Science.gov

Sample records for confronting industry-distributional concerns

  1. Childhood Injuries in Singapore: Can Local Physicians and the Healthcare System Do More to Confront This Public Health Concern?

    PubMed

    Ong, Alvin Cong Wei; Low, Sher Guan; Vasanwala, Farhad Fakhrudin

    2016-01-01

    Childhood injury is one of the leading causes of death globally. Singapore is no exception to this tragic fact, with childhood injuries accounting up to 37% of Emergency Department visits. Hence, it is important to understand the epidemiology and risk factors of childhood injuries locally. A search for relevant articles published from 1996-2016 was performed on PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar using keywords relating to childhood injury in Singapore. The epidemiology, mechanisms of injury, risk factors and recommended prevention strategies of unintentional childhood injuries were reviewed and described. Epidemiological studies have shown that childhood injury is a common, preventable and significant public health concern in Singapore. Home injuries and falls are responsible for majority of the injuries. Injuries related to childcare products, playground and road traffic accidents are also important causes. Healthcare professionals and legislators play an important role in raising awareness and reducing the incidence of childhood injuries in Singapore. For example, despite legislative requirements for many years, the low usage of child restraint seats in Singapore is worrisome. Thus, greater efforts in public health education in understanding childhood injuries, coupled with more research studies to evaluate the effectiveness and deficiencies of current prevention strategies will be necessary. PMID:27438844

  2. Childhood Injuries in Singapore: Can Local Physicians and the Healthcare System Do More to Confront This Public Health Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Alvin Cong Wei; Low, Sher Guan; Vasanwala, Farhad Fakhrudin

    2016-01-01

    Childhood injury is one of the leading causes of death globally. Singapore is no exception to this tragic fact, with childhood injuries accounting up to 37% of Emergency Department visits. Hence, it is important to understand the epidemiology and risk factors of childhood injuries locally. A search for relevant articles published from 1996–2016 was performed on PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar using keywords relating to childhood injury in Singapore. The epidemiology, mechanisms of injury, risk factors and recommended prevention strategies of unintentional childhood injuries were reviewed and described. Epidemiological studies have shown that childhood injury is a common, preventable and significant public health concern in Singapore. Home injuries and falls are responsible for majority of the injuries. Injuries related to childcare products, playground and road traffic accidents are also important causes. Healthcare professionals and legislators play an important role in raising awareness and reducing the incidence of childhood injuries in Singapore. For example, despite legislative requirements for many years, the low usage of child restraint seats in Singapore is worrisome. Thus, greater efforts in public health education in understanding childhood injuries, coupled with more research studies to evaluate the effectiveness and deficiencies of current prevention strategies will be necessary. PMID:27438844

  3. Confronting Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buswell, Carol

    2011-01-01

    People confront stereotypes every day, both in and out of the classroom. Some ideas have been carried in the collective memory and classroom textbooks for so long they are generally recognized as fact. Many are constantly being reinforced by personal experiences, family discussions, and Hollywood productions as well. The distinct advantage to…

  4. Confronting Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensley, Loren B.; Bertsch, Donald P.

    1987-01-01

    Since no school district is immune to death, the concepts of death and dying, stress management, and suicide should be worked into the curriculum beginning in the fourth grade. Advice is given concerning planning for potential tragedy, responding to a student's or staff member's death, and establishing memorials. Two figures cite teenage suicide…

  5. Confrontation and Administrative Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Arnold J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes some of the sociological and psychological effects of organizational conflict and offers 10 operational principles to guide public administrators of schools and social agencies in meeting the confrontation tactics of activist groups. (JH)

  6. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  7. Confronting Islamophobia in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramarajan, Dhaya; Runell, Marcella

    2007-01-01

    The "Religion and Diversity Education" program of the Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding includes innovative training for elementary and high school educators on addressing religious pluralism in school. This paper highlights the program and its curricula which confront Islamophobia by teaching students concrete skills for living in…

  8. An Empirical Examination of Confrontation Efficacy II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remer, Rory

    Social psychologists have studied interpersonal conflict by examining styles of conflict resolution such as negotiation/bargaining. Counseling psychologists have attempted to address these concerns through assertiveness and aspects of parenting training. In a previous study, a three-component confrontation model--specified behavior, emotional…

  9. Confrontation in the climacteric.

    PubMed Central

    Wilbush, J

    1994-01-01

    Why is an increasing number of women dissatisfied with their doctors' help in their climacteric? Why do so many object to hormone replacement therapy (HRT)? Why do they generally feel it is not 'natural'? Though many object to getting old, want to continue flaunting their 'eternal youth', many more, women and men, embrace retirement, wish to rest and slow down. There is no mistaking these extremes, for while the first grasp at every possible treatment, the last are but seldom medically seen. It is the middle majority, their demands, censure, disapproval, even open confrontation with those who try to help them which is difficult to understand. This paper briefly reviews the manner in which Western climacteric women have, during two hundred, but mainly last fifty, years confronted their world: their protests at societal attitudes, their private marital conflicts, their demands of doctors and, finally, their present criticism of them. It also pays detailed attention to the key concept of 'natural' treatment. Finally it suggests that much of present climacteric confrontation is a displacement activity, born of concurrent conflicting desires for both youth and retirement, rather than aimed specifically at doctors. PMID:8046706

  10. Confrontation in the climacteric.

    PubMed

    Wilbush, J

    1994-06-01

    Why is an increasing number of women dissatisfied with their doctors' help in their climacteric? Why do so many object to hormone replacement therapy (HRT)? Why do they generally feel it is not 'natural'? Though many object to getting old, want to continue flaunting their 'eternal youth', many more, women and men, embrace retirement, wish to rest and slow down. There is no mistaking these extremes, for while the first grasp at every possible treatment, the last are but seldom medically seen. It is the middle majority, their demands, censure, disapproval, even open confrontation with those who try to help them which is difficult to understand. This paper briefly reviews the manner in which Western climacteric women have, during two hundred, but mainly last fifty, years confronted their world: their protests at societal attitudes, their private marital conflicts, their demands of doctors and, finally, their present criticism of them. It also pays detailed attention to the key concept of 'natural' treatment. Finally it suggests that much of present climacteric confrontation is a displacement activity, born of concurrent conflicting desires for both youth and retirement, rather than aimed specifically at doctors. PMID:8046706

  11. Confronting AIDS: international consensus?

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    A coordinated effort by the World Bank, the European Commission, and UNAIDS, and drawing from a number of academic disciplines, including epidemiology, public health, and public economics, the recently published book "Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a Global Epidemic" argues that the global HIV/AIDS epidemic can be overcome and that national governments have a major role in preventing the spread of AIDS and tempering its impact. Considerable evidence is presented in support of the argument. The original idea for the book came out of collaboration between individuals in the European Commission and the World Bank. The World Bank's recognition of the importance of AIDS is a milestone in the course of the pandemic. Confronting AIDS highlights the potential and actual impact of AIDS upon households, communities, and countries; argues the case for interventions in both HIV prevention and care; and generally considers some of the difficult choices which need to be made about how scarce resources will be allocated, especially in developing countries. PMID:12294024

  12. Helping Counselors Learn to Confront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamminen, Armas W.; Smaby, Marlowe H.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a model for training counselors to learn to confront empathetically. Describes a confrontation training scale that includes inadequate responses of acquiescing and scolding and the progressively more effective responses of recognizing ineffective behavior, realizing its negative consequences, and committing to change. Suggests confronting…

  13. Managing Confrontations Safely and Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Most Monday mornings are noisy affairs where students and staff members are catching up on the events of the weekend. Sometimes these events are disputes that have festered over the weekend and are now ready to get settled. When a confrontation between students occurs, noise levels accelerate, students begin running, and an unnerving combination…

  14. Valuing Confrontations with the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Joseph T.

    1978-01-01

    Suggests teaching methods and materials for use by high school and college social studies teachers as they help students develop valuing skills. Entitled Valuing Confrontation With The Future (VCF), the materials promote consideration of provocative episodes such as electrical stimulation of the human brain and a congressional ban on large pets…

  15. Misunderstandings Concerning Genetics Among Patients Confronting Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klitzman, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Critical questions arise about misunderstandings of genetics. We interviewed for 2 h each, 64 individuals who had or were at risk for Huntington’s disease (HD), breast cancer or Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. These individuals revealed various misunderstandings that can affect coping, and testing, treatment and reproductive decisions. A therapeutic misconception about testing appeared: that testing would be helpful in and of itself. Many believed they could control genetic disorders (even HD), yet these beliefs were often incorrect, and could impede coping, testing, and treatment. Misunderstandings about statistics and genetics often fueled each other, and reflected denial, and desires for hope and control. Emotional needs can thus outweigh understandings of genetics and statistics, and providers’ input. Individuals often maintained non-scientific beliefs, though embarrassed by these. These data have implications for care, and public and professional education. Misunderstandings’ persistence, despite realization of their inaccuracy, suggests that providers need to address not just cognitive facts, but underlying emotional issues. PMID:20512408

  16. Concern for truth: driving defensively when confronting a zombie epidemic.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2013-11-01

    The newly approved drug Diclegis(®), indicated for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with pregnancy, has a very interesting background story going back more than 50 years, in which science, celebrity individuals, the media, and the courts crossed paths. The story illustrates how concepts of truth, evidence, objectivity, and disinterested inquiry can become distorted in various ways, and this is especially relevant and prevalent in today's media environment of cable television, talk radio, and especially the Internet. PMID:24124694

  17. Confronting Asian Concerns in Engaging Learners to Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Ganakumaran

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have theorized that cultural emphasis on education plays a major role in explaining Asian students' achievement. While Asian parents often view education as the main vehicle for upward social mobility, the social and cultural make-up of Asian societies and the context within which education is conducted in Asia often clash with the…

  18. Discussion: Confronting theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Hugh; Hayato, Yoshinari; Sobczyk, Jan

    2015-05-15

    This session focused on the current status of neutrino event generators, in practical terms the tool through which ‘theory confronts experiment’. Comparisons of event generators, both in terms of input physics, and in terms of produced distributions, has been a staple of this conference series, and the activities in this area are summarized. In addition, we discuss the highest priorities for model development, discuss the changing needs of experimental users, and comment on challenges and needs for the road ahead.

  19. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sanjeev V; Nair, Aparna

    2011-07-01

    Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We also briefly discuss the strategies that are most commonly utilized to mitigate stigma. Neurologists and other health care providers, social workers, support groups and policy makers working with epilepsy need to have a deep understanding of the social and cultural perceptions of epilepsy and the related stigma. It is necessary that societies establish unique determinants of stigma and set up appropriate strategies to mitigate stigma and facilitate the complete inclusion of people with epilepsy as well as mitigating any existing discrimination. PMID:22028525

  20. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.; Nair, Aparna

    2011-01-01

    Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We also briefly discuss the strategies that are most commonly utilized to mitigate stigma. Neurologists and other health care providers, social workers, support groups and policy makers working with epilepsy need to have a deep understanding of the social and cultural perceptions of epilepsy and the related stigma. It is necessary that societies establish unique determinants of stigma and set up appropriate strategies to mitigate stigma and facilitate the complete inclusion of people with epilepsy as well as mitigating any existing discrimination. PMID:22028525

  1. Confronting the Problem of Embodiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheville, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Embodiment has become an important construct for those in disciplines and specialty areas concerned with the form and function of the human body. This article suggests that accounts of embodiment have collapsed into an exclusionary framework that locates culture and cognition on oppositional terms. For some scholars, embodiment represents the…

  2. Cryogenic moderator simulations : confronting reality.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-06

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities.

  3. Gauge-flation confronted with Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, Ryo; Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Peloso, Marco E-mail: ema@physics.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    Gauge-flation is a recently proposed model in which inflation is driven solely by a non-Abelian gauge field thanks to a specific higher order derivative operator. The nature of the operator is such that it does not introduce ghosts. We compute the cosmological scalar and tensor perturbations for this model, improving over an existing computation. We then confront these results with the Planck data. The model is characterized by the quantity γ ≡ g{sup 2}Q{sup 2}/H{sup 2} (where g is the gauge coupling constant, Q the vector vev, and H the Hubble rate). For γ < 2, the scalar perturbations show a strong tachyonic instability. In the stable region, the scalar power spectrum n{sub s} is too low at small γ, while the tensor-to-scalar ratio r is too high at large γ. No value of γ leads to acceptable values for n{sub s} and r, and so the model is ruled out by the CMB data. The same behavior with γ was obtained in Chromo-natural inflation, a model in which inflation is driven by a pseudo-scalar coupled to a non-Abelian gauge field. When the pseudo-scalar can be integrated out, one recovers the model of Gauge-flation plus corrections. It was shown that this identification is very accurate at the background level, but differences emerged in the literature concerning the perturbations of the two models. On the contrary, our results show that the analogy between the two models continues to be accurate also at the perturbative level.

  4. A Stress and Coping Perspective on Confronting Sexism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Cheryl R.; Miller, Carol T.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we tested a stress and coping model of confronting sexism. One hundred fourteen university women completed measures of optimism, cognitive appraisals about the prospects of confronting discrimination (expectations of the costs and benefits of confrontation as well as confrontation-related anxiety), and reported on the extent to which…

  5. Recognizing, Confronting, and Eliminating Workplace Bullying.

    PubMed

    Berry, Peggy Ann; Gillespie, Gordon L; Fisher, Bonnie S; Gormley, Denise K

    2016-07-01

    Workplace bullying (WPB) behaviors negatively affect nurse productivity, satisfaction, and retention, and hinder safe patient care. The purpose of this article is to define WPB, differentiate between incivility and WPB, and recommend actions to prevent WPB behaviors. Informed occupational and environmental health nurses and nurse leaders must recognize, confront, and eliminate WPB in their facilities and organizations. Recognizing, confronting, and eliminating WPB behaviors in health care is a crucial first step toward sustained improvements in patient care quality and the health and safety of health care employees. PMID:27053288

  6. Building a Digital Workforce: Confronting the Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Policy Association, Washington, DC.

    The Digital Economic Opportunity Committee (DEOC) was created by the National Policy Association (NPA) in 2001 to confront the critical national shortage of workers with the information technology (IT) skills needed for the information age economy. The committee oversaw an 18-month workforce development research project titled Crossing the Digital…

  7. Confronting Racial Hatred to Make Schools Safer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soukamneuth, Sengsouvanh

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about how to confront racial tensions that sometimes arise among students from different racial groups. Here, the author presents a four-year study conducted by the Social Policy Research Associates, funded in part by Carnegie Corporation of New York, on school-based strategies for addressing intergroup relations…

  8. Macroeconomic Issues Confronting the Next President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solow, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    Identifies economic issues that confronted the United States in the late 1980's and discusses how the president might deal with them. Highlights the following issues: recession, rising price levels, the budget deficit, international trade imbalance, and revival of U.S. long-term growth. (GEA)

  9. Some Organizational Issues Confronting Establishment of an International High School: A Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoke, Gordon

    This position paper on the concept of an international high school is primarily concerned with two questions: (1) What constitutes a "region"? (2) What are the ingredients of a "center"? Demographic changes and declining resources are serious obstacles confronting efforts to create new institutions, and logistical demands are underrated by…

  10. Current Issues: Critical Issues Confronting the Nation and the World. 1987 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carwile, John; Zack, David R.

    This annual publication seeks to inform interested readers about important concerns of currently confronting the United States. An introduction provides: a brief discussion of individuals in the Reagan Administration; a list of the leadership positions and committees in the 100th Congress--the reader must fill in the person for each position; a…

  11. CHILD WITNESSES AND THE CONFRONTATION CLAUSE

    PubMed Central

    LYON, THOMAS D.; DENTE, JULIA A.

    2014-01-01

    After the Supreme Court’s ruling in Crawford v. Washington that a criminal defendant’s right to confront the witnesses against him is violated by the admission of testimonial hearsay that has not been cross-examined, lower courts have overturned convictions in which hearsay from children was admitted after child witnesses were either unwilling or unable to testify. A review of social scientific evidence regarding the dynamics of child sexual abuse suggests a means for facilitating the fair receipt of children’s evidence. Courts should hold that defendants have forfeited their confrontation rights if they exploited a child’s vulnerabilities such that they could reasonably anticipate that the child would be unavailable to testify. Exploitation includes choosing victims on the basis of their filial dependency, their vulnerability, or their immaturity, as well as taking actions that create or accentuate those vulnerabilities. PMID:25364063

  12. Confronting Drowsy Driving: The American Academy of Sleep Medicine Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Morgenthaler, Timothy; Chervin, Ronald; Carden, Kelly; Kirsch, Douglas; Kristo, David; Malhotra, Raman; Martin, Jennifer; Ramar, Kannan; Rosen, Ilene; Weaver, Terri; Wise, Merrill

    2015-01-01

    Drowsy driving is a serious public health concern which is often difficult for individual drivers to identify. While it is important for drivers to understand the causes of drowsy driving, there is still insufficient scientific knowledge and public education to prevent drowsy driving. As a result, the AASM is calling upon institutions and policy makers to increase public awareness and improve education on the issue, so our society can better recognize and prevent drowsy driving. The AASM has adopted a position statement to educate both healthcare providers and the general public about drowsy driving risks and countermeasures. Citation: Watson NF, Morgenthaler T, Chervin R, Carden K, Kirsch D, Kristo D, Malhotra R, Martin J, Ramar K, Rosen I, Weaver T, Wise M. Confronting drowsy driving: the american academy of sleep medicine perspective. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1335–1336. PMID:26414989

  13. Confronting Therapeutic Failure: A Conversation Guide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We reflect on the impact of bad news on both clinician and patient in the setting of cancer treatment failure. We review the classic six-step SPIKES (setting, perception, invitation for information, knowledge, empathy, summarize and strategize) protocol for giving bad news that has been widely adopted since it was first published in this journal in 2005. The goal of such a conversation guide is to describe both the process and the tasks that constitute vital steps for clinicians and to comment on the emotional impact of the conversation on the clinician. Confronting therapeutic failure is the hardest task for oncologists. We offer practical tips derived from a thorough review of the evidence and our clinical experience. Implications for Practice: Discussing the failure of anticancer therapy remains a very difficult conversation for oncologists and their patients. In this article, the process of confronting this failure is broken down into various components, and practical tips are provided for clinicians following a classic protocol for breaking bad news. Also addressed are the emotions of the oncologist and the reasons why these conversations are typically so hard. These insights are based on solid research intended to deepen the therapeutic connection between physician and patient. PMID:26099747

  14. Auditory confrontation naming in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jason; Bakker, Arnold; Maroof, David Aaron

    2010-11-01

    Naming is a fundamental aspect of language and is virtually always assessed with visual confrontation tests. Tests of the ability to name objects by their characteristic sounds would be particularly useful in the assessment of visually impaired patients, and may be particularly sensitive in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We developed an auditory naming task, requiring the identification of the source of environmental sounds (i.e., animal calls, musical instruments, vehicles) and multiple-choice recognition of those not identified. In two separate studies mild-to-moderate AD patients performed more poorly than cognitively normal elderly on the auditory naming task. This task was also more difficult than two versions of a comparable visual naming task, and correlated more highly with Mini-Mental State Exam score. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, although ROC analysis revealed auditory naming to be slightly less successful than visual confrontation naming in discriminating AD patients from normal participants. Nonetheless, our auditory naming task may prove useful in research and clinical practice, especially with visually impaired patients. PMID:20981630

  15. Auto- and allo-confrontation as tools for reflective activities.

    PubMed

    Mollo, Vanina; Falzon, Pierre

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a methodology of assistance to reflective activity, based on confronting participants with the video recording of their own activity or that of others. A typology of the various forms of use of confrontation is proposed and illustrated from a study based on the construction of technical procedures. Two categories of results are highlighted. On the one hand, individual auto-confrontation (confronting participants with their own activity) reveals the cognitive processes underlying the activity. On the other hand, individual allo-confrontation (confronting participants with an activity they practice but which is performed by someone else, without the latter being present) allows participants to develop their knowledge by getting aware of other types of representations. PMID:15374760

  16. Confronting Therapeutic Failure: A Conversation Guide.

    PubMed

    Morgans, Alicia K; Schapira, Lidia

    2015-08-01

    We reflect on the impact of bad news on both clinician and patient in the setting of cancer treatment failure. We review the classic six-step SPIKES (setting, perception, invitation for information, knowledge, empathy, summarize and strategize) protocol for giving bad news that has been widely adopted since it was first published in this journal in 2005. The goal of such a conversation guide is to describe both the process and the tasks that constitute vital steps for clinicians and to comment on the emotional impact of the conversation on the clinician. Confronting therapeutic failure is the hardest task for oncologists. We offer practical tips derived from a thorough review of the evidence and our clinical experience. PMID:26099747

  17. Bridgman's concern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, R. A.

    1993-07-01

    In 1956 P.W. Bridgman published a letter to the editor in the Journal of Applied Physics reporting results of electrical resistance measurements on iron under static high pressure. The work was undertaken to verify the existence of a polymorphic phase transition at 130 kbar (13 GPa) reported in the same journal and year by the Los Alamos authors, Bancroft, Peterson and Minshall for high pressure, shock-compression loading. In his letter, Bridgman reported that he failed to find any evidence for the transition. Further, he raised some fundamental concerns as to the state of knowledge of shock-compression processes in solids. Later it was determined that Bridgman's static pressure scale was in error, and the shock observations became the basis for calibration of pressure values in static high pressure apparatuses. In spite of the error in pressure scales, Bridgman's concerns on descriptions of shock-compression processes were perceptive and have provided the basis for subsequent fundamental studies of shock-compressed solids. The present paper, written in response to receipt of the 1993 American Physical Society Shock-Compression Science Award, provides a brief contemporary assessment of those shock-compression issues which were the basis of Bridgman's 1956 concerns.

