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Sample records for congenital intrapulmonary bronchogenic

  1. Mediastinal bronchogenic cyst mimicking congenital lobar emphysema.

    PubMed

    Arun, Sumitha; Kumar, Manish; Ross, Benjamin Jeyanth

    2016-01-01

    Bronchogenic cyst (BC) is a rare congenital malformation of the lung. Most patients remain asymptomatic until adulthood while some are symptomatic in the first few years of life. However, symptoms in newborn period are rare. We report a case of a 3-day-old preterm baby with respiratory distress diagnosed as congenital lobar emphysema on chest X-ray. A CT scan revealed a mediastinal cyst causing obstructive lobar emphysema. The cyst was excised and pathological examination was suggestive of BC. PMID:27609589

  2. Ectopic congenital bronchogenic cyst accompanied by infection appearing in the cervical region of an elderly female patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIU, ZHONGLONG; TIAN, ZHUOWEI; ZHANG, CHENPING; HE, YUE

    2016-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts (BCs) are rare congenital cystic lesions arising as a development malformation in the trachea-bronchial system during the embryonic period. The cysts mostly occur in the mediastinum, with an extremely low morbidity rate in the oromaxillofacial-head and neck region. The age distribution of patients who present with BCs shows a significant predominance towards young individuals compared with the elderly. The current study reports the case a 70-year-old female who presented with a painful mass in the right cervical region. Pre-operative computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound showed a heterogeneous hypodense cystic lesion accompanied by infection. A mass of gaseous density was observed on repeat CT following antibiotic therapy. The pathological examination after complete resection revealed a BC, which can also be easily misdiagnosed as common congenital cervical cysts, such as a branchial cleft cyst or a thyroglossal duct cyst, among others. There was no recurrence or any discomfort during the 34-month follow-up period. PMID:26893692

  3. Bronchogenic cysts of the neck in adults.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, Kenneth A; Tassler, Andrew B; Krowiak, Edward J; Deeb, Ziad E

    2004-09-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are congenital sacs that result from maldevelopment of the primitive foregut. Although they occur predominantly in the chest, there are reports of lesions in extrathoracic locations. The majority of reported bronchogenic cysts located in the neck are found in the pediatric population; a review of the literature reveals few reports of bronchogenic cysts of the neck among adults. The diagnosis of a bronchogenic cyst relies on the histology and location of the lesion. Here, we review our experience in the diagnosis and management of 2 adult patients with pathologically proven bronchogenic cysts. Both patients presented with solitary neck masses that proved to be bronchogenic cysts on histologic examination. Our purpose is to define the histopathologic and clinical characteristics of bronchogenic cysts and discuss the features that distinguish them from other cervical cysts. In conclusion, congenital bronchogenic cysts can occur in the neck of adults and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic cervical masses in adults, as well as children. PMID:15453524

  4. Multiple primary bronchogenic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Ji, H; Paljarvi, L; Soimakallio, S

    1996-07-01

    Multiple primary bronchogenic carcinomas (MPBCa) are extremely rare. The differentiation of a MPBCa from a pulmonary metastasis due to an extrathoracic neoplasm is sometimes difficult. We reviewed 324 pathologically proved primary pulmonary carcinomas and found six cases of MPBCa (1.9%). We herewith present the series and discuss the diagnosis of MPBCa. PMID:21594435

  5. [Intrapulmonary Sewing Needle].

    PubMed

    Hisama, Naoya; Tsunemitsu, Nobumasa; Yasumasu, Tetsuo; Yamasaki, Takashi; Uchida, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    Intrapulmonary aberrant needles are rarely encountered in clinical practice. A 82-year-old woman, though she was asymptomatic, was referred to our department due to an abnormal shadow on a chest X-ray. Chest X-ray and chest computed tomography showed a foreign body suspected to be a sewing needle in the left upper lobe. The needle was successfully removed by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. PMID:27246130

  6. Giant bronchogenic cyst with pericardial defect: a case report & literature review in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Toshiko; Iwata, Takekazu; Nakatani, Yukio; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pericardial defects are a rare anomaly, found during autopsy and cardiothoracic surgery. We describe a case of a 69-year-old female, with a right-sided congenital pericardial defect associated with a giant bronchogenic cyst (BC) found during surgery. The cyst was resected and the patient developed arrhythmia following surgery. A review of the literature in Japan was performed, focusing on congenital anomalies associated with pericardial defects and its pathogenesis. We paid particular attention to complications following thoracic surgery in patients with pericardial defects and indications of pericardial reconstruction in such patients. PMID:27621900

  7. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  8. Unilateral Obstructive Emphysema in Infancy due to Mediastinal Bronchogenic Cyst-Diagnostic Challenge and Management.

    PubMed

    Vimala, Leena Robinson; Sathya, Ravi Kishore Barla Sri; Lionel, Arul Premanand; Kishore, Jeenapalli Srinivasa; Navamani, Kirubakaran

    2015-05-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are the most common cystic mediastinal lesion in children. Bronchogenic cyst causing unilateral obstructive emphysema is a rare presentation. We report the case of a one and half month old infant who presented with respiratory distress which was initially suspected as left pneumothorax on frontal chest radiograph but was later found to be due to hyperinflated left lung and hence the possibility of congenital lobar emphysema was considered. CT thorax and limited MRI sections revealed a cystic lesion in mediastinum causing obstructive emphysema and mediastinal displacement. He underwent an emergency thoracotomy and excision of the cyst via an extrapleural approach. Post operatively, rapid improvement of the infant was noticed both clinically as well as radiologically. Cross sectional imaging like CT or MR is required for reaching the correct and early diagnosis in paediatric patients with respiratory distress, when there is diagnostic dilemma based on chest radiograph. PMID:26155530

  9. Intralobar pulmonary sequestration and mediastinal bronchogenic cyst.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, R. G.; Yip, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    A patient with a bronchogenic cyst and intralobar pulmonary sequestration is presented. Chest radiography showed a posterior mediastinal mass and a computed tomographic scan of the chest revealed, in addition, an abnormality suggestive of pulmonary sequestration. This was confirmed by an aortogram. It is important to be aware of the coexistence of these anomalies to make a diagnosis preoperatively. Images PMID:8016803

  10. Successful living donor liver transplant in a child with Abernethy malformation with biliary atresia, ventricular septal defect and intrapulmonary shunting.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Ashish; Srivastava, Ajitabh; Goyal, Neerav; Vij, Vivek; Wadhawan, Manav; Bera, Motilal; Gupta, Subash

    2009-12-01

    Congenital portosystemic shunts are the anomalies in which the mesenteric venous drainage bypasses the liver and drains directly into the systemic circulation. This is a report of a rare case of LDLT in a four-yr old male child suffering with biliary atresia (post-failed Kasai procedure) associated with (i) a large congenital CEPSh from the spleno-mesentric confluence to the LHV, (ii) intrapulmonary shunts, (iii) perimembranous VSD. The left lobe graft was procured from the mother of the child. Recipient IVC and the shunt vessel were preserved during the hepatectomy, and the caval and shunt clamping were remarkably short while performing the HV and portal anastomosis. Post-operative course was uneventful; intrapulmonary shunts regressed within three months after transplantation and currently after 18 months following transplant child is doing well with normal liver functions. CEPSh has been extensively discussed and all the published cases of liver transplantation for CEPSh were reviewed. PMID:19254272

  11. Spontaneous regression of bronchogenic cyst accompanied by pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Himuro, Naoya; Minakata, Takao; Oshima, Yutaka; Kataoka, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Kadokura, Mitsutaka

    2015-12-01

    Bronchogenic cysts arise from abnormal budding of the ventral diverticulum of the foregut or tracheobronchial tree during embryogenesis, are the most common cystic masses in the mediastinum, and are generally asymptomatic. A spontaneous regression in a mediastinal bronchogenic cyst (MBC) with pneumonia is rare. A 30-year-old male had a tumor shadow in the middle mediastinum. When he visited our hospital, he had a mild fever with coughing and sputum. A chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed a decrease in the tumor size and the existence of right pneumonia. MBC may be involved in the etiology of pneumonia; therefore, bronchogenic cysts need to be resected as soon as possible. PMID:26943430

  12. Production of interleukin-10 by human bronchogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D. R.; Kunkel, S. L.; Burdick, M. D.; Wilke, C. A.; Orringer, M. B.; Whyte, R. I.; Strieter, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a recently characterized cytokine with suppressive activity against various aspects of the cellular immune response. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that another anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IRAP) is produced and secreted by human bronchogenic carcinomas. We speculated that tumor production of IRAP may mitigate host responses and confer increased tumor viability. In this study, we investigated the capacity of human bronchogenic tumors to produce IL-10 as another possible mechanism to attenuate host defenses. We found increased levels of antigenic IL-10 in tissue homogenates of human bronchogenic carcinomas compared with normal lung tissue (13.69 +/- 2.87 versus 5.84 +/- 0.84 ng/mg total protein). Immunohistochemical staining of tumors illustrate primary localization of antigenic IL-10 to individual tumor cells. Analysis of supernatants of several unstimulated human bronchogenic cell lines in vitro demonstrated the ability of tumor cells to constitutively produce IL-10. Functional studies of mononuclear cells, cultured in the presence of conditioned medium from a bronchogenic cell line, demonstrated their increased tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 production with the addition of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10. These findings demonstrate that human bronchogenic carcinomas elaborate functional IL-10, which may significantly impair immune effector cell function and enable the tumor to evade host defenses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8030748

  13. Recurrent Intrapulmonary Solitary Fibrous Tumor With Malignant Transformation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Owada, Yuki; Watanabe, Yuzuru; Muto, Satoshi; Okabe, Naoyuki; Yonechi, Atsushi; Kanno, Ryuzo; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Intrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pleura; the so-called inverted pattern, which appears to grow into the lung parenchyma, is extremely rare. We experienced a 66-year-old woman with an intrapulmonary SFT that recurred locally with malignant transformation 2 years after wedge resection of the left upper lobe for the primary tumor. Subsequently, she underwent a lobectomy of the residual left upper lobe. Six years after the second operation she was well, without rerecurrence. Complete excision and long-term follow-up of intrapulmonary SFTs of the pleura are important, even when the primary tumor displays benign histopathologic features. PMID:27343529

  14. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary vasculature resulting in intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cuntaeous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  15. The clinical management of bronchogenic carcinoma-- A progress report.

    PubMed

    Baker, R R

    1975-11-01

    A number of new concepts in the clinical management of bronchogenic carcinoma have been introduced since an original review of this problem in The Johns Hopkins Medical Journal in 1967. Four specific problems in the updated management of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma are discussed: 1) the patient with cytologic evidence of malignant cells in the sputum and a normal chest radiograph; 2) the patient with an asymptomatic peripheral pulmonary nodule; 3) the patient with symptomatic bronchogenic carcinoma or bronchogenic carcinoma in a lobar or main stem bronchus; 4) the assessment of operability. Tantalum bronchography and fiberoptic bronchoscopy have proven effective in localizing the source of malignant cells shed from a radiologically occult bronchogenic carcinoma. Percutaneous needle biopsy and transbronchial biopsy under fluoroscopic control permit pathological examination of peripheral nodules. Transcervical mediastinoscopy and left parasternal exploration, as well as increased use of angiography and more sophisticated pulmonary function tests, allow better determination of the resectability of central lesions. As a result, fewer patients are subjected to unnecessary thoracotomies, and if thoracotomy is undertaken it usually offers the patient a reasonable chance of cure. PMID:1185914

  16. Intrapulmonary concentration of enrofloxacin in healthy calves

    PubMed Central

    OTOMARU, Konosuke; HIRATA, Masaya; IKEDO, Tomonobu; HORINOUCHI, Chie; NOGUCHI, Michiko; ISHIKAWA, Shingo; NAGATA, Shun-ichi; HOBO, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    To determine the intrapulmonary concentration of enrofloxacin (ERFX) in calves, plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and alveolar cells samples were obtained from clinically healthy calves. Four clinically healthy calves were administered a single dose of ERFX (5 mg/kg) by subcutaneous injection. Samples of plasma were obtained for each subjects at 0 (before administration), 1 and 2 hr after administration of ERFX. Samples of BALF were obtained from each subject at 0, 1 and 2 hr after administration of ERFX. This examination was conducted two times, one week apart. The mean EFRX concentrations in plasma at 1 and 2 hr after administration were l.23 and 1.29 µg/ml, respectively. The mean EFRX concentrations in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) at 1 and 2 hr after administration 8.53 µg/ml and 9.42 µg/ml, respectively. The mean ERFX concentrations of alveolar cells in BALF at 1 and 2 hr after administration were 4.04 µg/ml and 5.19 µg/ml, respectively. These results suggest that the ERFX concentrations in ELF and alveolar cells concentrations in BALF at 1 and 2 hr after administration were higher than the plasma concentrations. PMID:26668174

  17. Inspiratory flow and intrapulmonary gas distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rehder, K.; Knopp, T.J.; Brusasco, V.; Didier, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of flow of inspired gas on intrapulmonary gas distribution was examined by analysis of regional pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearances and of total pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearance measured at the mouth after equilibration of the lungs with /sup 133/Xe. Five awake healthy volunteers (24 to 40 yr of age) and another 5 healthy, anesthetized-paralyzed volunteers (26 to 28 yr of age) were studied while they were in the right lateral decubitus position. The awake subjects were studied at 3 inspiratory flows (0.4, 0.7, and 1.0 L/s) and the anesthetized-paralyzed subjects at 4 inspiratory flows (0.2, 0.5, 1.1, and 1.6 L/s). Interregional differences in /sup 133/Xe clearances along the vertical axis were significantly less during anesthesia-paralysis and mechanical ventilation than during spontaneous breathing in the awake state. No differences in the regional or total pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearances were detected at these different flows in either of the two states, i.e., the difference between the awake and anesthetized-paralyzed states persisted.

  18. Isolated adrenal masses in nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, T.W. Jr.; Bernardino, M.E.; Miller, J.I.; Mansour, K.; Greene, D.; Davis, W.A.

    1984-10-01

    Computed tomography has become an important diagnostic modality in the preoperative staging of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. The adrenal glands represent one of the most frequent sites of metastasis. Therefore, an isolated adrenal mass discovered on preoperative thoracoabdominal CT poses a diagnostic problem. Three hundred thirty patients with histologically proved nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma were evaluated. Thirty-two had adrenal masses without further evidence of disease in the abdomen, Eight of these 32 masses were metastases, 17 were proved adenomas, and 7 did not undergo biopsy. Thus an isolated adrenal mass is more likely benign than metastatic, and biopsy is advocated prior to withholding potentially curative surgery.

  19. Effect of intrapulmonary tetrahydrocannabinol administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Zuurman, L; Roy, C; Schoemaker, R C; Hazekamp, A; den Hartigh, J; Bender, J C M E; Verpoorte, R; Pinquier, J L; Cohen, A F; van Gerven, J M A

    2008-09-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was designed to identify which pharmacodynamic parameters most accurately quantify the effects of delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the predominantly psychoactive component of cannabis. In addition, we investigated the acceptability and usefulness of a novel mode of intrapulmonary THC administration using a Volcano vaporizer and pure THC instead of cannabis. Rising doses of THC (2, 4, 6 and 8 mg) or vehicle were administered with 90 minutes intervals to twelve healthy males using a Volcano vaporizer. Very low between-subject variability was observed in THC plasma concentrations, characterising the Volcano vaporizer as a suitable method for the administration of THC. Heart rate showed a sharp increase and rapid decline after each THC administration (8 mg: 19.4 bpm: 95% CI 13.2, 25.5). By contrast, dose dependent effects of body sway (8 mg: 108.5%: 95% CI 72.2%, 152.4%) and different subjective parameters did not return to baseline between doses (Visual Analogue Scales of 'alertness' (8 mg: -33.6 mm: 95% CI -41.6, -25.7), 'feeling high' (8 mg: 1.09 U: 95% CI 0.85, 1.33), 'external perception' (8 mg: 0.62 U: 95% CI 0.37, 0.86)). PK/PD-modeling of heart rate displayed a relatively short equilibration half-life of 7.68 min. CNS parameters showed equilibration half-lives ranging between 39.4 - 84.2 min. Some EEG-frequency bands, and pupil size showed small changes following the highest dose of THC. No changes were seen in saccadic eye movements, smooth pursuit and adaptive tracking performance. These results may be applicable in the development of novel cannabinoid agonists and antagonists, and in studies of the pharmacology and physiology of cannabinoid systems in humans. PMID:18515447

  20. Gastric bronchogenic cysts: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    TU, CHAOYONG; ZHU, JINGDE; SHAO, CHUXIAO; MAO, WEIBO; ZHOU, XINGMU; LIN, QIAOMEI; LI, ZHUKAI; ZHANG, JIE; ZHOU, QINGYUE; CHEN, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Gastric bronchogenic cysts are rare lesions, first described in 1956, with only 34 cases reported in the literature to date. The present study described a case of bronchogenic cyst of the stomach in a 17-year-old female who presented with periodic epigastric pain. In addition, the study analyzed the existing literature on these lesions. Gastric bronchogenic cysts are more common in females (female:male ratio, 21:14) and the median age of their development is 43 years. In total, 48.57% of the 34 previously reported cases were identified incidentally, and the remainder presented mainly with epigastric pain. Cyst sizes varied between 1.7 and 15 cm. In 3 cases, preoperative diagnosis was performed using needle biopsy, whereas several studies were initially misdiagnosed as stromal tumors. In 85% of the cases (31/35), cyst resection was performed, with laparoscopy used in 4 of the cases. The findings of the present study and literature review suggested that bronchogenic cysts of the stomach are rare, and surgical resection is warranted to treat symptoms and prevent malignant transformation. PMID:27073434

  1. Cerebral air embolism caused by a bronchogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Jung, Simon; Wiest, Roland; Frigerio, Susanna; Mattle, Heinrich P; Hess, Christian W

    2010-06-01

    An unusual case is presented of a tourist who developed fatal cerebral air embolism, pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium while ascending from low altitude to Europe's highest railway station. Presumably the air embolism originated from rupture of the unsuspected bronchogenic cyst as a result of pressure changes during the ascent. Cerebral air embolism has been observed during surgery, in scuba diving accidents, submarine escapes and less frequently during exposure to very high altitude. People with known bronchogenic cysts should be informed about the risk of cerebral air embolism and surgical removal should be considered. Cerebral air embolism is a rare cause of coma and stroke in all activities with rapid air pressure changes, including alpine tourism, as our unfortunate tourist illustrates. PMID:20498190

  2. Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Leukemoid Reaction, Marantic Endocarditis, and Consumptive Thrombocytopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Joseph C.; Ireland, Charles S.; Scott, Richard N.

