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Sample records for congenital diseases

  1. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart disease is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Congenital heart disease (CHD) can describe a number of different problems affecting the heart. It is the most common ...

  2. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  3. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  4. Congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation is an essential process by which sugars are attached to proteins and lipids. Complete lack of glycosylation is not compatible with life. Because of the widespread function of glycosylation, inherited disorders of glycosylation are multisystemic. Since the identification of the first defect on N-linked glycosylation in the 1980s, there are over 40 different congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases. This review will include defects of N-linked glycosylation, O-linked glycosylation and disorders of combined N- and O-linked glycosylation. PMID:23776380

  5. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  7. Health in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Judith A A E; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many adults with congenital heart disease encounter late complications. Late morbidity can be related to the congenital heart defect itself, but may also be the consequence of the surgical or medical treatment or longstanding alterations in hemodynamics, neurodevelopment and psychosocial development. This narrative review describes the cardiac and non-cardiac long-term morbidity in the adult population with congenital heart disease. PMID:27451323

  8. Arrhythmias in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Robert M.; Tseng, Zian H.

    2014-01-01

    Late after surgical repair of complex congenital heart disease, atrial arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death are a major cause of mortality. The six cases in this article highlight common challenges in the management of arrhythmias in the adult congenital heart disease population. PMID:25197326

  9. Critical congenital heart disease screening

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A.; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  10. Critical congenital heart disease screening.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  11. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  12. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  13. Congenital and Genetic Disease in Domestic Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, John J.

    1972-01-01

    Reviews observations on domestic animals that have led to the identification of environmental teratogens, and have provided insight into the pathogenesis of congenital defects and genetic diseases in man." (Author/AL)

  14. Flying and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Macartney, F J

    1984-03-01

    Only those congenital defects carrying a very low risk of complication (either before or after surgical correction) were considered. Atrial Septal Defects--(a) Ostium primum defects should be treated with caution either before or after surgical correction because of the risk of progressive conduction disorders and mitral regurgitation. (b) Ostium secundum defects could be considered for licensing (if the defect is small) or with surgical repair if the right ventricular systolic pressure is normal. (c) Sinus venosus defects--if too small to require surgical repair, licensing may be considered provided ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring shows no evidence of arrhythmias. Surgery increases the risk of sino-atrial disease, thus licensing should be permitted only where there is no evidence of arrhythmia and adequate cardiological follow-up is possible. Ventricular Septal Defects--Subjects with very small defects not requiring surgical closure may be considered for licensing. Subjects who have had surgical closure have a risk of arrhythmias and should be carefully evaluated. Pulmonary Stenosis--If mild (either before or after surgery) may be licensed, but regular assessment perhaps including right heart catheterization is needed to demonstrate stability of the lesion. Persistent Ductus Arteriosus--Surgical closure should be recommended on diagnosis and need not affect licensing. Isolated Bicuspid Aortic Valve--Need not debar from licensing, but careful annual examination (with electrocardiogram 2-D echocardiography and fluroscopy ) is required to detect calcification, stenosis or regurgitation. Coarctation of aorta--Subjects who have had a repair before the age of 12 years may be considered for licensing after examination of other risk factors (blood pressure at rest and on exercise in particular). Those repaired over the age of 12 may be considered for restricted licensing if normotensive. These recommendations will need review in the light of further long

  15. Functional Assessment for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed. PMID:24653734

  16. Congenital Chagas disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Yves; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Buekens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Congenital infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is a global problem, occurring on average in 5% of children born from chronically infected mothers in endemic areas, with variations depending on the region. This presentation aims to focus on and update epidemiological data, research methods, involved factors, control strategy and possible prevention of congenital infection with T. cruzi. Considering that etiological treatment of the child is always effective if performed before one year of age, the diagnosis of infection in pregnant women and their newborns has to become the standard of care and integrated into the surveillance programs of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus. In addition to the standard tests, polymerase chain reaction performed on blood of neonates of infected mothers one month after birth might improve the diagnosis of congenital infection. Recent data bring out that its transmission can be prevented through treatment of infected women before they become pregnant. The role of parasite genotypes and host genetic factors in parasite transmission and development of infection in foetuses/neonates has to be more investigated in order to better estimate the risk factors and impact on health of congenital infection with T. cruzi. PMID:25760448

  17. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease. PMID:26413101

  18. Congenital syphilis: subtle presentation of fulminant disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M L; Lynn, A W; Klein, L E; Balkowiec, K S

    1997-02-01

    The incidence of congenital syphilis has experienced a fourfold to fivefold increase in 6 years. It is a completely preventable disease whose clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic infection, to fulminant sepsis, to death. Congenital syphilis was diagnosed in a 6-week-old infant whose mother was negative for the disease by prenatal screen. The otherwise well child presented with a generalized, papulosquamous eruption of 3 weeks' duration but within hours multisystem failure developed from overwhelming treponemal sepsis. Factors related to increased incidence, problems in serodiagnosis, manifestations of the early versus late forms of the disease, and recommendations for evaluation and treatment are illustrated by this patient and are discussed. PMID:9039217

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension and Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Roth, Todd S; Aboulhosn, Jamil A

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) is a frequent complication in adults with congenital heart disease. Regardless of etiology, the optimal treatment strategy for this difficult population is challenging. The new frontier of targeted PAH therapies has demonstrated improved functional capacity in the various phenotypes of PAH-CHD, with work currently in progress scrutinizing outcomes. In those who fail conventional medical therapy, heart and heart-lung (block) transplantation become the final therapeutic options, with the role of ventricular assist devices and the total artificial heart still under investigation in this group. PMID:27443136

  20. Congenital von Willebrand's disease and clinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hassan, S; Qureshi, W; Donthireddy, V; Kuriakose, P

    2013-03-01

    Data from case reports and systematic reviews suggest an association of Hypothyroidism and Acquired von Willebrand's syndrome. It is not known if congenital von Willebrand's disease is associated with hypothyroidism in a similar way. The aim of this study was to identify the association of congenital von Willebrand's disease (VWD) with clinical hypothyroidism. A total of 350 cases of congenital VWD were initially screened from our institution database from 1985 to 2010. A careful review of patient records was carried out to see if patients truly had congenital VWD and coexisting clinical hypothyroidism. Patients with uncertain diagnoses or other bleeding disorders were excluded, leading to 197 patients remaining in the final sample. A random age- and sex-matched parallel control group was also obtained from the hospital database. Of 197 patients (mean age 43.8 ± 17.5 years, women 72%) of congenital VWD, 32/197 (16%) were diagnosed with clinical hypothyroidism, while only 11/197 (5.6%) of the matched controls were clinically hypothyroid. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated that VWD was an independent predictor of developing clinical hypothyroidism (OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.65-7.22, P = 0.001). The proportion of patients diagnosed with clinical hypothyroidism was more in the VWD group (P < 0.0001). Our analysis shows a strong association of clinical hypothyroidism in patients with congenital VWD, but future studies will be required to delineate a pathological mechanism. In our opinion, clinicians should consider checking thyroid function in the newly diagnosed and established cases of congenital VWD. PMID:23171382

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. PMID:26471823

  2. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sermer, Mathew; Silversides, Candice K

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in paediatric congenital heart surgery, there are a growing number of women with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching childbearing age. Pregnancy, however, is associated with haemodynamic stresses which can result in cardiac decompensation in women with CHD. Many women with CHD are aware of their cardiac condition prior to pregnancy, and preconception counselling is an important aspect of their care. Preconception counselling allows women to make informed pregnancy decisions, provides an opportunity for modifications of teratogenic medications and, when necessary, repair of cardiac lesions prior to pregnancy. Less commonly, the haemodynamic changes of pregnancy unmask a previously unrecognised heart lesion. In general, pregnancy outcomes are favourable for women with CHD, but there are some cardiac lesions that carry high risk for both the mother and the baby, and this group of women require care by an experienced multidisciplinary team. This review discusses preconception counselling including contraception, an approach to risk stratification and management recommendations in women with some common CHDs.

  3. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Elizabeth; Lesage, Flore; Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Hewitt, Richard; Janes, Sam M; Deprest, Jan A; Coppi, Paolo De

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper airway obstruction could take advantage from a de novo tissue engineering approach. Moreover, the international acceptance of the EXIT procedure as a means of securing the precarious neonatal airway, together with the advent of fetal surgery as a method of heading off postnatal co-morbidities, offers the revolutionary possibility of extending the clinical indication for tissue-engineered airway transplantation to infants affected by diverse severe congenital laryngotracheal malformations. This article outlines the necessary basic components for regenerative medicine solutions in this potential clinical niche. PMID:27301606

  4. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Oster, Matthew E; Kochilas, Lazaros

    2016-03-01

    Screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the United States Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Since that time, CCHD screening with pulse oximetry has become nearly universal for newborns born in the United States. There are various algorithms in use. Although the goal of the screening program is to identify children who may have CCHD, most newborns who have a low oxygen saturation will not have CCHD. Further study is needed to determine optimal guidelines for CCHD screening in special settings such as the neonatal intensive care unit, areas in high altitude, and home births. PMID:26876122

  5. Congenital Heart Disease and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Mike John; Shapiro, Adam J; Kennedy, Marcus Peter

    2016-03-01

    Through the better understanding of the genetics and clinical associations of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), an autosomal recessive disorder of ciliary motility and mucociliary clearance, the association between PCD and heterotaxic congenital heart disease (CHD) has been established. In parallel, research into the cause of CHD has elucidated further the role of ciliary function on the development of normal cardiovascular structure. Increased awareness by clinicians regarding this elevated risk of PCD in patients with CHD will allow for more comprehensive screening and identification of cases in this high-risk group with earlier diagnosis leading to improved health outcomes. PMID:26545972

  6. Atrial Macroreentry in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Darragh J; Sanders, Prashanthan; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C

    2015-01-01

    Macroreentrant atrial tachycardia is a common complication following surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD), and is often highly symptomatic with potentially significant hamodynamic consequences. Medical management is often unsuccessful, requiring the use of invasive procedures. Cavotricuspid isthmus dependent flutter is the most common circuit but atypical circuits also exist, involving sites of surgical intervention or areas of scar related to abnormal hemodynamics. Ablation can be technically challenging, due to complex anatomy, and difficulty with catheter stability. A thorough assessment of the pa-tients status and pre-catheter ablation planning is critical to successfully managing these patients. PMID:25308809

  7. Haemostatic defects in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, P; Värendh, G; Lundström, N R

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of defects of the haemostatic mechanism in 41 children with cyanotic congenital heart disease concluded that such abnormalities were common and normally involved factors synthesised in the liver, that is the vitamin K dependent factors (rothrombin, factors VII and IX) and factor V. No evidence was found of activation of the coagulation or fibrinolytic systems. The defects can be explained by deficient synthesis resulting from systemic hypoxia as well as from sluggishness of the local microcirculation caused by high blood viscosity. Vitamin K parenterally had no demonstrable effect. Replacement of these factors, possibly combined with measures to improve the microcirculation, therefore, appears to be the appropriate treatment. PMID:426953

  8. Evaluation of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Francesca; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana

    2016-03-01

    The clinical approach to adults with congenital heart diseases (ACHDs) is unique in cardiovascular medicine because these patients encompass a broad range of presentations. Each patient, despite having similar diagnosis, will be anatomically and physiologically unlike others within ACHD population, in relation to the type of repair, age at repair, associated defects, with specific long-term risk factors and complications. Furthermore, as many patients will not complain of symptoms, clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing must also be based on the underlying main diagnostic category, with complete standardized lesion-specific clinical protocols, investigating all known risk factors specific for each congenital heart disease and performed as part of screening for significant long-term complications. The first part of this review will focus on clinical history, physical examination, and the most important diagnostic testing in ACHD population. The second part of the article will focus on some clinical issues we have to face in our daily practice, such as heart failure, cyanosis, and pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, as survival rates of ACHD population continue to improve and patients with this condition live longer, we will briefly report on a new clinical concern regarding the impact of acquired morbidities like coronary artery disease that appear to be of greater importance in defining outcome in older patients with ACHD. PMID:26957402

  9. Computerized screening of children congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Amir A; Hancq, Joel; Dutoit, Thierry; Gharehbaghi, Arash; Kocharian, Armen; Kiani, A

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for automated screening of congenital heart diseases in children through heart sound analysis techniques. Our method relies on categorizing the pathological murmurs based on the heart sections initiating them. We show that these pathelogical murmur categories can be identified by examining the heart sound energy over specific frequency bands, which we call, Arash-Bands. To specify the Arash-Band for a category, we evaluate the energy of the heart sound over all possible frequency bands. The Arash-Band is the frequency band that provides the lowest error in clustering the instances of that category against the normal ones. The energy content of the Arash-Bands for different categories constitue a feature vector that is suitable for classification using a neural network. In order to train, and to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we use a training data-bank, as well as a test data-bank, collectively consisting of ninety samples (normal and abnormal). Our results show that in more than 94% of cases, our method correctly identifies children with congenital heart diseases. This percentage improves to 100%, when we use the Jack-Knife validation method over all the 90 samples. PMID:18718691

  10. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  11. A neonate with critical congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jarrett; Dawson, Emily; Williams, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is defined as a ductal-dependent congenital heart defect requiring surgical or percutaneous intervention via cardiac catheterization before 1 year of age. Most cases of CCHD can be diagnosed with prenatal ultrasound or fetal echocardiogram. If not prenatally diagnosed, CCHD can be stable in the newborn nursery due to persistent ductal patency, and the patient may only be diagnosed after ductal closure and development of cardiac symptoms at home. In this case, a 6-day-old female presented to the emergency department (ED) floppy with agonal respirations, poor capillary refill, and absent femoral pulses. On the day of presentation, the patient became increasingly fussy, refused feeding, and began to gasp. The patient was transported to the ED for evaluation, where a bedside echocardiogram revealed interrupted aortic arch (IAA), ventricular septal defect, minimal flow through a thread-like ductus arteriosus, and severely depressed cardiac function. IAA is very rare, with an incidence of three cases per 1 million live births. Patients require neonatal supportive care, continuous prostaglandin E1 infusion, and urgent referral for neonatal surgical repair in the first days to weeks of life. To reduce the volume of undiagnosed CCHD in the immediate newborn period, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Diseases in Newborns and Children (SACHDNC) recommended that CCHD screening via pulse oximetry be added to the recommended uniform screening panel. A positive screen results in an immediate referral for an echocardiogram. Fetal diagnosis, newborn screening, and/or careful clinical examination may have resulted in detection of IAA in our patient prior to ductal closure. PMID:24877491

  12. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect. PMID:27323105

  13. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kimberly Y; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    On March 16, 2012, the Ethics of the Heart 2012: Ethical and Policy Challenges in Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Conference took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The first session focused on the ethics surrounding genetic testing in patients with congenital heart disease. Summarized here is the introductory presentation given by Dr Elizabeth Goldmuntz entitled "The Role of Genetic Testing in Congenital Heart Disease," followed by a case presentation given by Dr Lisa D'Alessandro. The case and the panel discussion that ensued highlight several ethical principles and challenges in this unique patient population. PMID:23799755

  14. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  15. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  16. MicroRNAs in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tanya; Rajakaruna, Cha; Caputo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a broad term which encompasses a spectrum of pathology, the most common phenotypes include atrial septal defects (ASDs), ventricular septal defects (VSDs), patent ductus arteriosus (PAD) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). The impact of CHD is profound and it is estimated to be responsible for over 40% of prenatal deaths. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, highly conserved, non-coding RNAs which have complex roles in a variety of pathophysiological states. miRs are post-transcriptional negative regulators of gene expression. Individual miRs are known to exert effects in multiple target genes, therefore the altered expression of a single miR could influence an entire gene network resulting in complex pathological states. Recent evidences suggest a role in the dysregulation of miRs in CHD. Mouse knock out models have contributed to our knowledge base revealing specific patterns of miR expression in cardiovascular physiology and pathological states. Specific miRs necessary for embryonic cardiac development have been revealed. Dysregulation of these miRs has been shown to cause structural abnormalities in the heart and vasculature, thus furthering our understanding of the processes which result in CHD. These advances have provided new insight into the signalling pathways responsible for CHD. Furthermore, this new appreciation for miRs in the development of CHD has uncovered their potential for new therapeutic targets where modulated miR activity may reduce the burden of disease. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the cause-effect relationships of miRs in CHD and consider their potential as a therapeutic targets and biomarkers in this clinical setting. PMID:26734643

  17. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miall-Allen, V. M.; Kemp, G. J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Taylor, D. J.; Radda, G. K.; Haworth, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of studying myocardial and skeletal muscle bioenergetics using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in babies and young children with congenital heart disease. SUBJECTS: 16 control subjects aged 5 months to 24 years and 18 patients with CHD, aged 7 months to 23 years, of whom 11 had cyanotic CHD, five had cardiac failure, and two had had a Senning procedure. DESIGN: 31P MRS was carried out using a 1.9 Tesla horizontal 65 cm bore whole body magnet to study the myocardium in 10 patients and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) in 14 patients, eight of whom were exercised, together with appropriate controls. RESULTS: In hypoxaemic patients, in skeletal muscle at rest intracellular pH (pHi) was abnormally high [7.06 (SEM 0.04) v 7.04 (0.05), P < 0.01] and showed a positive correlation with haemoglobin (P < 0.03). On exercise, hypoxaemic patients fatigued more quickly but end-exercise pHi and phosphocreatine recovery were normal, implying that an equivalent but smaller amount of work had been performed. End-exercise ADP concentration was lower. On recovery, the initial rate of phosphocreatine resynthesis was low. Skeletal muscle bioenergetics were within normal limits in those in heart failure. In the myocardium, the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio was similar in controls and hypoxaemic subjects, but low in those in heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: In heart failure, the myocardial phosphocreatine/ATP ratio was reduced, as in adults, while resting skeletal muscle studies were normal. By contrast, hypoxaemic children had normal myocardial bioenergetics, but showed skeletal muscle alkalinity, and energy reserves were more readily depleted on exercise. On recovery, the initially slow phosphocreatine resynthesis rate reflects a low rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis, probably due to an inadequate oxygen supply. 31P MRS offers a safe, non-invasive method of studying myocardial and skeletal muscle bioenergetics in children as young as 5 months

  18. Indications for Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siân Pincott, E; Burch, M

    2011-01-01

    In this review we have looked at indications for cardiac transplantation in congenital heart disease. An outline of the general principles of the use of transplant as a management strategy both as a first line treatment and following other surgical interventions is discussed. We explore the importance of the timing of patient referral and the evaluations undertaken, and how the results of these may vary between patients with congenital heart disease and patients with other causes of end-stage heart failure. The potential complications associated with patients with congenital heart disease need to be both anticipated and managed appropriately by an experienced team. Timing of transplantation in congenital heart disease is difficult to standardize as the group of patients is heterogeneous. We discuss the role and limitations of investigations such as BNP, 6 minute walk, metabolic exercise testing and self estimated physical functioning. We also discuss the suitability for listing. It is clear that congenital heart patients should not be considered to be at uniform high risk of death at transplant. Morbidity varies greatly in the congenital patient population with the failing Fontan circulation having a far higher risk than a failing Mustard circulation. However the underlying issue of imbalance between donor organ supply and demand needs to be addressed as transplant teams are finding themselves in the increasingly difficult situation of supporting growing numbers of patients with a diverse range of pathologies with declining numbers of donor organs. PMID:22548027

  19. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  20. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  1. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, I; Suteu, Carmen; Blesneac, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital malformations and account for about eight cases per 1000 births and are often associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Increased shear stress and the excess flow through the pulmonary vascular bed due to a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt lead to the development of pulmonary vascular disease and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Without surgical repair approximately 30% of patients develop pulmonary vascular disease. Eisenmenger syndrome represents the extreme end of pulmonary arterial hypertension with congenital heart disease. We summarized the current therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension; conventional treatments including calcium channel blockers, anticoagulation, digitalis, diuretics, and new treatment: prostacyclin, bosentan, sildenafil, ambrisentan. Preliminary data of new therapies are encouraging with disease significantly improved natural history, but there is need for more evidence-based data. PMID:18333354

  2. Anesthesia for sickle cell disease and congenital myopathy in combination.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Rebecca; O'Donnell, Brian; Lynch, Brian; Stephens, Michael; O'Donovan, Frances

    2006-08-01

    We report on the perioperative management of anesthesia and analgesia in a child with sickle cell disease and a congenital myopathy, presenting for corrective orthopedic surgery. The case illustrates two valuable points of interest: the many benefits of regional anesthesia in complex medical cases and the successful use of tourniquets in children with sickle cell disease. PMID:16884472

  3. Adult congenital heart disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension: the Texas Adult Congenital Heart Program experience.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wayne J; Parekh, Dhaval R; Safdar, Zeenat

    2011-11-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a common structural defect of the heart or major blood vessels. Patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) have medical needs that are distinct from those of pediatric patients with CHD, and the transition into adult health care is important for management of the patient with ACHD. A large proportion of patients with CHD develop diseases and complications associated with the long-term stress of intracardiac shunts. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a significant complication of some CHD lesions. The treatment of these patients remains challenging due to their combined heart and lung disease, and multidisciplinary care is ofen necessitated for a variety of secondary conditions. A number of treatment options are available for the management of PAH associated with CHD, including prostanoids, phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, and endothelin receptor antagonists. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of such ACHD patients with PAH. PMID:22104452

  4. The emerging adult population with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, William G.; Webb, Gary D.

    2000-01-01

    The successes in managing infants and children with congenital heart disease have led to an emerging population of adult patients. As we enter this new century, the majority of patients with congenital heart disease will be adults, not children. It is important to maintain our commitment for continuing care to the emerging adult population. Psycho-social issues, including employment and pregnancy counseling, are required as well as the ongoing need for medical and occasionally surgical intervention. The health care system needs to develop supra-regional tertiary referral centers for care of these patients and provide information sharing and support for community-based physicians interested in the welfare of the adult with congenital heart disease. Copyright 2000 by W.B. Saunders Company PMID:11486200

  5. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386

  6. Computational fluid dynamics models and congenital heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pennati, Giancarlo; Corsini, Chiara; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful tool to investigate hemodynamics of the circulatory system. With improving imaging techniques and detailed clinical investigations, it is now possible to construct patient-specific models of reconstructive surgeries for the treatment of congenital heart diseases. These models can help clinicians to better understand the hemodynamic behavior of different surgical options for a treated patient. This review outlines recent advances in mathematical modeling in congenital heart diseases, the discoveries and limitations these models present, and future directions that are on the horizon. PMID:24432298

  7. Coping Behaviors of Parents with Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strobino, Jane

    The study addresses parental coping patterns of children with congenital heart disease in the state of Hawaii. Attention was given to geography and ethnicity as well as parental and child characteristics as factors impacting on the coping pattern. Telephone interviews with parents (N=32) obtained data concerning parent characteristics, their…

  8. Advances in Surgical Treatment of Congenital Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Ragalie, William S; Mitchell, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is frequently present in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Infants with CHD and TBM appear to do worse than those without TBM. The principle of operative intervention for TBM is to improve function of the airway and clinical status. When indicated, conventional surgical options include tracheostomy, aortopexy, tracheoplasty, and anterior tracheal suspension. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment of severe tracheobonchomalacia, which can be associated with a mortality rate as high as 80%. Congenital tracheal stenosis is also frequently associated with CHD (vascular rings, atrioventricular canal defects, and septal defects) and may require concomitant repair. Repair of tracheal stenosis is often associated with distal TBM. This article addresses new techniques that can be performed in corrective surgery for both TBM and congenital tracheal stenosis. PMID:27568138

  9. Advances in the Care of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Viviane G; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-09-01

    The significant decline in mortality among children and adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with an increasing prevalence of CHD in adults, particularly those with moderate to severe defects. As a significant percentage of adolescents and young adults are lost to follow-up in the transition from pediatric to adult care, they may present for elective procedures with substantial CHD-associated morbidity. In addition to the specific cardiac defect, the procedures performed, and the current pathophysiological status, several factors should be considered when managing the adult with CHD. These include the type of setting (adult vs pediatric institution); surgeon (pediatric vs adult cardiac surgeon); coexisting diseases associated with CHD, such as coronary artery disease, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular accidents, myopathy, and coagulation disorders; acquired diseases of aging; pregnancy; and psychosocial functioning. The current status of the management of common and important congenital cardiac defects is also described. PMID:25542866

  10. De novo mutations in congenital heart disease with neurodevelopmental and other congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Homsy, Jason; Zaidi, Samir; Shen, Yufeng; Ware, James S; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Karczewski, Konrad J; DePalma, Steven R; McKean, David; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Josh; Jin, Sheng Chih; Deanfield, John; Giardini, Alessandro; Porter, George A; Kim, Richard; Bilguvar, Kaya; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Tikhonova, Irina; Mane, Shrikant; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Qi, Hongjian; Vardarajan, Badri; Ma, Lijiang; Daly, Mark; Roberts, Amy E; Russell, Mark W; Mital, Seema; Newburger, Jane W; Gaynor, J William; Breitbart, Roger E; Iossifov, Ivan; Ronemus, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Kaltman, Jonathan R; Seidman, Jonathan G; Brueckner, Martina; Gelb, Bruce D; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Lifton, Richard P; Seidman, Christine E; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-12-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients have an increased prevalence of extracardiac congenital anomalies (CAs) and risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDDs). Exome sequencing of 1213 CHD parent-offspring trios identified an excess of protein-damaging de novo mutations, especially in genes highly expressed in the developing heart and brain. These mutations accounted for 20% of patients with CHD, NDD, and CA but only 2% of patients with isolated CHD. Mutations altered genes involved in morphogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation, including multiple mutations in RBFOX2, a regulator of mRNA splicing. Genes mutated in other cohorts examined for NDD were enriched in CHD cases, particularly those with coexisting NDD. These findings reveal shared genetic contributions to CHD, NDD, and CA and provide opportunities for improved prognostic assessment and early therapeutic intervention in CHD patients. PMID:26785492