  18. Symbolic Confrontation with Women Survivors of Childhood Sexual Victimization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apolinsky, Sandra R.; Wilcoxon, S. Allen

    1991-01-01

    Investigated comparative effects of symbolic confrontation in affecting measures of self-concept and depression of 30 adult female survivors of childhood sexual abuse participating in a counseling group. The results seem to suggest that the technique of symbolic confrontation can be effective in ameliorating negative aftereffects of victimization…

  19. Confronting Violence through the Arts: A Thematic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Alice

    2005-01-01

    When art, music, and poetry are integrated into the art room, children can confront difficult themes in works of art and process information in highly personal ways (Jewitt & Kress, 2003). An arts classroom gives children the time and place to confront images of war and violence and decode the multiple levels of meaning (Arnold, 1997) found within…

  20. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting. PMID:27025116

  1. Confronting mortality: faith and meaning across cultures.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Steve; Kellehear, Allan; Kripal, Jeffrey J; Leary, Lani

    2014-11-01

    Despite advances in technology and medicine, death itself remains an immutable certainty. Indeed, the acceptance and understanding of our mortality are among the enduring metaphysical challenges that have confronted human beings from the beginning of time. How have we sought to cope with the inevitability of our mortality? How do various cultural and social representations of mortality shape and influence the way in which we understand and approach death? To what extent do personal beliefs and convictions about the meaning of life or the notion of an afterlife affect how we perceive and experience the process of death and dying? Steve Paulson, executive producer and host of To the Best of Our Knowledge, moderated a discussion on death, dying, and what lies beyond that included psychologist Lani Leary, professor of philosophy and religion Jeffrey J. Kripal, and sociologist Allan Kellehear. The following is an edited transcript of the discussion that occurred February 5, 7:00-8:30 pm, at the New York Academy of Sciences in New York City. PMID:25060040

  2. Composite inflation confronts BICEP2 and PLANCK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwan, Khamphee; Channuie, Phongpichit

    2014-06-01

    We examine observational constraints on single-field inflation in which the inflaton is a composite field stemming from a four-dimensional strongly interacting field theory. We confront the predictions with the Planck and very recent BICEP2 data. In the large non-minimal coupling regions, we discover for the minimal composite inflationary model that the predictions lie well inside the joint 68% CL for the Planck data, but is in tension with the recent BICEP2 observations. In the case of the glueball inflationary model, the predictions satisfy the Planck results. However, this model can produce a large tensor-to-scalar ratio consistent with the recent BICEP2 observations if the number of e-foldings is slightly smaller than the range commonly used. For a super Yang-Mills paradigm, we discover that the predictions satisfy the Planck data, and surprisingly a large tensor-to-scalar ratio consistent with the BICEP2 results can also be produced for an acceptable range of the number of e-foldings and of the confining scale. In the small non-minimal coupling regions, all of the models can satisfy the BICEP2 results. However, the predictions of the glueball and superglueball inflationary models cannot satisfy the observational bound on the amplitude of the curvature perturbation launched by Planck, and the techni-inflaton self-coupling in the minimal composite inflationary model is constrained to be extremely small.

  3. When Do We Confront? Perceptions of Costs and Benefits Predict Confronting Discrimination on Behalf of the Self and Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Jessica J.; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A.; Sanchez, Diana T.

    2012-01-01

    Across two studies, we tested whether perceived social costs and benefits of confrontation would similarly predict confronting discrimination both when it was experienced and when it was observed as directed at others. Female undergraduate participants were asked to recall past experiences and observations of sexism, as well as their confronting…

  4. Confronting Misinformation in Climate Change Higher Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Among the many challenges faced by climate change educators is the highly politicized nature of the subject matter (e.g. McCright and Dunlap, 2011) and the associated misinformation from key media outlets and websites (e.g. see Oreskes and Conway, 2010). Students typically do not enter the classroom as 'blank slates', but often have already formed some opinion about climate change which may or may not be based on reputable sources. Further, many students have lives outside the classroom and/or off campus, and even those who do live in an isolated bubble of campus life will eventually graduate. Thus, providing students with a level of climate change knowledge and understanding robust enough to cope with misinformation may be an important goal for educators. This paper presents a case study of the direct use of climate change misinformation as a college-level classroom activity. Some research from other fields (notably psychology) has found that directly addressing misconceptions in the classroom can be the most effective means of dispelling them (Kowalski and Taylor, 2009). However, directly confronting misinformation in the classroom carries inherent risks, such as reinforcing misconceptions (e.g. Cook and Lewandowsky, 2011). This paper therefore considers approaches to minimizing those risks while attempting to maximize the possible benefits. This paper argues that use of misinformation as a teaching tool can provide useful exercises in critical thinking, testing of content knowledge, and consideration of the nature of science. Cook, J. and S. Lewandowsky. 2011. The Debunking Handbook. Online publication available www.skepticalscience.com/docs/Debunking_Handbook.pdf. Accessed 7 July 2012. Kowalski, P. and A.K. Taylor. 2009. DOI: 10.1080/00986280902959986. McCright, A., and R.T. Dunlap. 2011. The politicization of climate change and polarization in the American public's views of global warming, 2001-2010. The Sociological Quarterly 52:2, 155-194. Oreskes, N. and E

  5. Corporate concern.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, S

    1997-01-01

    In India, it has become clear that HIV/AIDS prevention and control efforts must involve all segments of society. After a 1995 survey revealed that the Indian people lack accurate information about HIV/AIDS and that condom use was low, the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) began to incorporate HIV/AIDS prevention activities in its social development activities in the work place. CII's objectives are to 1) mobilize companies to implement nondiscriminatory policies towards infected employees; 2) sensitize companies on issues related to HIV/AIDS; 3) advocate shared social responsibility; 4) implement behavior change programs at the work place; and 5) provide quality clinical services including referrals, diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and provision of condoms. As a result, a STD/HIV/AIDS prevention campaign was initiated in 1996 at the 500-employee Saraswati Industrial Syndicate Company. The campaign involved 1) endorsement by management; 2) a participatory approach; 3) a situation analysis based on concern for individuals; and 4) an intervention implementation design that included sensitization, group sessions, activities to enhance awareness, promotion of behavior changes, provision of services, reinforcements, expansion, and STD management. The successful implementation of this program resulted from recognition of the root issues involved and has inspired other companies to implement similar programs using the CII Options for Action Module. PMID:12293670

  6. Confronting the Pedagogical Challenge of Cyber Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanewald, Ria

    2008-01-01

    Cyber violence and the antidote of cyber safety are fast becoming a global concern for governments, educational authorities, teachers, parents and children alike. Despite substantial funding for information dissemination on preventative strategies and the development of electronic responses to hinder perpetrators, the phenomenon of cyber violence…

  7. An Empirical Examination of Confrontation Efficacy I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John Joseph; Remer, Rory

    Because people are separate individuals, interpersonal conflict is inevitable. Social psychologists have studied this area by examining styles of conflict resolution such as negotiation/bargaining. Counseling psychologists have attempted to address these concerns through assertiveness and aspects of parenting training. However, no specific model…

  8. Confronting Endometriosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Endometriosis Confronting Endometriosis Summer 2016 Table of Contents left to right: ... condition. Would you share your personal history with endometriosis? My symptoms started with my first period when ...

  9. Confrontational scavenging as a possible source for language and cooperation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of language and the high degree of cooperation found among humans seems to require more than a straightforward enhancement of primate traits. Some triggering episode unique to human ancestors was likely necessary. Here it is argued that confrontational scavenging was such an episode. Arguments for and against an established confrontational scavenging niche are discussed, as well as the probable effects of such a niche on language and co-operation. Finally, several possible directions for future research are suggested. PMID:21933413

  10. The Egalitarian Optimist and the Confrontation of Prejudice

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Justin A.; Czopp, Alexander M.; Geers, Andrew L.

    2010-01-01

    Standing up against prejudice often requires one to surmount powerful inter- and intra-individual forces. Egalitarian standards alone are often insufficient to surmount these forces. As individuals high in dispositional optimism vigorously pursue valued goals, even when threatened with obstacles, we propose that the combination of high optimism and salient egalitarian goals predicts the confrontation of prejudice. In the present study, individuals high and low in both optimism and prejudice were randomly assigned to hear a racist joke followed by an argument, or to hear the same joke but without the argument. We found that low-prejudice optimists who had their chronic egalitarian values made salient by hearing the argument were highly likely to confront a later act of prejudice. Self-report data closely mirrored this behavioral finding. These findings support a self-regulatory approach to confrontation and suggest new avenues for combating prejudice. PMID:20336167

  11. Confronting scale in watershed development in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syme, Geoffrey J.; Reddy, V. Ratna; Pavelic, Paul; Croke, Barry; Ranjan, Ram

    2012-08-01

    The issue of scale is examined in the context of a watershed development policy (WSD) in India. WSD policy goals, by improving the natural resource base, aim to improve the livelihoods of rural communities through increased sustainable production. It has generally been practiced at a micro-level of less than 500 ha, as this was seen to be a scale that would encourage participative management. There has been some concern that this land area may be too small and may lead to less than optimal hydrological, economic and equity outcomes. As a result there has been a move to create guidelines for meso-scale WSD of above 5,000 ha in an endeavour to improve outcomes. A multidisciplinary team was assembled to evaluate the proposed meso-scale approach. In developing an adequate methodology for the evaluation it soon became clear that scale in itself was not the only determinant of success. The effect of geographical scale (or level) on WSD is determined by the variation in other drivers that will influence WSD success such as hydrological conditions, land use and available institutional structures. How this should be interpreted at different levels in the light of interactions between biophysical and socio-economic scales is discussed.

  12. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Neil F; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another - from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a 'lone wolf'; identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds. PMID:24322528

  13. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S.; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another - from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a `lone wolf' identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds.

  14. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil F.; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S.; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another – from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a ‘lone wolf'; identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds. PMID:24322528

  15. Our Common Concerns in the Field of Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flemming, Arthur S.

    This keynote address speaks to problems faced by the elderly, particularly in the areas of finances and social services. The public concerns over the viability of the social security system are briefly examined and confronted. The speaker, U.S. Commissioner on Aging, stresses the need for his peers to become acquainted with, and use, the many…

  16. Death Concerns among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Rebecca; Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited…

  17. "Peer Pressure" and the Group Process: Building Cultures of Concern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Thomas F.; Copas, Randall L.

    2010-01-01

    Peer group treatment has been subject to two main lines of criticism. Some suggest any program which aggregates antisocial youth inevitably fosters negative peer influence. Others are concerned that certain peer programs are based on coercive peer confrontation. Positive Peer Culture [PPC] is an antidote to both of these varieties of toxic group…

  18. School Transportation Issues, Laws and Concerns: Implications for Future Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durick, Jody M.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly all building administrators are confronted with a variety of transportation issues. Challenges, concerns and questions can arise from various aspects, including student misbehaviors, transportation laws and its implications at the school level, to importance and implementation of a school bus safety program. As new and upcoming future…

  19. Significant Issues Confronting Vocational Education: Implications for UCVE Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleel, Ibrahim Adamu

    A study identified significant issues currently confronting vocational education and described what role(s) the University Council for Vocational Education (UCVE) might pursue relative to each issue. To identify significant issues, a literature review, analysis, and consensus building were used. A Delphi method was used to build consensus on the…

  20. Taking versus Confronting Visual Perspectives in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moll, Henrike; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Merzsch, Katharina; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that 3-year-olds can take other people's visual perspectives not only when they perceive different things (Level 1) but even when they see the same thing differently (Level 2). One hypothesis is that 3-year-olds are good perspective takers but cannot confront different perspectives on the same object (Perner, Stummer,…

  1. How to Help Students Confront Life's "Big Questions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walvoord, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Many college students are interested in spirituality and the "big questions" about life's meaning and values, but many professors seem not to know how to respond to that interest. In this article, the author offers several strategies to help students confront the "big questions". One way is to structure assignments and discussions so that students…

  2. Leader Confrontation and Member Change in Encounter Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Charles

    1980-01-01

    The most effective group leaders are those perceived as highly energetic, supportive, and flexible in their style, who provide stimulation for the group and opportunity for emotional expression and closeness. This positive confronting style is contrasted with an intrusive-aggressive or challenging style. (Author/JMF)

  3. Identity Pole: Confronting Issues of Personal and Cultural Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciminero, Sandra Elser

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the "Identity Pole" was to explore the big idea of identity. Students would confront issues of personal and cultural meaning, and draw upon interdisciplinary connections for inspiration. The author chose to present totem poles of the Northwest Coast Native Americans/First Nations of Canada, as well as school, state and national…

  4. 28 CFR 552.23 - Confrontation avoidance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information about the inmate and the immediate situation. Based on their assessment of that information, they... knowledge they have gained about the inmate and the incident, determine if use of force is necessary. ... MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Use of Force and Application of Restraints on Inmates § 552.23 Confrontation...

  5. Anxieties of Group Leaders in Police-Community Confrontations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Walter E.; Hanson, Philip G.

    In a community confrontation program with police and community members, group leaders face many problems dissimilar from those found in group therapy. Dealing with authority (police) was difficult when the leader held a low self-esteem. Dealing with very vocal, rebellious community members presented difficulties in accepting their reports as truth…

  6. Liabilities of a physician confronted with child abuse.

    PubMed

    Vansweevelt, Thierry

    2013-06-01

    Several research questions raises when physicians are confronted with a possible case of child abuse. First, there is a problem of professional secrecy. In most European countries, physicians have the right to speak when confronted with a state of emergency. In other countries, physicians have a duty to speak and alert the police when the life or physical integrity of a person is at stake. A second topic to be discussed involves the possible liability of physicians who do not report child abuse. By not reporting a case of possible child abuse, the physician is respecting the family life of the parents, even though the child might continue to suffer damages. Third and essentially, I analyse the possible liability of physicians who do inform the prosecutor ofa suspected child abuse. Specific criteria are elaborated to establish negligence when physicians report child abuse to the prosecutor. PMID:23984493

  7. Confronting Violence, Improving Women's Lives Special Display Opens at NLM | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Confronting Violence, Improving Women's Lives Special Display Opens at NLM ... Medicine Division. Photo Courtesy of Lisa Helfert Confronting Violence, Improving Women's Lives is on display in the ...

  8. Female genital cutting: confronting cultural challenges and health complications across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Farage, Miranda A; Miller, Kenneth W; Tzeghai, Ghebre E; Azuka, Charles E; Sobel, Jack D; Ledger, William J

    2015-01-01

    Female genital cutting affects over 140 million women worldwide. Prevalent in certain countries of Africa and the Middle East, the practice continues among immigrants to industrialized countries. Female genital cutting is a deeply rooted tradition that confers honor on a woman and her family, yet also a traumatic experience that creates significant dermatological, gynecological, obstetric and infectious disease complications. Little is known about postmenopausal health in cut women. The international community views this practice as a human rights violation. In addition to genital health complications, the medical community must confront an understudied concern of what happens as this population ages. These challenges must be addressed to provide optimal care to women affected by female genital cutting. PMID:25581057

  9. The Oedipus complex: A confrontation at the central cross-roads of psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Hartke, Raul

    2016-06-01

    The theory of the Oedipus complex as Freud formulated it rests on the following pillars: the child's characteristic sexual and aggressive impulses concerning the parents, phallic monism, and the castration complex. This paper reviews the context in which Freud discovered the Oedipus complex, as well as Freud's theory. It then examines the proposals of later authors whose general Oedipal theories differ from Freud's in an attempt to point out both their possible correlations and confrontations with Freud. It includes Klein's pre-genital Oedipal theory, Lacan's structuralist reinterpretation, Bion's reconception of the complex under the knowledge vertex, Green's generalized triangulation theory, Meltzer's notions of the aesthetic object and sexual mental states, and Chasseguet-Smirgel's archaic Oedipal matrix. PMID:27437633

  10. Urban inclusion as wellbeing: Exploring children's accounts of confronting diversity on inner city streets.

    PubMed

    Witten, Karen; Kearns, Robin; Carroll, Penelope

    2015-05-01

    The diversity of people living in a city is often most visible on inner city streets. These streets are also the neighbourhood environment of children who live in the central city. In the past, the wellbeing and sensibilities of children have been marginalised in planning practices in western cities but this is beginning to change with child-friendly and inclusive city discourses now more common. In this paper we report on children's experiences confronting diversity in inner-city Auckland. In 2012, 40 inner-city children, 9-12 years, participated in walking interviews in their local streets and school-based focus group discussions. As the children talked about their lives, moving and playing around neighbourhood streets, many described distress and discomfort as they confronted homelessness, drunkenness, and signs of the sex industry. A few older children also described strategies for coping with these encounters, an emerging acceptance of difference and pride in becoming streetwise. New Zealand (NZ) has a history of progressive social policy. In 2003, it became the first country in the world to decriminalise all forms of prostitution. Securing the health and human rights of sex workers were the primary drivers of the reforms. Similar concerns for health and rights underpin broadly inclusive local policies towards homelessness. To promote the health and wellbeing of inner city children their presence on city streets, alongside those of other marginalised groups, needs to be at the forefront of planning concerns. However we conclude that there are inherent tensions in promoting a child-friendly city in which diversity and inclusiveness are also valued. PMID:25618307

  11. Robotic swarm concept for efficient oil spill confrontation.

    PubMed

    Kakalis, Nikolaos M P; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2008-06-15

    This paper examines the behaviour of a distributed system/robotic swarm concept for the effective confrontation of oil spills. The system described consists of a number of identical robotic units of high-power autonomy that recover oil mechanically and are able to communicate with each other. A mathematical model that accounts for a multitude of oil weathering processes and for the concerted action of the autonomous units is implemented for this investigation. Computational assessment of the robotic swarm in weathering oil spills indicates the potential effectiveness of the method. PMID:18077087

  12. Details of a confrontation between two wild wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    A confrontation was photographed and video-taped at close range between a wild alpha mate wolf (Canis lupus) of known history and an alien adult on Ellesmere Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. For 100-110 seconds the two stood near each other, maneuvered around, and snapped at each other until the alien fled. The alpha and his mate, who suddenly joined the encounter, chased the other wolf for 1.2 km and gave up without inflicting wounds. Discussed are possible reasons why this wolf was not killed, while other alien wolves have been.

  13. [The people's mentality confronting plague in the Ming Dynasty].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu

    2013-03-01

    The social influence of plague was not only confined to its pathogenicity, but also its close relationship with the people's mentality. According to the historical materials of the Ming Dynasty, there were 2 kinds of mentalities when confronting with the prevalence of plague: negative and positive. The former included fear, helplessness, depression and superstition etc., and the latter included intelligence, consolation, thanksgiving and vigour etc. The negative passive mentality didn't help to fight effectively against the plague, or might even aggravate its prevalence. However, the positive mentality helped ameliorate and control the plague, and also the rehabilitation of the order of production and living order after the plague. PMID:24135475

  14. The Lived Experience of Iranian Women Confronting Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabi, Esmat; Hajian, Sepideh; Simbar, Masoomeh; Hoshyari, Mohammad; Zayeri, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The populations who survive from breast cancer are growing; nevertheless, they mostly encounter with many cancer related problems in their life, especially after early diagnosis and have to deal with these problems. Except for the disease entity, several socio-cultural factors may affect confronting this challenge among patients and the way they deal with. Present study was carried out to prepare clear understanding of Iranian women's lived experiences confronting breast cancer diagnosis and coping ways they applied to deal with it. Methods: This study was carried out by using qualitative phenomenological design. Data gathering was done through purposive sampling using semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 18 women who survived from breast cancer. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using Van Manen’s thematic analysis approach. Results: Two main themes were emerged from the interviews including "emotional turbulence" and "threat control". The first, comprised three sub themes including uncertainty, perceived worries, and living with fears. The second included risk control, recurrence control, immediate seeking help, seeking support and resource to spirituality. Conclusion: Emotional response was the immediate reflection to cancer diagnosis. However, during post-treatment period a variety of emotions were not uncommon findings, patients' perceptions have been changing along the time and problem-focused coping strategies have replaced. Although women may experience a degree of improvement and adjustment with illness, the emotional problems are not necessarily resolved, they may continue and gradually engender positive outcomes. PMID:26989665

  15. The History of Science as a Tool To Identify and Confront Pseudoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Seth C.

    2007-06-01

    Many are concerned by the widespread popularity pseudoscience has achieved in modern society. While it is easy to dismiss such beliefs as belonging to the uneducated, numerous studies have shown that such beliefs are not significantly reduced by a university education. In fact, one study found that belief in astrology was largely unaffected by the completion of a U.S. science degree: students who commenced a degree program believing in astrology finished that program still believing in it. This illustrates the extent to which even a successful science education has failed to transform students’ intellectual outlook, and should raise sharp concern as to the deficiencies in our present science curriculum. Over the years various authors have given sound justification for the inclusion of a historical component in science programs. I would like to add to these arguments the fact that knowledge of science history allows one to more easily identify and confront pseudoscience and that rectifying the current deficiency of historical context in our science education may be an effective approach to change the way students view claims and ideas presented to them.