    1982-01-01

    This paper details the simultaneous occurrence of a severe leukemoid reaction, non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) (marantic endocarditis), and a consumptive thrombocytopathy without signs of micro-angiopathic hemolysis on peripheral blood smear in a patient with terminal metastatic, undifferentiated, large cell bronchogenic carcinoma. The case is presented and the condition is discussed in detail. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:6889655

  3. Intrapulmonary recombinant factor VIIa for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in children.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong A; Kim, Byoung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening pulmonary complication in patients with hematologic malignancies or autoimmune disorders, and it has a high mortality rate. The current treatment options of corticosteroids, transfusions, and immunosuppressants have been limited and largely unsuccessful, and they can be accompanied by multiple complications. Intrapulmonary administration of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) has been reported in adults, but there are scarce data on its use in children. The present article reviews our institutional experience with intrapulmonary rFVIIa for the treatment of DAH in children. The study included 6 pediatric patients with acute, bronchoscopically confirmed DAH treated between 2011 and 2013. The median age was 11 years, and patient diagnoses were as follows: acute myeloid leukemia (2 patients), myelodysplastic syndrome (1 patient), hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (1 patient), T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (1 patient), and idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (1 patient). These patients were treated with intrapulmonary rFVIIa concurrent with methylprednisolone, fresh-frozen plasma, and maintenance of the platelet count >50 000/mm(3). Complete and sustained hemostasis after rFVIIa treatment and an absence of adverse events were observed in all patients. The PaO2/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio increased significantly, and rapid clinical improvements were observed. Two patients who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation died of subsequent respiratory syncytial virus and Acinetobacter baumannii infections, but the other 4 patients exhibited rapid improvement, were successfully weaned from ventilators, and experienced long-term survival. Our findings indicate that intrapulmonary administration of rFVIIa is an effective and safe treatment option for children with DAH; however, further clinical studies are needed. PMID:25548333

  4. Intrapulmonary teratoma: Report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Dasbaksi, Kallol; Haldar, Suranjan; Mukherjee, Kaushik; Chakraborty, Ushnish; Majumdar, Pinaki; Mukherjee, Plaban

    2016-07-01

    Intrapulmonary teratomas are rare tumors that are presumed to develop in association with mediastinal teratomas. This report describes the management of a rare case of a benign cystic intrapulmonary teratoma in the left upper lobe in a 26-year-old lady, which was successfully treated by lobectomy, with no recurrence after 4 years of follow-up. PMID:25939909

  5. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses in humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: implications for cryptogenic stroke?

    PubMed

    Norris, H Cameron; Mangum, Tyler S; Kern, Julia P; Elliott, Jonathan E; Beasley, Kara M; Goodman, Randy D; Mladinov, Suzana; Barak, Otto F; Bakovic, Darija; Dujic, Zeljko; Lovering, Andrew T

    2016-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? Do individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses at rest or during exercise? What is the main finding and its importance? Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have a greater prevalence of blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses at rest than age-matched control subjects. Given that the intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses are large enough to permit venous emboli to pass into the arterial circulation, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and an elevated risk of thrombus formation may be at risk of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomosis-facilitated embolic injury (e.g. stroke or transient ischaemic attack). The pulmonary capillaries prevent stroke by filtering venous emboli from the circulation. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses are large-diameter (≥50 μm) vascular connections in the lung that may compromise the integrity of the pulmonary capillary filter and have recently been linked to cryptogenic stroke and transient ischaemic attack. Prothrombotic populations, such as individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may be at increased risk of stroke and transient ischaemic attack facilitated by intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses, but the prevalence and degree of blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses in this population has not been fully examined and compared with age-matched healthy control subjects. We used saline contrast echocardiography to assess blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses at rest (n = 29 COPD and 19 control subjects) and during exercise (n = 10 COPD and 10 control subjects) in subjects with COPD and age-matched healthy control subjects. Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses was detected in 23% of subjects with COPD at rest and was significantly higher compared with age

  6. Transbronchial needle aspiration in the staging of bronchogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Benov, E; Michev, K; Kostadinov, D; Vlasov, V

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of transbronchial needle aspiration biopsy (TBNA) for the diagnosis of mediastinal involvement, we have prospectively examined 316 patients with morphologically verified bronchogenic carcinoma. The percentage of positive aspirations (149 of 316) from the three basic lymph node groups in the mediastinum was not significantly different. Tumor cells were aspirated from the mediastinum in 75 of 112 patients with radiologically positive findings and in patients with 74 of 204 radiologically negative findings. Mediastinal involvement was verified even in 61 of 196 patients with a normal endoscopic picture. Metastases were proved in 14 of 39 patients with peripheral versus 135 of 277 patients with central carcinoma. Tumor cells were aspirated in 47 of 76 patients with undifferentiated small cell carcinoma, 92 of 227 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, and 10 of 13 patients with adenocarcinoma. Our results suggest that TBNA being a highly diagnostic and less invasive method, will prove its clinical importance. PMID:18493418

  7. Transbronchial Needle Aspiration in the Staging of Bronchogenic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benov, Emil; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Vlasov, Vesselin

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of transbronchial needle aspiration biopsy (TBNA) for the diagnosis of mediastinal involvement, we have prospectively examined 316 patients with morphologically verified bronchogenic carcinoma. The percentage of positive aspirations (149 of 316) from the three basic lymph node groups in the mediastinum was not significantly different. Tumor cells were aspirated from the mediastinum in 75 of 112 patients with radiologically positive findings and in patients with 74 of 204 radiologically negative findings. Mediastinal involvement was verified even in 61 of 196 patients with a normal endoscopic picture. Metastases were proved in 14 of 39 patients with peripheral versus 135 of 277 patients with central carcinoma. Tumor cells were aspirated in 47 of 76 patients with undifferentiated small cell carcinoma, 92 of 227 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, and 10 of 13 patients with adenocarcinoma. Our results suggest that TBNA being a highly diagnostic and less invasive method, will prove its clinical importance. PMID:18493418

  8. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  9. Mouse model for efficacy testing of antituberculosis agents via intrapulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Woolhiser, Lisa K; Brooks, Elizabeth; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Lenaerts, Anne J

    2012-07-01

    Here we describe an experimental murine model that allows for aerosolized antituberculosis drug efficacy testing. Intrapulmonary aerosol delivery of isoniazid, capreomycin, and amikacin to mice with pulmonary infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis demonstrated efficacy in reducing pulmonary bacterial loads similar to that seen by standard drug delivery methods, even when lower concentrations of drugs and fewer doses were used in the aerosolized drug regimens. Interestingly, intrapulmonary delivery of isoniazid also reduced the bacterial load in the spleen. PMID:22547626

  10. Palliative embolisation for intrapulmonary shunting in lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Joanne Yue-Ai; Walters, Darren L.; Poon, Karl; Zimmerman, Paul; Aldons, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma (LPA) (formerly known as bronchioalveolar carcinoma) has rarely been reported to cause refractory hypoxia with intrapulmonary shunting [1–7]. We describe a case who underwent the palliative strategy of intravascular right lower pulmonary artery embolisation with an 18 mm Amplatzer II vascular plug to reduce intrapulmonary shunting. This is the first report we are aware of using this minimally invasive procedure to treat this condition. PMID:26236621

  11. Effect of the peptide bronchogen (Ala-Asp-Glu-Leu) on DNA thermostability.

    PubMed

    Monaselidze, J R; Khavinson, V Kh; Gorgoshidze, M Z; Khachidze, D G; Lomidze, E M; Jokhadze, T A; Lezhava, T A

    2011-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters of DNA melting in the presence of a peptide bronchogen in various concentrations were estimated on a differential scanning microcalorimeter. Bronchogen was shown to serve as a DNA-stabilizing agent. Bronchogen increased the melting temperature of DNA from calf thymus and mouse liver by 3.1°C in a narrow range of r (molar ratio of bronchogen/DNA b.p., 0.01-0.055). A further increase in r was not accompanied by changes in the melting temperature. The complex melting enthalpy (ΔH(melt)) remained unchanged in this range of r (0.01-1.0). ΔH(melt) for DNA from the thymus and mouse liver was 11.4 and 12.7 cal/g, respectively. Our results indicate that bronchogen is not an adenine-thymine-specific or guanine-cytosine-specific ligand. The type of binding is considered as strong and occasional. The binding occurs with both strands of DNA (mainly with nitrogen bases). PMID:21240358

  12. Bronchogenic Carcinoma with Cardiac Invasion Simulating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anirban; Das, Sibes K.; Pandit, Sudipta; Karmakar, Rathindra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac metastases in bronchogenic carcinoma may occur due to retrograde lymphatic spread or by hematogenous dissemination of tumour cells, but direct invasion of heart by adjacent malignant lung mass is very uncommon. Pericardium is frequently involved in direct cardiac invasion by adjacent lung cancer. Pericardial effusion, pericarditis, and tamponade are common and life threatening presentation in such cases. But direct invasion of myocardium and endocardium is very uncommon. Left atrial endocardium is most commonly involved in such cases due to anatomical contiguity with pulmonary hilum through pulmonary veins, and in most cases left atrial involvement is asymptomatic. But myocardial compression and invasion by adjacent lung mass may result in myocardial ischemia and may present with retrosternal, oppressive chest pain which clinically may simulate with the acute myocardial infarction (AMI). As a result, it leads to misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis of lung cancer. Here we report a case of non-small-cell carcinoma of right lung which was presented with asymptomatic invasion in left atrium and retrosternal chest pain simulating AMI due to myocardial compression by adjacent lung mass, in a seventy-four-year-old male smoker. PMID:27042370

  13. Intrapulmonary shunt and SCUBA diving: another risk factor?

    PubMed

    Madden, Dennis; Ljubkovic, Marko; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory and field investigations have demonstrated that intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) may provide an additional means for venous gas emboli (VGE) to cross over to the arterial circulation due to their larger diameter compared to pulmonary microcirculation. Once thought to be the primary cause of decompression sickness (DCS), it has been demonstrated that, even in large quantities, their presence does not always result in injury. Normally, VGE are trapped in the site of gas exchange in the lungs and eliminated via diffusion. When VGE crossover takes place in arterial circulation, they have the potential to cause more harm as they are redistributed to the brain, spinal column, and other sensitive tissues. The patent foramen ovale (PFO) was once thought to be the only risk factor for an increase in arterialization; however, IPAVAs represent another pathway for this crossover to occur. The opening of IPAVAs is associated with exercise and hypoxic gas mixtures, both of which divers may encounter. The goal of this review is to describe how IPAVAs may impact diving physiology, specifically during decompression, and what this means for the individual diver as well as the future of commercial and recreational diving. Future research must continue on the relationship between IPAVAs and the environmental and physiological circumstances that lead to their opening and closing, as well as how they may contribute to diving injuries such as DCS. PMID:25693625

  14. Computed tomography evaluation of the adrenal gland in the preoperative assessment of bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.; Madrazo, B.L.; Gitschlag, K.F.; Gross, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    One hundred ten patients with proved bronchogenic carcinoma who were undergoing computed tomography (CT) of the thorax also underwent CT of the adrenals to determine the value of routine preoperative assessement of this gland. Sixteen adrenal masses were found in 11 patients. In five patients the adrenals were the only site of metastasis. CT of the adrenals should be performed routinely when the thorax is examined pre-operatively in patients with non-oat-cell bronchogenic carcinoma to improve patient selection for thoractomy.

  15. Mycobacterium avium lung disease combined with a bronchogenic cyst in an immunocompetent young adult.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Soo; Han, Joungho; Jung, Ki Hwan; Kim, Je Hyeong; Koh, Won-Jung

    2013-01-01

    We report a very rare case of a bronchogenic cyst combined with nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in an immunocompetent patient. A 21-year-old male was referred to our institution because of a cough, fever, and worsening of abnormalities on his chest radiograph, despite anti-tuberculosis treatment. Computed tomography of the chest showed a large multi-cystic mass over the right-upper lobe. Pathological examination of the excised lobe showed a bronchogenic cyst combined with a destructive cavitary lesion with granulomatous inflammation. Microbiological culture of sputum and lung tissue yielded Mycobacterium avium. The patient was administered anti-mycobacterial treatment that included clarithromycin. PMID:23346002

  16. Alcohol Ablation Therapy of an Atypically Located Symptomatic Bronchogenic Cyst: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lakadamyali, Hatice Ergun, Tarkan; Lakadamyali, Huseyin; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2007-11-15

    Bronchogenic cyst is a rare developmental lesion. It is usually asymptomatic and most frequently located in the middle mediastinum and lung parenchyma. It can cause symptoms only when infected or pressing on neighboring structures. The MRI findings in a 34-year-old woman with an 8 months history of back pain were evaluated and revealed a cystic lesion in the left paravertebral area. The histopathologic evaluation of the material aspirated with CT guidance was reported to be bronchogenic cyst. A simultaneous alcohol ablation was accomplished. After the procedure the patient's pain disappeared and the follow-up MRI scan 1 year later revealed no relapse. Paravertebrally located bronchogenic cysts are very rare and only 3 cases were found to be reported in the medical literature prior to this one. While aspiration alone is sufficient for diagnosis, it is insufficient to treat the lesion and prevent the recurrences. This paper reports a paravertebral bronchogenic cyst which was symptomatic despite of its small size. CT-guided aspiration was accomplished and simultaneous alcohol ablation was carried out to prevent recurrences.

  17. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed. PMID:27607320

  18. Relationship between angiogenic squamous dysplasia and bronchogenic carcinoma in patients undergoing white light bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Mohammadi, Forouzan; Khodadad, Kian; Sadr, Makan; Seyfollahi, Leila; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To better understand the characteristic morphology of angiogenic squamous dysplasia (ASD) and its association with different types of common bronchogenic carcinomas using routine white light bronchoscopy. METHODS: Using a case-control design, 186 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks of bronchial tissue (136 cases, 50 controls) obtained from patients who underwent routine nonfluorescence bronchoscopy between 2004 and 2005 were studied. RESULTS: ASD occurred at a higher frequency in patients with neoplastic lesions compared with those without neoplastic lesions (28 of 136 versus one of 50). ASD was also more prevalent in patients with squamous cell carcinoma compared with other neoplasms. Seventy six per cent of the ASD patients (22 of 29) smoked cigarettes. The morphology of ASD on hematoxylin and eosin- and CD31-stained sections was characterized by prominent microvasculature and capillary projections closely juxtaposed to variable degrees of dysplasia in all of the bronchogenic carcinoma specimens, and to metaplasia in one case in the control group. CONCLUSION: ASD is a unique morphological entity that should be considered by pathologists even on bronchoscopic biopsies from patients who undergo white light bronchoscopy. The presence of ASD may represent a risk biomarker of bronchogenic carcinoma in screening programs and in chemoprevention of lung cancer. PMID:22679613

  19. Successful treatment of an intrathoracic bronchogenic cyst in a Holstein-Friesian calf

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 5-½-month-old female Holstein-Friesian calf was presented with a history of recurring ruminal tympany and poor development. The absence of lung sounds on the right hemithorax suggested a right-sided intrathoracic pathology. Radiography and computed tomography revealed a large thin-walled cavernous lesion with a gas-fluid interface which almost completely filled the right thoracic cavity. Fluid aspirated from the lesion was clear, yellowish and odorless. These findings led to the diagnosis of a bronchogenic cyst. Thoracotomy was performed under general anesthesia. The cyst strongly adhered to the adjacent lung tissue. After removal of the free wall, the adjacent lung tissue was sealed using surgical stapling instruments, and the non-removable part of the wall was curetted and rinsed. The intensive postoperative management included antibiotic therapy, oxygen supplementation and regional lidocaine infusion. Anti-inflammatory drugs were administered for further pain control. The calf recovered well and was released from the clinic on postoperative day 11. Intra- or extrathoracic bronchogenic cysts result from abnormal budding during the embryonic development of the tracheobronchial system. Successful treatment of this calf despite the size of the lesion and the invasive character of the surgical intervention indicates that resection of bronchogenic cysts in cattle may be an option for valuable animals. PMID:23421871

  20. A Case Report of Esophageal Bronchogenic Cyst and Review of the Literature With an Emphasis on Endoscopic Ultrasonography Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Jun; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal bronchogenic cysts are extremely rare. Here we report a more rare type of both presence of intra- and paraesophageal bronchogenic cyst that was safely removed via surgical resection. A 31-year-old male patient with space-occupying lesions in the mediastinum suddenly presented with persistent chest pain for 2 days and then transferred to dysphagia >1 week. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) showed a hypoechoic cystic-solid mass arising from the muscularis propria and local hyperechoic area in the deeper portion of cyst, concomitant with a heterogeneous center and tube-like structure lesion in mediastinum. Turbid coffee color paste contents were aspirated inside the tumor under endoscopic ultrasonography guided-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A subsequent surgery was performed and histologic finding was diagnostic of esophageal bronchogenic cyst. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the cyst was positive for carbohydrate antigen 199 (CA199) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125). At a follow-up visit 3 months later, the patient had a regular diet and no complaint. This study is to summarize the clinical manifestations and EUS features of esophageal bronchogenic cyst by retrospectively reviewing the literature and simultaneously to provide guide for the correct examination scheme. The appearance of esophageal bronchogenic cyst can be great variation; EUS seems to be a valuable option for diagnosis and surveillance. PMID:26986156

  1. Intrapulmonary haematoma complicating mechanical ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bonmarchand, G; Lefebvre, E; Lerebours-Pigeonnière, G; Genevois, A; Massari, P; Leroy, J

    1988-01-01

    Intrapulmonary haematomas occurred during mechanical ventilation of two patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bullous dystrophy. In both cases, the haematomas were revealed by blood-stained aspirates, a fall in haemoglobin level, and the appearance of radiological opacities. Haematoma occurrence in the area of a bulla which recently has rapidly increased in size, suggests that the haematoma is due to the rupture of stretched vessels embedded in the wall of the bulla. PMID:3379188

  2. Reversibility of intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunts in liver cirrhosis documented by serial radionuclide perfusion lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.S.; Barnett, C.A.; Farrer, P.A.

    1984-05-01

    Using serial perfusion lung scans, the opening up and closure of right-to-left intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunts has been documented over a period of several weeks in a patient with chronic alcoholic liver disease. The presence of the shunts correlates well with the severity of hypoxemia and the presence of nodular mottling on chest radiographs. The time course of these changes with clinical status suggests lability and the functional nature of these shunts.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates in vivo intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1.

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, M. S.; Vaporciyan, A. A.; Miyasaka, M.; Tamatani, T.; Ward, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Lung injury following deposition of IgG immune complexes is neutrophil-dependent and requires both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and CD18. In the current studies, we have evaluated the relationship between TNF alpha and expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in vitro and in vivo. In both rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, TNF alpha induced an early (within 60 minutes) increase in ICAM-1 expression, followed by a peak at 6 to 8 hours, with relatively stable expression at 24 hours. Expression of E-selectin did not show the early phase (within 60 minutes) of up-regulation, peaked at 4 hours, and then declined thereafter. Using a radioimmunochemical assay in vivo, it was demonstrated that intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes caused a progressive increase in ICAM-1 expression in lung over an 8-hour period. In animals pretreated with antibody to TNF alpha, the intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1 was significantly reduced. These results were confirmed by immunoperoxidase analysis of lung tissue. It was also shown that airway instillation of TNF alpha caused up-regulation of ICAM-1 in lung. These data support the concept that deposition of IgG immune complexes in lung induces intrapulmonary up-regulation of ICAM-1 in a manner that is TNF alpha-dependent. Images Figure 2 Figure 7 PMID:7685152

  4. [Congenital thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-03-01

    Congenital thrombophilia is a thrombotic diathesis caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities in blood coagulation factors or their inhibitory factors associated with physiological thrombus formation. Patients with congenital thrombophilia often present with unusual clinical episodes of venous thrombosis (occasionally combined with pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism) at a young age and recurrence in atypical vessels, such as the mesenteric vein and superior sagittal sinus, often with a family history of this condition. Studies in Japan as well as in western countries have shown congenital thrombophilia to be caused by a wide variety of genetic abnormalities in natural anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S. However, there may still be many unknown causes of hereditary thrombosis. We recently reported a case of hereditary thrombosis induced by a novel mechanism of antithrombin resistance, that is, congenital thrombophilia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the coagulation factor prothrombin. PMID:27076244

  5. Congenital toxoplasmosis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital toxoplasmosis is a group of symptoms that occur when an unborn baby (fetus) is infected with the parasite ... Toxoplasmosis infection can be passed to a developing baby if the mother becomes infected while pregnant. The ...