  11. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. PMID:25650280

  12. Antigenuria in infants with acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Freilij, H L; Corral, R S; Katzin, A M; Grinstein, S

    1987-01-01

    Detection and partial characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi soluble antigens (SAg) in urine, as well as demonstration of parasite circulating antigens (CAg) in serum from pediatric patients with acute (10 patients) and congenital (10 patients) Chagas' disease, are reported. Classical techniques for parasite detection and antibody serology were also conducted in both groups. Samples collected before the onset of parasiticidal drug treatment were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for SAg and CAg demonstration. The control population consisted of 6 children with acute toxoplasmosis, 6 with cutaneous leishmaniasis, and 20 healthy individuals. Patients with acute cases were 100% positive for both SAg and CAg, whereas patients with congenital disease were 80% CAg positive and 100% SAg positive. Controls yielded negative results in all cases. Partial characterization of SAg from two patients with acute disease was performed by iodination, affinity chromatography, immunoprecipitation, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Two different antigenic glycoproteins (80 kilodaltons, pI 6 to 6.5 and 55 kilodaltons, pI 6.5 to 7) were identified by these methods. Traditional serology and classical parasitologic tests failed, each in a different way, to provide an accurate diagnosis in the total of our patients. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for SAg detection proved to be the most effective procedure for achieving early and precise proof of infection in acute and congenital cases of Chagas' disease. Images PMID:3098778

  13. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori; Souza, Rogerio; Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested. PMID:24061754

  14. Arrhythmia diagnosis and management throughout life in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Bradley C; Berul, Charles I

    2016-03-01

    Arrhythmias, covering bradycardia and tachycardia, occur in association with congenital heart disease (CHD) and as a consequence of surgical repair. Symptomatic bradycardia can occur due to sinus node dysfunction or atrioventricular block secondary to either unrepaired CHD or surgical repair in the area of the conduction system. Tachyarrhythmias are common in repaired CHD due to scar formation, chamber distension or increased chamber pressure, all potentially leading to abnormal automaticity and heterogeneous conduction properties as a substrate for re-entry. Atrial arrhythmias occur more frequently, but ventricular tachyarrhythmias may be associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, notably in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot or aortic stenosis. Defibrillator implantation provides life-saving electrical therapy for hemodynamically unstable arrhythmias. Ablation procedures with 3D electroanatomic mapping technology offer a viable alternative to pharmacologic or device therapy. Advances in electrophysiology have allowed for successful management of arrhythmias in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:26642231

  15. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases. PMID:25942538

  16. Postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Peiling; Wang, Tuanjie; Gao, Jun; Yao, Jinhua; Li, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease. Methods: Three hundreds children with congenital heart disease admitted to our hospital to receive surgeries from February 2010 to February 2013 were selected. Results: A total of 120 children were tested as positive by sputum culture, with the infection rate of 40.0%. The top five most common pathogenic microorganisms included Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. S. epidermidis, S. aureus and Enterococcus were highly resistant to penicillin, azithromycin and erythromycin, moderately susceptible to levofloxacin and cefazolin, and completely susceptible to vancomycin. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that hospitalization stay length, combined use of antibiotics, systemic use of hormones, mechanical ventilation and catheter indwelling were the independent risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections (P<0.05). Conclusion: Nosocomial infection, which was the most frequent postoperative complication of pediatric congenital heart disease, was predominantly induced by Gram-positive bacteria that were highly susceptible to cephalosporins and vancomycin. Particular attention should be paid to decrease relevant risk factors to improve the prognosis. PMID:24948978

  17. [Psychopathology of chronic diseases in children and adolescents. Congenital cardiopathies].

    PubMed

    Masi, G; Brovedani, P

    1996-10-01

    A most significant life event in the first years of life is a disease, especially if it is of early onset, severe, life threatening, with an uncertain prognosis, and with the necessity of frequent diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Psychological implications are a significant parts of the illness, not a marginal component; they can affect prognosis and outcome. The authors describe the different psychological implications of an experience of chronic disease in children and adolescents and their families (parents and siblings). Congenital disease (for example congenital heart failure) has a peculiar significance: since it is diagnosed early, it influences mother-infant interactions from the beginning, in a crucial moment of the infant's psychological development; diagnostic and therapeutical interventions are early and frequent; congenital defects determine the strongest guilt feelings in the parents. Some specific psychological aspects can be described: the weakening of the Bodily self, the inhibition of thinking, the theories the child and the family formulates on the disease, the death feelings. Emotional features in children and adolescents with congenital cardiopathy are described: inhibition of emotions, marked anxiety, depressive reaction, with loneliness, low self-esteem and inadequacy, emotional lability, with oscillation between omnipotence and inadequacy; impulsiveness; weakness of self identity; especially in bodily Self. Some psychopathological aspects in children and adolescents with heart transplant and their families are also described. Intellectual level of patients with congenital heart disease is in the normal range, although significantly lower than normal controls. There is a positive correlation between worsening of intellectual functioning and clinical severity of the heart disease; this clinical severity is related both to restrictions in normal daily life activities, and blood oxygen saturation. It is hard to tease apart the role of

  18. Chagas' Disease: Pregnancy and Congenital Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection that kills approximately 12,000 people a year. Mass migration of chronically infected and asymptomatic persons has caused globalization of Chagas disease and has made nonvectorial infection, including vertical and blood-borne transmission, more of a threat to human communities than vectorial infection. To control transmission, it is essential to test all pregnant women living in endemic countries and all pregnant women having migrated from, or having lived in, endemic countries. All children born to seropositive mothers should be tested not only within the first month of life but also at ~6 months and ~12 months of age. The diagnosis is made by identification of the parasite in blood before the age of 6 months and by identification of the parasite in blood and/or positive serology after 10 months of age. Follow up for a year is essential as a significant proportion of cases are initially negative and are only detected at a later stage. If the condition is diagnosed and treated early, the clinical response is excellent and the majority of cases are cured. PMID:24949443

  19. The Right Heart in Congenital Heart Disease, Mechanisms and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Guihaire, Julien; Haddad, François; Mercier, Olaf; Murphy, Daniel J.; Wu, Joseph C.; Fadel, Elie

    2012-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease, the right heart may support the pulmonary or the systemic circulation. Several congenital heart diseases primarily affect the right heart including Tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of great arteries, septal defects leading to pulmonary vascular disease, Ebstein anomaly and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. In these patients, right ventricular dysfunction leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. In this paper, our objective is to review the mechanisms and management of right heart failure associated with congenital heart disease. We will outline pearls and pitfalls in the management of congenital heart disease affecting the right heart and highlight recent advances in the field. PMID:23483726

  20. Implantation of Total Artificial Heart in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S. L.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation. In the case presented here, a 17 year-old patient with congenital transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) experienced progressively worsening HF due to his congenital condition. He was hospitalized multiple times and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). However, his condition soon deteriorated to end-stage HF with multisystem organ failure. Due to the patient's grave clinical condition and the presence of complex cardiac lesions, the decision was made to proceed with a TAH. The abnormal arrangement of the patient's ventricles and great arteries required modifications to the TAH during implantation. With the TAH in place, the patient was able to return home and regain strength and physical well-being while awaiting a donor heart. He was successfully bridged to heart transplantation 5 months after receiving the device. This report highlights the TAH is feasible even in patients with structurally abnormal hearts, with technical modification. PMID:25078059

  1. Caring for infants with congenital heart disease and their families.

    PubMed

    Saenz, R B; Beebe, D K; Triplett, L C

    1999-04-01

    Congenital heart defects are classified into two broad categories: acyanotic and cyanotic lesions. The most common acyanotic lesions are ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, atrioventricular canal, pulmonary stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic stenosis and coarctation of the aorta. Congestive heart failure is the primary concern in infants with acyanotic lesions. The most common cyanotic lesions are tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries. In infants with cyanotic lesions, hypoxia is more of a problem than congestive heart failure. Suspicion of a congenital heart defect should be raised by the presence of feeding difficulties in association with tachypnea, sweating and subcostal recession, or severe growth impairment. Follow-up of infants with congenital heart disease should follow the schedule of routine care for healthy babies with some modifications, such as administration of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. More frequent follow-up is required if congestive heart failure is present. Family psychosocial issues should also be addressed. One of the main roles for the family physician is to help the parents put the diagnosis in perspective by clarifying expectations and misconceptions, and answering specific questions. PMID:10208705

  2. [Real time 3D echocardiography in congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Acar, P; Dulac, Y; Taktak, A; Villacèque, M

    2004-05-01

    The introduction of the 3D mode in echocardiography has led to its use in everyday clinical practice. One hundred and fifty real time 3D echocardiographic examinations were performed in 20 foetus, 110 children and 20 adults with various congenital heart lesions (shunts, valvular lesions, aortic diseases). The 4x matricial probe enables the instantaneous acquisition of transthoracic volumes. Four modes of 3D imaging were used: real time, total volume, colour Doppler and biplane. Quantitative measurements were performed at an outlying station. The feasibility of the method in the foetus, the child and the adult was respectively 90%, 99% and 85%. Real time 3D echocardiography did not affect the diagnoses made by standard echocardiography. The 3D imaging gave a more accurate description of atrial septal defects and congenital valvular lesions. Biplane imaging was decisive in the quantitative approach to aortic dilatation of Marfan's syndrome and in segmental analysis of the foetal heart. 3D colour Doppler imaging has been disappointing but the possibilities of volumic quantification of blood flow are very promising. The present limitations of the method are the inadequate resolution in the small child and the absence of quantitative measurement on the echograph. The facility of utilisation of the matricial probe should lead to routine usage of 3D echocardiography as with 2D and the Doppler modes. Its value should be decisive in many congenital cardiac lesions requiring surgery or interventional catheterisation. PMID:15214550

  3. Transcatheter interventions for multiple lesions in adults with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Tahir; Clarke, Bernard; Mahadevan, Vaikom

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnosis, surgery and interventional management have significantly changed the quality of life of patients with congenital heart disease. Historically, congenital heart disease patients with multiple cardiac lesions have been referred for surgery; however, with the advent of newer technologies and expertise, transcatheter treatment has evolved as an alternative option. A series of patients who underwent interventional procedures for multiple congenital heart disease lesions with excellent procedural and medium-term outcomes is reported. PMID:22826648

  4. Of mice and men: molecular genetics of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind CHD. The picture emerging from these studies suggest that genetic lesions associated with CHD affect a broad range of cellular signaling components, from ligands and receptors, across down-stream effector molecules to transcription factors and co-factors, including chromatin modifiers. PMID:23934094

  5. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  6. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  7. Congenital Heart Disease In Pediatric Patients: Recognizing The Undiagnosed And Managing Complications In The Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Judge, Pavan; Meckler Mshs, Garth

    2016-05-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common form of all congenital malformations and, despite advances in prenatal and newborn screening, it may present undiagnosed to the emergency department. Signs and symptoms of congenital heart disease are variable and often nonspecific, making recognition and treatment challenging. Patient presentations can range from life-threatening shock or cyanosis in a neonate to respiratory distress or failure to thrive in infants. Advances in surgical techniques have improved short- and long-term survival of infants and children with congenital heart disease, but these children are at risk for a variety of complications related to the underlying or surgical anatomy and physiology. This review focuses on the recognition and initial management of patients with undiagnosed congenital heart disease presenting to the ED and touches on considerations for postoperative infants and children with complex congenital heart disease. PMID:27096879

  8. The Management of Athletes with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Molossi, Silvana; Grenier, Michelle

    2015-07-01

    Although rare, sudden cardiac death (SCD) is devastating to families and communities. Screening of athletes prior to sports participation by trained professionals is useful in identifying individuals who carry known risk factors for SCD. Inclusive in this population are those athletes with congenital heart disease. Sports medicine specialists should be able to identify those at risk for adverse events surrounding vigorous activity and direct appropriate evaluation by the specialist (ie, cardiologist) as deemed appropriate. Equally importantly, they should be able to coach individuals in order to improve performance and quality of life with exercise in a safe environment. PMID:26100428

  9. Ventricular Tachycardia Following Surgical Repair of Complex Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Baysa, Sherrie Joy; Kanter, Ronald J

    2016-03-01

    A nine year old boy with complex congenital heart disease requiring right ventricular outflow tract surgery and palpitations had inducible monomorphic ventricular tachycardia at 300 bpm by programmed ventricular stimulation. He was treated with enteral phenytoin. With a therapeutic plasma level, repeat electrophysiological study was negative for inducible ventricular tachycardia using an aggressive pacing protocol. An insertable loop recorder was implanted, and the family was prescribed an automatic external defibrillator. The decision to not place an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was based upon anticipated need for serial cardiac MRI scans to monitor the effect of progressive outflow tract stenosis and regurgitation. PMID:26920195

  10. Heart Failure in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Nonpharmacologic Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    LeMond, Lisa; Mai, Tuan; Broberg, Craig S; Muralidaran, Ashok; Burchill, Luke J

    2015-11-01

    In early stages, heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains an elusive diagnosis. Many ACHD patients seem well-compensated owing to chronic physical and psychological adaptations. HF biomarkers and cardiopulmonary exercise tests are often markedly abnormal, although patients report stable health and good quality of life. Treatment differs from acquired HF. Evidence for effective drug therapy in ACHD-related HF is lacking. Residual ventricular, valvular, and vascular abnormalities contribute to HF pathophysiology, leading to an emphasis on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies. This article reviews emerging perspectives on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies, including catheter-based interventions, surgical correction, and palliative care. PMID:26471822

  11. Diagnosis and management of rare congenital nonimmune hemolytic disease.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2015-01-01

    Rare, congenital nonimmune hemolytic disorders of the erythrocyte, although uncommon, are important causes of anemia in the child and adult. These are a heterogeneous group of diseases that disrupt normal erythrocyte structure and function in varying ways. Predominant are abnormalities of hemoglobin stability, defects of erythrocyte metabolism, and disorders of erythrocyte hydration. Unstable hemoglobinopathies may lead to chronic or episodic hemolysis. Perturbation of critical enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway lead to altered erythrocyte metabolism and chronic hemolysis. Disorders of erythrocyte hydration are an under-recognized cause of hemolytic anemia. Beyond pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease, clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity characterize this group of disorders. Often, they are underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This review discusses pathophysiology, inheritance, clinical findings, laboratory manifestations, and management considerations in several rare nonimmune hemolytic diseases including the unstable hemoglobins, disorders of erythrocyte metabolism, and abnormalities of erythrocyte hydration. PMID:26637748

  12. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J A; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E B

    2009-12-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  13. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  14. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, D. D.; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T.; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  15. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  16. Congenital Muscle Disease Study of Patient and Family Reported Medical Information

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Muscular Dystrophy; Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; Fukutin-related Protein Gene; Limb Girdle; FKRP Gene; Childhood Onset LGMD; Adult Onset LGMD; POMT1; POMT2; POMGnT1; LARGE; Alpha Dystroglycan; Dystroglycanopathy; Centronuclear; Multiminicore; Multicore; Minicore; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Myotubular; Nemaline; Congenital Myopathy; Neuromuscular; Rigid Spine; Phenotype-Genotype Correlation; Cough Assisted Device; Neuromuscular Disease; Respiratory Exacerbation; Invasive Ventilation; Chest Physiotherapy; Congenital Myopathies; Genetic Mutations; Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy; Wheelchair Use; Cataract; Opthalmoplegia; Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; Intermediate Collagen VI Myopathy; Laminin Alpha 2 Related Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; MDC1A; Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Undiagnosed; Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Merosin Positive; Walker Warburg Syndrome; Muscle Eye Brain Disease; Fukuyama; Integrin Alpha 7 Deficiency; Integrin Alpha 9 Deficiency; Laminopathy; Lamin AC; SEPN 1 Related Myopathies; Bethlem Myopathy; Dystroglycanopathies; LGMD2K; LGMD2I; LGMD2L; LGMD2N; Actin Aggregation Myopathy; Cap Disease; Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Core Rod Myopathy; Hyaline Body Myopathy; Multiminicore Myopathy; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Tubular Aggregate Myopathy; Zebra Body Disease Myopathy; Congenital Myopathy Other; Reducing Body Myopathy; Sarcotubular Myopathy; Spheroid Body Myopathy

  17. Potential effects of environmental chemical contamination in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Francesca; Chiappa, Enrico; Gargani, Luna; Picano, Eugenio

    2014-04-01

    There is compelling evidence that prenatal exposures to environmental xenobiotics adversely affect human development and childhood. Among all birth defects, congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent of all congenital malformations and remains the leading cause of death. It has been estimated that in most cases the causes of heart defects remain unknown, while a growing number of studies have indicated the potential role of environmental agents as risk factors in CHD occurrence. In particular, maternal exposure to chemicals during the first trimester of pregnancy represents the most critical window of exposure for CHD. Specific classes of xenobiotics (e.g. organochlorine pesticides, organic solvents, air pollutants) have been identified as potential risk factors for CHD. Nonetheless, the knowledge gained is currently still incomplete as a consequence of the frequent heterogeneity of the methods applied and the difficulty in estimating the net effect of environmental pollution on the pregnant mother. The presence of multiple sources of pollution, both indoor and outdoor, together with individual lifestyle factors, may represent a further confounding element for association with the disease. A future new approach for research should probably focus on individual measurements of professional, domestic, and urban exposure to physical and chemical pollutants in order to accurately retrace the environmental exposure of parents of affected offspring during the pre-conceptional and pregnancy periods. PMID:24452958

  18. Genetics of congenital heart disease: the glass half empty.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Akl C; Gelb, Bruce D; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2013-02-15

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital anomaly in newborn babies. Cardiac malformations have been produced in multiple experimental animal models, by perturbing selected molecules that function in the developmental pathways involved in myocyte specification, differentiation, or cardiac morphogenesis. In contrast, the precise genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis for these perturbations in humans remains poorly understood. Over the past few decades, researchers have tried to bridge this knowledge gap through conventional genome-wide analyses of rare Mendelian CHD families, and by sequencing candidate genes in CHD cohorts. Although yielding few, usually highly penetrant, disease gene mutations, these discoveries provided 3 notable insights. First, human CHD mutations impact a heterogeneous set of molecules that orchestrate cardiac development. Second, CHD mutations often alter gene/protein dosage. Third, identical pathogenic CHD mutations cause a variety of distinct malformations, implying that higher order interactions account for particular CHD phenotypes. The advent of contemporary genomic technologies including single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, next-generation sequencing, and copy number variant platforms are accelerating the discovery of genetic causes of CHD. Importantly, these approaches enable study of sporadic cases, the most common presentation of CHD. Emerging results from ongoing genomic efforts have validated earlier observations learned from the monogenic CHD families. In this review, we explore how continued use of these technologies and integration of systems biology is expected to expand our understanding of the genetic architecture of CHD. PMID:23410880

  19. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  20. Families of children with congenital heart disease: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Wei, Holly; Roscigno, Cecelia I; Hanson, Cherissa C; Swanson, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    In 2000 and 2002, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute launched two initiatives to encourage treatment innovations and research on children with heart disease and their families. Since then, no systematic reviews have examined the evidence regarding the impacts of having a child with congenital heart disease (CHD) on families. This review synthesized key findings regarding families of children with CHD, critiqued research methods, described what has been done, and provided recommendations for future inquiry. Databases searched included PubMed, CINAHL, Family & Society Studies Worldwide, Women's Studies International, and PsycINFO. The literature search followed the PRISMA guidelines. As a result, ninety-four articles were reviewed. Four major themes were derived: parents' psychological health, family life, parenting challenges, and family-focused interventions. In conclusion, while they found parents having psychological symptoms, researchers did not explore parents' appraisals of what led to their symptoms. Research is needed to explore parents' experiences and expectations. PMID:26404115

  1. [Congenital Minamata disease accompanied by arachnoid cyst (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hira, K; Harada, M; Takehara, S; Kabashima, K; Tatetsu, S; Fujioka, M; Yasutake, H; Ozaki, M

    1982-03-01

    A male, born on December 8, 1956, during the period when many Minamata diseases broke out in a district. His parents who ate much fish and shell fish taken in Minamata Bay suffered from the light, incomplete Minamata disease showing sensory disturbance, the constriction of the visual field, muscular weakness, etc. He weighed 3,225 gr. upon the normal birth given 10 months after pregnancy. His abnormalities were noted since his head was not stabilized on the neck even six months after the birth. Because of the delay in the development of the motor function, he became barely able to sit, stand up and begin walking at the ages of 3, 5 and 6 respectively. In 1962 (at the age of 6), his congenital Minamata disease was diagnosed in view of his clinical symptoms and epidemiological conditions. The mercury value in the hair and blood upon the birth is not known because a considerable time had elapsed after the birth when his mercury poisoning was discovered. However, the clinical symptoms included intelligence disturbance, character change, dysarthria, primitive reflexes, strabismus, hypersalivation, ataxia and hyperkinesia, indicating a typical congenital Minamata disease. Until he became 13 years old (1969) or so, his mental and motor function developed, both gradually. In the same year, he was admitted to a special class for the handicapped. EEG examination revealed that there was a slow alpha activity in the basic pattern and that 6 Hz positive spike was found in the sleep EEG. The constriction of the visual field was classified through examination.2+ PMID:7093064

  2. Congenital Heart Disease: How to Care for Your Baby and Yourself

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Congenital Heart Disease | How to Care for Your Baby and Yourself I was depressed when I found out my baby has a heart problem. ... a sick baby. Source Caring for Infants with Congenital Heart Disease and Their Families by RB Saenz, M.D., ...

  3. School Children with Congenital Heart Disease: Quality of Life and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jillian; Massie, Kendra; Mortimer, Tamara; Maxwell, Lani

    2005-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is one of the most common pediatric chronic illnesses that can have an impact on the lives of affected children and their families. Despite the growing number of school-age children who live with congenital heart disease, few researchers have investigated the lives and well-being of these children and their families. The…

  4. Congenital Heart Disease: Guidelines of Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Services for Children with Handicaps.