  16. Confronting Hip Resurfacing and Big Femoral Head Replacement Gait Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karampinas, Panagiotis K.; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S.; Vlamis, John; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Korres, Dimitrios S.

    2014-01-01

    Improved hip kinematics and bone preservation have been reported after resurfacing total hip replacement (THRS). On the other hand, hip kinematics with standard total hip replacement (THR) is optimized with large diameter femoral heads (BFH-THR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcomes of THRS and BFH-THR and correlate these results to bone preservation or the large femoral heads. Thirty-one patients were included in the study. Gait speed, postural balance, proprioception and overall performance. Our results demonstrated a non-statistically significant improvement in gait, postural balance and proprioception in the THRS confronting to BFH-THR group. THRS provide identical outcomes to traditional BFH-THR. The THRS choice as bone preserving procedure in younger patients is still to be evaluated. PMID:24744841

  17. Confronting as autonomy promotion: Speaking up against discrimination and psychological well-being in racial minorities.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Diana T; Himmelstein, Mary S; Young, Danielle M; Albuja, Analia F; Garcia, Julie A

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have considered confrontation in the context of coping with discriminatory experiences. These studies test for the first time whether confronting racial discrimination is associated with greater psychological well-being and physical health through the promotion of autonomy. In two separate samples of racial minorities who had experienced racial discrimination, confrontation was associated with greater psychological well-being, and this relationship was mediated by autonomy promotion. These findings did not extend to physical health symptoms. These studies provide preliminary evidence that confrontation may aid in the process of regaining autonomy after experiencing discrimination and therefore promote well-being. PMID:25694342

  18. Art as Social Concern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her eleventh- and twelfth-grade portfolio class used art as a social concern through a sketchbook and a linoleum print. Students thumbed through copies of the "New York Times" to find an article that described a modern-day social concern. Students were assigned to choose an article, summarize it, and come…

  19. Food Concerns. Research Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1998-01-01

    Adolescent vegetarianism is most frequent among females, and involves meat avoidance, concern for the environment and animal welfare, gender equality, weight loss behaviors, and a concern with body appearance. It can be a precursor to eating disorders. Training and ongoing follow-up are necessary to instill proper food handling procedures in…

  20. Aligning Actions at Work: How Managers Confront Problems of Employee Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, G. H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Explores how managers handle performance problems by isolating particular confrontive techniques recommended by managers. Addresses how these techniques enhance both alignment between managers and employees, and managerial control. Divides techniques into three categories: alternatives to confrontation, investigative actions, and fault finding.…

  1. Confronting the concordance model of cosmology with Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman

    2014-01-01

    We confront the concordance (standard) model of cosmology, the spatially flat ΛCDM Universe with power-law form of the primordial spectrum with Planck CMB angular power spectrum data searching for possible smooth deviations beyond the flexibility of the standard model. The departure from the concordance cosmology is modeled in the context of Crossing statistic and statistical significance of this deviation is used as a measure to test the consistency of the standard model to the Planck data. Derived Crossing functions suggest the presence of some broad features in angular spectrum beyond the expectations of the concordance model. Our results indicate that the concordance model of cosmology is consistent to the Planck data only at 2 to 3σ confidence level if we allow smooth deviations from the angular power spectrum given by the concordance model. This might be due to random fluctuations or may hint towards smooth features in the primordial spectrum or departure from another aspect of the standard model. Best fit Crossing functions indicate that there are lack of power in the data at both low-l and high-l with respect to the concordance model. This hints that we may need some modifications in the foreground modeling to resolve the significant inconsistency at high-l. However, presence of some systematics at high-l might be another reason for the deviation we found in our analysis.

  2. Confronting DGP braneworld gravity with cosmico observations after Planck data

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lixin

    2014-02-01

    The normal branch of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld gravity with brane tension is confronted by the currently available cosmic observations from the geometrical and dynamical perspectives. On the geometrical side, the type Ia supernova as standard candle, the baryon acoustic oscillation as standard ruler and the cosmic microwave background measurement from the first released 15.5 months data were used to fix the background evolutions. On the dynamical side, the redshift space distortion data will be used to determine the evolution of the matter perturbation. Through a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis, we found the dimensionless crossover scale Ω{sub r{sub c}} = 1/(4H{sup 2}{sub 0}r{sup 2}{sub c}) = 0.00183{sub −0.00183}{sup +0.000338} in a spatially flat normal branch of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld. This result suggests that the crossover scale r{sub c} should be around 12H{sup −1}{sub 0} which is consistent with the previous result r{sub c} > 3H{sup −1}{sub 0} and greater. It also implies that the five-dimensional gravity effect is weak to be observed in H{sup −1}{sub 0} scale.

  3. Confronting the concordance model of cosmology with Planck data

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2014-01-01

    We confront the concordance (standard) model of cosmology, the spatially flat ΛCDM Universe with power-law form of the primordial spectrum with Planck CMB angular power spectrum data searching for possible smooth deviations beyond the flexibility of the standard model. The departure from the concordance cosmology is modeled in the context of Crossing statistic and statistical significance of this deviation is used as a measure to test the consistency of the standard model to the Planck data. Derived Crossing functions suggest the presence of some broad features in angular spectrum beyond the expectations of the concordance model. Our results indicate that the concordance model of cosmology is consistent to the Planck data only at 2 to 3σ confidence level if we allow smooth deviations from the angular power spectrum given by the concordance model. This might be due to random fluctuations or may hint towards smooth features in the primordial spectrum or departure from another aspect of the standard model. Best fit Crossing functions indicate that there are lack of power in the data at both low-ℓ and high-ℓ with respect to the concordance model. This hints that we may need some modifications in the foreground modeling to resolve the significant inconsistency at high-ℓ. However, presence of some systematics at high-ℓ might be another reason for the deviation we found in our analysis.

  4. Confronting Uncertainty in Wildlife Management: Performance of Grizzly Bear Management

    PubMed Central

    Artelle, Kyle A.; Anderson, Sean C.; Cooper, Andrew B.; Paquet, Paul C.; Reynolds, John D.; Darimont, Chris T.

    2013-01-01

    Scientific management of wildlife requires confronting the complexities of natural and social systems. Uncertainty poses a central problem. Whereas the importance of considering uncertainty has been widely discussed, studies of the effects of unaddressed uncertainty on real management systems have been rare. We examined the effects of outcome uncertainty and components of biological uncertainty on hunt management performance, illustrated with grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in British Columbia, Canada. We found that both forms of uncertainty can have serious impacts on management performance. Outcome uncertainty alone – discrepancy between expected and realized mortality levels – led to excess mortality in 19% of cases (population-years) examined. Accounting for uncertainty around estimated biological parameters (i.e., biological uncertainty) revealed that excess mortality might have occurred in up to 70% of cases. We offer a general method for identifying targets for exploited species that incorporates uncertainty and maintains the probability of exceeding mortality limits below specified thresholds. Setting targets in our focal system using this method at thresholds of 25% and 5% probability of overmortality would require average target mortality reductions of 47% and 81%, respectively. Application of our transparent and generalizable framework to this or other systems could improve management performance in the presence of uncertainty. PMID:24223134

  5. Confronting uncertainty in wildlife management: performance of grizzly bear management.

    PubMed

    Artelle, Kyle A; Anderson, Sean C; Cooper, Andrew B; Paquet, Paul C; Reynolds, John D; Darimont, Chris T

    2013-01-01

    Scientific management of wildlife requires confronting the complexities of natural and social systems. Uncertainty poses a central problem. Whereas the importance of considering uncertainty has been widely discussed, studies of the effects of unaddressed uncertainty on real management systems have been rare. We examined the effects of outcome uncertainty and components of biological uncertainty on hunt management performance, illustrated with grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in British Columbia, Canada. We found that both forms of uncertainty can have serious impacts on management performance. Outcome uncertainty alone--discrepancy between expected and realized mortality levels--led to excess mortality in 19% of cases (population-years) examined. Accounting for uncertainty around estimated biological parameters (i.e., biological uncertainty) revealed that excess mortality might have occurred in up to 70% of cases. We offer a general method for identifying targets for exploited species that incorporates uncertainty and maintains the probability of exceeding mortality limits below specified thresholds. Setting targets in our focal system using this method at thresholds of 25% and 5% probability of overmortality would require average target mortality reductions of 47% and 81%, respectively. Application of our transparent and generalizable framework to this or other systems could improve management performance in the presence of uncertainty. PMID:24223134

  6. Confronting reality in strategic environmental assessment in Slovenia — Costs and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Kontić, Branko Dermol, Urška

    2015-01-15

    We enlarge on the viewpoint published in the Environmental Impact Assessment Review in 2012 — A viewpoint on the approval context of strategic environmental assessments. Additional alerts concerning the procedural ineffectiveness of the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process from the cost–benefit point of view are advanced. The major contribution to the long lasting, costly SEA processes, comes from ultraistic treatment of Natura 2000. The case study deals with a plan for constructing a traffic bypass around Škofljica, a town near Ljubljana. Based on their conclusions the authors propose that the following elements of the SEA procedure should be improved and optimised: –CBA for SEA should become a regular component when measuring its effectiveness. –Concretisation of expected SEA inputs to the plan should clarify its role at the earliest stage of the process. –SEA should contribute interactively to the optimisation of alternatives; cost–benefit analysis of the SEA process could support this process. –Nature protection interest should be confronted and balanced with wider development interests as formulated in the plan and should not be applied in absolute terms (e.g. Natura 2000). - Highlights: • SEA in Slovenia is ineffective and costly • SEA serves fundamentalism of nature protection through the Natura 2000 system • SEA does not support optimization and improvement of development projects.

  7. Confronting Safety Gaps across Labor and Delivery Teams

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, David G.; Lyndon, Audrey; Kennedy, Holly Powell; O’Keeffe, Dan; Zlatnik, Marya G.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of four safety concerns among labor and delivery teams: dangerous shortcuts, missing competencies, disrespect, and performance problems. 3282 participants completed surveys. 92% of physicians (906/985), 93% of midwives (385/414), and 98% of nurses (1846/1884) observed at least one concern within the preceding year. A majority of respondents said these concerns undermined patient safety, harmed patients, or led them to seriously consider transferring or leaving their positions. Only 9% of physicians, 13% of midwives, and 13% of nurses shared their full concerns with the person involved. Organizational silence is evident within labor and delivery teams. Improvement will require multiple strategies, employed at the personal, social, and structural levels. PMID:23871951

  8. Confronting safety gaps across labor and delivery teams.

    PubMed

    Maxfield, David G; Lyndon, Audrey; Kennedy, Holly Powell; O'Keeffe, Daniel F; Zlatnik, Marya G

    2013-11-01

    We assessed the occurrence of 4 safety concerns among labor and delivery teams: dangerous shortcuts, missing competencies, disrespect, and performance problems. A total of 3282 participants completed surveys, and 92% of physicians (906 of 985), 93% of midwives (385 of 414), and 98% of nurses (1846 of 1884) observed at least 1 concern within the preceding year. A majority of respondents said these concerns undermined patient safety, harmed patients, or led them to seriously consider transferring or leaving their positions. Only 9% of physicians, 13% of midwives, and 13% of nurses shared their full concerns with the person involved. Organizational silence is evident within labor-and-delivery teams. Improvement will require multiple strategies, used at the personal, social, and structural levels. PMID:23871951

  9. Confronting Models with Data: The GEWEX Cloud Systems Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David; Curry, Judith; Duynkerke, Peter; Krueger, Steven; Moncrieff, Mitchell; Ryan, Brian; Starr, David OC.; Miller, Martin; Rossow, William; Tselioudis, George

    2002-01-01

    The GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS; GEWEX is the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) was organized to promote development of improved parameterizations of cloud systems for use in climate and numerical weather prediction models, with an emphasis on the climate applications. The strategy of GCSS is to use two distinct kinds of models to analyze and understand observations of the behavior of several different types of clouds systems. Cloud-system-resolving models (CSRMs) have high enough spatial and temporal resolutions to represent individual cloud elements, but cover a wide enough range of space and time scales to permit statistical analysis of simulated cloud systems. Results from CSRMs are compared with detailed observations, representing specific cases based on field experiments, and also with statistical composites obtained from satellite and meteorological analyses. Single-column models (SCMs) are the surgically extracted column physics of atmospheric general circulation models. SCMs are used to test cloud parameterizations in an un-coupled mode, by comparison with field data and statistical composites. In the original GCSS strategy, data is collected in various field programs and provided to the CSRM Community, which uses the data to "certify" the CSRMs as reliable tools for the simulation of particular cloud regimes, and then uses the CSRMs to develop parameterizations, which are provided to the GCM Community. We report here the results of a re-thinking of the scientific strategy of GCSS, which takes into account the practical issues that arise in confronting models with data. The main elements of the proposed new strategy are a more active role for the large-scale modeling community, and an explicit recognition of the importance of data integration.

  10. Scalar doublet models confront τ and b anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, James M.

    2016-04-01

    There are indications of a possible breakdown of the standard model, suggesting that τ lepton interactions violate flavor universality, particularly through B meson decays. BABAR, Belle, and LHCb report high ratios of B →D(*)τ ν . There are long-standing excesses in B →τ ν and W →τ ν decays and a deficit in inclusive τ to strange decays. We investigate whether two Higgs doublet models with the most general allowed couplings to quarks, and a large coupling to τ leptons, can explain these anomalies while respecting other flavor constraints and technical naturalness. Fits to B →D(*)τ ν data require couplings of the new Higgs doublet to down-type quarks, opening the door to many highly constrained flavor-changing neutral current processes. We confront these challenges by introducing a novel ansatz that relates the new up- and down-type Yukawa couplings, and demonstrate viable values of the couplings that are free from fine-tuning. LEP and LHC searches for new Higgs bosons decaying via H0→τ+τ- and H±→τ±ν allow a window of masses mH=[100 - 125 ] GeV and m±˜100 GeV that is consistent with the predictions of our model. Contamination of the W+→τ+ν signal by H+→τ+ν decays at LEP could explain the apparent W →τ ν excess. We predict that the branching ratio for Bs→τ+τ- is not far below its current limit of several percent. An alternative model with decays of B →D(*)τ νs to a sterile neutrino is also argued to be viable.

  11. The experience of living with fibromyalgia: confronting an invisible disability.

    PubMed

    Sturge-Jacobs, Marilyn

    2002-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex, chronic, painful musculoskeletal syndrome which is characterized by extreme fatigue, disordered sleep, and other associated physical and cognitive problems. Because its etiology is unknown, and because no specific pathophysiological mechanisms have been found to underlie the syndrome, making a diagnosis is very difficult. FM adversely affects the quality of life, and the societal costs based on medical expenses, lost wages, lost tax revenue and compensation expenditures are very significant. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe and enhance the understanding of the experience of living with FM. The participants included nine women ranging in age from 30 years to 56 years who had been diagnosed with the condition for more than a year. Data were collected by means of unstructured interviews. Thematic analysis, using van Manen's (1990) methodology, identified eight themes: (a) pain-the constant presence, (b) fatigue-the invisible foe, (c) sleep-the impossible dream, (d) thinking of a frog (e) dealing with a flare-up, (f) longing for a normal life, (g) the power of naming-seeking a diagnosis, and (h) living within the boundaries. These themes were integral parts of the whole story, and through their interrelationships, the essence confronting an invisible disability was captured. The findings of this qualitative study have implications for nursing practice, education and research. It has become an increasing challenge for our health care system to adequately cope with the large numbers of persons diagnosed with chronic illnesses. Administrators of these systems can benefit from the information learned during this study. PMID:12371466

  12. US IRBs confronting research in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Klitzman, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, US-sponsored research is carried out in developing countries, but how US Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) approach the challenges they then face is unclear. METHODS I conducted in-depth interviews of 2 hours each, with 46 IRB chairs, directors, administrators and members. I contacted the leadership of 60 IRBs in the United States (US) (every fourth one in the list of the top 240 institutions by National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding), and interviewed IRB leaders from 34 (55%). RESULTS US IRBs face ethical and logistical challenges in interpreting and applying principles and regulations in developing countries, given economic and health disparities, and limited contextual knowledge. These IRBs perceive wide variations in developing world IRBs/RECs’ quality, resources and training; and health systems in some countries may have long-standing practices of corruption. These IRBs often know little of local contexts, regulations and standards of care, and struggle with understandings of other cultures’ differing views of autonomy, and risks and benefits of daily life. US IRBs thus face difficult decisions, including how to interpret principles, how much to pay subjects and how much sustainability to require from researchers. IRB responses and solutions include trying to maintain higher standards for developing world research, obtain cultural expertise, build IRB infrastructure abroad, communicate with foreign IRBs, ‘negotiate’ for maximum benefits for participants and fearing ‘worst-case scenarios’. CONCLUSIONS US IRBs confront a series of tensions and dilemmas in reviewing developing world research. These data have important implications for increased education of IRBs/RECs and researchers in the US and abroad, and for research and practice. PMID:22515423

  13. Confrontation Naming and Reading Abilities at Primary School: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Savelli, Enrico; Termine, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Background. Confrontation naming tasks are useful in the assessment of children with learning and language disorders. Objectives. The aims of this study were (1) providing longitudinal data on confrontation naming; (2) investigating the role of socioeconomic status (SES), intelligence, age, and gender in confrontation naming; (3) identifying relationship between confrontation naming and reading abilities (fluency, accuracy, and comprehension). Method. A five-year longitudinal investigation of confrontation naming (i.e., the Boston Naming Test (BNT)) in a nonclinical sample of Italian primary school children was conducted (n = 126), testing them at the end of each school year, to assess nonverbal intelligence, confrontation naming, and reading abilities. Results. Performance on the BNT emerged as a function of IQ and SES. Significant correlations between confrontation naming and reading abilities, especially comprehension, were found; BNT scores correlated better with reading fluency than with reading accuracy. Conclusions. The longitudinal data obtained in this study are discussed with regard to reading abilities, intelligence, age, gender, and socioeconomic status. PMID:26124541

  14. Confronting AIDS. Directions for Public Health, Health Care, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    This book is addressed to anyone involved with or affected by the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, including legislators, researchers, health care personnel, insurance providers, educators, health officials, executives in the pharmaceutical industry, blood bank administrators, and other concerned individuals. The following…

  15. The Heat is On! Confronting Climate Change in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, R.; Atwood-Blaine, D.

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses a professional development workshop for K-12 science teachers entitled "The Heat is On! Confronting Climate Change in the Classroom." This workshop was conducted by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), which has the primary goal to understand and predict the role of polar ice sheets in sea level change. The specific objectives of this summer workshop were two-fold; first, to address the need for advancement in science technology engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and second, to address the need for science teacher training in climate change science. Twenty-eight Kansas teachers completed four pre-workshop assignments online in Moodle and attended a one-week workshop. The workshop included lecture presentations by scientists (both face-to-face and via video-conference) and collaboration between teachers and scientists to create online inquiry-based lessons on the water budget, remote sensing, climate data, and glacial modeling. Follow-up opportunities are communicated via the CReSIS Teachers listserv to maintain and further develop the collegial connections and collaborations established during the workshop. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluation results indicate that this workshop was particularly effective in the following four areas: 1) creating meaningful connections between K-12 teachers and CReSIS scientists; 2) integrating distance-learning technologies to facilitate the social construction of knowledge; 3) increasing teachers' content understanding of climate change and its impacts on the cryosphere and global sea level; and 4) increasing teachers' self-efficacy beliefs about teaching climate science. Evaluation methods included formative content understanding assessments (via "clickers") during each scientist's presentation, a qualitative evaluation survey administered at the end of the workshop, and two quantitative evaluation instruments administered pre- and post- workshop. The first of these

  16. [Adolescent confronting cancer and its place in the family].

    PubMed

    Chavand, Aurélie; Grandjean, Hélène; Vignes, Michel

    2007-04-01

    Adolescent medicine is expanding in Europe with particular attention being given to cancer of adolescents and its treatment. At a time where specialised units for adolescents are being born, it is essential to collect the current knowledge on the pathological impact of the illness in this age period whose limits themselves are often blurred (13-21 years or 15-25 years). Adolescence is a transition between childhood and adulthood, during which one seeks psychological and emotional development. Cancer, by its direct repercussion on the adolescent and also by the disorganisation of the family, can involve risks impending the process of maturation and can also be a purveyor of psychological after-affects. The occurrence of the illness can isolate the adolescent and leak to a restriction of the psychological investment. The reality of possible death can hinder the ill adolescent from developing his natural opposition to the adults who represent authority such as parents or nurses, thereby hindering access to autonomy, independence and identity construction. One can find oneself locked in a state of trouble, confusion, becoming a stranger to oneself, with an impression of distance waxing between the young patient and others. The parents find themselves weakening and must make calls on their supporters. The siblings see their daily life becoming more unsettled and find themselves confronted by parents less available and reassuring. The impact on the brothers and sisters vary depending on their age and the capacity of the parent's adaptation. From the onset, adolescents struck by cancer necessitate an adaptation of the medical staff. The medical information, the treatment and the aid-care contracts must be approved by the adolescent himself but the parent's involvement remains essential. It is necessary to create an alliance of three. Conflicts and rivalry occur frequently between parents and the medical staff. One must study the possibility of creating a place adapted to

  17. Top Concerns for 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sandra L.; Meyerson, Joel W.

    1992-01-01

    An annual national survey of college and university trustees indicates five top social, political, and economic areas of concern for higher education: public opinion about higher education; demographic trends; implications of family income and savings rate; effects of recession and unemployment; and the direction of national education policy. (MSE)

  18. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  19. The Concerned Observer Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiger, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom experiment--the "concerned observer" experiment--for production students that dramatizes basic film language by relating it to several levels of human observation. Details the experiment's three levels, and concludes that film language mimics wide-ranging states of human emotion and ideological persuasion. (PRA)

  20. Expression of Concern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, Damien

    2016-08-01

    This is a note of a temporary expression of concern related to the publication titled, "Sapphirine and fluid inclusions in Tel Thanoun mantle xenoliths, Syria" by Ahmad Bilal, which appeared in Journal of African Earth Sciences, 116 (2016) 105-113.