  6. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  7. Congenital cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following birth defects: Chondrodysplasia syndrome Congenital rubella Conradi-Hünermann syndrome Down syndrome (trisomy 21) Ectodermal ... Images Eye Cataract - close-up of the eye Rubella syndrome Cataract References Dahan E. Pediatric cataract surgery. ...

  8. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fact that this disease can be cured with antibiotics if caught early, rising rates of syphilis among pregnant women in the United States have increased the number of infants born with congenital syphilis.

  9. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  10. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at birth. ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; ...

  11. Comparison of immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 168 strain in pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengcheng; Li, Yunfeng; Shao, Guoqing; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) 168 strain in the local respiratory tract in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: an intranasal immunization group, an intrapulmonary immunization group, an intramuscular immunization group and a control group. The levels of local respiratory tract cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6 in the early stage of immunization (P<0.01), local specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in nasal swab samples (P<0.01); and IgA- and IgG-secreting cells in the nasal mucosa and trachea were higher after intranasal vaccination (P<0.01) than in the control group. Interestingly, intrapulmonary immunization induced much stronger immune responses than intranasal immunization. Intrapulmonary immunization also significantly increased the secretion of IL-6 and local specific sIgA and the numbers of IgA- and IgG-secreting cells. The levels of IL-10 and interferon-γ in the nasal swab samples and the numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes in the lung and hilar lymph nodes were significantly increased by intrapulmonary immunization compared with those in the control group (P<0.01). These data suggest that intrapulmonary immunization with attenuated Mhp is effective in evoking local cellular and humoral immune responses in the respiratory tract. Intrapulmonary immunization with Mhp may be a promising route for defense against Mhp in pigs. PMID:25649413

  12. Comparison of immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 168 strain in pigs

    PubMed Central

    LI, Pengcheng; LI, Yunfeng; SHAO, Guoqing; YU, Qinghua; YANG, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) 168 strain in the local respiratory tract in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: an intranasal immunization group, an intrapulmonary immunization group, an intramuscular immunization group and a control group. The levels of local respiratory tract cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6 in the early stage of immunization (P<0.01), local specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in nasal swab samples (P<0.01); and IgA- and IgG-secreting cells in the nasal mucosa and trachea were higher after intranasal vaccination (P<0.01) than in the control group. Interestingly, intrapulmonary immunization induced much stronger immune responses than intranasal immunization. Intrapulmonary immunization also significantly increased the secretion of IL-6 and local specific sIgA and the numbers of IgA- and IgG-secreting cells. The levels of IL-10 and interferon-γ in the nasal swab samples and the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the lung and hilar lymph nodes were significantly increased by intrapulmonary immunization compared with those in the control group (P<0.01). These data suggest that intrapulmonary immunization with attenuated Mhp is effective in evoking local cellular and humoral immune responses in the respiratory tract. Intrapulmonary immunization with Mhp may be a promising route for defense against Mhp in pigs. PMID:25649413

  13. Mediastinal Bronchogenic Cyst With Acute Cardiac Dysfunction: Two-Stage Surgical Approach.

    PubMed

    Smail, Hassiba; Baste, Jean Marc; Melki, Jean; Peillon, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    We describe a two-stage surgical approach in a patient with cardiac dysfunction and hemodynamic compromise resulting from a massive and compressive mediastinal bronchogenic cyst. To drain this cyst, video-assisted mediastinoscopy was performed as an emergency procedure, which immediately improved the patient's cardiac function. Five days later and under video thoracoscopy, resection of the cyst margins was impossible because the cyst was tightly adherent to the left atrium. We performed deroofing of this cyst through a right thoracotomy. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery, and no recurrence was observed at the long-term follow-up visit. PMID:26434484

  14. Unusual mode of presentation of intrathoracic bronchogenic cyst: A double location

    PubMed Central

    Atoini, Fouad; Ouarssani, Aziz; Ouadnouni, Yassine; Smahi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    A 63 year old woman presenting chronic back pain and neuralgia had abnormal shadow on chest radiograph. She has a history of pulmonary tuberculosis treated in 1977. The chest-CT scan showed a soft tissue mass in the lower lobe of the right lung and a cystic mass in the paravertebral region. The patient had right lower lobectomy and complete excision of a paraoesophageal cyst. Both masses were bronchogenic cysts at histology. The patient had an uneventful discharge the seventh postoperative day. After 4 years and 7 months of follow-up with CT-scann, the patient was free of symptoms with no evidence of recurrent disease. PMID:27222776

  15. Unusual mode of presentation of intrathoracic bronchogenic cyst: A double location.

    PubMed

    Atoini, Fouad; Ouarssani, Aziz; Ouadnouni, Yassine; Smahi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    A 63 year old woman presenting chronic back pain and neuralgia had abnormal shadow on chest radiograph. She has a history of pulmonary tuberculosis treated in 1977. The chest-CT scan showed a soft tissue mass in the lower lobe of the right lung and a cystic mass in the paravertebral region. The patient had right lower lobectomy and complete excision of a paraoesophageal cyst. Both masses were bronchogenic cysts at histology. The patient had an uneventful discharge the seventh postoperative day. After 4 years and 7 months of follow-up with CT-scann, the patient was free of symptoms with no evidence of recurrent disease. PMID:27222776

  16. Pharmacokinetic and therapeutic efficacy of intrapulmonary administration of zoledronate for the prevention of bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Mozume, Takunori; Yanagi, Shin-Ichiro; Hasei, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Tetsushi; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Zoledronate, a third-generation nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, is a new therapeutic agent for the prevention of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Due to the poor oral absorption of zoledronate, the intravenous route has been the preferred method of administration. To evaluate whether the lung is a promising alternative route of zoledronate administration for the prevention of joint destruction in RA, we examined the pharmacokinetics, safety and therapeutic potential of zoledronate after intrapulmonary administration. The bioavailability of zoledronate was 55% after intrapulmonary administration in rats. In a collagen-induced RA mouse model, an intrapulmonary administration of zoledronate given 7 d before the 2nd collagen immunization effectively suppressed bone loss and joint destruction to a level similar to that achieved with intravenous injection at 21 d after the 2nd collagen immunization. Zoledronate only slightly affected lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 4 h after intrapulmonary administration of the therapeutic dose in rats. Moreover, zoledronate only slightly changed the plasma level of creatinine after intrapulmonary administration while creatinine significantly increased after intravenous injection of zoledronate in mice. These results indicate that the lung is a promising alternative route of zoledronate administration for the treatment and prevention of joint destruction in RA. PMID:26508267

  17. The impact of a novel lung gross dissection protocol on intrapulmonary lymph node retrieval from lung cancer resection specimens

    PubMed Central

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U.; Eke, Ransome; Sareen, Srishti; Leary, Cynthia; Coleman, LaShundra; Faris, Nicholas; Yu, Xinhua; Spencer, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although thorough pathologic nodal staging provides the greatest prognostic information in patients with potentially curable non-small cell lung cancer, N1 nodal metastasis is frequently missed. We tested the impact of corrective intervention with a novel pathology gross dissection protocol on intrapulmonary lymph node retrieval. Methods Retrospective review of consecutive lobectomy, or greater, lung resection specimens over a period of 15 months before and 15 months after training Pathologist's Assistants on the novel dissection protocol. Results 141 specimens were examined before and 121 specimens after introduction of the novel dissection protocol. The median number of intrapulmonary lymph nodes retrieved increased from 2 to 5 (p<.0001), and the 75th – 100th percentile range of detected intrapulmonary lymph node metastasis increased from 0 – 5 to 0 – 17 (p=.0003). In multivariate analysis, the extent of resection, examination period (pre- or post-intervention), and pathologic N1 (vs. N0) status were most strongly associated with a higher number of intrapulmonary lymph nodes examined. Conclusions A novel pathology dissection protocol is a feasible and effective means of improving the retrieval of intrapulmonary lymph nodes for examination. Further studies to enhance dissemination and implementation of this novel pathology dissection protocol are warranted. PMID:24866232

  18. Antedrug budesonide by intrapulmonary treatment attenuates bleomycin-induced lung injury in rats with minimal systemic adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Masayuki; Haramoto, Mari; Nakajima, Oumi; Yang, Liying; Hinotsu, Shiro; Yokohira, Masanao; Imaida, Katsumi; Kawakami, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroids are routinely used in patients with pulmonary fibrosis, yet they have several adverse effects. To improve this situation, we used an animal model of pulmonary injury and early fibrosis and investigated whether the combination of an intrapulmonary inhalation device with antedrug budesonide (BUD) administered to the lung had greater efficacy and fewer systemic adverse effects compared to long-acting dexamethasone (DEX). BUD or DEX was administrated either intrapulmonary or intravenously to bleomycin-treated rats. Anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects were evaluated according to inflammatory cell count, total protein concentration and soluble collagen concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The systemic immunosuppressive effects were also assessed by measuring body, spleen and thymus weight. BUD and DEX were compared with respect to their pharmacokinetic profiles in plasma and lung. Intrapulmonary treatment of BUD attenuates various inflammatory and early fibrotic indices with minimal systemic adverse effects compared with DEX. The area under the curve (AUC) of BUD by intrapulmonary spray was 6.6-fold higher than the AUC of DEX in the lung. This study suggests that antedrug BUD by intrapulmonary treatment has local anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects with minimal systemic adverse effects. PMID:20606314

  19. Cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin in the treatment of non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Evans, W K; Feld, R; DeBoer, G; Osoba, D; Curtis, J E; Baker, M A; Myers, R E; Quirt, I C; Pritchard, K I; Brown, T C; Kutas, G J; Blackstein, M E; Ottema, B; Millband, L

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and forty-three patients with unresectable non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma were treated with combination chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (CAP). Objective responses were seen in 27.5% of 131 evaluable patients. Response rates for squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell anaplastic carcinoma were 30.2% (13 of 43 patients), 28.0% (14 of 50), and 32.1% (nine of 28), respectively. The median survival time for responders with extensive disease was 33.0 weeks compared with 29.3 weeks for patients with stable disease and only 9.6 weeks for patients with disease progression. The survival advantage of patients responding to CAP relative to those who had disease progression during treatment is highly significant statistically (P = 0.0005). However, patients whose disease remained stable also had longer survival than those who had disease progression (P = 0.001), and their survival was not significantly different from that of responders (P = 0.19). The CAP chemotherapy regimen was generally well-tolerated, although acute gastrointestinal symptoms were common. Our results indicate that CAP chemotherapy can cause tumor regression in patients with non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma and may extend the survival of responding patients. PMID:7028256

  20. [Congenital syphilis].

    PubMed

    Tabák, Réka; Tabák, Adám; Várkonyi, Viktória

    2010-01-10

    Syphilis has been a re-emerging disease in the past few decades. As a consequence, the prevalence of congenital syphilis is expected to be on the rise. Maternal syphilis may be related to several pathologies, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or congenital syphilis in the child. Infants that acquire syphilis in utero are frequently asymptomatic, and the organ damage caused by the infection may be apparent only years later. Syphilis is a curable disease, and most of its complications in the infant can be prevented by screening and treating the mother. Every newborn potentially infected should be treated with penicillin immediately starting on the day of birth. PMID:20061233

  1. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  2. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." PMID:25726292

  3. Intrapulmonary delivery of ethyl pyruvate attenuates lipopolysaccharide- and lipoteichoic acid-induced lung inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Zoelen, Marieke A D; de Vos, Alex F; Larosa, Gregory J; Draing, Christian; von Aulock, Sonja; van der Poll, Tom

    2007-11-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP) is a stable pyruvate derivative that has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in various models of systemic inflammation including endotoxemia. We here sought to determine the local effects of EP, after intrapulmonary delivery, in models of lung inflammation induced by instillation via the airways of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a constituent of the gram-negative bacterial cell wall) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA, a component of the gram-positive bacterial cell wall). For this, we first established that EP dose dependently reduced the responsiveness of mouse MH-S alveolar macrophages and mouse MLE-15 and MLE-12 respiratory epithelial cells to stimulation with LPS or LTA in vitro. We then showed that intranasal administration of EP dose dependently inhibited tumor necrosis factor alpha release in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice challenged with either LPS or LTA via the airways. Moreover, EP reduced the recruitment of neutrophils into the bronchoalveolar space after either LPS or LTA administration. These data suggest that intrapulmonary delivery of EP diminishes lung inflammation induced by LPS or LTA, at least in part by targeting alveolar macrophages and respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:17577142

  4. In Vitro Evaluation of a Device for Intra-Pulmonary Aerosol Generation and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Naqwi, Amir A.; Dolovich, Myrna; Somani, Arif

    2015-01-01

    For infants born with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), liquid bolus delivery of surfactant administered through an endotracheal tube is common practice. While this method is generally effective, complications such as transient hypoxia, hypercapnia, and altered cerebral blood flow may occur. Aerosolized surfactant therapy has been explored as an alternative. Unfortunately, past efforts have led to disappointing results as aerosols were generated outside the lungs with significant pharyngeal deposition and minimal intrapulmonary instillation. A novel aerosol generator (Microjet™) is evaluated herein for intrapulmonary aerosol generation within an endotracheal tube and tested with Curosurf and Infasurf surfactants. Compared with other aerosol delivery devices, this process utilizes low air flow (range 0.01-0.2 L/min) that is ideal for limiting potential barotrauma to the premature newborn lung. The mass mean diameter (MMD) of the particles for both tested surfactants was less than 4 μm, which is ideal for both uniform and distal lung delivery. As an indicator of phospholipid function, surfactant surface tension was measured before and after aerosol formation; with no significant difference. Moreover, this device has an outside diameter of <1mm, which permits insertion into an endotracheal tube (of even 2.0 mm). In the premature infant where intravenous access is either technically challenging or difficult, aerosol drug delivery may provide an alternative route in patient resuscitation, stabilization and care. Other potential applications of this type of device include the delivery of nutrients, antibiotics, and analgesics via the pulmonary route. PMID:26884641

  5. Ventilatory and intrapulmonary chemoreceptor sensitivity to CO2 in the burrowing owl.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, D L; Faraci, F M; Fedde, M R

    1985-12-01

    We measured the ventilatory response of anesthetized, unidirectionally ventilated pigeons and burrowing owls to changes in intrapulmonary CO2 concentration and the static CO2 sensitivity of intrapulmonary chemoreceptors (IPC) in these species and the domestic goose. Compared with pigeons, burrowing owls showed a significantly reduced respiratory frequency and amplitude response to increases in FICO2 from 0.05 to 0.10, which corroborates similar findings in intact, awake individuals of the same species. The average static CO2 sensitivity of IPC in geese, pigeons, and burrowing owls, as reflected by the average slope of the linear regressions of receptor discharge frequency on ln(PICO2), was -7.96, -11.1 and -6.87 imp/sec . ln(PICO2), respectively. The sensitivities of individual receptors were normally distributed in geese and pigeons, but skewed in burrowing owls. Therefore, the median CO2 sensitivity [-5.50 imp/sec . ln(PICO2)] is a more appropriate measure of the typical CO2 sensitivity of IPC in burrowing owls. The static CO2 sensitivity of IPC in burrowing owls is the lowest reported for euthermic birds with a normal acid-base balance and may materially contribute to the blunted ventilatory response of these birds to the elevated CO2 levels they encounter in nature. PMID:3937191

  6. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure. PMID:26704658

  7. The importance of determining surgical indications in cases of lung cancer and interstitial pneumonia with multiple intrapulmonary lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yuki; Akiyama, Hirohiko; Kinoshita, Hiroyasu; Atari, Maiko; Fukuhara, Mitsuro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Uramoto, Hidetaka

    2015-01-01

    Introduction When considering treatment for pulmonary cancer complicated by interstitial pneumonia, the greatest problem is acute exacerbation. We report two cases of pulmonary cancer complicated by interstitial pneumonia in which multiple intrapulmonary lymph nodes were noted. Case presentations Cases 1 and 2 were 76- and 62-year-old males, respectively. Both cases were diagnosed as pulmonary cancer complicated by interstitial pneumonia, and upon chest CT, it was noted that, in addition to the primary lesions, there were multiple nodule shadows under the pleura in the lung lobe, which required identification in order to rule out lung metastasis. In Case 1, the pulmonary nodules were first resected during surgery and a swift diagnosis was made, determining them to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes, which were then operated on curatively. In Case 2, the patient underwent thoracoscopic observation during surgery, the shadows were diagnosed visually as intrapulmonary lymph nodes, and curative surgery was implemented. Discussion and conclusions The greatest problem in treating pulmonary cancer complicated with interstitial pneumonia is acute exacerbation, wherein, in the absence of any surgical indications, alternative treatment is limited. Thus, contra-indicating surgery for a patient due to a diagnosis of metastasis within the lungs, based only on nodule images, should be avoided. If nodules are noted in the area of the pleura, the possibility exists that these could be intrapulmonary lymph nodes, along with metastasis within the lung, and thoracoscopic surgery should be implemented proactively while keeping these in mind. PMID:26656149

  8. Preoperative CT evaluation of adrenal glands in non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.E. Jr.; Heaston, D.K.; Dunnick, N.R.; Korobkin, M.

    1982-08-01

    Preoperative chest computed tomographic (CT) scans in 84 patients with biopsy-proven non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma were reviewed. At least one adrenal gland was visualized in 70 of these. Evidence of a solid adrenal mass was present in 18 (14.5%) glands in 15 (21.4%) patients. Percutaneous needle aspiration under CT guidance confirmed metastatic malignancy in the four patients who were biopsied. Because the documented presence of adrenal metastases in non-small cell lung cancer makes surgical resection or local irradiation inappropriate, it is recommended that both adrenal glands in their entirety be specifically included whenever a staging chest CT examination is performed in patients with such tumors. Percutaneous needle biopsy for pathologic confirmation of the nature of solid adrenal masses discovered in this process is also useful.

  9. Purification of a protein associated with human bronchogenic squamous-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kelly, B S; Levy, J G

    1979-03-01

    A heteroantiserum raised in rabbits to extracts of human squamous-cell carcinoma of the lung which exhibited marked tumour specificity was used to monitor the fractionation and isolation of a tumour-associated component of the extract. KC1 extracts of pools of both normal lung and bronchogenic squamous-cell carcinoma were subjected to a series of purification steps involving acid precipitation, salting out, DEAE chromatography and preparative polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. At each stage, fractions were tested for their ability to react in the complement-fixation assay with the antiserum. A protein was ultimately isolated which did not appear to be present at detectable levels in an equivalent fraction of normal lung extract, reacted with the heteroantiserum, and appeared to be present in all extracts of squamous-cell carcinoma. PMID:465295

  10. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Overview What is congenital adrenal hyperplasia? Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH, is a disorder that affects the adrenal glands. The adrenal ...

  11. Transient Intrapulmonary Shunting in a Patient Treated With β2-Adrenergic Agonists for Status Asthmaticus

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Joseph E.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.