    These guidelines were written to help families coordinate the health care that may be needed by a child with congenital heart disease. The booklet begins with general information about congenital heart disease. It then discusses the goals of health care, the health care team, the importance of periodic health care, and record keeping procedures.…

  5. [Congenital ChagaśDisease: epidemiology, laboratorial diagnosis, prognosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Reiche, E M; Inouye, M M; Bonametti, A M; Jankevicius, J V

    1996-01-01

    The authors review studies about epidemiology, clinical aspects and methods used in laboratorial diagnosis of congenital Chagas'disease, emphasizing the limitations in their specificity and sensibility, and suggest alternative methods to improve the accuracy and the quality of the laboratorial diagnosis of congenital Chagaśdisease, essential to an efficient treatment. PMID:14688943

  6. Risks and Benefits of Exercise Training in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Marie-A; Marcotte, François; Dore, Annie; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Mondésert, Blandine; Mercier, Lise-Andrée; Khairy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Exercise capacity in adults with various forms of congenital heart disease is substantially lower than that of the general population. Although the underlying congenital heart defect, and its sequelae, certainly contribute to observed exercise limitations, there is evidence suggesting that deconditioning and a sedentary lifestyle are important implicated factors. The prevalence of acquired cardiovascular comorbidities is on the increase in the aging population with congenital heart disease, such that obesity and a sedentary lifestyle confer increased risk. Health fears and misconceptions are common barriers to regular physical activity in adults with congenital heart disease, despite evidence linking lower functional capacity to poor outcomes, and data supporting the safety and efficacy of exercise in bestowing numerous physical and psychosocial rewards. With few exceptions, adults with congenital heart disease should be counselled to exercise regularly. In this contemporary review, we provide a practical approach to assessing adults with congenital heart disease before exercise training. We examine available evidence supporting the safety and benefits of exercise training. Risks associated with exercise training in adults with congenital heart disease are discussed, particularly with regard to sudden cardiac death. Finally, recommendations for exercise training are provided, with consideration for the type of congenital heart disease, the nature (ie, static vs dynamic) and intensity (ie, low, medium, high) of the physical activity, and associated factors such as systemic ventricular dysfunction and residual defects. Further research is required to determine optimal exercise regimens and to identify effective strategies to implement exercise training as a key determinant of healthy living. PMID:26868839

  7. Adult congenital heart disease: A paradigm of epidemiological change.

    PubMed

    Ntiloudi, Despοina; Giannakoulas, George; Parcharidou, Despοina; Panagiotidis, Theofilos; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2016-09-01

    Increasing survival rates for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) represent a major achievement of modern medicine. Despite incredible progress been made in diagnosis, follow-up, early treatment and management in adulthood, many patients are faced with long-term complications, such as arrhythmia, thromboembolism, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, endocarditis and/or the need for reoperation. In parallel, half of the patients are female, most of childbearing age, and, thus warrant specialist reproductive counseling and appropriate obstetric care. It is not surprising therefore, that healthcare utilization has steadily increased for CHD in recent years. Furthermore, cardiology and other medical disciplines are now faced with new challenges, namely the provision of expert care and optimal, lifelong medical surveillance for these patients. PMID:27240150

  8. Pacing and Defibrillators in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chubb, Henry; O’Neill, Mark; Rosenthal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Device therapy in the complex congenital heart disease (CHD) population is a challenging field. There is a myriad of devices available, but none designed specifically for the CHD patient group, and a scarcity of prospective studies to guide best practice. Baseline cardiac anatomy, prior surgical and interventional procedures, existing tachyarrhythmias and the requirement for future intervention all play a substantial role in decision making. For both pacing systems and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, numerous factors impact on the merits of system location (endovascular versus non-endovascular), lead positioning, device selection and device programming. For those with Fontan circulation and following the atrial switch procedure there are also very specific considerations regarding access and potential complications. This review discusses the published guidelines, device indications and the best available evidence for guidance of device implantation in the complex CHD population. PMID:27403295

  9. Preconception Counseling for Women with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Min-Tai; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Shenn-Nan; Chiu, Hsin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    With advances that have been made over the recent decades in transcatheter and surgical interventions, most patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) can survive into adulthood. Overall, probably half of these surviving patients are female. When these female CHD patients reach childbearing age, however, pregnancy management will be a major issue. In order to meet the demands of fetal growth, the maternal cardiovascular system starts a series of adaptations beginning in early pregnancy. These adaptations include: decreased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances, decreased blood pressure, expansion of the blood volume, increased heart rate and increased cardiac output. For women with CHD, this hemodynamic alteration may increase the risks of adverse cardiovascular events as well as the fetal and neonatal complications. Therefore, proper risk stratification and effective counseling for women with CHD who are planning their pregnancies is an important undertaking. PMID:27122914

  10. Congenital Heart Disease: The Crossroads of Genetics, Epigenetics and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Vecoli, Cecilia; Pulignani, Silvia; Foffa, Ilenia; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are recognized as the most common type of birth malformations. Although recent advances in pre- and neonatal diagnosis as well as in surgical procedures have reduced the morbidity and mortality for many CHD, the etiology for CHD remains undefined. In non-syndromic and isolated (without a familial history or a Mendelian inheritance) forms of CHDs, a multifactorial pathogenesis with interplay between inherited and non-inherited causes is recognized. In this paper, we discuss the current knowledge of the potential molecular mechanisms, mediating abnormal cardiac development in non-syndromic and isolated CHD, including mutations in cardiac transcription factors, the role of somatic mutations and epigenetic alterations as well as the influence of gene-environment interactions. In the near future, the advent of high-throughput genomic technologies with the integration of system biology will expand our understanding of isolated, non-syndromic CHDs for their prevention, early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25435801

  11. Pheochromocytoma complicated by cyanotic congenital heart disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Usui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hori, Yumiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Oue, Takaharu; Morii, Eiichi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Coincidental cyanotic congenital heart disease and pheochromocytoma is uncommon, although some cases have been reported. We describe a girl aged 15 yr and 11 mo with pheochromocytoma and tricuspid atresia treated by performing the Fontan surgery. The patient did not have any specific symptoms of syndrome related to pheochromoytoma or a family history of pheochromocytoma. During cardiac catheterization, her blood pressure increased markedly, and an α-blocker was administered. Catecholamine hypersecretion was observed in the blood and urine, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the right adrenal gland. Scintigraphy showed marked accumulation of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the tumor, which led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. We did not detect any germline mutations in the RET, VHL, SDHB, SDHD, TMEM127, or MAX genes. This patient had experienced mild systemic hypoxia since birth, which may have contributed to the development of pheochromocytoma. PMID:27212797

  12. Pulmonary vascular resistance in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N J; Shinebourne, E A; Scallan, M J; Sopwith, T A; Denison, D M

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary and systemic blood flow and pulmonary vascular resistance were measured in 21 children with congenital heart disease. Blood flow was calculated by the direct Fick method, using measurements of metabolic gas exchange obtained by remote respiratory mass spectrometry. The observations showed that the administration of oxygen caused an appreciable fall in pulmonary vascular resistance in 16 of the 21 children studied and that this fall would not have been appreciated from a study of pulmonary arterial pressure alone as it was masked by a corresponding rise in blood flow. In 10 of 14 children, in whom superior vena caval blood was also sampled, the rise in flow was largely due to an increase in intracardiac left to right shunt. It was accompanied by widening of the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, perhaps due to imperfect gas equilibration within the lung. PMID:6515594

  13. Pheochromocytoma complicated by cyanotic congenital heart disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Usui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hori, Yumiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Oue, Takaharu; Morii, Eiichi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Coincidental cyanotic congenital heart disease and pheochromocytoma is uncommon, although some cases have been reported. We describe a girl aged 15 yr and 11 mo with pheochromocytoma and tricuspid atresia treated by performing the Fontan surgery. The patient did not have any specific symptoms of syndrome related to pheochromoytoma or a family history of pheochromocytoma. During cardiac catheterization, her blood pressure increased markedly, and an α-blocker was administered. Catecholamine hypersecretion was observed in the blood and urine, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the right adrenal gland. Scintigraphy showed marked accumulation of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the tumor, which led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. We did not detect any germline mutations in the RET, VHL, SDHB, SDHD, TMEM127, or MAX genes. This patient had experienced mild systemic hypoxia since birth, which may have contributed to the development of pheochromocytoma. PMID:27212797

  14. Headache in a Patient with Complex Congenital Heart Disease: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Waheed; Miteff, Ferdi; Collins, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Headache in adult patients with congenital heart disease may be a manifestation of the underlying cardiac condition or more common alternative causes of headache. In patients with pre-existing congenital heart disease, consideration of potentially uncommon aetiologies of headache is important. We report an uncommon case of headache in a patient with complex congenital heart disease characterised by Ebstein's anomaly with previous surgical repair complicated by idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This case illustrates the importance of understanding the implications of headache with reference to the underlying cardiac disease as well as specific issues related to a relatively young cohort of patients. PMID:26251315

  15. Cardiac Embryology and Molecular Mechanisms of Congenital Heart Disease: A Primer for Anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Kloesel, Benjamin; DiNardo, James A; Body, Simon C

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart disease is diagnosed in 0.4% to 5% of live births and presents unique challenges to the pediatric anesthesiologist. Furthermore, advances in surgical management have led to improved survival of those patients, and many adult anesthesiologists now frequently take care of adolescents and adults who have previously undergone surgery to correct or palliate congenital heart lesions. Knowledge of abnormal heart development on the molecular and genetic level extends and improves the anesthesiologist's understanding of congenital heart disease. In this article, we aim to review current knowledge pertaining to genetic alterations and their cellular effects that are involved in the formation of congenital heart defects. Given that congenital heart disease can currently only occasionally be traced to a single genetic mutation, we highlight some of the difficulties that researchers face when trying to identify specific steps in the pathogenetic development of heart lesions. PMID:27541719

  16. Congenital labial mucocele: rare presentation of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, Igor Henrique; Cardoso, Samantha; Carvalho, Camila Nunes; Carvalho, Alessandra Albuquerque Tavares; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucoceles are common lesions characterized by accumulation of mucus following rupture of a minor salivary gland duct. However, congenital mucoceles are a rare and distinctive oral condition observed in newborns. This case report details the features of a congenital labial nodule diagnosed as congenital mucocele. These lesions are rare in the oral cavity and should be diagnosed in the delivery room, but many cases are referred for further evaluation. Management is simple, and recurrence is not expected. PMID:26943092

  17. Social burden and lifestyle in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zomer, A Carla; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P; van der Velde, Enno T; Sieswerda, Gert-Jan T; Wajon, Elly M C; Plomp, Koos; van Bergen, Paul F M; Verheugt, Carianne L; Krivka, Eva; de Vries, Cees J; Lok, Dirk J A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate how the presence and severity of congenital heart disease (CHD) influence social life and lifestyle in adult patients. A random sample (n = 1,496) from the CONgenital CORvitia (n = 11,047), the Dutch national registry of adult patients with CHD, completed a questionnaire on educational attainment, employment and marital statuses, and lifestyle (response 76%). The Utrecht Health Project provided a large reference group (n = 6,810) of unaffected subjects. Logistic regression models were used for subgroup analyses and to adjust for age, gender, and socioeconomic status where appropriate. Of all patients 51.5% were men (median age 39 years, interquartile range 29 to 51) with mild (46%), moderate (44%), and severe (10%) CHD. Young (<40-year-old) patients with CHD were more likely to have achieved a lower education (adjusted odds ratios [ORs] 1.6 for men and 1.9 for women, p <0.05 for the 2 comparisons), significantly more often unemployed (adjusted ORs 5.9 and 2.0 for men and women, respectively), and less likely to be in a relationship compared to the reference group (adjusted ORs 8.5 for men and 4.5 for women). These poorer outcomes were seen in all severity groups. Overall, the CHD population smoked less (adjusted OR 0.5, p <0.05), had more sports participation (adjusted OR 1.2, p <0.05), and had less obesity (adjusted OR 0.7, p <0.05) than the reference group. In conclusion, there was a substantial social disadvantage in adult patients with CHD, which was seen in all severity groups and primarily in young men. In contrast, adults with CHD had healthier lifestyles compared to the reference group. PMID:22444325

  18. Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moko, Lilamarie E.; Ginns, Jonathan; Rosenbaum, Marlon; Greutmann, Matthias; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Hageman, Abbie; Kim, Yuli; Deng, Lisa X.; Grewal, Jasmine; Zaidi, Ali N.; Almansoori, Ghadeera; Oechslin, Erwin; Earing, Michael; Landzberg, Michael J.; Singh, Michael N.; Wu, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Context: Aberrant cellular oxygen sensing is a leading theory for development of pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL). Objective: The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) increases the risk for PHEO-PGL. Design/Setting/Participants: We investigated the association between CCHD and PHEO-PGL with two complementary studies: study 1) an international consortium was established to identify congenital heart disease (CHD) patients with a PHEO-PGL diagnosis confirmed by pathology or biochemistry and imaging; study 2) the 2000–2009 Nationwide Inpatient Survey, a nationally representative discharge database, was used to determine population-based cross-sectional PHEO-PGL frequency in hospitalized CCHD patients compared with noncyanotic CHD and those without CHD using multivariable logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, and genetic PHEO-PGL syndromes. Results: In study 1, we identified 20 PHEO-PGL cases, of which 18 had CCHD. Most presented with cardiovascular or psychiatric symptoms. Median cyanosis duration for the CCHD PHEO-PGL cases was 20 years (range 1–57 y). Cases were young at diagnosis (median 31.5 y, range 15–57 y) and 7 of 18 had multiple tumors (two bilateral PHEO; six multifocal or recurrent PGL), whereas 11 had single tumors (seven PHEO; four PGL). PGLs were abdominal (13 of 17) or head/neck (4 of 17). Cases displayed a noradrenergic biochemical phenotype similar to reported hypoxia-related PHEO-PGL genetic syndromes but without clinical signs of such syndromes. In study 2, hospitalized CCHD patients had an increased likelihood of PHEO-PGL (adjusted odds ratio 6.0, 95% confidence interval 2.6–13.7, P < .0001) compared with those without CHD; patients with noncyanotic CHD had no increased risk (odds ratio 0.9, P = .48). Conclusions: There is a strong link between CCHD and PHEO-PGL. Whether these rare diseases coassociate due to hypoxic stress, common

  19. Guidelines and protocols for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in children and adults with congenital heart disease: SCMR expert consensus group on congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has taken on an increasingly important role in the diagnostic evaluation and pre-procedural planning for patients with congenital heart disease. This article provides guidelines for the performance of CMR in children and adults with congenital heart disease. The first portion addresses preparation for the examination and safety issues, the second describes the primary techniques used in an examination, and the third provides disease-specific protocols. Variations in practice are highlighted and expert consensus recommendations are provided. Indications and appropriate use criteria for CMR examination are not specifically addressed. PMID:23763839

  20. Recent Advances in Surgery of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerbode, Frank; Sharma, Giridhari

    1970-01-01

    In the cyanotic group palliative procedures for transposition of the great arteries are frequently life-saving in infancy, and the definitive operations such as the atrial baffle, and the Rastelli procedure for those with ventricular septal defect and pulmonic stenosis, are now firmly established. In tetralogy of Fallot shunting procedures continue to be employed in infancy and early childhood, and the complete repair is usually done after the age of five. Corrective operations for total anomalous venous return may have to be staged, and the results are more satisfactory in older children. The various forms of endocardial cushion defects can usually be recognized accurately preoperatively, and where the normal anatomical relationships can be restored, excellent results obtained. Brilliant operative success can now be had in some forms of truncus arteriosus and double outlet right ventricle. It is quite common to find congenital heart disease in adults, frequently after many years of having been treated as rheumatic heart disease. The operative risk in this group is less than 10 percent, and in most instances such patients are restored to their normal physiological age after operation. PMID:4926370

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. Personal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has changed dramatically with the development of targeted therapy with selective pulmonary vasodilators. The number of adult Japanese patients with PAH associated with CHD is increasing. It is important to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of these patients, and to achieve this, a register of adult Japanese patients with PAH associated with CHD should be established. At the World Symposium in Nice, France, in 2013, the consensus was reached that patients with a pulmonary resistance of < 4 Wood Units (WU)·m(2) have operable disease, and patients with a pulmonary resistance of > 8 WU·m(2) have inoperable disease. However, these criteria are conservative. Some patients with a pulmonary resistance of > 8 WU·m(2) and a good response to a pulmonary vasodilator test have operable disease and a favorable clinical course long after repair of CHD. The criteria determining operability in patients with PAH associated with CHD in the era of pulmonary vasodilators should be established using data obtained from patient registers and/or multicenter studies. The optimal management of Eisenmenger syndrome should also be established using data obtained from patient registers. Prospective studies should be conducted to determine the life expectancy of patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in the era of targeted therapy. A relatively mild increase in pulmonary resistance may result in failure of a Fontan circulation. The effects of pulmonary vasodilators on the long-term prognosis of patients who have undergone the Fontan operation are still unclear. PMID:25787791

  2. State-of-the-Art CT Imaging Techniques for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    CT is increasingly being used for evaluating the cardiovascular structures and airways in the patients with congenital heart disease. Multi-slice CT has traditionally been used for the evaluation of the extracardiac vascular and airway abnormalities because of its inherent high spatial resolution and excellent air-tissue contrast. Recent developments in CT technology primarily by reducing the cardiac motion and the radiation dose usage in congenital heart disease evaluation have helped expand the indications for CT usage. Tracheobronchomalacia associated with congenital heart disease can be evaluated with cine CT. Intravenous contrast injection should be tailored to unequivocally demonstrate cardiovascular abnormalities. Knowledge of the state-of-the-art CT imaging techniques that are used for evaluating congenital heart disease is helpful not only for planning and performing CT examinations, but also for interpreting and presenting the CT image findings that consequently guide the proper medical and surgical management. PMID:20046490

  3. Bioengineering and Stem Cell Technology in the Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Alexis; Edel, Michael J.; Blue, Gillian; Dilley, Rodney J.; Harvey, Richard P.; Winlaw, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease places a significant burden on the individual, family and community despite significant advances in our understanding of aetiology and treatment. Early research in ischaemic heart disease has paved the way for stem cell technology and bioengineering, which promises to improve both structural and functional aspects of disease. Stem cell therapy has demonstrated significant improvements in cardiac function in adults with ischaemic heart disease. This finding, together with promising case studies in the paediatric setting, demonstrates the potential for this treatment in congenital heart disease. Furthermore, induced pluripotent stems cell technology, provides a unique opportunity to address aetiological, as well as therapeutic, aspects of disease. PMID:26239354

  4. The school age child with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Lynn; Kelly, Michelle M; Reynolds, Kathryn; Conlan, Misty; Taylor, Felisha

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the United States, there are approximately 1 in 150 adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD) (). Infant and childhood mortality related to CHD decreased by 31% between 1987 and 2005 (). This survival trend is predicted to increase each year due to advancements in treatment and management of CHD. This significant shift in the epidemiology of CHD requires nurses to take action in preparing children with CHD and their families for their teenage years and young adulthood. The school-age child is the ideal age to begin teaching the child about their healthcare needs and how to care for themselves in preparation for the future. The school-age child with CHD has specific physical, intellectual, emotional, and developmental needs that must be considered and managed using a multidisciplinary approach. Pediatric nurses must be aware of these needs as they help the child and their family seamlessly and successfully transition into young adulthood as a happy and healthy CHD survivor. PMID:25330332

  5. Practical stepwise approach to rhythm disturbances in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Huh, June

    2010-06-01

    Patients with congenital heart diseases (CHD) are confronted with early- and late-onset complications, such as conduction disorders, arrhythmias, myocardial dysfunction, altered coronary flow, and ischemia, throughout their lifetime despite successful hemodynamic and/or anatomical correction. Rhythm disturbance is a well-known and increasingly frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CHD. Predisposing factors to rhythm disturbances include underlying cardiac defects, hemodynamic changes as part of the natural history, surgical repair and related scarring, and residual hemodynamic abnormalities. Acquired factors such as aging, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and others may also contribute to arrhythmogenesis in CHD. The first step in evaluating arrhythmias in CHD is to understand the complex anatomy and to find predisposing factors and hemodynamic abnormalities. A practical stepwise approach can lead to diagnosis and prompt appropriate interventions. Electrophysiological assessment and management should be done with integrated care of the underlying heart defects and hemodynamic abnormalities. Catheter ablation and arrhythmia surgery have been increasingly applied, showing increasing success rates with technological advancement despite complicated arrhythmia circuits in complex anatomy and the difficulty of access. Correction of residual hemodynamic abnormalities may be critical in the treatment of arrhythmia in patients with CHD. PMID:21189938

  6. Practical stepwise approach to rhythm disturbances in congenital heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart diseases (CHD) are confronted with early- and late-onset complications, such as conduction disorders, arrhythmias, myocardial dysfunction, altered coronary flow, and ischemia, throughout their lifetime despite successful hemodynamic and/or anatomical correction. Rhythm disturbance is a well-known and increasingly frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CHD. Predisposing factors to rhythm disturbances include underlying cardiac defects, hemodynamic changes as part of the natural history, surgical repair and related scarring, and residual hemodynamic abnormalities. Acquired factors such as aging, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and others may also contribute to arrhythmogenesis in CHD. The first step in evaluating arrhythmias in CHD is to understand the complex anatomy and to find predisposing factors and hemodynamic abnormalities. A practical stepwise approach can lead to diagnosis and prompt appropriate interventions. Electrophysiological assessment and management should be done with integrated care of the underlying heart defects and hemodynamic abnormalities. Catheter ablation and arrhythmia surgery have been increasingly applied, showing increasing success rates with technological advancement despite complicated arrhythmia circuits in complex anatomy and the difficulty of access. Correction of residual hemodynamic abnormalities may be critical in the treatment of arrhythmia in patients with CHD. PMID:21189938

  7. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-02-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  8. Direct micromethod for diagnosis of acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Feilij, H; Muller, L; Gonzalez Cappa, S M

    1983-01-01

    A microhematocrit concentration method (MH) for immediate diagnosis of Chagas' disease during the acute stage or in congenital cases was standardized. Parasitemia as low as 1,000 parasites per ml was detected, after centrifugation of six 50-microliters capillary tubes, by 10-min microscopic observation of each buffy coat spread between slide and cover glass. Operator's time was reduced by at least one-third when compared with a fresh blood observation (FB). In 12 of the 15 patients studied, diagnosis was performed in 4.9 +/- 3.08 min with MH, whereas 27.0 +/- 12.1 min were necessary when FB was used. In the three remaining patients whose FB results were negative, MH became positive after 13, 16, and 40 min. In our experience, FB proved to be more sensitive than previously reported. Suckling mouse inoculation also proved to be sensitive but, as in xenodiagnosis and in hemoculture, the delay in getting the final result was a limiting factor. PMID:6413530

  9. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  10. Pregnant women with congenital heart disease: cardiac, anesthetic and obstetrical implications.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Susan M; Arendt, Katherine W; Landzberg, Michael J; Economy, Katherine E; Khairy, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Remarkable advances in surgical and clinical management have resulted in survival to adulthood in the large majority of patients with congenital heart malformations, even with the most complex disease. Over 1 million adults with congenital heart disease currently live in the USA, approximately half of whom are women of childbearing age. Collectively, congenital malformations are the most common form of heart disease in pregnant women. Indeed, in North America, congenital defects are now the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality from heart disease. This article begins with a summary of cardiovascular changes during pregnancy and highlights key features in pre-pregnancy counseling, maternal cardiac and obstetric risk, and neonatal complications. Management issues regarding pregnancy and delivery are elaborated, including anesthesia considerations. While it is beyond the scope of this article to discuss particulars related to all forms of congenital heart disease, selected subtypes are detailed at greater length. In the absence of clinical trial evidence to inform the care of pregnant women with congenital heart disease, this article is inspired by the premise that knowledgeable multidisciplinary assessment and management provides the best opportunity to substantially improve outcomes for mother and baby. PMID:20222821

  11. Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiac Catheterization In the last two decades, tremendous medical advances have been made. These allow congenital heart defects to be treated in the cath lab without surgery. Valvuloplasty or Balloon Valvotomy This procedure is done to open a ...

  12. Assessment of operability of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Myers, Patrick O; Tissot, Cécile; Beghetti, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a common complication of congenital heart disease, and is now predominantly among patients with uncorrected left-to-right shunts. A growing population is characterized by persistent or recurrent PAH after surgical or interventional correction of left-to-right shunts; the latter having a worse prognosis than other forms of PAH associated with congenital heart disease. New treatments for PAH have been shown to be effective in improving PAH exercise capacity and hemodynamics, raising the hope for making previously inoperable congenital heart defects operable and shifting the framework for the assessment of operability. This review focuses on current methods for assessing operability in PAH associated with congenital heart disease, and the possibility of "treat-and-repair" vs. "repair-and-treat" strategies for patients with inoperable or borderline PAH. PMID:24225339

  13. Sonocubic fine: new three-dimensional ultrasound software to the screening of congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Araujo Júnior, Edward; Rocha, Luciane Alves da; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common fetal congenital malformations; however, the prenatal rate detection still is low. The two-dimensional echocardiography is the "gold standard" exam to screening and diagnosis of congenital heart disease during the prenatal; however, this exam is operator-depending and it is realized only in high risk pregnancies. Spatio-temporal image correlation is a three-dimensional ultrasound software that analyses the fetal heart and your connections in the multiplanar and rendering modes; however, spatio-temporal image correlation too is operator-depending and time-consuming. We presenting a new three-dimensional software named Sonocubic fine to the screening of congenital heart disease. This software applies intelligent navigation technology to spatio-temporal image correlation volume datasets to automatically generate nine fetal echocardiography standard views. Thus, this new software tends to be less operator-depending and time-consuming. PMID:25372918

  14. Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease The Coronary Arterial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The coronary circulation in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) includes the extramural coronary arteries, basal coronary blood flow, flow reserve, the coronary microcirculation, and coronary atherogenesis. Methods: Coronary arteriograms were analyzed in 59 adults with CCHD. Dilated extramural coronaries were examined histologically in six patients. Basal coronary blood flow was determined with N-13 positron emission tomography in 14 patients and in 10 controls. Hyperemic flow was induced by intravenous dipyridamole pharmacologic stress. Immunostaining against SM alpha-actin permitted microcirculatory morphometric analysis. Non-fasting total cholesterols were retrieved in 279 patients divided into four groups: Group A---143 cyanotic unoperated, Group B---47 rendered acyanotic by reparative surgery, Group C---41 acyanotic unoperated, Group D---48 acyanotic before and after operation. Results: Extramural coronary arteries were mildly or moderately dilated to ectatic in 49/59 angiograms. Histologic examination disclosed loss of medial smooth muscle, increased medial collagen, and duplication of internal elastic lamina. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased. Hyperemic flow was comparable to controls. Remodeling of the microcirculation was based upon coronary arteriolar length, volume and surface densities. Coronary atherosclerosis was absent in both the arteriograms and the necropsy specimens. Conclusions: Extramural coronary arteries in CCHD dilate in response to endothelial vasodilator substances supplemented by mural attenuation caused by medial abnormalities. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased, but hyperemic flow was normal. Remodeling of the microcirculation was responsible for preservation of flow reserve. The coronaries were atheroma-free because of the salutory effects of hypocholesterolemia, hypoxemia, upregulated nitric oxide, low platelet counts, and hyperbilirubinrmia. PMID:22845810

  15. Academic proficiency in children after early congenital heart disease surgery.

    PubMed

    Mulkey, Sarah B; Swearingen, Christopher J; Melguizo, Maria S; Reeves, Rachel N; Rowell, Jacob A; Gibson, Neal; Holland, Greg; Bhutta, Adnan T; Kaiser, Jeffrey R

    2014-02-01

    Children with early surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) are known to have impaired neurodevelopment; their performance on school-age achievement tests and their need for special education remains largely unexplored. The study aimed to determine predictors of academic achievement at school age and placement in special education services among early CHD surgery survivors. Children with CHD surgery at <1 year of age from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2003, at the Arkansas Children's Hospital were identified. Out-of-state births and infants with known genetic and/or neurologic conditions were excluded. Infants were matched to an Arkansas Department of Education database containing standardized assessments at early school age and special-education codes. Predictors for achieving proficiency in literacy and mathematics and the receipt of special education were determined. Two hundred fifty-six children who attended Arkansas public schools and who had surgery as infants were included; 77.7 % had either school-age achievement-test scores or special-education codes of mental retardation or multiple disabilities. Scores on achievement tests for these children were 7-13 % lower than those of Arkansas students (p < 0.01). They had an eightfold increase in receipt of special education due to multiple disabilities [odds ratio (OR) 10.66, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 4.23-22.35] or mental retardation (OR 4.96, 95 % CI 2.6-8.64). Surgery after the neonatal period was associated with decreased literacy proficiency, and cardiopulmonary bypass during the first surgery was associated with decreased mathematics proficiency. Children who had early CHD surgery were less proficient on standardized school assessments, and many received special education. This is concerning because achievement-test scores at school age are "real-world" predictors of long-term outcomes. PMID:24000004