  1. Disease concerns in energycane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseases may be a limiting factor in the production of energycane, a perennial crop, by reducing annual yields and reducing the longevity of the crop cycle. Disease concerns also include the potential that a compatible pathogen could spread between energycane and sugarcane, sorghum, or corn. Widespr...

  2. Widening Privacy Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amidon, Paige

    1992-01-01

    Discusses privacy concerns relating to electronic information media. European privacy initiatives from the European Community are described, including personal data protection, impact on the online industry, and telecommunications privacy; and activities in the United States are examined, including telephone caller privacy, electronic mail…

  3. Quebec's Toxic Pollution Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    The best solution to the problems of increased pollution of Quebec lakes and rivers with toxic wastes and increased incidence of pollution related diseases is to educate children, to make them aware of the environment and man's interrelationship with it. Attitudes of concern, based on knowledge, must be developed so that as adults, they will take…

  4. Food allergy: current concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, J.H.

    1981-05-01

    This commentary focuses on the author's concerns with various aspects of food allergy. Strict criteria should be applied to the definition of food allergy and its diagnostic techniques. Industrial inhalational exposures, food contaminations and cross-sensitization all are important influences which demand studious attention.

  5. The Avoidance of the Ontological Confrontation of Death: A Psychometric Research Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thauberger, Patrick C.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Reports structural properties of the Thauberger Avoidance of the Ontological Confrontation of Death Scale with respect to social desirability as well as results of an analysis focusing on the hypothesized relationship of this construct to neuroticism. (Author)

  6. Self-confrontation Reviewed: A Conceptualization for Video Playback in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Frances F.; Manning, Brad A.

    1973-01-01

    A discussion is presented of whether teacher education video playback practices can be informed by the experimental and theoretical literature on confrontation, particularly the literature outside teacher education. (Author/KM)

  7. Bridgman`s concern

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.A.

    1993-09-01

    In 1956 P.W. Bridgman published a letter to the editor in the Journal of Applied Physics reporting results of electrical resistance measurements on iron under static high pressure. The work was undertaken to verify the existence of a polymorphic phase transition at 130 kbar (13 GPa) reported in the same journal and year by the Los Alamos authors, Bancroft, Peterson and Minshall for high pressure, shock-compression loading. In his letter, Bridgman reported that he failed to find any evidence for the transition. Further, he raised some fundamental concerns as to the state of knowledge of shock-compression processes in solids. Later it was determined that Bridgman`s static pressure scale was in error, and the shock observations became the basis for calibration of pressure values in static high pressure apparatuses. In spite of the error in pressure scales, Bridgman`s concerns on descriptions of shock-compression processes were perceptive and have provided the basis for subsequent fundamental studies of shock-compressed solids. The present paper, written in response to receipt of the 1993 American Physical Society Shock-Compression Science Award, provides a brief contemporary assessment of those shock-compression issues which were the basis of Bridgman`s 1956 concerns.

  8. Confronting the barriers to chronic care management in Medicare.

    PubMed

    Berenson, Robert A; Horvath, Jane

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of the current Medicare program--both traditional fee-for-service and risk-based contracting--to address the needs of beneficiaries with chronic conditions, who represent almost 80 percent of program enrollment. Grounded in indemnity insurance principles, including concerns about "moral hazard," the traditional Medicare program faces difficulty evolving to support of a chronic care model of health care practice. Although capitation may be the most desirable platform to support provision of care to beneficiaries with chronic conditions, the current structural limitations and problems faced in the Medicare+Choice program limit capitation's use at this time. PMID:14527234

  9. Energy decisions reframed as justice and ethical concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Heffron, Raphael J.; McCauley, Darren; Goldthau, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    All too often, energy policy and technology discussions are limited to the domains of engineering and economics. Many energy consumers, and even analysts and policymakers, confront and frame energy and climate risks in a moral vacuum, rarely incorporating broader social justice concerns. Here, to remedy this gap, we investigate how concepts from justice and ethics can inform energy decision-making by reframing five energy problems — nuclear waste, involuntary resettlement, energy pollution, energy poverty and climate change — as pressing justice concerns. We conclude by proposing an energy justice framework centred on availability, affordability, due process, transparency and accountability, sustainability, equity and responsibility, which highlights the futurity, fairness and equity dimensions of energy production and use.

  10. Genetics and attribution issues that confront the microbial forensics field.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce

    2004-12-01

    The commission of an act of bioterrorism or biocrime is a real concern for law enforcement and society. Efforts are underway to develop a strong microbial forensic program to assist in identifying perpetrators of acts of bioterrorism and biocrimes, as well as serve as a deterrent for those who might commit such illicit acts. Genetic analyses of microbial organisms will likely be a powerful tool for attribution of criminal acts. There are some similarities to forensic human DNA analysis practices, such as: molecular biology technology, use of population databases, qualitative conclusions of test results, and the application of QA/QC practices. Differences include: database size and composition, statistical interpretation methods, and confidence/uncertainty in the outcome of an interpretation. PMID:15639572

  11. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set. PMID:25368428

  12. Ethics of environmental concern

    SciTech Connect

    Attfield, R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of ideas and a philosophical investigation into normative ethics and some of its applications focus in this book on environmental concerns. Part one explores moral traditions, which may appear deficient because traditions have been misrepresented. Attitudes and ideas toward ecological problems have a basis in Jewish and Christian stewardship traditions. Part two re-examines moral principles in light of scientific discoveries that have generated and revealed new side effects of human actions on the complex systems of nature. If all worthwhile life is of intrinsic value, it is necessary to reassess and broaden the human obligation to ecology. The author disagrees with the movement to focus environmental ethics on the biosphere as an organic whole rather than on fellow creatures, although his principles embody constraints in the interests of future creaters. The book concludes with an assessment of principles on pollution, resources, population, and preservation. 302 references.

  13. Individual and Situational Factors Related to Young Women's Likelihood of Confronting Sexism in Their Everyday Lives.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Melanie M; Friedman, Carly K; Leaper, Campbell

    2009-10-01

    Factors related to young women's reported likelihood of confronting sexism were investigated. Participants were 338 U.S. female undergraduates (M = 19 years) attending a California university. They were asked to complete questionnaire measures and to write a personal narrative about an experience with sexism. Approximately half (46%) the women reported confronting the perpetrator. Individual factors (prior experience with sexism, feminist identification, collective action) and situational factors (familiarity and status of perpetrator, type of sexism) were tested as predictors in a logistic regression. Women were less likely to report confronting sexism if (1) they did not identify as feminists, (2) the perpetrator was unfamiliar or high-status/familiar (vs. familiar/equal-status), or (3) the type of sexism involved unwanted sexual attention (vs. sexist comments). PMID:19784381

  14. USA-France: Confronting two perspectives on shale gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, C.; Fellous, J.

    2013-12-01

    Exploiting shale gas and oil can be seen from very different perspectives, whether you live in the US where it is a decade long reality shaping the country's energy landscape or in France, where it is banned by law since 2011. Beyond this situation, the overall legal framework that regulates (or not) environmental and water protection, the use of chemicals, land ownership and the exploitation of underground mineral resources, the attribution of licenses for exploration and exploitation, etc. in Europe (and particularly in France, the only European country with Bulgaria where hydraulic fracturation is strictly forbidden) and in the US is at complete variance. This presentation will discuss subsequent attitudes vis-à-vis exploration, exploitation, scientific research on shale gas and fracking, and public activism that has arisen as a result of environmental, socioeconomic and human concerns. It will compare and contrast the different views and look at lessons that can be learned from those differences. This work is building upon the experience of the authors who have studied the issues relating to energy, water, population and climate and their connections, as seen from both sides of the Atlantic.

  15. Confronting an influenza pandemic: ethical and scientific issues.

    PubMed

    Schuklenk, U; Gartland, K M A

    2006-12-01

    The prolonged concern over the potential for a global influenza pandemic to cause perhaps many millions of fatalities is a chilling one. After the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) scares [1], attention has turned towards the possibility of an avian influenza virus hybridizing with a human influenza virus to create a highly virulent, as yet unknown, killer, on a scale unseen since the Spanish flu outbreak of 1918, which produced more fatalities than the Great War. In deciding how countries should react to this potential pandemic, individually and collectively, a reasonable and practical balance must be struck between the rights and obligations of individual citizens and protection of the wider community and, indeed, society as a whole. In this communication, ethical issues are discussed in the context of some of the scientific questions relating to a potential influenza pandemic. Among these issues are the rights and obligations of healthcare professionals, difficulties surrounding resource allocation, policies that have an impact on liberty and trade, when and how to introduce any vaccine or other form of mass treatment, global governance questions and the role of health policies in contemporary society. By considering these issues and questions in advance of an influenza, or indeed any other, pandemic commencing, countries can be better prepared to deal with the inevitably difficult decisions required during such events, rather than dusting down outdated previous plans, or making and implementing policy in an ad hoc manner with a resultant higher risk of adverse consequences. PMID:17073773

  16. Confronting moral pluralism in posttraditional Western societies: bioethics critically reassessed.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, H Tristram

    2011-06-01

    In the face of the moral pluralism that results from the death of God and the abandonment of a God's eye perspective in secular philosophy, bioethics arose in a context that renders it essentially incapable of giving answers to substantive moral questions, such as concerning the permissibility of abortion, human embryonic stem cell research, euthanasia, etc. Indeed, it is only when bioethics understands its own limitations and those of secular moral philosophy in general can it better appreciate those tasks that it can actually usefully perform in both the clinical and academic setting. It is the task of this paper to understand and reevaluate bioethics by understanding these limits. Academic bioethicists can analyze ideas, concepts, and claims necessary to understanding the moral questions raised in health care, assessing the arguments related to these issues, and provide an understanding of the different moral perspectives on bioethical issues. In the clinical setting, bioethicists can provide legal advice, serve as experts on IRBs, mediating disputes, facilitating decision-making and risk management, and clarifying normative issues. However, understanding this is only possible when one understands the history, genesis, and foundations of bioethics and its inability to provide a resolution to postmodern moral pluralism. PMID:21724971

  17. Anesthetic Concerns of Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William T.

    1999-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are acutely aware of the fact that, although a given surgical procedure may be relatively simple, the required anesthetic care is, in certain cases, extremely complex. This principle is particularly evident when one ponders the difficulties involved in providing even basic anesthetic care in microgravity. In this issue some of these difficulties through the evaluation of airway management techniques during water immersion are confronted, a simulation of the gravito-inertial conditions of space flight. As prelude for this paper, I would like to outline some of the challenges to be overcome before surgical, anesthetic, and critical care can be delivered beyond our home planet.

  18. Accuracy of 25-hydroxyvitamin D assays: confronting the issues.

    PubMed

    Carter, Graham D

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) is widely used for assessing vitamin D status. There has been a dramatic increase in 25-OHD requests over recent years prompting many laboratories to consider the use of automated immunoassays. To achieve higher throughput, these methods have abandoned the traditional solvent extraction of samples and are therefore more prone to non-specific interference. The Vitamin D External Quality Assessment Scheme (DEQAS) has revealed method-related differences in 25-OHD results, raising concerns about the comparability and accuracy of different assays. This paper highlights some of the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical issues which may influence the accuracy of 25-OHD assays and interpretation of results. Recent attention has focused on reconciling the relatively high results given by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to those of the DiaSorin radioimmunoassay (RIA) on which clinical decision points have previously been based. Data is presented on 20 DEQAS samples which were analysed by an LC-MS/MS assay developed as a candidate reference measurement procedure by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The NIST results were on average 11.2% lower than those given by routine LC-MS/MS methods. If confirmed, these results suggest that most routine LC-MS/MS assays are perhaps overestimating 25-OHD by failing to resolve a molecule having the same mass as 25-OHD(3) and a similar fragmentation pattern. All 25-OHD assays should be monitored by a proficiency testing scheme and the results made available to clinicians and editors of scientific journals. PMID:20795940

  19. States, Congress confront abortion services under Medicaid, health care plan.

    PubMed

    1994-01-13

    Abortion coverage under various health care reform proposals has dominated the political reproductive rights debate, while poor women's access to abortion under Medicaid presents a current practical concern. Under the Clinton administration's proposed Health Security Act, abortion would be covered under "services for pregnant women," and Medicaid would eventually be incorporated into the national health plan. A final version is a long way off. For now, the Hyde amendment, limiting Medicaid coverage of abortion, controls the issue. Congress has made only negligible progress in freeing federal funds for Medicaid abortions: only in situations of life endangerment, rape, or incest. States are required to cover abortions that are medically necessary under the new guidelines, which now include pregnancy arising from rape and incest. The federal policy defers to state law on the definition of rape and incest, allowing for reasonable reporting or documentation requirements, while disallowing unduly burdensome regulations by allowing the treating physician reimbursement when the physician certifies that the patient was unable for physical or psychological reasons to comply with the requirement. States disagreeing with the new abortion policy immediately registered their opposition. Utah's health department, which has a "life only" law, has pledged not to implement the new federal policy until there is further clarification. The Health Care Financing Administrator responded by writing that "the decision to implement this policy nationwide was not discretionary." Congress chose not to add statutory language deferring to the states, and under U.S. Constitutional law, where state law or policy conflicts with federal law, federal law takes precedence. The next battle will certainly center on attempts to amend the Hyde amendment itself as well as health care legislation along the "states' option" lines. PMID:12345518

  20. Biosimilars: Hope and concern.

    PubMed

    Emmanouilides, Christos E; Karampola, Maria I; Beredima, Maria

    2016-08-01

    As patents of the first introduced biologic therapeutics in oncology have begun to expire, competing pharmaceutical companies are allowed to produce and market the same protein as the original agent. These products are called biosimilars. Upon patent expiration, biosimilars would hopefully be a cheaper alternative to the original agent and that is the main reason for their existence. Although the financial aspect is similar to generics, the complex nature of these products generates the need for a distinct regulatory environment. Biosimilars are produced by DNA technology in bacteria, plant cells, or animal cells, while generics are produced by chemical synthesis. Details in the process of synthesis, selection of the microorganism, protein extraction, purification and manufacturing, affect the precise nature of the end product. Monoclonal antibodies are large proteins with four polypeptide chains and interact variably with each other and with the environment. It is important for payors to realize that biosimilars are different from generics; therefore, they need to develop different set of rules for approving, registering, and dispensing biosimilars. Regulators ought to respect the physicians' request for non-interchangeability and facilitate in any possible way of traceability. Such regulations along with a rigorous pharmacovigilance program will satisfy the concerns for true equivalence in activity and long-term safety. This is the only way to accumulate over time reliable safety information for new biosimilars. In conclusion, the wish born by the medical community and the society for a more affordable health system triggers the emergence of biosimilars, which could meet that goal if properly regulated. PMID:26391898

  1. Adolescent fertility: worldwide concerns.

    PubMed

    Senderowitz, J; Paxman, J M

    1985-04-01

    There is growing concern over the adverse health, social, economic, and demographic effects of adolescent fertility. Morbidity and mortality rates ar significantly higher for teenage mothers and their infants, and early initiation of childbearing generally means truncated education, lower future family income, and larger completed family size. Adolescent fertility rates, which largely reflect marriage patterns, range from 4/1000 in Mauritania; in sub-Saharan Africa, virtually all rates are over 100. In most countries, adolescent fertility rates are declining due to rising age at marriage, increased educational and economic opportunities for young women, changes in social customs, increased use of contraception, and access to abortion. However, even if fertility rates were to decline dramatically among adolescent women in developing countries, their sheer numbers imply that their fertility will have a major impact on world population growth in the years ahead. The number of women in the world ages 15-19 years is expected to increase from 245 million in 1985 to over 320 million in the years 2020; 82% of these women live in developing countries. As a result of more and earlier premarital sexual activity, fostered by the lengthening gap between puberty and marriage, diminished parental and social controls, and increasing peer and media pressure to be sexually active, abortion and out-of-wedlock childbearing are increasing among teenagers in many developed and rapidly urbanizing developing countries. Laws and policies regarding sex education in the schools and access to family planning services by adolescents can either inhibit or support efforts to reduce adolescent fertility. Since contraceptive use is often sporadic and ineffective among adolescents, family planning services are crucial. Such programs should aim to reduce adolescents' dependence on abortion through preventive measures and increase awareness of the benefits of delayed sexual activity. Similarly, sex

  2. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  3. Confronting water in an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David; Trottier, Julie

    2010-03-01

    SummaryTrans-boundary water agreements are usually conceived as allocation agreements. In other words, water is treated as if it were a pie to be divided among the riparian states. The treatment of water as if it were as immobile as land may be useful in the short term, but it is fundamentally flawed as a means to avoid conflict as well as to ensure efficient, equitable, and sustainable management of water over the long term. This article proposes to avoid quantitative allocations within international water agreements, whether they be presented as percentage or fixed allocations or whether or not accompanied by a periodic revision clause. It proposes instead an ongoing joint management structure that allows for continuous conflict resolution concerning water demands and uses in a manner that effectively de-nationalises water uses. As well, it builds on existing, functioning institutions that are already active over a variety of scalar levels. It disaggregates what is usually perceived as a national water demand into its component institutions and re-aggregates them within an international institutional context. Though this approach for building trans-boundary water agreements can prove useful in any geographical situation, this article uses the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a model. It proposes to respect the existing differences in the institutional management of water between the two entities and to reach four general objectives: economic efficiency, social and political equity, ecological sustainability, and the ability to implement the agreement in practice. The institutional design and proposed mechanisms follow five key principles for shared management: water allocations that are not fixed but variable over time; equality in rights and responsibilities; priority for demand management over supply management; continuous monitoring of water quality and quantity; and mediation among competing uses of fresh water. This institutional structure balances water

  4. Confronting dynamics and uncertainty in optimal decision making for conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Byron K.; Johnson, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of conservation efforts ultimately depends on the recognition that decision making, and the systems that it is designed to affect, are inherently dynamic and characterized by multiple sources of uncertainty. To cope with these challenges, conservation planners are increasingly turning to the tools of decision analysis, especially dynamic optimization methods. Here we provide a general framework for optimal, dynamic conservation and then explore its capacity for coping with various sources and degrees of uncertainty. In broadest terms, the dynamic optimization problem in conservation is choosing among a set of decision options at periodic intervals so as to maximize some conservation objective over the planning horizon. Planners must account for immediate objective returns, as well as the effect of current decisions on future resource conditions and, thus, on future decisions. Undermining the effectiveness of such a planning process are uncertainties concerning extant resource conditions (partial observability), the immediate consequences of decision choices (partial controllability), the outcomes of uncontrolled, environmental drivers (environmental variation), and the processes structuring resource dynamics (structural uncertainty). Where outcomes from these sources of uncertainty can be described in terms of probability distributions, a focus on maximizing the expected objective return, while taking state-specific actions, is an effective mechanism for coping with uncertainty. When such probability distributions are unavailable or deemed unreliable, a focus on maximizing robustness is likely to be the preferred approach. Here the idea is to choose an action (or state-dependent policy) that achieves at least some minimum level of performance regardless of the (uncertain) outcomes. We provide some examples of how the dynamic optimization problem can be framed for problems involving management of habitat for an imperiled species, conservation of a

  5. Confronting dynamics and uncertainty in optimal decision making for conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Byron K.; Johnson, Fred A.

    2013-06-01

    The effectiveness of conservation efforts ultimately depends on the recognition that decision making, and the systems that it is designed to affect, are inherently dynamic and characterized by multiple sources of uncertainty. To cope with these challenges, conservation planners are increasingly turning to the tools of decision analysis, especially dynamic optimization methods. Here we provide a general framework for optimal, dynamic conservation and then explore its capacity for coping with various sources and degrees of uncertainty. In broadest terms, the dynamic optimization problem in conservation is choosing among a set of decision options at periodic intervals so as to maximize some conservation objective over the planning horizon. Planners must account for immediate objective returns, as well as the effect of current decisions on future resource conditions and, thus, on future decisions. Undermining the effectiveness of such a planning process are uncertainties concerning extant resource conditions (partial observability), the immediate consequences of decision choices (partial controllability), the outcomes of uncontrolled, environmental drivers (environmental variation), and the processes structuring resource dynamics (structural uncertainty). Where outcomes from these sources of uncertainty can be described in terms of probability distributions, a focus on maximizing the expected objective return, while taking state-specific actions, is an effective mechanism for coping with uncertainty. When such probability distributions are unavailable or deemed unreliable, a focus on maximizing robustness is likely to be the preferred approach. Here the idea is to choose an action (or state-dependent policy) that achieves at least some minimum level of performance regardless of the (uncertain) outcomes. We provide some examples of how the dynamic optimization problem can be framed for problems involving management of habitat for an imperiled species, conservation of a

  6. An Assessment of the Influence of the Industry Distribution Chain on the Oxygen Levels in Commercial Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Using Non-Destructive Oxygen Sensor Technology.