    2014-01-01

    Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVs) are large-diameter pathways that directly connect the arterial and venous networks, bypassing the pulmonary capillaries. Ubiquitously present in healthy humans, these pathways are recruited in experimental conditions by exercise, hypoxia, and catecholamines and have been previously shown to be closed by hyperoxia. Whether they play a role in pulmonary pathophysiology is unknown. Here, we describe IPAV recruitment associated with hypoxemia and right-to-left shunt in a patient with status asthmaticus, treated with agonists of the B2-adrenergic pathway. Our observation of IPAVs in a pediatric patient, mechanically ventilated with 100% O2, suggests that these pathways are recruited in clinically important circumstances and challenges the notion that IPAVs are always closed by alveolar hyperoxia. PMID:24639274

  12. Intrapulmonary schwannoma diagnosed with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Shinkai, Masaharu; Shinoda, Masahiro; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for further examination of a lung tumor. CT of the chest revealed a round, well-defined 2.4-cm nodule in S2, adjacent to right superior lobe bronchus. Endobronchial ultrasonography showed a well-defined, hypoechoic tumor with echogenic capsule and posterior acoustic enhancement. Diagnosis of schwannoma was confirmed from the specimen obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. She underwent tumorectomy due to the possibility of obstructive pneumonia. Pathology diagnosis from the surgical specimen was also schwannoma. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration and findings with endobronchial ultrasonography might be helpful in the diagnosis of intrapulmonary schwannoma. PMID:24907227

  13. Gas exchange and intrapulmonary distribution of ventilation during continuous-flow ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Vettermann, J.; Brusasco, V.; Rehder, K.

    1988-05-01

    In 12 anesthetized paralyzed dogs, pulmonary gas exchange and intrapulmonary inspired gas distribution were compared between continuous-flow ventilation (CFV) and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV). Nine dogs were studied while they were lying supine, and three dogs were studied while they were lying prone. A single-lumen catheter for tracheal insufflation and a double-lumen catheter for bilateral endobronchial insufflation (inspired O2 fraction = 0.4; inspired minute ventilation = 1.7 +/- 0.3 (SD) 1.kg-1.min-1) were evaluated. Intrapulmonary gas distribution was assessed from regional 133Xe clearances. In dogs lying supine, CO2 elimination was more efficient with endobronchial insufflation than with tracheal insufflation, but the alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference was larger during CFV than during CMV, regardless of the type of insufflation. By contrast, endobronchial insufflation maintained both arterial PCO2 and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference at significantly lower levels in dogs lying prone than in dogs lying supine. In dogs lying supine, the dependent lung was preferentially ventilated during CMV but not during CFV. In dogs lying prone, gas distribution was uniform with both modes of ventilation. The alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference during CFV in dogs lying supine was negatively correlated with the reduced ventilation of the dependent lung, which suggests that increased ventilation-perfusion mismatching was responsible for the increase in alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference. The more efficient oxygenation during CFV in dogs lying prone suggests a more efficient matching of ventilation to perfusion, presumably because the distribution of blood flow is also nearly uniform.

  14. Congenital Anomalies in Infant with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Zahra; Yavarikia, Alireza; Torabian, Saadat

    2012-01-01

    Objective Congenital hypothyroidism is characterized by inadequate thyroid hormone production in newborn infants. Many infants with CH have co-occurring congenital malformations. This is an investigation on the frequency and types of congenital anomalies in infants with congenital hypothyroidism born from May 2006-2010 in Hamadan, west province of Iran. Methods The Iranian neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism was initiated in May 2005. This prospective descriptive study was conducted in infants diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism being followed up in Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic of Besat Hospital, a tertiary care centre in Hamadan. Cases included all infants with congenital hypothyroidism diagnosed through newborn screening program or detected clinically. Anomalies were identified by clinical examination, echocardiography, and X-ray of the hip during the infant’s first year of life. Results A total of 150 infants with biochemically confirmed primary congenital hypothyroidism (72 females and 78 males) were recruited during the period between May 2006-2010. Overall, 30 (20%) infants had associated congenital anomalies. The most common type of anomaly was Down syndrome. Seven infants (3.1%) had congenital cardiac anomalies such as: ASD (n=3), VSD (n=2), PS (n =1), PDA (n=1). Three children (2.6%) had developmental dysplasia of the hip (n=3). Conclusion The overall frequency of Down syndrome, cardiac malformation and other birth defect was high in infants with CH. This reinforces the need to examine all infants with congenital hypothyroidism for the presence of associated congenital anomalies. PMID:23074545

  15. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  16. Congenital neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Evans, A. R.

    1965-01-01

    The clinical histories and post-mortem findings in five cases of neuroblastoma are described, and an account given of the microscopic characteristics of the tumours. In four of the cases the tumour was present at birth and was probably so in the fifth case. In only one case was the presence of the malignant tumour a significant factor in causing death. The differential diagnosis of such tumours is discussed. The accumulated evidence of many recorded cases suggests that neuroblastoma, becoming manifest in the early months or weeks of life, and congenital tumour, would be included in such a group, and has an appreciably better prognosis than has this same tumour when it becomes manifest in later childhood. The literature is briefly reviewed to illustrate this aspect of prognosis and possible reasons for it are indicated. Images PMID:14247705

  17. Congenital Cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Walker, David; Shinners, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Congenital cholesteatoma is one of the more common causes of the onset of childhood conductive hearing loss unrelated to middle ear effusion. If undiagnosed, the disease can progress to irreversibly destroy the conductive hearing architecture, as well as the surrounding skull base of the lateral temporal bone. When diagnosed early, the growth can be removed and the conductive hearing mechanism preserved in the vast majority of patients. Because most children are asymptomatic, the burden falls on primary care providers to perform pneumatic otoscopy and visualize all quadrants of the tympanic membrane even in young children who frequently resist attempts to conduct a thorough examination to rule out suspicious lesions. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e167-e170.]. PMID:27171804

  18. Congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    For most people, music, like language, is acquired effortlessly in early life. But a few percent of the population have lifelong difficulties in the perception and production of music. In this chapter we discuss psycho-acoustic and behavioral studies that have attempted to delineate the nature of the auditory perceptual deficits in this group and consider whether these difficulties extend outside the musical domain. Finally, we review structural imaging studies in this group which point to subtle anomalies in temporal and frontal areas. We suggest that amusia can be considered a disorder of neural development, which has relatively specific consequences at the behavioral level. Studies of congenital amusia provide a unique window on the neurocognitive architecture of music processing. PMID:23622169

  19. Congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Pankaj; Philip, Rajeev; Saran, Sanjay; Gutch, Manish; Razi, Mohd Sayed; Agroiya, Puspalata; Gupta, Keshavkumar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the one of the most common preventable cause of mental retardation. In the majority of patients, CH is caused by an abnormal development of the thyroid gland (thyroid dysgenesis) that is a sporadic disorder and accounts for 85% of cases and the remaining 15% of cases are caused by dyshormonogenesis. The clinical features of congenital hypothyroidism are so subtle that many newborn infants remain undiagnosed at birth and delayed diagnosis leads to the most severe outcome of CH, mental retardation, emphasizing the importance of neonatal screening. Dried capillary blood is used for screening and it is taken from heel prick optimally between 2 and 5 days of age. Blood spot TSH or thyroxine (T4) or both are being used for CH screening in different programs around the world. Neonates with abnormal thyroid screening tests should be recalled immediately for examination and a venipuncture blood sample should be drawn for confirmatory serum testing. Confirmatory serum should be tested for TSH and free T4, or total T4. Serum TSH and T4 undergo dynamic changes in the first weeks of life; it is important to compare serum results with age-normal reference ranges. Treatment should be started promptly and infant should be rendered euthyroid as early as possible, as there is an inverse relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and the age at diagnosis. Levothyroxine (l-thyroxine) is the treatment of choice and American academy of pediatrics and European society of pediatric endocrinology recommend 10-15μgm/kg/day as initial dose. The immediate goal of therapy is to normalize T4 within 2 weeks and TSH within one month. The overall goal of treatment is to ensure growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes as close as possible to their genetic potential. PMID:25729683

  20. Exercise-induced intrapulmonary shunting of venous gas emboli does not occur after open-sea diving.

    PubMed

    Dujić, Zeljko; Palada, Ivan; Obad, Ante; Duplancić, Darko; Brubakk, Alf O; Valic, Zoran

    2005-09-01

    Paradoxical arterializations of venous gas emboli can lead to neurological damage after diving with compressed air. Recently, significant exercise-induced intrapulmonary anatomical shunts have been reported in healthy humans that result in widening of alveolar-to-arterial oxygen gradient. The aim of this study was to examine whether intrapulmonary shunts can be found following strenuous exercise after diving and, if so, whether exercise should be avoided during that period. Eleven healthy, military male divers performed an open-sea dive to 30 m breathing air, remaining at pressure for 30 min. During the bottom phase of the dive, subjects performed mild exercise at approximately 30% of their maximal oxygen uptake. The ascent rate was 9 m/min. Each diver performed graded upright cycle ergometry up to 80% of the maximal oxygen uptake 40 min after the dive. Monitoring of venous gas emboli was performed in both the right and left heart with an ultrasonic scanner every 20 min for 60 min after reaching the surface pressure during supine rest and following two coughs. The diving profile used in this study produced significant amounts of venous bubbles. No evidence of intrapulmonary shunting was found in any subject during either supine resting posture or any exercise grade. Also, short strenuous exercise after the dive did not result in delayed-onset decompression sickness in any subject, but studies with a greater number of participants are needed to confirm whether divers should be allowed to exercise after diving. PMID:15845772

  1. Combined methotrexate and high-dose vincristine chemotherapy with radiation therapy for small cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Holoye, P.Y.; Libnoch, J.A.; Anderson, T.; Cox, J.D.; Byhardt, R.W.; Hoffmann, R.G.

    1985-04-01

    The addition of methotrexate to a previously described regimen of cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin (doxorubicin), and high-dose vincristine (VAC) was tested in 50 evaluable patients with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma. Prophylactic whole brain radiation therapy was given during the first chemotherapy course and consolidation radiation therapy was given to the mediastinum and primary site after achieving partial or complete remission. The addition of methotrexate did not improve the incidence of complete remission as compared to a previous regimen without it. The addition of radiation therapy improved the local control rate. The high-dose vincristine in this and a previous CAV study improved the incidence of complete remission in both limited and extensive disease presentation as compared with the authors previous experience and induced an acceptable and reversible neurotoxicity. Moderate dose consolidation radiotherapy to the lung primary and mediastinum was effective in improving local control. The distinction between limited and extensive disease was found to be vague, as 22% of the patients could be shifted from one group to the other depending on definition. The evaluation of the various staging procedures indicates that bone scan gave a small number of truly abnormal tests. Isotopic brain and liver-spleen scan could be duplicated by computerized axial tomography (CAT). CAT scan of abdomen disclosed unexpected extension to the retroperitoneal nodes and adrenals.

  2. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in locally advanced epidermoid bronchogenic carcinoma. A randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, M.G.; Minatel, E.; Veronesi, A.; Roncadin, M.; De Paoli, A.; Franchin, G.; Magri, D.M.; Tirelli, U.; Carbone, A.; Grigoletto, E. )

    1990-02-01

    Between June 1980 and December 1983, 111 patients with inoperable epidermoid bronchogenic carcinoma (limited disease) were entered into a randomized trial comparing radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin (doxorubicin), methotrexate, and procarbazine. Thirty-five of 62 (56.4%) patients treated with 4500 rad in 15 fractions in 3 weeks and 19 of 49 (38.8%) patients treated with the same radiation treatment and chemotherapy had an objective response. The difference in response rate was not significant (P = 0.900). Median time to progression was 5.9 and 7.02 months, respectively, for the radiation treatment and the combined treatment. Median survival was 11.74 and 10.03 months, respectively, without statistically significant differences between the two groups of patients. The toxicity was acceptable and no treatment-related death occurred in either treatment schedule. In this study no significant superiority of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment over radiation therapy alone was evidenced. Whether different chemotherapy regimens may prove more effective in this context should be clarified by further studies.

  3. [Inflammatory pseudopapilloma after recurring aspiration of fruit stones as rare differential diagnosis of bronchogenic cancer].

    PubMed

    Walther, J W; Kollmeier, J; De Zeeuw, J; Orth, M; Wiethege, A; Müller, K M; Schultze-Werninghaus, G; Rasche, K

    2002-07-01

    We present the case of a 51-year old man with drug-resistant pneumonia in the upper right lobe, weight loss and a 50-pack year history of cigarette smoking who underwent bronchoscopy. By clinical and radiological findings bronchogenic cancer was assumed. Fiberbronchoscopy showed an exophytic tumor-like mass obliterating the right upper lobe. Biopsies revealed an epithelial pseudopapillomatous tumor with multiple mucosal dysplasia and metaplasia. A second bronchoscopy in order to remove the lesion revealed a foreign body embedded in the tissue which could be removed easily. The foreign body proved to be a cherry stone, after its removal pneumonia resolved completely. In the same patient this lesion was recurrent one year later after aspiration of a grape seed. We present this case to emphasize the relationship between foreign body aspiration and inflammatory pseudopapilloma as a sequela of the inflammatory insult provoked by foreign bodies. Bronchoscopy is mandatory and may obviate misdiagnosis and thoracotomy. The use of inhaled and systemic steroids can be used to facilitate successful endoscopic extraction. PMID:12140798

  4. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Maynika V; LaFranchi, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) occurs in approximately 1:2,000 to 1:4,000 newborns. The clinical manifestations are often subtle or not present at birth. This likely is due to trans-placental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone, while many infants have some thyroid production of their own. Common symptoms include decreased activity and increased sleep, feeding difficulty, constipation, and prolonged jaundice. On examination, common signs include myxedematous facies, large fontanels, macroglossia, a distended abdomen with umbilical hernia, and hypotonia. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Thyroid dysgenesis accounts for 85% of permanent, primary CH, while inborn errors of thyroid hormone biosynthesis (dyshormonogeneses) account for 10-15% of cases. Secondary or central CH may occur with isolated TSH deficiency, but more commonly it is associated with congenital hypopitiutarism. Transient CH most commonly occurs in preterm infants born in areas of endemic iodine deficiency. In countries with newborn screening programs in place, infants with CH are diagnosed after detection by screening tests. The diagnosis should be confirmed by finding an elevated serum TSH and low T4 or free T4 level. Other diagnostic tests, such as thyroid radionuclide uptake and scan, thyroid sonography, or serum thyroglobulin determination may help pinpoint the underlying etiology, although treatment may be started without these tests. Levothyroxine is the treatment of choice; the recommended starting dose is 10 to 15 mcg/kg/day. The immediate goals of treatment are to rapidly raise the serum T4 above 130 nmol/L (10 ug/dL) and normalize serum TSH levels. Frequent laboratory monitoring in infancy is essential to ensure optimal neurocognitive outcome. Serum TSH and free T4 should be measured every 1-2 months in the first 6 months of life and every 3-4 months thereafter. In general, the prognosis

  5. The effects of nitroglycerin, norepinephrine and aminophylline on intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses in healthy humans at rest.

    PubMed

    Lozo, Mislav; Lojpur, Mihajlo; Madden, Dennis; Lozo, Petar; Banic, Ivana; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the effects of the intravenous infusion of nitroglycerin (NTG), norepinephrine (NE) and aminophylline (AMP) on the opening and recruitment of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) in healthy humans at rest. In ten volunteers saline contrast echocardiography was performed during administration of two doses of the NTG (3μgkg(-1)min(-1) and 6μgkg(-1)min(-1)) and NE (0.1μgkg(-1)min(-1) and 0.25μgkg(-1)min(-1)) as well as 30min following the administration of AMP at rate of 6mgkg(-1). Echocardiography was used to assign bubble scores (0-5) based on the number and spatial distribution of bubbles in the left ventricle. Doppler ultrasound was used to estimate pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Using a Finometer the following hemodynamic parameters were assessed: heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance as well as systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure. The most important finding from the current study was that nitroglycerin, norepinephrine and aminophylline in the applied doses were not found to promote IPAVA opening in healthy humans at rest. PMID:24802049

  6. Comparison of intrapulmonary chemoreceptor response to PCO2 in the duck and chicken.

    PubMed

    Hempleman, S C; Burger, R E

    1985-08-01

    Intrapulmonary chemoreceptors (IPC) in the burrowing owl are reported to be much less sensitive to PCO2 than IPC in the chicken. This blunted IPC sensitivity has been suggested to be a physiological adaptation to hypercapnic subterranean environments. To investigate the natural variation IPC responses in non-burrowing species, stimulus-response characteristics of 87 IPC in 22 anesthetized Pekin ducks were recorded and compared to those from 54 previously reported chicken IPC. Average logarithmic stimulus response curves were described by slopes of - 11.2 and - 10.7 imp X (sec X InPCO2)-1 for duck and chicken, respectively. Each had slopes steeper than the - 6.87 imp X (sec X InPCO2)-1 slope reported for the burrowing owl. As with chicken IPC, slopes and intercepts of the individual curves were highly correlated in the duck. It appears that a general mechanism of receptor transduction exists in birds, with some quantitative interspecies variation. PMID:3931192

  7. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad A; Afifi, Ashraf M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency present at birth. Babies with CH who are not identified and treated promptly develop severe mental retardation. Most of the babies with CH do not manifest the typical known signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, and this is most likely due to transplacental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone in addition to some residual neonatal thyroid function, as might be seen with thyroid hypoplasia, an ectopic gland, or mild dyshormonogenesis. Screening for CH has enabled the virtual eradication of the devastating effects of mental retardation due to sporadic CH in most developed countries of the world. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Permanent CH refers to a persistent deficiency of thyroid hormone that requires life-long treatment. Transient CH refers to a temporary deficiency of thyroid hormone that is discovered at birth but recovers to normal in the first few months or years of life. In the last several decades, there have been exciting advances in our understanding of fetal and neonatal thyroid physiology. In addition, advances in molecular biology have helped in understanding the early events in thyroid gland embryogenesis, mechanisms of thyroid action in the brain, the molecular basis for many of the inborn errors of thyroid hormonogenesis, and thyroid hormone action. However, many questions and challenges are still not answered. For example, the increasing numbers of surviving small and premature neonates with abnormalities in thyroid function need definite diagnostic criteria and whether they require medical therapy. Another challenge is the dilemma of finding the best screening methodology that is sensitive and cost effective. PMID:22570946

  8. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  9. Radiotherapy of bronchogenic carcinoma: analysis of a treatment schedule designed for use with hyperbaric oxygen. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Sause, W.T.; Sweeney, R.A.; Plenk, H.P.; Thomson, J.W.

    1981-07-01

    All cases of bronchogenic carcinoma treated with curative intent over an eight-year period were reviewed. Most were treated with 12 x 400 rad in 32 days using /sup 60/Co, a schedule designed to optimize the radiation-sensitizing properties of hyperbaric oxygen. While O/sub 2/ gave no obvious benefit, overall four-year survival was 10.6% and that of patients with good prognostic indicators was 18%. No radiation myelitis was observed. This protocol delivers an adequate tumor dose and appears to be tolerated well by most patients.

  10. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. A congenital ... rare. Symptoms A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the following: Brown ...

  11. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart disease is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Congenital heart disease (CHD) can describe a number of different problems affecting the heart. It is the most common ...

  12. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ACHA Search The futures of adults with congenital heart disease made brighter by their pasts Get Involved 2016 ... conference theme is "The Changing Landscape of Adult Congenital Heart Disease." Join Us Help us improve the quality of ...

