for example, the decomposition of the acoustic field into backward and forward propagating waves near such a boundary, the determination of acoustic intensity, the detection of the acoustic field with high signal-to-noise ratios even near a soft, pressure release boundary, and determination of the impedance of the structure itself. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Electrically tunable terahertz metamaterials with embedded large-area transparent thin-film transistor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei-Zong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Ye, Jiandong; Lu, Hai; Liang, Lanju; Huang, Xiaoming; Liu, Mingkai; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Powell, David A.; Yu, Guang; Jin, Biaobing; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2016-03-01

    Engineering metamaterials with tunable resonances are of great importance for improving the functionality and flexibility of terahertz (THz) systems. An ongoing challenge in THz science and technology is to create large-area active metamaterials as building blocks to enable efficient and precise control of THz signals. Here, an active metamaterial device based on enhancement-mode transparent amorphous oxide thin-film transistor arrays for THz modulation is demonstrated. Analytical modelling based on full-wave techniques and multipole theory exhibits excellent consistent with the experimental observations and reveals that the intrinsic resonance mode at 0.75 THz is dominated by an electric response. The resonant behavior can be effectively tuned by controlling the channel conductivity through an external bias. Such metal/oxide thin-film transistor based controllable metamaterials are energy saving, low cost, large area and ready for mass-production, which are expected to be widely used in future THz imaging, sensing, communications and other applications.

  3. Large-area graphene synthesis and its application to interface-engineered field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sae Byeok; Park, Jaesung; Lee, Wi Hyoung; Cho, Kilwon; Hong, Byung Hee

    2012-08-01

    This article reviews recent advances in the large-area synthesis of graphene sheets and the applications of such sheets to graphene-based transistors. Graphene is potentially useful in a wide range of practical applications that could benefit from its exceptional electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. Tremendous effort has been devoted to overcoming several fundamental limitations of graphene, such as a zero band gap and a low direct current conductivity-to-optical conductivity ratio. The intrinsic properties of graphene depend on the synthetic and transfer route, and this dependence has been intensively investigated. Several representative reports describing the application of graphene as a channel and electrode material for use in flexible transparent transistor devices are discussed. A fresh perspective on the optimization of graphene as a 2D framework for crystalline organic semiconductor growth is introduced, and its effects on transistor performance are discussed. This critical review provides insights and a new perspective on the development of high-quality large-area graphene and the optimization of graphene-based transistors.

  4. The role of printing techniques for large-area dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Paolo; Vesce, Luigi; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-10-01

    The versatility of printing technologies and their intrinsic ability to outperform other techniques in large-area deposition gives scope to revolutionize the photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing field. Printing methods are commonly used in conventional silicon-based PVs to cover part of the production process. Screen printing techniques, for example, are applied to deposit electrical contacts on the silicon wafer. However, it is with the advent of third generation PVs that printing/coating techniques have been extensively used in almost all of the manufacturing processes. Among all the third generation PVs, dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) technology has been developed up to commercialization levels. DSSCs and modules can be fabricated by adopting all of the main printing techniques on both rigid and flexible substrates. This allows an easy tuning of cell/module characteristics to the desired application. Transparency, colour, shape, layout and other DSSC’s features can be easily varied by changing the printing parameters and paste/ink formulations used in the printing process. This review focuses on large-area printing/coating technologies for the fabrication of DSSCs devices. The most used and promising techniques are presented underlining the process parameters and applications.

  5. A Large Area Tactile Sensor Patch Based on Commercial Force Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Barquero, Maria Jose; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Navas-González, Rafael; Sánchez, Jose Antonio; Serón, Javier; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the design of a tactile sensor patch to cover large areas of robots and machines that interact with human beings. Many devices have been proposed to meet such a demand. These realizations are mostly custom-built or developed in the lab. The sensor of this paper is implemented with commercial force sensors. This has the benefit of a more foreseeable response of the sensor if its behavior is understood as the aggregation of readings from all the individual force sensors in the array. A few reported large area tactile sensors are also based on commercial sensors. However, the one in this paper is the first of this kind based on the use of polymeric commercial force sensing resistors (FSR) as unit elements of the array or tactels, which results in a robust sensor. The paper discusses design issues related to some necessary modifications of the force sensor, its assembly in an array, and the signal conditioning. The patch has 16 × 9 force sensors mounted on a flexible printed circuit board with a spatial resolution of 18.5 mm. The force range of a tactel is 6 N and its sensitivity is 0.6 V/N. The array is read at a rate of 78 frames per second. Finally, two simple application examples are also carried out with the sensor mounted on the forearm of a rescue robot that communicates with the sensor through a CAN bus. PMID:22163910

  6. Electrically tunable terahertz metamaterials with embedded large-area transparent thin-film transistor arrays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Zong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Ye, Jiandong; Lu, Hai; Liang, Lanju; Huang, Xiaoming; Liu, Mingkai; Shadrivov, Ilya V; Powell, David A; Yu, Guang; Jin, Biaobing; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2016-01-01

    Engineering metamaterials with tunable resonances are of great importance for improving the functionality and flexibility of terahertz (THz) systems. An ongoing challenge in THz science and technology is to create large-area active metamaterials as building blocks to enable efficient and precise control of THz signals. Here, an active metamaterial device based on enhancement-mode transparent amorphous oxide thin-film transistor arrays for THz modulation is demonstrated. Analytical modelling based on full-wave techniques and multipole theory exhibits excellent consistent with the experimental observations and reveals that the intrinsic resonance mode at 0.75 THz is dominated by an electric response. The resonant behavior can be effectively tuned by controlling the channel conductivity through an external bias. Such metal/oxide thin-film transistor based controllable metamaterials are energy saving, low cost, large area and ready for mass-production, which are expected to be widely used in future THz imaging, sensing, communications and other applications. PMID:27000419

  7. Total-internal-reflection-based photomask for large-area photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Shao-Kang; Lin, Kung-Hsuan; Chen, Cheng-Lung; Chou, Chen-Hsun; Lin, You-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Photolithography has been widely implemented with a photomask in contact or in close proximity to the photoresist layer. The flatness of the substrates is a crucial factor to guarantee the quality of the entire patterned photoresist (PR) layer especially for large-area photolithography. However, some substrates, such as sapphire wafers, do not possess highly uniform thickness as silicon wafer does. In this work, we demonstrate that a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) photomask with optical total-internal-reflection structure can effectively circumvent this problem for mass production. Different from conventional photomask that the light is blocked by the patterned reflective/absorbing materials, the distributions of light intensity on the PR is engineered by the geometric structure of the transparent PDMS photomask. We demonstrate that 4 in. patterned sapphire wafers can be successfully fabricated by using this PDMS photomask, which can be easily integrated into the present techniques in industry for mass production of substrates for GaN-based optoelectronic devices.

  8. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M.; Fukui, T.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T.

    2012-01-01

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  9. The Trigger and Onboard Filter of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.; Grove, J. E.; Kocian, M.; Ritz, S.; Russell, J. J.; Siskind, E.; Smith, P.; Usher, T.; Winer, B.

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy phenomena. Achieving the capability requires a hardware trigger and onboard software event filters that are robust and highly efficient for gamma rays while remaining powerful rejecters of the much larger fluxes of charged-particle backgrounds. Because of the important discovery windows for science and the uncertainties in the background fluxes, configuration flexibility is a particularly important system feature. This paper describes the purposes and architecture of the system, the components and capabilities of the hardware trigger and onboard software filters, and the on-orbit operations plan and expected performance.

  10. The Trigger And Onboard Filter of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.; Grove, J.E.; Kocian, M.; Ritz, S.; Russell, J.J.; Siskind, E.; Smith, P.; Winer, B.; Usher, T.; /SLAC

    2007-11-13

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy phenomena. Achieving this capability requires a hardware trigger and onboard software event filters that are robust and highly efficient for gamma rays while keeping the event rates due to the much larger fluxes of charged particle backgrounds at an acceptable level. Because of the important discovery windows for science and the uncertainties in the background fluxes, configuration flexibility is a particularly important system feature. This poster describes the purposes and architecture of the system, the components and capabilities of the hardware trigger and onboard software filters, testing and operation experience on the ground, and the on-orbit operations plan and expected performance.

  11. TFT-Based Active Pixel Sensors for Large Area Thermal Neutron Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnen, George

    Due to diminishing availability of 3He, which is the critical component of neutron detecting proportional counters, large area flexible arrays are being considered as a potential replacement for neutron detection. A large area flexible array, utilizing semiconductors for both charged particle detection and pixel readout, ensures a large detection surface area in a light weight rugged form. Such a neutron detector could be suitable for deployment at ports of entry. The specific approach used in this research, uses a neutron converter layer which captures incident thermal neutrons, and then emits ionizing charged particles. These ionizing particles cause electron-hole pair generation within a single pixel's integrated sensing diode. The resulting charge is then amplified via a low-noise amplifier. This document begins by discussing the current state of the art in neutron detection and the associated challenges. Then, for the purpose of resolving some of these issues, recent design and modeling efforts towards developing an improved neutron detection system are described. Also presented is a low-noise active pixel sensor (APS) design capable of being implemented in low temperature indium gallium zinc oxide (InGaZnO) or amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor process compatible with plastic substrates. The low gain and limited scalability of this design are improved upon by implementing a new multi-stage self-resetting APS. For each APS design, successful radiation measurements are also presented using PiN diodes for charged particle detection. Next, detection array readout methodologies are modeled and analyzed, and use of a matched filter readout circuit is described as well. Finally, this document discusses detection diode integration with the designed TFT-based APSs.

  12. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  13. Molecular, electronic structure and conformational flexibility of the 1,6-dihydropyrimidine, 4,5-dihydrofuro[2,3-d]pyrimidine and their oxo, imino and methylene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, Oleg V.; Antonov, Dmitry M.

    1996-11-01

    Molecular and electronic structures of 1,6-dihydropyrimidine, 4,5-dihydrofuro[2,3-d]pyrimidine and their oxo, imino and methylene derivatives have been studied using the semiempirical quantum-chemical method AM1. The equilibrium geometry of all molecules is planar. These results were confirmed by X-ray structural investigations of the 1-oxo- and 1-imino derivatives of 2,5-dimethyl-3-(2,2,2-trichloroethyl)-4,5-dihydrofuro[2,3-d]pyrimidine. However, the dihydropyrimidine ring in all compounds possesses a degree of conformational flexibility. The transition from a planar equilibrium conformation to a distorted sofa with the CNCC torsion angle ± 20° causes an increase of energy less than 1.5 kcal mol -1. The factors that determine this property of the dihydroheterocycle (bending strain, non-aromaticity, conjugation, 1,2-allylic strain) have been considered.

  14. A large area detector for x-ray applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rodricks, B.; Huang, Qiang; Hopf, R.; Wang, Kemei

    1993-10-01

    A large area detector for x-ray synchrotron applications has been developed. The front end of this device consist of a scintillator coupled to a fiber-optic taper. The fiber-optic taper is comprised of 4 smaller (70 mm x 70 mm) tapers fused together in a square matrix giving an active area of 140 mm x 140 mm. Each taper has a demagnification of 5.5 resulting in four small ends that are 12 mm diagonally across. The small ends of each taper are coupled to four microchannel-plate-based image intensifiers. The output from each image intensifier is focused onto a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detector. The four CCDs are read out in parallel and are independently controlled. The image intensifiers also act as fast (20 ns) electronic shutters. The system is capable of displaying images in real time. Additionally, with independent control on the readout of each row of data from the CCD, the system is capable of performing high speed imaging through novel readout manipulation.

  15. Development of a large area space solar cell assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a large area high efficiency solar cell assembly is described. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon solar cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are the use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and integration of coverglass application and cell fabrications. Cell development experiments concerned optimization of ion implantation processing of 2 ohm-cm boron-doped silicon. Process parameters were selected based on these experiments and cells with area of 34.3 sq cm wre fabricated. The average AMO efficiency of the twenty-five best cells was 13.9% and the best bell had an efficiency of 14.4%. An important innovation in cell encapsulation was also developed. In this technique, the coverglass is applied before the cell is sawed to final size. The coverglass and cell are then sawed as a unit. In this way, the cost of the coverglass is reduced, since the tolerance on glass size is relaxed, and costly coverglass/cell alignment procedures are eliminated. Adhesive investigated were EVA, FEP-Teflon sheet and DC 93-500. Details of processing and results are reported.

  16. An advanced open path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mani, S.

    1996-12-31

    Over 100 million gallons of radioactive and toxic waste materials generated in weapon materials production are stored in 322 tanks buried within large areas at DOE sites. Toxic vapors occur in the tank headspace due to the solvents used and chemical reactions within the tanks. To prevent flammable or explosive concentration of volatile vapors, the headspace are vented, either manually or automatically, to the atmosphere when the headspace pressure exceeds preset values. Furthermore, 67 of the 177 tanks at the DOE Hanford Site are suspected or are known to be leaking into the ground. These underground storage tanks are grouped into tank farms which contain closely spaced tanks in areas as large as 1 km{sup 2}. The objective of this program is to protect DOE personnel and the public by monitoring the air above these tank farms for toxic air pollutants without the monitor entering the tanks farms, which can be radioactive. A secondary objective is to protect personnel by monitoring the air above buried 50 gallon drums containing moderately low radioactive materials but which could also emit toxic air pollutants.

  17. DESIGN OF A LARGE-AREA FAST NEUTRON DIRECTIONAL DETECTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER, P.E.

    2006-10-29

    A large-area fast-neutron double-scatter directional detector and spectrometer is being constructed using l-meter-long plastic scintillator paddles with photomultiplier tubes at both ends. The scintillators detect fast neutrons by proton recoil and also gamma rays by Compton scattering. The paddles are arranged in two parallel planes so that neutrons can be distinguished from muons and gamma rays by time of flight between the planes. The signal pulses are digitized with a time resolution of one gigasample per second. The location of an event along each paddle can be determined from the relative amplitudes or timing of the signals at the ends. The angle of deflection of a neutron in the first plane can be estimated from the energy deposited by the recoil proton, combined with the scattered neutron time-of-flight energy. Each scattering angle can be back-projected as a cone, and many intersecting cones define the incident neutron direction from a distant point source. Moreover, the total energy of each neutron can be obtained, allowing some regions of a fission source spectrum to be distinguished from background generated by cosmic rays. Monte Carlo calculations will be compared with measurements.

  18. Large-area nanogap plasmon resonator arrays for plasmonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; van Wolferen, Henk; Wormeester, Herbert; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin T.

    2012-07-01

    Large-area (~8000 mm2) Au nanogap plasmon resonator array substrates manufactured using maskless laser interference lithography (LIL) with high uniformity are presented. The periodically spaced subwavelength nanogap arrays are formed between adjacent nanopyramid (NPy) structures with precisely defined pitch and high length density (~1 km cm-2), and are ideally suited as scattering sites for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as well as refractive index sensing. The two-dimensional grid arrangement of NPy structures renders the excitation of the plasmon resonators minimally dependent on the incident polarization. The SERS average enhancement factor (AEF) has been characterized using over 30 000 individual measurements of benzenethiol (BT) chemisorbed on the Au NPy surfaces. From the 1(a1), βCCC + νCS ring mode (1074 cm-1) of BT on surfaces with pitch λg = 200 nm, AEF = 0.8 × 106 and for surfaces with λg = 500 nm, AEF = 0.3 × 107 from over 99% of the imaged spots. Maximum AEFs > 108 have been measured in both cases.

  19. Research and Development of Large Area Color AC Plasma Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Tsutae

    1998-10-01

    Plasma display is essentially a gas discharge device using discharges in small cavities about 0. 1 m. The color plasma displays utilize the visible light from phosphors excited by the ultra-violet by discharge in contrast to monochrome plasma displays utilizing visible light directly from gas discharges. At the early stage of the color plasma display development, the degradation of the phosphors and unstable operating voltage prevented to realize a practical color plasma display. The introduction of the three-electrode surface-discharge technology opened the way to solve the problems. Two key technologies of a simple panel structure with a stripe rib and phosphor alignment and a full color image driving method with an address-and-display-period-separated sub-field method have realized practically available full color plasma displays. A full color plasma display has been firstly developed in 1992 with a 21-in.-diagonal PDP and then a 42-in.-diagonal PDP in 1995 Currently a 50-in.-diagonal color plasma display has been developed. The large area color plasma displays have already been put into the market and are creating new markets, such as a wall hanging TV and multimedia displays for advertisement, information, etc. This paper will show the history of the surface-discharge color plasma display technologies and current status of the color plasma display.

  20. Pulsar Simulations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzano, M.; Harding, A. K.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Burnett, T.; Chiang, J.; Digel, S. W.; Dubois, R.; Kuss, M. W.; Latronico, L.; McEnery, J. E.; Omodei, N.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Spandre, G.; Thompson, D. J.

    2009-01-01

    Pulsars are among the prime targets for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the recently launched Fermi observatory. The LAT will study the gamma-ray Universe between 20 MeV and 300 GeV with unprecedented detail. Increasing numbers of gamma-ray pulsars are being firmly identified, yet their emission mechanisms are far from being understood. To better investigate and exploit the tAT capabilities for pulsar science. a set of new detailed pulsar simulation tools have been developed within the LAT collaboration. The structure of the pulsar simulator package (PulsarSpeccrum) is presented here. Starting from photon distributions in energy and phase obtained from theoretical calculations or phenomenological considerations, gamma-rays are generated and their arrival times at the spacecraft are determined by taking Into account effects such as barycentric effects and timing noise. Pulsars in binary systems also can be simulated given orbital parameters. We present how simulations can be used for generating a realistic set of gamma rays as observed by the LAT, focusing on some case studies that show the performance of the LAT for pulsar observations.

  1. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  2. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-04-20

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ∼5.1σ. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, Γ ∼ 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy γ-rays. The very hard GeV γ-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the γ-rays. The γ-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347.

  3. Edge field emission of large-area single layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Bandurin, Denis A.; Orekhov, Anton S.; Purcell, Stephen T.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2015-12-01

    Field electron emission from the edges of large-area (∼1 cm × 1 cm) graphene films deposited onto quartz wafers was studied. The graphene was previously grown by chemical vapour deposition on copper. An extreme enhancement of electrostatic field at the edge of the films with macroscopically large lateral dimensions and with single atom thickness was achieved. This resulted in the creation of a blade type electron emitter, providing stable field emission at low-voltage with linear current density up to 0.5 mA/cm. A strong hysteresis in current-voltage characteristics and a step-like increase of the emission current during voltage ramp up were observed. These effects were explained by the local mechanical peeling of the graphene edge from the quartz substrate by the ponderomotive force during the field emission process. Specific field emission phenomena exhibited in the experimental study are explained by a unique combination of structural, electronic and mechanical properties of graphene. Various potential applications ranging from linear electron beam sources to microelectromechanical systems are discussed.

  4. SPLASH: A Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Joanne; Caswell, James; Gomez, Jose F.; Mcclure-Griffiths, Naomi; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Dickey, John; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Carretti, Ettore; Ellingsen, Simon; Walsh, Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Hennebelle, Patrick; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Gibson, Steven; Jones, Courtney; Krishnan, Vasaant

    2013-10-01

    The OH 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that may trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. The survey will answer critical questions on the global distribution of diffuse OH, the degree to which it traces ‘hidden’ material caught between the regimes probed by traditional tracers of the neutral ISM, and its role as a probe of molecular cloud formation. As a blind survey for all four ground-state transitions, SPLASH will also detect many new OH masers, facilitating a broad range of astrophysical studies. This proposal requests 670 hours spread over two semesters to complete Phase 1 of the SPLASH project, which will map 152 square degrees in the inner Galactic Plane, including the Galactic Centre. Following the ongoing success of the project, we request that its pre-graded status be renewed for a final two semesters.

  5. High-efficiency, large-area CdTe panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, S. P.; Singh, V. P.; Ackerman, B.

    1989-04-01

    This technical progress report on large-area CdTe solar panels cover work accomplished from June 1987 to May 1988. The highest-efficiency devices produced during this period measured 10.6 percent efficient on a 0.302-cm(2) cell. On 11-7/8 in. by 12 in. panels, the highest output obtained was 5.3 W over 847 cm(2), or 7.0 percent active-area efficiency. The aperture-area efficiency is presently about 12 percent lower, or 6.3 percent efficiency, because of interconnection losses. A 4-ft(2) panel was also produced. Resistivities of less than 100 ohm-cm have been observed consistently in phosphorus- or copper-doped CdTe. Surface analysis is presented for various CdTe treatments. Devices were characterized and analyzed using electron-beam-induced current, capacitance, spectral response, and I-V curves at various temperatures. A model for junction transport is presented. An encapsulation system is described, and lifetime test results are presented.