    PubMed

    O' Callaghan, Karen A M; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Kerry, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    The establishment and control of oxygen levels in packs of oxygen-sensitive food products such as cheese is imperative in order to maintain product quality over a determined shelf life. Oxygen sensors quantify oxygen concentrations within packaging using a reversible optical measurement process, and this non-destructive nature ensures the entire supply chain can be monitored and can assist in pinpointing negative issues pertaining to product packaging. This study was carried out in a commercial cheese packaging plant and involved the insertion of 768 sensors into 384 flow-wrapped cheese packs (two sensors per pack) that were flushed with 100% carbon dioxide prior to sealing. The cheese blocks were randomly assigned to two different storage groups to assess the effects of package quality, packaging process efficiency, and handling and distribution on package containment. Results demonstrated that oxygen levels increased in both experimental groups examined over the 30-day assessment period. The group subjected to a simulated industrial distribution route and handling procedures of commercial retailed cheese exhibited the highest level of oxygen detected on every day examined and experienced the highest rate of package failure. The study concluded that fluctuating storage conditions, product movement associated with distribution activities, and the possible presence of cheese-derived contaminants such as calcium lactate crystals were chief contributors to package failure. PMID:27331815

  7. An Assessment of the Influence of the Industry Distribution Chain on the Oxygen Levels in Commercial Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Using Non-Destructive Oxygen Sensor Technology

    PubMed Central

    O’ Callaghan, Karen A.M.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Kerry, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment and control of oxygen levels in packs of oxygen-sensitive food products such as cheese is imperative in order to maintain product quality over a determined shelf life. Oxygen sensors quantify oxygen concentrations within packaging using a reversible optical measurement process, and this non-destructive nature ensures the entire supply chain can be monitored and can assist in pinpointing negative issues pertaining to product packaging. This study was carried out in a commercial cheese packaging plant and involved the insertion of 768 sensors into 384 flow-wrapped cheese packs (two sensors per pack) that were flushed with 100% carbon dioxide prior to sealing. The cheese blocks were randomly assigned to two different storage groups to assess the effects of package quality, packaging process efficiency, and handling and distribution on package containment. Results demonstrated that oxygen levels increased in both experimental groups examined over the 30-day assessment period. The group subjected to a simulated industrial distribution route and handling procedures of commercial retailed cheese exhibited the highest level of oxygen detected on every day examined and experienced the highest rate of package failure. The study concluded that fluctuating storage conditions, product movement associated with distribution activities, and the possible presence of cheese-derived contaminants such as calcium lactate crystals were chief contributors to package failure. PMID:27331815

  8. Confronting Delinquency: Probations Officers' Use of Coercion and Client-Centered Tactics to Foster Youth Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwalbe, Craig S.; Maschi, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Youthful compliance with juvenile court mandates is a cornerstone of effective probation practice. Despite this, research has not examined probation strategies for encouraging and enforcing youthful compliance with probation conditions. This study describes the use of confrontational tactics and client-centered approaches reported by probation…

  9. The Learning Disabled Delinquent: Teaching Socially Appropriate Reactions to Confrontations for Negative Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Darrell J.

    1982-01-01

    A private psychiatric hospital program is described which cooperates with referring probation officers to develop socially appropriate reactions in learning disabled delinquents by confronting them with their negative behaviors. A case study involving systematic reinforcement, social skills training, and cognitive restructuring in a token economy…

  10. Self Confrontation Counseling: A Selective Review With Implications for Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Frances F.; And Others

    This report reviews relevant educational literature and current practices to discover the relationship between personal change and self confrontation. Five areas of study include a) outcomes, b) help for whom, c) the helpful situation, d) the helpful treatment, and e) the helpful helper. The first section briefly describes the outcomes of self…

  11. Markets, Equality and Democratic Education: Confronting the Neoliberal and Libertarian Reconceptualisations of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Youl-Kwan

    2010-01-01

    The global emergence of market liberalism marks an effort to decouple the link between citizenship and the welfare state and to rearticulate people's identity as homo economicus, as independent citizens having the right to property and the freedom to choose in the marketplace. Confronting this phenomenon, this paper reviews neoliberal and…

  12. Multichannel fNIRS Assessment of Overt and Covert Confrontation Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriai-Izawa, Ayano; Dan, Haruka; Dan, Ippeita; Sano, Toshifumi; Oguro, Keiji; Yokota, Hidenori; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Watanabe, Eiju

    2012-01-01

    Confrontation naming tasks assess cognitive processes involved in the main stage of word production. However, in fMRI, the occurrence of movement artifacts necessitates the use of covert paradigms, which has limited clinical applications. Thus, we explored the feasibility of adopting multichannel functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to…

  13. Laughing with and at Patients: The Roles of Laughter in Confrontations in Addiction Group Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arminen, Ilkka; Halonen, Mia

    2007-01-01

    In Minnesota treatment, the therapists aim at breaking clients' denial to encourage them to accept their addiction. However, the confrontation is risky since, instead of making the patient ready for a change, it may strengthen resistance against the diagnosis of addiction and the treatment recommendations. We will explore the role of laughter in…

  14. Confronting the Unknown: Principal Preparation Training in Issues Related to Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelle, Pamela; Bilton, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines principal preparation programs from the perspective of readiness to confront and/or support special education issues at the school building level. The purpose of this research was to answer the following questions: (1) What is the principal's readiness level upon program completion in dealing with special education issues in…

  15. Perceptual, Evaluative and Behavioral Changes Through Externally Mediated Self-Confrontation; Explorations and Experiments in Microsettings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschenk, Bernhard

    1974-01-01

    The development and application of the idea of microteaching in research and education is described in this report. It examines the use of different feedback devices for self-control and self-direction. The main conclusions reached are: (1) externally mediated self-confrontation via CCTV/VR is a therapeutic treatment; and (2) microsetting models…

  16. The Effects of Homogeneous versus Heterogeneous Stimuli on the Confrontation-Naming Performance of Aphasics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah E.; Wright, Judith M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of semantic grouping on confrontation-naming performances of 16 fluent and 10 nonfluent aphasic adults was examined. Performances were not uniformly facilitated in one naming condition over the other. Some patients, however, did appear to display performance discrepancies between the two conditions. (Author/CL)

  17. "Do You Remember": Confronting Post-9/11 Censorship through Critical Questioning and Poetic Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Jeanine M.

    2008-01-01

    Jeanine M. Staples led a group of students, ages fourteen to eighteen, in developing a critical stance about words and images found in 9/11 media. Through questions, comments, and declarations toward these texts, the students labeled as "disengaged" actively participated in constructing a collaborative poem to confront repressive thinking.…

  18. Lonely Courage, Commemorative Confrontation, and Communal Therapy: William James Remembers the Massachusetts 54th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stob, Paul

    2012-01-01

    On May 31, 1897, William James, one of America's most influential philosophers and psychologists, delivered the first civic oration of his career. The principal orator at the dedication of the Robert Gould Shaw memorial in Boston, James did what commemorative speakers are not supposed to do. He chose to be confrontational and divisive in a…

  19. Post Stereotypes: Deconstructing Racial Assumptions and Biases through Visual Culture and Confrontational Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Yuha

    2015-01-01

    The Post Stereotypes project embodies confrontational pedagogy and involves postcard artmaking designed to both solicit expression of and deconstruct students' racial, ethnic, and cultural stereotypes and assumptions. As part of the Cultural Diversity in American Art course, students created postcard art that visually represented their personal…

  20. Role Conflict and Role Ambiguity of Resident Assistants when Confronted with Alcohol Consumption of Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Mary Beth

    2011-01-01

    Resident assistants serve a vital function within the residence hall; however, the challenges they confront are different from those of other students. For example, resident assistants may deal with over-consumption or illegal consumption of alcohol on campus. Addressing this issue may cause resident assistants to experience role conflict and role…

  1. Three Misconceptions about Radiation--And What We Teachers Can Do to Confront Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years teaching physics, I have noticed that my students are becoming more and more interested in the topic of radiation. Mobile phones, modern game consoles, and WiFi--all of these devices involving some kind of radiation are part of our students' everyday lives. Students are also frequently confronted in the media with…

  2. Differentiating between Confrontive and Coercive Kinds of Parental Power-Assertive Disciplinary Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumrind, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, I differentiate between coercive and confrontive kinds of power assertion to elucidate the significantly different effects on children's well-being of authoritarian and authoritative styles of parental authority. Although both parenting styles (in contrast to the permissive style) are equally demanding, forceful, and…

  3. What Are the Issues Confronting Infertile Women? A Qualitative and Quantitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammerli, Katja; Znoj, Hansjorg; Berger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a stressful experience, yet little is known about the specific issues confronting infertile women. In the present study, researchers sought to identify themes important to infertile women and examine possible associations with mental health levels. Using qualitative content analysis, researchers analyzed the email messages of 57…

  4. Educating Women Students in the Academy to Confront Gender Discrimination and Contribute to Equity Afterward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentkowski, Marcia; Rogers, Glen

    2010-01-01

    We argue that (1) faculty and other academic professionals who educate undergraduate women in capabilities such as effective communication, teamwork, and leadership that are integrated with the disciplines (e.g., biology, history, fine arts) and professions (e.g., education, nursing, management) indirectly assist their students to confront gender…

  5. Understanding and Confronting Alcohol-Induced Risky Behavior among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dornier, Lucien J.; Fauquier, Katharine J.; Field, April R.; Budden, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Confronting alcohol abuse is a challenge for most higher education institutions. Each year, students are admitted to hospitals for issues arising from the misuse of alcohol. The deaths of some engaged in alcohol related activities is especially worrisome. Factors such as age and financial standing could impact the likelihood of abuse. So-called…

  6. Students' Alternative Conceptions about the Lotus Effect: To Confront or to Ignore?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubisch, Franziska; Heyne, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    At the botanical garden of the University of Würzburg, we conducted practical lessons on bionics, focused on the lotus effect, with 260 students. Those approx. 14 years old, 8th-grade mid-level students were divided into two groups. During an instructional discussion about the topic, one group was confronted with their alternative conceptions…

  7. Academic Misconduct: A Goals-Plans-Action Approach to Peer Confrontation and Whistle-Blowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henningsen, Mary Lynn Miller; Valde, Kathleen S.; Denbow, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Academic misconduct is a serious, pervasive, communication phenomenon on college campuses. In this study, the goals-plans-action model (Dillard, 1990) was used as a theoretical framework to investigate peer confrontation of cheating and whistle-blowing to a course instructor. In an experiment, participants were asked to respond to measures of…

  8. The Dilemmas of Peer Relationships Confronting Mathematically Gifted Female Adolescents: Nine Cases in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Chen-Yao

    2011-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of research studies addressing the dilemmas of peer relationships confronting gifted adolescent females. In this study, the peer relationships of nine mathematically gifted adolescent females living in Taiwan are explored using a qualitative multicase study. Data analysis revealed six compelling themes: a proclivity for…

  9. Current Issues: Critical Issues Confronting the Nation and the World. 1990 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close Up Foundation, Arlington, VA.

    This annual publication seeks to inform interested readers about issues currently confronting the United States. The introductory section briefly discusses the 101st Congress, members of the Bush administration, and the Supreme Court. The federal budget process is also discussed in this section. The section on domestic policy issues contains the…

  10. Beyond the Myth of Confrontation: A Comparative Study of African and African-American Female Protagonists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eko, Ebele

    1986-01-01

    Describes mother-daughter relations in four American and African literary works: Ama Ata Aidoo's "Anowa," Gloria Naylor's "Women of Brewster Place," Bessie Head's "Maru," and Paule Marshall's "Brown Girl Brownstones." Argues that the myth of Black mother-daughter confrontations camouflages deep-seated frustrations associated with racial and sexual…

  11. Out of the Mainstream: Issues Confronting the Male Profeminist Elementary School Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jesse; Kelly, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A brief description of the notion of patriarchy and the feminization of teaching precedes a discussion of a core of central issues that profeminist male elementary school teachers are likely to confront, involving male privilege and domination, the teacher-child relationship, advocate versus technician roles, collegialism, and the…

  12. Challenges Confronting Female Intercollegiate Athletic Directors of NCAA Member Institutions by Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarterman, Jerome; DuPree, Aimee D.; Willis, Kimberly Pettaway

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the major challenges confronting female intercollegiate athletic directors and directors of women's intercollegiate athletics programs of NCAA member institutions. A 34-item questionnaire was mailed to 169 female intercollegiate athletic directors and directors of women's intercollegiate athletics programs. Of the 169 directors…

  13. Confronting Challenges to the Liberal Arts Curriculum: Perspectives of Developing and Transitional Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Patti McGill

    2012-01-01

    Comparative research on higher education in developing and transitional countries is often focused on such issues as access, finance, student mobility and the impact of globalization, but there has been little attention to curriculum and the forces that shape it. Confronting Challenges to the Liberal Arts Curriculum fills an important gap in the…

  14. Cross-Cultural Counseling Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahia, Chikezie Emmanuel

    1984-01-01

    Examines problems and concerns of cross cultural counseling and psychotherapy. Raises specific questions concerning research designs and approaches, differences in cosmology, epistemology, differences in nosology, and problems of evaluation or testing. (JAC)

  15. Concerns of Entering Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Robert H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    First-year dental students from three schools were surveyed to assess their concern about psychosocial, academic, time, isolation, and money issues. Similarity in ranking of concerns, and differences in intensity of concern are examined for implications for research in stress management. (MSE)

  16. Addressing Public Concerns about GMOs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction of genetic engineering technology to agriculture has raised concerns in the public sector regarding the safety of applying this technology to the food supply. Concerns focus on two major issues: human/animal health and environmental risks. Such concerns have arisen in part because...

  17. Confronting Deregulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madget, James

    1997-01-01

    Discusses how schools can capitalize on new opportunities for cost savings and improved service in a deregulated electric industry. It discusses strategies for preparing to buy electrical power on the open market and examines two forms of purchasing called "wholesale-wheeling" and "retail-wheeling." Steps in conducting a utility audit are…

  18. Confronting Cyberbullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1990s and early 2000s, as schools first started getting widespread access to the internet, many administrators saw the potential in this new technology, but also huge risks and liabilities. While billions were being spent on hardware and connectivity, the mainstream media was fueling parental fears with stories of online predators…

  19. Beyond Confrontation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that school boards have failed to translate their vision of education to the community. Suggests using up-to-date methods like telemarketing, working with the news media, and televising board meetings. Maintains that boards must find ways to convince the community of the importance of long-term goals for education instead of short-term…

  20. "Are you talking to me?" confronting behavioral disturbances in patients with headache.

    PubMed

    Saper, Joel R

    2006-10-01

    The famous question, "Are you talking to me?," was coined by Robert DeNiro in his lead role as Travis Bickle in the Martin Scorsese classic, Taxi Driver. The phrase also characterizes the troubling encounters that many headache-treating professionals confront as they attempt to discuss serious matters of care and compliance with some of their headache patients. Although most headache patients are eager to take professional advice and guidance, there exists a minority of patients whose behavior undermines a collaborative relationship between doctor and patient. In these cases, the physician may need to directly confront this behavior in order to overcome behavioral barriers that interfere with desirable treatment outcomes. This article offers explicit means and strategies to engage difficult patients, increase the likelihood of program adherence and improvement, and develop a more satisfying doctor-patient relationship, based on clinical experience in a national referral center for difficult-to-manage headache patients. PMID:17034396

  1. When do high and low status group members support confrontation? The role of perceived pervasiveness of prejudice.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Kimberly Barsamian; Barreto, Manuela; Kaiser, Cheryl R; Rego, Marco Silva

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines how perceived pervasiveness of prejudice differentially affects high and low status group members' support for a low status group member who confronts. In Experiment 1 (N = 228), men and women read a text describing sexism as rare or as pervasive and subsequently indicated their support for a woman who confronted or did not confront a sexist remark. Experiment 2 (N = 324) specified the underlying process using a self-affirmation manipulation. Results show that men were more supportive of confrontation when sexism was perceived to be rare than when it was pervasive. By contrast, women tended to prefer confrontation when sexism was pervasive relative to when it was rare. Personal self-affirmation decreased men's and increased women's support for confrontation when prejudice was rare, suggesting that men's and women's support for confrontation when prejudice is rare is driven by personal impression management considerations. Implications for understanding how members of low and high status groups respond to prejudice are discussed. PMID:26014280

  2. No reason to talk about it: Families confront the nuclear taboo

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, D.S.; Zeitlin, S.

    1987-01-01

    Based on interviews with families from various ethnic and economic backgrounds, the authors look at the effect of the nuclear threat on family life, exploring such issues as how parents deal with their children's fears about the threat of nuclear war and the difficulty adolescents have committing themselves to the adult community in the nuclear age. Using Erik Erikson's stages of development as a framework, they move from early childhood to old age in their analysis of how families confront the nuclear issue.

  3. Eye tracking unconscious face-to-face confrontations: dominance motives prolong gaze to masked angry faces.

    PubMed

    Terburg, David; Hooiveld, Nicole; Aarts, Henk; Kenemans, J Leon; van Honk, Jack

    2011-03-01

    In primates, dominance/submission relationships are generally automatically and nonaggressively established in face-to-face confrontations. Researchers have argued that this process involves an explicit psychological stress-manipulation mechanism: Striding with a threatening expression, while keeping direct eye contact, outstresses rivals so that they submissively avert their gaze. In contrast, researchers have proposed a reflexive and implicit modulation of face-to-face confrontation in humans, on the basis of evidence that dominant and submissive individuals exhibit vigilant and avoidant responses, respectively, to facial anger in masked emotional Stroop tasks. However, these tasks do not provide an ecologically valid index of gaze behavior. Therefore, we directly measured gaze responses to masked angry, happy, and neutral facial expressions with a saccade-latency paradigm and found that increased dominance traits predict a more prolonged gaze to (or reluctance to avert gaze from) masked anger. Furthermore, greater non-dominance-related reward sensitivity predicts more persistent gaze to masked happiness. These results strongly suggest that implicit and reflexive mechanisms underlie dominant and submissive gaze behavior in face-to-face confrontations. PMID:21303993

  4. Expressed Concerns of Yemeni Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alzubaidi, Abdulgawi; Upton, Graham; Baluch, Bahman

    1998-01-01

    Examines the concerns of adolescents 13 to 17 years old (N=150) in the Republic of Yemen. Results indicate that the major concerns reported were related to vocational and educational future, recreational activities, religious matters, and school curriculum and teaching methods. Also discusses gender differences. (Author/MKA)

  5. Energy Problems and Environmental Concern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Train, Russell E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses problems encountered in energy extraction and consumption, involving nuclear power plant construction, environmental consequences of energy systems, and energy conservation ethics. Indicates that the increasing concern over environmental quality is not the true cause of present energy problems. (CC)

  6. Teachers' Concerns About Biotechnology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Sadler, Troy D.; Koroly, Mary Jo

    2013-04-01

    The impacts of biotechnology are found in nearly all sectors of society from health care and food products to environmental issues and energy sources. Despite the significance of biotechnology within the sciences, it has not become a prominent trend in science education. In this study, we seek to more fully identify biology teachers' concerns about biotechnology instruction and their reported practices. Consistent with the Stages of Concern framework as modified by Hord et al., we investigated teachers' awareness, informational, personal, management, consequences, collaboration, and refocusing concerns about biotechnology teaching by employing a qualitative design that allowed for the emergence of teachers' ideas. Twenty high school life science teachers attending a biotechnology institute were interviewed using an interview protocol specifically designed to target various Stages of Concern. Although the Stages of Concern framework guided the development of interview questions in order to target a wide range of concerns, data analysis employed a grounded theory approach wherein patterns emerged from teachers' own words and were constantly compared with each other to generate larger themes. Our results have potential to provide guidance for professional development providers and curriculum developers committed to supporting initial implementation of biotechnology education. Recommendations include supporting teacher development of biotechnology content knowledge; promoting strategies for obtaining, storing and managing biotechnology equipment and materials; providing opportunities for peer teaching as a means of building teacher confidence; and highlighting career opportunities in biotechnology and the intersections of biotechnology and everyday life.

  7. The Problems That the Classroom Teachers Working in Villages and County Towns Confront in Educational Inspection and Their Opinions Concerning the Effect of These Problems on Their Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdem, Ali Riza; Yaprak, Meral

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to establish that the problems of education supervision of the class teachers working in the village and township centre in Denizli and their opinions about these problems affect their performance. 321 class teachers working in official primary schools in townships of Denizli and 272 class teachers working in…

  8. Issues of Statewide Concern in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Richard M.

    The adequacy of existing coordinating and governing structures in higher education is considered. Some of the changed conditions that current boards are confronting are as follows: declining college enrollments, the need to find new student clienteles, the effect of decreased job opportunities for college graduates on public attitudes on funding…

  9. Expressed concerns of Yemeni adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alzubaidi, A; Upton, G; Baluch, B

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the concerns of adolescents in the Republic of Yemen. A short version of the Mooney Problem Check List was administered to 150 13- to 17-year-old males and females. Results indicated that the major concerns and problems reported by Yemeni adolescents were related to their vocational and educational future, recreational activities, religious matters, and school curriculum and teaching methods. Problems related to social life, family, and health and physical issues were less prominent. Results also showed that though there were similarities in the number of concerns expressed by males and females, males reported more difficulties with their vocational and educational future, marriage and sexual matters, and finances and employment, while females reported more problems with recreational activities, personal relationships, and health. PMID:9583671

  10. Women trafficking: causes, concerns, care!

    PubMed

    Khowaja, Shaneela Sadaruddin; Tharani, Ambreen Jawed; Agha, Ajmal; Karamaliani, Rozina Sherali

    2012-08-01

    Pakistan is both a country of origin and destination as far as women trafficking is concerned. Poverty, gender discrimination, lack of education, and ignorance about legal rights are some of the underlying causes. Available data suggest several areas of concern, like, for instance: direct health effects, maladaptive coping leading to the use of illicit drugs, and inaccessibility to healthcare facilities. Therefore, numerous interventions would be required at three levels: the prevention of trafficking, the protection of victims and the prosecution of the traffickers. PMID:23862261

  11. Reflecting on parental concerns in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors: observations from a general pediatrician.