  13. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  14. Congenital bronchial atresia: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqi; Dai, Weimin; Sun, Yu'e; Chu, Xiangyang; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively summarize the clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment of congenital bronchial atresia (CBA) in 12 patients. Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) images of 12 patients with CBA treated in the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital were reviewed. Analysis of chest radiographs revealed ten patients had hilar mass-like shadows and two had pneumonia-like shadows; most patients (n = 8) showed hyperlucency of the peripheral lung fields. CT revealed a mucocele in all the patients (n = 12); the mucoceles were round in four patients and club-like in eight. In 80% of the cases (n = 10), associated anomalies, including occlusions of the bronchus central to the mucocele, emphysematous changes of the peripheral lung fields, bronchogenic cyst, and anomalous branching of the bronchial tree and vascular structure were observed. CBA was detected in the right lobe in eight patients and the left lobe in the remaining four. No surgical intervention was performed in 5 CBA patients and the remaining 7 patients underwent surgery, including lobectomy in 5 patients and local resection in 2 patients. Among these 7 patients, 3 had a preoperative diagnosis of malignant disease, and the remaining 4 had severe clinical symptoms that could not be effectively treated by medicines. All patients were followed up, and none experienced obvious discomfort. CBA is a relatively rare and benign malformation disease. Chest CT is the procedure of choice for diagnosis. The presence of a bronchocele and surrounding emphysematous changes are typical radiologic findings in CBA. Surgery should be reserved only for patients with serious complications secondary to the atretic bronchus. PMID:22408569

  15. Congenital Bronchial Atresia: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqi; Dai, Weimin; Sun, Yu'e; Chu, Xiangyang; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively summarize the clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment of congenital bronchial atresia (CBA) in 12 patients. Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) images of 12 patients with CBA treated in the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital were reviewed. Analysis of chest radiographs revealed ten patients had hilar mass-like shadows and two had pneumonia-like shadows; most patients (n = 8) showed hyperlucency of the peripheral lung fields. CT revealed a mucocele in all the patients (n = 12); the mucoceles were round in four patients and club-like in eight. In 80% of the cases (n = 10), associated anomalies, including occlusions of the bronchus central to the mucocele, emphysematous changes of the peripheral lung fields, bronchogenic cyst, and anomalous branching of the bronchial tree and vascular structure were observed. CBA was detected in the right lobe in eight patients and the left lobe in the remaining four. No surgical intervention was performed in 5 CBA patients and the remaining 7 patients underwent surgery, including lobectomy in 5 patients and local resection in 2 patients. Among these 7 patients, 3 had a preoperative diagnosis of malignant disease, and the remaining 4 had severe clinical symptoms that could not be effectively treated by medicines. All patients were followed up, and none experienced obvious discomfort. CBA is a relatively rare and benign malformation disease. Chest CT is the procedure of choice for diagnosis. The presence of a bronchocele and surrounding emphysematous changes are typical radiologic findings in CBA. Surgery should be reserved only for patients with serious complications secondary to the atretic bronchus. PMID:22408569

  16. Congenital Intralabyrinthine Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sanjay; Prasad, Kiran; Azadarmaki, Roya

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma is presented. High-resolution computerized tomographic scans and intraoperative photomicrographs display features of intralabyrinthine extension. We discuss pathogenetic theories for the development of congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma. The distinction of this condition from congenital cholesteatoma with labyrinthine erosion is discussed. PMID:25057421

  17. Congenital sternoclavicular dermoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Willaert, Annelore; Bruninx, Liesje; Hens, Greet; Hauben, Esther; Devriendt, Koen; Vander Poorten, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    We report a case series of 8 patients, presenting with a congenital sinus in the region of the sternoclavicular joint. This rare malformation has only been reported in the Japanese dermatological literature under the name of "congenital dermoid fistula of the anterior chest region". It has to be distinguished from other congenital anomalies and requires complete excision. PMID:26810293

  18. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses in humans--response to exercise and the environment.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Andrew T; Duke, Joseph W; Elliott, Jonathan E

    2015-02-01

    Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) have been known to exist in human lungs for over 60 years. The majority of the work in this area has largely focused on characterizing the conditions in which IPAVA blood flow (Q̇IPAVA ) is either increased, e.g. during exercise, acute normobaric hypoxia, and the intravenous infusion of catecholamines, or absent/decreased, e.g. at rest and in all conditions with alveolar hyperoxia (FIO2 = 1.0). Additionally, Q̇IPAVA is present in utero and shortly after birth, but is reduced in older (>50 years) adults during exercise and with alveolar hypoxia, suggesting potential developmental origins and an effect of age. The physiological and pathophysiological roles of Q̇IPAVA are only beginning to be understood and therefore these data remain controversial. Although evidence is accumulating in support of important roles in both health and disease, including associations with pulmonary arterial pressure, and adverse neurological sequelae, there is much work that remains to be done to fully understand the physiological and pathophysiological roles of IPAVA. The development of novel approaches to studying these pathways that can overcome the limitations of the currently employed techniques will greatly help to better quantify Q̇IPAVA and identify the consequences of Q̇IPAVA on physiological and pathophysiological processes. Nevertheless, based on currently published data, our proposed working model is that Q̇IPAVA occurs due to passive recruitment under conditions of exercise and supine body posture, but can be further modified by active redistribution of pulmonary blood flow under hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions. PMID:25565568

  19. Effect of engineered nanoparticles on vasomotor responses in rat intrapulmonary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, Arnaud; Andujar, Pascal; Ladeiro, Yannick; Ducret, Thomas; Rogerieux, Francoise; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Baudrimont, Isabelle; Guibert, Christelle; Roux, Etienne; Canal-Raffin, Mireille; Brochard, Patrick; Marano, Francelyne; Marthan, Roger; Muller, Bernard

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary circulation could be one of the primary vascular targets of finest particles that can deeply penetrate into the lungs after inhalation. We investigated the effects of engineered nanoparticles on vasomotor responses of small intrapulmonary arteries using isometric tension measurements. Acute in vitro exposure to carbon nanoparticles (CNP) decreased, and in some case abolished, the vasomotor responses induced by several vasoactive agents, whereas acute exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2}NP) did not. This could be attributed to a decrease in the activity of those vasoactive agents (including PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, serotonin, endothelin-1 and acetylcholine), as suggested when they were exposed to CNP before being applied to arteries. Also, CNP decreased the contraction induced by 30 mM KCl, without decreasing its activity. After endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores depletion (by caffeine and thapsigargin), CaCl{sub 2} addition induced a contraction, dependent on Store-Operated Calcium Channels that was not modified by acute CNP exposure. Further addition of 30 mM KCl elicited a contraction, originating from activation of Voltage-Operated Calcium Channels that was diminished by CNP. Contractile responses to PGF{sub 2{alpha}} or KCl, and relaxation to acetylcholine were modified neither in pulmonary arteries exposed in vitro for prolonged time to CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP, nor in those removed from rats intratracheally instilled with CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP. In conclusion, prolonged in vitro or in vivo exposure to CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP does not affect vasomotor responses of pulmonary arteries. However, acute exposure to CNP decreases contraction mediated by activation of Voltage-Operated, but not Store-Operated, Calcium Channels. Moreover, interaction of some vasoactive agents with CNP decreases their biological activity that might lead to misinterpretation of experimental data.

  20. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses in humans – response to exercise and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Andrew T; Duke, Joseph W; Elliott, Jonathan E

    2015-01-01

    Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) have been known to exist in human lungs for over 60 years. The majority of the work in this area has largely focused on characterizing the conditions in which IPAVA blood flow (IPAVA) is either increased, e.g. during exercise, acute normobaric hypoxia, and the intravenous infusion of catecholamines, or absent/decreased, e.g. at rest and in all conditions with alveolar hyperoxia ( = 1.0). Additionally, IPAVA is present in utero and shortly after birth, but is reduced in older (>50 years) adults during exercise and with alveolar hypoxia, suggesting potential developmental origins and an effect of age. The physiological and pathophysiological roles of IPAVA are only beginning to be understood and therefore these data remain controversial. Although evidence is accumulating in support of important roles in both health and disease, including associations with pulmonary arterial pressure, and adverse neurological sequelae, there is much work that remains to be done to fully understand the physiological and pathophysiological roles of IPAVA. The development of novel approaches to studying these pathways that can overcome the limitations of the currently employed techniques will greatly help to better quantify IPAVA and identify the consequences of IPAVA on physiological and pathophysiological processes. Nevertheless, based on currently published data, our proposed working model is that IPAVA occurs due to passive recruitment under conditions of exercise and supine body posture, but can be further modified by active redistribution of pulmonary blood flow under hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions. PMID:25565568

  1. Relaxation of intrapulmonary artery and vein by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and cyclic GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Ignarro, L.J.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present study examines the relationship between tissue cyclic nucleotide levels and relaxation of bovine intrapulmonary arterial and venous smooth muscle in response to nitroglycerin, nitroprusside, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and isoproterenol. Recent studies have suggested that cyclic GMP may be involved in the relaxation of vascular smooth muscle produced by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and that S-nitrosothiols may act as intermediates of the latter agents. In the present study, nitroglycerin, nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine were more potent as relaxants of venous than arterial segments. Each of these agents elevated tissue cyclic GMP levels, but not cyclic AMP levels, before relaxation. These nitrogen oxide-containing agents were more potent as elevators of cyclic GMP levels in venous than arterial tissue and this correlated generally with their effects on vascular smooth muscle tone. Methylene blue antagonized both relaxation and increased cyclic GMP levels elicited by nitroglycerin, nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. In contrast to the nitrogen oxide vasodilators, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP was equally effective in reducing induced tone in arterial or venous segments. Similarly, isoproterenol relaxed arterial and venous segments with equivalent sensitivities. Relaxation by isoproterenol was preceded by or occurred concomitantly with increased levels of cyclic AMP but not cyclic GMP and both effects were antagonized by propranolol. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that vascular smooth muscle relaxation in response to nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators or isoproterenol may be mediated or modulated by the intracellular accumulation of cyclic GMP or cyclic AMP, respectively.

  2. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, methotrexate, procarbazine (camp) in 64 consecutive patients with epidermoid bronchogenic carcinoma, limited disease: a prospective study. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, M.G.; Tirelli, U.; De Paloi, A., et. al.

    1982-06-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients with inoperable epidermoid bronchogenic carcinoma (limited disease) were treated with radiotherapy to the primary and nodal areas and combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, methotrexate and procarbazine. The overall response rate (CR + PR) to combined treatment was 62%. The median survival time was 12.7 months. The toxicity was acceptable and no treatment-related death occurred.

  3. Sonographic detection of intrapulmonary shunting of venous gas bubbles during exercise after diving in a professional diver.

    PubMed

    Obad, Ante; Palada, Ivan; Ivancev, Vladimir; Valic, Zoran; Fabijanic, Damir; Brubakk, Alf O; Dujic, Zeljko

    2007-10-01

    We report a case of right-to-left intrapulmonary (IP) shunting of venous gas bubbles at a high level of exercise after diving. The diagnosis was made using a 4-chamber view of the heart via echocardiography during exercise. This case is the first in which we could find evidence of IP shunt recruitment during exercise after diving, and the bubble grade was the highest ever seen in our laboratory. Venous bubbles crossing over through IP shunts during exercise after diving is a very rare event. PMID:17676615

  4. Ginsenoside Rg1 enhances lymphatic transport of intrapulmonary silica via VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 signaling in silicotic rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Mao, Lijun; Guan, Li; Zhang, Yanlin; Zhao, Jinyuan

    2016-03-25

    Ginsenoside Rg1, extracted mainly from Panax ginseng, has been shown to exert strong pro-angiogenic activities in vivo. But it is unclear whether ginsenoside Rg1 could promote lung lymphangiogenesis to improve lymphatic transport of intrapulmonary silica in silicotic rats. Here we investigated the effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on lymphatic transport of silica during experimental silicosis, and found that ginsenoside Rg1 treatment significantly raised the silicon content in tracheobronchial lymph nodes and serum to reduce the silicon level in lung interstitium, meanwhile increased pulmonary lymphatic vessel density by enhancing the protein and mRNA expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3). The stimulative effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on lymphatic transport of silica was actively correlated with its pro-lymphangiogenic identity. And VEGFR-3 inhibitor SAR131675 blocked these above effects of ginsenoside Rg1. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 exhibits good protective effect against lung burden of silica during experimental silicosis through improving lymphatic transport of intrapulmonary silica, which is potentially associated with the activation of VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 signaling pathway. PMID:26920056

  5. Hypoxia, not pulmonary vascular pressure, induces blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Joshua C; Lovering, Andrew T; Ainslie, Philip N; Stembridge, Mike; Burgess, Keith R; Bakker, Akke; Donnelly, Joseph; Lucas, Samuel JE; Lewis, Nia CS; Dominelli, Paolo B; Henderson, William R; Dominelli, Giulio S; Sheel, A William; Foster, Glen E

    2015-01-01

    Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) is increased with exposure to acute hypoxia and has been associated with pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). We aimed to determine the direct relationship between blood flow through IPAVA and PASP in 10 participants with no detectable intracardiac shunt by comparing: (1) isocapnic hypoxia (control); (2) isocapnic hypoxia with oral administration of acetazolamide (AZ; 250 mg, three times a day for 48 h) to prevent increases in PASP; and (3) isocapnic hypoxia with AZ and 8.4% NaHCO3 infusion (AZ + HCO3–) to control for AZ-induced acidosis. Isocapnic hypoxia (20 min) was maintained by end-tidal forcing, blood flow through IPAVA was determined by agitated saline contrast echocardiography and PASP was estimated by Doppler ultrasound. Arterial blood samples were collected at rest before each isocapnic–hypoxia condition to determine pH, [HCO3–] and . AZ decreased pH (–0.08 ± 0.01), [HCO3–] (−7.1 ± 0.7 mmol l−1) and (−4.5 ± 1.4 mmHg; P < 0.01), while intravenous NaHCO3 restored arterial blood gas parameters to control levels. Although PASP increased from baseline in all three hypoxic conditions (P < 0.05), a main effect of condition expressed an 11 ± 2% reduction in PASP from control (P < 0.001) following AZ administration while intravenous NaHCO3 partially restored the PASP response to isocapnic hypoxia. Blood flow through IPAVA increased during exposure to isocapnic hypoxia (P < 0.01) and was unrelated to PASP, cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance for all conditions. In conclusion, isocapnic hypoxia induces blood flow through IPAVA independent of changes in PASP and the influence of AZ on the PASP response to isocapnic hypoxia is dependent upon the H+ concentration or . PMID:25416621

  6. Stability of Markers Used for Real-Time Tumor Tracking After Percutaneous Intrapulmonary Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Water, Steven van de; Levendag, Peter C.; Holt, Bronno van der; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the stability of markers used for real-time tumor tracking after percutaneous intrapulmonary placement. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with 44 lesions, 111 markers, and {>=}2 repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were studied. The tumor on the repeat CT scans was registered with the tumor on the planning CT scan. Next, the three-dimensional marker coordinates were determined on the planning CT scan and repeat CT scans. Marker stability was analyzed by the displacement of the markers and the displacement of the center of mass (COM) of the marker configurations. In addition, we assessed the reliability of using the intermarker distance as a check for displacements in the COM of the marker configurations. Results: The median marker displacement was 1.3 mm (range, 0.1-53.6). The marker displacement was >5 mm in 12% of the markers and >10 mm in 5% of the markers. The causes of marker displacement >5 mm included marker migration (2 of 13) and target volume changes (5 of 13). Nonsynchronous tumor and marker movement during breathing might have been responsible for the displacements >5 mm in the other 6 of 13 markers. The median displacement in the COM of the marker configurations was 1.0 mm (range, 0.1-23.3). Displacements in the COM of the marker configurations of {>=}2.0 mm were detected by changes in the intermarker distance of >1.5 mm in 96% of the treatment fractions. Conclusion: The median marker displacement was small (1.3 mm). Nevertheless, displacements >5 mm occurred in 12% of the markers. Therefore, we recommend the implantation of multiple markers because multiple markers will enable a quick and reliable check of marker displacement by determining the change in the intermarker distance. A displacement in the COM of the marker configuration of {>=}2.0 mm was almost always detected (96%) by a change in the distance between the markers of >1.5 mm. This enabled the displaced marker to be disabled, such that tumor localization

  7. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  8. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. A congenital ... A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the ... Hair Regular or uneven borders Smaller affected areas near the ...

  9. Congenital CMV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... CMV Babies Born with CMV (Congenital CMV Infection) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Detection and Intervention Helping Children With Congenital CMV Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  10. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  11. Effect of short-term organoid culture on the pharmaco-mechanical properties of rat extra- and intrapulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Christelle; Savineau, Jean Pierre; Crevel, Huguette; Marthan, Roger; Rousseau, Eric

    2005-11-01

    1 Organoid cultured explants from differentiated tissues have gained renewed interest in the undertaking of physiological and pharmacological studies. In the work herein, we examined the pharmaco-mechanical properties of an in vitro model consisting of organoid cultured rings derived from rat extra- and intrapulmonary arteries, over a period of 4 days in culture. 2 Mechanical changes were quantified using isometric tension measurements on both fresh and cultured pulmonary arterial tissues, with experiments performed in the presence or absence of 10% foetal calf serum. Conventional histochemical and immunofluorescent stainings were also performed to assess tissue structure integrity and apoptosis. 3 The explants developed spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRC) in approximately half of the vessels. SRC amplitude and time course were modified by conditions and agents acting on membrane potential (high-potassium solutions--levcromakalim, a potassium channel opener), while nitrendipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, suppressed SRC. 4 Cultured explants also developed a hyper-reactivity to high potassium challenges (10-40 mM). Whereas contraction to serotonin (5-HT) was enhanced in intrapulmonary arteries, contraction to endothelin-1 remained unchanged after 4 days of culture. Serum did not alter contractile properties during the culture period. 5 Endothelial-dependent relaxation was maintained in response to A23187 500 microM, but was abolished in response to 10 microM carbamylcholine. 6 Histological and immuno-histological analyses revealed the absence of hypertrophied vascular wall or apoptosis. 7 In conclusion, the contractile phenotype as well as tissue structure integrity of organoid explants remain essentially intact during short-term culture, making this model suitable for pharmaco-genomic studies. PMID:16151441

  12. Impact of catheter fragmentation followed by local intrapulmonary thrombolysis in acute high risk pulmonary embolism as primary therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Bishav; Aslam, Naved; Kumar Mehra, Anil; Takkar Chhabra, Shibba; Wander, Praneet; Tandon, Rohit; Singh Wander, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) with more than 50% compromise of pulmonary circulation results significant right ventricular (RV) afterload leading to progressive RV failure, systemic hypotension and shock. Prompt restoration of thrombolysis, surgical embolectomy, or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) prevents progressive hemodynamic decline. We report our single center experience in high risk PE patients treated with standard pigtail catheter mechanical fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary thrombolysis as a primary therapy. Methods 50 consecutive patients with diagnosis of high risk PE defined as having shock index >1 with angiographic evidence of >50% pulmonary arterial occlusion are included in the present study. All patients underwent emergent cardiac catheterization. After ensuring flow across pulmonary artery with mechanical breakdown of embolus by rotating 5F pigtail catheter; bolus dose of urokinase (4400 IU/kg) followed by infusion for 24 h was given in the thrombus. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded and follow up pulmonary angiogram was done. Clinical and echo follow up was done for one year. Results Pigtail rotational mechanical thrombectomy restored antegrade flow in all patients. The mean pulmonary artery pressure, Miller score, Shock index decreased significantly from 41 ± 8 mmHg, 20 ± 5, 1.32 ± 0.3 to 24.52 ± 6.89, 5.35 ± 2.16, 0.79 ± 0.21 respectively (p < 0.0001). In-hospital major complications were seen in 4 patients. There was a statistically significant reduction of PA pressures from 62 ± 11 mmHg to 23±6 mmHg on follow up. Conclusions Rapid reperfusion of pulmonary arteries with mechanical fragmentation by pigtail catheter followed by intrapulmonary thrombolysis results in excellent immediate and intermediate term outcomes in patients presenting with high risk pulmonary embolism. PMID:24973834

  13. Congenital myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nizamani, Noor Bakht; Talpur, Khalid Iqbal; Memon, Mariya Nazish

    2013-07-01

    Congenital myasthenia gravis is caused by genetic mutations affecting neuromuscular transmission, characterized by muscle weakness usually starting in childhood. A two and a half years old male child presented with bilateral ptosis and hoarseness of voice. The symptoms progressed giving the clinical impression of congenital myasthenia gravis. A series of tests were done including Ice Pack Test, acetylcholine receptor antibody test, trial of steroids and finally neostigmine test which confirmed the diagnosis. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing congenital myasthenia gravis and highlights the potential benefits of neostigmine test in its diagnosis. PMID:23823963

  14. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  15. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  16. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  17. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract. PMID:27043388

  18. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  19. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with one or more heart defects has congenital heart disease . Surgery is needed if the defect could harm ... 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  20. Impact of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... complex lesions, limitations are common. Some children with congenital heart disease have developmental delay or other learning difficulties. What ... defects? Successful treatment requires highly specialized care. Severe congenital heart disease requires extensive financial resources both in and out ...