  6. The new event analysis of the Fermi large area telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgrò, Carmelo

    2014-07-01

    Since its launch on June 11, 2008 the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has been exploring the gamma-ray sky at energies from 20 MeV to over 300 GeV. Five years of nearly flawless operation allowed a constant improvement of the detector knowledge and, as a consequence, continuous update of the event selection and the corresponding instrument response parametrization. The final product of this effort is a radical revision of the entire event-level analysis, from the event reconstruction algorithms in each subsystem to the background rejection strategy. The potential improvements include a larger acceptance coupled with a significant reduction in background contamination, better angular and energy resolution and an extension of the energy reach below 100 MeV and in the TeV range. In this paper I will describe the new reconstruction and the event-level analysis, show the expected instrument performance and discuss future prospects for astro-particle physics with the LAT.

  7. Saturn: A large area x-ray simulation accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomquist, D.D.; Stinnett, R.W.; McDaniel, D.H.; Lee, J.R.; Sharpe, A.W.; Halbleib, J.A.; Schlitt, L.G.; Spence, P.W.; Corcoran, P.

    1987-01-01

    Saturn is the result of a major metamorphosis of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I) from an ICF research facility to the large-area x-ray source of the Simulation Technology Laboratory (STL) project. Renamed Saturn, for its unique multiple-ring diode design, the facility is designed to take advantage of the numerous advances in pulsed power technology made by the ICF program in recent years and much of the existing PBFA-I support system. Saturn will include significant upgrades in the energy storage and pulse-forming sections. The 36 magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) that provided power flow to the ion diode of PBFA-I were replaced by a system of vertical triplate water transmission lines. These lines are connected to three horizontal triplate disks in a water convolute section. Power will flow through an insulator stack into radial MITLs that drive the three-ring diode. Saturn is designed to operate with a maximum of 750 kJ coupled to the three-ring e-beam diode with a peak power of 25 TW to provide an x-ray exposure capability of 5 x 10/sup 12/ rads/s (Si) and 5 cal/g (Au) over 500 cm/sup 2/.

  8. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  9. Dark Matter Searches with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Meurer, Christine

    2008-12-24

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, successfully launched on June 11th, 2008, is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The main instrument, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), with a wide field of view (>2 sr), a large effective area (>8000 cm{sup 2} at 1 GeV), sub-arcminute source localization, a large energy range (20 MeV-300 GeV) and a good energy resolution (close to 8% at 1 GeV), has excellent potential to either discover or to constrain a Dark Matter signal. The Fermi LAT team pursues complementary searches for signatures of particle Dark Matter in different search regions such as the galactic center, galactic satellites and subhalos, the milky way halo, extragalactic regions as well as the search for spectral lines. In these proceedings we examine the potential of the LAT to detect gamma-rays coming from Weakly Interacting Massive Particle annihilations in these regions with special focus on the galactic center region.

  10. Influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Leonora, E.; Aiello, S.; Leotta, G.

    2011-07-01

    The influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers proposed for a future deep sea neutrino telescope was studied under the EU-funded KM3NeT design study. The aims were to evaluate variations in PMT performance in the Earth's magnetic field and to decide whether the use of magnetic shielding is necessary. Measurements were performed on three Hamamatsu PMTs: two 8-inch R5912 types, one of these with super-bi-alkali photocathode, and a 10-inch R7081 type with a standard bi-alkali photocathode. The various characteristics of the PMTs were measured while varying the PMT orientations with respect to the Earth's magnetic field, both with and without a mu-metal cage as magnetic shield. In the 8-inch PMTs the impact of the magnetic field was found to be smaller than that on the 10-inch PMT. The increased quantum efficiency in the 8 super-bi-alkali PMT almost compensated its smaller detection surface compared to the 10' PMT. No significant effects were measured upon transit time and the fraction of spurious pulses. (authors)

  11. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bartelt, J.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Atwood, W. B.; Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bisello, D.; Baughman, B. M. E-mail: massimiliano.razzano@pi.infn.it

    2009-05-10

    The Vela pulsar is the brightest persistent source in the GeV sky and thus is the traditional first target for new {gamma}-ray observatories. We report here on initial Fermi Large Area Telescope observations during verification phase pointed exposure and early sky survey scanning. We have used the Vela signal to verify Fermi timing and angular resolution. The high-quality pulse profile, with some 32,400 pulsed photons at E {>=} 0.03 GeV, shows new features, including pulse structure as fine as 0.3 ms and a distinct third peak, which shifts in phase with energy. We examine the high-energy behavior of the pulsed emission; initial spectra suggest a phase-averaged power-law index of {gamma} = 1.51{sup +0.05} {sub -0.04} with an exponential cutoff at E{sub c} = 2.9 {+-} 0.1 GeV. Spectral fits with generalized cutoffs of the form e{sup -(E/E{sub c}){sup b}} require b {<=} 1, which is inconsistent with magnetic pair attenuation, and thus favor outer-magnetosphere emission models. Finally, we report on upper limits to any unpulsed component, as might be associated with a surrounding pulsar wind nebula.

  12. Ultra-stiff large-area carpets of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Dallas, Panagiotis; Britton, Jude; Lozano, Juan G; Murdock, Adrian T; Ferraro, Claudio; Gutierrez, Eduardo Saiz; Rijnveld, Niek; Holdway, Philip; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Grobert, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    Herewith, we report the influence of post-synthesis heat treatment (≤2350 °C and plasma temperatures) on the crystal structure, defect density, purity, alignment and dispersibility of free-standing large-area (several cm(2)) carpets of ultra-long (several mm) vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs). VA-MWCNTs were produced in large quantities (20-30 g per batch) using a semi-scaled-up aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) setup. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that the heat treatment at 2350 °C under inert atmosphere purifies, removes residual catalyst particles, and partially aligns adjacent single crystals (crystallites) in polycrystalline MWCNTs. The purification and improvement in the crystallites alignment within the MWCNTs resulted in reduced dispersibility of the VA-MWCNTs in liquid media. High-resolution microscopy revealed that the crystallinity is improved in scales of few tens of nanometres while the point defects remain largely unaffected. The heat treatment also had a marked benefit on the mechanical properties of the carpets. For the first time, we report compression moduli as high as 120 MPa for VA-MWCNT carpets, i.e. an order of magnitude higher than previously reported figures. The application of higher temperatures (arc-discharge plasma, ≥4000 °C) resulted in the formation of a novel graphite-matrix composite reinforced with CVD and arc-discharge-like carbon nanotubes. PMID:27240959

  13. Exploring the conformational energy landscape of glassy disaccharides by cross polarization magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and numerical simulations. II. Enhanced molecular flexibility in amorphous trehalose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Ronan; Bordat, Patrice; Cesaro, Attilio; Descamps, Marc

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses chemical shift surfaces to simulate experimental C13 cross polarization magic angle spinning spectra for amorphous solid state disaccharides, paying particular attention to the glycosidic linkage atoms in trehalose, sucrose, and lactose. The combination of molecular mechanics with density functional theory/gauge invariant atomic orbital ab initio methods provides reliable structural information on the conformational distribution in the glass. The results are interpreted in terms of an enhanced flexibility that trehalose possesses in the amorphous solid state, at least on the time scale of C13 nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. Implications of these findings for the fragility of trehalose glass and bioprotectant action are discussed.

  14. GLAST large area telescope - daily survey of high energy sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi

    2003-07-01

    GLAST Large Area Telescope was proposed to NASA in 1999 as a follow-up of EGRET on-board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory by an international collaboration. The proposal has been approved as a part of the GLAST observatory mission in its capability to explore a wide range of astrophysics with 5-40 times higher sensitivity and extended energy coverage (20MeV to 300GeV) than EGRET. The instrument consists of 16 towers of e+e- pair tracker, 16 blocks of segmented electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles covering the tracker towers. It will have 5-10 times larger on-axis effective area, 6 times wider field-of-view (FOV), and up to 5 times better angular resolution when compared with EGRET. The Large Area Telescope will cover about 40% of the sky above the Earth's horizon in its FOV at any given time and will scan nearly the entire Universe every orbit (~ 90min): about 20% of Gamma-Ray Bursts will be observed from the onset of the bursts to the initial after-glow phase; all longer-lasting transients and variabilities will be detected daily at the improved sensitivity. The instrument has been prototyped twice between 1995 and 2001, designed almost to the Flight Model by the international collaboration of the US (NASA and DoE), France, Italy, Japan, and Sweden. The first prototype consisted of one tower of e+e- pair trackers, one block of segmented calorimeters and a smaller set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles (Beam Test Engineering Model, BTEM), which was put into e+, p, and γ beams at SLAC in the winter of 1999-2000. It was subsequently modified for a balloon experiment (Balloon Flight Engineering Model, BFEM) and flown at Palestine, Texas in August 2001. Data collected in the test experiments have been analyzed and compared with predictions of computer simulation codes such as Geant4. These studies have confirmed validity of the basic design, brought up a few issues for further improvement, and gathered data on

  15. Attribution and Characterisation of Sclerophyll Forested Landscapes Over Large Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Simon; Soto-Berelov, Mariela; Suarez, Lola; Wilkes, Phil; Woodgate, Will; Haywood, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the attribution and characterisation of Sclerophyll forested landscapes over large areas. First we define a set of woody vegetation data primitives (e.g. canopy cover, leaf area index (LAI), bole density, canopy height), which are then scaled-up using multiple remote sensing data sources to characterise and extract landscape woody vegetation features. The advantage of this approach is that vegetation landscape features can be described from composites of these data primitives. The proposed data primitives act as building blocks for the re-creation of past woody characterisation schemes as well as allowing for re-compilation to support present and future policy and management and decision making needs. Three main research sites were attributed; representative of different sclerophyll woody vegetated systems (Box Iron-bark forest; Mountain Ash forest; Mixed Species foothills forest). High resolution hyperspectral and full waveform LiDAR data was acquired over the three research sites. At the same time, land management agencies (Victorian Department of Environment, Land Water and Planning) and researchers (RMIT, CRC for Spatial Information and CSIRO) conducted fieldwork to collect structural and functional measurements of vegetation, using traditional forest mensuration transects and plots, terrestrial lidar scanning and high temporal resolution in-situ autonomous laser (VegNet) scanners. Results are presented of: 1) inter-comparisons of LAI estimations made using ground based hemispherical photography, LAI 2200 PCA, CI-110 and terrestrial and airborne laser scanners; 2) canopy height and vertical canopy complexity derived from airborne LiDAR validated using ground observations; and, 3) time-series characterisation of land cover features. 1. Accuracy targets for remotely sensed LAI products to match within ground based estimates are ± 0.5 LAI or a 20% maximum (CEOS/GCOS) with new aspirational targets of 5%). In this research we

  16. Ultra-stiff large-area carpets of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Dallas, Panagiotis; Britton, Jude; Lozano, Juan G.; Murdock, Adrian T.; Ferraro, Claudio; Gutierrez, Eduardo Saiz; Rijnveld, Niek; Holdway, Philip; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Grobert, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    Herewith, we report the influence of post-synthesis heat treatment (<=2350 °C and plasma temperatures) on the crystal structure, defect density, purity, alignment and dispersibility of free-standing large-area (several cm2) carpets of ultra-long (several mm) vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs). VA-MWCNTs were produced in large quantities (20-30 g per batch) using a semi-scaled-up aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) setup. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that the heat treatment at 2350 °C under inert atmosphere purifies, removes residual catalyst particles, and partially aligns adjacent single crystals (crystallites) in polycrystalline MWCNTs. The purification and improvement in the crystallites alignment within the MWCNTs resulted in reduced dispersibility of the VA-MWCNTs in liquid media. High-resolution microscopy revealed that the crystallinity is improved in scales of few tens of nanometres while the point defects remain largely unaffected. The heat treatment also had a marked benefit on the mechanical properties of the carpets. For the first time, we report compression moduli as high as 120 MPa for VA-MWCNT carpets, i.e. an order of magnitude higher than previously reported figures. The application of higher temperatures (arc-discharge plasma, >=4000 °C) resulted in the formation of a novel graphite-matrix composite reinforced with CVD and arc-discharge-like carbon nanotubes.Herewith, we report the influence of post-synthesis heat treatment (<=2350 °C and plasma temperatures) on the crystal structure, defect density, purity, alignment and dispersibility of free-standing large-area (several cm2) carpets of ultra-long (several mm) vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs). VA-MWCNTs were produced in large quantities (20-30 g per batch) using a semi-scaled-up aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) setup. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that the heat treatment at 2350 °C under

  17. Studies of dielectrics on graphite and large-area graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirkle, Adam R.

    Graphene is a promising material as an alternative to Si in future logic devices due to extremely high carrier mobility and other attractive physical and electronic properties. While the exact structure of commercially viable graphene-based device architectures is not yet clear, adoption of graphene in such an architecture will certainly require the deposition of scaled dielectrics. Numerous challenges arise, many due to the surface chemistry of graphene which is dramatically different from that of bulk semiconductors due to the absence of bonding states resulting from the two-dimensional nature of sp2 C-C bonds in graphene. The low surface reactivity means that application of conventional dielectric deposition processes generally results in poor, non-uniform nucleation, hindering dielectric scaling below thicknesses of 20-50 nm. This dissertation focuses on studies of the graphene surface and potential routes to scalable dielectric deposition by means of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD). The role of initial surface condition and cleanliness is considered, and several approaches for the formation of dielectric nucleation layers are studied. Several physical and electrical techniques are employed including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrical characterization of graphene FETs and capacitors. Additionally, the lack of commercial availability of high quality large-area graphene samples required for these dielectric studies led to the development of in-house capability for CVD growth of graphene on copper substrates and transfer to insulating substrates. Studies of this growth and transfer process are presented.

  18. Low-Field, Large-Area Helicon Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. F.; Evans, J. D.; Jiang, X.; Tynan, G.

    1996-10-01

    Previous experiments footnote F.F. Chen and G. Chevalier, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10, 1389 (1992). with helicon discharges in both 1- and 2-inch diam tubes have shown a density peak at magnetic fields B between 10 and 40 G and that this peak appears only with RF powers >1kW. Theory indicates that the Trivelpiece-Gould branch of the dispersion relation is important at low B, but it is not clear whether the density rise is due to increased absorption or simply to impurities from the wall. Multiple discharges of this type can be used to create a large-area plasma source for industrial applications. Two devices have been constructed to test this idea. Device 1 has a 2-in diam tube, 6-in long, with a right-hand helical antenna and a 0-100 G field, injecting plasma into a large B = 0 region. RF power at 13.56 and 27.12 MHz is applied up to 600W. The plasma density falls off with increasing B-field and is highest at 0 G. With a 12-in long tube, this fall-off is eliminate! d.! De vice 2 has 7 tubes of the same type arranged in a honeycomb pattern on the top plate of a large chamber with multi-dipole confinement. By careful matching, discharges can be struck in all 7 tubes simultaneously. Density uniformity data is not available at the time of this abstract. These devices unfortunately cannot be used to verify the theory, since the magnetic fields are nonuniform.

  19. Large-area settlement pattern recognition from Landsat-8 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Marc; Pittore, Massimiliano

    2016-09-01

    The study presents an image processing and analysis pipeline that combines object-based image analysis with a Support Vector Machine to derive a multi-layered settlement product from Landsat-8 data over large areas. 43 image scenes are processed over large parts of Central Asia (Southern Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Eastern Uzbekistan). The main tasks tackled by this work include built-up area identification, settlement type classification and urban structure types pattern recognition. Besides commonly used accuracy assessments of the resulting map products, thorough performance evaluations are carried out under varying conditions to tune algorithm parameters and assess their applicability for the given tasks. As part of this, several research questions are being addressed. In particular the influence of the improved spatial and spectral resolution of Landsat-8 on the SVM performance to identify built-up areas and urban structure types are evaluated. Also the influence of an extended feature space including digital elevation model features is tested for mountainous regions. Moreover, the spatial distribution of classification uncertainties is analyzed and compared to the heterogeneity of the building stock within the computational unit of the segments. The study concludes that the information content of Landsat-8 images is sufficient for the tested classification tasks and even detailed urban structures could be extracted with satisfying accuracy. Freely available ancillary settlement point location data could further improve the built-up area classification. Digital elevation features and pan-sharpening could, however, not significantly improve the classification results. The study highlights the importance of dynamically tuned classifier parameters, and underlines the use of Shannon entropy computed from the soft answers of the SVM as a valid measure of the spatial distribution of classification uncertainties.

  20. Large area mode field photonic crystal fiber design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuqin; An, Wensheng; Wang, Kang; Zhu, Guangxin; Le, Zichun

    2005-11-01

    A novel design method about photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with large area model field (LAMF) is demonstrated. Different from ordinarily design that the core of PCF formed by missing one air holes in the center of section, many air holes distributed in heartland all together come into being the core region. Air holes are arranged regularly in core region and outer cladding regions according to different periodical character, respectively. The effective refractive index (n eff ) of core region should be higher than cladding region because of total internal reflection (TIR) requirement. In this paper, two kinds of typical scheme are offered to realize LAMF-PCF. First, Λ, the spacing of neighboring air holes in whole section is fixed, once the radius of air holes in the core region r c is smaller than the cladding air holes r cla, LAMF-PCF will be formed. The modal area only lessens a little as r c is reduced. Especially, optimal size of r c can nearly make MFA insensitive to wavelength. On the contrary, dispersion parameter of PCF will take place visible change along with r c reduced, and ultra-flattened dispersion character can be realized when r c is optimized. Another method of designing LAMF-PCF is keeping all air holes uniform in the whole section of PCF, but the space of neighboring air holes in the core region Λ c is longer than the cladding region Λ cla, so n eff of core region is higher than the cladding region and TIR can take place.

  1. Background simulations for the Large Area Detector onboard LOFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Riccardo; Feroci, Marco; Del Monte, Ettore; Mineo, Teresa; Lund, Niels; Fraser, George W.

    2013-12-01

    The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT), currently in an assessment phase in the framework the ESA M3 Cosmic Vision programme, is an innovative medium-class mission specifically designed to answer fundamental questions about the behaviour of matter, in the very strong gravitational and magnetic fields around compact objects and in supranuclear density conditions. Having an effective area of ˜10 m2 at 8 keV, LOFT will be able to measure with high sensitivity very fast variability in the X-ray fluxes and spectra. A good knowledge of the in-orbit background environment is essential to assess the scientific performance of the mission and optimize the design of its main instrument, the Large Area Detector (LAD). In this paper the results of an extensive Geant-4 simulation of the instrumentwillbe discussed, showing the main contributions to the background and the design solutions for its reduction and control. Our results show that the current LOFT/LAD design is expected to meet its scientific requirement of a background rate equivalent to 10 mCrab in 2‒30 keV, achieving about 5 mCrab in the most important 2-10 keV energy band. Moreover, simulations show an anticipated modulation of the background rate as small as 10 % over the orbital timescale. The intrinsic photonic origin of the largest background component also allows for an efficient modelling, supported by an in-flight active monitoring, allowing to predict systematic residuals significantly better than the requirement of 1 %, and actually meeting the 0.25 % science goal.

  2. Progress on conformal microwave array applicators for heating chestwall disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, P. R.; Maccarini, P. F.; Juang, T.; Jacobsen, S. K.; Gaeta, C. J.; Schlorff, J. L.; Milligan, A. J.

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies have reported the computer modeling, CAD design, and theoretical performance of single and multiple antenna arrays of Dual Concentric Conductor (DCC) square slot radiators driven at 915 and 433 MHz. Subsequently, practical CAD designs of microstrip antenna arrays constructed on thin and flexible printed circuit board (PCB) material were reported which evolved into large Conformal Microwave Array (CMA) sheets that could wrap around the surface of the human torso for delivering microwave energy to large areas of superficial tissue. Although uniform and adjustable radiation patterns have been demonstrated from multiple element applicators radiating into simple homogeneous phantom loads, the contoured and heterogeneous tissue loads typical of chestwall recurrent breast cancer have required additional design efforts to achieve good coupling and efficient heating from the increasingly larger conformal array applicators used to treat large area contoured patient anatomy. Thus recent work has extended the theoretical optimization of DCC antennas to improve radiation efficiency of each individual aperture and reduce mismatch reflections, radiation losses, noise, and cross coupling of the feedline distribution network of large array configurations. Design improvements have also been incorporated into the supporting bolus structure to maintain effective coupling of DCC antennas into contoured anatomy and to monitor and control surface temperatures under the entire array. New approaches for non-invasive monitoring of surface and sub-surface tissue temperatures under each independent heat source are described that make use of microwave radiometry and flexible sheet grid arrays of thermal sensors. Efforts to optimize the clinical patient interface and move from planar rectangular shapes to contoured vest applicators that accommodate entire disease in a larger number of patients are summarized. By applying heat more uniformly to large areas of contoured anatomy

  3. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-02-01

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 310-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 310-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-310-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations.