    PubMed

    Stern, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This issue of Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics explores the concerns and point of view of parents who have had to confront the devastating diagnosis of a pediatric brain tumor. This commentary, written by a general pediatrician, is a synthesis of several narrative themes which touch on a range of topics from relapse to long-term sequelae and other issues that effect a growing population of pediatric brain tumor patients. It offers a glimpse into the problems that need to be addressed by health professionals, educators and support teams who provide short and long term care to these patients and their families. PMID:24748259

  12. Three Misconceptions About Radiation — And What We Teachers Can Do to Confront Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    During the last few years teaching physics, I have noticed that my students are becoming more and more interested in the topic of radiation. Mobile phones, modern game consoles, and WiFi—all of these devices involving some kind of radiation are part of our students' everyday lives. Students are also frequently confronted in the media with debates relating to different types of radiation: What are the effects of nuclear contamination going to be after the Fukushima accident? Can radiation from mobile phones really cause cancer? Should the use of tanning booths be forbidden for teenagers? Although students seem to be very motivated to learn about the topic of radiation, I have encountered several misconceptions about this topic that my students bring into the physics classroom. Some of these misconceptions might be caused by biased media reports, while others can be attributed to a different usage of the word radiation in everyday language (when compared to the scientific usage of this term). In this paper, I would like to present the most common misconceptions about radiation that I have encountered in my physics courses and I would like to give some ideas how to confront these ideas in teaching. A detailed description of these misconceptions discovered through empirical research can be found in one of my research articles.1

  13. Context effects on verb production in specific language impairment (SLI): confrontation naming versus connected speech.

    PubMed

    Kambanaros, Maria

    2014-11-01

    A handful of studies have shown that verbs are more vulnerable than nouns to retrieval deficits on picture-based naming tasks for children with specific language impairment (SLI). The aim of this study was to examine if the disproportionate verb as opposed to noun production deficit reported for naming is also found in connected speech. Sixteen children participated in the study: eight children diagnosed with SLI (mean age: 6:3 years) and eight typically language developing (TLD, mean age: 5:9 years) controls. Verb and noun production was measured in connected speech and compared to picture confrontation naming. Both groups of children showed a significant difficulty naming verbs compared to nouns. In contrast, they did not differ on the total number of both verb tokens and verb types produced in connected speech. The findings indicate that the previously reported verb retrieval difficulties in SLI are a product of the confrontation naming task demands rather than a true verb deficit. PMID:24798099

  14. Online Catalogs: Issues and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausser, Jaye

    This document explores the various issues and concerns related to the development of online systems in libraries and, in particular, online catalogs. Following a preface, foreword, and introduction, chapters are devoted to each of the following topics: (l) providing for special interests including the disabled; (2) authority control; (3) subject…

  15. Teachers' Aides: Tasks and Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balderson, James H.; Nixon, Mary

    1976-01-01

    Addresses three questions: (1) What tasks do aides perform? (2) Does training make a difference in the type of tasks aides perform? (3) What are the concerns of aides? (Available from the Department of Educational Administration, The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G5; $0.50, single copy.) (Author/IRT)

  16. Consumer Concerns: Newcomer's Guide. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jean

    A bilingual pamphlet containing practical law-related information for recent Russian Jewish immigrants to New York City, this document addresses consumer concerns. Following a brief description of the Newcomer series, 15 questions are listed, each followed by an answer. Questions asked include the meaning of the terms consumer and contract;…

  17. Empathic concern drives costly altruism

    PubMed Central

    FeldmanHall, Oriel; Dalgleish, Tim; Evans, Davy; Mobbs, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Why do we self-sacrifice to help others in distress? Two competing theories have emerged, one suggesting that prosocial behavior is primarily motivated by feelings of empathic other-oriented concern, the other that we help mainly because we are egoistically focused on reducing our own discomfort. Here we explore the relationship between costly altruism and these two sub-processes of empathy, specifically drawing on the caregiving model to test the theory that trait empathic concern (e.g. general tendency to have sympathy for another) and trait personal distress (e.g. predisposition to experiencing aversive arousal states) may differentially drive altruistic behavior. We find that trait empathic concern – and not trait personal distress – motivates costly altruism, and this relationship is supported by activity in the ventral tegmental area, caudate and subgenual anterior cingulate, key regions for promoting social attachment and caregiving. Together, this data helps identify the behavioral and neural mechanisms motivating costly altruism, while demonstrating that individual differences in empathic concern-related brain responses can predict real prosocial choice. PMID:25462694

  18. School Safety Concerns All Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Megan

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that school safety is an issue that concerns all students. Discusses how the staff of the Rockwood South (Missouri) "RAMpage" covered the shootings at Columbine High School in a 14-page issue and in follow-up issues. Suggests that the student newspaper covered the controversial topic in an appropriate, tasteful manner. (RS)

  19. The Roots of Environmental Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chawla, Louise; Hart, Roger A.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a conceptual model of how young children learn about the physical environment, reviewing theories concerning environmental cognition and moral development. Notes that children in developed nations receive much of their information about the environment from the media and are often exposed to conflicting viewpoints about the natural world.…

  20. Concerning Justice and Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Estelle R.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I explore matters concerning justice and music education. I briefly sketch responses to five interrelated questions: Why should music educators be interested in justice? What is meant by the term social justice and how is it distinguished from justice of other kinds? How do liberal views of humanity, particularly the preciousness of…

  1. Antibody persistence and T-cell balance: Two key factors confronting HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Gallo, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for a prophylactic AIDS vaccine is ongoing, but it is now clear that the successful vaccine must elicit protective antibody responses. Accordingly, intense efforts are underway to identify immunogens that elicit these responses. Regardless of the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection, be it neutralization, Fc-mediated effector function, or both, antibody persistence and appropriate T-cell help are significant problems confronting the development of a successful AIDS vaccine. Here, we discuss the evidence illustrating the poor persistence of antibody responses to Env, the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, and the related problem of CD4+ T-cell responses that compromise vaccine efficacy by creating excess cellular targets of HIV-1 infection. Finally, we propose solutions to both problems that are applicable to all Env-based AIDS vaccines regardless of the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection. PMID:25349379

  2. Confronting QCD with the experimental hadronic spectral functions from tau decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, C. A.; Nasrallah, N. F.; Schilcher, K.

    2009-09-01

    The (nonstrange) vector and axial-vector spectral functions extracted from {tau} decay by the ALEPH Collaboration are confronted with QCD in the framework of a finite energy sum rule involving a polynomial kernel tuned to suppress the region beyond the kinematical end point where there is no longer data. This effectively allows for a QCD finite energy sum rule analysis to be performed beyond the region of the existing data. Results show excellent agreement between data and perturbative QCD in the remarkably wide energy range s=3-10 GeV{sup 2}, leaving room for a dimension d=4 vacuum condensate consistent with values in the literature. A hypothetical dimension d=2 term in the operator product expansion is found to be extremely small, consistent with zero. Fixed order and contour improved perturbation theory are used, with both leading to similar results within errors. Full consistency is found between vector and axial-vector channel results.

  3. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus confronts host degradation by sheltering in small/midsized protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gorovits, Rena; Fridman, Lilia; Kolot, Mikhail; Rotem, Or; Ghanim, Murad; Shriki, Oz; Czosnek, Henryk

    2016-02-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci to tomato and other crops. TYLCV proteins are endangered by the host defenses. We have analyzed the capacity of the tomato plant and of the whitefly insect vector to degrade the six proteins encoded by the TYLCV genome. Tomato and whitefly demonstrated the highest proteolytic activity in the fractions containing soluble proteins, less-in large protein aggregates; a significant decrease of TYLCV proteolysis was detected in the intermediate-sized aggregates. All the six TYLCV proteins were differently targeted by the cytoplasmic and nuclear degradation machineries (proteases, ubiquitin 26S proteasome, autophagy). TYLCV could confront host degradation by sheltering in small/midsized aggregates, where viral proteins are less exposed to proteolysis. Indeed, TYLCV proteins were localized in aggregates of various sizes in both host organisms. This is the first study comparing degradation machinery in plant and insect hosts targeting all TYLCV proteins. PMID:26654789

  4. Memory for Names Test Provides a Useful Confrontational Naming Task for Aging and Continuum of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Brouillette, Robert M.; Martin, Corby K.; Correa, John B.; Davis, Allison B.; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D.; Foil, Heather C.; Hymel, Aimee; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop new neuropsychometric tools sensitive enough to detect subtle declines in cognitive performance during normal aging, as well as to distinguish between normal aging and the earliest stages of dementia. In this study, we report our findings regarding a new confrontational naming test, the Memory for Names test. We conducted evaluations utilizing a cohort of 234 elderly participants who comprised a spectrum of cognitive function ranging from normal for age (Uniform Data Set Overall Appraisal = 2, Clinical Dementia Rating = 0) to demented (Clinical Dementia Rating = 1–2, Mini Mental Status Examination Total Score <25). The Memory for Names test was found to measure the same cognitive construct as the Boston Naming Test. In conclusion, the Memory for Names test is a reliable and valid measure of age-related cognitive function that can discriminate between normal aging and mild cognitive impairment, and between mild cognitive impairment and dementia. PMID:21304184

  5. Current challenges for confronting the public health problem of snakebite envenoming in Central America.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, José María

    2014-01-01

    Snakebite envenoming is a serious public health problem in Central America, where approximately 5,500 cases occur every year. Panama has the highest incidence and El Salvador the lowest. The majority, and most severe, cases are inflicted by the pit viper Bothrops asper (family Viperidae), locally known as 'terciopelo', 'barba amarilla' or 'equis'. About 1% of the bites are caused by coral snakes of the genus Micrurus (family Elapidae). Despite significant and successful efforts in Central America regarding snakebite envenomings in the areas of research, antivenom manufacture and quality control, training of health professionals in the diagnosis and clinical management of bites, and prevention of snakebites, much remains to be done in order to further reduce the impact of this medical condition. This essay presents seven challenges for improving the confrontation of snakebite envenoming in Central America. Overcoming these challenges demands a coordinated partnership of highly diverse stakeholders though inter-sectorial and inter-programmatic interventions. PMID:24602234

  6. UNITY: Confronting Supernova Cosmology's Statistical and Systematic Uncertainties in a Unified Bayesian Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, D.; Aldering, G.; Barbary, K.; Boone, K.; Chappell, G.; Currie, M.; Deustua, S.; Fagrelius, P.; Fruchter, A.; Hayden, B.; Lidman, C.; Nordin, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Saunders, C.; Sofiatti, C.; Supernova Cosmology Project, The

    2015-11-01

    While recent supernova (SN) cosmology research has benefited from improved measurements, current analysis approaches are not statistically optimal and will prove insufficient for future surveys. This paper discusses the limitations of current SN cosmological analyses in treating outliers, selection effects, shape- and color-standardization relations, unexplained dispersion, and heterogeneous observations. We present a new Bayesian framework, called UNITY (Unified Nonlinear Inference for Type-Ia cosmologY), that incorporates significant improvements in our ability to confront these effects. We apply the framework to real SN observations and demonstrate smaller statistical and systematic uncertainties. We verify earlier results that SNe Ia require nonlinear shape and color standardizations, but we now include these nonlinear relations in a statistically well-justified way. This analysis was primarily performed blinded, in that the basic framework was first validated on simulated data before transitioning to real data. We also discuss possible extensions of the method.

  7. Memory for names test provides a useful confrontational naming task for aging and continuum of dementia.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Robert M; Martin, Corby K; Correa, John B; Davis, Allison B; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Foil, Heather C; Hymel, Aimee; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop new neuropsychometric tools sensitive enough to detect subtle declines in cognitive performance during normal aging, as well as to distinguish between normal aging and the earliest stages of dementia. In this study, we report our findings regarding a new confrontational naming test, the Memory for Names test. We conducted evaluations utilizing a cohort of 234 elderly participants who comprised a spectrum of cognitive function ranging from normal for age (Uniform Data Set Overall Appraisal = 2, Clinical Dementia Rating = 0) to demented (Clinical Dementia Rating = 1-2, Mini Mental Status Examination Total Score <25). The Memory for Names test was found to measure the same cognitive construct as the Boston Naming Test. In conclusion, the Memory for Names test is a reliable and valid measure of age-related cognitive function that can discriminate between normal aging and mild cognitive impairment, and between mild cognitive impairment and dementia. PMID:21304184

  8. Confronting diminished epistemic privilege and epistemic injustice in pregnancy by challenging a "panoptics of the womb".

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lauren

    2015-02-01

    This paper demonstrates how the problematic kinds of epistemic power that physicians have can diminish the epistemic privilege that pregnant women have over their bodies and can put them in a state of epistemic powerlessness. This result, I argue, constitutes an epistemic injustice for many pregnant women. A reconsideration of how we understand and care for pregnant women and of the physician-patient relationship can provide us with a valuable context and starting point for helping to alleviate the knowledge/power problems that are symptomatic of the current system and structure of medicine. I suggest that we can begin to confront this kind of injustice if medicine adopts a more phenomenological understanding of bodies and if physicians and patients--in this case, pregnant women--become what I call "epistemic peers." PMID:25503792

  9. Confronting Oral Health Disparities Among American Indian/Alaska Native Children: The Pediatric Oral Health Therapist

    PubMed Central

    Nash, David A.; Nagel, Ron J.

    2005-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) children are disproportionately affected by oral disease compared with the general population of American children. Additionally, AIAN children have limited access to professional oral health care. The Indian Health Service (IHS) and AIAN tribal leaders face a significant problem in ensuring care for the oral health of these children. We discuss the development and deployment of a new allied oral health professional, a pediatric oral health therapist. This kind of practitioner can effectively extend the ability of dentists to provide for children not receiving care and help to confront the significant oral health disparities existing in AIAN children. Resolving oral health disparities and ensuring access to oral health care for American Indians and Alaska Natives is a moral issue—one of social justice. PMID:16006412

  10. Introduction to a special section on ecohydrology of semiarid environments: Confronting mathematical models with ecosystem complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoray, Tal; Assouline, Shmuel; Katul, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Current literature provides large number of publications about ecohydrological processes and their effect on the biota in drylands. Given the limited laboratory and field experiments in such systems, many of these publications are based on mathematical models of varying complexity. The underlying implicit assumption is that the data set used to evaluate these models covers the parameter space of conditions that characterize drylands and that the models represent the actual processes with acceptable certainty. However, a question raised is to what extent these mathematical models are valid when confronted with observed ecosystem complexity? This Introduction reviews the 16 papers that comprise the Special Section on Eco-hydrology of Semiarid Environments: Confronting Mathematical Models with Ecosystem Complexity. The subjects studied in these papers include rainfall regime, infiltration and preferential flow, evaporation and evapotranspiration, annual net primary production, dispersal and invasion, and vegetation greening. The findings in the papers published in this Special Section show that innovative mathematical modeling approaches can represent actual field measurements. Hence, there are strong grounds for suggesting that mathematical models can contribute to greater understanding of ecosystem complexity through characterization of space-time dynamics of biomass and water storage as well as their multiscale interactions. However, the generality of the models and their low-dimensional representation of many processes may also be a "curse" that results in failures when particulars of an ecosystem are required. It is envisaged that the search for a unifying "general" model, while seductive, may remain elusive in the foreseeable future. It is for this reason that improving the merger between experiments and models of various degrees of complexity continues to shape the future research agenda.

  11. Active defense scheme against DDoS based on mobile agent and network control in network confrontation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Rong; Li, Junshan; Ye, Xia; Wang, Rui

    2013-03-01

    In order to effective defend DDoS attacks in network confrontation, an active defense scheme against DDoS is built based on Mobile Agent and network control. A distributed collaborative active defense model is constructed by using mobile agent technology and encapsulating a variety of DDoS defense techniques. Meanwhile the network control theory is applied to establish a network confrontation's control model for DDoS to control the active defense process. It provides a new idea to solve the DDoS problem.

  12. An Inquiry into Teacher Concerns in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yih-fen; Reeves, Carolyn

    This study identified concerns of teachers in Taiwan and contrasted concerns of these teachers with the 56 concerns which comprise the Teacher Concerns Checklist (TCC), Form B, developed in the United States. A total of 294 teachers (155 preservice teachers and 139 inservice teachers) completed a Chinese version of the Survey of Teacher Concerns.…

  13. Phytotoxins: environmental micropollutants of concern?

    PubMed

    Bucheli, Thomas D

    2014-11-18

    Natural toxins such as mycotoxins or phytotoxins (bioactive compounds from fungi and plants, respectively) have been widely studied in food and feed, where they are stated to out-compete synthetic chemicals in their overall human and animal toxicological risk. A similar perception and awareness is yet largely missing for environmental safety. This article attempts to raise concern in this regard, by providing (circumstantial) evidence that phytotoxins in particular can be emitted into the environment, where they may contribute to the complex mixture of organic micropollutants. Exposures can be orders-of-magnitude higher in anthropogenically managed/affected (agro-)ecosystems than in the pristine environment. PMID:25325883

  14. Io. [theories concerning volcanic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the continuing investigation of Io is presented. Gravitational resonance is discussed as the cause of Io's volcanism, and the volcanic activity is explained in terms of sulfur chemistry. Theories concerning the reasons for the two main types of volcanic eruptions on Io are advanced and correlated with geographical features of the satellite. The sulfur and silicate models of the calderas are presented, citing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Problems of the gravitational resonance theory of Io's heat source are then described. Finally, observations of Io planned for the Galileo mission are summarized.

  15. Customer concerns regarding satellite servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    The organization of orbital servicing of satellites is discussed. Provision of servicing equipment; design interfaces between the satellite and the servicing equipment; and the economic viability of the concept are discussed. The proposed solution for satisfying customer concerns is for the servicing organizations to baseline an adequate inventory of servicing equipment with standard interfaces and established servicing costs. With this knowledge, the customer can conduct tradeoff studies and make programmatic decisions regarding servicing options. A dialog procedure between customers and servicing specialists is outlined.

  16. Towards a feminist global bioethics: addressing women's health concerns worldwide.

    PubMed

    Tong, R

    2001-01-01

    In this paper I argue that a global bioethics is possible. Specifically, I present the view that there are within feminist approaches to bioethics some conceptual and methodological tools necessary to forge a bioethics that embraces the health-related concerns of both developing and developed nations equally. To support my argument I discuss some of the challenges that have historically confronted feminists. If feminists accept the idea that women are entirely the same, then feminists present as fact the fiction of the essential "Woman." Not only does "Woman" not exist, -she" obscures important racial, ethnic, cultural, and class differences among women. However, if feminists stress women's differences too much, feminists lose the power to speak coherently and cogently about gender justice, women's rights, and sexual equality in general. Analyzing the ways in which the idea of difference as well as the idea of sameness have led feminists astray, I ask whether it is possible to avoid the Scylla of absolutism (imperialism, colonialism, hegemony) on the one hand and the Charybdis of relativism (postmodernism, fragmentation, Balkanization) on the other. Finally, after reflecting upon the work of Uma Narayan, Susan Muller Okin, and Martha Nussbaum, I conclude that there is a way out of this ethical bind. By focusing on women's, children's, and men's common human needs, it is possible to lay the foundation for a just and caring global bioethics. PMID:11561998

  17. Concerns About STEM Education Restructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-05-01

    Several education experts told Eos that they generally favored some improvements in U.S. federal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, but they also expressed concern about the Obama administration's proposed STEM reorganization plan as it affects the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). John Farrington, chair of the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) panel that issued a review of the NOAA education program in 2010, told Eos that he is confident that a considerable amount of thought went into this proposal to consolidate the K-12 STEM efforts, that consolidation could make for greater efficiencies, and that a positive aspect of having the Department of Education (ED) as a lead is that STEM education should not be considered as separate from the education of the student as a whole.

  18. Partial integration raises antitrust concerns.

    PubMed

    Brock, T H; Kamoie, B E

    2000-11-01

    Recently, providers have begun to explore a new model of integrated delivery system, the partially integrated IDS. Typically, a partially integrated IDS is a joint venture, owned by a core group of providers that maintains complete financial and operational independence outside the joint venture. The IDS contracts with other providers to furnish services that the part-owners do not furnish. A partially integrated IDS raises antitrust concerns because the participating providers may be seen as competitors banding together to set prices jointly for healthcare services. Therefore, to minimize their antitrust exposure, providers that are considering this model should be careful to structure the IDS in accordance with the relevant Federal antitrust laws (i.e., Section 1 of the Sherman Act), taking into account the Federal antitrust agencies' various guidelines and enforcement policies. PMID:11688054

  19. [Therapeutic issues concerning male fertility].