  16. Pregnancy and contraception in young women with congenital heart disease: General considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Rachel M; Sermer, Mathew; Colman, Jack M

    2011-01-01

    Young women with heart disease are increasingly being seen in obstetrical referral centres owing, in large part, to the dramatic improvements in survival of young adults with congenital heart disease in recent years. Although pregnancies in most women with heart disease result in favourable outcomes, there are important exceptions that must be recognized. These exceptions pose significant mortality risk to the mother and/or the fetus. The present article outlines cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy, general outcomes and management considerations for practitioners caring for pregnant young women with congenital heart disease. A lesion-specific review is published in a complementary article. PMID:22468131

  17. Bilateral congenital lumbar hernias in a patient with central core disease--A case report.

    PubMed

    Lazier, Joanna; Mah, Jean K; Nikolic, Ana; Wei, Xing-Chang; Samedi, Veronica; Fajardo, Carlos; Brindle, Mary; Perrier, Renee; Thomas, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lumbar hernias are rare malformations caused by defects in the development of the posterior abdominal wall. A known association exists with lumbocostovertebral syndrome; however other associated anomalies, including one case with arthrogryposis, have been previously reported. We present an infant girl with bilateral congenital lumbar hernias, multiple joint contractures, decreased muscle bulk and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia. Molecular testing revealed an R4861C mutation in the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene, known to be associated with central core disease. This is the first reported case of the co-occurrence of congenital lumbar hernias and central core disease. We hypothesize that ryanodine receptor 1 mutations may interrupt muscle differentiation and development. Further, this case suggests an expansion of the ryanodine receptor 1-related myopathy phenotype to include congenital lumbar hernias. PMID:26684984

  18. Quality of Life and Congenital Heart Disease in Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Bertoletti, Juliana; Marx, Giovana Caroline; Hattge, Sérgio Pedro; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Advances in cardiac surgery techniques and early diagnosis have enabled the increased survival of individuals with congenital heart disease. The investigation of the quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease provides complementary information to clinical data that can assist in decision making on the part of health professionals. Although many studies have been conducted to investigate the quality of life of children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, the results prove to be contradictory; while some studies show that congenital heart disease can impact the quality of life, others describe a better perception of quality of life among children and adolescents who suffer from the disease when compared with healthy control subjects. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the assessment of health related quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, in order to systematize the existing knowledge on this topic today. It is observed that research seeks to investigate aspects of personality in cardiac patients, their coping strategies used and perceived social support, aiming at better understanding the association of these variables with the level of quality of life in this population. PMID:24676375

  19. Incidence of Congenital Heart Disease: The 9-Year Experience of the Guangdong Registry of Congenital Heart Disease, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jian; Chen, Guanchun; Mai, Jinzhuang; Guo, Xiaoling; Ou, Yanqiu; Chen, Jimei; Gong, Wei; Gao, Xiangmin; Wu, Yong; Nie, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    There are 16.5 million newborns in China annually. However, the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) has not been evaluated. In 2004, we launched an active province-wide hospital-based CHD registry in the Guangdong Province of southern China. In this study, we examined the incidence of CHD and its subtypes from 2004 to 2012 and compared our findings to the literature. Our results indicate there is an increasing trend of CHD incidence. The increase in incidence occurred mainly for single lesion and the most common subtypes (e.g., ventricular or atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus). There were no increases found for multiple lesions or more complex subtypes. The proportion of CHD cases that were detected early (e.g., 1 week) increased over time. The incidence of CHD stabilized in 2010–2012 with the average cumulative incidences of 9.7, 9.9, and 11.1 per 1,000 live births at 1 week, 1 month, and 1 year, respectively. The incidences of CHD subtypes were comparable with recent international results. The data did not support previous reports that Asian children have a higher incidence of pulmonary outflow obstructions and lower incidence of transposition of the great arteries. However, there was a lower incidence of left ventricular outflow tract obstructions observed in our series. The increase in CHD incidence observed over time was due to improved detection and diagnosis. The true incidence of CHD in China was approximately 11.1 per 1,000 live births, which is higher than previously reported. PMID:27409588

  20. Incidence of Congenital Heart Disease: The 9-Year Experience of the Guangdong Registry of Congenital Heart Disease, China.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanji; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhuang, Jian; Chen, Guanchun; Mai, Jinzhuang; Guo, Xiaoling; Ou, Yanqiu; Chen, Jimei; Gong, Wei; Gao, Xiangmin; Wu, Yong; Nie, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    There are 16.5 million newborns in China annually. However, the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) has not been evaluated. In 2004, we launched an active province-wide hospital-based CHD registry in the Guangdong Province of southern China. In this study, we examined the incidence of CHD and its subtypes from 2004 to 2012 and compared our findings to the literature. Our results indicate there is an increasing trend of CHD incidence. The increase in incidence occurred mainly for single lesion and the most common subtypes (e.g., ventricular or atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus). There were no increases found for multiple lesions or more complex subtypes. The proportion of CHD cases that were detected early (e.g., 1 week) increased over time. The incidence of CHD stabilized in 2010-2012 with the average cumulative incidences of 9.7, 9.9, and 11.1 per 1,000 live births at 1 week, 1 month, and 1 year, respectively. The incidences of CHD subtypes were comparable with recent international results. The data did not support previous reports that Asian children have a higher incidence of pulmonary outflow obstructions and lower incidence of transposition of the great arteries. However, there was a lower incidence of left ventricular outflow tract obstructions observed in our series. The increase in CHD incidence observed over time was due to improved detection and diagnosis. The true incidence of CHD in China was approximately 11.1 per 1,000 live births, which is higher than previously reported. PMID:27409588

  1. Noteworthy Literature in 2015: Anesthesia for Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Twite, Mark; Ing, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    This article is a review of the literature published during the 12 months of 2015, which is of interest to the congenital cardiac anesthesiologist. While the review is not exhaustive, it identifies 7 themes in the literature for 2015 and cites 78 peer-reviewed publications. PMID:26783264

  2. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions.

  3. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Complex congenital cardiac lesions

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, Candice K; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger’s syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352139

  4. Can pulmonary vasodilator therapy expand the operative indications for congenital heart disease?

    PubMed

    Inai, Kei

    2015-01-01

    The operability of congenital heart disease with left to right shunt depends on the severity of the pulmonary vascular disease induced by the increased pulmonary blood flow. Although some recommendations exist regarding operative indications according to pathological, hemodynamic, and epidemiological factors, the evidence underlying these recommendations is not conclusive. Recently, oral pulmonary vasodilator therapy has been reported to improve outcomes in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and this therapy also appears to be effective in patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension, including those with postoperative pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome. It is expected that the availability of novel pulmonary vasodilator therapy will expand the operative indications in patients with congenital heart disease with left to right shunt, but there is currently insufficient evidence to definitively determine this. A multicenter double-blind study should be conducted to further examine this issue. PMID:25787792

  5. Matrix metalloproteinases as candidate biomarkers in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baggen, Vivan J M; Eindhoven, Jannet A; van den Bosch, Annemien E; Witsenburg, Maarten; Cuypers, Judith A A E; Langstraat, Jannette S; Boersma, Eric; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-07-01

    Context Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are associated with diastolic dysfunction and heart failure in acquired heart disease. Objective To investigate the role of MMPs as novel biomarkers in clinically stable adults with congenital heart disease. Methods We measured serum MMP-2, -3, -9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in 425 patients and analysed the association with cardiac function and exercise capacity. Results MMP-2 was significantly associated with exercise capacity, ventilatory efficiency and left ventricular deceleration time, independently of age, sex, body surface area and NT-proBNP. Conclusion MMP-2 may provide new information in the clinical evaluation of adults with congenital heart disease. PMID:26983903

  6. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities

    PubMed Central

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-01-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context. PMID:23680886

  7. Choosing Between MRI and CT Imaging in the Adult with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bonnichsen, Crystal; Ammash, Naser

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in the outcomes of surgical and catheter-based interventions and medical therapy have led to a growing population of adult patients with congenital heart disease. Adult patients with previously undiagnosed congenital heart disease or those previously palliated or repaired may have challenging echocardiographic examinations. Understanding the distinct anatomic and hemodynamic features of the congenital anomaly and quantifying ventricular function and valvular dysfunction plays an important role in the management of these patients. Rapid advances in imaging technology with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) allow for improved visualization of complex cardiac anatomy in the evaluation of this unique patient population. Although echocardiography remains the most widely used imaging tool to evaluate congenital heart disease, alternative and, at times, complimentary imaging modalities should be considered. When caring for adults with congenital heart disease, it is important to choose the proper imaging study that can answer the clinical question with the highest quality images, lowest risk to the patient, and in a cost-efficient manner. PMID:27002621

  8. Comparative hemodynamic effect of metrizamide and Renografin 76 in infants with congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Baltaxe, H.A.; Mooring, P.; Kugler, J.; Pinsky, W.; Chu, W.K.

    1983-06-01

    Twenty patients under the age of 2 years with suspected congenital heart disease received alternately Renografin 76 and metrizamide for angiocardiography. The dose was 2.0 ml/kg per injection for both contrast media into the left ventricle. Metrizamide induced slightly lesser change in heart rate, peak systolic pressure, and peak end-diastolic pressures. Serum osmolality, hematocrit, and serum electrolytes were affected equally by the contrast media. Metrizamide was well tolerated by the neonates with congenital heart disease and its radiopacity was adequate for diagnostic purposes. At the doses administered, metrizamide does not seem to have any great advantage over Renografin 76 for angiocardiography in infants with severe congenital heart disease.

  9. Down syndrome: Molecular mapping of the congenital heart disease and duodenal stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Korenburg, J.R. ); Bradley, C.; Disteche, C.M. )

    1992-02-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of congenital heart and gut disease and mental retardation. DS individuals also have characteristic facies, hands, and dermatoglyphics, in addition to abnormalities of the immune system, and increased risk of leukemia, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Although their molecular basis is unknown, recent work on patients with DS and partial duplications of chromosome 21 has suggested small chromosomal regions located in band q22 that are likely to contain the genes for some of these features. The authors now extend these analyses to define molecular markers for the congenital heart disease, the duodenal stenosis, and an 'overlap' region for the facial and some of the skeletal features. They report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular analysis of two patients. These studies provide the molecular basis for the construction of a DS phenotypic map and focus the search for genes responsible for the physical features, congenital heart disease, and duodenal stenosis of DS.

  10. The Critically Ill Infant with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Ashley M; Lu, Le N

    2015-08-01

    This article presents an approach for identification of infants with congenital heart disorders. These disorders are difficult to diagnose because of the complexity and variety of cardiac malformations; additionally presentation can be complicated by age-dependent physiology. By compiling data from the history and the physical examination, the emergency physician can identify lesion category and initiate stabilization procedures. Critical congenital cardiac lesions can be classified as left-sided obstructive ductal dependent, right-sided obstructive ductal dependent, and shunting or mixing. The simplified approach categorizes infants with these lesions respectively as "pink," "blue," or "gray." The emergency provider can provide life-saving stabilization until specialized care can be obtained. PMID:26226862

  11. The Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Section: increasing the opportunities for the congenital heart disease community within the American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gerard R; Mitchell, Stephanie; Beekman, Robert H; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Jenkins, Kathy J; Landzberg, Michael; Webb, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (AC/PC) Section was established to develop a clear voice within the American College of Cardiology and address the myriad issues facing the congenital heart disease profession. The Section is governed by the AC/PC Council, which includes pediatric cardiologists, adult congenital cardiologists, a cardiac care associate, and a fellow-in-training member. The Council is responsible for bidirectional communication between the College's Board of Trustees and the AC/PC Section members. Since its founding in 2004, Section objectives have been defined by the College's mission: to advocate for quality cardiovascular care through education, research promotion, and the development and application of standards and guidelines and to influence health care policy. The pillars of the College-advocacy, quality, education, and member engagement-serve as the defining template for the Section's strategy. The Section has developed work groups in advocacy, clinical practice, education and training, quality, and publications. A separate leadership group has been developed for adult congenital heart disease. Work groups are open to all Section members. Recognition of the importance of lifelong care in congenital heart disease led Section leaders to incorporate pediatric cardiology and adult congenital heart disease content into each of the work groups. There are more than 1,200 Section members, with nearly 400 members actively contributing to Section activities. This article outlines Section efforts to date and highlights significant successes to date. PMID:22192673

  12. [Rare diseases and their patient organization: the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases].

    PubMed

    Pogány, Gábor

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the author is to discuss special issues of rare diseases, with emphasis on circumstances present in Hungary, including those leading to the foundation of the non-governmental organization, the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. The author briefly reviews the most important findings of current international surveys which have been performed with or without the involvement of member associations of the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. At the level of medical and social services in Hungary, it is still "incidental" to get to the appropriate expert or centre providing the diagnosis or treatment. It is difficult to find the still very few existing services due to the lack of suitable "pathways" and referrals. There are long delays in obtaining the first appointment, resulting in vulnerability and inequality along the regions. The overall consequence is the insufficiency or lack of access to medical and social services. There are also difficulties related to the supply of orphan medication and the long duration of hospitalization. At the level of patient organizations financial scarcity and uncertainty are typical, combined with inappropriate infrastructural background and human resources. The poor quality of organization of patient bodies along with insufficient cooperation among them are characteristic as well. The author concludes that a National Plan or Strategy is needed to improve the current fragmentation of services which would enable patients and health, social and educational professionals to provide and use the best care in the practice. This would ensure all patients with rare diseases to be diagnosed within a possible shortest time allowing access to the care and support needed in time resulting in a decrease in burden of families and society. PMID:24566696

  13. Congenital Tuberculosis as a Result of Disseminated Maternal Disease: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-Honeysberg, Mónica; Diazgranados-Cuenca, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is highly prevalent worldwide, congenital tuberculosis is one of the least common manifestations of the disease. The diagnosis is usually difficult because of the non-specific clinical presentation and the lack of awareness of maternal disease prior to pregnancy and delivery. We present the case of a preterm neonate with congenital tuberculosis, born to a previously healthy mother who had developed severe disseminated tuberculosis during her pregnancy. Once the diagnosis was confirmed in the mother, the congenital infection was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric aspirates, and positive polymerase chain reaction in a cerebrospinal fluid examination. Treatment for tuberculosis with a four-drug regimen resulted in an adequate clinical response in both the mother and infant. PMID:26508944

  14. Real-Time Color-Flow CMR in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Pena, Erasmo; Nguyen, Patricia K.; Nayak, Krishna S.; Yang, Phillip C.; Rosenthal, David N.; Hu, Bob S.; Pauly, John M.; McConnell, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    CMR is valuable in the evaluation of congenital heart disease (CHD). Traditional flow imaging sequences involve cardiac and respiratory gating, increasing scan time and susceptibility to arrhythmias. We studied a real-time color-flow CMR system for the detection of flow abnormalities in 13 adults with CHD. All 16 congenital flow abnormalities previously detected by echocardiography were visualized using color-flow CMR, including atrial septal defects (n = 4), ventricular septal defects (n = 9), aortic coarctation (n = 1), Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 1) and Fontan shunt (n = 1). Real-time color-flow CMR can identify intra- and extra-cardiac flow abnormalities in adults with congenital heart disease. PMID:17060103

  15. Why should we care about ethical and policy challenges in congenital heart disease?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, James N; Kaufman, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects 1% of infants worldwide, and approximately 90% of children with serious CHD who have access to surgery survive to adulthood. Particularly as this population ages, there are unique ethical and policy challenges pertaining to this diverse population of children and adults, which also serve as a paradigm for other chronic diseases. A unique forum to discuss these issues occurred at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia on March 16 to 17, 2012, and was entitled "Ethics of the Heart: Ethical and Policy Challenges in Adult and Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease." The conference convened a multidisciplinary panel of nationally known experts in the fields of Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease, Adult Congenital Heart Disease, and Bioethics to identify and discuss the most important ethical issues in CHD through talks, panel discussions, and one-on-one interviews in six topic areas: genetic testing, transitions of care from pediatric to adult CHD, transplantation and mechanical circulatory support, research and development in CHD, the social and personal costs of success in treating CHD, and end-of-life considerations. This article is an introduction to the topics discussed. PMID:23799747

  16. Frequency of Congenital Heart Diseases in Prelingual Sensory-Neural Deaf Children

    PubMed Central

    Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Jafar; Malekzadeh, Iran; Nasirmohtaram, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hearing impairment is the most frequent sensorial congenital defect in newborns and has increased to 2–4 cases per 1,000 live births. Sensory-neural hearing loss (SNHL) accounts for more than 90% of all hearing loss. This disorder is associated with other congenital disorders such as renal, skeletal, ocular, and cardiac disorders. Given that congenital heart diseases are life-threatening, we decided to study the frequency of congenital heart diseases in children with congenital sensory-neural deafness. Materials and Methods: All children who had undergone cochlear implantation surgery due to SNHL and who had attended our hospital for speech therapy during 2008–2011 were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Results: Thirty-one children (15 boys and 16 girls) with a mean age of 55.70 months were examined, and underwent electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography. None of the children had any signs of heart problems in their medical records. Most of their heart examinations were normal, one patient had expiratory wheeze, four (12%) had mid-systolic click, and four (12%) had an intensified S1 sound. In echocardiography, 15 children (46%) had mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and two (6%) had minimal mitral regurgitation (MR). Mean ejection fraction (EF) was 69% and the mean fractional shortening (FS) was 38%. Conclusion: This study indicates the need for echocardiography and heart examinations in children with SNHL. PMID:27280096

  17. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  18. Evaluation of Neurodevelopment and Factors Affecting it in Children With Acyanotic Congenital Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozmen, Ayten; Terlemez, Semiha; Tunaoglu, Fatma Sedef; Soysal, Sebnem; Pektas, Ayhan; Cilsal, Erman; Koca, Ulker; Kula, Serdar; Deniz Oguz, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rate of congenital heart disease is 0.8% in all live births. The majority of this, however, is acyanotic congenital heart disease. The survival rate of children with cardiac disease has increased with the developments provided in recent years and their lifetime is extended. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate neurodevelopment of children with uncomplicated acyanotic congenital heart disease in preschool period and determine the factors affecting their neurodevelopmental process. Patients and Methods: 132 children with acyanotic congenital heart disease aged 6 - 72 months were involved in the study. Mental development and intelligence levels of patients under 2 years old were assessed by using Bayley Development Scale-III, and Stanford Binet Intelligence test was employed for patients over 2 years old. Denver Developmental Screening Test II was applied to all patients for their personal-social, fine motor, gross motor and language development. Results: The average age of patients (67 girls, 65 boys) included in the study was 35.2 ± 19.6 months. It was determined that there were subnormal mental level in 13 (10%) patients and at least one specific developmental disorder in 33 (25%) patients. Bayley Mental Development Scale score of patients who had received incubator care in perinatal period was found significantly low (88 ± 4.2) compared to those with no incubator care (93.17 ± 8.5) (P = 0.028). Low educational level of father was established to be linked with low mental development scores at the age of 2 and following that age (P < 0.05). Iron deficiency anemia was discovered to be related to low psychometric test scores at every age (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Neurodevelopmental problems in children with acyanotic congenital heart disease were found higher compared to those in society. Mental development and intelligence levels of patients were determined to be closely associated with receiving incubator care, father’s educational level and

  19. Intellectual Development of Infants, Children and Adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Jo

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common congenital defect in children, affecting between 3 and 10 in every 1000 live births. While significant advances in medical and surgical management have resulted in increasing numbers of survivors, it is also recognized that there is a growing population of children living with neurological impairment and lowered…

  20. Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Children and Adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Beena; Francis, Johnson

    2005-01-01

    Major physical illnesses usually have an impact on the psychological well-being of any individual. An illness of early onset, with necessity of frequent diagnostic and therapeutic interventions can adversely affect the emotional balance and behavioural adaptation of children and adolescents. This is applicable for congenital heart disease,…

  1. Physical Activity and Sport Participation in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease: Perceptions of Children and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Kirsh, Joel A.; Kilburn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This study explored perceptions toward physical activity and sport in the lives of youth with congenital heart disease. Thirteen cardiac participants were interviewed in the presence of their parents, and a process of inductive analysis was conducted. Sport was not considered a valued pursuit despite the belief that it is essential for the…

  2. Risk Factors for Gross Motor Dysfunction in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Suzanne H.; Eldridge, Bev J.; Galea, Mary P.; Harris, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) that is severe enough to require early surgery are at risk for cognitive and motor delays, as well as musculoskeletal impairments, and are best managed by an interdisciplinary team during their hospital stay and after discharge. The purpose of this article is to review some of the risk factors associated…

  3. Understanding age-based transition needs: Perspectives from adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to explore the transition process in congenital heart disease (CHD) care through the perceived needs and concerns of adolescents (pretransition) and the experiential insight from adults (post-transition), in order to inform future transition initiatives and information ...

  4. Congenital Chagas' disease transmission in the United States: Diagnosis in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Jorge; Bofill, Lina M; Bolivar, Hector; Torres-Viera, Carlos; Urbina, Julio A; Benhayon, Daniel; Torres, Jaime R

    2016-01-01

    Two brothers with congenitally-acquired Chagas' disease (CD) diagnosed during adulthood are reported. The patients were born in the USA to a mother from Bolivia who on subsequent assessment was found to be serologically positive for Trypanosoma cruzi. Serologic screening of all pregnant women who migrated from countries with endemic CD is strongly recommended. PMID:27516969

  5. Masquerading acidosis after cardiopulmonary bypass: a case of propionic acidemia and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Robert A; Monge, Michael C; Charrow, Joel; Costello, John M; Epting, Conrad L

    2015-04-01

    We report the case of a child with both propionic acidemia and cyanotic congenital heart disease. The presence of an underlying inborn error of metabolism confounded the management of this patient in the postoperative period, resulting in therapeutic misdirection until the true etiology of hyperlactemia was recognized. PMID:25870350

  6. Recreational scuba diving in patients with congenital heart disease: Time for new guidelines.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Schnell, Frédéric; Brouant, Benoît; Phan, Gerald; Lafay, Vincent; Bonnemains, Laurent; Bédossa, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The number of recreational scuba divers is steadily increasing. In its latest recommendations, the French Federation of Undersea Studies and Sports listed congenital heart disease as a formal and final contraindication to scuba diving. On the other hand, with the progress made in their management, the prognosis and quality of life of patients with congenital heart diseases have improved considerably, enabling them to engage in physical and sports endeavours, which are known to confer general health and psychological benefits. As a consequence, the ability of these patients to dive has become a regular and recurrent issue. We review the various types of scuba diving, the physical performance required for its practice, its effects on cardiovascular function and the elements that need to be considered before recommending whether it can be practiced safely at various levels of difficulty. Because of the diversity and broad heterogeneity of congenital heart diseases, a detailed evaluation of each patient's performance based on clinical criteria common to all congenital heart diseases is recommended. PMID:27364729

  7. Grown-up congenital heart (GUCH) disease: current needs and provision of service for adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    The size of the national population of patients with grown-up congenital heart disease (GUCH) is uncertain, but since 80–85% of patients born with congenital heart disease now survive to adulthood (age 16 years), an annual increase of 2500 can be anticipated according to birth rate. Organisation of medical care is haphazard with only three of 18 cardiac surgical centres operating on over 30 cases per annum and only two established specialised units fully equipped and staffed. Not all grown-ups with congenital heart disease require the same level of expertise; 20–25% are complex, rare, etc, and require life long expert supervision and/or intervention; a further 35–40% require access to expert consultation. The rest, about 40%, have simple or cured diseases and need little or no specialist expertise. The size of the population needing expertise is small in comparison to coronary and hypertensive disease, aging, and increasing in complexity. It requires expert cardiac surgery and specialised medical cardiology, intensive care, electrophysiology, imaging and interventions, "at risk" pregnancy services, connection to transplant services familiar with their basic problem, clinical nurse specialist advisors, and trained nurses. An integrated national service is described with 4–6 specialist units established within adult cardiology, ideally in relation or proximity to university hospital/departments in appropriate geographic location, based in association with established paediatric cardiac surgical centres with designated inpatient and outpatient facilities for grown-up patients with congenital heart disease. Specialist units should accept responsibility for educating the profession, training the specialists, cooperative research, receiving patients "out of region", sharing particular skills between each other, and they must liaise with other services and trusts in the health service, particularly specified outpatient clinics in district and regional centres. Not

  8. Rare combination of congenital heart disease and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Miyamoto, Takashi; Yoshitake, Shuichi; Naito, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tomio

    2015-10-01

    Here, we describe a case of total anomalous pulmonary venous return with coarctation of the aorta that was diagnosed as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis at autopsy in a male infant. Surgical repair was performed at 1 day of age, but the infant died on postoperative day 51 due to respiratory insufficiency without any evidence of pulmonary venous obstruction. He had been unexpectedly diagnosed with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and pulmonary hypoplasia on autopsy. Congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a serious condition with a high mortality rate, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with a clinical picture of pulmonary venous obstruction, because most patients are unable to survive without proper treatment. In this report, we address specific issues that should be discussed in such cases based on our recent experience. PMID:26310609

  9. The Role of Beta-Blocker in Heart Failure in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Norozi, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to the enormous progress in the field of cardiac surgery and paediatric cardiology since the mid of 20th century, more and more children with congenital heart defects reach the adulthood. This on the other hand encounter physician and patients various problems due to late complications after the heart surgery like congestive heart failure, arrhythmia and sudden death. One of the challenging area is the medical management of heart failure in these patients with complex anatomy and hemodynamics. The lack of evidence of the effectiveness of the anti congestive medications in this population in from of large randomized controlled trials, makes it difficult to establish universally accepted therapy guidelines. In this article we will review the evidence of the beta-blockers in heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease. Also we will discuss the mechanisms of heart failure in this patient's cohort and will review the literature with respect to the use of neurohormonal antagonists in congenital heart disease. There is an urgent need to initiate well-designed clinical trials to prove if the positive results of neurohormonal blockade in acquired heart failure in adults can be translated in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25198738