  4. Realization of Large-Area Wrinkle-Free Monolayer Graphene Films Transferred to Functional Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byeong-Ju; Choi, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Hyun-You; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Choi, Hyung-Jin; Jung, Hyun-June; Jung, Min-Wook; An, Ki-Seok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Structural inhomogeneities, such as the wrinkles and ripples within a graphene film after transferring the free-standing graphene layer to a functional substrate, degrade the physical and electrical properties of the corresponding electronic devices. Here, we introduced titanium as a superior adhesion layer for fabricating wrinkle-free graphene films that is highly applicable to flexible and transparent electronic devices. The Ti layer does not influence the electronic performance of the functional substrates. Experimental and theoretical investigations confirm that the strong chemical interactions between Ti and any oxygen atoms unintentionally introduced on/within the graphene are responsible for forming the clean, defect-free graphene layer. Our results accelerate the practical application of graphene-related electronic devices with enhanced functionality. The large-area monolayer graphenes were prepared by a simple attachment of the Ti layer with the multi-layer wrinkle-free graphene films. For the first time, the graphene films were addressed for applications of superior bottom electrode for flexible capacitors instead of the novel metals. PMID:26043868

  5. Large-area multilayer infrared nano-wire grid polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayduk, Alexey E.; Prinz, Victor Ya.; Seleznev, Vladimir A.; Rechkunov, Sergey N.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a technology for fabricating infrared polarizers based on double- and four-layer metal-dielectric nanogratings. Due to the use of nanoimprint lithography, the size of fabricated samples with 190-nm grating period could be made exceeding 170 cm2. The fabricated polarizers are flexible, and they have high quality over the entire area of the sample. Spectrophotometric measurements and numerical simulations have showed that the polarizers exhibited a large transmission coefficient and a high extinction ratio (over 3 ṡ 104). In order to expand applications of polarizers to the bio-inspired wide field-of-view systems, technology for fabricating polarizers on curved surfaces prepared by 3D printing has been developed. The obtained results offer much promise for polarimetry purposes.

  6. The Spitzer-HETDEX Exploratory Large-area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papovich, C.; Shipley, H. V.; Mehrtens, N.; Lanham, C.; Lacy, M.; Ciardullo, R.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Bassett, R.; Behroozi, P.; Blanc, G. A.; de Jong, R. S.; DePoy, D. L.; Drory, N.; Gawiser, E.; Gebhardt, K.; Gronwall, C.; Hill, G. J.; Hopp, U.; Jogee, S.; Kawinwanichakij, L.; Marshall, J. L.; McLinden, E.; Mentuch Cooper, E.; Somerville, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Tran, K.-V.; Tuttle, S.; Viero, M.; Wechsler, R.; Zeimann, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) of the Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey. SHELA covers ≈24 deg2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey “Stripe 82” region, and falls within the footprints of the Hobby–Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Dark Energy Survey. The HETDEX blind R ∼ 800 spectroscopy will produce ∼200,000 redshifts from the Lyα emission for galaxies in the range 1.9 < z < 3.5, and an additional ∼200,000 redshifts from the [O ii] emission for galaxies at z < 0.5. When combined with deep ugriz images from the Dark Energy Camera, K-band images from NEWFIRM, and other ancillary data, the IRAC photometry from Spitzer will enable a broad range of scientific studies of the relationship between structure formation, galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, the presence of active galactic nuclei, and environment over a co-moving volume of ∼0.5 Gpc3 at 1.9 < z < 3.5. Here, we discuss the properties of the SHELA IRAC data set, including the data acquisition, reduction, validation, and source catalogs. Our tests show that the images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 μJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 μm (1σ, for R = 2″ circular apertures). As a demonstration of the science, we present IRAC number counts, examples of highly temporally variable sources, and galaxy surface density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. In the spirit of the Spitzer Exploratory programs, we provide all of the images and catalogs as part of the publication.

  7. The Spitzer-HETDEX Exploratory Large-area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papovich, C.; Shipley, H. V.; Mehrtens, N.; Lanham, C.; Lacy, M.; Ciardullo, R.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Bassett, R.; Behroozi, P.; Blanc, G. A.; de Jong, R. S.; DePoy, D. L.; Drory, N.; Gawiser, E.; Gebhardt, K.; Gronwall, C.; Hill, G. J.; Hopp, U.; Jogee, S.; Kawinwanichakij, L.; Marshall, J. L.; McLinden, E.; Mentuch Cooper, E.; Somerville, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Tran, K.-V.; Tuttle, S.; Viero, M.; Wechsler, R.; Zeimann, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) of the Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey. SHELA covers ≈24 deg2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey “Stripe 82” region, and falls within the footprints of the Hobby–Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Dark Energy Survey. The HETDEX blind R ˜ 800 spectroscopy will produce ˜200,000 redshifts from the Lyα emission for galaxies in the range 1.9 < z < 3.5, and an additional ˜200,000 redshifts from the [O ii] emission for galaxies at z < 0.5. When combined with deep ugriz images from the Dark Energy Camera, K-band images from NEWFIRM, and other ancillary data, the IRAC photometry from Spitzer will enable a broad range of scientific studies of the relationship between structure formation, galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, the presence of active galactic nuclei, and environment over a co-moving volume of ˜0.5 Gpc3 at 1.9 < z < 3.5. Here, we discuss the properties of the SHELA IRAC data set, including the data acquisition, reduction, validation, and source catalogs. Our tests show that the images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 μJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 μm (1σ, for R = 2″ circular apertures). As a demonstration of the science, we present IRAC number counts, examples of highly temporally variable sources, and galaxy surface density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. In the spirit of the Spitzer Exploratory programs, we provide all of the images and catalogs as part of the publication.

  8. Large-Area Permanent-Magnet ECR Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2007-01-01

    A 40-cm-diameter plasma device has been developed as a source of ions for material-processing and ion-thruster applications. Like the device described in the immediately preceding article, this device utilizes electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) excited by microwave power in a magnetic field to generate a plasma in an electrodeless (noncontact) manner and without need for an electrically insulating, microwave-transmissive window at the source. Hence, this device offers the same advantages of electrodeless, windowless design - low contamination and long operational life. The device generates a uniform, high-density plasma capable of sustaining uniform ion-current densities at its exit plane while operating at low pressure [<10(exp -4) torr (less than about 1.3 10(exp -2) Pa)] and input power <200 W at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. Though the prototype model operates at 2.45 GHz, operation at higher frequencies can be achieved by straightforward modification to the input microwave waveguide. Higher frequency operation may be desirable in those applications that require even higher background plasma densities. In the design of this ECR plasma source, there are no cumbersome, power-hungry electromagnets. The magnetic field in this device is generated by a permanent-magnet circuit that is optimized to generate resonance surfaces. The microwave power is injected on the centerline of the device. The resulting discharge plasma jumps into a "high mode" when the input power rises above 150 W. This mode is associated with elevated plasma density and high uniformity. The large area and uniformity of the plasma and the low operating pressure are well suited for such material-processing applications as etching and deposition on large silicon wafers. The high exit-plane ion-current density makes it possible to attain a high rate of etching or deposition. The plasma potential is <3 V low enough that there is little likelihood of sputtering, which, in plasma processing, is undesired

  9. Serendipitous SAD Solution for DMSO-Soaked SOCS2-ElonginC-ElonginB Crystals Using Covalently Incorporated Dimethylarsenic: Insights into Substrate Receptor Conformational Flexibility in Cullin RING Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Gadd, Morgan S.; Bulatov, Emil; Ciulli, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (SOCS2) is the substrate-binding component of a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complex that targets phosphorylated hormone receptors for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. As a key regulator of the transcriptional response to growth signals, SOCS2 and its protein complex partners are potential targets for small molecule development. We found that crystals of SOCS2 in complex with its adaptor proteins, Elongin C and Elongin B, underwent a change in crystallographic parameters when treated with dimethyl sulfoxide during soaking experiments. To solve the phase problem for the new crystal form we identified the presence of arsenic atoms in the crystals, a result of covalent modification of cysteines by cacodylate, and successfully extracted anomalous signal from these atoms for experimental phasing. The resulting structure provides a means for solving future structures where the crystals must be treated with DMSO for ligand soaking approaches. Additionally, the conformational changes induced in this structure reveal flexibility within SOCS2 that match those postulated by previous molecular dynamics simulations. This conformational flexibility illustrates how SOCS2 can orient its substrates for successful ubiquitination by other elements of the CRL complex. PMID:26121586

  10. Latest innovations in large area web coating technology via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition source technology

    SciTech Connect

    George, M. A.; Chandra, H.; Morse, P.; Madocks, J.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, the authors discuss the latest results of our development of large area plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) source technologies for flexible substrates. A significant challenge is the economical application of thin films for use as vapor barriers, transparent conductive oxides, and optical interference thin films. Here at General Plasma the authors have developed two innovative PECVD source technologies that provide an economical alternative to low temperature sputtering technologies and enable some thin film materials not accessible by sputtering. The Penning Discharge Plasma (PDP trade mark sign ) source is designed for high rate direct PECVD deposition on insulating, temperature sensitive web [J. Modocks, Proceedings of the Society of Vacuum Coaters, 2003 (unpublished), p. 187]. This technology has been utilized to deposit SiO{sub 2} and SiC:H for barrier applications [V. Shamamian et al. Proceedings of the Flexible Displays and Manufacturing Conferrence, 2006 (unpublished)]. The Plasma Beam Source (PBS trade mark sign ) is a remote plasma source that is more versatile for deposition on not only insulating flexible substrates but also conductive or rigid substrates for deposition of thin films that are sensitive to the high ion bombardment flux inherent to the PDP trade mark sign technology. The authors have developed PBS thin film processes in our laboratory for deposition of SiO{sub 2}, SiC:O, SiN:C, SiN:H, ZnO, FeO{sub x}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. [M. A. George, Conference Proceedings of the Association of Industrial Metallizers, Coaters, and Laminators (AIMCAL), 2007 (unpublished)]. The authors discuss the design of the patented sources, plasma physics, and chemistry of the deposited thin films.

  11. Accounting for conformational flexibility and torsional anharmonicity in the H + CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH hydrogen abstraction reactions: A multi-path variational transition state theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2014-05-07

    This work reports a detailed theoretical study of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from ethanol by atomic hydrogen. The calculated thermal rate constants take into account torsional anharmonicity and conformational flexibility, in addition to the variational and tunneling effects. Specifically, the kinetics calculations were performed by using multi-path canonical variational transition state theory with least-action path tunneling corrections, to which we have added the two-dimensional non-separable method to take into account torsional anharmonicity. The multi-path thermal rate constant is expressed as a sum over conformational reaction channels. Each of these channels includes all the transition states that can be reached by internal rotations. The results show that, in the interval of temperatures between 250 and 2500 K, the account for multiple paths leads to higher thermal rate constants with respect to the single path approach, mainly at low and at high temperatures. In addition, torsional anharmonicity enhances the slope of the Arrhenius plot in this range of temperatures. Finally, we show that the incorporation of tunneling into the hydrogen abstraction reactions substantially changes the contribution of each of the transition states to the conformational reaction channel.

  12. Laser two-photon polymerization micro- and nanostructuring over a large area on various substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, M.; Purlys, V.; Žukauskas, A.; Bickauskaite, G.; Gertus, T.; Danilevicius, P.; Paipulas, D.; Rutkauskas, M.; Gilbergs, H.; Baltriukiene, D.; Bukelskis, L.; Širmenis, R.; Bukelskiene, V.; Gadonas, R.; Sirvydis, V.; Piskarskas, A.

    2010-04-01

    A tightly focused ultrafast pulsed laser beam is guided into the volume of the photosensitive material and induces nonlinear photomodification. By translating the sample, the position of the focus is changed relatively, thus point-by-point complex 3D structures can be written inside the bulk. In this report, we present a Laser Two-Photon Polymerization (LTPP) setup for three-dimensional micro/nanostructuring for applications in photonics, microoptics, micromechanics, microfluidics and biomedicine. This system enables fabrication of functional devices over a large area (up to several cm in lateral size) with reproducible sub-micrometer resolution (up to 200 nm). In our experiments a Yb:KGW active media laser oscillator (75 fs, 200 kW, 515 nm frequency doubled, 80 MHz) was used as an irradiation source. The sample was mounted on XYZ wide range linear motor driven positioning stages having 10 nm positioning resolution. These stages enable an overall travelling range of 100 mm into X and Y directions and 50 mm in Z direction and support a linear scanning speed of up to 300 mm/s. Control of all the equipment was automated via custom made computer software "3D-Poli" specially designed for LTPP applications. The model of the structure can be imported as CAD file, this enables rapid and flexible structuring out of various photopolymers like ORMOCERs, ORMOSILs, acrylates and PEGDAs which are commonly used in conventional UV mask, nanoimprint and μ-stereolithographies. In this paper, we demonstrate polymeric microstructures fabricated over a large area on glass, plastic and metal substrates. This opens a way to produce functional devices like photonic crystals, microlenses, micromechanic and microfluidic components and artificial scaffolds as templates for cell growth. Additionally, results of primary myogenic stem cells expanding on microfabricated polymeric scaffolds are provided. Cell proliferation tests show the material and structure to be biocompatible for the

  13. Ultraclean and large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Cu foil using chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yao; Shang, Xunzhong; Dong, Ji; Xu, Kai; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2015-07-01

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been demonstrated to be an excellent dielectric layer as well as an ideal van der Waals epitaxial substrate for fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers and their vertical heterostructures. Although many groups have obtained large-scale monolayer h-BN through low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), it is still a challenge to grow clean monolayers without the reduction of domain size. Here we report the synthesis of large-area (4 × 2 cm2) high quality monolayer h-BN with an ultraclean and unbroken surface on copper foil by using LPCVD. A detailed investigation of the key factors affecting growth and transfer of the monolayer was carried out in order to eliminate the adverse effects of impurity particles. Furthermore, an optimized transfer approach allowed the nondestructive and clean transfer of the monolayer from copper foil onto an arbitrary substrate, including a flexible substrate, under mild conditions. Atomic force microscopy indicated that the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the monolayer h-BN on SiO2 was less than 0.269 nm for areas with fewer wrinkles. Selective area electron diffraction analysis of the h-BN revealed a pattern of hexagonal diffraction spots, which unambiguously demonstrated its highly crystalline character. Our work paves the way toward the use of ultraclean and large-area monolayer h-BN as the dielectric layer in the fabrication of high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices for novel 2D atomic layer materials.

  14. GLAST: Exploring Nature's Highest Energy Processes with the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, Seth; Myers, J. D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multi-agency space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV. Several successful exploratory missions in gamma-ray astronomy led to the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). Launched in 1991, EGRET made the first complete survey of the sky in the 30 MeV-10 GeV range. EGRET showed the high-energy gamma-ray sky to be surprisingly dynamic and diverse, with sources ranging from the sun and moon to massive black holes at large redshifts. Most of the gamma-ray sources detected by EGRET remain unidentified. In light of the discoveries with EGRET, the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope vastly more capable than instruments flown previously, as well as a secondary instrument to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. The main instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will have superior area, angular resolution, field of view, and deadtime that together will provide a factor of 30 or more advance in sensitivity, as well as provide capability for study of transient phenomena. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will have a field of view several times larger than the LAT and will provide spectral coverage of gamma-ray bursts that extends from the lower limit of the LAT down to 10 keV. The basic parameters of the GBM are compared to those of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on CGRO in Table 1-2. With the LAT and GBM, GLAST will be a flexible observatory for investigating the great range of astrophysical phenomena best studied in high-energy gamma rays. NASA plans to launch GLAST in late 2005.

  15. Ultrathin and lightweight organic solar cells with high flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrunner, Martin; White, Matthew S.; Głowacki, Eric D.; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Bauer, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Application-specific requirements for future lighting, displays and photovoltaics will include large-area, low-weight and mechanical resilience for dual-purpose uses such as electronic skin, textiles and surface conforming foils. Here we demonstrate polymer-based photovoltaic devices on plastic foil substrates less than 2 μm thick, with equal power conversion efficiency to their glass-based counterparts. They can reversibly withstand extreme mechanical deformation and have unprecedented solar cell-specific weight. Instead of a single bend, we form a random network of folds within the device area. The processing methods are standard, so the same weight and flexibility should be achievable in light emitting diodes, capacitors and transistors to fully realize ultrathin organic electronics. These ultrathin organic solar cells are over ten times thinner, lighter and more flexible than any other solar cell of any technology to date. PMID:22473014

  16. Ultrathin and lightweight organic solar cells with high flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbrunner, Martin; White, Matthew S; Głowacki, Eric D; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Bauer, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Application-specific requirements for future lighting, displays and photovoltaics will include large-area, low-weight and mechanical resilience for dual-purpose uses such as electronic skin, textiles and surface conforming foils. Here we demonstrate polymer-based photovoltaic devices on plastic foil substrates less than 2 μm thick, with equal power conversion efficiency to their glass-based counterparts. They can reversibly withstand extreme mechanical deformation and have unprecedented solar cell-specific weight. Instead of a single bend, we form a random network of folds within the device area. The processing methods are standard, so the same weight and flexibility should be achievable in light emitting diodes, capacitors and transistors to fully realize ultrathin organic electronics. These ultrathin organic solar cells are over ten times thinner, lighter and more flexible than any other solar cell of any technology to date. PMID:22473014

  17. Ultrathin and lightweight organic solar cells with high flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbrunner, Martin; White, Matthew S.; Głowacki, Eric D.; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Bauer, Siegfried

    2012-04-01

    Application-specific requirements for future lighting, displays and photovoltaics will include large-area, low-weight and mechanical resilience for dual-purpose uses such as electronic skin, textiles and surface conforming foils. Here we demonstrate polymer-based photovoltaic devices on plastic foil substrates less than 2 μm thick, with equal power conversion efficiency to their glass-based counterparts. They can reversibly withstand extreme mechanical deformation and have unprecedented solar cell-specific weight. Instead of a single bend, we form a random network of folds within the device area. The processing methods are standard, so the same weight and flexibility should be achievable in light emitting diodes, capacitors and transistors to fully realize ultrathin organic electronics. These ultrathin organic solar cells are over ten times thinner, lighter and more flexible than any other solar cell of any technology to date.

  18. Infrared photodissociation of a water molecule from a flexible molecule-H{sub 2}O complex: Rates and conformational product yields following XH stretch excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Jasper R.; Herbert, John M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2007-04-07

    Infrared-ultraviolet hole-burning and hole-filling spectroscopies have been used to study IR-induced dissociation of the tryptamine{center_dot}H{sub 2}O and tryptamine{center_dot}D{sub 2}O complexes. Upon complexation of a single water molecule, the seven conformational isomers of tryptamine collapse to a single structure that retains the same ethylamine side chain conformation present in the most highly populated conformer of tryptamine monomer. Infrared excitation of the tryptamine{center_dot}H{sub 2}O complex was carried out using a series of infrared absorptions spanning the range of 2470-3715 cm{sup -1}. The authors have determined the conformational product yield over this range and the dissociation rate near threshold, where it is slow enough to be measured by our methods. The observed threshold for dissociation occurred at 2872 cm{sup -1} in tryptamine{center_dot}H{sub 2}O and at 2869 cm{sup -1} in tryptamine{center_dot}D{sub 2}O, with no dissociation occurring on the time scale of the experiment ({approx}2 {mu}s) at 2745 cm{sup -1}. The dissociation time constants varied from {approx}200 ns for the 2869 cm{sup -1} band of tryptamine{center_dot}D{sub 2}O to {approx}25 ns for the 2872 cm{sup -1} band of tryptamine{center_dot}H{sub 2}O. This large isotope dependence is associated with a zero-point energy effect that increases the binding energy of the deuterated complex by {approx}190 cm{sup -1}, thereby reducing the excess energy available at the same excitation energy. At all higher energies, the dissociation lifetime was shorter than the pulse duration of our lasers (8 ns). At all wavelengths, the observed products in the presence of collisions are dominated by conformers A and B of tryptamine monomer, with small contributions from the other minor conformers. In addition, right at threshold (2869 cm{sup -1}), tryptamine{center_dot}D{sub 2}O dissociates exclusively to conformer A in the absence of collisions with helium, while both A and B conformational

  19. Large area nanoscale metal meshes for use as transparent conductive layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuanhao; Li, Qunqing; Chen, Mo; Li, Guanhong; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Jiaping; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-10-01

    We report on the experimental realization of using super-aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) as etching masks for the fabrication of large area nanoscale metal meshes. This method can easily be extended to different metals on both rigid and flexible substrates. The as-fabricated metal meshes, including the ones made of gold, copper, and aluminum, are suitable for use as transparent conductive layers (TCLs). The metal meshes, which are similar to the SACNT networks in their dimensional features of tens of nanometers, exhibit compatible performance in terms of optical transmittance and sheet resistance. Moreover, because the metal meshes are fabricated as an integrated material, there is no junction resistance between the interconnected metal nanostructures, which markedly lowers their sheet resistance at high temperatures. The fabrication of such an effective etching mask involves a simple drawing process of the SACNT networks prepared and a common deposition process. This approach should be easy to extend to various research fields and has broad prospects in commercial applications.We report on the experimental realization of using super-aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) as etching masks for the fabrication of large area nanoscale metal meshes. This method can easily be extended to different metals on both rigid and flexible substrates. The as-fabricated metal meshes, including the ones made of gold, copper, and aluminum, are suitable for use as transparent conductive layers (TCLs). The metal meshes, which are similar to the SACNT networks in their dimensional features of tens of nanometers, exhibit compatible performance in terms of optical transmittance and sheet resistance. Moreover, because the metal meshes are fabricated as an integrated material, there is no junction resistance between the interconnected metal nanostructures, which markedly lowers their sheet resistance at high temperatures. The fabrication of such an effective etching mask involves a simple