    PubMed

    Bernard, V; Bouvattier, C; Christin-Maitre, S

    2014-10-01

    Men reproductive health has long been ignored although it is responsible for 50% of couple's infertility. However, in recent years, the understanding of endocrine physiology underlying testis development and spermatogenesis has enabled the development of new therapeutic strategies. Some concern the management of male infertility. Others are dealing with finding an effective male contraceptive. In this review, we first present the management of infertility, in patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. We then describe the major improvements for Klinefelter patient's infertility. Finally, we review the different hormonal and non-hormonal methods for male contraception, currently in development. Efficacy and safety of the some non-hormonal methods remain to be demonstrated so far in humans. PMID:25617918

  20. Expectant Fathers: Changes and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Beverly

    1989-01-01

    The author conducted a compreshensive literature review on expectant fatherhood to determine the needs of men participating in the childbearing cycle. A sparse but growing body of knowledge exists about this population. A number of authors reported distinct changes and concerns. Most of the study subjects were participatns in prenatal classes, a factor which suggests that the findings may not reflect the needs of all expectant fathers. All partners were experiencing a normal pregnancy. This precluded the anxiety of a high-risk situation as a confounding variable. Most information given to expectant fathers was intended to assist them to support their partners. There was little evidence that men received much professional guidance to prepare them for fatherhood. PMID:21249006

  1. Who Gets Blamed for Intimate Partner Violence? The Relative Contributions of Perpetrator Sex Category, Victim Confrontation, and Observer Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Cindy; Moore, Todd; Crone, Travis; DeFreitas, Stacie Craft; Rhatigan, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of perpetrator sex category, victim confrontation, observer sex category, and observer attitudes on attributions of blame and behavioral stability for partner violence. Data were collected from 728 college-aged students enrolled at 2 universities in the United States. Results demonstrated that males and…

  2. Business Education Students' Evaluation of the Benefits and Challenges Confronting Student Industrial Works Experience Scheme in Edo and Delta States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olumese, H. A.; Ediagbonya, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    This research paper specifically investigated Business Education students' evaluation of the benefits and challenges confronting Student Industrial Works Experience Scheme (SIWES) in Edo and Delta States. Two research questions were raised to guide the study and were answered descriptively. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for…

  3. Whither American Social Policy? Confronting the New Politics of Child and Family Policy in the United States. Report 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamerman, Sheila B., Ed.; Kahn, Alfred J., Ed.

    "Confronting the New Politics of Child and Family Policy in the United States" is an 18-month project designed to help states, local governments, and the voluntary sector as they respond to the social policy debates and changes precipitated by the 104th Congress. The project's main vehicle will be a series of reports, based on a series of small…

  4. The Guiding Effects of a Critical Reading Program on the Use of External Reading Strategies When Confronting an Ironical Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabay, Aysegul

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a sample of 60 pre-service teachers to examine the guiding effects of understanding critical reading theories on using external reading strategies such as note-taking and underlining when confronting an ironical literary text. The study broke down the teachers into one control group of 30 teachers and one experimental group of…

  5. Raising Black Children. Two Leading Psychiatrists Confront the Educational, Social, and Emotional Problems Facing Black Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, James P.; Poussaint, Alvin F.

    This book responds to nearly 1,000 commonly asked questions concerning a child's development from infancy to adolescence, as it applies to black children. Common parental concerns are discussed from sibling rivalry to setting a curfew, as well as advice for parents and teachers who must foster healthy self-esteem in black children living within a…

  6. Concerns of Teachers: Research and Reconceptualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Frances F.; And Others

    Factor analyses of 1,359 Teacher Concerns Statements (TCS) indicate a single bipolar factor best describes preservice teachers' concerns, the poles being self-adequacy and teaching performance. Two concerns factors are required to describe inservice teachers' concerns: self-adequacy vs. pupil-benefit (bipolar), and teaching performance. Thus, the…

  7. Future Directions for EC Education: 10 Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Colin

    2009-01-01

    What are the problems that early childhood educators are trying to answer? In this article, the author presents his ten concerns for early childhood teacher education: (1) A concern about policymakers' pottery wheels; (2) A concern about "white shoe" education evangelists; (3) A concern that increasing control may cripple autonomy and build…

  8. Current Research on the Concerns of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Frances F.; Parsons, Jane S.

    This paper familiarizes the educational community with the research on teacher concerns that has taken place since the publication of Fuller's 1969 article "Concerns of Teachers: A Developmental Conceptualization" (SP 003 919). Two studies are described concerning reliability of information for the Teacher Concerns Statement and the establishment…

  9. Measuring Library Staff Concerns during Technological Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francq, Carole

    The Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM), which was developed over the past 25 years through the Research and Development Center at the University of Texas at Austin, identifies seven stages of concern involved in implementing an innovation: awareness, information, personal concerns, management concerns, consequences, collaboration, and refocusing…

  10. Non-anthropocentric Reasoning in Children: Its incidence when they are confronted with ecological dilemmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, António; Vasconcelos, Clara Maria; Strecht-Ribeiro, Orlando; Torres, Joana

    2013-01-01

    This study used an individual structured interview to (1) verify the incidence of non-anthropocentric reasoning in 123 children attending the 3rd and 4th years in three primary schools in the Lisbon area (Portugal), when they are confronted with ecological dilemmas and (2) establish those places they frequented which permit animal contact. The results show a greater incidence of non-anthropocentric reasoning than that obtained in other international studies. This may be related to the focus of the questions asked, which invited children to imagine themselves as another animal or to present situations where human interaction is unfair. This incidence was found independently of gender, school origin and whether or not pets were owned, even with the more biologically complex animals. School year was the only variable proven to make a difference in conceptually more demanding questions. We also verified that the children's general past experience of nature is essentially aligned to 'controlled environments depending on ongoing human management', confirming a decline in direct contact with 'natural and semi-natural environments'. However, this type of experience does not seem to exert a negative influence on their non-anthropocentric reasoning.

  11. Confronting predictions of stellar evolution theory: the case of single field M dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Mann, Andrew W.; Gaidos, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Using a homogenous sample of single field M dwarf stars from the CONCH-SHELL catalog, we confront the reliability of predictions from low mass stellar evolution models. Empirical values for the bolometric flux, effective temperature, and stellar radius are typically determined with better than 1%, 2%, and 5% precision, respectively. Coupled with precise [M/H] values, these observations place strong constraints on the accuracy of stellar models. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) formalism is used to establish the most likely stellar properties, with associated uncertainties, by interpolating within a dense grid of Dartmouth stellar evolution models with mass, age, metallicity, and distance as free parameters. The observed effective temperature and bolometric flux are adopted as independent observables in the MCMC likelihood function with the addition of the observed [M/H] and distance as informative Bayesian priors. Results are presented comparing model mass estimates to those from an empirical mass-luminosity calibration, and showing how well stellar models reproduce the observed radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities. Reliability of stellar models is then investigated as a function of mass, [M/H], equivalent width of H-alpha, and X-ray luminosity. Finally, we briefly discuss various physical mechanisms to explain the observed trends, particularly in the context of the hypothesis that magnetic activity is the source of model-observation discrepancies.

  12. Tameness and stress physiology in a predator-naive island species confronted with novel predation threat

    PubMed Central

    Rödl, Thomas; Berger, Silke; Michael Romero, L; Wikelski, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tame behaviour, i.e. low wariness, in terrestrial island species is often attributed to low predation pressure. However, we know little about its physiological control and its flexibility in the face of predator introductions. Marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on the Galápagos Islands are a good model to study the physiological correlates of low wariness. They have lived virtually without predation for 5–15 Myr until some populations were first confronted with feral cats and dogs some 150 years ago. We tested whether and to what extent marine iguanas can adjust their behaviour and endocrine stress response to novel predation threats. Here, we show that a corticosterone stress response to experimental chasing is absent in naive animals, but is quickly restored with experience. Initially, low wariness also increases with experience, but remains an order of magnitude too low to allow successful escape from introduced predators. Our data suggest that the ability of marine iguanas to cope with predator introductions is limited by narrow reaction norms for behavioural wariness rather than by constraints in the underlying physiological stress system. In general, we predict that island endemics show flexible physiological stress responses but are restricted by narrow behavioural plasticity. PMID:17476779

  13. Sigmund Freud and Otto Rank: debates and confrontations about anxiety and birth.

    PubMed

    Pizarro Obaid, Francisco

    2012-06-01

    The publication of Otto Rank's The Trauma of Birth (1924) gave rise to an intense debate within the secret Committee and confronted Freud with one of his most beloved disciples. After analyzing the letters that the Professor exchanged with his closest collaborators and reviewing the works he published during this period, it is clear that anxiety was a crucial element among the topics in dispute. His reflections linked to the signal anxiety concept allowed Freud to refute Rank's thesis that defined birth trauma as the paradigmatic key to understanding neurosis, and, in turn, was a way of confirming the validity of the concepts of Oedipus complex, repression and castration in the conceptualization of anxiety. The reasons for the modifications of anxiety theory in the mid-1920s cannot be reduced, as Freud would affirm officially in his work of 1926, to the detection of internal contradictions in his theory or to the desire to establish a metapsychological version of the problem, for they gain their essential impulse from the debate with Rank. PMID:22671256

  14. Confrontation Between a Quantized Periods of Some Exo-planetary Systems and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fady Morcos, Abd

    2012-07-01

    Confrontation Between a Quantized Periods of Some Exo-planetary Systems and Observations A.B. Morcos Corot and Kepler were designed to detect Earth-like extra solar planets. The orbital elements and periods of these planets will contain some uncertainties. Many theoretical treatments depend on the idea of quantization were done aiming to find orbital elements of these exoplenets. In the present work, as an extension of previous works, the periods of some extoplanetary systems are calculated by using a simple derived formula. The orbital velocities of some of them are predicted . A comparison between the calculated and observed data is done References 1-J.M. Barnothy , the stability of the Solar System and of small Stellar Systems . (Y.Kazai edn,IAU,1974). 2-L.Nottale,Fractal Space-Time and Microphysics,Towards a Theory of Scale Relativity,( World Scientific, London,1994). 3-L. Nottale, A&A Lett. 315, L9 (1996). 4-L. Nottale, G. Schumacher and J. Gay, A&A , 322, 1018 , (1997). 5-L. Nottale, A&A , 361, 379 (2000). 6-A.G. Agnese and R.Festa, arXiv:astro-ph/9807186v1, (1998). 7-A.G. Agnese and R.Festa, arXiv:astro-ph/9910534v2. (1999). 8- A.B.Morcos, MG 12 , France (2009). 9- A.B.Morcs, Cospar 38 , Bremen , Germany (2010)

  15. Current challenges for confronting the public health problem of snakebite envenoming in Central America

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Snakebite envenoming is a serious public health problem in Central America, where approximately 5,500 cases occur every year. Panama has the highest incidence and El Salvador the lowest. The majority, and most severe, cases are inflicted by the pit viper Bothrops asper (family Viperidae), locally known as ‘terciopelo’, ‘barba amarilla’ or ‘equis’. About 1% of the bites are caused by coral snakes of the genus Micrurus (family Elapidae). Despite significant and successful efforts in Central America regarding snakebite envenomings in the areas of research, antivenom manufacture and quality control, training of health professionals in the diagnosis and clinical management of bites, and prevention of snakebites, much remains to be done in order to further reduce the impact of this medical condition. This essay presents seven challenges for improving the confrontation of snakebite envenoming in Central America. Overcoming these challenges demands a coordinated partnership of highly diverse stakeholders though inter-sectorial and inter-programmatic interventions. PMID:24602234

  16. Confronting AeroCom models with particle size distribution data from surface in situ stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Stephen; Fiebig, Markus; Mann, Graham; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The size distribution is the most important property for describing any interaction of an aerosol particle population with its surroundings. In first order, it determines both, the aerosol optical properties quantifying the direct aerosol climate effect, and the fraction of aerosol particles acting as cloud condensation nuclei quantifying the indirect aerosol climate effect. Aerosol schemes of modern climate models resolve the aerosol particle size distribution (APSD) explicitly. In improving the skill of climate models, it is therefore highly useful to confront these models with precision APSD data observed at surface stations. Corresponding previous work focussed on comparing size integrated, seasonal particle concentrations at selected sites with ensemble model averages to assess overall model skill. Building on this work, this project intends to refine the approach by comparing median particle size and integral concentration of fitted modal size distributions. It will also look at skill differences between models in order to find reasons for matches and discrepancies. The presentation will outline the project, and will elaborate on input requested from modelling groups to participate in the exercise.

  17. Confronting the relaxation mechanism for a large cosmological constant with observations

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, Spyros; Bauer, Florian; Solà, Joan E-mail: fbauerphysik@eml.cc

    2012-01-01

    In order to deal with a large cosmological constant a relaxation mechanism based on modified gravity has been proposed recently. By virtue of this mechanism the effect of the vacuum energy density of a given quantum field/string theory (no matter how big is its initial value in the early universe) can be neutralized dynamically, i.e. without fine tuning, and hence a Big Bang-like evolution of the cosmos becomes possible. Remarkably, a large class (F{sup n}{sub m}) of models of this kind, namely capable of dynamically adjusting the vacuum energy irrespective of its value and size, has been identified. In this paper, we carefully put them to the experimental test. By performing a joint likelihood analysis we confront these models with the most recent observational data on type Ia supernovae (SNIa), the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and the high redshift data on the expansion rate, so as to determine which ones are the most favored by observations. We compare the optimal relaxation models F{sup n}{sub m} found by this method with the standard or concordance ΛCDM model, and find that some of these models may appear as almost indistinguishable from it. Interestingly enough, this shows that it is possible to construct viable solutions to the tough cosmological fine tuning problem with models that display the same basic phenomenological features as the concordance model.

  18. Activity confrontation methods: A reflexive and metacognitive approach for interprofessional collaboration training.

    PubMed

    Aiguier, Gregory; Oboeuf, Alexandre; Cobbaut, Jean-Philippe; Vanpee, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Integration of interprofessional collaboration into healthcare education and training programmes has become a fundamental issue. Its objective is to learn how to collectively build collaborative care practice that addresses the uniqueness of each context and the specific situation of the patient. It is also about understanding the process of collectively building collaborative care practice in order to be able to apply it in different contexts. This article describes a study that aimed to examine the value of relying on activity confrontation methods to develop training. These methods consist of filming practitioners during an activity and encouraging them to analyse it. It was found that these methods encourage reflexive analysis of the motives for pursuing interprofessional action (identifying constitutive factors) but also a metacognitive approach on the conditions of learning (p < 0.01). In addition to the educational dimensions (methods and leadership positions) and organisational dimensions (frameworks), it was found that the patient's role is essential in developing interprofessional care practice and training (p < 0.01). Given the nature of these findings, this article goes on to suggest that the patient must be considered a "partner" in development and delivery of interprofessional learning and care. PMID:25625891

  19. The threat at home: Confronting the toxic legacy of the U. S. Military

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, S.

    1992-01-01

    The environmental problems that confront the military--and the communities where military facilities are located--are as varied and diverse as the military itself. Past waste management and mismanagement practices have led to large-scale contamination of soil and groundwater with toxic or hazardous fuels, solvents, trace metals, pesticides, explosives, and propellants. Nuclear production facilities generate mixed wastes, which contain both radioactive and toxic contaminants. Test sites and proving grounds are known to contain a large number of unexploded munitions buried in the soil, and a number of arsenals and ammunition plants store chemical weapons agents, which are no longer needed, such as mustard gas and nerve agents. The book is divided into three parts--[open quotes]The Threat[close quotes], [open quotes]Secret Legacies[close quotes], and [open quotes]Facing the Future[close quotes]. Shulman devotes separate chapters to individual facilities and sites, describing the environmental degradation and damage that has occurred. Through interviews with private citizens, the author portrays the anger and suspicion that exist in surrounding communities. The author describes the frustration of Congressional committees as well as military and contract personnel involved in cleanup, who decry the lack of guidance from the Pentagon.

  20. Moving from Requirements to Design Confronting Security Issues: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halkidis, Spyros T.; Chatzigeorgiou, Alexander; Stephanides, George

    Since the emergence of software security as a research area, it has been evident that security should be incorporated as early as possible in the software lifecycle. The advantage is that large gains can be achieved in terms of cost and effort compared to the introduction of security as an afterthought. The earliest possible phase to consider possible attacks is during requirements specification. A widely accepted approach to consider security in the requirements is the employment of misuse cases. In this paper we examine a case study to automatically generate a class diagram, based on the use and misuse cases present in the requirements. Particularly, we extend a natural language processing approach to move beyond a general domain model and produce a detailed class diagram. Moreover, security patterns are introduced in appropriate places of the design to confront the documented attacks and protect the threatened resources. Additionally, we perform an experimental study to investigate the tradeoff between the additional effort to mitigate the attacks and the security risk of the resulting system. Finally, the optimization problem of finding the smallest system regarding additional effort given a maximum acceptable risk is established and an appropriate algorithm to solve it is proposed.

  1. Understanding and confronting snakebite envenoming: The harvest of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, José María

    2016-01-01

    During 45 years, the Instituto Clodomiro Picado (ICP, University of Costa Rica) has developed an ambitious scientific, technological, productive, and social program aimed at providing a better understanding of snakes and their venoms, contributing to the development, production and distribution of antivenoms, improving the prevention and management of snakebite envenomings, and strengthening human resources in science and technology. Among other topics, its research agenda has focused on the local tissue alterations induced by viperid snake venoms, i.e. myonecrosis, hemorrhage, dermonecrosis, extracellular matrix degradation, lymphatic vessel damage, and inflammation. In addition, the preclinical efficacy of antivenoms has been thoroughly investigated, together with the technological development of novel antivenoms. ICP's project has been based on a philosophical frame characterized by: (a) An integrated approach for confronting the problem of snakebites, involving research, production, extension activities, and teaching; (b) a cooperative and team work perspective in the pursuit of scientific, technological, productive, and social goals; (c) a search for excellence and continuous improvement in the quality of its activities; and (d) a vision of solidarity and compassion, based on the realization that snakebite envenomings mostly affect impoverished vulnerable populations in the rural settings of developing countries. A key aspect in this program has been the consolidation of international partnerships with groups of all continents, within a frame of academic and social cooperation, some of which are described in this review. PMID:26615826

  2. Effects of Perceptual and Contextual Enrichment on Visual Confrontation Naming in Adult Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Yvonne; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Reilly, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of enriching line drawings with color/texture and environmental context as a facilitator of naming speed and accuracy in older adults. Method Twenty young and 23 older adults named high-frequency picture stimuli from the Boston Naming Test (Kaplan, Goodglass, & Weintraub, 2001) under three conditions: (a) black-and-white items, (b) colorized-texturized items, and (c) scene-primed colored items (e.g., “hammock” preceded 1,000 ms by a backyard scene). Results With respect to speeded naming latencies, mixed-model analyses of variance revealed that young adults did not benefit from colorization-texturization but did show scene-priming effects. In contrast, older adults failed to show facilitation effects from either colorized-texturized or scene-primed items. Moreover, older adults were consistently slower to initiate naming than were their younger counterparts across all conditions. Conclusions Perceptual and contextual enrichment of sparse line drawings does not appear to facilitate visual confrontation naming in older adults, whereas younger adults do tend to show benefits of scene priming. We interpret these findings as generally supportive of a processing speed account of age-related object picture-naming difficulty. PMID:21498581

  3. Confronting structural violence in sex work: lessons from a community-led HIV prevention project in Mysore, India.

    PubMed

    Argento, Elena; Reza-Paul, Sushena; Lorway, Robert; Jain, Jinendra; Bhagya, M; Fathima, Mary; Sreeram, S V; Hafeezur, Rahman Syed; O'Neil, John

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from community-led HIV prevention projects suggests that structural interventions may result in reduced rates of HIV and STIs. The complex relationship between empowerment and confronting stigma, discrimination and physical abuse necessitates further investigation into the impact that such interventions have on the personal risks for sex workers. This article aims to describe lived experiences of members from a sex worker's collective in Mysore, India and how they have confronted structural violence. The narratives highlight experiences of violence and the development and implementation of strategies that have altered the social, physical, and emotional environment for sex workers. Building an enabling environment was key to reducing personal risks inherent to sex work, emphasizing the importance of community-led structural interventions for sex workers in India. PMID:21218278

  4. Confronting the 21st century's hidden crisis: reducing human numbers by 80%.

    PubMed

    Smail, J K

    1995-08-01

    While there are some recent indications that fertility rates are beginning to decline, the current composite for most of the less-developed world is still nearly 4.1, double that needed for zero population growth. Only about 20% of the current world population (about 1.2 billion people) could be said to have a generally adequate standard of living, defined here as something approximating that of industrialized Western Europe, Japan, or North America. The other 80% (approximately 4.5 billion), incorporating most of the inhabitants of the developing nations, live in conditions ranging from mild deprivation to severe deficiency. Assertions that the earth might be able to support a population of 10, 15, or even 20 billion for an indefinite period of time at a standard of living superior to the present one are demonstrably false and misleading. It is therefore necessary to confront the inescapable fact that human numbers will have to be reduced by 80% or more, from the all-but-inevitable 9-11 billion in the mid-21st century to something approaching 2 billion by the end of the 22nd century, some 200 years from now. If it is indeed inevitable that global population size is destined to reach 10-12 billion within the next half century, even efforts to reach a somewhat larger optimum population in the 4-5 billion range would still require a very significant decrease in human numbers, roughly on the order of 60%. In pragmatic terms, the initial stabilization and subsequent 80% reduction in human numbers suggested earlier could be brought about with relative ease by establishing a worldwide average fertility rate of approximately 1.5-1.7 over the next several generations lasting well into the 22nd century at least. PMID:12178984