  1. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. PMID:27301600

  2. Congenital hyperinsulinism with hyperammonaemia

    PubMed Central

    Pschibul, Alex; Müller, Jörg; Fahnenstich, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism is considered to be the most frequent cause of persistent recurrent hypoglycaemia in infants. The clinical presentation and response to pharmacological treatment may vary significantly depending on the underlying pathology. We report a case of a female infant with mild but early onset of recurrent hypoglycaemia. Metabolic workup revealed hyperinsulinism combined with mild hyperammonaemia as well as elevation of α-ketoglutarate in urine. Genetic testing demonstrated a de novo mutation in exon 7 of the glutamate dehydrogenase gene on chromosome 10. Episodes of hypoglycaemia responded to treatment with diazoxide. The differential diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of congenital hyperinsulinism is discussed. PMID:22315648

  3. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  4. Congenital midline nasofrontal masses.

    PubMed

    Saettele, Megan; Alexander, Alan; Markovich, Brian; Morelli, John; Lowe, Lisa H

    2012-09-01

    Congenital midline nasal masses are uncommon anomalies including nasal dermoids/epidermoids, nasal glial heterotopias and encephaloceles. These lesions can occur at the nasal bridge, extend intranasally and have intracranial extension with communication to the subarachnoid space. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of these lesions is critically important for presurgical planning and prevention of potentially fatal complications. Neuroimaging is essential in the evaluation of congenital midline nasal masses to identify the specific type of lesion, evaluate for the presence of intracranial extension and allow for appropriate presurgical planning. PMID:22648391

  5. Congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-07-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  6. Congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  7. Intrapulmonary aquaporin-5 expression as a possible biomarker for discriminating smothering and choking from sudden cardiac death: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-07-10

    The diagnosis of mechanical asphyxia as a cause of death, especially smothering and choking lacking evident injury, is one of the most difficult tasks in forensic pathology. The present study investigated the intrapulmonary expressions of aquaporins (AQPs; AQP-1 and AQP-5), as markers of water homeostasis, in forensic autopsy cases (total n=64, within 48 h postmortem) of mechanical asphyxiation due to neck compression (strangulation, n=24), including manual/ligature strangulation (n=12) and atypical hanging (n=12), smothering (n=7) and choking (n=8), compared with sudden cardiac death (n=14) and acute brain injury (n=11). Quantification of mRNA using a Taqman real-time PCR assay system demonstrated suppressed expression of AQP-5, but not AQP-1, in smothering and choking, compared with that in strangulation as well as sudden cardiac death and acute brain injury death. Immunostaining of AQP-5 was weakly detected in a linear pattern in the type I alveolar epithelial cells in smothering and choking cases, while cardiac and brain injury death showed marked positivity, and most strangulation cases had AQP-5-positive granular aggregates and fragments in intra-alveolar spaces. These observations indicate a partial difference in pulmonary molecular pathology among these causes of death, suggesting a procedure for possible discrimination of smothering and choking from sudden cardiac death. PMID:22421325

  8. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  9. Congenital alopecia universalis.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, P K; Laha, N N

    1989-09-01

    A case of congenital alopecia universalis without any other ectodermal defect and mental abnormality is described in a girl of eight years. There was no family history in any of the members. The child was born of a non-consanguineous marriage. PMID:2632563

  10. OPERATION FOR CONGENITAL CATARACT

    PubMed Central

    Barkan, Otto

    1949-01-01

    The traditional treatment of needling or discission of congenital cataract or membrane is open to many serious objections. Removal of the cataract by a modified form of linear extraction is recommended. The technique, with recent improvements which further assure extraction without hazard in early infancy, is described. PMID:18125222

  11. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  12. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  13. Chemoimmunotherapy of small cell bronchogenic carcinoma with VP-16-213, ifosfamide, vincristine, adriamycin, and Corynebacterium parvum

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivieso, M.; Tenczynski, T.F.; Rodriguez, V.; Burgess, M.A.; Mountain, C.F.; Barkley, H.T. Jr.; Hersh, E.M.; Bodey, G.P.

    1981-07-15

    Thirty-five consecutive patients with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma (SCBC) received chemoimmunotherapy with VP-16-213, Ifosfamide, vincristine, Adriamycin, and Corynebacterium parvum. Of 33 evaluable patients, 26 (79%) responded with complete (55%) or partial (24%) remissions. Complete remissions were more common among patients with limited disease (11/14 patients, 79%) compared with those with extensive disease (7/19 patients, 37%) and among patients (11/14 patients, 79%) compared with those with extensive disease (7/19 patients, 37%) and among patients who were ambulatory prior to therapy (16/25 patients, 64%) compared with those who were nonambulatory (2/8 patients, 25%). Myelosuppression consisted primarily of neutropenia. Eight percent of the treatment courses in 29% of the patients were associated with hematuria and/or documented episodes of infection during neutropenia. There were three deaths possibly related to treatment, in two of which there was no evidence of disease at post-mortem examination. Six patients relapsed in the central nervous system (CNS). In four instances, CNS relapse was the only site of tumor progression. Central nervous system relapse was more common among evaluable patients who did not receive prophylactic brain irradiation (5/17 patients, 29%, vs. 1/15 patients, 7%; P . 0.23). The median survival duration for all patients was 63 weeks, being slightly longer for patients with limited disease than for those with extensive disease (70.9 weeks vs. 56 weeks; P . 0.18). This was also true for patients who achieved complete rather than partial remissions (71 weeks vs. 50 weeks; P . 0.09). Patients receiving prophylactic brain irradiation experienced longer survival (100.8 weeks vs. 48 weeks; P . 0.01).

  14. Identification of Independent Primary Tumors and Intrapulmonary Metastases Using DNA Rearrangements in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen J.; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Harris, Faye R.; Halling, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Sarah H.; Terra, Simone; Drucker, Travis M.; Asiedu, Michael K.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Yi, Eunhee S.; Peikert, Tobias; Yang, Ping; Vasmatzis, George; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Distinguishing independent primary tumors from intrapulmonary metastases in non–small-cell carcinoma remains a clinical dilemma with significant clinical implications. Using next-generation DNA sequencing, we developed a chromosomal rearrangement–based approach to differentiate multiple primary tumors from metastasis. Methods Tumor specimens from patients with known independent primary tumors and metastatic lesions were used for lineage test development, which was then applied to multifocal tumors. Laser capture microdissection was performed separately for each tumor. Genomic DNA was isolated using direct in situ whole-genome amplification methodology, and next-generation sequencing was performed using an Illumina mate-pair library protocol. Sequence reads were mapped to the human genome, and primers spanning the fusion junctions were used for validation polymerase chain reaction. Results A total of 41 tumor samples were sequenced (33 adenocarcinomas [ADs] and eight squamous cell carcinomas [SQCCs]), with a range of three to 276 breakpoints per tumor identified. Lung tumors predicted to be independent primary tumors based on different histologic subtype did not share any genomic rearrangements. In patients with lung primary tumors and paired distant metastases, shared rearrangements were identified in all tumor pairs, emphasizing the patient specificity of identified breakpoints. Multifocal AD and SQCC samples were reviewed independently by two pulmonary pathologists. Concordance between histology and genomic data occurred in the majority of samples. Discrepant tumor samples were resolved by genome sequencing. Conclusion A diagnostic lineage test based on genomic rearrangements from mate-pair sequencing demonstrates promise for distinguishing independent primary from metastatic disease in lung cancer. PMID:25385739

  15. Short term exposure to NO sup 2 decreases intrapulmonary killing of Mycoplasma pulmonis by damaging alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.K.; Davidson, M.K.; Schoeb, T.R.; Lindsey, J.R. Veteran Administration Medical Center, Birmingham, AL )

    1991-03-11

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of pathogen free C57BL/6N mice to 5 or 10 ppm of NO{sub 2} increased severity of murine respiratory mycoplasmosis and that this effect was associated with decreased intrapulmonary killing (IPK) of Mycoplasma pulmonis (MP). The purposes of the present studies were to titrate the NO{sub 2} effect and to determine if the changes in IPK were due to the effects of NO{sub 2} on alveolar macrophages. Exposure to less than 5 ppm NO{sub 2} had no effect on IPK of MP. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells killed MP in vitro only if they were allowed to associate with mycoplasmas in vivo. Prior exposure to NO{sub 2} abrogated killing in this in vivo-in vitro model. Exposure to NO{sub 2} did not increase the protein content of BAL within 24 hours. Greater than 95% of the BAL cells were macrophages, and greater than 98% of the cell-associated mycoplasmas were on or in alveolar macrophages. Immediately after exposure, viability of alveolar macrophages, as measured by trypan blue exclusion and fluorescein diacetate uptake, was 89 {plus minus} 4% and 88 {plus minus} 4% in the control group, respectively; 56 {plus minus} 19% and 64 {plus minus} 11% in the group receiving MP alone; 23 {plus minus} 7% and 48 {plus minus} 9% in the group receiving 10 ppm NO{sub 2}; and 16 {plus minus} 6% and 25 {plus minus} 6% in the group receiving both MP and NO{sub 2} exposures. Viability was significantly decreased following exposure to 5 or 10 ppm NO{sub 2}, but not following exposure to 2 ppm. Viability did not return to normal until 7 days after exposure to NO{sub 2}, at which time IPK also returned to normal. The cellular target of NO{sub 2} exposure in relation to IPK of MP appears to be the alveolar macrophage.

  16. A methodological approach for quantifying and characterizing the stability of agitated saline contrast: implications for quantifying intrapulmonary shunt.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Heather K; Boulet, Lindsey M; Dominelli, Paolo B; Foster, Glen E

    2016-08-01

    Agitated saline contrast echocardiography is often used to determine blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (Q̇IPAVA). We applied indicator dilution theory to time-acoustic intensity curves obtained from a bolus injection of hand-agitated saline contrast to acquire a quantitative index of contrast mass. Using this methodology and an in vitro model of the pulmonary circulation, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of transit time and gas composition [air vs. sulphur hexafluoride (SF6)] on contrast conservation between two detection sites separated by a convoluted network of vessels. We hypothesized that the contrast lost between the detection sites would increase with transit times and be reduced by using contrast bubbles composed of SF6 Changing the flow and/or reducing the volume of the circulatory network manipulated transit time. Contrast conservation was measured as the ratio of outflow and inflow contrast masses. For air, 53.2 ± 3.4% (SE) of contrast was conserved at a transit time of 9.25 ± 0.02 s but dropped to 16.0 ± 1.0% at a transit time of 10.17 ± 0.06 s. Compared with air, SF6 contrast conservation was significantly greater (P < 0.05) with 114.3 ± 2.9% and 73.7 ± 3.3% of contrast conserved at a transit time of 10.39 ± 0.02 s and 13.46 ± 0.04 s, respectively. In summary, time-acoustic intensity curves can quantify agitated saline contrast, but loss of contrast due to bubble dissolution makes measuring Q̇IPAVA across varying transit time difficult. Agitated saline composed of SF6 is stabilized and may be a suitable alternative for Q̇IPAVA measurement. PMID:27365283

  17. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Deshingkar, S A; Barpande, S R; Bhavthankar, J D

    2011-07-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  18. Congenital hemophagocytic reticulosis.

    PubMed

    Koto, A; Morecki, R; Santorineou, M

    1976-04-01

    A fatal case of an apparently congenital form of hemophagocytic reticulosis is reported. The onset was manifested by hyperbilirubinemia and hepatosplenomegaly which were present at birth and persisted throughout life. Fever, anemia and pancytopenia developed at 1 month of age and became progressively worse. A splenectomy was performed at the age of 3 months, but the child died one day later with disseminated intravascular coagulation and pulmonary hemorrhage. The literature is reviewed with regard to the relationship of this case to (familial) hemophagocytic reticulosis and malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis). It is suggested that congenital hemophagocytic reticulosis, as described here, (familial) hemophagocytic reticulosis in infants, and malignant histiocytosis in adults all represent the same basic disorder with different ages of onset and clinicopathologic manifestations. PMID:1266810

  19. Update on congenital glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Anil K; Chakrabarti, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Congenital glaucoma is a global problem and poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. A detailed evaluation under general anesthesia is advisable to establish the diagnosis and plan for management. Medical therapy has a limited role and surgery remains the primary therapeutic modality. While goniotomy or trabeculotomy ab externo is valuable in the management of congenital glaucoma, primary combined trabeculotomy–trabeculectomy offers the best hope of success in advanced cases. Trabeculectomy with antifibrotic agent and glaucoma drainage devices has a role in the management of refractory cases, and cyclodestructive procedures should be reserved for patients where these procedures have failed. Early diagnosis, prompt therapeutic intervention and proper refractive correction are keys to success. Management of residual vision and visual rehabilitation should be an integral part of the management of children with low vision and lifelong follow-up is a must. PMID:21150027

  20. Congenital scoliosis - Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ujjwal K; Goel, Vivek; Harshavardhana, Nanjanduppa; Webb, John K

    2010-04-01

    Congenital spinal vertebral anomalies can present as scoliosis or kyphosis or both. The worldwide prevalence of the vertebral anomalies is 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. Vertebral anomalies can range from hemi vertebrae (HV) which may be single or multiple, vertebral bar with or without HV, block vertebrae, wedge shaped or butterfly vertebrae. Seventy per cent of congenital vertebral anomalies result in progressive deformities. The risk factors for progression include: type of defect, site of defect (junctional regions) and patient's age at the time of diagnosis. The key to success in managing these spinal deformities is early diagnosis and anticipation of progression. One must intervene surgically to halt the progression of deformity and prevent further complications associated with progressive deformity. Planning for surgery includes a preoperative MRI scan to rule out spinal anomalies such as diastematomyelia. The goals of surgical treatment for congenital spinal deformity are to achieve a straight growing spine, a normal standing sagittal profile, and a short fusion segment. The options of surgery include in situ fusion, convex hemi epiphysiodesis and hemi vertebra excision. These basic surgical procedures can be combined with curve correction, instrumentation and short segment fusion. Most surgeons prefer posterior (only) surgery for uncomplicated HV excision and short segment fusion. These surgical procedures can be performed through posterior, anterior or combined approaches. The advocates of combined approaches suggest greater deformity correction possibilities with reduced incidence of pseudoarthrosis and minimize crankshaft phenomenon. We recommend posterior surgery for curves involving only an element of kyphosis or modest deformity, whereas combined anterior and posterior approach is indicated for large or lordotic deformities. In the last decade, the use of growing rods and vertebral expandable prosthetic titanium rib has improved the armamentarium of the

  1. Congenital midline cervical cleft.

    PubMed

    Agag, Richard; Sacks, Justin; Silver, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare disorder of the ventral neck that is clinically evident at birth and must be differentiated from the more common thyroglossal duct cyst. The case of CMCC presented here was associated with chromosomes 13/14 de novo Robertsonian translocations as well as midline deformities including a sacral tuft and a minor tongue-tie. The case is presented as well as discussion of histopathology, embryology, and surgical treatment. PMID:17214531

  2. Other congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Cobbett, J R

    1974-06-29

    The plastic surgeon is not a miracle worker, as so many of his patients believe. Nevertheless, he can do much to minimize the functional and cosmetic effect of many congenital deformities. If a moral can be drawn from this article it must be that the plastic surgeon should be given an early opportunity to see and assess the patients described here, if only to ease the anxiety in the minds of their parents by appropriate reassurance and discussion. PMID:4853507

  3. Congenital Cataract Screening.

    PubMed

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  4. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  5. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital hepatic fibrosis congenital hepatic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the liver that is ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registry: Leber congenital amaurosis 9 National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis These resources from MedlinePlus ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  8. The Clinical Use of Genomic Profiling to Distinguish Intrapulmonary Metastases From Synchronous Primaries in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Samuel J; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Costa, Daniel B; VanderLaan, Paul A; Sanford, Eric M; Schrock, Alexa; Gay, Laurie; Ali, Siraj M; Miller, Vincent A

    2015-09-01

    The ability to reliably distinguish synchronous primary non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from intrapulmonary metastatic spread affects staging and treatment decisions in resected NSCLC. Adjuvant therapy for early-stage NSCLC is complicated and recommendations are primarily based on older data from trials that used now-outdated staging systems. Patients found to have 2 tumors with similar morphology in the same lobe are currently staged as pathologic T3 (pT3) but such cases represent a minority of patients in adjuvant lung cancer trials. Potentially more precise than tumor morphology alone, comprehensive genomic profiling technologies have the power to discriminate whether tumors in the same lobe represent 2 separate primary lesions or localized spread of a single lesion. In addition to lineage insights, tumor profiling simultaneously provides information on actionable genomic alterations. In this review we discuss the data that support the ability of molecular technologies to distinguish synchronous primary tumors from intrapulmonary metastases and discuss the use of molecular assays as an adjunct to current staging systems. Two cases are presented to highlight the potential immediate clinical implications of comprehensive genomic profiling. PMID:25911330

  9. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy. PMID:26886341

  10. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  11. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  12. [Congenital myasthenic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Araga, Shigeru

    2008-06-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are rare heterogeneous disorders in which neuromuscular transmission is compromised by one or more specific mechanisms. CMS are clinically diagnosed by a history of fatigability and muscle weakness since infancy or early childhood, a decremental EMG response and the absence of acetylcholine receptor antibodies. CMS form a heterogeneous group of disorders which are classified as originating from presynaptic, synaptic or postsynaptic defects. Molecular genetic studies reveal a various type of mutations in synapse-associated genes. However, the genetic abnormalities of many CMS are still unresolved. This article outlines the classification of CMS and etiology of individual forms. PMID:18540366

  13. Precalcaneal Congenital Fibrolipomatous Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Hye; Park, Oun-Jae; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Won, Chong-Hyun; Chang, Sung-Eun; Choi, Jee-Ho; Moon, Kee-Chan

    2011-01-01

    Precalcaneal congenital fibrolipomatous hamartomas (PCFHs) are characterized clinically by the presence of unilateral or bilateral, asymptomatic nodules in the medial precalcaneal plantar region of the heel. They are skin colored and usually painless nodules. In most patients, the lesions appear within the first few months of life, but they may also be present at birth. Generally PCFHs are benign, but they can grow in proportion to the growth of the infants. Here, we report the case of a 4-month-old boy with a solitary, localized skin-colored nodule on the precalcaneal plantar region of his right heel, diagnosed as a PCFH. PMID:21738373

  14. Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Witchel, Selma Feldman; Azziz, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) due to P450c21 (21-hydroxylase deficiency) is a common autosomal recessive disorder. This disorder is due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which is located at chromosome 6p21. The clinical features predominantly reflect androgen excess rather than adrenal insufficiency leading to an ascertainment bias favoring diagnosis in females. Treatment goals include normal linear growth velocity and “on-time” puberty in affected children. For adolescent and adult women, treatment goals include regularization of menses, prevention of progression of hirsutism, and fertility. This paper will review key aspects regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of NCAH. PMID:20671993

  15. Congenital nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Begolli, Mirije; Begolli, Ilir; Gojani, Xhenane; Arenliu-Qosaj, Fatime; Berisha, Merita

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this case is to present a case of a two month old female with congenital nephritic syndrome, which is very rare. On admission, the baby showed marked edema and distended abdomen. She was diagnosed and treated with daily albumin infusions, antibiotics, diuretic, gamma globulin replacement, ACEI and NSAIDs. Parents were informed about the nature of the disease, prognosis, and advised for further medical care in a more advanced kidney transplantation centre. This was the first treatment of this condition in the Pediatric Clinic in Kosovo and it presented a challenge for us. PMID:22299306

  16. CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Burton E.

    1954-01-01

    Treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in infants is a matter of semi-emergency and should be done as soon as adequate preparations can be made because sometimes fatal complications develop swiftly. In preoperative preparation there is great advantage in thorough decompression of the abdominal viscera, stomach, bowel and bladder. As to operation, the author believes the abdominal approach has most to recommend it. In the postoperative period, continued gastric suction for a brief time, parenteral administration of fluids and use of a Mistogen tent with a high moist oxygen content will facilitate rapid recovery. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13209363

  17. Congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation is an essential process by which sugars are attached to proteins and lipids. Complete lack of glycosylation is not compatible with life. Because of the widespread function of glycosylation, inherited disorders of glycosylation are multisystemic. Since the identification of the first defect on N-linked glycosylation in the 1980s, there are over 40 different congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases. This review will include defects of N-linked glycosylation, O-linked glycosylation and disorders of combined N- and O-linked glycosylation. PMID:23776380

  18. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  19. Congenital Median Upper Lip Fistula

    PubMed Central

    al Aithan, Bandar

    2012-01-01

    Congenital median upper lip fistula (MULF) is an extremely rare condition resulting from abnormal fusion of embryologic structures. We present a new case of congenital medial upper lip fistula located in the midline of the philtrum of a 6 year old girl. PMID:22953305

  20. [Genetics of congenital lipodystrophies].