  20. Automated Science Processing for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, James

    2012-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi γ-ray Space Telescope provides high sensitivity to emission from astronomical sources over a broad energy range (20MeV to >300 GeV) and has substantially improved spatial, energy, and timing resolution compared with previous observatories at these energies [4]. One of the LAT's most innovative features is that it performs continuous monitoring of the gamma-ray sky with all-sky coverage every 3 h. This survey strategy greatly enables the search for transient behavior from both previously known and unknown sources. In addition, the constant accumulation of data allows for increasingly improved measurements of persistent sources. These include the Milky Way Galaxy itself, which produces gamma-ray emission as a result from interactions of cosmic rays with gas in the Galaxy, and potential signals from candidate dark matter particles in the Milky Way and its neighboring galaxies. The automated science processing (ASP) functionality of the Fermi Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) is a part of the automated data pipeline that processes the raw data arriving from the spacecraft and puts it into a form amenable to scientific analysis. ASP operates at the end of the pipeline on the processed data and is intended to detect and characterize transient behavior (e.g., short time scale increases or “flares” in the gamma-ray flux) from astronomical sources. On detection of a flaring event, ASP will alert other observatories on a timely basis so that they may train their telescopes on the flaring source in order to detect possible correlated activity in other wavelength bands. Since the data from the LAT is archived and publicly available as soon as it is processed, ASP serves mainly to provide triggers for those follow-up observations; its estimates of the properties of the flaring sources (flux, spectral index, location) need not be the best possible, as subsequent off-line analysis can provide more refined

  1. Large-area alignment of tungsten oxide nanowires over flat and patterned substrates for room-temperature gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Ju, Yanrui; Payamyar, Payam; Primc, Darinka; Rao, Jingyi; Willa, Christoph; Koziej, Dorota; Niederberger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Alignment of nanowires over a large area of flat and patterned substrates is a prerequisite to use their collective properties in devices such as gas sensors. In this work, uniform single-crystalline ultrathin W18 O49 nanowires with diameters less than 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 have been synthesized, and, despite their flexibility, assembled into thin films with high orientational order over a macroscopic area by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Alignment of the tungsten oxide nanowires was also possible on top of sensor substrates equipped with electrodes. Such sensor devices were found to exhibit outstanding sensitivity to H2 at room temperature. PMID:25412600

  2. Single-Step Soft-Imprinted Large-Area Nanopatterned Antireflection Coating.

    PubMed

    van de Groep, Jorik; Spinelli, Pierpaolo; Polman, Albert

    2015-06-10

    We demonstrate an effective nanopatterned antireflection coating on glass that is based on sol-gel chemistry and large-area substrate-conformal soft-imprint technology. The printed 120 nm tall silica nanocylinders with a diameter of 245 nm in a square array with 325 nm pitch form an effective-index (n = 1.20) antireflection coating that reduces the double-sided reflection from a borosilicate glass slide from 7.35% to 0.57% (averaged over the visible spectral range) with a minimum reflectance <0.05% at 590 nm. The nanoglass coating is made using a simple process involving only spin-coating and an imprint step, without vacuum technology or annealing required. The refractive index of the nanoglass layers can be tailored over a broad range by controlling the geometry (1.002 < n < 1.44 in theory), covering a wide range that is not achievable with natural materials. We demonstrate that the nanoglass coating effectively eliminates glare from smart-phone display windows and significantly improves the efficiency of glass-encapsulated solar cells. These features, that are achieved over an angular range as wide as ±50°, together with strong hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, make nanoglass coatings a promising technology to improve the functionality of optoelectronic devices based on glass encapsulation. PMID:26010375

  3. Large-area thermoelectric high-aspect-ratio nanostructures by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Ruoho, Mikko; Juntunen, Taneli; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of large-area high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. We fabricate the structures by atomic layer deposition of conformal ZnO thin films on track-etched polycarbonate substrate. The resulting structure consists of ZnO tubules which continue through the full thickness of the substrate. The electrical and thermal properties of the structures are studied both in-plane and out-of-plane. They exhibit very low out-of-plane thermal conductivity down to 0.15 W m(-1) K(-1) while the in-plane sheet resistance of the films was found to be half that of the same film on glass substrate, allowing material-independent doubling of output power of any planar thin-film thermoelectric generator. The wall thickness of the fabricated nanotubes was varied within a range of up to 100 nm. The samples show polycrystalline nature with (002) preferred crystal orientation. PMID:27454037

  4. Macroscopic and high-throughput printing of aligned nanostructured polymer semiconductors for MHz large-area electronics

    PubMed Central

    Bucella, Sadir G.; Luzio, Alessandro; Gann, Eliot; Thomsen, Lars; McNeill, Christopher R.; Pace, Giuseppina; Perinot, Andrea; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio; Caironi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility semiconducting polymers offer the opportunity to develop flexible and large-area electronics for several applications, including wearable, portable and distributed sensors, monitoring and actuating devices. An enabler of this technology is a scalable printing process achieving uniform electrical performances over large area. As opposed to the deposition of highly crystalline films, orientational alignment of polymer chains, albeit commonly achieved by non-scalable/slow bulk alignment schemes, is a more robust approach towards large-area electronics. By combining pre-aggregating solvents for formulating the semiconductor and by adopting a room temperature wired bar-coating technique, here we demonstrate the fast deposition of submonolayers and nanostructured films of a model electron-transporting polymer. Our approach enables directional self-assembling of polymer chains exhibiting large transport anisotropy and a mobility up to 6.4 cm2 V−1 s−1, allowing very simple device architectures to operate at 3.3 MHz. Thus, the proposed deposition strategy is exceptionally promising for mass manufacturing of high-performance polymer circuits. PMID:26403619

  5. Macroscopic and high-throughput printing of aligned nanostructured polymer semiconductors for MHz large-area electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucella, Sadir G.; Luzio, Alessandro; Gann, Eliot; Thomsen, Lars; McNeill, Christopher R.; Pace, Giuseppina; Perinot, Andrea; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio; Caironi, Mario

    2015-09-01

    High-mobility semiconducting polymers offer the opportunity to develop flexible and large-area electronics for several applications, including wearable, portable and distributed sensors, monitoring and actuating devices. An enabler of this technology is a scalable printing process achieving uniform electrical performances over large area. As opposed to the deposition of highly crystalline films, orientational alignment of polymer chains, albeit commonly achieved by non-scalable/slow bulk alignment schemes, is a more robust approach towards large-area electronics. By combining pre-aggregating solvents for formulating the semiconductor and by adopting a room temperature wired bar-coating technique, here we demonstrate the fast deposition of submonolayers and nanostructured films of a model electron-transporting polymer. Our approach enables directional self-assembling of polymer chains exhibiting large transport anisotropy and a mobility up to 6.4 cm2 V-1 s-1, allowing very simple device architectures to operate at 3.3 MHz. Thus, the proposed deposition strategy is exceptionally promising for mass manufacturing of high-performance polymer circuits.

  6. Macroscopic and high-throughput printing of aligned nanostructured polymer semiconductors for MHz large-area electronics.

    PubMed

    Bucella, Sadir G; Luzio, Alessandro; Gann, Eliot; Thomsen, Lars; McNeill, Christopher R; Pace, Giuseppina; Perinot, Andrea; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio; Caironi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility semiconducting polymers offer the opportunity to develop flexible and large-area electronics for several applications, including wearable, portable and distributed sensors, monitoring and actuating devices. An enabler of this technology is a scalable printing process achieving uniform electrical performances over large area. As opposed to the deposition of highly crystalline films, orientational alignment of polymer chains, albeit commonly achieved by non-scalable/slow bulk alignment schemes, is a more robust approach towards large-area electronics. By combining pre-aggregating solvents for formulating the semiconductor and by adopting a room temperature wired bar-coating technique, here we demonstrate the fast deposition of submonolayers and nanostructured films of a model electron-transporting polymer. Our approach enables directional self-assembling of polymer chains exhibiting large transport anisotropy and a mobility up to 6.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), allowing very simple device architectures to operate at 3.3 MHz. Thus, the proposed deposition strategy is exceptionally promising for mass manufacturing of high-performance polymer circuits. PMID:26403619

  7. Large-area spatially ordered arrays of gold nanoparticles directed by lithographically confined DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Hung, Albert M; Micheel, Christine M; Bozano, Luisa D; Osterbur, Lucas W; Wallraff, Greg M; Cha, Jennifer N

    2010-02-01

    The development of nanoscale electronic and photonic devices will require a combination of the high throughput of lithographic patterning and the high resolution and chemical precision afforded by self-assembly. However, the incorporation of nanomaterials with dimensions of less than 10 nm into functional devices has been hindered by the disparity between their size and the 100 nm feature sizes that can be routinely generated by lithography. Biomolecules offer a bridge between the two size regimes, with sub-10 nm dimensions, synthetic flexibility and a capability for self-recognition. Here, we report the directed assembly of 5-nm gold particles into large-area, spatially ordered, two-dimensional arrays through the site-selective deposition of mesoscopic DNA origami onto lithographically patterned substrates and the precise binding of gold nanocrystals to each DNA structure. We show organization with registry both within an individual DNA template and between components on neighbouring DNA origami, expanding the generality of this method towards many types of patterns and sizes. PMID:20023644

  8. Large-Area Sub-Wavelength Optical Patterning via Long-Range Ordered Polymer Lens Array.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Liow, Chihao; Tao, Kai; Guo, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaotian; Miao, Jianmin

    2016-06-29

    Fabrication of large-area, highly orderly, and high-resolution nanostructures in a cost-effective fashion prompts advances in nanotechnology. Herein, for the first time, we demonstrate a unique strategy to prepare a long-range highly regular polymer lens from photoresist nanotrenches based templates, which are obtained from underexposure. The relationship between exposure dose and the cross-sectional morphology of produced photoresist nanostructures is revealed for the first time. The polymer lens arrays are repeatedly used for rapid generation of sub-100 nm nanopatterns across centimeter-scale areas. The light focusing properties of the nanoscale polymer lens are investigated by both simulation and experiment. It is found that the geometry, size of the lens, and the exposure dose can be deployed to adjust the produced feature size, spacing, and shapes. Because the polymer lenses are derived from top-down photolithography, the nearly perfect long-range periodicity of produced nanopatterns is ensured, and the feature shapes can be flexibly designed. Because this nanolithographic strategy enables subwavelength periodical nanopatterns with controllable feature size, geometry, and composition in a cost-effective manner, it can be optimized as a viable and potent nanofabrication tool for various technological applications. PMID:27301636

  9. Enhanced light emission from large-area monolayer MoS₂ using plasmonic nanodisc arrays.

    PubMed

    Butun, Serkan; Tongay, Sefaattin; Aydin, Koray

    2015-04-01

    Single-layer direct band gap semiconductors such as transition metal dichalcogenides are quite attractive for a wide range of electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics applications. Their monolayer thickness provides significant advantages in many applications such as field-effect transistors for high-performance electronics, sensor/detector applications, and flexible electronics. However, for optoelectronics and photonics applications, inherent monolayer thickness poses a significant challenge for the interaction of light with the material, which therefore results in poor light emission and absorption behavior. Here, we demonstrate enhanced light emission from large-area monolayer MoS2 using plasmonic silver nanodisc arrays, where enhanced photoluminescence up to 12-times has been measured. Observed phenomena stem from the fact that plasmonic resonance couples to both excitation and emission fields and thus boosts the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale. Reported results allow us to engineer light-matter interactions in two-dimensional materials and could enable highly efficient photodetectors, sensors, and photovoltaic devices, where photon absorption and emission efficiency highly dictate the device performance. PMID:25729895

  10. Micro- and nanoscale electrical characterization of large-area graphene transferred to functional substrates.

    PubMed

    Fisichella, Gabriele; Di Franco, Salvatore; Fiorenza, Patrick; Lo Nigro, Raffaella; Roccaforte, Fabrizio; Tudisco, Cristina; Condorelli, Guido G; Piluso, Nicolò; Spartà, Noemi; Lo Verso, Stella; Accardi, Corrado; Tringali, Cristina; Ravesi, Sebastiano; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on catalytic metals is one of main approaches for high-quality graphene growth over large areas. However, a subsequent transfer step to an insulating substrate is required in order to use the graphene for electronic applications. This step can severely affect both the structural integrity and the electronic properties of the graphene membrane. In this paper, we investigated the morphological and electrical properties of CVD graphene transferred onto SiO2 and on a polymeric substrate (poly(ethylene-2,6-naphthalene dicarboxylate), briefly PEN), suitable for microelectronics and flexible electronics applications, respectively. The electrical properties (sheet resistance, mobility, carrier density) of the transferred graphene as well as the specific contact resistance of metal contacts onto graphene were investigated by using properly designed test patterns. While a sheet resistance R sh ≈ 1.7 kΩ/sq and a specific contact resistance ρc ≈ 15 kΩ·μm have been measured for graphene transferred onto SiO2, about 2.3× higher R sh and about 8× higher ρc values were obtained for graphene on PEN. High-resolution current mapping by torsion resonant conductive atomic force microscopy (TRCAFM) provided an insight into the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for the very high ρc in the case of graphene on PEN, showing a ca. 10× smaller "effective" area for current injection than in the case of graphene on SiO2. PMID:23616943

  11. Grid-based matching for full-field large-area deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xian; Anthony, Brian W.; C. Kojimoto, Nigel

    2015-03-01

    Grid-based measurement can facilitate metrology and inspection of flexible electronics manufacturing. Multiple fundamental difficulties, however, arise in the large-area and full-field deformation measurement of deformable grid patterns including noise, occlusions, and artifacts. This paper addresses one of the key issues in deformation measurement: the registration and matching of deformed grid patterns. The emphasis is on accurate and robust periodicity tracing registration and constellation matching algorithms for grid pattern fidelity. The registration algorithm uses deviation metrics in deformed grids to estimate global translation, rotation and scaling; the matching algorithm uses the constellation reference grid to mine buried deformed point patterns. Using synthetic data, the validity of the registration algorithm is proved by registering noisy deformed grid patterns with various distortion scales and transformations; the validity of the matching algorithm is proved by matching deformed grid point patterns with various distortion scales, extra point rates and missing point rates. Compared to established non-rigid registration and point pattern matching algorithms, our algorithms demonstrate higher speed, sub-pixel accuracy and robustness in the matching of highly-deformed and noisy grids.

  12. Conformationally restricted isoindoline-derived spin labels in duplex DNA: distances and rotational flexibility by pulsed electron-electron double resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gophane, Dnyaneshwar B; Endeward, Burkhard; Prisner, Thomas F; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th

    2014-11-24

    Three structurally related isoindoline-derived spin labels that have different mobilities were incorporated into duplex DNA to systematically study the effect of motion on orientation-dependent pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) measurements. To that end, a new nitroxide spin label, (ExIm)U, was synthesized and incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides. (ExIm)U is the first example of a conformationally unambiguous spin label for nucleic acids, in which the nitroxide N-O bond lies on the same axis as the three single bonds used to attach the otherwise rigid isoindoline-based spin label to a uridine base. Continuous-wave (CW) EPR measurements of (ExIm)U confirm a very high rotational mobility of the spin label in duplex DNA relative to the structurally related spin label (Im)U, which has restricted mobility due to an intramolecular hydrogen bond. The X-band CW-EPR spectra of (ExIm)U can be used to identify mismatches in duplex DNA. PELDOR distance measurements between pairs of the spin labels (Im)U, (Ox)U, and (ExIm)U in duplex DNA showed a strong angular dependence for (Im)U, a medium dependence for (Ox)U, and no orientation effect for (ExIm)U. Thus, precise distances can be extracted from (ExIm)U without having to take orientational effects into account. PMID:25296640

  13. Structure of Aquifex aeolicus argonaute highlights conformational flexibility of the PAZ domain as a potential regulator of RNA-induced silencing complex function.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Umar Jan; Paterok, Dirk; Koglin, Alexander; Gohlke, Holger; Piehler, Jacob; Chen, Julian C-H

    2007-05-01

    Gene silencing mediated by RNA interference requires the sequence-specific recognition of target mRNA by the endonuclease Argonaute, the primary enzymatic component of the RNA-induced silencing complex. We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute, refined at 3.2A resolution. Relative to recent Argonaute structures, a 24 degrees reorientation of the PAZ domain in our structure opens a basic cleft between the N-terminal and PAZ domains, exposing the guide strand binding pocket of PAZ. This rearrangement leads to a branched, Y-shaped system of grooves that extends through the molecule and merges in a central channel containing the catalytic residues. A 5.5-ns molecular dynamics simulation of Argonaute shows a strong tendency of the PAZ and N-terminal domains to be mobile. Binding of single-stranded DNA to Argonaute monitored by total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy shows biphasic kinetics, also indicative of domain rearrangement upon DNA binding. Conformational rearrangement of the PAZ domain may therefore be critical for the catalytic cycle of Argonaute and the RNA-induced silencing complex. PMID:17130125

  14. Flexible vs Rigid Epitope Conformations for Diagnostic- and Vaccine-Oriented Applications: Novel Insights from the Burkholderia pseudomallei BPSL2765 Pal3 Epitope.

    PubMed

    Gori, Alessandro; Peri, Claudio; Quilici, Giacomo; Nithichanon, Arnone; Gaudesi, Davide; Longhi, Renato; Gourlay, Louise; Bolognesi, Martino; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Musco, Giovanna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-03-11

    Peptides seldom retain stable conformations if separated from their native protein structure. In an immunological context, this potentially affects the development of selective peptide-based bioprobes and, from a vaccine perspective, poses inherent limits in the elicitation of cross-reactive antibodies by candidate epitopes. Here, a 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole-mediated stapling strategy was used to stabilize the native α-helical fold of the Pal3 peptidic epitope from the protein antigen PalBp (BPSL2765) from Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiological agent of melioidosis. Whereas Pal3 shows no propensity to fold outside its native protein context, the engineered peptide (Pal3H) forms a stable α-helix, as assessed by MD, NMR, and CD structural analyses. Importantly, Pal3H shows an enhanced ability to discriminate between melioidosis patient subclasses in immune sera reactivity tests, demonstrating the potential of the stapled peptide for diagnostic purposes. With regard to antibody elicitation and related bactericidal activities, the linear peptide is shown to elicit a higher response. On these bases, we critically discuss the implications of epitope structure engineering for diagnostic- and vaccine-oriented applications. PMID:27623032

  15. Conformational flexibility related to enzyme activity: evidence for a dynamic active-site gatekeeper function of Tyr(215) in Aerococcus viridans lactate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Stoisser, Thomas; Brunsteiner, Michael; Wilson, David K; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) belongs to a large family of flavoenzymes that catalyze oxidation of α-hydroxy acids. How in these enzymes the protein structure controls reactivity presents an important but elusive problem. LOX contains a prominent tyrosine in the substrate binding pocket (Tyr(215) in Aerococcus viridans LOX) that is partially responsible for securing a flexible loop which sequesters the active site. To characterize the role of Tyr(215), effects of substitutions of the tyrosine (Y215F, Y215H) were analyzed kinetically, crystallographically and by molecular dynamics simulations. Enzyme variants showed slowed flavin reduction and oxidation by up to 33-fold. Pyruvate release was also decelerated and in Y215F, it was the slowest step overall. A 2.6-Å crystal structure of Y215F in complex with pyruvate shows the hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl and the keto oxygen in pyruvate is replaced with a potentially stronger hydrophobic interaction between the phenylalanine and the methyl group of pyruvate. Residues 200 through 215 or 216 appear to be disordered in two of the eight monomers in the asymmetric unit suggesting that they function as a lid controlling substrate entry and product exit from the active site. Substitutions of Tyr(215) can thus lead to a kinetic bottleneck in product release. PMID:27302031

  16. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility. PMID:24531468

  17. Conformational flexibility related to enzyme activity: evidence for a dynamic active-site gatekeeper function of Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans lactate oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Stoisser, Thomas; Brunsteiner, Michael; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) belongs to a large family of flavoenzymes that catalyze oxidation of α-hydroxy acids. How in these enzymes the protein structure controls reactivity presents an important but elusive problem. LOX contains a prominent tyrosine in the substrate binding pocket (Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans LOX) that is partially responsible for securing a flexible loop which sequesters the active site. To characterize the role of Tyr215, effects of substitutions of the tyrosine (Y215F, Y215H) were analyzed kinetically, crystallographically and by molecular dynamics simulations. Enzyme variants showed slowed flavin reduction and oxidation by up to 33-fold. Pyruvate release was also decelerated and in Y215F, it was the slowest step overall. A 2.6-Å crystal structure of Y215F in complex with pyruvate shows the hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl and the keto oxygen in pyruvate is replaced with a potentially stronger hydrophobic interaction between the phenylalanine and the methyl group of pyruvate. Residues 200 through 215 or 216 appear to be disordered in two of the eight monomers in the asymmetric unit suggesting that they function as a lid controlling substrate entry and product exit from the active site. Substitutions of Tyr215 can thus lead to a kinetic bottleneck in product release. PMID:27302031

  18. A buried lysine that titrates with a normal pKa: Role of conformational flexibility at the protein–water interface as a determinant of pKavalues

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Michael J.; Schlessman, Jamie L.; Chimenti, Michael S.; Sue, Gloria R.; Damjanović, Ana; García-Moreno E., Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    Previously we reported that Lys, Asp, and Glu residues at positions 66 and 92 in staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) titrate with pKa values shifted by up to 5 pKa units in the direction that promotes the neutral state. In contrast, the internal Lys-38 in SNase titrates with a normal pKa. The crystal structure of the L38K variant shows that the side chain of Lys-38 is buried. The ionizable moiety is ∼7 Å from solvent and ion paired with Glu-122. This suggests that the pKa value of Lys-38 is normal because the energetic penalty for dehydration is offset by a favorable Coulomb interaction. However, the pKa of Lys-38 was also normal when Glu-122 was replaced with Gln or with Ala. Continuum electrostatics calculations were unable to reproduce the pKa of Lys-38 unless the protein was treated with an artificially high dielectric constant, consistent with structural reorganization being responsible for the normal pKa value of Lys-38. This reorganization must be local because circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy indicate that the L38K protein is native-like under all conditions studied. In molecular dynamics simulations, the ion pair between Lys-38 and Glu-122 is unstable. The simulations show that a minor rearrangement of a loop is sufficient to allow penetration of water to the amino moiety of Lys-38. This illustrates both the important roles of local flexibility and water penetration as determinants of pKa values of ionizable groups buried near the protein–water interface, and the challenges faced by structure-based pKa calculations in reproducing these effects. PMID:18369193

  19. Conformational flexibility in the apolipoprotein E amino-terminal domain structure determined from three new crystal forms: implications for lipid binding.