  10. An embryological point of view on associated congenital anomalies of children with Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Slavikova, T; Zabojnikova, L; Babala, J; Varga, I

    2015-01-01

    The most common congenital gut motility disorder is the Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). This anomaly is characterized by absence of neural crest-derived enteric neuronal ganglia. The aim of our study was to analyze the relationship between HSCR and other congenital anomalies or malfunctions. We examined 130 patients with Hirschsprung disease from Slovakia for last 10 years. During patients examination we focused not only on morphological abnormalities, but also functional anomalies. The incidence of associated congenital anomalies in our patients with HSCR was 26.1 %. But if we add functional defects (hypothyroidism, malfunction in cellular immunity, neurological deficit) to the morphological congenital abnormalities, the rate of the patients with HSCR with additional defects achieves 50.1 %. Nine of our patients (6.9 %) had syndromic HSCR. The most frequent disorder (13.6 % of patients) was primary deficiency in cellular immunity. More than 12.3 % of patients with HSCR had genitourinary abnormalities, in 10.0 % of patients variable degree of psychomotor retardation was observed, and skeletal, muscle and limb anomalies involved 7.7 % of patients. In 7.6 % cases of patients we found congenital hypothyroidism (including 2 cases of agenesis of thyroid gland). More than 6.1 % of patients presented with an associated anomaly in gastrointestinal tract (mostly anorectal malformations). Up to 5.5 % patients had congenital anomaly of heart, 3.8 % had ophthalmic and 3.1 % had craniofacial anomalies. Down syndrome was the main diagnosis in 3.8 % patients. We discussed  the relationship between HSCR and other anomalies, which are probably caused by abnormal migration, proliferation, or differentiation, of neural crest cells during embryogenesis (Tab. 1, Fig. 2, Ref. 75). PMID:26621159

  11. Cardiovascular diseases in grandparents and the risk of congenital heart diseases in grandchildren.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, K P J; Obermann-Borst, S A; Sijbrands, E J G; Wildhagen, M F; Helbing, W A; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M

    2014-04-01

    Hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia are associated with both adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) and having a child with a congenital heart disease (CHD). We investigated associations between CVD in grandparents and the risk of CHD in grandchildren. In a case-control family study, we obtained detailed questionnaire information on CVD and CHD in 247 families with a CHD child and 203 families without a CHD child. Grandparents with CVD or intermittent claudication (IC) were significantly associated with an increased risk for CHD in grandchildren [OR 1.39 (95% CI 1.03-1.89) and OR 2.77 (95% CI 1.02-7.56), respectively]. The risk of CHD grandchildren was particularly increased in paternal grandfathers with CVD [OR 1.85 (95% CI 1.01-3.37)]. Overall, having a grandparent with CVD increased the risk for CHD in the grandchild by 1.65 (95% CI 1.12-2.41). After adjustment for potential maternal confounders, this risk was 1.44 (95% CI 0.94-2.21). Having two or more grandparents with CVD was associated with an approximately threefold risk for CHD grandchildren [OR adjusted 2.72 (95% CI 1.08-6.89)]. Our data suggest that CVD and IC in grandparents are associated with an increased risk of having a CHD grandchild. These first findings may be explained by shared causality of derangements in metabolic pathways and are in line with the fetal origins of health and disease. PMID:24847701

  12. Use of a Novel Chagas Urine Nanoparticle Test (Chunap) for Diagnosis of Congenital Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Sánchez, Gerardo; Valencia Ayala, Edward; Liotta, Lance; Bern, Caryn; Luchini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of congenital T. cruzi transmission is considered one of the pillars of control programs of Chagas disease. Congenital transmission accounts for 25% of new infections with an estimated 15,000 infected infants per year. Current programs to detect congenital Chagas disease in Latin America utilize microscopy early in life and serology after 6 months. These programs suffer from low sensitivity by microscopy and high loss to follow-up later in infancy. We developed a Chagas urine nanoparticle test (Chunap) to concentrate, preserve and detect T. cruzi antigens in urine for early, non-invasive diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings This is a proof-of-concept study of Chunap for the early diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease. Poly N-isopropylacrylamide nano-particles functionalized with trypan blue were synthesized by precipitation polymerization and characterized with photon correlation spectroscopy. We evaluated the ability of the nanoparticles to capture, concentrate and preserve T. cruzi antigens. Urine samples from congenitally infected and uninfected infants were then concentrated using these nanoparticles. The antigens were eluted and detected by Western Blot using a monoclonal antibody against T. cruzi lipophosphoglycan. The nanoparticles concentrate T. cruzi antigens by 100 fold (western blot detection limit decreased from 50 ng/ml to 0.5 ng/ml). The sensitivity of Chunap in a single specimen at one month of age was 91.3% (21/23, 95% CI: 71.92%–98.68%), comparable to PCR in two specimens at 0 and 1 month (91.3%) and significantly higher than microscopy in two specimens (34.8%, 95% CI: 16.42%–57.26%). Chunap specificity was 96.5% (71/74 endemic, 12/12 non-endemic specimens). Particle-sequestered T. cruzi antigens were protected from trypsin digestion. Conclusion/Significance Chunap has the potential to be developed into a simple and sensitive test for the early diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease. PMID

  13. Analysis of outcomes for congenital cardiac disease: can we do better?

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Wernovsky, Gil; Elliott, Martin J

    2007-09-01

    This review discusses the historical aspects, current state of the art, and potential future advances in the areas of nomenclature and databases for the analysis of outcomes of treatments for patients with congenitally malformed hearts. We will consider the current state of analysis of outcomes, lay out some principles which might make it possible to achieve life-long monitoring and follow-up using our databases, and describe the next steps those involved in the care of these patients need to take in order to achieve these objectives. In order to perform meaningful multi-institutional analyses, we suggest that any database must incorporate the following six essential elements: use of a common language and nomenclature, use of an established uniform core dataset for collection of information, incorporation of a mechanism of evaluating case complexity, availability of a mechanism to assure and verify the completeness and accuracy of the data collected, collaboration between medical and surgical subspecialties, and standardised protocols for life-long follow-up. During the 1990s, both The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons created databases to assess the outcomes of congenital cardiac surgery. Beginning in 1998, these two organizations collaborated to create the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project. By 2000, a common nomenclature, along with a common core minimal dataset, were adopted by The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery. In 2000, The International Nomenclature Committee for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease was established. This committee eventually evolved into the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease. The working component of this international nomenclature society has been The International Working Group for Mapping and Coding

  14. Interventional catheterization in surgically treated patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Friedli, B; Oberhänsli, I; Faidutti, B

    2000-12-01

    Interventional catheterization is an alternative to surgery for some congenital heart defects. For other malformations, the surgeon and the interventionist will join in an effort to obtain an optimal result: the typical example is pulmonary atresia with VSD and aortopulmonary collaterals. In other cases, the cardiologist may be called upon to intervene with catheter techniques to correct sequelae or residual lesions after surgical correction, avoiding redo surgery. Most often, the task consists of opening stenoses by balloon dilatation and/or stenting the main targets being pulmonary artery branch stenoses, venous obstructions after Mustard procedure, and recoarctations. Whereas simple balloon dilatation of recoarctation often brings good results, stents are often needed to obtain optimal results in pulmonary branch stenoses. Stenting of pulmonary veins has been disappointing. Closing unwanted vessels and defects is another task for the interventional cardiologist after cardiac surgery. Here, the most frequent procedure is closing aortopulmonary collaterals in pulmonary atresia and VSD after corrective surgery. Advantages and limitations of these procedures are discussed. PMID:11145397

  15. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Farber, Gregory K; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D; Burns, Kristin M; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C; Chung, Wendy K; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H; Forrest, Christopher B; Gaynor, William J; Gaies, Michael G; Go, Alan S; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L; Schwartz, Steven M; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of congenital heart disease data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in congenital heart disease, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the working group. PMID:27045129

  16. Caries experience in young children with congenital heart disease in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Elizangela Lins Cavalcanti; Azevedo, Vitor Manuel Pereira; Castro, Rodolfo de Almeida Lima; Reis, Luciana Carvalho; De Lorenzo, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Oral care is frequently suboptimal in children from developing countries, especially those suffering from severe systemic diseases. The aim of the present study was to analyze the oral epidemiological profile of 3-to-5-year-old children with congenital heart disease. Dental and medical records of children evaluated at the Dental Service of the National Institute of Cardiology, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were reviewed. Caries experience was reported using the dmft index. Negative behavior towards dental management was recorded. The sample consisted of 144 children aged 4.41 ± 0.95 years. The mean dmft value was 5.4 ± 4.9, and 80.5% had at least one caries lesion. Dmft index was greater in the presence of cyanotic cardiac disease and in children with negative behavior. An increase in the "missing" component of the dmft index was also found in children using medicine on a daily basis. A higher caries experience was associated with children whose fathers had only an elementary education. In conclusion, children with congenital heart disease had high levels of caries experience at a young age. Cyanosis, negative behavior, daily use of medicine, one-parent family and the educational level of fathers seem to influence caries experience in children with congenital cardiac disease. PMID:23538422

  17. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Lars J.; Leirgul, Elisabeth; Boyd, Heather A.; Priest, James; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.; Quertermous, Thomas; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Background— Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. Methods and Results— In a national cohort study, we identified 2 025 727 persons born from 1978 to 2011; among them were 7296 (0.36%) persons exposed to maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus. Pregestational diabetes mellitus was identified by using the National Patient Register and individual-level information on all prescriptions filled in Danish pharmacies. Persons with CHD (n=16 325) were assigned to embryologically related cardiac phenotypes. The CHD prevalence in the offspring of mothers with pregestational diabetes mellitus was 318 per 10 000 live births (n=232) in comparison with a baseline risk of 80 per 10 000; the adjusted relative risk for CHD was 4.00 (95% confidence interval, 3.51–4.53). The association was not modified by year of birth, maternal age at diabetes onset, or diabetes duration, and CHD risks associated with type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 (insulin-independent) diabetes mellitus did not differ significantly. Persons born to women with previous acute diabetes complications had a higher CHD risk than those exposed to maternal diabetes mellitus without complications (relative risk, 7.62; 95% confidence interval, 5.23–10.6, and relative risk, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.91–4.13, respectively; P=0.0004). All specific CHD phenotypes were associated with maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus (relative risk range, 2.74–13.8). Conclusions— The profoundly increased CHD risk conferred by maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus neither changed over time nor differed by diabetes subtype. The association with acute pregestational diabetes complications was particularly strong, suggesting a role for glucose in the causal pathway. PMID:27166384

  18. Anxiety determinants in mothers of children with congenital heart diseases undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rahimianfar, Ali Akbar; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Sarebanhassanabadi, Mohammadtaghi; Dehghani, Hamide; Namayandeh, Syedeh Mahdieh; Khavary, Zohre; Rahimianfar, Fatemeh; Aghbageri, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: The infants with congenital cardiovascular diseases are faced with too much problems in the case of their ongoing life. Mothers’ stress investigation would be important because can receive the stress from his parents. The aim of the following study was determined anxiety in mothers of children undergoing cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted by an analytical study on 69 infants’ mothers who were operated due to their cardiovascular abnormalities in Yazd Afshar Hospital (2012). In this study, some demographic information and influential factors were recorded germane to mothers’ stress, including residential location, history of infant hospitalization or congenital disease as well as some questions in the case of stimuli of the hospital environment, family support, economic situation and the mothers’ awareness of their stress. Results: There are statistically significant differences between mothers’ stress and their age (P = 0.03) and infants’ age (P < 0.0001). There are not statically significant differences between mothers’ stress score mean and their educational level (P = 0.75), the infants’ hospitalization history (P = 0.57), the history of congenital of disease in family (P = 0.24) and the family support in infant care (P = 0.08). Conclusion: Those mothers who asserted the stimuli of the hospital environment, infant and its mother support, economic situation and the mothers’ awareness lack of disease and infant status as strong stress-making stimuli enjoy a stress high mean. PMID:26918237

  19. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. PMID:24774396

  20. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2016-08-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27617095

  1. Mechanical circulatory support: strategies and outcomes in pediatric congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K; Bennett Pearce, F; Dabal, Robert J; Carlo, Waldemar F

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute or progressive heart failure in the setting of congenital heart disease may need mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to enhance survival while awaiting cardiac transplantation. Because the majority of MCS devices are implanted after prior cardiac operations, special precautions are necessary at the time of implant. MCS in single ventricle patients usually requires ventricular and aortic cannulation, with a systemic to pulmonary artery shunt for pulmonary blood flow. Limited outcomes data is available, with less than 15% of pediatric MCS patients having congenital heart disease. The Berlin EXCOR is the only durable device currently available for infants. Neurologic complications are the major cause of mortality, and survival during support is poor for infants <5 kg. Patients post-Fontan with acute cardiac failure and/or respiratory failure are at high risk for death before transplant and should be considered for MCS therapy. Several emerging miniature continuous flow devices will soon broaden the landscape of available pediatric devices. PMID:24725719

  2. Lifestyle Modification for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Todd M; Leung, Steven T; Ahmad, Raza; Young, Thomas; Lavie, Carl J; Moodie, Douglas S; Shah, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease are now living longer due to the advancements in medicine. As such, these patients are now experiencing morbidities that are commonly seen in the general population such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, and arrhythmias. Often times these problems can be attributed to the underlying adult congenital heart disease; however, a patient making poor lifestyle choices only compounds their risk for these life-threatening comorbidities. The aim of this article is to propose recommendations for health care providers to follow with this specific patient population. These recommendations encompass the importance of proper caloric intake, methods of weight loss (including behavioral therapy, drugs, and surgeries), practical recommendations for physical activity, and the implications of substance abuse. Being proactive and addressing important lifestyle choices in this population can reduce comorbidities and, therefore, medical cost. PMID:26931766

  3. ptk7 mutant zebrafish models of congenital and idiopathic scoliosis implicate dysregulated Wnt signalling in disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Madeline; Gao, Xiaochong; Yu, Lisa X; Paria, Nandina; Henkelman, R. Mark; Wise, Carol A.; Ciruna, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Scoliosis is a complex genetic disorder of the musculoskeletal system, characterized by three-dimensional rotation of the spine. Curvatures caused by malformed vertebrae (congenital scoliosis (CS)) are apparent at birth. Spinal curvatures with no underlying vertebral abnormality (idiopathic scoliosis (IS)) most commonly manifest during adolescence. The genetic and biological mechanisms responsible for IS remain poorly understood due largely to limited experimental models. Here we describe zygotic ptk7 (Zptk7) mutant zebrafish, deficient in a critical regulator of Wnt signalling, as the first genetically defined developmental model of IS. We identify a novel sequence variant within a single IS patient that disrupts PTK7 function, consistent with a role for dysregulated Wnt activity in disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that embryonic loss-of-gene function in maternal-zygotic ptk7 mutants (MZptk7) leads to vertebral anomalies associated with CS. Our data suggest novel molecular origins of, and genetic links between, congenital and idiopathic forms of disease. PMID:25182715

  4. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias.

  5. Embolization of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformations Associated with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesekera, N. T. Padley, S. P.; Kazmi, F.; Davies, C. L.; McCall, J. M.

    2009-09-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a rare cause of vaginal bleeding and miscarriage. We report two cases of uterine AVMs in patients with a history of complex congenital heart disease, an association that has not been previously described. Both patients were treated by selective uterine artery embolization, a minimally invasive therapy that has revolutionized the management of uterine AVMs, thus offering an alternative to conventional hysterectomy.

  6. Trisomy 18 and complex congenital heart disease: seeking the threshold benefit.

    PubMed

    Boss, Renee D; Holmes, Kathryn W; Althaus, Janyne; Rushton, Cynda H; McNee, Hunter; McNee, Theresa

    2013-07-01

    A prenatal diagnosis of ductal-dependent, complex congenital heart disease was made in a fetus with trisomy 18. The parents requested that the genetic diagnosis be excluded from all medical and surgical decision-making and that all life-prolonging therapies be made available to their infant. There was conflict among the medical team about what threshold of neonatal benefit could outweigh maternal and neonatal treatment burdens. A prenatal ethics consultation was requested. PMID:23733790

  7. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ACHA Search The futures of adults with congenital heart disease made brighter by their pasts Get Involved 2016 ... conference theme is "The Changing Landscape of Adult Congenital Heart Disease." Join Us Help us improve the quality of ...

  8. Preoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to cardiac surgery in children with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Hernandez, V; Thiagarajan, RR; Fynn-Thompson, F; Rajagopal, SK; Nento, DE; Yarlagadda, V; Teele, SA; Allan, CK; Emani, SM; Laussen, PC; Pigula, FA; Bacha, EA

    2014-01-01

    Background The efficacy of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in bridging children with unrepaired heart defects to a definitive or palliative surgical procedure has been rarely reported. The goal of this study is to report our institutional experience with ECMO used to provide preoperative stabilization after acute cardiac or respiratory failure in patients with congenital heart disease before cardiac surgery. Methods A retrospective review of the ECMO database at Children's Hospital Boston was undertaken. Children with unrepaired congenital heart disease supported with ECMO for acute cardiac or respiratory failure as bridge to a definitive or palliative cardiac surgical procedure were identified. Data collection included patient demographics, indication for ECMO, details regarding ECMO course and complications, and survival to hospital discharge. Results Twenty-six patients (18 male, 8 female) with congenital heart disease were bridged to surgical palliation or anatomic repair with ECMO. Median age and weight at ECMO cannulation were, respectively, 0.12 months (range, 0 to 193) and 4 kg (range, 1.8 to 67 kg). Sixteen patients (62%) survived to hospital discharge. Variables associated with mortality included inability to decannulate from ECMO after surgery (p = 0.02) and longer total duration of ECMO (p = 0.02). No difference in outcomes was found between patients with single and biventricular anatomy. Conclusions Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, used as a bridge to surgery, represents a useful modality to rescue patients with failing circulation and unrepaired complex heart defects. PMID:19766826

  9. Twenty-five years of progress in the medical treatment of pediatric and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    McNamara, D G

    1983-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been a many-fold increase in the prospect that with early recognition and modern treatment the newborn with critical congenital heart disease will reach adult life in a healthy condition, prepared to earn a living and to function as a spouse and as a parent. Advancements in the medical treatment of congenital heart disease may create less public acclaim than may surgical treatment but many purely medical developments provide the basis for achieving ultimate surgical success and, by judicious use of some forms of medical treatment, operation can be avoided altogether. The eight major contributions to patient care that are discussed in this review and the 35 that are simply listed are merely examples of the many developments that have occurred in the past 25 years. These include: 1) the organization of pediatric cardiology and the contribution of volunteer health organizations, 2) continuing medical education aimed at promoting early diagnosis of congenital heart disease and prompt referral to a cardiac center, 3) advances in the technology of cardiac catheterization, 4) Rashkind's balloon atrial septostomy and other catheter manipulative procedures, 5) pharmacologic manipulation of the ductus, 6) beta-adrenergic blockade for control of a variety of problems, including paroxysmal hypoxemic attacks, certain arrhythmias and relief of symptoms in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 7) echocardiography, and 8) advances in arrhythmias, electrophysiologic studies and use of pacemakers. PMID:6131085

  10. Embolization of Collateral Vessels Using Mechanically Detachable Coils in Young Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Ogino, H.; Hara, M.; Satake, M.; Oshima, H.; Banno, T.; Mizuno, K.; Mishima, A.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2003-11-15

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of embolizing collateral vessels using mechanically detachable coils (MDCs) in children aged 3 years or younger with congenital heart disease. The subjects were 8 children with congenital heart disease featuring collateral vessels (age 18 days-3 years): 3 with a single ventricle, 2 with the tetralogy of Fallot, 2 with pulmonary atresia, and 1 with a ventricular septal defect. The embolized vessels were the major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) in 5 patients, the persistent left superior vena cava in 2, and the coronary arteriovenous fistula in 1. A 4 or a 5 F catheter was used as the guiding device, and embolization was performed using MDCs and other conventional coils introduced through the microcatheter. One patient had growth of new MAPCAs after embolization, and these MAPCAs were also embolized with MDCs. Thus, a total of 9 embolization procedures were performed in 8 patients. Complete occlusion of the collateral vessels was achieved in 8 of 9 procedures (89%). Seven of 8 patients (88%) had uneventful courses after embolization, and MDC procedures appeared to play important roles in avoiding coil migration and achievement of safe coil embolization. One patient who underwent MAPCA embolization showed no improvement in heart function and died 2 months and 19 days later. Embolization of collateral vessels using MDCs in young children with congenital heart disease can be an effective procedure and a valuable adjunct to surgical management.

  11. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fact that this disease can be cured with antibiotics if caught early, rising rates of syphilis among pregnant women in the United States have increased the number of infants born with congenital syphilis.

  12. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  13. A complex case of congenital cystic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Cordiner, David S; Evans, Clair A; Brundler, Marie-Anne; McPhillips, Maeve; Murio, Enric; Darling, Mark; Taheri, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    This case outlines the potential complexity of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). It highlights the challenges involved in managing this condition, some of the complications faced and areas of uncertainty in the decision making process. With a paucity of published paediatric cases on this subject, this should add to the pool of information currently available. PMID:22605879

  14. Surgery for congenital mitral valve disease in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Uva, M S; Galletti, L; Gayet, F L; Piot, D; Serraf, A; Bruniaux, J; Comas, J; Roussin, R; Touchot, A; Binet, J P

    1995-01-01

    Between 1980 and 1993, 20 patients less than 1 year of age underwent operations for congenital mitral valve disease. Ten patients had congenital mitral incompetence and 10 had congenital mitral stenosis. Mean age was 6.6 +/- 3.4 months and mean weight was 5.6 +/- 1.5 kg. Atrioventricular canal defects, univentricular heart, class III/IV hypoplastic left heart syndrome, discordant atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial connections, and acquired mitral valve disease were excluded. Indications for operation were intractable heart failure or severe pulmonary hypertension, or both. Associated lesions, present in 90% of the patients, had been corrected by a previous operation in seven. In congenital mitral incompetence there was normal leaflet motion (n = 3), leaflet prolapse (n = 2), and restricted leaflet motion (n = 5). In congenital mitral stenosis anatomic abnormalities were parachute mitral valve (n = 4), typical mitral stenosis (n = 3), hammock mitral valve (n = 2), and supramitral ring (n = 1). Mitral valve repair was initially performed in 19 patients and valve replacement in one with hammock valve. Concurrent repair of associated lesions was performed in 12 patients. The operative mortality rate was zero. There were six early reoperations in five patients for mitral valve replacement (n = 4), a second repair (n = 1), and prosthetic valve thrombectomy (n = 1). One late death occurred 9 months after valve replacement. Late reoperations for mitral valve replacement (n = 2), aortic valve replacement (n = 1), mitral valve repair (n = 2), subaortic stenosis resection (n = 1), and second mitral valve replacement (n = 1) were performed in five patients. Actuarial freedom from reoperation is 58.0% +/- 11.3% (70% confidence limits 46.9% to 68.9%) at 7 years. After a mean follow-up of 67.6 +/- 42.8 months, 94% of living patients are in New York Heart Association class I. Doppler echocardiographic studies among the 13 patients with a native mitral valve show mitral

  15. Modeling congenital disease and inborn errors of development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Matthew J.; Letsou, Anthea

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fly models that faithfully recapitulate various aspects of human disease and human health-related biology are being used for research into disease diagnosis and prevention. Established and new genetic strategies in Drosophila have yielded numerous substantial successes in modeling congenital disorders or inborn errors of human development, as well as neurodegenerative disease and cancer. Moreover, although our ability to generate sequence datasets continues to outpace our ability to analyze these datasets, the development of high-throughput analysis platforms in Drosophila has provided access through the bottleneck in the identification of disease gene candidates. In this Review, we describe both the traditional and newer methods that are facilitating the incorporation of Drosophila into the human disease discovery process, with a focus on the models that have enhanced our understanding of human developmental disorders and congenital disease. Enviable features of the Drosophila experimental system, which make it particularly useful in facilitating the much anticipated move from genotype to phenotype (understanding and predicting phenotypes directly from the primary DNA sequence), include its genetic tractability, the low cost for high-throughput discovery, and a genome and underlying biology that are highly evolutionarily conserved. In embracing the fly in the human disease-gene discovery process, we can expect to speed up and reduce the cost of this process, allowing experimental scales that are not feasible and/or would be too costly in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26935104

  16. Modeling congenital disease and inborn errors of development in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Matthew J; Letsou, Anthea

    2016-03-01

    Fly models that faithfully recapitulate various aspects of human disease and human health-related biology are being used for research into disease diagnosis and prevention. Established and new genetic strategies in Drosophila have yielded numerous substantial successes in modeling congenital disorders or inborn errors of human development, as well as neurodegenerative disease and cancer. Moreover, although our ability to generate sequence datasets continues to outpace our ability to analyze these datasets, the development of high-throughput analysis platforms in Drosophila has provided access through the bottleneck in the identification of disease gene candidates. In this Review, we describe both the traditional and newer methods that are facilitating the incorporation of Drosophila into the human disease discovery process, with a focus on the models that have enhanced our understanding of human developmental disorders and congenital disease. Enviable features of the Drosophila experimental system, which make it particularly useful in facilitating the much anticipated move from genotype to phenotype (understanding and predicting phenotypes directly from the primary DNA sequence), include its genetic tractability, the low cost for high-throughput discovery, and a genome and underlying biology that are highly evolutionarily conserved. In embracing the fly in the human disease-gene discovery process, we can expect to speed up and reduce the cost of this process, allowing experimental scales that are not feasible and/or would be too costly in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26935104