    PubMed

    Buffet, A; Lombes, M; Caron, P

    2015-10-01

    Congenital lipodystrophies are heterogeneous genetic diseases, leading to the loss of adipose tissue. This loss of adipose tissue can be generalized or partial, thus defining different phenotypes. These lipodystrophies have a major metabolic impact, secondary to lipotoxicity. This lipotoxicity is responsible for insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis. The severity of the metabolic impact correlates with the severity of the loss of adipose tissue. Mutations in 15 predisposition genes are currently described; BSCL2 and AGPT2 genes are the major genes in the generalized forms. On the contrary, LMNA and PPARG gene mutations are recovered in partial lipodystrophies forms. These different genes encode for proteins involved in adipocyte physiology, altering adipocyte differentiation, triglycerides synthesis and lysis or playing a major role in the lipid droplet formation. Congenital lipodystrophies treatment is based on the management of metabolic comorbidities but recombinant leptin therapy appears to have promising results. These different points have been recently discussed during the 2015 Endocrine Society Congress, notably by S. O'Rahilly and are highlighted in this review. PMID:26776286

  1. Congenital fiber type disproportion.

    PubMed

    Kissiedu, Juliana; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Type I muscle fiber atrophy in childhood can be encountered in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. Congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) is one such condition which presents as a nonprogressive muscle weakness. The diagnosis is often made after excluding other differential diagnostic considerations. We present a 2-year-9-month-old full term boy who presented at 2 months with an inability to turn his head to the right. Over the next couple of years, he showed signs of muscle weakness, broad based gait and a positive Gower's sign. He had normal levels of creatine kinase and normal electromyography. A biopsy of the vastus lateralis showed a marked variation in muscle fiber type. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-ase stains highlighted a marked type I muscle atrophy with rare scattered atrophic type II muscle fibers. No abnormalities were observed on the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or cytochrome oxidase stained sections. Ragged red fibers were not present on the trichrome stain. Abnormalities of glycogen or lipid deposition were not observed on the periodic acid-Schiff or Oil-Red-O stains. Immunostaining for muscular dystrophy associated proteins showed normal staining. Ultrastructural examination showed a normal arrangement of myofilaments, and a normal number and morphology for mitochondria. A diagnosis of CFTD was made after excluding other causes of type I atrophy including congenital myopathy. The lack of specific clinical and genetic disorder associated with CFTD suggests that it is a spectrum of a disease process and represents a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:26526626

  2. [Congenital defects and incapacity].

    PubMed

    Jouve de la Barreda, Nicolás

    2009-01-01

    As a whole the congenital defects constitute an important section of the medical attention affecting near 3% of the population. A 15% of spontaneous abortions take place of which the greater frequency corresponds to the chromosome anomalies (25%) and the monogenic mutations (20%) and in a lesser extent to the effects of teratogenic agents. Between the genetic causes determining the congenital defects the mutations that affect genes acting in the early stages of development occupy a main place. These alterations can affect to homeotic genes or monogenic systems that act during the critical phases of the organogenesis. It seems evident that an alteration in the expression of a necessary gene for the appearance of a morphogenetic change constitutes the angular stone to understand resurging of a malformation or discapacity. In the last years has been demonstrated the importance of the teratogenic or environmental agents on the delicate internal physiological balance during the critical stages of the development. In this context must be included the inductive environmental factors inducing epigenetic modifications in the early stage of the development of the embryos produced by fertilization in vitro. PMID:19799481

  3. [Congenital multiple arthrogryposis].

    PubMed

    Parsch, Klaus; Pietrzak, Szymon

    2007-03-01

    From 1975 to 2004 a total of 38 children handicapped by congenital multiple arthrogryposis were cared for. The congenital joint contractures demand a major effort in terms of surgical reconstruction. In the case of distal arthrogryposis the chances that patients will be able to walk without help are good, while those with amyoplasia are likely to be dependent on mobility aids throughout their lives. The ultimate goal of treatment for patients is to develop into self-confident adults who can cope with life despite their handicaps. The hip in arthrogryposis shows variable forms of pathology, ranging from the almost normal hip to hip contractures with dislocation. Its treatment has some limited advantages, but hardly improves mobility. The knee contractures are actively treated to allow patients to sit, stand and walk better. The club foot and the rocker-bottom foot need sophisticated conservative and operative treatments. If conservative manipulation of bilateral extension contractures of the elbow fails operative treatment is carried out on the dominant side. For shoulder, hand and finger contractures conservative manipulation brings about little improvement, and surgical approaches help hardly at all. PMID:17323063

  4. Cataracts in Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Veena; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Latkany, Paul; Troia, Robert N.; Jalbrzikowski, Jessica; Kasza, Kristen; Karrison, Ted; Cezar, Simone; Sautter, Mari; Greenwald, Mark J.; Mieler, William; Mets, Marilyn B.; Alam, Ambereen; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Roizen, Nancy; Rabiah, Peter; Del Monte, Monte A.; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and natural history of cataracts in children with congenital toxoplasmosis. Methods Children referred to the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) between 1981 and 2005 were examined by ophthalmologists at predetermined times according to a specific protocol. The clinical course and treatment of patients who developed cataracts was reviewed. Results In the first year of life, 134 of 173 children examined were treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and Leucovorin, while the remaining 39 were not treated. Cataracts occurred in 27 eyes of 20 patients (11.6%, 95% confidence interval [7.2%, 17.3%]). Fourteen cataracts were present at birth, and 13 developed postnatally. Locations of the cataracts included anterior polar (3 eyes), anterior subcapsular (6), nuclear (5), posterior subcapsular (7), and unknown (6). Thirteen cataracts were partial, 9 total, and 5 with unknown complexity. Twelve cataracts remained stable, 12 progressed, and progression was not known for 3. Five of 27 eyes had cataract surgery, with 2 of these developing glaucoma. Sixteen eyes of 11 patients had retinal detachment and cataract. All eyes with cataracts had additional ocular lesions. Conclusions In the NCCCTS cohort, 11.6% of patients were diagnosed with cataracts. There was considerable variability in the presentation, morphology, and progression of the cataracts. Associated intraocular pathology was an important cause of morbidity. PMID:18086432

  5. [Enzymopathic congenital hyperlactacidemia].

    PubMed

    Leroux, J P; Marsac, C; Saudubray, J M

    1976-01-01

    Congenital enzymopathic hyperlactacidemia results from a defect of utilisation of pyruvate either at the level of the pyruvate junction (pyruvate-carboxylase, pyruvate-dehydrogenase and Kreb's cycle), or at the level of the unidirectional enzymes on neo-glucogenesis and of neo-glycogenogenesis, e.g. glucose-6-phosphatase, phosphoenol-pyruvate-carboxykinase and glycogen synthetase. The enzymopathies which affect neoglucogenesis associate hyper-lactacidemia and fasting hypoglycemia and more or less marked hepatomegaly. Type I glycogenesis (von Gierke's disease) is the best known example. Enzymopathies which affect the pyruvate junction and the Krebs cycle, may be manifested in addition by: --either chronic neuropathies, e.g. Leigh's disease, recurrent ataxia, and moderate hyperalactacidemia,--or, as in congenital lactic acidoses, which have a rapid and severe prognosis with major hyperlactacidemia. Functional investigation, in particular, loading tests are of great value in orientation and justify the practice of tissue biopsy which permits the enzyme diagnosis. Recent, still unconfirmed knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases emphasizes the considerable importance of estimation of blood lactic acid in the investigation of metabolic acidoses of hereditary origin. PMID:184725

  6. [Conventional x-ray techniques and computed tomography in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymph node involvement in non-small cell bronchogenic cancer. Which method is reliable?].

    PubMed

    Krestin, G P; Krestin, M; Gross-Fengels, W; Thul, H

    1992-06-01

    52 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma were studied preoperatively by means of conventional tomography and CT. The results were compared with surgical findings to evaluate the accuracy of these methods in detecting mediastinal lymph node involvement. 323 mediastinal lymph nodes were identified by CT and 237 of these were studied histologically. In 25% of lymph nodes with diameter between 0.5 and 1 cm metastases could be identified. On the other hand, 25% of lymph nodes measuring up to 3 cm did not contain metastases. The results varied in different regions (pre- and paratracheal, azygos region, aorto-pulmonary, subcarinal). The probability of involvement of small nodes was doubled if there were in regions neighbouring metastases. In view of the high incidence of false positive and false negative CT findings, conventional methods were sufficient in the presence of definite pathological findings. PMID:1319769

  7. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  8. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  9. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dessinioti, Cleo; Katsambas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia consists of a heterogenous group of inherited disorders due to enzymatic defects in the biosynthetic pathway of cortisol and/or aldosterone. This results in glucocorticoid deficiency, mineralocorticoid deficiency, and androgen excess. 95% of CAH cases are due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Clinical forms range from the severe, classical CAH associated with complete loss of enzyme function, to milder, non-classical forms (NCAH). Androgen excess affects the pilosebaceous unit, causing cutaneous manifestations such as acne, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism. Clinical differential diagnosis between NCAH and polycystic ovary syndrome may be difficult. In this review, the evaluation of patients with suspected CAH, the clinical presentation of CAH forms, with emphasis on the cutaneous manifestations of the disease, and available treatment options, will be discussed. PMID:22523607

  10. Multicystic congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

    PubMed

    Drut, Ricardo

    2002-01-01

    This report describes an unusual example of congenital mesoblastic nephroma cellular variant that presented in a 1-week-old neonate as a multicystic tumor of the kidney. Extensive pseudocystic cavitation resulted from progressive accumulation of ground substance in a loosely myxoid tissue composed of stellate- and spindle-shaped cells that compressed and infiltrated renal tissue. The cells of the tumor were positive for vimentin and smooth muscle actin. The patient is alive and well 16 years after surgery. Differential diagnosis from segmental cystic dysplasia, cystic intralobar nephrogenic rest, cystic nephroma, cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma, cystic nephroblastoma, and cystic clear cell sarcoma of the kidney, all of which may present at this age, is discussed. PMID:11927972

  11. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  12. Congenital vertical talus: a review.

    PubMed

    McKie, Janay; Radomisli, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Congenital vertical talus, also known as congenital convex pes valgus, is an uncommon disorder of the foot, manifested as a rigid rocker-bottom flatfoot. Radiographically, it is defined by dorsal dislocation of the navicular on the talus. This condition requires surgical correction. If left untreated, this foot deformity results in a painful and rigid flatfoot with weak push-off power. This article provides an overview of this rare foot deformity, outlines appropriate workup of the disorder, and details current treatment options, with emphasis on the evolution of treatment of congenital vertical talus. PMID:19963176

  13. Increased cardiac output, not pulmonary artery systolic pressure, increases intrapulmonary shunt in healthy humans breathing room air and 40% O2

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan E; Duke, Joseph W; Hawn, Jerold A; Halliwill, John R; Lovering, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVAs) has been demonstrated to increase in healthy humans during a variety of conditions; however, whether or not this blood flow represents a source of venous admixture (/) that impairs pulmonary gas exchange efficiency (i.e. increases the alveolar-to-arterial difference (A–aDO2)) remains controversial and unknown. We hypothesized that blood flow through IPAVAs does provide a source of /. To test this, blood flow through IPAVAs was increased in healthy humans at rest breathing room air and 40% O2: (1) during intravenous adrenaline (epinephrine) infusion at 320 ng kg−1 min−1 (320 ADR), and (2) with vagal blockade (2 mg atropine), before and during intravenous adrenaline infusion at 80 ng kg−1 min−1 (ATR + 80 ADR). When breathing room air the A–aDO2 increased by 6 ± 2 mmHg during 320 ADR and by 5 ± 2 mmHg during ATR + 80 ADR, and the change in calculated / was +2% in both conditions. When breathing 40% O2, which minimizes contributions from diffusion limitation and alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion inequality, the A–aDO2 increased by 12 ± 7 mmHg during 320 ADR, and by 9 ± 6 mmHg during ATR + 80 ADR, and the change in calculated / was +2% in both conditions. During 320 ADR cardiac output () and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) were significantly increased; however, during ATR + 80 ADR only was significantly increased, yet blood flow through IPAVAs as detected with saline contrast echocardiography was not different between conditions. Accordingly, we suggest that blood flow through IPAVAs provides a source of intrapulmonary shunt, and is mediated primarily by increases in rather than PASP. PMID:25085889

  14. Efficiency of a New Mesh-Type Nebulizer (NE-SM1 NEPLUS) for Intrapulmonary Delivery of Ipratropium Bromide in Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Hun; Kwon, Gu-Youn; Park, Do-Yang; Bang, Ji-Yeon; Jang, Dong-Min; Lee, Soo-Han; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Byung-Moon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficiency of a new mesh-type nebulizer for the intrapulmonary delivery of ipratropium bromide in surgical patients under mechanical ventilation. A total of 20 patients were randomly allocated to receive 0.5 mg ipratropium bromide using either a control (Pariboy SX, Pari, Co., Starnberg, Germany, n = 10) or test (NE-SM1 NEPLUS, KTMED INC., Seoul, Korea, n = 10) nebulizer during general anaesthesia. Ipratropium bromide was nebulized continuously for 20 min. in each group. Plasma concentrations of ipratropium bromide were obtained from blood samples at preset intervals. Non-compartmental analysis of ipratropium bromide was performed to compare the efficiency of pulmonary drug delivery in both nebulizers. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of ipratropium bromide was performed. Additionally, the noise level during the nebulizer operation and the aerosol particle size for each device were measured. The dose-normalized AUC(last) was 0.10 min/L for both nebulizers. The pharmacokinetics of nebulized ipratropium bromide can be described best by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption. The apparent volume of distribution and metabolic clearance were 1340 L and 6.78 L/min, respectively. Type of nebulizer was a significant covariate for absorption rate constant. The equivalent sound level and median aerosol particle diameter were 35.0 dB and 4.52 μm for the test nebulizer, and 60.2 dB and 3.85 μm for the control nebulizer, respectively. From the standpoint of the dose-normalized AUC(last) , a new vibrating mesh-type nebulizer shows similar performance in the intrapulmonary delivery of ipratropium bromide to that of a jet-type nebulizer in surgical patients. PMID:26440415

  15. Airway smooth muscle changes in the nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model.

    PubMed

    Belik, Jaques; Davidge, Sandra T; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Jingyi; Greer, John J

    2003-05-01

    In the fetal rat, nitrofen induces congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and pulmonary vascular remodeling similar to what is observed in the human condition. Airway hyperactivity is common in infants with CDH and attributed to the ventilator-induced airway damage. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that airway smooth muscle mechanical properties are altered in the nitrofen-induced CDH rat model. Lungs from nitrofen-exposed fetuses with hernias (CDH) or intact diaphragm (nitrofen) and untreated fetuses (control) were studied on gestation d 21. The left intrapulmonary artery and bronchi were removed and mounted on a wire myograph, and lung expression, content, and immunolocalization of cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated. Pulmonary artery muscle in the CDH group had significantly (p < 0.01) lower force generation compared with control and nitrofen groups. In contrast, the same generation bronchial smooth muscle of the CDH and nitrofen groups developed higher force compared with control. Whereas no differences were found in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vascular muscle tone, the epithelium-dependent airway muscle relaxation was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in the CDH and nitrofen groups. The lung mRNA levels of COX-1 and COX-2 were increased in the CDH and nitrofen groups. COX-1 vascular and airway immunostaining, as well as COX-1 and COX-2 lung protein content, were increased in the CDH group. This is the first report of airway smooth muscle abnormalities in the nitrofen-induced fetal rat model of CDH. We speculate that congenital airway muscle changes may be present in the human form of this disease. PMID:12612200

  16. [Congenital lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Crespo, J M; Teixidor de Otto, J L

    1998-07-01

    Hernias in the lumbar region are abdominal wall defects that appear in two possible locations: the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft and the inferior lumbar triangle of Petit. There are 40 cases reported in the pediatric literature, and only 16 are considered congenital, associated with the lumbocostovertebral syndrome and/or meningomyelocele. A new case is presented. A premature newborn with a mass in the left flank that increases when the patient cries and reduces easily. The complementary studies confirm the diagnosis of lumbar hernia and reveal the presence of lumbocostovertebral syndrome associated. At the time of operation a well defined fascial defect at the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft is primarily closed. The diagnosis of lumbar hernia is not difficult to establish but it is necessary the screening of the lumbocostovertebral syndrome. We recommend the surgical treatment before 12 months of age; the objective is to close the defect primarily or to use prosthetic material if necessary. PMID:12602034

  17. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported. PMID:26197921

  18. Congenital parotid fistula.

    PubMed

    Natasha, Shiggaon

    2014-01-01

    Parotid fistula is a cause of great distress and embarrassment to the patient. Parotid fistula is most commonly a post-traumatic situation. Congenital parotid salivary fistulas are unusual entities that can arise from accessory parotid glands or even more infrequently, from normal parotid glands through an aberrant Stensen's duct. The treatment of fistulous tract is usually surgical and can be successfully excised after making a skin incision along the skin tension line around the fistula opening. This report describes a case of right accessory parotid gland fistula of a 4-year-old boy with discharge of pus from right cheek. Computed tomography (CT) fistulography and CT sialography demonstrated fistulous tract arising from accessory parotid gland. Both CT fistulography and CT sialography are very helpful in the diagnosis and surgical planning. In this case, superficial parotidectomy is the treatment of choice. A detailed history, clinical and functional examination, proper salivary gland investigations facilitates in correct diagnosis followed by immediate surgical intervention helps us to restore physical, psychological health of the child patient. PMID:25231049