    PubMed Central

    Segelke, B. W.; Forstner, M.; Knapp, M.; Trakhanov, S. D.; Parkin, S.; Newhouse, Y. M.; Bellamy, H. D.; Weisgraber, K. H.; Rupp, B.

    2000-01-01

    An amino-terminal fragment of human apolipoprotein E3 (residues 1-165) has been expressed and crystallized in three different crystal forms under similar crystallization conditions. One crystal form has nearly identical cell dimensions to the previously reported orthorhombic (P2(1)2(1)2(1)) crystal form of the amino-terminal 22 kDa fragment of apolipoprotein E (residues 1-191). A second orthorhombic crystal form (P2(1)2(1)2(1) with cell dimensions differing from the first form) and a trigonal (P3(1)21) crystal form were also characterized. The structures of the first orthorhombic and the trigonal form were determined by seleno-methionine multiwavelength anomalous dispersion, and the structure of the second orthorhombic form was determined by molecular replacement using the structure from the trigonal form as a search model. A combination of modern experimental and computational techniques provided high-quality electron-density maps, which revealed new features of the apolipoprotein E structure, including an unambiguously traced loop connecting helices 2 and 3 in the four-helix bundle and a number of multiconformation side chains. The three crystal forms contain a common intermolecular, antiparallel packing arrangement. The electrostatic complimentarity observed in this antiparallel packing resembles the interaction of apolipoprotein E with the monoclonal antibody 2E8 and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Superposition of the model structures from all three crystal forms reveals flexibility and pronounced kinks in helices near one end of the four-helix bundle. This mobility at one end of the molecule provides new insights into the structural changes in apolipoprotein E that occur with lipid association. PMID:10850798

  20. Ultrahigh Detective Heterogeneous Photosensor Arrays with In-Pixel Signal Boosting Capability for Large-Area and Skin-Compatible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehyun; Kim, Jaekyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Myungwon; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-01

    An ultra-thin and large-area skin-compatible heterogeneous organic/metal-oxide photosensor array is demonstrated which is capable of sensing and boosting signals with high detectivity and signal-to-noise ratio. For the realization of ultra-flexible and high-sensitive heterogeneous photosensor arrays on a polyimide substrate having organic sensor arrays and metal-oxide boosting circuitry, solution-processing and room-temperature alternating photochemical conversion routes are applied. PMID:26928606

  1. Packaging and modular assembly of large-area and fine-pitch 2-D ultrasonic transducer arrays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Der-Song; Wodnicki, Robert; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Woychik, Charles; Thomenius, Kai E; Fisher, Rayette A; Mills, David M; Byun, Albert J; Burdick, William; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Bonitz, Barry; Davies, Todd; Thomas, Glen; Otto, Bernd; Töpper, Michael; Fritzsch, Thomas; Ehrmann, Oswin

    2013-07-01

    A promising transducer architecture for largearea arrays employs 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) devices with backside trench-frame pillar interconnects. Reconfigurable array (RA) application-specified integrated circuits (ASICs) can provide efficient interfacing between these high-element-count transducer arrays and standard ultrasound systems. Standard electronic assembly techniques such as flip-chip and ball grid array (BGA) attachment, along with organic laminate substrate carriers, can be leveraged to create large-area arrays composed of tiled modules of CMUT chips and interface ASICs. A large-scale, fully populated and integrated 2-D CMUT array with 32 by 192 elements was developed and demonstrates the feasibility of these techniques to yield future large-area arrays. This study demonstrates a flexible and reliable integration approach by successfully combining a simple under-bump metallization (UBM) process and a stacked CMUT/interposer/ASIC module architecture. The results show high shear strength of the UBM (26.5 g for 70-μm balls), high interconnect yield, and excellent CMUT resonance uniformity (s = 0.02 MHz). A multi-row linear array was constructed using the new CMUT/interposer/ASIC process using acoustically active trench-frame CMUT devices and mechanical/ nonfunctional Si backside ASICs. Imaging results with the completed probe assembly demonstrate a functioning device based on the modular assembly architecture. PMID:25004504

  2. Large area substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using glass-drawing technique

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.

    2012-06-26

    A method of making a large area substrate comprises drawing a plurality of tubes to form a plurality of drawn tubes, and cutting the plurality of drawn tubes into cut drawn tubes. Each cut drawn tube has a first end and a second end along the longitudinal direction of the respective cut drawn tube. The cut drawn tubes collectively have a predetermined periodicity. The method of making a large area substrate also comprises forming a metal layer on the first ends of the cut drawn tubes to provide a large area substrate.

  3. High throughput fabrication of large-area plasmonic color filters by soft-X-ray interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Libin; Hu, Xiaolin; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Liansheng; Zhao, Jun; Yang, Shumin; Tai, Renzhong; Fecht, Hans-Jorg; Zhang, Dong-Xian; Wang, Li-Qiang; Jiang, Jian-Zhong

    2016-08-22

    Plasmonic color filters in mass production have been restricted from current fabrication technology, which impede their applications. Soft-X-ray interference lithography (XIL) has recently generated considerable interest as a newly developed technique for the production of periodic nano-structures with resolution theoretically below 4 nm. Here we ameliorate XIL by adding an order sorting aperture and designing the light path properly to achieve perfect-stitching nano-patterns and fast fabrication of large-area color filters. The fill factor of nanostructures prepared on ultrathin Ag films can largely affect the transmission minimum of plasmonic color filters. By changing the fill factor, the color can be controlled flexibly, improving the utilization efficiency of the mask in XIL simultaneously. The calculated data agree well with the experimental results. Finally, an underlying mechanism has been uncovered after systematically analyzing the localized surface plasmon polaritons (LSPPs) coupling in electric field distribution. PMID:27557190

  4. Large area crop inventory experiment crop assessment subsystem software requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The functional data processing requirements are described for the Crop Assessment Subsystem of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment. These requirements are used as a guide for software development and implementation.

  5. Large-area, lithography-free, low-cost SERS sensor with good flexibility and high performance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Xu, Zhida; Ameen, Abid; Ding, Fei; Lin, Guohong; Liu, Gang Logan

    2016-09-23

    Cost-effective, sensitive and bio-compatible surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate has been in high demand since the Raman spectrum was designated as a significant tool for analyzing the composition of liquids, gases and solids in 1998 [1]. In this research, we presented the design, fabrication and characterization of an improved gold-based SERS substrate. With fine tuning of the SiO2 thickness we achieved a 3.391 times improvement and achieved an enhancement factor of 1.55 * 10(7) which is 15 times better than the current gold-standard Klarite substrate. Such improvement is ascribed to the localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and propagating SPR, which is proved by full-wave finite-difference time-domain simulations. PMID:27540828

  6. Pattern uniformity in large-area ultraviolet nano-imprinting by a cylindrically inflated flexible mold under low pressure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geehong; Jeong, Mira; Lim, Hyungjun; Lee, Jaejong; Choi, Kee Bong; Do, Lee-Mi

    2012-07-01

    This paper shows a novel nano-imprint method with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica mold that was bonded on a cylindrically inflated polycarbonate (PC) film via a low air pressure. The PDMS mold, which was deformed in terms of its cylindrical shape, made a line contact with a substrate from the center region and the contact region, then expanded gradually to the outside of the substrate when the contact force increased. This contact procedure squeezed the resin that was dropped on the substrate from the center to the outside, which prevented the trapping of air bubbles while the cavities were filled with the patterns on the PDMS mold. The main characteristic of the proposed process was that the nano-imprint can be realized under a low pressure, compared to conventional processes. We will show the system that was implemented under the proposed process concept and the patterns that were transferred in an ultraviolet curable resin under pressure conditions of less than 5 kPa. PMID:22966567

  7. Combining large area fluorescence with multiphoton microscopy for improved detection of oral epithelial neoplasia (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Qiu, Suimin; McCammon, Susan; Resto, Vicente; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) show promise for revealing indicators of neoplasia representing the complex microstructural organization of mucosa, potentially providing high specificity for detection of neoplasia, but is limited by small imaging area. Large area fluorescence methods on the other hand show high sensitivity appropriate for screening but are hampered by low specificity. In this study, we apply MPAM-SHGM following guidance from large area fluorescence, by either autofluorescence or a targeted metabolic fluorophore, as a potentially clinically viable approach for detection of oral neoplasia. Sites of high neoplastic potentially were identified by large area red/green autofluorescence or by a fluorescently labelled deoxy-glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-D-glucose (2-NBDG) to highlight areas of high glucose uptake across the buccal pouch of a hamster model for OSCC. Follow-up MPAM-SHGM was conducted on regions of interests (ROIs) to assess whether microscopy would reveal microscopic features associated with neoplasia to confirm or exclude large area fluorescence findings. Parameters for analysis included cytologic metrics, 3D epithelial connective tissue interface metrics (MPAM-SHGM) and intensity of fluorescence (widefield). Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histology and graded by a pathologist. A small sample of human ex vivo tissues were also imaged. A generalized linear model combining image metrics from large area fluorescence and volumetric MPAM-SHGM indicated the ability to delineate normal and inflammation from neoplasia.

  8. Design of a broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloak based on a fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Chen, Tianning; Liang, Qingxuan; Wang, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    A broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloak based on fluid medium was designed and numerically implemented with homogeneous metamaterials according to the transformation acoustics. In the present work, fluid medium as the body of the inclusion could be tuned by changing the fluid to satisfy the variant acoustic parameters instead of redesign the whole cloak. The effective density and bulk modulus of the composite materials were designed to agree with the parameters calculated from the coordinate transformation methodology by using the effective medium theory. Numerical simulation results showed that the sound propagation and scattering signature could be controlled in the broadband ultra-large area acoustic invisibility cloak, and good cloaking performance has been achieved and physically realized with homogeneous materials. The broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloaking properties have demonstrated great potentials in the promotion of the practical applications of acoustic cloak.

  9. CVD diamond wafers as large-area thermoluminescence detectors for measuring the spatial distribution of dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Olko, P.; Olko, P.; Nesládek, M.; Bergonzo, P.; Rbisz, M.; Waligórski, M. P. R.

    2003-09-01

    The applicability of large-area CVD diamond wafers (diameter about 5 cm, thickness about 0.1 mm), read out as thermoluminescence (TL) detectors, for assessing two-dimensional (2-D) dose distribution over their area, was investigated. To obtain 2-D TL images, a special TL reader equipped with large-area planchet and a CCD camera instead of the usual PM tube was developed. Several 2-D TL images: of an alpha source (Am-241), a Ra-226 needle source and a Ru-106 ophthalmic applicator, were measured and high-resolution digital images obtained. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential capability of large-area CVD diamond wafers, read out as TL detectors, in 2-D dosimetry for medical applications. (

  10. Rapid confocal imaging of large areas of excised tissue with strip mosaicing

    PubMed Central

    Abeytunge, Sanjee; Li, Yongbiao; Larson, Bjorg; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2011-01-01

    Imaging large areas of tissue rapidly and with high resolution may enable rapid pathology at the bedside. The limited field of view of high-resolution microscopes requires the merging of multiple images that are taken sequentially to cover a large area. This merging or mosaicing of images requires long acquisition and processing times, and produces artifacts. To reduce both time and artifacts, we developed a mosaicing method on a confocal microscope that images morphology in large areas of excised tissue with sub-cellular detail. By acquiring image strips with aspect ratios of 10:1 and higher (instead of the standard ∼1:1) and “stitching” them in software, our method images 10×10 mm2 area of tissue in about 3 min. This method, which we call “strip mosaicing,” is currently three times as fast as our previous method. PMID:21639560

  11. Large-Area Chemical and Biological Decontamination Using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL) System.

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E; Smith, Rob R; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Ilgner, Ralph H; Brown, Gilbert M

    2008-01-01

    Methods for quickly decontaminating large areas exposed to chemical and biological (CB) warfare agents can present significant logistical, manpower, and waste management challenges. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pursuing an alternate method to decompose CB agents without the use of toxic chemicals or other potentially harmful substances. This process uses a high energy arc lamp (HEAL) system to photochemically decompose CB agents over large areas (12 m2). Preliminary tests indicate that more than 5 decades (99.999%) of an Anthrax spore simulant (Bacillus globigii) were killed in less than 7 seconds of exposure to the HEAL system. When combined with a catalyst material (TiO2) the HEAL system was also effective against a chemical agent simulant, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP). These results demonstrate the feasibility of a rapid, large-area chemical and biological decontamination method that does not require toxic or corrosive reagents or generate hazardous wastes.

  12. Synthesis of self-assembled large area films of complex hierarchical PZT clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap Chaudhary, Raghvendra; Saxena, Sumit; Kmar, Amit; Bharadwaj, Rajesh; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-02-01

    The ability to bridge nano-micro interface for applications in functional miniaturized devices is of fundamental interest. We have synthesized novel large area films of complex hierarchical micro-flower morphologies of piezo-ceramics using hydrothermal reactions. The overall size of the samples produced is ∼cm2. The growth morphologies are found to be dependent on concentration and pressure inside the reaction chamber. This can be used to deterministically grow these complex multi-scaled microstructures over a large area. These results outline a strategy for growth of omni-directional microstructures by utilizing self assembly processes.

  13. An Analysis Methodology for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2004-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has been designed to detect high-energy gamma rays and determine their direction of incidence and energy. We propose a reconstruction algorithm based on recent advances in statistical methodology. This method, alternative to the standard event analysis inherited from high energy collider physics experiments, incorporates more accurately the physical processes occurring in the detector, and makes full use of the statistical information available. It could thus provide a better estimate of the direction and energy of the primary photon.

  14. A study on large area Hamamatsu photomultipliers for Cherenkov neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonora, E.; Aiello, S.; Giordano, V.; Randazzo, N.; Lo Presti, D.; Bonanno, D.; Longhitano, F.; Sipala, V.

    2015-11-01

    Many of the existing neutrino telescopes use large area photomultipliers integrated into transparent glass vessels to make the detection element called ``optical module''. The characteristics of the photomultipliers have a severe impact on the performance of the whole detectors. This paper describes a large work of characterization of large area photomultipliers performed in the frame of R&D activities of large volume underwater neutrino detectors. Dedicated studies are also reported about noise pulses, super bialkali photocathode photomultipliers, ageing effects, influences of the Earth's magnetic field and on the effects of the external glass vessels on the optical module's noise pulses.

  15. Data acquisition and control system for high-performance large-area CCD systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasieva, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Astronomical CCD systems based on second-generation DINACON controllers were developed at the SAO RAS Advanced Design Laboratory more than seven years ago and since then have been in constant operation at the 6-meter and Zeiss-1000 telescopes. Such systems use monolithic large-area CCDs. We describe the software developed for the control of a family of large-area CCD systems equipped with a DINACON-II controller. The software suite serves for acquisition, primary reduction, visualization, and storage of video data, and also for the control, setup, and diagnostics of the CCD system.

  16. A novel method for the activity measurement of large-area beta reference sources.

    PubMed

    Stanga, D; De Felice, P; Keightley, J; Capogni, M; Ioan, M R

    2016-03-01

    A novel method has been developed for the activity measurement of large-area beta reference sources. It makes use of two emission rate measurements and is based on the weak dependence between the source activity and the activity distribution for a given value of transmission coefficient. The method was checked experimentally by measuring the activity of two ((60)Co and (137)Cs) large-area reference sources constructed from anodized aluminum foils. Measurement results were compared with the activity values measured by gamma spectrometry. For each source, they agree within one standard uncertainty and also agree within the same limits with the certified values of the source activity. PMID:26701656

  17. System and method for interfacing large-area electronics with integrated circuit devices

    DOEpatents

    Verma, Naveen; Glisic, Branko; Sturm, James; Wagner, Sigurd

    2016-07-12

    A system and method for interfacing large-area electronics with integrated circuit devices is provided. The system may be implemented in an electronic device including a large area electronic (LAE) device disposed on a substrate. An integrated circuit IC is disposed on the substrate. A non-contact interface is disposed on the substrate and coupled between the LAE device and the IC. The non-contact interface is configured to provide at least one of a data acquisition path or control path between the LAE device and the IC.

  18. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  19. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  20. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer.

    PubMed

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  1. Characterization of large-area reference sources for the calibration of beta-contamination monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janßen, H.; Klein, R.

    1996-02-01

    A method has been developed whereby the activity of a large-area reference source for the calibration of beta-contamination monitors can be determined from a series of measured countrates in a suitable detection system as a function of the distance between the surface of the source and the front face of the detector.

  2. Direct patterning and biofunctionalization of a large-area pristine graphene sheet.

    PubMed

    Hong, Daewha; Bae, KiEun; Park, Duckshin; Kim, Houngkyung; Hong, Seok-Pyo; Kim, Mi-Hee; Lee, Bong Soo; Ko, Sangwon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Zheng, Xu; Yun, Wan Soo; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Choi, Insung S; Lee, Jungkyu K

    2015-03-01

    Direct patterning of streptavidin and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells was successfully achieved over a large-area pristine graphene sheet on Si/SiO2 by aryl azide-based photografting with the conventional UV lithographic technique and surface-initiated, atom transfer radical polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate. PMID:25488174

  3. Independent Peer Evaluation of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE): The LACIE Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Yield models and crop estimate accuracy are discussed within the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment. The wheat yield estimates in the United States, Canada, and U.S.S.R. are emphasized. Experimental results design, system implementation, data processing systems, and applications were considered.

  4. Detecting Change in Landscape Greenness over Large Areas: An Example for New Mexico, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring and quantifying changes in vegetation cover over large areas using remote sensing can potentially detect large-scale, slow changes (e.g., climate change), as well as more local and rapid changes (e.g., fire, land development). A useful indicator for detecting change i...

  5. LARGE AREA LAND COVER MAPPING THROUGH SCENE-BASED CLASSIFICATION COMPOSITING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade, a number of initiatives have been undertaken to create definitive national and global data sets consisting of precision corrected Landsat MSS and TM scenes. One important application of these data is the derivation of large area land cover products spanning ...

  6. Large-Area Metasurface Perfect Absorbers from Visible to Near-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, Gleb M; Huang, Jiani; Hoang, Thang B; Bowen, Patrick T; Su, Logan; Smith, David R; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2015-12-22

    An absorptive metasurface based on film-coupled colloidal silver nanocubes is demonstrated. The metasurfaces are fabricated using simple dip-coating methods and can be deposited over large areas and on arbitrarily shaped objects. The surfaces show nearly complete absorption, good off-angle performance, and the resonance can be tuned from the visible to the near-infrared. PMID:26549512

  7. Methodology for large-area moderate-resolution monitoring of soil organic carbon change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into the soil helps to reduce global warming by greenhouse gases and helps to sustain the soil. Methods need to be developed to monitor changes in soil organic carbon over large areas such as the central United States. Direct measurements are acc...

  8. Transformational, Large Area Fabrication of Nanostructured Materials Using Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will address critical additional steps over large areas of as-synthesized nanostructured materials, such as annealing, phase transformation, or activation of dopants, dramatically reducing the processing costs of the solid-state lighting and photovoltaic materials.