  17. Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for correction of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Elisa; Caputo, Massimo; Madeddu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This review article reports on the new field of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering and its potential on the management of congenital heart disease. To date, stem cell therapy has mainly focused on treatment of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, with initial indication of safety and mild-to-moderate efficacy. Preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the approach could be uniquely suited for the correction of congenital defects of the heart. The basic concept is to create living material made by cellularized grafts that, once implanted into the heart, grows and remodels in parallel with the recipient organ. This would make a substantial improvement in current clinical management, which often requires repeated surgical corrections for failure of implanted grafts. Different types of stem cells have been considered and the identification of specific cardiac stem cells within the heterogeneous population of mesenchymal and stromal cells offers opportunities for de novo cardiomyogenesis. In addition, endothelial cells and vascular progenitors, including cells with pericyte characteristics, may be necessary to generate efficiently perfused grafts. The implementation of current surgical grafts by stem cell engineering could address the unmet clinical needs of patients with congenital heart defects. PMID:26176009

  18. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes. PMID:24775619

  19. Mechanisms of disease: congenital muscular dystrophies-glycosylation takes center stage.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul T

    2006-04-01

    Recent studies have defined a group of muscular dystrophies, now termed the dystroglycanopathies, as novel disorders of glycosylation. These conditions include Walker-Warburg syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease, Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy types 1C and 1D, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I. Although clinical findings can be highly variable, dystroglycanopathies are all characterized by cortical malformations and ocular defects at the more severe end of the clinical spectrum, in addition to muscular dystrophy. All of these disorders are defined by the underglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. Defective glycosylation of dystroglycan severs the link between this important cell adhesion molecule and the extracellular matrix, thereby contributing to cellular pathology. Recent experiments indicate that glycosylation might not only define forms of muscular dystrophy but also provide an avenue to the development of therapies for these disorders. PMID:16932553

  20. De novo mutations in Congenital Heart Disease with Neurodevelopmental and Other Birth Defects

    PubMed Central

    Homsy, Jason; Zaidi, Samir; Shen, Yufeng; Ware, James S.; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; DePalma, Steven R.; McKean, David; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Josh; Jin, Sheng Chih; Deanfield, John; Giardini, Alessandro; Porter, George A.; Kim, Richard; Bilguvar, Kaya; Lopez, Francesc; Tikhonova, Irina; Mane, Shrikant; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Qi, Hongjian; Vardarajan, Badri; Ma, Lijiang; Daly, Mark; Roberts, Amy E.; Russell, Mark W.; Mital, Seema; Newburger, Jane W.; Gaynor, J. William; Breitbart, Roger E.; Iossifov, Ivan; Ronemus, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J.; Kaltman, Jonathan R.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Brueckner, Martina; Gelb, Bruce D.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Lifton, Richard P.; Seidman, Christine E.; Chung, Wendy K.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients have increased prevalence of extra-cardiac congenital anomalies (CA) and risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDD). Exome sequencing of 1,213 CHD parent-offspring trios identified an excess of protein-damaging de novo mutations, especially in genes highly expressed in developing heart and brain. These mutations accounted for 20% of patients with CHD, NDD and CA but only 2% with isolated CHD. Mutations altered genes involved in morphogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation, including multiple mutations in RBFOX2, an mRNA splice regulator. Genes mutated in other cohorts ascertained for NDD were enriched in CHD cases, particularly those with coexisting NDD. These findings reveal shared genetic contributions to CHD, NDD, and CA and provide opportunities for improved prognostic assessment and early therapeutic intervention in CHD patients. PMID:26785492

  1. Risk Factors for post-Cardiac Surgery Diaphragmatic Paralysis in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akbariasbagh, Parvin; Mirzaghayan, Mohammad Reza; Akbariasbagh, Naseredin; Shariat, Mamak; Ebrahim, Bita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injured phrenic nerve secondary to cardiac surgeries is the most common cause of diaphragmatic paralysis (DP) in infants. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for DP caused by congenital heart defect corrective surgeries in pediatrics. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted in a 2-year period (2006–2008), included 451 children with congenital heart diseases admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital. The diaphragmatic function was examined via fluoroscopy, and the frequency of DP and its relevant parameters were evaluated. Results: Of the 451 patients, comprising 268 males and 183 females at an age range of 3 days to 204 months (28.2 ± 33.4 months), 25 (5.5%) infants (60% male and 40% female, age range = 15 days to 132 months, 41.2 ± 28.1 months) had DP as follows: 48% unilateral right-sided and 36% unilateral left-sided. Additionally, 68% had cyanotic congenital heart disease and 84% had DP following total correction surgery. The highest prevalence rates of DP resulting in phrenic hemiparesis were observed after arterial switch operation, Fontan procedure, and Blalock–Taussig shunt surgery, respectively. Thirteen (52%) of the 25 DP patients underwent surgical diaphragmatic plication because of severe respiratory distress and dependency on mechanical ventilation, and most of the cases of plication underwent arterial switch operation. The rate of mortality was 24% (6 patients). Conclusion: DP with a prevalence of 5.5% was one of the most common complications secondary to cardiac surgeries in the infants included in the present study. Effective factors were age, weight, cyanotic congenital heart defects, and previous cardiac surgery. Diaphragmatic plication improved prognosis in severe cases. PMID:26697086

  2. Caroli's disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis associated with polycystic kidney disease. A case presenting with acute focal bacterial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Sung, J M; Huang, J J; Lin, X Z; Ruaan, M K; Lin, C Y; Chang, T T; Shu, H F; Chow, N H

    1992-12-01

    Congenital cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic biliary ducts (Caroli's disease), until recently, has been infrequently recognized. It is often associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We hereby report a case with Caroli's disease, polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and CHF: This 24-year-old female patient initially presented with acute bacterial nephritis (ABN). Renal ultrasonography revealed bilateral enlarged kidneys with multiple cysts. Because her parents showed no renal cyst on ultrasonographic examination, she received further studies. Abdominal ultrasonography showed cystic dilatation of the biliary tree. Computed tomography (CT) with meglumine lotroxinate (biliscopin) infusion study and hepatobiliary scintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of Caroli's disease. Liver biopsy revealed CHF: The radiographic and scintigraphic pictures are hereby illustrated and CT with biliscopin infusion study is emphasized. We conclude that if radiologic evidence of renal cystic lesions is absent in the parents of patients with PKD, the coexistence of Caroli's disease and CHF should be considered. The clinical pictures of ABN in this patient are also discussed. As far as we know, this is the first reported case of ABN in a patient with PKD and Caroli's disease, and it showed good response to antibiotic therapy. PMID:1468163

  3. Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction: human disease and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Julie; Gonzalez, Julien; Miravete, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Chaaya, Rana; Decramer, Stéphane; Bandin, Flavio; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Schanstra, Joost P

    2011-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction is the most frequently observed cause of obstructive nephropathy in children. Neonatal and foetal animal models have been developed that mimic closely what is observed in human disease. The purpose of this review is to discuss how obstructive nephropathy alters kidney histology and function and describe the molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of the lesions, including inflammation, proliferation/apoptosis, renin–angiotensin system activation and fibrosis, based on both human and animal data. Also we propose that during obstructive nephropathy, hydrodynamic modifications are early inducers of the tubular lesions, which are potentially at the origin of the pathology. Finally, an important observation in animal models is that relief of obstruction during kidney development has important effects on renal function later in adult life. A major short-coming is the absence of data on the impact of UPJ obstruction on long-term adult renal function to elucidate whether these animal data are also valid in humans. PMID:20681980

  4. Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Adult Women with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to 21-hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mimi S.; Merke, Deborah P.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder characterized by impaired cortisol biosynthesis, with or without aldosterone deficiency, and androgen excess. Patients with the classic (severe) form also have epinephrine deficiency. Patients with CAH have an increased prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease including obesity, hypertension and insulin resistance. Androgen excess in women appears to be an additional risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Carotid intima media thickness, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis also has been found to be increased in adults with CAH. The multiple hormonal imbalances present in the adult woman with CAH, in combination with chronic glucocorticoid therapy, contribute to cardiovascular disease risk. Further investigation of the predisposition to cardiovascular disease in women with CAH is warranted. Longitudinal studies are needed and interventions targeting obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and hyperandrogenism may offer improved outcome. PMID:19530065

  5. Comparison of speed of inhalational induction in children with and without congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hasija, Suruchi; Chauhan, Sandeep; Jain, Pawan; Choudhury, Arin; Aggarwal, Neelam; Pandey, Ravinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conduct of stable inhalational anesthetic induction in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) presents special challenges. It requires in-depth understanding of the effect of congenital shunt lesions on the uptake, delivery, and equilibration of anesthetic drugs. Intracardiac shunts can alter the induction time and if delivery of anesthetic agent is not carefully titrated, can lead to overdosing and undesirable myocardial depression. Aims: To study the effect of congenital shunt lesions on the speed of inhalational induction and also the impact of inhalational induction on hemodynamics in the presence of congenital shunt lesions. Setting: Tertiary care hospital. Design: A prospective, single-center clinical study. Materials and Methods: Ninety-three pediatric patients undergoing elective surgery were segregated into three equal groups, namely, Group 1: no CHD, Group 2: acyanotic CHD, and Group 3: cyanotic CHD. General anesthesia was induced with 8% sevoflurane in 6 L/min air-oxygen. The time to induction was noted at loss of eyelash reflex and decrease in bispectral index (BIS) value below 60. End-tidal sevoflurane concentration, minimum alveolar concentration, and BIS were recorded at 15 s intervals for the 1st min followed by 30 s interval for another 1 min during induction. Hemodynamic data were recorded before and after induction. Results: Patients in Group 3 had significantly prolonged induction time (99 ± 12.3 s; P < 0.001), almost twice that of the patients in other two groups (51 ± 11.3 s in Group 1 and 53 ± 12.0 s in Group 2). Hypotension occurred after induction in Group 1. No other adverse hemodynamic perturbations were observed. Conclusion: The time to inhalational induction of anesthesia is significantly prolonged in patients with right-to-left shunt, compared to patients without CHD or those with left-to-right shunt, in whom it is similar. Sevoflurane is safe and maintains stable hemodynamics in the presence of CHD. PMID:27397451

  6. Population Pharmacokinetics of Etomidate in Neonates and Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Felice; El-Komy, Mohammed H.; Hammer, Gregory B.; Frymoyer, Adam; Cohane, Carol A.; Drover, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a rapid-onset, short-acting hypnotic medication administered for induction of anesthesia. It is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in older children and adults. Pharmacokinetic data to help guide dosing in neonates and infants is lacking. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of etomidate in neonates and infants with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods Four neonates and sixteen infants, postnatal age 0.3 – 11.7 months, requiring open-heart surgery received 0.3 mg/kg of etomidate administered as a single intravenous dose prior to surgery. Blood sampling for plasma etomidate concentration occurred immediately following etomidate administration until the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass. A population pharmacokinetic approach using nonlinear mixed–effects modeling was applied to characterize etomidate pharmacokinetics. Results The pharmacokinetics of etomidate was described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. An allometric weight-based model was applied to scale results to a 70 kg adult. Covariates including age and cardiac physiology were not found to significantly impact etomidate pharmacokinetics. The study population was found to have a central and intercompartmental clearance of 0.624 L/min/70-kg and 0.44 L/min/70-kg, respectively; central and peripheral distribution volume of 9.47 and 22.8 L/70-kg, respectively. Inter-individual variability was between 94–142% for all parameters and residual variability was 29%. Conclusions The clearance of etomidate is lower in neonates and infants with congenital heart disease compared to published values for older children without congenital heart disease. In addition, etomidate pharmacokinetics is highly variable in this pediatric cardiac population. PMID:25377074

  7. [Optimization of postoperative medical therapy of infective endocarditis in patients with congenital valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Chistyakov, I S; Medvedev, A P; Pichugin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined surgical and medical treatment of infective endocarditis in patients with congenital valvular heart disease when included in a regimen of the drug Reamberin. In this regard, the analysis of the effectiveness of a combination regimen of 74 patients with valvular congenital heart diseases complicated with infective endocarditis. Given the indications for surgical correction operative technique features and possible technical difficulties in carrying out such operations, due to the inflammatory changes and tissue destruction, and ways to overcome them. For the correction of metabolic disorders in the postoperative period, 47 patients (main group) was appointed Reamberin: once, intravenous drip 400 ml/day during the first 5 days after surgery. 27 patients (control group) was conducted infusion therapy depending on the severity of the condition according to the classical scheme. In addition to standard clinical and laboratory examination, to assess the effectiveness of Reamberin was investigated catalase activity of CPK in blood serum in the dynamics of observation (1, 3 and 5 days after surgery). It is revealed that surgical approach, used in complex treatment of patients with valvular congenital heart diseases, including reorganization of the cavities of the heart, increasing the frequency of joints and the use of reinforcing strips of synthetic material that prevents the cutting of sutures through the inflamed tissue has achieved good short-and long-term results. Infective endocarditis and destruction of the valvular annulus fibrosus the use of a frame of strips of polytetrafluoroethylene allows you to restore its integrity and to implant a mechanical prosthesis. The inclusion in the regimen of patients with infective endocarditis complicated by cardiac insufficiency in the early postoperative period the drug Reamberin improves the efficiency of treatment by a more rapid restoration of the normal

  8. Health considerations for children with congenital heart disease in school: part 1.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patricia; Evangelista, Juli-anne; Green, Angela; Uzark, Karen

    2012-11-01

    School participation for children with congenital heart disease (CHD) can be challenging. Despite advances in treatment that have increased survival to adulthood and decreased morbidity, concerns remain about their health and safety in the school environment. This article, the first in a two-part series, provides an overview of the health issues involving school-age children with CHD. School nurses are in a unique position to advocate for the child's health care needs in the school setting, facilitate communication with the health care team, educate school personnel, and participate in the individualized educational planning process. PMID:23193726

  9. Oxygen consumption and evaporative water loss in infants with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kennaird, D L

    1976-01-01

    The relation between environmental temperature, heat production, oxygen consumption, and evaporative water loss was studied in 67 infants with congenital heart disease. The majority of the cyanosed infants had a low minimum oxygen consumption, a low evaporative water loss, and a diminished metabolic response to cold stress. Minimum oxygen consumption and evaporative water loss rose in 6 of these infants after the construction of a surgical shunt. Many of the ill acyanotic infants had an abnormally high minimum oxygen consumption, and those in cardiac failure often continued to sweat in an environment below the thermoneutral temperature zone. PMID:942228

  10. Pulse Oximetry Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease: Bringing Evidence Into Practice.

    PubMed

    Amsbaugh, Sarah; Scott, Shannon D; Foss, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common and serious type of infant birth defect. Pulse oximetry screening has been supported in the literature as a valuable tool to aid in the prompt detection of critical defects. Pulse oximetry is easily accessible, inexpensive, and noninvasive, and can be readily performed by clinical nurses at the infant's bedside; however, it remains a technology that is underutilized in newborns. Nurses can be leaders in addressing the need to translate knowledge into practice to improve the morbidity and mortality rates in the newborn population. PMID:25458107

  11. Bronchial compression due to stent placement in pulmonary artery in a child with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Mónica; Beleña, José; Cabeza, Raúl; Beltrán, María

    2005-12-01

    Congenital heart disease, such as transposition of the great vessels (TGV), requires surgical procedures which can lead to important complications. We report on a case of bronchial obstruction following placement of a pulmonary artery stent in a 4-year-old boy who had undergone a Rastelli procedure to correct TGV, ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis. There are many complications that can arise as a consequence of intravascular stents in heart surgery, as well as many causes of bronchial compression. However we have not found any report which describes bronchial compression as a direct consequence of endovascular stent. PMID:16324040

  12. Successful cord blood transplantation in an adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Shugo; Fujishima, Yukiteru; Suzuki, Yuzo; Tsukushi, Yasuhiko; Oyake, Tatsuo; Togawa, Ryou; Oyama, Kotaro; Ikai, Akio; Ito, Shigeki; Ishida, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in surgical corrections and supportive care for congenital heart disease have resulted in increasing numbers of adult survivors who may develop hematological malignancies. Treatments including chemotherapy for such patients may cause serious hemodynamic or cardiac complications, especially in those receiving stem cell transplantation. We present a 29-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and congenital heart disease. She had been diagnosed with pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum at birth, and the anomaly was surgically corrected according to the Fontan technique at age 9 years. Her induction chemotherapy required modifications due to poor cardiac status with Fontan circulation. However, after surgical procedures including total cavopulmonary connection and aortic valve replacement at first complete remission, her cardiac status was significantly improved. Subsequently, she underwent cord blood stem cell transplantation at the third complete remission. She required intensive supportive care for circulatory failure as a pre-engraftment immune reaction and stage III acute graft versus host disease of the gut, but recovered from these complications. She was discharged on day 239, and remained in complete remission at 1-year post-transplantation. PMID:27599417

  13. Right upper limb bud triplication and polythelia, left sided hemihypertrophy and congenital hip dislocation, facial dysmorphism, congenital heart disease, and scoliosis: disorganisation-like spectrum or patterning gene defect?

    PubMed Central

    Sabry, M A; al-Saleh, Q; al-Saw'an, R; al-Awadi, S A; Farag, T I

    1995-01-01

    A Somali female baby with right upper limb triplication, polythelia, left sided hemihypertrophy, congenital hip dislocation, facial dysmorphism, congenital heart disease, and scoliosis is described. It seems that the above described pattern of anomalies has not been reported before. The possible developmental genetic mechanism responsible for this phenotype is briefly discussed. Images PMID:7562971

  14. Identification of a Divergent Lineage Porcine Pestivirus in Nursing Piglets with Congenital Tremors and Reproduction of Disease following Experimental Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Bailey L.; Arruda, Paulo H.; Magstadt, Drew R.; Schwartz, Kent J.; Dohlman, Tyler; Schleining, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Abby R.; Visek, Callie A.; Victoria, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital tremors is a sporadic disease of neonatal pigs characterized by action-related repetitive myoclonus. A majority of outbreaks of congenital tremors have been attributed to an unidentified virus. The objectives of this project were to 1) detect potential pathogen(s) in samples from piglets with congenital tremors and 2) develop an infection model to reproduce disease. Using next-generation sequencing, a divergent lineage pestivirus was detected in piglets with congenital tremors. The virus was originally most closely related to a bat pestivirus but is now more closely related to a recently published novel porcine pestivirus provisionally named atypical porcine pestivirus. A quantitative real-time PCR detected the virus in samples from neonatal piglets with congenital tremors from two separate farms, but not in samples from unaffected piglets from the same farm. To fulfill the second objective, pregnant sows were inoculated with either serum containing the pestivirus or PBS (control) by intravenous and intranasal routes simultaneously with direct inoculation of fetal amniotic vesicles by ultrasound-guided surgical technique. Inoculations were performed at either 45 or 62 days of gestation. All sows inoculated with the novel pestivirus farrowed piglets affected with congenital tremors while PBS-inoculated control piglets were unaffected. Tremor severity for each piglet was scored from videos taken 0, 1 and 2 days post-farrowing. Tremor severity remained relatively constant from 0 to 2 days post-farrowing for a majority of piglets. The prevalence of congenital tremors in pestivirus-inoculated litters ranged from 57% (4 out of 7 affected piglets) to 100% (10 out of 10 affected piglets). The virus was consistently detected by PCR in tissues from piglets with congenital tremors but was not detected in control piglets. Samples positive by PCR in greater than 90% of piglets sampled included brainstem (37 out of 41), mesenteric lymph node (37 out of 41

  15. From gene discovery to new biological mechanisms: heparanases and congenital urinary bladder disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Neil A.; Hilton, Emma N.; Woolf, Adrian S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a scientific investigation into the pathogenesis of a urinary bladder disease. The disease in question is called urofacial syndrome (UFS), a congenital condition inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. UFS features incomplete urinary bladder emptying and vesicoureteric reflux, with a high risk of recurrent urosepsis and end-stage renal disease. The story starts from a human genomic perspective, then proceeds through experiments that seek to determine the roles of the implicated molecules in embryonic frogs and newborn mice. A future aim would be to use such biological knowledge to intelligently choose novel therapies for UFS. We focus on heparanase proteins and the peripheral nervous system, molecules and tissues that appear to be key players in the pathogenesis of UFS and therefore must also be critical for functional differentiation of healthy bladders. These considerations allow the envisioning of novel biological treatments, although the potential difficulties of targeting the developing bladder in vivo should not be underestimated. PMID:26315301

  16. Lesion-Specific Factors Contributing to Inhospital Costs in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Cedars, Ari M; Burns, Sara; Novak, Eric L; Amin, Amit P

    2016-06-01

    The population of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) in the United States is growing rapidly with concomitant increases in care costs. We sought to define the variables having the greatest influence on annual cost of inpatient care in patients with ACHD in the United States. To do so, we conducted a retrospective analysis of admissions in patients >18 years old with a 3-digit International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, code of 745 to 747 from the State Inpatient Databases of Arkansas (2008 to 2010), California (2003 to 2012), Florida (2005 to 2012), Hawaii (2006 to 2010), Nebraska (2003 to 2011), and New York (2005 to 2012). We selected variables we believed would have the greatest effect on care costs and built a series of multivariable regression models grouping patients by congenital lesion to examine the relative contribution of the specified variables to total annual inpatient cost. We analyzed a total of 68,314 patients aged 57 ± 18.6 years, 51% of whom were women. The multivariable regression model had an overall R(2) of 0.35. Readmission was responsible for 10.3% of annual inpatient cost among all patients with ACHD and had the greatest effect on inpatient care cost for each congenital lesion except Eisenmenger syndrome and conotruncal abnormalities, for both of which it was the second most significant contributor. Other major contributors to annual inpatient care costs included length of stay and operative procedures. In conclusion, rehospitalization is the most significant contributor to annual inpatient cost for individual patients with ACHD in the United States, regardless of underlying anatomy. PMID:27079214

  17. Spectrum of congenital heart disease in a tropical environment: an echocardiography study.

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Mahmoud U.; Mukhtar-Yola, Mariya; Karaye, Kamilu M.