  5. Control of leucocyte differentiation from embryonic stem cells upon vasculogenesis and confrontation with tumour tissue.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Madeleine; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Sauer, Heinrich; Wartenberg, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells spontaneously differentiate capillary-like structures as well as leucocytes such as monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer (NK) cells and cytototoxic T lymphocytes. The interplay between vasculogenesis and leucocyte differentiation as well as the population of tumour tissues with ES cell-derived leucocytes and endothelial cells is, however, not sufficiently specified. In the present study, gene expression of the cell surface markers CD68 and CD14 (expressed on monocytes and macrophages), Mac-1 (CD11b) (expressed on granulocytes, monocytes and NK cells) and CD16 (expressed on neutrophils) was investigated in murine CGR8 ES cells in relation to the endothelial cell markers CD31 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. Expression of leucocyte markers increased from day 7-8 of cell culture on. Furthermore, addition of macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the cell culture medium resulted in a threefold increase in the number of CD68(+) monocytes/macrophages. Treatment of embryoid bodies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) up-regulated CD14 thus suggesting functionality of the CD14 LPS receptor. Differentiation of vascular structures positive for CD31 and VE-cadherin preceded leucocyte differentiation by 2 days (i.e. from day 5-6 on) suggesting that vasculogenesis may be a determinant of leucocyte differentiation. Consequently the Flk-1 antagonist SU5416 which inhibits vasculogenesis of ES cells significantly blunted leucocyte differentiation. Confrontation culture of embryoid bodies with multicellular breast tumour spheroids initiated significant increase of leucocyte cell numbers and invasion of leucocytes into the tumour tissue. In summary our data demonstrate that during ES cell differentiation vasculogenesis precedes leucocyte differentiation, and point towards the direction that leucocyte cell invasion into tumour tissue may initiate the pro-inflammatory microenvironment necessary for tumour vascularization. PMID:20414974

  6. Health behaviors and their correlates among participants in the Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey

    PubMed Central

    Müllerová, Hana; Landis, Sarah H; Aisanov, Zaurbek; Davis, Kourtney J; Ichinose, Masakazu; Mannino, David M; Maskell, Joe; Menezes, Ana M; van der Molen, Thys; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Tabberer, Maggie; Han, MeiLan K

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims We used data from the Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey to test the hypothesis that patients with COPD who report less engagement with their disease management are also more likely to report greater impact of the disease. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional survey of 4,343 subjects aged ≥40 years from 12 countries, fulfilling a case definition of COPD based on self-reported physician diagnosis or symptomatology. The impact of COPD was measured with COPD Assessment Test, modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, and hospital admissions and emergency department visits for COPD in the prior year. The 13-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13) instrument and the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) were used to measure patient disease engagement and medication adherence, respectively. Results Twenty-eight percent of subjects reported being either disengaged or struggling with their disease (low engagement: PAM-13 levels 1 and 2), and 35% reported poor adherence (MMAS-8 <6). In univariate analyses, lower PAM-13 and MMAS-8 scores were significantly associated with poorer COPD-specific health status, greater breathlessness and lower BMI (PAM-13 only), less satisfaction with their doctor’s management of COPD, and more emergency department visits. In multivariate regression models, poor satisfaction with their doctor’s management of COPD was significantly associated with both low PAM-13 and MMAS-8 scores; low PAM-13 scores were additionally independently associated with higher COPD Assessment Test and modified Medical Research Council scores and low BMI (underweight). Conclusion Poor patient engagement and medication adherence are frequent and associated with worse COPD-specific health status, higher health care utilization, and lower satisfaction with health care providers. More research will be needed to better understand what factors can be modified to improve medication adherence and

  7. The burden of COPD in Italy: results from the Confronting COPD survey.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, R; Rossi, A; Cerveri, I

    2003-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease state characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible, and progressive lung function decline. In Italy, an estimated 2.6 million men and women have COPD, and the disease causes around 18 000 deaths each year. In addition to mortality, morbidity from COPD results in substantial use of secondary healthcare resources. The burden of COPD in Italy may be due to the underdiagnosis of the disease by healthcare professionals, particularly in the early stages of the disease, and a lack of awareness among physicians of recommended treatment practices. In an attempt to address the need for information on the burden of COPD, a large-scale international survey, Confronting COPD in North America and Europe, assessed clinical outcomes, use of healthcare resources and loss of productivity in the workplace, and the economic cost of this disease in Italy and six other countries. In Italy, the economic analysis of the survey data showed that the mean annual cost of COPD to the healthcare system was Euro 1261.25 per patient Indirect costs were estimated at Euro 47.29 per patient, bringing the societal cost of the disease to Euro 1308.54 per patient. Three-quarters of the direct per patient cost of COPD in Italy were accounted for by inpatient hospitalizations (Euro 963.10), suggesting that interventions aimed at preventing exacerbations could alleviate the burden of COPD in Italy. The high impact of COPD on the Italian healthcare system is also likely to be a consequence of the underdiagnosis and undertreatment of the disease, suggesting that costs may be reduced by increasing the utilization of spirometry as a diagnostic tool, and improving physician adherence to treatment guidelines. Patients with severe COPD and other comorbidities showed higher costs (Euro 6366 and Euro 1861, respectively) than patients with mild disease (Euro 441) or no comorbidities (Euro 1021), underlying the importance of smoking

  8. Confronting the Challenges of Climate Literacy at the High School Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, N.; Ledley, T. S.; Bardar, E.; Dunlap, C.; Youngman, B.; McNeal, K. S.; Libarkin, J.

    2011-12-01

    Confronting the Challenges of Climate Literacy (CCCL) is a research and development project designed to help high school students grasp the range of temporal and spatial scales at which climate can be defined and at which Earth system processes occur. CCCL includes three lab-based climate curriculum modules and a strong professional development component that helps partner teachers strengthen their own understanding of climate literacy and develop into climate literacy professional development providers. The research and evaluation components of this 4-year project provide essential guidance as they probe the efficacy of the evolving curriculum units, the professional development component, and the teamwork that is essential to the success of the project. In this session we will review the three curriculum modules, covering the Cryosphere, Weather and Climate, and Carbon, which comprise the CCCL sequence now being pilot-tested. We will identify ways in which we address some of the well-know misconceptions about climate and the Earth system that impede student understanding, as well as the approaches we are using to strengthen students grasp of the challenging range of temporal and spatial scales at which Earth system processes and climate occur. We will describe the professional development component of the program, which draws teachers from Mississippi and Texas into a partnership with curriculum developers to contribute to the curriculum modules, pilot test the modules in their classrooms, and eventually lead professional development workshops for their peers. We will also identify the key research questions around student learning that we will be exploring when the teachers engaged in the professional development implement the revised modules in their classrooms.

  9. Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey: Economic Impact of COPD in 12 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Jason; Landis, Sarah H.; Maskell, Joe; Oh, Yeon-Mok; van der Molen, Thys; Han, MeiLan K.; Mannino, David M.; Ichinose, Masakazu; Punekar, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Background The Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey estimated the prevalence and burden of COPD across 12 countries. Using data from this survey we evaluated the economic impact of COPD. Methods This cross-sectional, population-based survey questioned 4,343 subjects aged 40 years and older, fulfilling a case definition of COPD based on self-reported physician diagnosis or symptomatology. Direct cost measures were based on exacerbations of COPD (treated and those requiring emergency department visits and/or hospitalisation), contacts with healthcare professionals, and COPD medications. Indirect costs were calculated from work loss values using the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment scale. Combined direct and indirect costs estimated the total societal costs per patient. Results The annual direct costs of COPD ranged from $504 (South Korea) to $9,981 (USA), with inpatient hospitalisations (5 countries) and home oxygen therapy (3 countries) being the key drivers of direct costs. The proportion of patients completely prevented from working due to their COPD ranged from 6% (Italy) to 52% (USA and UK) with 8 countries reporting this to be ≥20%. Total societal costs per patient varied widely from $1,721 (Russia) to $30,826 (USA) but a consistent pattern across countries showed greater costs among those with increased burden of COPD (symptoms, health status and more severe disease) and a greater number of comorbidities. Conclusions The economic burden of COPD is considerable across countries, and requires targeted resources to optimise COPD management encompassing the control of symptoms, prevention of exacerbations and effective treatment of comorbidities. Strategies to allow COPD patients to remain in work are important for addressing the substantial wider societal costs. PMID:27092775

  10. The burden of COPD in the U.K.: results from the Confronting COPD survey.

    PubMed

    Britton, M

    2003-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a condition characterized by progressive airflow limitation and decline in lung function. As seen in other developed countries throughout the world, COPD in the U.K is associated with considerable mortality, and morbidity from the disease places a significant burden on the healthcare system and society. Despite the obvious burden of COPD in this country, there is a lack of recognition of COPD among the general public. Healthcare professionals may also fail to recognize the burden of disease, as shown by underdiagnosis and inadequate managemen. A key step in increasing awareness of the burden of COPD is obtaining comprehensive information about the impact of the disease on patients, the health service and society. The large-scale international survey, Confronting COPD in North America and Europe, aimed to address this need for information, by interviewing patients and physicians in eight countries. An economic analysis of patient responses to the survey in the U.K showed that COPD places a high burden on the healthcare system and society with annual direct costs estimated at pounds 819.42 per patient, and indirect cost at pound 819.66 per patient resulting in total per patient costs of pound 1639.08. The cost impact of the disease was particularly marked in secondary care, as a result of inpatient hospitalizations, amounting to 54% of direct costs. These results suggest that reducing patient requirement for hospital care could alleviate the burden of COPD on the U.K. healthcare system. This will require considerable improvements to the way the disease is managed by healthcare professionals in primary care, with earlier diagnosis and the use of interventions aimed at preventing exacerbations and delaying the progression of disease. PMID:12647945

  11. Confronting the realities of implementing contextual learning ideas in a biology classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Julia B.

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the implementation of contextual learning practices in a biology class. Research contends that contextual learning classrooms are active learning environments where students are involved in "hands-on" team projects and the teacher assumes a facilitator role. In this student-centered classroom, students take ownership and responsibility for their own learning. This study examined these assertions and other factors that emerged as the study developed. The research methods used were qualitative. The subject for this study was a biology teacher with twenty-six years of experience who implemented contextual learning practices in two of her biology classes in the 1997--98 school year. As the teacher confronted contextual learning, we engaged in collaborative research that included fourteen interviews transcribed verbatim for analysis, classroom observations and the teacher's written reports. Throughout the study, factors developed that adversely affected contextual learning practices. These factors were discipline, curriculum, and administrative decisions over which the teacher had no control. These are examined along with their consequences for implementing a contextual classroom. Successful practices that worked in the teacher's classroom were also determined and included the teacher's "failure is not an option" policy, mandatory tutoring, behavior contracts, high expectations and teamed projects. Besides contextual learning, a key component of the study was the collaborative research process and its meaning to the subject, the researcher and future researchers who attempt this collaborative approach. The study's conclusion indicate that scheduling, multiple repeaters, discipline and the state Standards of Learning moved the teacher away from contextual learning practices to a more teacher-directed classroom. Two recommendations of this study are that further research is needed to study how the state Standards of Learning have

  12. 12 CFR 347.106 - Going concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Going concerns. 347.106 Section 347.106 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.106 Going concerns. Going concerns. If a bank acquires an equity interest in a... revenues of the foreign organization may be attributable to activities that are not permissible under §...

  13. 12 CFR 347.106 - Going concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Going concerns. 347.106 Section 347.106 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.106 Going concerns. Going concerns. If a bank acquires an equity interest in a... revenues of the foreign organization may be attributable to activities that are not permissible under §...

  14. 12 CFR 347.106 - Going concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Going concerns. 347.106 Section 347.106 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.106 Going concerns. Going concerns. If a bank acquires an equity interest in a... revenues of the foreign organization may be attributable to activities that are not permissible under §...

  15. 12 CFR 347.106 - Going concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Going concerns. 347.106 Section 347.106 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.106 Going concerns. Going concerns. If a bank acquires an equity interest in a... revenues of the foreign organization may be attributable to activities that are not permissible under §...

  16. 12 CFR 347.106 - Going concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Going concerns. 347.106 Section 347.106 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.106 Going concerns. Going concerns. If a bank acquires an equity interest in a... revenues of the foreign organization may be attributable to activities that are not permissible under §...

  17. Development and Validation of a Concerns Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Archie

    The Stages of Concern (SoC) Questionnaire was developed in order to measure the attitudes of individuals toward innovation. The Concerns Based Adoption Model provided the theoretical basis for the instrument. According to this model, individuals are first concerned with themselves, later with the details of the task, and finally with the impact of…

  18. "I Just Don't like that Kid": Confronting and Managing Personal Feelings about Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Sue

    2008-01-01

    All good teachers try hard to treat each child fairly and kindly, with care and concern. Indeed, they are ethically obliged to do so (National Association for the Education of Young Children [NAEYC], 2005). As they are human, however, they may occasionally meet a child to whom they react negatively. It is not something to be proud of, but they…

  19. Taking a Stand: Confronting the Costs and Benefits of Divestment. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neururer, Julie

    Nonmonetary costs of the divestiture from U.S. corporations that do business with South Africa are examined, based on four case studies of colleges. Hidden costs concern the realm of beliefs, values, and perceptions and include the costs to: community standards, public relations, corporate links, institutional identity, cohesion, social…

  20. Confronting Cyber-Bullying: What Schools Need to Know to Control Misconduct and Avoid Legal Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shariff, Shaheen

    2009-01-01

    This book is directed to academics, educators, and government policy-makers who are concerned about addressing emerging cyber-bullying and anti-authority student expressions through the use of cell phone and Internet technologies. There is a current policy vacuum relating to the extent of educators' legal responsibilities to intervene when such…

  1. Confronting the "Threat" of Private Practice: Challenges for Social Work Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Philip; Barker, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Few graduate social work curricula include training in private practice. A study found that attitudes of social work faculty and students concerning this issue differ significantly. It is suggested that creative approaches for integrating the realities of professional practice with the traditional values and mission of social work be developed.…

  2. Confronting the Ubiquity of Electronic Communication and Social Media: Ethical and Legal Considerations for Psychoeducational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demers, Joseph A.; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Most U.S. children and adults use computers and the Internet on a daily basis. The pervasiveness of electronic communication in a variety of contexts, including home and school, raises ethical and legal concerns for school psychologists and those in related fields of practice, because of the risks to privacy and confidentiality, boundaries,…

  3. Current Issues: Critical Issues Confronting the Nation and the World. 1996 Edition [and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close Up Foundation, Arlington, VA.

    This book accompanied by the Teacher's guide, focuses on policy issues being discussed and debated by U.S. policymakers. The book provides essays on current issues facing the nation and the world. Ten chapters highlight domestic policy issues and 10 chapters are about foreign policy issues. This book informs readers about important concerns of…

  4. Current Issues: Critical Issues Confronting the Nation and the World. 1989 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Charles R., Ed.

    This book investigates a variety of contemporary issues, both domestic U.S. concerns and those of an international focus that involve the United States. The introduction develops the context of the book by discussing the Reagan legacy, the 101st Congress, the Supreme Court, and the making of the U.S. federal budget. The domestic policy issues of…

  5. Confronting Our Discomfort: Clearing the Way for Anti-Bias in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Tamar

    Despite having a genuine concern about racism and oppression, many early childhood teachers encounter significant feelings of discomfort as they try to implement antibias values in their classrooms. Based on the view that it is not possible to authentically teach children about acceptance without engaging in reflection upon one's own values and…

  6. When Educators Confront Child Abuse: An Analysis of the Decision to Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crenshaw, Wesley B.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Five scenarios of child abuse were used to study the recognition and reporting of child abuse by 664 teachers, counselors, school psychologists, principals, and district superintendents. Areas of concern included: reporting rates, effects of victim and reporter gender, and knowledge of and support for mandatory reporting among educators. (SW)

  7. Responding to climate change: Adélie Penguins confront astronomical and ocean boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Grant; Toniolo, Viola; Ainley, David G; Parkinson, Claire L; Arrigo, Kevin R; Trathan, Phil N

    2010-07-01

    Long-distance migration enables many organisms to take advantage of lucrative breeding and feeding opportunities during summer at high latitudes and then to move to lower, more temperate latitudes for the remainder of the year. The latitudinal range of the Adélie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) spans approximately 22 degrees. Penguins from northern colonies may not migrate, but due to the high latitude of Ross Island colonies, these penguins almost certainly undertake the longest migrations for the species. Previous work has suggested that Adélies require both pack ice and some ambient light at all times of year. Over a three-year period, which included winters of both extensive and reduced sea ice, we investigated characteristics of migratory routes and wintering locations of Adélie Penguins from two colonies of very different size on Ross Island, Ross Sea, the southernmost colonies for any penguin. We acquired data from 3-16 geolocation sensor tags (GLS) affixed to penguins each year at both Cape Royds and Cape Crozier in 2003-2005. Migrations averaged 12760 km, with the longest being 17 600 km, and were in part facilitated by pack ice movement. Trip distances varied annually, but not by colony. Penguins rarely traveled north of the main sea-ice pack, and used areas with high sea-ice concentration, ranging from 75% to 85%, about 500 km inward from the ice edge. They also used locations where there was some twilight (2-7 h with sun < 6 degrees below the horizon). We report the present Adélie Penguin migration pattern and conjecture on how it probably has changed over the past approximately 12000 years, as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet withdrew southward across the Ross Sea, a situation that no other Adélie Penguin population has had to confront. As sea ice extent in the Ross Sea sector decreases in the near future, as predicted by climate models, we can expect further changes in the migration patterns of the Ross Sea penguins. PMID:20715628

  8. Economic analysis of the Confronting COPD survey: an overview of results.

    PubMed

    Wouters, E F M

    2003-03-01

    An economic analysis of data from a large-scale international survey, Confronting COPD in North America and Europe, was conducted in seven countries (Canada, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, the U.K and the U.SA.), to investigate the burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The results demonstrated the high economic impact of COPD on the healthcare system and society in each country. The mean annual direct costs of the disease were particularly high in the U.S.A. (US dollar 4119 per patient) and Spain (US dollar 3196 per patient) but relatively low in The Netherlands (US dollar 606) and France (US dollar 522). Lost productivity due to COPD had a particularly high impact on the economy in France, The Netherlands and the U.K, accounting for 67%, 50% and 41% of overall costs, respectively. The total societal cost of COPD per patient ranged from over US dollar 5646 in the U.S.A. to US dollar 1023 in The Netherlands. In five out of seven countries, the majority (52-84%) of direct costs associated with COPD were due to inpatient hospitalizations. As acute exacerbations of COPD are a key driver of secondary care costs, interventions aimed at preventing and treating exacerbations effectively could significantly reduce the economic impact of this disease. In all of the participating counties, COPD was underdiagnosed and undertreated. Between 9% and 30% of patients were undiagnosed despite having symptoms consistent with COPD, and up to 65% of patients did not receive regular prescribed medication. Patients reported poor symptom control and considerable use of healthcare resources. Therefore, reducing the burden of COPD will involve better evaluation and diagnosis of patients with COPD, as well as improved management of chronic COPD symptoms by healthcare professionals. The survey also demonstrated that the societal costs of COPD were 4-17 times higher in patients with severe COPD than in patients with mild COPD. Patients with comorbid conditions

  9. Confronting multi-year idealized LES with measurements at a mid-latitude meteorological site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schemann, V.; Neggers, R.; Wegener, C.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) at permanent meteorological sites is increasingly being used for the evaluation and improvement of parameterizations of fast boundary-layer physics for weather and climate models. Typically, idealized LES are generated that represent fine-scale downscalings of a large-scale model state at locations of interest, resolved at temporal and spatial resolutions at which turbulence and boundary layer clouds can be expected to be resolved. The setup relies on prescribed large-scale forings in combination with continuous nudging, at a time-scale large enough to allow the resolved fast physics to have enough freedom to establish their own, unique state. This study critically assesses the representativeness of such long-term LES, and asks to what degree the continuous nudging affects the budgets of thermodynamic state variables. To this purpose long-term, multi-year LES is confronted with relevant observations at a European midlatitude continental site. The large-scale advective forcings and surface properties used to drive the LES are derived from analyses of the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Evaluated aspects of the boundary layer include near-surface meteorology, vertical structure, and bulk properties including clouds. The evaluation focuses on the diurnal cycle, with the oservational datasets derived from state-of-the-art instrumentation at the Juelich Observatory for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE) in Germany. Conditional sampling is used to highlight results for regimes of interest, including the clear convective and shallow cumulus topped boundary layer. We find that the LES is able to reproduce the observed amplitude and time-variation of key boundary layer properties, including clouds. Budget studies of the thermodynamic state variables reveal that a rough balance exists between the prescribed larger-scale advection and the turbulence/convection as resolved by the

  10. 48 CFR 752.219-8 - Utilization of small business concerns and small disadvantaged business concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... business concerns and small disadvantaged business concerns. 752.219-8 Section 752.219-8 Federal... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 752.219-8 Utilization of small business concerns and small disadvantaged business concerns. The Foreign Assistance Act calls for USAID to give...