  9. Large-area high-quality graphene on Ge(001)/Si(001) substrates.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, I; Dabrowski, P; Ciepielewski, P; Kolkovsky, V; Klusek, Z; Baranowski, J M; Strupinski, W

    2016-06-01

    Various experimental data revealing large-area high-quality graphene films grown by the CVD method on Ge(001)/Si(001) substrates are presented. SEM images have shown that the structure of nano-facets is formed on the entire surface of Ge(001), which is covered by a graphene layer over the whole macroscopic sample surface of 1 cm(2). The hill-and-valley structures are positioned 90° to each other and run along the <100> direction. The hill height in relation to the valley measured by STM is about 10 nm. Raman measurements have shown that a uniform graphene monolayer covers the nano-facet structures on the Ge(001) surface. Raman spectroscopy has also proved that the grown graphene monolayer is characterized by small strain variations and minimal charge fluctuations. Atomically resolved STM images on the hills of the nanostructures on the Ge(001) surface have confirmed the presence of a graphene monolayer. In addition, the STS/CITS maps show that high-quality graphene has been obtained on such terraces. The subsequent coalescence of graphene domains has led to a relatively well-oriented large-area layer. This is confirmed by LEED measurements, which have indicated that two orientations are preferable in the grown large-area graphene monolayer. The presence of large-area coverage by graphene has been also confirmed by low temperature Hall measurements of a macroscopic sample, showing an n-type concentration of 9.3 × 10(12) cm(-2) and a mobility of 2500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). These important characteristic features of graphene indicate a high homogeneity of the layer grown on the large area Ge(001)/Si(001) substrates. PMID:27189131

  10. Large-area high-quality graphene on Ge(001)/Si(001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternak, I.; Dabrowski, P.; Ciepielewski, P.; Kolkovsky, V.; Klusek, Z.; Baranowski, J. M.; Strupinski, W.

    2016-05-01

    Various experimental data revealing large-area high-quality graphene films grown by the CVD method on Ge(001)/Si(001) substrates are presented. SEM images have shown that the structure of nano-facets is formed on the entire surface of Ge(001), which is covered by a graphene layer over the whole macroscopic sample surface of 1 cm2. The hill-and-valley structures are positioned 90° to each other and run along the <100> direction. The hill height in relation to the valley measured by STM is about 10 nm. Raman measurements have shown that a uniform graphene monolayer covers the nano-facet structures on the Ge(001) surface. Raman spectroscopy has also proved that the grown graphene monolayer is characterized by small strain variations and minimal charge fluctuations. Atomically resolved STM images on the hills of the nanostructures on the Ge(001) surface have confirmed the presence of a graphene monolayer. In addition, the STS/CITS maps show that high-quality graphene has been obtained on such terraces. The subsequent coalescence of graphene domains has led to a relatively well-oriented large-area layer. This is confirmed by LEED measurements, which have indicated that two orientations are preferable in the grown large-area graphene monolayer. The presence of large-area coverage by graphene has been also confirmed by low temperature Hall measurements of a macroscopic sample, showing an n-type concentration of 9.3 × 1012 cm-2 and a mobility of 2500 cm2 V-1 s-1. These important characteristic features of graphene indicate a high homogeneity of the layer grown on the large area Ge(001)/Si(001) substrates.

  11. Metamaterials with conformational nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapine, Mikhail; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Powell, David A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2011-11-01

    Within a decade of fruitful development, metamaterials became a prominent area of research, bridging theoretical and applied electrodynamics, electrical engineering and material science. Being man-made structures, metamaterials offer a particularly useful playground to develop interdisciplinary concepts. Here we demonstrate a novel principle in metamaterial assembly which integrates electromagnetic, mechanical, and thermal responses within their elements. Through these mechanisms, the conformation of the meta-molecules changes, providing a dual mechanism for nonlinearity and offering nonlinear chirality. Our proposal opens a wide road towards further developments of nonlinear metamaterials and photonic structures, adding extra flexibility to their design and control.

  12. Large-area perovskite nanowire arrays fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll micro-gravure printing and doctor blading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiao; Wu, Han; Sun, Jia; Yan, Donghang; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2016-02-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite nanowires (PNWs) show great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors and photodetectors. It is very meaningful to fabricate ordered, large-area PNW arrays and greatly accelerate their applications and commercialization in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, highly oriented and ultra-long methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) PNW array thin films were fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll (R2R) micro-gravure printing and doctor blading in ambient environments (humility ~45%, temperature ~28 °C), which produced PNW lengths as long as 15 mm. Furthermore, photodetectors based on these PNWs were successfully fabricated on both silicon oxide (SiO2) and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and showed moderate performance. This study provides low-cost, large-scale techniques to fabricate large-area PNW arrays with great potential applications in flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite nanowires (PNWs) show great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors and photodetectors. It is very meaningful to fabricate ordered, large-area PNW arrays and greatly accelerate their applications and commercialization in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, highly oriented and ultra-long methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) PNW array thin films were fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll (R2R) micro-gravure printing and doctor blading in ambient environments (humility ~45%, temperature ~28 °C), which produced PNW lengths as long as 15 mm. Furthermore, photodetectors based on these PNWs were successfully fabricated on both silicon oxide (SiO2) and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and showed moderate performance. This study provides low-cost, large-scale techniques to fabricate large-area PNW arrays

  13. Crystal Structure and Optical Properties of Al-Doped ZnO Large-Area Thin Films Using 1500 mm Dual Cylindrical Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, JinJu; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Yim, Haena; Choi, Won-Kook; Choi, Ji-Won

    2015-11-01

    The large-area Al-doped ZnO thin films are successfully deposited at room temperature on polycarbonate substrate using a 1500 mm dual cylindrical cathodes sputtering system. Those thin films have smooth surfaces (RMS: 9.6 nm) and lower thicknesses deviation (Uniformity: 98.6%) despite of high RF power. The optical transmittance properties of 3.13 wt% Al doped ZnO thin films have above 85% in visible region. A dual cylindrical cathodes sputtering system can fabricate transparent electrode on flexible electronic devices at room temperature for mass production of 6th generation solar cell and display industry. PMID:26726519

  14. Large-Area Chemically Modified Graphene Films: Electrophoretic Deposition and Characterization by Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.; Whittaker, L; Jaye, C; Baroudi, K; Fischer, D; Banerjee, S

    2009-01-01

    A facile, rapid, and scalable electrophoretic deposition approach is developed for the fabrication of large-area chemically derived graphene films on conductive substrates based on the electrophoretic deposition of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide components. Two distinctive approaches for fabricating conformal graphene films are developed. In the first approach, graphene oxide sheets are electrophoretically deposited from an aqueous solution after the oxidation of graphite to graphite oxide and the subsequent exfoliation of graphite oxide to graphene oxide. Next, the graphene oxide films are reduced via dip-coating in an aqueous solution of hydrazine. In the second approach, graphene oxide is reduced to graphene nanosheets in a strongly alkaline solution and the reduced graphene sheets are directly electrophoretically deposited onto conductive substrates. The film thickness can be modified by the deposition time and the obtained films span several square millimeters in area. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to study the surface chemistry, electronic band structure, and degree of alignment of the electrophoretically deposited films. Polarized NEXAFS measurements verify the presence of epoxide surface functionalities on the graphene basal planes and indicate significant recovery of extended p-bonded networks upon defunctionalization by hydrazine treatment. These measurements further indicate significantly improved alignment of the graphene sheet components of the films parallel to the substrate surface when defunctionalization is performed prior to electrophoretic deposition.

  15. The conformationally flexible S9-S10 linker region in the core domain of p53 contains a novel MDM2 binding site whose mutation increases ubiquitination of p53 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Harumi; Burch, Lindsay R; Smith, Amanda J; Dornan, David; Wallace, Maura; Ball, Kathryn L; Hupp, Ted R

    2002-08-01

    Although the N-terminal BOX-I domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53 contains the primary docking site for MDM2, previous studies demonstrated that RNA stabilizes the MDM2.p53 complex using a p53 mutant lacking the BOX-I motif. In vitro assays measuring the specific activity of MDM2 in the ligand-free and RNA-bound state identified a novel MDM2 interaction site in the core domain of p53. As defined using phage-peptide display, the RNA.MDM2 isoform exhibited a notable switch in peptide binding specificity, with enhanced affinity for novel peptide sequences in either p53 or small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-U (snRNP-U) and substantially reduced affinity for the primary p53 binding site in the BOX-I domain. The consensus binding site for the RNA.MDM2 complex within p53 is SGXLLGESXF, which links the S9-S10 beta-sheets flanking the BOX-IV and BOX-V motifs in the core domain and which is a site of reversible conformational flexibility in p53. Mutation of conserved amino acids in the linker at Ser(261) and Leu(264), which bridges the S9-S10 beta-sheets, stimulated p53 activity from reporter templates and increased MDM2-dependent ubiquitination of p53. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved Phe(270) within the S10 beta-sheet resulted in a mutant p53, which binds more stably to RNA.MDM2 complexes in vitro and which is strikingly hyper-ubiquitinated in vivo. Introducing an Ala(19) mutation into the p53(F270A) protein abolished both RNA.MDM2 complex binding and hyper-ubiquitination in vivo, thus indicating that p53(F270A) protein hyper-ubiquitination depends upon MDM2 binding to its primary site in the BOX-I domain. Together, these data identify a novel MDM2 binding interface within the S9-S10 beta-sheet region of p53 that plays a regulatory role in modulating the rate of MDM2-dependent ubiquitination of p53 in cells. PMID:11925449

  16. Fast and large-area growth of uniform MoS2 monolayers on molybdenum foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Guoan; Zeng, Tian; Yu, Jin; Zhou, Jianxin; You, Yuncheng; Wang, Xufeng; Wu, Hongrong; Sun, Xu; Hu, Tingsong; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    A controllable synthesis of two-dimensional crystal monolayers in a large area is a prerequisite for potential applications, but the growth of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers in a large area with spatial homogeneity remains a great challenge. Here we report a novel and efficient method to fabricate large-scale MoS2 monolayers by direct sulfurization of pre-annealed molybdenum foil surfaces with large grain boundaries of more than 50 μm in size at elevated temperatures. Continuous MoS2 monolayers can be formed uniformly by sulfurizing the Mo foils in sulfur vapor at 600 °C within 1 min. At a lower temperature even down to 500 °C, uniform MoS2 monolayers can still be obtained but in a much longer sulfurizing duration. It is demonstrated that the formed monolayers can be nondestructively transferred onto arbitrary substrates by removing the Mo foil using diluted ferric chloride solution and can be successfully fabricated into photodetectors. The results show a novel avenue to efficiently fabricate two-dimensional crystals in a large area in a highly controllable way and should have great potential for the development of large-scale applications of two-dimensional crystals in electrophotonic systems.A controllable synthesis of two-dimensional crystal monolayers in a large area is a prerequisite for potential applications, but the growth of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers in a large area with spatial homogeneity remains a great challenge. Here we report a novel and efficient method to fabricate large-scale MoS2 monolayers by direct sulfurization of pre-annealed molybdenum foil surfaces with large grain boundaries of more than 50 μm in size at elevated temperatures. Continuous MoS2 monolayers can be formed uniformly by sulfurizing the Mo foils in sulfur vapor at 600 °C within 1 min. At a lower temperature even down to 500 °C, uniform MoS2 monolayers can still be obtained but in a much longer sulfurizing duration. It is demonstrated that the

  17. Enabling large area and high throughput roll-to-roll NIL by novel inkjetable and photo-curable NIL resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thesen, Manuel W.; Rumler, Maximilian; Schlachter, Florian; Grützner, Susanne; Moormann, Christian; Rommel, Mathias; Nees, Dieter; Ruttloff, Stephan; Pfirrmann, Stefan; Vogler, Marko; Schleunitz, Arne; Grützner, Gabi

    2014-03-01

    The high throughput and large area nanostructuring of flexible substrates by continuous roller processes has great potential for future custom applications like wire grid polarizers, antireflection films, or super-hydrophobic surfaces. For each application different material characteristics have to be considered, e.g. refractive index, hydrophobicity, or dry etch stability. Herein, we show experimental results of nanoimprint lithography resist developments focused on inkjetable and photo-curable resists suitable for high throughput production, especially roll-to-roll NIL. The inkjet deposition of the novel materials is demonstrated by the use of different state-of-the-art inkjet printheads at room temperature. A plate-to-plate process on silicon substrates was successfully implemented on a NPS300 nano patterning stepper with previously inkjet dispensed NIL resist. Furthermore, we demonstrate a throughput of 30 m min-1 in a roller NIL process on PET. Dry etching of unstructured thin films on Si wafers was performed, and it was demonstrated that the etch stability in Si is tunable to a value of 3.5:1 by a concise selection of the resist components. The surface roughness of the etched films was measured to be < 2 nm, after etching of around 100 nm of the resist films what is an essential factor for a low line edge roughness. All resists reported herein can be deposited via inkjet dispensing at room temperature, are suitable for continuous high throughput imprinting on flexible substrates, and are applicable in step-wise NIL processes with good etch resistance in dry etch processes.

  18. High-Resolution, Large-Area Fabrication of Compliant Electrodes via Laser Ablation for Robust, Stretchable Dielectric Elastomer Actuators and Sensors.

    PubMed

    Araromi, Oluwaseun A; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R

    2015-08-19

    A key element in stretchable actuators, sensors, and systems based on elastomer materials are compliant electrodes. While there exist many methodologies for fabricating electrodes on dielectric elastomers, very few succeed in achieving high-resolution patterning over large areas. We present a novel approach for the production of mechanically robust, high-resolution compliant electrodes for stretchable silicone elastomer actuators and sensors. Cast, 2-50 μm thick poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-carbon composite layers are patterned by laser ablation and subsequently bonded to a PDMS membrane by oxygen plasma activation. The technique affords great design flexibility and high resolution and readily scales to large-area arrays of devices. We validate our methodology by producing arrays of actuators and sensors on up to A4-size substrates, reporting on microscale dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) generating area strains of over 25%, and interdigitated capacitive touch sensors with high sensitivity yet insensitivity to substrate stretching. We demonstrate the ability to cofabricate highly integrated multifunctional transducers using the same process flow, showing the methodology's promise in realizing sophisticated and reliable complex stretchable devices with fine features over large areas. PMID:26197865

  19. Inkjetable and photo-curable resists for large-area and high-throughput roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thesen, Manuel W.; Nees, Dieter; Ruttloff, Stephan; Rumler, Maximilian; Rommel, Mathias; Schlachter, Florian; Grützner, Susanne; Vogler, Marko; Schleunitz, Arne; Grützner, Gabi

    2014-10-01

    We report on our development strategy of photo-curable resists for nanoimprint lithography (NIL) based on modularity. Starting with a basic formulation, we address two topics: the integration of fluorinated additives and the enhancement of the dry etching stability. We prove both concepts by the introduction of two different resists derived from the same basic formulation. The viscosity of the novel resist materials was optimized for inkjet dispensing at room temperature (RT). The novel resist materials can be applied either in NIL batch processes or in high-throughput roller processes. Batch-wise imprints were performed on various substrates such as Si or plastics, demonstrating the distinctive application versatility of the novel materials. Dry etching of spin-coated thin films on Si wafers was performed, demonstrating an etch stability versus Si of 3.5:1 by using the resist formulation with improved etching stability. Roll-to-roll NIL at high throughput on large areas was performed with web speeds of up to 30 m min-1 with different stamp materials. We conclude that all resists reported herein can be deposited via inkjet dispensing at RT, are suitable for continuous high-throughput imprinting on flexible substrates, and are applicable in step-wise NIL processes with good etch resistance in dry etch processes.

  20. High-intensity terahertz radiation from a microstructured large-area photoconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyhaupt, A.; Winnerl, S.; Dekorsy, T.; Helm, M.

    2005-03-01

    We present a planar large-area photoconducting emitter for impulsive generation of terahertz (THz) radiation. The device consists of an interdigitated electrode metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structure which is masked by a second metallization layer isolated from the MSM electrodes. The second layer blocks optical excitation in every second period of the MSM finger structure. Hence charge carriers are excited only in those periods of the MSM structure which exhibit a unidirectional electric field. Constructive interference of the THz emission from accelerated carriers leads to THz electric field amplitudes up to 85V/cm when excited with fs optical pulses from a Ti:sapphire oscillator with an average power of 100mW at a bias voltage of 65V applied to the MSM structure. The proposed device structure has a large potential for large-area high-power THz emitters.

  1. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, J. S. Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2014-11-15

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  2. Large Area Transition Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters for Diffuse X-ray Background Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, K. M.; Busch, S. E.; Eckart, M. E.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.

    2014-08-01

    We are developing transition edge sensor (TES) mirocalorimeters with large area (0.72 mm) absorbers to study the keV diffuse X-ray background. The goal is to develop a 2 cm array of 256 pixels for a sounding rocket payload. We present a pixel design which includes a Mo/Au bilayer TES coupled to a large (850 x 850 x 0.2 m) gold absorber. Our simulations indicate that such a design can achieve energy resolution as good as 1.6 eV FWHM in our target bandpass of 0.05-1 keV. Additionally, thermal modelling shows that for typical gold layers, the position-dependent variation of the pulse shape over the large area of the absorber is not expected to significantly degrade this energy resolution. An array of devices will be fabricated in late 2013 to test this design.

  3. Performance of the Anti-Coincidence Detector on the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; Charles, E.; Hartman, R.C.; Moiseev, A.A.; Ormes, J.F.; /NASA, Goddard /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), the outermost detector layer in the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT), is designed to detect and veto incident cosmic ray charged particles, which outnumber cosmic gamma rays by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The challenge in ACD design is that it must have high (0.9997) detection efficiency for singly-charged relativistic particles, but must also have a low probability for self-veto of high-energy gammas by backsplash radiation from interactions in the LAT calorimeter. Simulations and tests demonstrate that the ACD meets its design requirements. The performance of the ACD has remained stable through stand-alone environmental testing, shipment across the U.S., installation onto the LAT, shipment back across the U.S., LAT environmental testing, and shipment to Arizona. As part of the fully-assembled GLAST observatory, the ACD is being readied for final testing before launch.

  4. Extraordinary suppression of carrier scattering in large area graphene oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Negishi, R. Kobayashi, Y.

    2014-12-22

    In this study, we find that thermal treatment in ethanol vapor has a remarkable suppression effect of carrier scattering occurring between reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes in large area films. We observe excellent electrical properties such as high carrier mobility (∼5 cm{sup 2}/Vs) and low sheet resistance (∼40 KΩ/□) for the rGO films. From the electrical conductivity analysis of large area rGO films using two-dimensional variable range hopping model and structural analysis using Raman spectra measured from the rGO films, we reveal that the significant effect is caused by the expansion of conjugated π-electron system in rGO flake due to the efficient restoration of graphitic structure.

  5. Seeded on-surface supramolecular growth for large area conductive donor-acceptor assembly.

    PubMed

    Goudappagouda; Chithiravel, Sundaresan; Krishnamoorthy, Kothandam; Gosavi, Suresh W; Babu, Sukumaran Santhosh

    2015-07-01

    Charge transport features of organic semiconductor assemblies are of paramount importance. However, large-area extended supramolecular structures of donor-acceptor combinations with controlled self-assembly pathways are hardly accessible. In this context, as a representative example, seeded on-surface supramolecular growth of tetrathiafulvalene and tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) using active termini of solution-formed sheaves has been introduced to form an extended assembly. We demonstrate for the first time, the creation of a large-area donor-acceptor assembly on the surface, which is practically very tedious, using a seeded, evaporation-assisted growth process. The excellent molecular ordering in this assembly is substantiated by its good electrical conductivity (~10⁻² S cm⁻¹). The on-surface assembly via both internally formed and externally added sheaf-like seeds open new pathways in supramolecular chemistry and device applications. PMID:26036616

  6. Transferred large area single crystal MoS2 field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Hee; McCulloch, William; Lee, Edwin W.; Ma, Lu; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Hwang, Jinwoo; Wu, Yiying; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-11-01

    Transfer of epitaxial, two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 on sapphire grown via synthetic approaches is a prerequisite for practical device applications. We report centimeter-scale, single crystal, synthesized MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates, with a field-effect mobility of 4.5 cm2 V-1 s-1, which is among the highest mobility values reported for the transferred large-area MoS2 transistors. We demonstrate simple and clean transfer of large-area MoS2 films using deionized water, which can effectively avoid chemical contamination. The transfer method reported here allows standard i-line stepper lithography process to realize multiple devices over the entire film area.

  7. Toward Large-Area Sub-Arcsecond X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Allured, Ryan; Atkins, Carolyn; Burrows, David N.; Cao, Jian; Chalifoux, Brandon D.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Elsner, Ronald F.; Graham, Michael E.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; McMuldroch, Stuart; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Riveros, Raul E.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Saha, Timo T.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Vaynman, Semyon; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Wang, Xiaoli; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The future of x-ray astronomy depends upon development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (>1 sq m) and finer angular resolution(<1).Combined with the special requirements of nested grazing incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of spaceborne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging. Achieving this goal will require precision fabrication, alignment, mounting, and assembly of large areas (>100 sq m) of lightweight (1 kg/sq m areal density) high quality mirrors-possibly entailing active (in-space adjustable) alignment and figure correction. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward large area sub-arcsecond x-ray telescopes. Key words: X-ray telescopes, x-ray optics, active optics, electroactive devices, silicon mirrors, differential deposition, ion implantation.