    2007-01-01

    Echocardiography is a major mode of cardiovascular imaging with versatile applications. Modern two-dimensional echocordiographic techniques provide a comprehensive means for evaluating virtually all forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) found in both adults and children. CHD is an abnormality in cardiocirculatory structure or function that is present at birth, even if it is discovered much later. We set out to describe the spectrum of CHD using echocardiography in two centers in Kano, northern Nigeria. In this retrospective study, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) data collected from two echocardiography laboratories in Kano over a period of 48 months (June 2002 to May 2006) were reviewed. Patients with diagnosis of congenital heart disease were selected. Information obtained from the records included the age, gender, clinical diagnosis and echocardiographic findings. One-hundred-twenty-two patients had CHD, making 9.3% of the 1312 patients with abnormal echocardiograms. There were 73 males and 49 females (ratio 1.5:1); and their ages ranged from nine days to 35 years. Forty-one (33.6%) children presented for echocardiography before the age of one year, and 69% presented before the age of five years. Thirteen (10.6%) were > or =18 years. Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the most common echocardiographic diagnosis present in 56 patients (45.9%). Thirty-two (26.2%) had tetralogy of Fallot, and 15 (12.3%) had atrial septal defect (ASD). Ten (8.2%) had endocardial cushion defect, and nine (7.4%) had other congenital heart abnormalities. Coarctation of the aorta and aortic stenosis were rare. CHD is a common cardiovascular problem in our setting, and a number of patients were diagnosed in adulthood. With increasing availability of echocardiographic facilities, more cases of CHD are likely to be identified early. PMID:17595936

  18. Asplenia in children with congenital heart disease as a cause of poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Genel, Ferah; Erdur, Baris; Ozbek, Erhan; Gulez, Nesrin; Mese, Timur

    2015-01-01

    The absence of a spleen is a well-known risk factor for severe bacterial infections, especially due to encapsulated bacteria. Congenital asplenia can be part of multiple congenital abnormalities as in heterotaxy including Ivemark syndrome with congenital anomalies of the heart or great vessels, or it can be isolated, which is extremely rare. In these cases, asplenia is an important factor effecting mortality. In this report, the clinical courses of five children with asplenia and concomitant minor or complex cardiac anomalies are presented. The ages of the children ranged between 1.5 and 17 months at the time of diagnosis. All of the cases had had a history of hospitalisation for infectious diseases before the diagnosis. The patient who was diagnosed at 17 months old had a history pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacterial meningitis beginning at five months old. Three children had complex cardiac anomalies, one child had ventricular septal defect, and one child had atrial septal defect. Howell-Jolly bodies were determined in peripheral blood smear in all of the patients. The diagnoses of asplenia were confirmed with spleen scintigraphy. One of the patients with complex cardiac anomalies died a short time after diagnosis, because of cardiac failure. The rest of the four patients were vaccinated for encapsulated bacteria and were taken under antibiotic prophylaxis. These children did not need hospitalisation for infectious diseases during the follow-up period (5-40 months). In asplenic children, early diagnosis, antibiotic prophylaxis, and immunisation for encapsulated bacteria can decrease the risk of morbidity and mortality. PMID:26557043

  19. Mortality from Congenital Heart Disease in Mexico: A Problem on the Rise

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cosme, José Luis; Rolón-Porras, Constanza; Aguinaga-Ríos, Mónica; Acosta-Granado, Pedro Manuel; Reyes-Muñoz, Enrique; Murguía-Peniche, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Temporal trends in mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) vary among regions. It is therefore necessary to study this problem in each country. In Mexico, congenital anomalies were responsible for 24% of infant mortality in 2013 and CHD represented 55% of total deaths from congenital anomalies among children under 1 year of age. The objectives of this study were to analyze the trends in infant mortality from CHD in Mexico (1998 to 2013), its specific causes, age at death and associated socio-demographic factors. Methods Population-based study which calculated the compounded annual growth rate of death rom CHD between 1998 and 2013. Specific causes, age at which death from CHD occurred and risk factors associated with mortality were analyzed for the year 2013. Results Infant mortality from CHD increased 24.8% from 1998 to 2013 (114.4 to 146.4/ 100,000 live births). A total of 3,593 CHD deaths occurred in 2013; the main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt (n = 487; 19.8/100,000 live births) and cyanotic heart disease (n = 410; 16.7/100,000). A total of 1,049 (29.2%) deaths from CHD occurred during the first week of life. Risk factors associated with mortality from CHD were, in order of magnitude: non-institutional birth, rural area, birth in a public hospital and male sex. Conclusions Mortality from CHD has increased in Mexico. The main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt, which are not necessarily fatal if treated promptly. Populations vulnerable to death from CHD were identified. Approximately one-third of the CHD occurred during the first week of life. It is important to promote early diagnosis, especially for non-institutional births. PMID:26937635

  20. 3D Printing to Guide Ventricular Assist Device Placement in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Saeed, Omar; Zaidi, Ali; Sanz, Javier; Nielsen, James C; Hsu, Daphne T; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2016-04-01

    As the population of adults with congenital heart disease continues to grow, so does the number of these patients with heart failure. Ventricular assist devices are underutilized in adults with congenital heart disease due to their complex anatomic arrangements and physiology. Advanced imaging techniques that may increase the utilization of mechanical circulatory support in this population must be explored. Three-dimensional printing offers individualized structural models that would enable pre-surgical planning of cannula and device placement in adults with congenital cardiac disease and heart failure who are candidates for such therapies. We present a review of relevant cardiac anomalies, cases in which such models could be utilized, and some background on the cost and procedure associated with this process. PMID:27033018

  1. Cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD): focus on hypoxemia, secondary erythrocytosis, and coagulation alterations.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Luis M; Guzzetta, Nina A

    2015-10-01

    Children with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have complex alterations in their whole blood composition and coagulation profile due to long-standing hypoxemia. Secondary erythrocytosis is an associated physiological response intended to increase circulating red blood cells and oxygen carrying capacity. However, this response is frequently offset by an increase in whole blood viscosity that paradoxically reduces blood flow and tissue perfusion. In addition, the accompanying reduction in plasma volume leads to significant deficiencies in multiple coagulation proteins including platelets, fibrinogen and other clotting factors. On the one hand, these patients may suffer from severe hyperviscosity and subclinical 'sludging' in the peripheral vasculature with an increased risk of thrombosis. On the other hand, they are at an increased risk for postoperative hemorrhage due to a complex derangement in their hemostatic profile. Anesthesiologists caring for children with CCHD and secondary erythrocytosis need to understand the pathophysiology of these alterations and be aware of available strategies that lessen the risk of bleeding and/or thrombosis. The aim of this review is to provide an updated analysis of the systemic effects of long-standing hypoxemia in children with primary congenital heart disease with a specific focus on secondary erythrocytosis and hemostasis. PMID:26184479

  2. Subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillators in children, young adults and patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bordachar, Pierre; Marquié, Christelle; Pospiech, Thomas; Pasquié, Jean-Luc; Jalal, Zakaria; Haissaguerre, Michel; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2016-01-15

    The demonstration of severe complications in patients implanted with a transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has led to the development of devices equipped with a subcutaneous lead. This new technique offers numerous advantages but also certain disadvantages. Various studies or anecdotal clinical cases have specifically been conducted with this subcutaneous defibrillation system in children and/or patients with congenital heart disease. Results of these studies suggest: 1) a high feasibility despite being limited by a selection process that excludes patients requiring permanent pacing and patients declared ineligible during pre-screening; 2) good efficacy of electrical shocks in reducing induced or spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias; 3) in this specific subset of patients, 2 types of complications have been particularly described: a risk of device exteriorization and infection, and a large number of inappropriate therapies primarily related to T-wave oversensing. The subcutaneous ICD could therefore constitute the gold standard for patients with complex congenital heart disease with no venous access to the heart or with a persistent shunt increasing the risk of systemic emboli as well as in young patients with channelopathy or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy not requiring long-term pacing. Technological change (reduction in device size, better differentiation between R- and T-waves, possibility of pacing if device coupled with a leadless pacemaker) could reduce the limitations and complications and thereby increase the indications in this sub-group of patients. PMID:26519678

  3. [The Spanish Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of congenital toxoplasmosis].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, F; del Castillo Martín, F; Fuentes Corripio, I; Goncé Mellgren, A; Fortuny Guasch, C; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; González-Tomé, M I; Couceiro Gianzo, J A; Neth, O; Ramos Amador, J T

    2013-08-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis is the result of transplacental fetal infection by Toxoplasma gondii after the primary maternal infection. The severity of the disease depends on the gestational age at transmission. First trimester infections are more severe, but less frequent, than third trimester infections. Acute maternal infection is diagnosed by seroconversion or by the detection of IgM antibodies and a low IgG avidity test. In these cases, spiramycin should be initiated to prevent transmission to the fetus. For identification of fetal infection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of amniotic fluid after 18 weeks gestation should be performed. If fetal infection is confirmed, the mothers should be treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid. Most infants infected in utero are born with no obvious signs of toxoplasmosis, but up to 80% developed learning and visual disabilities later in life. Neonatal diagnosis with IgM/IgA antibodies or blood/cerebrospinal fluid PCR may be difficult because false-negative results frequently occur. In these cases diagnosis is possible by demonstrating a rise in IgG titers during follow-up or by the detection of antibodies beyond one year of age. Early treatment with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine may improve the ophthalmologic and neurological outcome. Congenital toxoplasmosis is a preventable disease. Pre-pregnancy screening and appropriate counseling regarding prevention measures in seronegative women may prevent fetal infection. PMID:23352717

  4. Identifying improvements to complex pathways: evidence synthesis and stakeholder engagement in infant congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Sonya; Knowles, Rachel; Wray, Jo; Tregay, Jenifer; Ridout, Deborah A; Utley, Martin; Franklin, Rodney; Bull, Catherine L; Brown, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Many infants die in the year following discharge from hospital after surgical or catheter intervention for congenital heart disease (3–5% of discharged infants). There is considerable variability in the provision of care and support in this period, and some families experience barriers to care. We aimed to identify ways to improve discharge and postdischarge care for this patient group. Design A systematic evidence synthesis aligned with a process of eliciting the perspectives of families and professionals from community, primary, secondary and tertiary care. Setting UK. Results A set of evidence-informed recommendations for improving the discharge and postdischarge care of infants following intervention for congenital heart disease was produced. These address known challenges with current care processes and, recognising current resource constraints, are targeted at patient groups based on the number of patients affected and the level and nature of their risk of adverse 1-year outcome. The recommendations include: structured discharge documentation, discharging certain high-risk patients via their local hospital, enhanced surveillance for patients with certain (high-risk) cardiac diagnoses and an early warning tool for parents and community health professionals. Conclusions Our recommendations set out a comprehensive, system-wide approach for improving discharge and postdischarge services. This approach could be used to address challenges in delivering care for other patient populations that can fall through gaps between sectors and organisations. PMID:27266768

  5. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  6. Pulmonary vascular disease in different types of congenital heart disease. Implications for interpretation of lung biopsy findings in early childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, S G

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular structure was studied by analysing serial reconstructions of the arterial pathways and random sections of tissue in the lungs of 16 children who died with different types of congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Cases of ventricular septal defect showed an appreciable increase in muscularity of both preacinar and intra-acinar (respiratory unit) arteries, and intimal proliferation was infrequent and mild. By contrast, cases of transposition of the great arteries with ventricular septal defect and atrioventricular septal defect showed an increase in preacinar muscularity, a short heavily muscularised arterial segment containing intimal proliferation at the entrance to the acinus, whereas the intra-acinar arteries beyond showed only a moderate increase in muscularity. In these children who were less than 1 year of age an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance was due to strategically placed small areas of intimal proliferation and not to widespread obliterative pulmonary vascular disease. The study demonstrated and explained differences in the appearance of the peripheral pulmonary arteries in different types of congenital heart disease, which help interpret the findings of lung biopsies. Images PMID:6498033

  7. Single ventricle, bicuspid aorta and interatrial wall aneurysm as a rare complex adult congenital heart disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Single ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve and interatrial wall aneurysm in adulthood are a rare and unique case in medical literature. This presented case with congenital heart disease has never been treated surgically and clinical consequences seriously presented in adulthood. Case presentation A 27 year old man with complex congenital heart disease presented. At the age of six, the single ventricle was ultrasonographly diagnosed, but at age 27 clinical consequences started to be seriously present. We explored his history, clinical course, physical examination, laboratory findings, medical treatments and actual patient condition. Conclusion The possibilities for surgical evaluation are presented. PMID:19183494

  8. Paternal aging and increased risk of congenital disease, psychiatric disorders, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Conti, Simon L; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    As couples are increasingly delaying parenthood, the effect of the aging men and women on reproductive outcomes has been an area of increased interest. Advanced paternal age has been shown to independently affect the entire spectrum of male fertility as assessed by reductions in sperm quality and fertilization (both assisted and unassisted). Moreover, epidemiological data suggest that paternal age can lead to higher rates of adverse birth outcomes and congenital anomalies. Mounting evidence also suggests increased risk of specific pediatric and adult disease states ranging from cancer to behavioral traits. While disease states associated with advancing paternal age have been well described, consensus recommendations for neonatal screening have not been as widely implemented as have been with advanced maternal age. PMID:26975491

  9. Paternal aging and increased risk of congenital disease, psychiatric disorders, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Simon L; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    As couples are increasingly delaying parenthood, the effect of the aging men and women on reproductive outcomes has been an area of increased interest. Advanced paternal age has been shown to independently affect the entire spectrum of male fertility as assessed by reductions in sperm quality and fertilization (both assisted and unassisted). Moreover, epidemiological data suggest that paternal age can lead to higher rates of adverse birth outcomes and congenital anomalies. Mounting evidence also suggests increased risk of specific pediatric and adult disease states ranging from cancer to behavioral traits. While disease states associated with advancing paternal age have been well described, consensus recommendations for neonatal screening have not been as widely implemented as have been with advanced maternal age. PMID:26975491

  10. The Application of an Anatomical Database for Fetal Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Pei, Qiu-Yan; Li, Yun-Tao; Yang, Zhen-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fetal congenital heart anomalies are the most common congenital anomalies in live births. Fetal echocardiography (FECG) is the only prenatal diagnostic approach used to detect fetal congenital heart disease (CHD). FECG is not widely used, and the antenatal diagnosis rate of CHD varies considerably. Thus, mastering the anatomical characteristics of different kinds of CHD is critical for ultrasound physicians to improve FECG technology. The aim of this study is to investigate the applications of a fetal CHD anatomic database in FECG teaching and training program. Methods: We evaluated 60 transverse section databases including 27 types of fetal CHD built in the Prenatal Diagnosis Center in Peking University People's Hospital. Each original database contained 400–700 cross-sectional digital images with a resolution of 3744 pixels × 5616 pixels. We imported the database into Amira 5.3.1 (Australia Visage Imaging Company, Australia) three-dimensional (3D) software. The database functions use a series of 3D software visual operations. The features of the fetal CHD anatomical database were analyzed to determine its applications in FECG continuing education and training. Results: The database was rebuilt using the 3D software. The original and rebuilt databases can be displayed dynamically, continuously, and synchronically and can be rotated at arbitrary angles. The sections from the dynamic displays and rotating angles are consistent with the sections in FECG. The database successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship features of different fetal CHDs. We established a fetal CHD anatomy training database and a standardized training database for FECG. Ultrasound physicians and students can learn the anatomical features of fetal CHD and FECG through either centralized training or distance education. Conclusions: The database of fetal CHD successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship of different kinds of

  11. Variability in Non-Cardiac Surgical Procedures in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, Jason P.; Cooper, Jennifer N.; McConnell, Patrick I.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Shah, Samir S.; Minneci, Peter C.; Deans, Katherine J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the volume and variability of non-cardiac surgeries performed in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) requiring cardiac surgery in the first year of life. Methods Patients who underwent cardiac surgery by 1 year of age and had a minimum 5-year follow-up at 22 of the hospitals contributing to the Pediatric Health Information System database between 2004–2012 were included. Frequencies of non-cardiac surgical procedures by age 5 years were determined and categorized by subspecialty. Patients were stratified according to their maximum RACHS-1 (Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery) category. The proportions of patients across hospitals who had a non-cardiac surgical procedure for each subspecialty were compared using logistic mixed effects models. Results 8,857 patients underwent congenital heart surgery during the first year of life, 3,621 (41%) of whom had 13,894 non-cardiac surgical procedures by 5 years. Over half of all procedures were in general surgery (4,432; 31.9%) or otolaryngology (4,002; 28.8%). There was significant variation among hospitals in the proportion of CHD patients having non-cardiac surgical procedures. Compared to children in the low risk group (RACHS-1 categories 1–3), children in the high-risk group (categories 4–6) were more likely to have general, dental, orthopedic, and thoracic procedures. Conclusions Children with CHD requiring cardiac surgery frequently also undergo non-cardiac surgical procedures; however, considerable variability in the frequency of these procedures exists across hospitals. This suggests a lack of uniformity in indications used for surgical intervention. Further research should aim to better standardize care for this complex patient population. PMID:25475794

  12. Congenital and childhood myotonic dystrophy: Current aspects of disease and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Genevieve; Cardamone, Michael; Farrar, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is multisystem disease arising from mutant CTG expansion in the non-translating region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase gene. While DM1 is the most common adult muscular dystrophy, with a worldwide prevalence of one in eight thousand, age of onset varies from before birth to adulthood. There is a broad spectrum of clinical severity, ranging from mild to severe, which correlates with number of DNA repeats. Importantly, the early clinical manifestations and management in congenital and childhood DM1 differ from classic adult DM1. In neonates and children, DM1 predominantly affects muscle strength, cognition, respiratory, central nervous and gastrointestinal systems. Sleep disorders are often under recognised yet a significant morbidity. No effective disease modifying treatment is currently available and neonates and children with DM1 may experience severe physical and intellectual disability, which may be life limiting in the most severe forms. Management is currently supportive, incorporating regular surveillance and treatment of manifestations. Novel therapies, which target the gene and the pathogenic mechanism of abnormal splicing are emerging. Genetic counselling is critical in this autosomal dominant genetic disease with variable penetrance and potential maternal anticipation, as is assisting with family planning and undertaking cascade testing to instigate health surveillance in affected family members. This review incorporates discussion of the clinical manifestations and management of congenital and childhood DM1, with a particular focus on hypersomnolence and sleep disorders. In addition, the molecular genetics, mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and development of novel treatment strategies in DM1 will be summarised. PMID:26566479

  13. [Congenital syphilis].

    PubMed

    Tabák, Réka; Tabák, Adám; Várkonyi, Viktória

    2010-01-10

    Syphilis has been a re-emerging disease in the past few decades. As a consequence, the prevalence of congenital syphilis is expected to be on the rise. Maternal syphilis may be related to several pathologies, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or congenital syphilis in the child. Infants that acquire syphilis in utero are frequently asymptomatic, and the organ damage caused by the infection may be apparent only years later. Syphilis is a curable disease, and most of its complications in the infant can be prevented by screening and treating the mother. Every newborn potentially infected should be treated with penicillin immediately starting on the day of birth. PMID:20061233

  14. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and Eisenmenger Syndrome: Current Practice in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David B.; Hanna, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon but serious disease characterized by severe pulmonary vascular disease and significant morbidity and mortality. PAH associated with congenital heart disease (APAH-CHD) is one etiology of PAH that has innate characteristics delineating it from other forms of PAH. The patient with APAH-CHD presents with unique challenges consisting of not only pulmonary vascular disease but also the complexity of the cardiac lesion. Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) represents the severe end of the spectrum for disease in APAH-CHD. Over time, systemic-to-pulmonary shunting through cardiac defects increases pulmonary vascular resistance to levels significant enough to reverse shunting across the defect. Historically, ES patients have been reported to have better outcomes than IPAH despite similarities in pulmonary vascular disease. However, recent studies are challenging this notion. Nonetheless, APAH-CHD survival has improved with the advent of modern PAH targeted therapies. New therapeutic options have allowed us to reconsider the dogma of inoperability in APAH-CHD patients with unrepaired defects. Certainly advances have been made, however, investigators must continue to advance the field through controlled clinical trials in both adult and pediatric APAH-CHD patients. PMID:25604592

  15. Cardiovascular and Neonatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women With High-Risk Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Pillutla, Priya; Nguyen, Tina; Markovic, Daniela; Canobbio, Mary; Koos, Brian J; Aboulhosn, Jamil A

    2016-05-15

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) increases the risk of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. However, previous studies have included mainly women with low-risk features. A single-center, retrospective analysis of pregnant women with CHD was performed. Inclusion criteria were the following high-risk congenital lesions and co-morbidities: maternal cyanosis; New York Heart Association (NHYA) functional class >II; severe ventricular dysfunction; maternal arrhythmia, single ventricle (SV) physiology, severe left-sided heart obstruction and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Multivariate analyses for predictors of adverse maternal cardiovascular and neonatal outcomes were performed. Forty-three women reported 61 pregnancies. There were no maternal or neonatal deaths. Maternal cardiac (31%) and neonatal (54%) complications were frequent. The most frequent cardiac events were pulmonary edema, arrhythmia, and reduced NYHA class. Previous arrhythmia conferred a 12-fold increase in the odds of experiencing at least one major cardiac complication. Maternal SV physiology was an independent risk factor for low birth weight, risk of neonatal intensive care unit admission and lower gestational age. Maternal cyanosis and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension also predicted adverse neonatal outcomes. In conclusion, mothers without antepartum arrhythmia or functional incapacity are unlikely to experience arrhythmias or a decrease in NYHA class during pregnancy. In addition, SV physiology is a robust predictor of neonatal complications. Antepartum counseling and assessment of maternal fitness are crucial for the woman with CHD. PMID:27055756

  16. New aspects of anesthetic management in congenital heart disease “common arterial trunk”

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Ferasatkish, Rasoul

    2014-01-01

    Now-a-days truncus arteriosus has been known as “common arterial trunk” (CAT) and is an uncommon congenital cardiac defect presenting in about 1-3% congenital heart disease. Environmental and genetic factors effects on incidence of CAT and other conotruncal anomalies. The majority patients with CAT and 22q11 deletion have other anomalies such as hypoplasia or aplasia of the thymus or parathyroid glands and immune deficits (T-cell deficiency), calcium metabolism disorder (hypocalcemia), palatal defects, learning and speech disorder, craniofacial anomalies, and neuropsychological abnormalities. CAT without surgical treatment frequently involves early severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) or early death from heart failure and associated conditions. Therefore, without corrective surgical repair, most CAT patients die in the initial years of life. In numerous centers early surgical repair associated with superior than 80% long-standing survival. Anesthesiologist must be performs comprehensive preoperative evaluation of infants or neonates with this disorder. In CAT patient exactly hemodynamic monitoring and suitable techniques to regulate pulmonary vascular resistance and systemic vascular resistance and cardiac function are more important than the select of a special anesthetic drug. Therefore, anesthetic drugs should be carefully administrated and titrate and under monitoring. Management of CAT after surgical repair depends on the adequacy of treatment, cardiac function, level of PAH, and degree of bleeding. Inotropic support is frequently necessary after the cardiac ischemia associated to the surgical repair. Pulmonary vasodilator drugs were used to PAH treatment. PMID:25097611

  17. [Analysis of microdeletions in 22q11 in Colombian patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Marleny; Villalba, Guiovanny; Mateus, Heidi; Villegas, Victoria; Fonseca, Dora; Núñez, Federico; Caicedo, Víctor; Pachón, Sonia; Bernal, Jaime E

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac defects are the most frequent congenital malformations, with an incidence estimated between 4 and 12 per 1000 newborns. Their etiology is multifactorial and might be attributed to genetic predispositions and environmental factors. Since 1990 these types of pathologies have been associated with 22q11 microdeletion. In this study, the frequency of microdeletion 22q11 was determined in 61 patients with non-syndromic congenital heart disease. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and TUPLE1 and STR D10S2198 genes were amplified by multiplex PCR and visualized in agarose gels. Gene content was quantified by densitometry. Three patients were found with microdeletion 22q11, representing a 4.9% frequency. This microdeletion was associated with two cases of Tetralogy of Fallot and a third case with atrial septal defect (ASD). In conclusion, the frequency for microdeletion 22q11 in the population analyzed was 4.9%. The cases that presented Teratology of Fallot had a frequency for this microdeletion of 7.4% and for ASD of 11.1%. PMID:22523843

  18. The Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study: rationale, design, and early results.

    PubMed

    Gelb, Bruce; Brueckner, Martina; Chung, Wendy; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Kaltman, Jonathan; Kaski, Juan Pablo; Kim, Richard; Kline, Jennie; Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Porter, George; Roberts, Amy; Rosenberg, Ellen; Seiden, Howard; Seidman, Christine; Sleeper, Lynn; Tennstedt, Sharon; Kaltman, Jonathan; Schramm, Charlene; Burns, Kristin; Pearson, Gail; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2013-02-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the leading cause of infant mortality among birth defects, and later morbidities and premature mortality remain problematic. Although genetic factors contribute significantly to cause CHD, specific genetic lesions are unknown for most patients. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium established the Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study to investigate relationships between genetic factors, clinical features, and outcomes in CHD. The Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium comprises 6 main and 4 satellite sites at which subjects are recruited, and medical data and biospecimens (blood, saliva, cardiovascular tissue) are collected. Core infrastructure includes an administrative/data-coordinating center, biorepository, data hub, and core laboratories (genotyping, whole-exome sequencing, candidate gene evaluation, and variant confirmation). Eligibility includes all forms of CHD. Annual follow-up is obtained for probands <1-year-old. Parents are enrolled whenever available. Enrollment from December 2010 to June 2012 comprised 3772 probands. One or both parents were enrolled for 72% of probands. Proband median age is 5.5 years. The one third enrolled at age <1 year are contacted annually for follow-up information. The distribution of CHD favors more complex lesions. Approximately, 11% of probands have a genetic diagnosis. Adequate DNA is available from 97% and 91% of blood and saliva samples, respectively. Genomic analyses of probands with heterotaxy, atrial septal defects, conotruncal, and left ventricular outflow tract obstructive lesions are underway. The scientific community's use of Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium resources is welcome. PMID:23410879

  19. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group on research in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roberta G; Pearson, Gail D; Barst, Robyn J; Child, John S; del Nido, Pedro; Gersony, Welton M; Kuehl, Karen S; Landzberg, Michael J; Myerson, Merle; Neish, Steven R; Sahn, David J; Verstappen, Amy; Warnes, Carole A; Webb, Catherine L

    2006-02-21

    The Working Group on research in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) was convened in September 2004 under the sponsorship of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the Office of Rare Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, to make recommendations on research needs. The purpose of the Working Group was to advise the NHLBI on the current state of the science in ACHD and barriers to optimal clinical care, and to make specific recommendations for overcoming those barriers. The members of the Working Group were chosen to provide expert input on a broad range of research issues from both scientific and lay perspectives. The Working Group reviewed data on the epidemiology of ACHD, long-term outcomes of complex cardiovascular malformations, issues in assessing morphology and function with current imaging techniques, surgical and catheter-based interventions, management of related conditions including pregnancy and arrhythmias, quality of life, and informatics. After research and training barriers were discussed, the Working Group recommended outreach and educational programs for adults with congenital heart disease, a network of specialized adult congenital heart disease regional centers, technology development to support advances in imaging and modeling of abnormal structure and function, and a consensus on appropriate training for physicians to provide care for adults with congenital heart disease. PMID:16487831

  20. Health Care Costs for Adults With Congenital Heart Disease in the United States 2002 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Briston, David A; Bradley, Elisa A; Sabanayagam, Aarthi; Zaidi, Ali N

    2016-08-15

    More adults than children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are alive today. Few studies have evaluated adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) health care utilization in the United States. Data from the National Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2012, using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes for moderate and complex CHD were analyzed. Hospital discharges, total billed and reimbursed amounts, length of stay, and gender/age disparities were evaluated. There was an increase in CHD discharges (moderate CHD: 4,742 vs 6,545; severe CHD: 807 vs 1,115) and total billed and reimbursed dollar amounts across all CHD (billed: $2.7 vs $7.0 billion, 155% increase; reimbursed: $1.3 vs $2.3 billion, 99% increase) and in the ACHD subgroup (billed: $543 million vs $1.5 billion, 178% increase; reimbursed: $221 vs $433 million, 95% increase). Women comprised more discharges in 2002 but not in 2012 (men:women, 2002: 6,503 vs 7,805; 2012: 7,715 vs 7,200, p = 0.39). Gender-based billed amounts followed similar trends (2002: $263 vs $280 million; 2012: $845 vs $662 million, p = 0.006) as did reimbursements (2002: $108 vs $114 million; 2012: $243 vs $190 million, p = 0.008). All age subgroups demonstrated increased health care expenditures, including the >44 versus 18- to 44-year-old age subgroup (billed: $618 vs $347 million, p <0.001; reimbursed: $136 vs $75 million, p <0.001). Our results reveal increased ACHD billed and reimbursed amounts and hospital discharges with a shift in gender-based ACHD hospitalizations: men now account for more hospitalizations in the United States. In conclusion, increased health care expenditure in older patients with ACHD is likely to increase further as health care system use and costs continue to grow. PMID:27476099

  1. Congenital Sodium Diarrhea: A Form of Intractable Diarrhea, With a Link to Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Müller, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs) represent a group of challenging clinical conditions for pediatricians because of the severity of the presentation and the broad range of possible differential diagnoses. CDDs arise from alterations in the transport of nutrients and electrolytes across the intestinal mucosa, from enterocyte and enteroendocrine cell differentiation and/or polarization defects, and from the modulation of the intestinal immune response. Advances were made recently in deciphering the etiology and pathophysiology of one of these disorders, congenital sodium diarrhea (CSD). CSD refers to an intractable diarrhea of intrauterine onset with high fecal sodium loss. CSD is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. A syndromic form of CSD features choanal and intestinal atresias as well as recurrent corneal erosions. Small bowel histology frequently detects an epithelial "tufting" dysplasia. It is autosomal recessively inherited, and caused by SPINT2 mutations. The nonsyndromic form of CSD can be caused by dominant activating mutations in GUCY2C, encoding intestinal receptor guanylate cyclase C (GC-C), and by autosomal recessive SLC9A3 loss-of-function mutations. SLC9A3 encodes Na/H antiporter 3, the major intestinal brush border Na/H exchanger, and a downstream target of GC-C. A number of patients with GUCY2C and SLC9A3 mutations developed inflammatory bowel disease. Both the number of recognized CDD forms as well as the number of underlying disease genes are gradually increasing. Knowledge of these CDD genes enables noninvasive, next-generation gene panel-based testing to facilitate an early diagnosis in CDD. Primary Na/H antiporter 3 and GC-C malfunction is implicated as a predisposition for inflammatory bowel disease in subset of patients. PMID:26835907

  2. Screening and Characterization of Spontaneous Porcine Congenital Heart Defects for Gene Identification and Models of Human Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rodent models of human congenital birth defects have been instrumental for gene discovery and investigation of mechanisms of disease. However, these models are limited by their small size making practiced intervention or detailed anatomic evaluation difficult. Swine have similar anato...