  8. The effect of gettering on areal inhomogeneities in large-area multicrystalline-silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.; Sopori, B.L.

    1997-10-01

    Multicrystalline-silicon (mc-Si) materials and cells feature large areal variations in material and junction quality. The regions with poor device quality have been predicted to have more recombination current at forward bias than a simple area-weighted average due to the parallel interconnection of the good and bad regions by the front junction. The authors have examined the effect of gettering on areal inhomogeneities in large-area mc-Si cells. Cells with large areal inhomogeneities were found to have increased non-ideal recombination current, which is in line with theoretical predictions. Phosphorus-diffusion and aluminum-alloy gettering of mc-Si was found to reduce the areal inhomogeneities and improve large-area mc-Si device performance.

  9. Catalytic Growth of Graphene: Toward Large-Area Single-Crystalline Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ago, Hiroki; Ogawa, Yui; Tsuji, Masaharu; Mizuno, Seigi; Hibino, Hiroki

    2012-08-16

    For electronic applications, synthesis of large-area, single-layer graphene with high crystallinity is required. One of the most promising and widely employed methods is chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Cu foil/film as the catalyst. However, the CVD graphene is generally polycrystalline and contains a significant amount of domain boundaries that limit intrinsic physical properties of graphene. In this Perspective, we discuss the growth mechanism of graphene on a Cu catalyst and review recent development in the observation and control of the domain structure of graphene. We emphasize the importance of the growth condition and crystallinity of the Cu catalyst for the realization of large-area, single-crystalline graphene. PMID:26295775

  10. Fast and cost-effective fabrication of large-area plasmonic transparent biosensor array.

    PubMed

    Intartaglia, R; Beke, S; Moretti, M; De Angelis, F; Diaspro, A

    2015-03-01

    Surface enhanced Raman-based sensors are widely used for chemical and biological species analysis; but to date the high cost, long production time, hazardous, and toxic content as well as small sensing area and opacity are limiting their capabilities for widespread applications in the medical and environmental fields. We present a novel cost-effective method for fast laser-based fabrication of affordable large-area and transparent periodic arrays of ligand-free metallic nanoparticles, offering a maximum possibility for the adsorption/immobilization of molecules and labeling. Further, we demonstrate a remarkable detection limit in the picomolar range by means of Raman scattering, thus evidencing a superior signal-to-noise ratio compared to other sensor substrates. The high sensitivity performance along with a fast and cheap fabrication procedure of reusable large-area transparent plasmonic devices opens the route for direct, in situ multimodal optical analysis with broad applications in the biomedical/analytical fields. PMID:25591078

  11. Large area mapping of soil moisture using the ESTAR passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Levine, D. M.; Swift, C. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations designed to study land surface hydrologic-atmospheric interactions, showing the potential of L band passive microwave radiometry for measuring surface soil moisture over large areas, are discussed. Satisfying the data needs of these investigations requires the ability to map large areas rapidly. With aircraft systems this means a need for more beam positions over a wider swath on each flightline. For satellite systems the essential problem is resolution. Both of these needs are currently being addressed through the development and verification of Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) technology. The ESTAR L band radiometer was evaluated for soil moisture mapping applications in two studies. The first was conducted over the semiarid rangeland Walnut Gulch watershed located in south eastern Arizona (U.S.). The second was performed in the subhumid Little Washita watershed in south west Oklahoma (U.S.). Both tests showed that the ESTAR is capable of providing soil moisture with the same level of accuracy as existing systems.

  12. Photon counting pixel and array in amorphous silicon technology for large area digital medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Shin, Kyung W.; Safavian, Nader; Taghibakhsh, Farhad; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    A single photon counting Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) based pixel architecture in amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology is reported for large area digital medical imaging. The VCO converts X-ray generated input charge into an output oscillating frequency signal. Experimental results for an in-house fabricated VCO circuit in a-Si technology are presented and external readout circuits to extract the image information from the VCO's frequency output are discussed. These readout circuits can be optimized to reduce the fixed pattern noise and fringing effects in an imaging array containing many such VCO pixels. Noise estimations, stability simulations and measurements for the fabricated VCO are presented. The reported architecture is particularly promising for large area photon counting applications (e.g. low dose fluoroscopy, dental computed tomography (CT)) due to its very low input referred electronic noise, high sensitivity and ease of fabrication in low cost a-Si technology.

  13. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milnes, J. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.

    2014-11-01

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  14. Meter-Scale Large-Area Plasma Sources for Next-Generation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    Development of large-area high-density plasma sources with a scale length of meters is strongly desired for a variety of plasma processes, especially the flat panel display fabrications. Considering design issues for plasma production with high-frequency power sources to satisfy the requirements for enlargement of source-size exceeding a meter, the power deposition profile and hence the plasma distribution become inherently non-uniform, largely due to standing wave effects, which cannot be avoided with increasing source size when the source employs power-coupling devices (inductive antennas or capacitive electrodes) with a scale-length equivalent to or as long as the 1/4 wavelength of the HF-power transmission. In this article, these constraints associated with large-area sources are reviewed, and an inductively coupled RF plasma source with multiple low-inductance antenna (LIA) units is presented as a promising candidate to avoid the problems with conventional sources.

  15. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Milnes, J S; Horsfield, C J; Conneely, T M; Howorth, J

    2014-11-01

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year. PMID:25430347

  16. Large-Area Synthesis of High-Quality Uniform Few-Layer MoTe2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Xu, Kai; Zubair, Ahmad; Liao, Albert D; Fang, Wenjing; Ouyang, Fangping; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Ueno, Keiji; Saito, Riichiro; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2015-09-23

    The controlled synthesis of large-area, atomically thin molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2) crystals is crucial for its various applications based on the attractive properties of this emerging material. In this work, we developed a chemical vapor deposition synthesis to produce large-area, uniform, and highly crystalline few-layer 2H and 1T' MoTe2 films. It was found that these two different phases of MoTe2 can be grown depending on the choice of Mo precursor. Because of the highly crystalline structure, the as-grown few-layer 2H MoTe2 films display electronic properties that are comparable to those of mechanically exfoliated MoTe2 flakes. Our growth method paves the way for the large-scale application of MoTe2 in high-performance nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. PMID:26305492

  17. Fabrication of large area silicon solar cells by rapid thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoththaman, S.; Laureys, W.; Nijs, J.; Mertens, R.

    1995-10-01

    Large area n+pp+ solar cells have been fabricated on 10 cm×10 cm pseudo-quasi-square CZ silicon wafers (1 Ω cm, p-type) predominantly used by the photovoltaic (PV) industry. All the high-temperature steps have been performed by rapid thermal processing (RTP). Emitter formation, back surface field (BSF) formation, and surface oxidation have been performed in just two RTP steps each lasting 50 s. Solar cells of 15% efficiency have been fabricated this way, demonstrating the applicability of this low thermal budget technology to large area, modulable size, industrial quality Si wafers. Furthermore, the rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) is shown to result in good quality thin oxides with Si/SiO2 interface trap densities (Dit)<1011 cm-3 eV-1 near-midgap.

  18. Very Large Area/Volume Microwave ECR Plasma and Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor); Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing very large area and large volume plasmas. The invention utilizes electron cyclotron resonances in conjunction with permanent magnets to produce dense, uniform plasmas for long life ion thruster applications or for plasma processing applications such as etching, deposition, ion milling and ion implantation. The large area source is at least five times larger than the 12-inch wafers being processed to date. Its rectangular shape makes it easier to accommodate to materials processing than sources that are circular in shape. The source itself represents the largest ECR ion source built to date. It is electrodeless and does not utilize electromagnets to generate the ECR magnetic circuit, nor does it make use of windows.

  19. Large-area CdTe diode detector for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, K.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.; Sato, G.; Kouda, M.; Okada, Y.; Mitani, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kuroda, Y.; Onishi, M.; Ohno, R.; Kitajima, H.

    2003-10-01

    The current status of Schottky CdTe diode detectors, especially in view of their space application for hard X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, are reported. For practical use in space science, a large-area CdTe diode with a size of 21.5×21.5mm2 and a thickness of 0.5mm was developed. A good energy resolution, 2.8keV (FWHM) at -20°C, and high homogeneity to within 0.2% over the detector were achieved for the spectral performance. This device has successfully passed a series of tests required for its use in space, in view of utilizing Japanese M-V rockets. The tests include the mechanical environment test, vacuum test, long run for weeks and proton-beam radiation. Initial results from a 2×2 segmented electrode large-area device with a guard-ring are also presented.

  20. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  1. A novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Dey, Dibyendu; Memis, Omer G.; Katsnelson, Alex; Mohseni, Hooman

    2008-08-01

    With nanotechnology becoming widely used, many applications such as plasmonics, sensors, storage devices, solar cells, nano-filtration and artificial kidneys require the structures with large areas of uniform periodic nanopatterns. Most of the current nano-manufacturing techniques, including photolithography, electron-beam lithography, and focal ion beam milling, are either slow or expensive to be applied into the areas. Here, we demonstrate an alternative and novel lithography technique - Nanosphere Photolithography (NSP) - that generates a large area of highly uniform periodic nanoholes or nanoposts by utilizing the monolayer of hexagonally close packed (HCP) silica microspheres as super-lenses on top of photoresist. The size of the nanopatterns generated is almost independent of the sphere sizes and hence extremely uniform patterns can be obtained. We demonstrate that the method can produce hexagonally packed arrays of hole of sub-250 nm size in positive photoresist using a conventional exposure system with a broadband UV source centered at 400 nm. We also show a large area of highly uniform gold nanoholes (~180 nm) and nanoposts (~300nm) array with the period of 1 μm fabricated by the combination of lift-off and NSP. The process is not limited to gold. Similar structures have been shown with aluminum and silicon dioxide layer. The period and size of the structures can also be tuned by changing proper parameters. The technique applying self-assembled and focusing properties of micro-/nano-spheres into photolithography establishes a new paradigm for mask-less photolithography technique, allowing rapid and economical creation of large areas of periodic nanostructures with a high throughput.

  2. Polycrystalline CVD diamond detector: Fast response and high sensitivity with large area

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Linyue Zhang, Xianpeng; Zhong, Yunhong; Ouyang, Xiaoping Zhang, Jianfu

    2014-01-15

    Polycrystalline diamond was successfully used to fabricate a large area (diameter up to 46 mm) radiation detector. It was proven that the developed detector shows a fast pulsed response time and a high sensitivity, therefore its rise time is lower than 5 ns, which is two times faster than that of a Si-PIN detector of the same size. And because of the large sensitive area, this detector shows good dominance in fast pulsed and low density radiation detection.

  3. Development of large area, low-cost, solar cell processing sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitre, S.; Donon, J.

    1981-01-01

    A cost effective process based on state-of-the-art technology has been developed for the production of large-area (55 sq cm and larger) solar cells. The process is capable of providing silicon and polysilicon cell efficiencies in excess of 10% at an overall cost of 12 c/watt in 1980 dollars. The process provides large throughputs and is suitable for complete automation with high yields. Various stages of the process development are discussed.

  4. Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

    2009-03-31

    This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

  5. Soil Property Mapping Over Large Areas Using Sparse Ad-hoc Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, A.; Liu, J.

    2011-12-01

    Information on spatial variation of soil properties over large areas is a critical input for environmental modeling at large scales. Yet, quality information on soil spatial variation over large areas is difficult to obtain due to the large number of field samples required. Existing samples are often sparse and ad-hoc. The soil property maps created from these samples using existing techniques are not only at low quality but also lack the uncertainty information. This paper presents a new approach to map soil properties and quantify uncertainty in the derived soil property maps over large areas using sparse and ad-hoc samples. The underlying assumption of this new approach is the soil-landscape concept which stipulates that the more similar the environment conditions between two locations the more similar the soil property values are between the two sites. Under this assumption each sample can be considered as a representative over areas of similar environmental conditions. The level of representation of an individual sample for an unsampled location can be approximated by the similarity between their respective environment conditions. Based on this "individual representation" concept and with a Case-based Reasoning (CBR) approach soil property values at unsampled locations can be predicted and the uncertainty associated with each prediction can also be quantified based on their environmental similarity to individual samples. A case study over the Illy Region, a 50,000 km2 area in Xinjiang, Northwest China, has demonstrated that the approach can be an effective alternative for mapping soil property and quantifying uncertainty over large areas with sparse and ad-hoc samples.

  6. Lithography-free large-area metamaterials for stable thermophotovoltaic energy conversion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coppens, Zachary J.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Valentine, Jason G.

    2016-02-08

    A large-area metamaterial thermal emitter is fabricated using facile, lithography-free techniques. The device is composed of conductive oxides, refractory ceramics, and noble metals and shows stable, selective emission after exposure to 1173 K for 22 h in oxidizing and inert atmospheres. Lastly, the results indicate that the metamaterial can be used to achieve high-performance thermophotovoltaic devices for applications such as portable power generation.

  7. Testing of a Neon Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks is required for future NASA missions. A cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP) can provide a closed-loop cooling system for this purpose and has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A neon CLHP was tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryopump as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components. Tests conducted included loop cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, power cycle, heat removal capability, loop capillary limit and recovery from a dry-out, low power operation, and long duration steady state operation. The neon CLHP demonstrated robust operation. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully by applying power to both the pump and evaporator without any pre-conditioning. It could adapt to changes in the pump power andor evaporator power, and reach a new steady state very quickly. The evaporator could remove heat loads between 0.25W and 4W. When the pump capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the pump power. Steady state operations were demonstrated for up to 6 hours. The ability of the neon loop to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  8. Fast and large-area growth of uniform MoS2 monolayers on molybdenum foils.

    PubMed

    Tai, Guoan; Zeng, Tian; Yu, Jin; Zhou, Jianxin; You, Yuncheng; Wang, Xufeng; Wu, Hongrong; Sun, Xu; Hu, Tingsong; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-01-28

    A controllable synthesis of two-dimensional crystal monolayers in a large area is a prerequisite for potential applications, but the growth of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers in a large area with spatial homogeneity remains a great challenge. Here we report a novel and efficient method to fabricate large-scale MoS2 monolayers by direct sulfurization of pre-annealed molybdenum foil surfaces with large grain boundaries of more than 50 μm in size at elevated temperatures. Continuous MoS2 monolayers can be formed uniformly by sulfurizing the Mo foils in sulfur vapor at 600 °C within 1 min. At a lower temperature even down to 500 °C, uniform MoS2 monolayers can still be obtained but in a much longer sulfurizing duration. It is demonstrated that the formed monolayers can be nondestructively transferred onto arbitrary substrates by removing the Mo foil using diluted ferric chloride solution and can be successfully fabricated into photodetectors. The results show a novel avenue to efficiently fabricate two-dimensional crystals in a large area in a highly controllable way and should have great potential for the development of large-scale applications of two-dimensional crystals in electrophotonic systems. PMID:26743938

  9. Rapid, High-Resolution Forest Structure and Terrain Mapping over Large Areas using Single Photon Lidar

    PubMed Central

    Swatantran, Anu; Tang, Hao; Barrett, Terence; DeCola, Phil; Dubayah, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Single photon lidar (SPL) is an innovative technology for rapid forest structure and terrain characterization over large areas. Here, we evaluate data from an SPL instrument - the High Resolution Quantum Lidar System (HRQLS) that was used to map the entirety of Garrett County in Maryland, USA (1700 km2). We develop novel approaches to filter solar noise to enable the derivation of forest canopy structure and ground elevation from SPL point clouds. SPL attributes are compared with field measurements and an existing leaf-off, low-point density discrete return lidar dataset as a means of validation. We find that canopy and ground characteristics from SPL are similar to discrete return lidar despite differences in wavelength and acquisition periods but the higher point density of the SPL data provides more structural detail. Our experience suggests that automated noise removal may be challenging, particularly over high albedo surfaces and rigorous instrument calibration is required to reduce ground measurement biases to accepted mapping standards. Nonetheless, its efficiency of data collection, and its ability to produce fine-scale, three-dimensional structure over large areas quickly strongly suggests that SPL should be considered as an efficient and potentially cost-effective alternative to existing lidar systems for large area mapping. PMID:27329078

  10. Rapid, High-Resolution Forest Structure and Terrain Mapping over Large Areas using Single Photon Lidar.

    PubMed

    Swatantran, Anu; Tang, Hao; Barrett, Terence; DeCola, Phil; Dubayah, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Single photon lidar (SPL) is an innovative technology for rapid forest structure and terrain characterization over large areas. Here, we evaluate data from an SPL instrument - the High Resolution Quantum Lidar System (HRQLS) that was used to map the entirety of Garrett County in Maryland, USA (1700 km(2)). We develop novel approaches to filter solar noise to enable the derivation of forest canopy structure and ground elevation from SPL point clouds. SPL attributes are compared with field measurements and an existing leaf-off, low-point density discrete return lidar dataset as a means of validation. We find that canopy and ground characteristics from SPL are similar to discrete return lidar despite differences in wavelength and acquisition periods but the higher point density of the SPL data provides more structural detail. Our experience suggests that automated noise removal may be challenging, particularly over high albedo surfaces and rigorous instrument calibration is required to reduce ground measurement biases to accepted mapping standards. Nonetheless, its efficiency of data collection, and its ability to produce fine-scale, three-dimensional structure over large areas quickly strongly suggests that SPL should be considered as an efficient and potentially cost-effective alternative to existing lidar systems for large area mapping. PMID:27329078

  11. Simple room-temperature preparation of high-yield large-area graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, N M; Lim, H N; Chia, C H; Yarmo, M A; Muhamad, M R

    2011-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much attention from researchers due to its interesting mechanical, electrochemical, and electronic properties. It has many potential applications such as polymer filler, sensor, energy conversion, and energy storage devices. Graphene-based nanocomposites are under an intense spotlight amongst researchers. A large amount of graphene is required for preparation of such samples. Lately, graphene-based materials have been the target for fundamental life science investigations. Despite graphene being a much sought-after raw material, the drawbacks in the preparation of graphene are that it is a challenge amongst researchers to produce this material in a scalable quantity and that there is a concern about its safety. Thus, a simple and efficient method for the preparation of graphene oxide (GO) is greatly desired to address these problems. In this work, one-pot chemical oxidation of graphite was carried out at room temperature for the preparation of large-area GO with ~100% conversion. This high-conversion preparation of large-area GO was achieved using a simplified Hummer's method from large graphite flakes (an average flake size of 500 μm). It was found that a high degree of oxidation of graphite could be realized by stirring graphite in a mixture of acids and potassium permanganate, resulting in GO with large lateral dimension and area, which could reach up to 120 μm and ~8000 μm(2), respectively. The simplified Hummer's method provides a facile approach for the preparation of large-area GO. PMID:22267928

  12. Design, Production and Testing of Cost-Effective, Large-Area, MCP-based Planar Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junqi; Byrum, Karen; Demarteau, Marcel; Noonan, John; Setru, Sagar; Virgo, Mathew; Wagner, Robert; Walters, Dean; Wang, Xing; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Huyue

    2014-03-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP)-based photodetectors with large-area, thin planar geometry and glass-body assembly, are considered as next generation photodetector to replace photomultiplier tubes. They have shown significant potential for applications in high energy collider physics and astrophysics. Due to the extreme sensitivity of the photocathode to water and oxygen, the production of this kind of photodetectors requires photocathodes to be transferred under high vacuum. A new photodetector production facility at Argonne National Laboratory was designed and constructed. The facility aims to produce small form-factor, MCP-based photodetectors completely made out of glass. 6 x 6 cm2 photodetectors using metal and alkali antimonide as photocathode are currently under production. An overview of the production sequence and first performance results will be presented. Scaling up the production to larger form-factor devices will be discussed. The challenge of sealing a large area photodetector has recently been overcome. Windows with 20 × 20 cm2 active photocathode area were successfully sealed and progress towards large-area photodetector production progress will be reported.

  13. Rapid, High-Resolution Forest Structure and Terrain Mapping over Large Areas using Single Photon Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swatantran, Anu; Tang, Hao; Barrett, Terence; Decola, Phil; Dubayah, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    Single photon lidar (SPL) is an innovative technology for rapid forest structure and terrain characterization over large areas. Here, we evaluate data from an SPL instrument - the High Resolution Quantum Lidar System (HRQLS) that was used to map the entirety of Garrett County in Maryland, USA (1700 km2). We develop novel approaches to filter solar noise to enable the derivation of forest canopy structure and ground elevation from SPL point clouds. SPL attributes are compared with field measurements and an existing leaf-off, low-point density discrete return lidar dataset as a means of validation. We find that canopy and ground characteristics from SPL are similar to discrete return lidar despite differences in wavelength and acquisition periods but the higher point density of the SPL data provides more structural detail. Our experience suggests that automated noise removal may be challenging, particularly over high albedo surfaces and rigorous instrument calibration is required to reduce ground measurement biases to accepted mapping standards. Nonetheless, its efficiency of data collection, and its ability to produce fine-scale, three-dimensional structure over large areas quickly strongly suggests that SPL should be considered as an efficient and potentially cost-effective alternative to existing lidar systems for large area mapping.

  14. A High-Flux, Flexible Membrane with Parylene-encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H G; In, J; Kim, S; Fornasiero, F; Holt, J K; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-14

    We present fabrication and characterization of a membrane based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene. Carbon nanotubes have shown orders of magnitude enhancement in gas and water permeability compared to estimates generated by conventional theories [1, 2]. Large area membranes that exhibit flux enhancement characteristics of carbon nanotubes may provide an economical solution to a variety of technologies including water desalination [3] and gas sequestration [4]. We report a novel method of making carbon nanotube-based, robust membranes with large areas. A vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube array is infiltrated with parylene. Parylene polymer creates a pinhole free transparent film by exhibiting high surface conformity and excellent crevice penetration. Using this moisture-, chemical- and solvent-resistant polymer creates carbon nanotube membranes that promise to exhibit high stability and biocompatibility. CNT membranes are formed by releasing a free-standing film that consists of parylene-infiltrated CNTs, followed by CNT uncapping on both sides of the composite material. Thus fabricated membranes show flexibility and ductility due to the parylene matrix material, as well as high permeability attributed to embedded carbon nanotubes. These membranes have a potential for applications that may require high flux, flexibility and durability.

  15. Laser interference lithography for large area patterning and the fabrication of functional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wathuthanthri, Ishan

    Nature-inspired phenomena such as the "moth eye" and "lotus leaf" effects have gained a lot of interest in recent years due to potential applications in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines. To practically achieve a majority of these biomimetic applications it is necessary to fabricate such nano-featured surfaces in a low-cost and high-throughput manner. To this end, this dissertation focuses on developing and using the Interference Lithography (IL) technologies to achieve large-area nanopatterning. IL is a parallel-type nanolithography technique that shares many of the advantages of other parallel-type techniques such as deep-UV photolithography while alleviating a majority of concerns such as cost and complexity. IL relies on the interference of two or more beams of light where the resulting interference fringes are generally recorded on a light sensitive polymeric material such as photoresist. In simple two-beam IL systems, the periodicity of the interference fringes is simply a function of wavelength and the angle of separation of the two beams, while the maximum coverage area is a constrained by the optical path and the exposed area. To this extent, in the design of interferometers for nanopatterning, the challenge remains in designing systems where a simple mechanism exists for varying the angle of separation of the interfering beams and in turn periodicity of the interference fringes while also enabling large-area exposures. To this end, the first half of this dissertation demonstrates three different IL systems (Lloyd-mirror, two-degree-of freedom Lloyd-mirror, and the tunable two-mirror systems) designed and established at Stevens capable of fast tuning of periodicities while also achieving wafer-scale (4") large-area nanopatterning. Using the large-area nanopatterns of photoresist, various pattern transfer techniques have also been investigated where the photoresist film is used as a template layer to transfer the large-area periodic

  16. The design and application of large area intensive lens array focal spots measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bingzhen; Yao, Shun; Yang, Guanghui; Dai, Mingchong; Wang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) modules are getting thinner and using smaller cells now days. Correspondingly, large area intensive lens arrays with smaller unit dimension and shorter focal length are wanted. However, the size and power center of lens array focal spots usually differ from the design value and are hard to measure, especially under large area situation. It is because the machining error and deformation of material of the lens array are hard to simulate in the optical design process. Thus the alignment error between solar cells and focal spots in the module assembly process will be hard to control. Under this kind of situation, the efficiency of CPV module with thinner body and smaller cells is much lower than expected. In this paper, a design of large area lens array focal spots automatic measurement system is presented, as well as its prototype application results. In this system, a four-channel parallel light path and its corresponding image capture and process modules are designed. These modules can simulate focal spots under sunlight and have the spots image captured and processed using charge coupled devices and certain gray level algorithm. Thus the important information of focal spots such as spot size and location will be exported. Motion control module based on grating scale signal and interval measurement method are also employed in this system in order to get test results with high speed and high precision on large area lens array no less than 1m×0.8m. The repeatability of the system prototype measurement is +/-10μm with a velocity of 90 spot/min. Compared to the original module assembled using coordinates from optical design, modules assembled using data exported from the prototype is 18% higher in output power, reaching a conversion efficiency of over 31%. This system and its design can be used in the focal spot measurement of planoconvex lens array and Fresnel lens array, as well as other kinds of large area lens array application

  17. Large-area perovskite nanowire arrays fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll micro-gravure printing and doctor blading.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiao; Wu, Han; Sun, Jia; Yan, Donghang; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2016-02-25

    Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite nanowires (PNWs) show great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors and photodetectors. It is very meaningful to fabricate ordered, large-area PNW arrays and greatly accelerate their applications and commercialization in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, highly oriented and ultra-long methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) PNW array thin films were fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll (R2R) micro-gravure printing and doctor blading in ambient environments (humility ∼45%, temperature ∼28 °C), which produced PNW lengths as long as 15 mm. Furthermore, photodetectors based on these PNWs were successfully fabricated on both silicon oxide (SiO2) and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and showed moderate performance. This study provides low-cost, large-scale techniques to fabricate large-area PNW arrays with great potential applications in flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26883938

  18. Large Area 2D and 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals Fabricated by a Roll-to-Roll Langmuir-Blodgett Method.

    PubMed

    Parchine, Mikhail; McGrath, Joe; Bardosova, Maria; Pemble, Martyn E

    2016-06-14

    We present our results on the fabrication of large area colloidal photonic crystals on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using a roll-to-roll Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) colloidal photonic crystals from silica nanospheres (250 and 550 nm diameter) with a total area of up to 340 cm(2) have been fabricated in a continuous manner compatible with high volume manufacturing. In addition, the antireflective properties and structural integrity of the films have been enhanced via the use of a second roll-to-roll process, employing a slot-die coating of an optical adhesive over the photonic crystal films. Scanning electron microscopy images, atomic force microscopy images, and UV-vis optical transmission and reflection spectra of the fabricated photonic crystals are analyzed. This analysis confirms the high quality of the 2D and 3D photonic crystals fabricated by the roll-to-roll LB technique. Potential device applications of the large area 2D and 3D colloidal photonic crystals on flexible PET film are briefly reviewed. PMID:27218474

  19. Potential energy hypersurface and molecular flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koča, Jaroslav

    1993-02-01

    The molecular flexibility phenomenon is discussed from the conformational potential energy(hyper) surface (PES) point of view. Flexibility is considered as a product of three terms: thermodynamic, kinetic and geometrical. Several expressions characterizing absolute and relative molecular flexibility are introduced, depending on a subspace studied of the entire conformational space, energy level E of PES as well as absolute temperature. Results obtained by programs DAISY, CICADA and PANIC in conjunction with molecular mechanics program MMX for flexibility analysis of isopentane, 2,2-dimethylpentane and isohexane molecules are introduced.

  20. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail. PMID:26264684

  3. Testing of a Helium Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin Lee

    2015-01-01

    Future NASA space telescopes and exploration missions require cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks. One device that can potentially be used to provide closed-loop cryocooling is the cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP). A CLHP has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A helium CLHP has been tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryocooler as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components in the 3K temperature range. A copper plate with attached electrical heters was used to simulate the heat source, and heat was collected by the CLHP evaporator and transferred to the cryocooler for ultimate heat rejection. The helium CLHP thermal performance test included cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, capillary limit, heat removal capability, rapid power changes, and long duration steady state operation. The helium CLHP demonstrated robust operation under steady state and transient conditions. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully without pre-conditioning by simply applying power to both the capillary pump and the evaporator plate. It could adapt to rapid changes in the heat load, and reach a new steady state very quickly. Heat removal between 10mW and 140mW was demonstrated, yielding a power turn down ratio of 14. When the CLHP capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the power to the capillary pump. Steady state operations up to 17 hours at several heat loads were demonstrated. The ability of the helium CLHP to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  4. Testing of a Helium Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA space telescopes and exploration missions require cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks. One device that can potentially be used to provide closed-loop cryocooling is the cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP). A CLHP has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A helium CLHP has been tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryocooler as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components in the 3K temperature range. A copper plate with attached electrical heaters was used to simulate the heat source, and heat was collected by the CLHP evaporator and transferred to the cryocooler for ultimate heat rejection. The helium CLHP thermal performance test included cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, capillary limit, heat removal capability, rapid power changes, and long duration steady state operation. The helium CLHP demonstrated robust operation under steady state and transient conditions. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully without pre-conditioning by simply applying power to both the capillary pump and the evaporator plate. It could adapt to rapid changes in the heat load, and reach a new steady state very quickly. Heat removal between 10mW and 140mW was demonstrated, yielding a power turn down ratio of 14. When the CLHP capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the power to the capillary pump. Steady state operations up to 17 hours at several heat loads were demonstrated. The ability of the helium CLHP to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  5. Self-consistent electrodynamics of large-area high-frequency capacitive plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhigang; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2010-10-15

    Capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) generated using high frequency (3-30 MHz) and very high frequency (30-300 MHz) radio-frequency (rf) sources are used for many plasma processing applications including thin film etching and deposition. When chamber dimensions become commensurate with the effective rf wavelength in the plasma, electromagnetic wave effects impose a significant influence on plasma behavior. Because the effective rf wavelength in plasma depends upon both rf and plasma process conditions (e.g., rf power and gas pressure), a self-consistent model including both the rf power delivery system and the plasma discharge is highly desirable to capture a more complete physical picture of the plasma behavior. A three-dimensional model for self-consistently studying both electrodynamic and plasma dynamic behavior of large-area (Gen 10, >8 m{sup 2}) CCP is described in this paper. This model includes Maxwell's equations and transport equations for charged and neutral species, which are coupled and solved in the time domain. The complete rf plasma discharge chamber including the rf power delivery subsystem, rf feed, electrodes, and the plasma domain is modeled as an integrated system. Based on this full-wave solution model, important limitations for processing uniformity imposed by electromagnetic wave propagation effects in a large-area CCP (3.05x2.85 m{sup 2} electrode size) are studied. The behavior of H{sub 2} plasmas in such a reactor is examined from 13.56 to 200 MHz. It is shown that various rectangular harmonics of electromagnetic fields can be excited in a large-area rectangular reactor as the rf or power is increased. The rectangular harmonics can create not only center-high plasma distribution but also high plasma density at the corners and along the edges of the reactor.

  6. Approaching total absorption at near infrared in a large area monolayer graphene by critical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yonghao; Chadha, Arvinder; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yichen; Menon, Laxmy; Yang, Hongjun; Zhou, Weidong; Piper, Jessica R.; Fan, Shanhui; Jia, Yichen; Xia, Fengnian; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrate experimentally close to total absorption in monolayer graphene based on critical coupling with guided resonances in transfer printed photonic crystal Fano resonance filters at near infrared. Measured peak absorptions of 35% and 85% were obtained from cavity coupled monolayer graphene for the structures without and with back reflectors, respectively. These measured values agree very well with the theoretical values predicted with the coupled mode theory based critical coupling design. Such strong light-matter interactions can lead to extremely compact and high performance photonic devices based on large area monolayer graphene and other two–dimensional materials.

  7. The Silicon Tracker Readout Electronics of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Luca; Brez, Alessandro; Himel, Thomas; Hirayama, Masaharu; Johnson, R.P.; Kroeger, Wilko; Latronico, Luca; Minuti, Massimo; Nelson, David; Rando, Riccardo; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Sgro, Carmelo; Spandre, Gloria; Spencer, E.N.; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Tajima, Hiro; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ziegler, Marcus; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /Maryland U. /UC, Santa Cruz /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2006-02-27

    A unique electronics system has been built and tested for reading signals from the silicon-strip detectors of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. The system amplifies and processes signals from 884,736 36-cm strips using only 160 W of power, and it achieves close to 100% detection efficiency with noise occupancy sufficiently low to allow it to self trigger. The design of the readout system is described, and results are presented from ground-based testing of the completed detector system.

  8. Transverse charge transport through DNA oligomers in large-area molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsouras, Ilias; Piliego, Claudia; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the nature of charge transport in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using self-assembled layers of DNA in large-area molecular junctions. A protocol was developed that yields dense monolayers where the DNA molecules are not standing upright, but are lying flat on the substrate. As a result the charge transport is measured not along the DNA molecules but in the transverse direction, across their diameter. The electrical transport data are consistent with the derived morphology. We demonstrate that the charge transport mechanism through DNA is identical to non-resonant tunneling through alkanethiols with identical length, classifying DNA as a dielectric.

  9. Status of GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large-area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rochester, L.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    GLAST is a satellite-based observatory consisting of the Large-Area Telescope (LAT), a modular 4 x 4-tower pair-conversion telescope with a field-of-view greater than 2 steradians, capable of measuring gamma-ray energies in the range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), a set of NaI and BGO detectors covering 8 steradians and sensitive to photons with energies between 10 keV and 25 MeV, allowing for correlative observations of transient events. The observatory is currently being constructed and is scheduled to be launched in August 2007.

  10. Coatings for large-area low-cost solar concentrators and reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1994-09-01

    Large-optics coating facilities and processes at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) that were used to develop large-area high-performance laser mirrors for SDIO are now being used to fabricate a variety of optical components for commercial clients, and for novel applications for other DoD clients. Emphasis of this work is on technology transfer of low-cost coating processes and equipment to private clients. Much of the technology transfer is being accomplished through the CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) process funded by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  11. Large-Area Atom Interferometry with Frequency-Swept Raman Adiabatic Passage.

    PubMed

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L; Kinast, Joseph M; Stoner, Richard E

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate light-pulse atom interferometry with large-momentum-transfer atom optics based on stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage. Our atom optics have produced momentum splittings of up to 30 photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive interferometer for laser cooled atoms. We experimentally verify the enhancement of phase shift per unit acceleration and characterize interferometer contrast loss. By forgoing evaporative cooling and velocity selection, this method lowers the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty and enables large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates. PMID:26382675

  12. Precisely Controlled Ultrathin Conjugated Polymer Films for Large Area Transparent Transistors and Highly Sensitive Chemical Sensors.

    PubMed

    Khim, Dongyoon; Ryu, Gi-Seong; Park, Won-Tae; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Myungwon; Noh, Yong-Young

    2016-04-01

    A uniform ultrathin polymer film is deposited over a large area with molecularlevel precision by the simple wire-wound bar-coating method. The bar-coated ultrathin films not only exhibit high transparency of up to 90% in the visible wavelength range but also high charge carrier mobility with a high degree of percolation through the uniformly covered polymer nanofibrils. They are capable of realizing highly sensitive multigas sensors and represent the first successful report of ethylene detection using a sensor based on organic field-effect transistors. PMID:26849096

  13. Effects of electrolyte gating on photoluminescence spectra of large-area WSe2 monolayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Keiichiro; Pu, Jiang; Kozawa, Daichi; Matsuda, Kazunari; Li, Lain-Jong; Takenobu, Taishi

    2016-06-01

    We fabricated electric double-layer transistors comprising large-area WSe2 monolayers and investigated the effects of electrolyte gating on their photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Using the efficient gating effects of electric double layers, we succeeded in the application of a large electric field (∼107 V cm‑1) and the accumulation of high carrier density (>1013 cm‑2). As a result, we observed PL spectra based on both positively and negatively charged excitons and their gate-voltage-dependent redshifts, suggesting the effects of both an electric field and charge accumulation.

  14. Procedures and results of the measurements on large area photomultipliers for the NEMO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, S.; Leonora, E.; Aloisio, A.; Ameli, F.; Amore, I.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anzalone, A.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Battaglieri, M.; Bazzotti, M.; Bellotti, R.; Bersani, A.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bonori, M.; Bouhdaef, B.; Cacopardo, G.; Calı, C.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carminati, G.; Cassano, B.; Ceres, A.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Costa, M.; D'Amico, A.; DeBonis, G.; DeRosa, G.; DeRuvo, G.; DeVita, R.; Distefano, C.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Gabrielli, A.; Galeotti, S.; Gandolfi, E.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgi, F.; Giovanetti, G.; Grimaldi, A.; Grmek, A.; Habel, R.; Imbesi, M.; Lonardo, A.; LoPresti, D.; Lucarelli, F.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Maugeri, F.; Migneco, E.; Minutoli, S.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Orlando, A.; Osipenko, M.; Papaleo, R.; Pappalardo, V.; Piattelli, P.; Piombo, D.; Raffaelli, F.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Reito, S.; Ricco, G.; Riccobene, G.; Ripani, M.; Rovelli, A.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Russo, S.; Sapienza, P.; Sedita, M.; Shirokov, E.; Simeone, F.; Sciliberto, D.; Sipala, V.; Sollima, C.; Spurio, M.; Stefani, F.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Urso, S.; Vecchi, M.; Vicini, P.; Wischnewski, R.

    2010-03-01

    The selection of the photomultiplier plays a crucial role in the R&D activity related to a large-scale underwater neutrino telescope. This paper illustrates the main procedures and facilities used to characterize the performances of 72 large area photomultipliers, Hamamatsu model R7081 sel. The voltage to achieve a gain of 5×10 7, dark count rate and single photoelectron time and charge properties of the overall response were measured with a properly attenuated 410 nm pulsed laser. A dedicated study of the spurious pulses was also performed. The results prove that the photomultipliers comply with the general requirements imposed by the project.

  15. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  16. A large-area microstrip-gas-counter for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Apple, J. A.; Austin, R. A.; Dietz, K. L.; Minamitani, T.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1996-02-01

    We have developed a large-area coded-mask telescope for hard-X-ray astronomy. The heart of the instrument is an imaging microstrip-gas-counter of active area 30 cm × 30 cm and filled with 2 × 105 Pa of xenon + 2% isobutylene. Fabricated on a single sheet of borosilicate glass, 1 mm thick, the microstrip features fine anodes (10 μm) and interleaved cathodes from which the position sensing is derived. Rear pickup electrodes provide the second coordinate. Full details of the instrument and its performance are presented. A first flight, from a high-altitude balloon, is scheduled for the Spring of 1977.

  17. Design and Characteristics of the Anticoincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, A. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Johnson, T. E.; Ormes, J. F.; Thompson, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) is the outermost detector layer in the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), surrounding the top and sides of the tracker. The purpose of the ACD is to detect and veto incident cosmic ray charged particles, which outnumber cosmic gamma rays by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The challenge in ACD design is that it must have high (0.9997) detection efficiency for singly charged relativistic particles, but must also have low sensitivity to backsplash particles. These are products of high- energy interactions in the LAT calorimeter. They can cause a veto signal in the ACD, resulting in loss of good gamma-ray events.

  18. Microfabrication of large-area circular high-stress silicon nitride membranes for optomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, E.; Bawaj, M.; Borrielli, A.; Di Giuseppe, G.; Forte, S.; Kralj, N.; Malossi, N.; Marconi, L.; Marin, F.; Marino, F.; Morana, B.; Natali, R.; Pandraud, G.; Pontin, A.; Prodi, G. A.; Rossi, M.; Sarro, P. M.; Vitali, D.; Bonaldi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In view of the integration of membrane resonators with more complex MEMS structures, we developed a general fabrication procedure for circular shape SiNx membranes using Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Large area and high-stress SiNx membranes were fabricated and used as optomechanical resonators in a Michelson interferometer, where Q values up to 1.3 × 106 were measured at cryogenic temperatures, and in a Fabry-Pérot cavity, where an optical finesse up to 50000 has been observed.

  19. Long life electrodes for large-area x-ray generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothe, Dietmar E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This invention is directed to rugged, reliable, and long-life electrodes for use in large-area, high-current-density electron gun and x-ray generators which are employed as contamination-free preionizers for high-energy pulsed gas lasers. The electron source at the cathode is a corona plasma formed at the interface between a conductor, or semiconductor, and a high-permittivity dielectric. Detailed descriptions are provided of a reliable cold plasma cathode, as well as an efficient liquid-cooled electron beam target (anode) and x-ray generator which concentrates the x-ray flux in the direction of an x-ray window.

  20. Periodic large-area metallic split-ring resonator metamaterial fabrication based on shadow nanosphere lithography.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, Michael Christian; Koroknay, Elisabeth; Fu, Liwei; Patoka, Piotr; Kandulski, Witold; Giersig, Michael; Giessen, Harald

    2009-03-01

    A fast and cheap, large-area (>1 cm(2)), high-coverage fabrication technique for periodic metallic split-ring resonator metamaterials is presented, which allows control of inner- and outer-ring diameters, gap angles, as well as thickness and periodicity. This method, based on shadow nanosphere lithography, uses tilted-angle-rotation thermal evaporation onto Langmuir-Blodgett-type monolayers of close-packed polystyrene nanospheres. Excellent agreement of the process parameters with a simplified model is demonstrated. Pronounced, tunable optical metamaterial resonances in the range of 100 THz are consistent with simulations. PMID:19148886