  3. Providing Guidance for School Personnel Making Decisions in the Service of School Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jillian; MacMath, Sheryl

    2006-01-01

    Due to improved medical procedures, more and more children with congenital heart disease are entering the school system. In order to help both school and health professionals involved in the education of children, we provide a brief review of the literature, review real-life dilemmas that school personnel face on a daily basis, and interpret the…

  4. "What I Wish You Knew": Social Barriers toward Physical Activity in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease (CHD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moola, Fiona; Fusco, Caroline; Kirsh, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the benefits of physical activity for youth with congenital heart disease (CHD), most patients are inactive. Although literature has addressed medical and psychological barriers to participation, little is known about the social barriers that youth encounter. This qualitative study explored sociocultural barriers to physical activity from…

  5. Diagnosis of congenital von Willebrand disease during a preoperative assessment in a multiple myeloma patient without bleeding history.

    PubMed

    El Ouaaliti, Malika; Li, Rong; Gobin, Delphine; Bron, Dominique; Cantinieaux, Brigitte

    2016-07-01

    We report a rare case of type 2M von Willebrand disease diagnosed in an elderly multiple myeloma patient who had no personal and family bleeding history. This case report emphasis the importance to not systematically exclude a congenital vWD in adult patients when coagulation screening tests indicate toward a vWD. PMID:27386134

  6. Surgical strategies for patients with congenital heart disease and severe pulmonary hypertension in low/middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Sachin; Keshri, Vikas Kumar; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Juneja, Rajnish; Saxena, Anita; Kothari, Shyam Sunder; Airan, Balram

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss specific surgical strategies that are used in patients with congenital heart disease and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Our own experience, with the use of unidirectional valved patches in managing these patients, is also discussed in detail. PMID:27326218

  7. Is Pulse Oximetry Useful for Screening Neonates for Critical Congenital Heart Disease at High Altitudes?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien I E

    2016-06-01

    Now that pulse oximetry is used widely to screen for critical congenital heart disease, it is time to consider whether this screening method is applicable to those who live at high altitudes. Consideration of basic physical principles and reports from the literature indicate that not only is the 95 % cutoff point for arterial oxygen saturation incorrect at high altitudes, but the lower saturations are accompanied by greater variability and therefore there is the possibility of a greater percentage of false-positive screening tests at high altitudes. Because of ethnic differences in response to high altitudes, normative data will have to be collected separately in different countries and perhaps for different ethnic groups. PMID:27090652

  8. Anatomical delineation of congenital heart disease using 3D magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams Bornemeier, Renee; Fellows, Kenneth E.; Fogel, Mark A.; Weinberg, Paul M.

    1994-05-01

    Anatomic delineation of the heart and great vessels is a necessity when managing children with congenital heart disease. Spatial orientation of the vessels and chambers in the heart and the heart itself may be quite abnormal. Though magnetic resonance imaging provides a noninvasive means for determining the anatomy, the intricate interrelationships between many structures are difficult to conceptualize from a 2-D format. Taking the 2-D images and using a volumetric analysis package allows for a 3-D replica of the heart to be created. This model can then be used to view the anatomy and spatial arrangement of the cardiac structures. This information may be utilized by the physicians to assist in the clinical management of these children.

  9. Techniques for transcatheter recanalization of completely occluded vessels and pathways in patients with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Latson, Larry A; Qureshi, Athar M

    2010-01-01

    Occlusions of major vessels in patients with congenital heart disease may occur due to a variety of factors. These occlusions are often felt to be best addressed surgically; however, we and others have been successful in recanalizing most of these vessels in the catheterization laboratory. Most of these patients will require multiple procedures in the catheterization laboratory to ensure vessel patency and to facilitate vessel growth. Physicians performing the procedure should have a thorough understanding of the anatomic considerations for the intended procedure and have access to a variety of devices and equipment to optimize the result of the procedure. In this article, we review some of the technical aspects that are vital for the success of the procedure. PMID:21234193

  10. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, SJ; Caputo, M; Tulloh, RM

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed. PMID:26516182

  11. Factors Influencing Adaptation and Performance at Physical Exercise in Complex Congenital Heart Diseases after Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bassareo, P. P.; Saba, L.; Solla, P.; Barbanti, C.; Marras, A. R.; Mercuro, G.

    2014-01-01

    In the last thirty years, steady progress in the diagnostic tools and care of subjects affected by congenital heart diseases (CHD) has resulted in a significant increase in their survival to adulthood, even for those affected by complex CHD. Based on these premises, a number of teenagers and adults affected by corrected (surgically or through interventional techniques) CHD ask to be allowed to undertake sporting activities, both at a recreational and competitive level. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanisms influencing the adaption at physical exercise of patients suffering from complex CHD. The conclusion is that even if there are some modest risks with exercise, they should be seen in perspective, and the life-long benefits of regular exercise on general health, mood, and well-being should be emphasized. PMID:24822218

  12. Universal Pulse Oximetry Screening for Early Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a major cause of infant death and morbidity worldwide. An early diagnosis and timely intervention can significantly reduce the likelihood of an adverse outcome. However, studies from the United States and other developed countries have shown that as many as 30%–50% of infants with CCHD are discharged after birth without being identified. This diagnostic gap is likely to be even higher in low-resource countries. Several large randomized trials have shown that the use of universal pulse-oximetry screening (POS) at the time of discharge from birth hospital can help in early diagnosis of these infants. The objective of this review is to share data to show that the use of POS for early detection of CCHD meets the criteria necessary for inclusion to the universal newborn screening panel and could be adopted worldwide. PMID:27279759

  13. [Hemorrhagic congenital diseases: What can be the future of plasma-derived products against recombinants?].

    PubMed

    Schved, J-F

    2015-08-01

    Until 1990, congenital hemorrhagic disorders were treated by plasma-derived concentrates. The first recombinant drug, recombinant factor VIII was available after this date and few years later recombinant factor IX could also be proposed to patients. The evolution of market share in France was different between these two drugs: while recombinant factor VIII took a large place in hemophilia A treatment (85%), plasma-derived factor IX represent 50% of the French market. In the next years, the arrival of long-acting antihemophilic factors may lead to the dramatically reduce the amount of plasma-derived antihemophilic factors used to treat hemophilia. For rare bleeding coagulation disorders, plasma-derived concentrates are still widely used, while they are the only concentrates available in most diseases. This situation is unlikely to evolve significantly in the next years. PMID:25933512

  14. Association between 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and congenital heart disease: A meta-analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenju; Hou, Zongliu; Wang, Chunhui; Wei, Chuanyu; Li, Yaxiong; Jiang, Lihong

    2013-01-01

    Background Inconsistent results were reported in recent literature regarding the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T/A1298C polymorphisms and the susceptibility of congenital heart disease (CHD). In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the associations by employing multiple analytical methods. Methods Literature search was performed and published articles were obtained from PubMed, Embase and CNKI databases based on the exclusion and inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from eligible studies and the crude odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random or fix effects model to evaluate the associations between the MTHFR C677T/A1298C polymorphisms and CHD development. Subgroup based analysis was performed by Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium, ethnicity, types of CHD, source of control and sample size. Results Twenty-four eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Significant association was found between fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism and CHD development in all genetic models. The pooled ORs and 95% CIs in all genetic models indicated that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with CHD in Asian, but not Caucasian in subgroup analysis. The maternal MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not associated with CHD except for recessive model. Moreover, neither maternal nor fetal MTHFR A1298C polymorphism was associated with CHD. Conclusion The fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism may increase the susceptibility to CHD. Fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism was more likely to affect Asian fetus than Caucasian. The MTHFR A1298C polymorphism may not be a risk of congenital heart disease. PMID:25606381

  15. Immunologic Aging in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: Does Infant Sternotomy Matter?

    PubMed

    Elder, Robert W; George, Roshan P; McCabe, Nancy M; Rodriguez Iii, Fred H; Book, Wendy M; Mahle, William T; Kirk, Allan D

    2015-10-01

    Thymectomy is performed routinely in infants undergoing cardiothoracic surgery. Children post-sternotomy have decreased numbers of T lymphocytes, although the mechanisms involved and long-term consequences of this have not been defined. We hypothesized that lymphopenia in patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) would be reflective of premature T cell maturation and exhaustion. Adults with ACHD who had sternotomy to repair congenital heart disease as infants (<1 year) and age-matched ACHD patients without prior sternotomy were studied using polychromatic flow cytometry interrogating markers of lymphocyte maturation, exhaustion and senescence. Group differences were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Eighteen ACHD patients aged 21-40 years participated: 10 cases and 8 controls. Median age at sternotomy for cases was 52 days. Cases and controls were matched for age (28.9 vs. 29.1 years; p = 0.83), gender (p = 0.15) and race (p = 0.62) and had similar case complexity. Cases had a lower mean percentage of cytotoxic CD8 lymphocytes compared to controls (26.8 vs. 33.9 %; p = 0.016), with fewer naive, undifferentiated CD8 T cells (31.0 vs. 53.6 %; p = 0.027). CD8 cells expressing PD1, a marker of immune exhaustion, trended higher in cases versus controls (25.6 vs. 19.0 %; p = 0.083). Mean percentage of CD4 cells was higher in cases versus controls (65.6 vs. 59.6 %; p = 0.027), without differences in CD4 T cell maturation subtype. In summary, ACHD patients who undergo sternotomy as infants exhibit differences in T lymphocyte composition compared to ACHD controls, suggesting accelerated immunologic exhaustion. Investigation is warranted to assess the progressive nature and clinical impact of this immune phenotypic change. PMID:25916315

  16. Propofol effect on cerebral oxygenation in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Thilo; Schubert, Stephan; Ewert, Peter; Stiller, Brigitte; Nagdyman, Nicole; Berger, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Propofol is a short-acting, intravenously administered hypnotic agent which is used in procedural sedation in children. Propofol is known to decrease systemic vascular resistance, arterial blood pressure and can lead to desaturations and decreased systemic perfusion in children with cardiac shunting. This may result in a reduction in cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can monitor cerebral tissue oxygenation in the frontal neocortex. The objective of our study was to measure the changes in cerebral oxygen and blood supply after Propofol infusion in children with congenital heart disease. Propofol infusion may reduce cerebral oxygenation in children with congenital heart disease. The study group consisted of 32 children (f:m = 18:14), with median age of 49 (5-112) months and median weight of 15 (5-34) kg. We performed NIRS derived continuous measurement of cerebral oxygenation and cardiac output using Electrical velocimetry for 5 min before and after sedation with Propofol (1-2 mg/kg i.v.) for cardiac catheterization. Simultaneously, non-invasive arterial blood pressure and transcutaneous oxygen saturation were measured. Propofol sedation led to a significant decrease in mean arterial pressure (79 ± 16 vs. 67 ± 12 mmHg) (p = 0.01) and cardiac index (3.2 ± 0.8 vs. 2.9 ± 0.6 ml/min/m(2)) (p = 0.03). In contrast, cerebral tissue oxygenation index, increased significantly from 57 ± 11 to 59 ± 10 % (p < 0.05). Sedation with Propofol increased cerebral tissue oxygenation despite a decrease in cardiac index and arterial blood pressure. This may be caused by a decreased oxygen consumption of the sedated brain with intact cerebral auto-regulation. PMID:25311762

  17. Brain in Congenital Heart Disease Across the Lifespan: The Cumulative Burden of Injury.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Ariane; Miller, Steven P; Marino, Bradley Scott; Jefferson, Angela L; Newburger, Jane W

    2016-05-17

    The number of patients surviving with congenital heart disease (CHD) has soared over the last 3 decades. Adults constitute the fastest-growing segment of the CHD population, now outnumbering children. Research to date on the heart-brain intersection in this population has been focused largely on neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood and adolescence. Mutations in genes that are highly expressed in heart and brain may cause cerebral dysgenesis. Together with altered cerebral perfusion in utero, these factors are associated with abnormalities of brain structure and brain immaturity in a significant portion of neonates with critical CHD even before they undergo cardiac surgery. In infancy and childhood, the brain may be affected by risk factors related to heart disease itself or to its interventional treatments. As children with CHD become adults, they increasingly develop heart failure, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary disease. These acquired cardiovascular comorbidities can be expected to have effects similar to those in the general population on cerebral blood flow, brain volumes, and dementia. In both children and adults, cardiovascular disease may have adverse effects on achievement, executive function, memory, language, social interactions, and quality of life. Against the backdrop of shifting demographics, risk factors for brain injury in the CHD population are cumulative and synergistic. As neurodevelopmental sequelae in children with CHD evolve to cognitive decline or dementia during adulthood, a growing population of CHD can be expected to require support services. We highlight evidence gaps and future research directions. PMID:27185022

  18. Homozygous Mutation of the FGFR1 Gene Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and 46,XY Disorder of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Mazen, Inas; Amin, Heba; Kamel, Alaa; El Ruby, Mona; Bignon-Topalovic, Joelle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are the most common cause of all birth defects and account for nearly 25% of all major congenital anomalies leading to mortality in the first year of life. Extracardiac anomalies including urogenital aberrations are present in ∼30% of all cases. Here, we present a rare case of a 46,XY patient with CHD associated with ambiguous genitalia consisting of a clitoris-like phallus and a bifid scrotum. Exome sequencing revealed novel homozygous mutations in the FGFR1 and STARD3 genes that may be associated with the phenotype. PMID:27055092

  19. Evolving hybrid approaches: the preservation of the 'neglected' pulmonary valve function in patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Bacha, Emile; Stellin, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The involvement of the hemodynamic expertise in the operating room led to the development of new strategies aimed to improve both early and long-term outcome of patients with congenital heart disease. During the last decade, with the aim of preserving the pulmonary valve function, we embarked on a new surgical approach, which combines surgical and interventional techniques, which are performed in the operating room. We believe that the preservation of the pulmonary valve function can be extended to any patients with classic tetralogy of Fallot and other selected patients with congenital pulmonary valve hypoplasia and dysfunction. PMID:26950198

  20. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  1. Impact of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... complex lesions, limitations are common. Some children with congenital heart disease have developmental delay or other learning difficulties. What ... defects? Successful treatment requires highly specialized care. Severe congenital heart disease requires extensive financial resources both in and out ...

  2. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with one or more heart defects has congenital heart disease . Surgery is needed if the defect could harm ... 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  3. Environmental Risk Factors for Congenital Heart Disease in the Shandong Peninsula, China: A Hospital-based Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiwei; Liu, Junxiu; Tang, Ji; Ji, Jiafen; Chen, Jingwu; Liu, Changyun

    2009-01-01

    Background In China, and in Shandong province, the proportionate contribution of birth defects to infant mortality has increased, and congenital heart disease (CHD) is now the most common cause of birth defects. The cause of approximately 90% of cases of congenital heart disease is multifactorial. Little is known about modifiable environmental risk factors or regional differences. We investigated putative environmental risk factors for congenital heart disease in the Shandong province of China in order to improve prevention of CHD. Methods We conducted a hospital-based 1:2 matched case–control study of 164 patients with congenital heart diseases and 328 controls, all of whom were retrospectively interviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify environmental risk factors for CHD. Results The environmental risk factors associated with CHD were mother’s education level (odds ratio [OR], 0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15–0.67), neonatal asphyxia or hypoxia (OR, 3.74; 95% CI, 1.25–11.18), number of previous pregnancies (OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.44–4.97), maternal upper respiratory tract infection (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.56–10.85), maternal infection (OR, 7.98; 95% CI, 2.14–29.72), maternal B-mode ultrasound examination (OR, 4.05; 95% CI, 1.48–11.08), and maternal mental stress (OR, 3.93; 95% CI, 1.94–7.94) during early pregnancy. No significant interactions were observed among these factors. Conclusions Augmenting maternal mental healthcare, obtaining regular health counseling and testing during pregnancy, preventing upper respiratory tract infections, limiting medication during early pregnancy, offering health promotion and health education to women of childbearing age (especially those with less formal education), and improving obstetric procedures and techniques may lower the occurrence of congenital heart disease. PMID:19398851

  4. Interactions between cytokines, congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1-5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  5. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  6. Evaluation of High Resolution Melting for MTHFR C677T Genotyping in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuying; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Hui; Dong, Rui; Yang, Xiaomeng; Liu, Yi; Ma, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Background High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple, flexible and low-cost mutation screening technique. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene encoding a critical enzyme, potentially affects susceptibility to some congenital defects like congenital heart disease (CHD). We evaluate the performance of HRM for genotyping of the MTHFR gene C677T locus in CHD cases and healthy controls of Chinese Han population. Methods A total of 315 blood samples from 147 CHD patients (male72, female 75) and 168 healthy controls (male 92, female 76) were enrolled in the study. HRM was utilized to genotype MTHFR C677T locus of all the samples. The results were compared to that of PCR-RFLP and Sanger sequencing. The association of the MTHFR C677T genotypes and the risk of CHD was analyzed using odds ratio with their 95% confidence interval (CIs) from unconditional logistic regression. Results All the samples were successfully genotyped by HRM within 1 hour and 30 minutes while at least 6 hours were needed for PCR-RFLP and sequencing. The genotypes of MTHFR C677T CC, CT, and TT were 9.52%, 49.66%, and 40.82% in CHD group but 29.17%, 50% and 20.83% in control group, which were identical using both methods of HRM and PCR-RFLP, demonstrating the sensitivity and specificity of HRM were all 100%. Conclusion MTHFR C677T is a potential risk factor for CHD in our local residents of Shandong province in China. HRM is a fast, sensitive, specific and reliable method for clinical application of genotyping. PMID:26990189

  7. Novel materials and devices in the transcatheter management of congenital heart diseases - the future comes slowly (part 1).

    PubMed

    Sizarov, Aleksander; Boudjemline, Younes

    2016-04-01

    Management of congenital defects of the heart and great vessels constitutes the largest part of paediatric cardiology practice. Most of these defects require interventions, either corrective or palliative, to guarantee patient survival, symptom relief and/or better quality of life. Interventions can be performed either surgically or transcatheter percutaneously. The surgical repairs are invasive, with long-term results often being suboptimal for complex lesions and after the use of grafts, especially in small patients. Nowadays, various transcatheter devices allow much less invasive percutaneous management in some carefully selected patients with congenital heart disease. However, the currently available materials and devices are only suitable for a small proportion of children, while the majority of young patients with cardiac defects still need surgery, as no transcatheter alternatives exist. There are, however, numerous new biomaterials, devices and technologies that have the potential to expand the transcatheter approach to a much broader spectrum of congenital cardiovascular lesions and conditions. In this three-part review, we describe new advances in transcatheter devices and materials, which promise to extend the application of the percutaneous approach to younger and more complex patient groups with congenital heart disease. The first part focuses on new possibilities for the transcatheter treatment of vascular stenoses in growing patients and the closure of intracardiac defects. PMID:26898634

  8. Emerging Research Directions in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: A Report From an NHLBI/ACHA Working Group.

    PubMed

    Gurvitz, Michelle; Burns, Kristin M; Brindis, Ralph; Broberg, Craig S; Daniels, Curt J; Fuller, Stephanie M P N; Honein, Margaret A; Khairy, Paul; Kuehl, Karen S; Landzberg, Michael J; Mahle, William T; Mann, Douglas L; Marelli, Ariane; Newburger, Jane W; Pearson, Gail D; Starling, Randall C; Tringali, Glenn R; Valente, Anne Marie; Wu, Joseph C; Califf, Robert M

    2016-04-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, affecting about 0.8% of live births. Advances in recent decades have allowed >85% of children with CHD to survive to adulthood, creating a growing population of adults with CHD. Little information exists regarding survival, demographics, late outcomes, and comorbidities in this emerging group, and multiple barriers impede research in adult CHD. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Adult Congenital Heart Association convened a multidisciplinary working group to identify high-impact research questions in adult CHD. This report summarizes the meeting discussions in the broad areas of CHD-related heart failure, vascular disease, and multisystem complications. High-priority subtopics identified included heart failure in tetralogy of Fallot, mechanical circulatory support/transplantation, sudden cardiac death, vascular outcomes in coarctation of the aorta, late outcomes in single-ventricle disease, cognitive and psychiatric issues, and pregnancy. PMID:27102511

  9. Changing practice of cardiac surgery in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Srinathan, S K; Bonser, R S; Sethia, B; Thorne, S A; Brawn, W J; Barron, D J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To review 13 years’ data from a unit for grown ups with congenital heart disease (GUCH) to understand the change in surgical practice. Methods: Records were reviewed of patients over 16 years of age undergoing surgery between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2002 in a dedicated GUCH unit. Patients with atrial septal defects were included but not those with Marfan’s syndrome or undergoing a first procedure for bicuspid aortic valves. Three equal time periods of 52 months were analysed. Results: Of 474 operations performed, 162 (34.2%) were repeat operations. The percentage of repeat operations increased from 24.8% (41 of 165) in January 1990–April 1994 to 49.7% (74 of 149) in September 1998–December 2002. Mortality was 6.3% (n  =  30). The median age decreased from 25.4 years (interquartile range 18.7) in January 1990–April 1994 to 23.9 (interquartile range 17.3) in September 1998–December 2002 (p  =  0.04). The proportion of patients with a “simple” diagnosis decreased from 45.4% (74 or 165) in January 1990–April 1994 to 27.5% (41 of 149) in September 1998–December 2002 (p  =  0.013). Pulmonary valve replacements in operated tetralogy of Fallot increased from one case in January 1990–April 1994 to 23 cases in September 1998–December 2002 and conduit replacement increased from five cases to 17. However, secundum atrial septal defect closures decreased from 35 cases to 14 (p < 0.0001). The estimated cost (not including salaries and prosthetics) incurred by an adult patient with congenital heart disease was £2290 compared with £2641 for a patient undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Conclusion: Despite the impact of interventional cardiology, the total number of surgical procedures remained unchanged. The complexity of the cases increased particularly with repeat surgery. Nevertheless, the patients do well with low mortality and the inpatient costs remain comparable with costs of surgery for acquired disease. PMID

  10. [Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on tuberculosis in pregnant women and neonates (i): Epidemiology and diagnosis. Congenital tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, F; Mellado Peña, M J; Del Rosal Rabes, T; Noguera Julián, A; Goncé Mellgren, A; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) screening in pregnancy using tuberculin skin test (TST) is recommended in case of symptoms of TB disease, close contact with a patient with infectious TB, or high risk of developing active disease. The new interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) tests are recommended in BCG-vaccinated pregnant women with positive TST and no known risk factors for TB, and in those immunocompromised, with clinical suspicion of TB but negative TST. TB diagnosis is difficult due to the non-specific symptoms, the increased frequency of extrapulmonary disease, the delay in radiological examinations, and the high rate of tuberculin anergy. Neonatal TB can be acquired in utero (congenital TB), or through airborne transmission after delivery (postnatal TB). Congenital TB is extremely rare and does not cause fetal malformations. It may be evident at birth, although it usually presents after the second week of life. In newborns with no family history of TB, the disease should be considered in cases of miliary pneumonia, hepatosplenomegaly with focal lesions, or lymphocytic meningitis with hypoglycorrhachia, especially in those born to immigrants from high TB-burden countries. TST is usually negative, and IGRAs have lower sensitivity than in older children. However, the yield of acid-fast smear and culture is higher, mostly in congenital TB. Molecular diagnosis techniques enable early diagnosis and detection of drug resistance mutations. There is a substantial risk of disseminated disease and death. PMID:25754313