  19. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  20. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Juan A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  1. Congenital Triangular Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Yin Li, Vincent Chum; Yesudian, Paul Devakar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital triangular alopecia (CTA) also known as temporal triangular alopecia is a benign noncicatricial pattern of hair loss. It typically affects the frontotemporal region and rarely involves the temporoparietal or occipital scalp. It is a nonprogressive disorder that presents as a triangular, oval or lancet-shaped patch of alopecia. CTA can manifest at birth or develop later in life. The exact etiology of this condition remains unknown. Rarely, it may be associated with other disorders such as Down's syndrome and phakomatosis pigmentovascularis. The diagnosis is based on its distinct clinical appearance. Histologically, hair follicles are miniaturized and replaced by sparse vellus hair follicles. Tricoscopy using a polarized light handheld dermatoscope can be a useful diagnostic tool. CTA is often asymptomatic and remains unchanged throughout the life. No treatment is required. Surgical intervention with follicular unit hair transplantation can provide a satisfactory cosmetic result. In this paper, we have identified 126 cases of CTA in the published literature cited on PubMed between 1905 and 2015. From the available evidence, 79% of patients with CTA presented with unilateral hair loss, 18.5% with bilateral involvement and rarely, with occipital alopecia (2.5%). There was no gender predilection. These figures are entirely consistent with previously published data. Physicians should remember to consider CTA as a potential diagnosis in any patient presenting with a nonscarring alopecia in order to avoid unnecessary investigations and treatments. PMID:26180448

  2. Congenital Rhabdomyosarcoma of Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghnejad-Tabari, Ahmad; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Nariman, Shahin; Hassas-Yeganeh, Shaghayegh; Gharib, Atoosa; Khaleghnejad-Tabari, Nasibeh

    2012-01-01

    A 16-day-old female was referred with congenital swelling on her right shoulder. On examination, there was a hard, round, ecchymotic, nontender, slightly movable, warm and shiny 10x15 cm mass on the right axillary pits which was extended to the right side of neck and chest wall. The mass separated the shoulder from the chest wall causing paralysis of right hand. Chest X-ray, ultrasound and MRI with contrast demonstrated a soft tissue mass suspected to be a hemangioma. The mass rapidly increased in size despite aggressive steroid therapy with rupture and bleeding. On the 45th post natal day the baby was taken to operating room to control the bleeding and if possible total excision of the mass. The mass was separated easily from the surrounding tissue and was excised along with right upper extremity. At the end of surgery the baby had cardiac arrest, and apparently died of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC). The final pathology report was Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). PMID:25628836

  3. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  4. Singing in congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Dalla Bella, Simone; Giguère, Jean-François; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-07-01

    Congenital amusia is a musical disorder characterized by impaired pitch perception. To examine to what extent this perceptual pitch deficit may compromise singing, 11 amusic individuals and 11 matched controls were asked to sing a familiar tune with lyrics and on the syllable /la/. Acoustical analysis of sung renditions yielded measures of pitch accuracy (e.g., number of pitch errors) and time accuracy (e.g., number of time errors). The results revealed that 9 out of 11 amusics were poor singers, mostly on the pitch dimension. Poor singers made an anomalously high number of pitch interval and contour errors, produced pitch intervals largely deviating from the score, and lacked pitch stability; however, more than half of the amusics sang in-time. Amusics' variability in singing proficiency was related to their residual pitch perceptual ability. Thus, their singing deficiency might be a consequence of their perceptual deficit. Nevertheless, there were notable exceptions. Two amusic individuals, despite their impoverished perception, sang proficiently. The latter findings are consistent with the existence of separate neural pathways for auditory perception and action. PMID:19603898

  5. Animal models related to congenital heart disease and clinical research in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Loukanov, Tsvetomir; Geiger, Ralf; Agrawal, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    There are several animal models for studying human pulmonary hypertension (PH). An increased flow model in pigs was developed at the University Hospital in Heidelberg in order to simulate congenital heart disease. The high pulmonary blood flow is achieved by installation of a Blalock-Taussig anastomosis. In order to further improve this model by adding a pressure component, the left pulmonary artery is ligated. An acute model, which is used at the Innsbruck Medical University, addresses another disease entity. Human meconium is placed deeply into the trachea of the pigs in order to induce an acute respiratory distress syndrome-like response in the lungs. Animals were randomly assigned to four treatment groups. Inhaled iloprost, due to its pulmonary and intrapulmonary selectivity, was the only substance that significantly reduced intrapulmonary shunt volumes. In humans, PH encompasses multiple disease subtypes. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) accounts for only 6% of PH cases, however, all existing treatments are indicated only for PAH. This means that for 94% of patients with PH, no specific medication is available. Therefore, huge efforts have been made to better understand the pathophysiology of PH and to detect new signalling pathways that may allow new compounds to be developed that will ultimately improve the prognosis of PAH and non-PAH PH patients. Promising new substances include riociguat, a stimulator of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), as well as cinaciguat, a sGC activator, and an elastase inhibitor. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) is an oral agent that targets the intact/native form of sGC. It enhances the sensitivity of sGC to low levels of bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) and is also capable of stimulating native sGC independently of NO. Thus, unlike phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, the effect of riociguat is not limited by low NO levels. In a multicentre open-label phase II study, riociguat exerted strong and significant effects on pulmonary

  6. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Audiologic Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Karen B.

    2013-01-01

    The association between congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was first described almost 50 years ago. Studies over the intervening decades have further described the relationship between congenital CMV infection and SNHL in children. However, congenital CMV infection remains a leading cause of SNHL in children in the United States and the world today. As more CMV infections are identified, it is important to recognize that infants who are born to seroimmune mothers are not completely protected from SNHL, although their hearing loss is often milder than that seen in CMV-infected infants following primary maternal infections. Late-onset and progressive hearing losses occur following congenital CMV infection, and CMV-infected infants should be evaluated regularly to provide for early detection of hearing loss and appropriate intervention. Fluctuating hearing loss that is not explained by concurrent middle ear infections is another characteristic of CMV-related hearing loss in children. Challenges still remain in predicting which children with congenital CMV infection will develop hearing loss and, among those who do develop loss, whether or not the loss will continue to deteriorate. PMID:24257423

  7. Congenital Scoliosis (Mini-review).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Moramarco, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis is a lateral deformity of the spine with a disturbance of the sagittal profile caused by malformations of vertebra and ribs. Typically, early surgical intervention is the suggested treatment (before three-years-old) for young patients with congenital scoliosis. While a previous study was conducted in 2011 to investigate long-term studies supporting the necessity for this recommendation and no evidence was found, this current review, is an updated search for evidence published from 2011 through March 2015. This also failed to find any prospective or randomized controlled studies to support the hypothesis that spinal fusion surgery in patients with congenital scoliosis should be considered as evidence-based treatment. Contradictory results exist on the safety of hemivertebra resection and segmental fusion using pedicle screw fixation. When using the VEPTR (vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib) device, studies show a high rate of complications exist. It is difficult to predict the final outcome for patients with congenital scoliosis. However, it is possible that many patients with congenital scoliosis may be able to avoid spinal surgery with the application of advanced bracing technology. Therefore, it is only prudent to advocate for conservative management first before spinal surgery is considered. PMID:26769614

  8. Treatment of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Rall, Katharina; Campo, Rudi; Oppelt, Peter; Isaacson, Keith

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of müllerian malformations is 1 in 200, or 0.5%. A third of the anomalies are septate, a third bicornuate uteri, 10% arcuate uterus, 10% didelphis and unicornuate uterus, and < 5% uterine and vaginal aplasia. Correct diagnosis of the malformation is most important but often very difficult. Correct treatment can only be performed if the malformation is clear. Longitudinal vaginal septums have to be removed due to potential obstetric problems. Transverse vaginal septums can cause hematocolpos and pain and have to be incised crosswise and excised so as not to shorten the vagina at the same time. Congenital vaginal agenesis occurs in Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome patients and in androgen insensitivity syndrome. The first choice for surgical treatment should be the new laparoscopic-assisted creation of a neovagina. Septate uterus has to be distinguished from a bicornuate uterus. Even if it is not proven to be a cause for infertility, the chance of miscarriage can be diminished by performing hysteroscopic metroplasty. Repair of a uterine septum in infertility patients often improves pregnancy rates. In contrast, surgical repair of a bicornuate uterus requires an abdominal metroplasty. This should only be performed if the patient has recurrent fetal loss due to the uterine structural defect. In a unicornuate uterus it is most important to determine if there is a second uterine horn that can cause cyclic pain if it has functioning endometrium. The only surgical option in these cases is to remove the rudimentary uterus with endometrium and hematometra, respectively. PMID:21437824

  9. Common Tests for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Defect - Fetal Circulation • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  11. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  12. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26, ... person with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address ...

  13. Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... health problems than their parents. Learn more about genetic counseling . Single gene: Rarely, congenital heart defects are caused ... of Congenital Heart Defects • Understand Your Risk Introduction Genetic Counseling • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Related Sites ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  15. Congenital lobar emphysema: 30-year case series in two university hospitals*

    PubMed Central

    Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Rodrigues, Olavo Ribeiro; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Schmidt, Aurelino Fernandes; Cataneo, Antonio José Maria

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the cases of patients with congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) submitted to surgical treatment at two university hospitals over a 30-year period. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of children with CLE undergoing surgical treatment between 1979 and 2009 at the Botucatu School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas or the Mogi das Cruzes University Hospital. We analyzed data regarding symptoms, physical examination, radiographic findings, diagnosis, surgical treatment, and postoperative follow-up. RESULTS: During the period studied, 20 children with CLE underwent surgery. The mean age at the time of surgery was 6.9 months (range, 9 days to 4 years). All of the cases presented with symptoms at birth or during the first months of life. In all cases, chest X-rays were useful in defining the diagnosis. In cases of moderate respiratory distress, chest CT facilitated the diagnosis. One patient with severe respiratory distress was misdiagnosed with hypertensive pneumothorax and underwent chest tube drainage. Only patients with moderate respiratory distress were submitted to bronchoscopy, which revealed no tracheobronchial abnormalities. The surgical approach was lateral muscle-sparing thoracotomy. The left upper and middle lobes were the most often affected, followed by the right upper lobe. Lobectomy was performed in 18 cases, whereas bilobectomy was performed in 2 (together with bronchogenic cyst resection in 1 of those). No postoperative complications were observed. Postoperative follow-up time was at least 24 months (mean, 60 months), and no late complications were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Although CLE is an uncommon, still neglected disease of uncertain etiology, the radiological diagnosis is easily made and surgical treatment is effective. PMID:24068262

  16. [The congenital afibrinogenemia: case report].

    PubMed

    Brahem, Imen; Charfeddine, Bassem; Chraiti, Haythem; Ben Abdallah, Jihene; Ben Othmen, Leila; Neffati, Souhir; Ali Smach, Mohamed; Ltaief, Affef; Ksourri, Monia; Dridi, Hedi; Limem, Khalifa

    2010-01-01

    The deficiency in factor I or fibrinogen is a largely unknown genetic disease. It is a rare condition inherited as an autosomal recessive, whose clinical events are variable, ranging from moderate to minimal bleeding or cataclysmic hemorrhage. We report a case of congenital afibrinogenemia in a 17 years-old patient hospitalized in surgical ICU for hemoperitoneum medium abundance discovered by abdominal ultrasound performed before a picture of abdominopelvic pain lasting for 24 hours. Exploration led to the diagnosis of congenital afibrinogenemia with favorable evolution with a contribution of factor deficient. Through this case we raise the problem of congenital afibrinogenemia in diagnosis and the peculiarities of its management. PMID:20870582

  17. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Bergoffen, J; Kant, J; Sladky, J; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E H; Fischbeck, K H

    1994-01-01

    The congenital form of myotonic dystrophy is reported to be almost exclusively, if not exclusively, maternally transmitted. We present a case of congenital myotonic dystrophy which was inherited from a mildly affected father. This family illustrates that the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy can occur without intrauterine or other maternal factors related to the disease. The possibility of paternal transmission of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy could be considered when counselling myotonic dystrophy patients and their families. Images PMID:7966187

  18. Congenital granular-cell myoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cussen, L J; MacMahon, R A

    1975-04-01

    The clinical and pathologic features of congenital granular-cell myoblastoma in five infant girls are reported. One lesion, treated expectantly, progressively decreased in size and after 3 yr and 9 mo could not be detected, while two lesions which were imcompletely excised did not recur. It is suggested that congenital granular-cell myoblastoma is caused by an intrauterine stimulus, and that this stimulus may possible be production of estrogen by the fetus. Congential granular-cell myoblastoma should be treated expectantly or by limited excision, and has an excellent prognosis. PMID:164527

  19. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G.; Álvarez Romero, J. T. E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com Calderón, A. Torres E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com M, V. Tovar E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com

    2014-11-07

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) {sup vs} {sup DW}, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  20. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G.; Álvarez Romero, J. T.; Torres Calderón, A.; Tovar, M. V.

    2014-11-01

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) vs DW, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  1. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia. PMID:17650728

  2. Congenital long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Celano, Giuseppe; Dagradi, Federica; Schwartz, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary cardiac disease characterized by a prolongation of the QT interval at basal ECG and by a high risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Disease prevalence is estimated at close to 1 in 2,500 live births. The two cardinal manifestations of LQTS are syncopal episodes, that may lead to cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death, and electrocardiographic abnormalities, including prolongation of the QT interval and T wave abnormalities. The genetic basis of the disease was identified in the mid-nineties and all the LQTS genes identified so far encode cardiac ion channel subunits or proteins involved in modulating ionic currents. Mutations in these genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1, KCNE2, CACNA1c, CAV3, SCN5A, SCN4B) cause the disease by prolonging the duration of the action potential. The most prevalent LQTS variant (LQT1) is caused by mutations in the KCNQ1 gene, with approximately half of the genotyped patients carrying KCNQ1 mutations. Given the characteristic features of LQTS, the typical cases present no diagnostic difficulties for physicians aware of the disease. However, borderline cases are more complex and require the evaluation of various electrocardiographic, clinical, and familial findings, as proposed in specific diagnostic criteria. Additionally, molecular screening is now part of the diagnostic process. Treatment should always begin with β-blockers, unless there are valid contraindications. If the patient has one more syncope despite a full dose β-blockade, left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD) should be performed without hesitation and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy should be considered with the final decision being based on the individual patient characteristics (age, sex, clinical history, genetic subgroup including mutation-specific features in some cases, presence of ECG signs – including 24-hour Holter recordings – indicating high electrical instability). The prognosis of the

  3. Health in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Judith A A E; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many adults with congenital heart disease encounter late complications. Late morbidity can be related to the congenital heart defect itself, but may also be the consequence of the surgical or medical treatment or longstanding alterations in hemodynamics, neurodevelopment and psychosocial development. This narrative review describes the cardiac and non-cardiac long-term morbidity in the adult population with congenital heart disease. PMID:27451323

  4. Experimental model of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Kajdacsy-Balla, A; Howeedy, A; Bagasra, O

    1993-01-01

    Female LSH hamsters infected with Treponema pallidum subsp, endemicum before pregnancy or during early pregnancy transmit a form of syphilis to the fetus that is similar to human congenital syphilis. The offspring develops rhinitis, skin rash, failure to thrive, and hepatosplenomegaly. T. pallidum is detectable in their livers, spleens, and nasal secretions. Immunoglobulin M antibodies are detected in the serum. Images PMID:8335390

  5. Congenital Chagas disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Yves; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Buekens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Congenital infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is a global problem, occurring on average in 5% of children born from chronically infected mothers in endemic areas, with variations depending on the region. This presentation aims to focus on and update epidemiological data, research methods, involved factors, control strategy and possible prevention of congenital infection with T. cruzi. Considering that etiological treatment of the child is always effective if performed before one year of age, the diagnosis of infection in pregnant women and their newborns has to become the standard of care and integrated into the surveillance programs of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus. In addition to the standard tests, polymerase chain reaction performed on blood of neonates of infected mothers one month after birth might improve the diagnosis of congenital infection. Recent data bring out that its transmission can be prevented through treatment of infected women before they become pregnant. The role of parasite genotypes and host genetic factors in parasite transmission and development of infection in foetuses/neonates has to be more investigated in order to better estimate the risk factors and impact on health of congenital infection with T. cruzi. PMID:25760448

  6. Evolutive leukoencephalopathy in congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Krakar, Goran; Đaković, Ivana; Delin, Sanja; Bošnjak, Vlatka Mejaški

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is the most common infectious cause of congenital brain injury. Type and severity of congenital cytomegalovirus infection-related brain abnormalities depend on the developmental stage of the central nervous system at the time of fetal infection. The aim of this study was to follow the course of leukoencephalopathy in a patient with congenital cytomegalovirus infection. We describe brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a boy with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection performed at the age of 3 weeks, 13 months, and 4 and 7 years. Neonatal brain MRI showed most of characteristic findings in congenital cytomegalovirus infection with most prominent white matter abnormalities and cortical dysplasia. MRI follow-up images showed that cortical dysgenesis remained unchanged and static, whereas white matter abnormalities evolved over the years. We propose that leukoencephalopathy in congenital cytomegalovirus infection is not only nonprogressive or static but even evolutive and suggests both underlying disruption and delay of myelination. PMID:24453153

  7. Coping with Congenital Hand Differences

    PubMed Central

    Franzblau, Lauren E.; Chung, Kevin C.; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chin, Autumn Y. T.; Nellans, Kate W.; Waljee, Jennifer F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although functional outcomes following reconstruction for congenital hand differences are frequently described, much less is known regarding children’s ability to cope with psychosocial effects of these conditions. We qualitatively explored stress and coping mechanisms among children following reconstructive surgery for congenital hand differences. Methods Forty patients and their parents participated in semi-structured interviews examining stress related to hand functioning and appearance, emotional responses to stress, and coping strategies. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed thematically. A consensus taxonomy for classifying content evolved from comparisons of coding by two reviewers. Themes expressed by participants were studied for patterns of connection and grouped into broader categories. Results In this sample, 58% of children and 40% of parents reported stress related to congenital hand differences, attributed to functional deficits (61%), hand appearance (27%), social interactions (58%), and emotional reactions (46%). Among the 18 children who reported stress, 43% of parents were not aware of the presence of stress. Eight coping strategies emerged, including humor (12%), self-acceptance (21%), avoidance (27%), seeking external support (30%), concealment (30%), educating others (9%), support programs (21%) and religion (24%). Conclusions Although children with congenital hand differences often experience emotional stress related to functional limitations and aesthetic deformities, many apply positive coping mechanisms that enhance self-esteem and self-esteem. Clinicians caring for children with congenital hand differences should inform families about potential sources of stress in order to direct resources toward strengthening coping strategies and support systems. Level of Evidence Level IV-Case series PMID:25502854

  8. Comparison of Intrapulmonary and Systemic Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate (CMS) and Colistin after Aerosol Delivery and Intravenous Administration of CMS in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients. PMID:25267660

  9. Comparison of intrapulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) and colistin after aerosol delivery and intravenous administration of CMS in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Couet, William; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients. PMID:25267660

  10. Dissimilarities between methylene blue and cyanide on relaxation and cyclic GMP formation in endothelium-intact intrapulmonary artery caused by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and acetylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to ascertain whether cyanide shares the properties of methylene blue as a selective inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle relaxation elicited by agents that stimulate the formation of cyclic GMP. Experiments were performed with endothelium-intact rings prepared from bovine intrapulmonary artery. Methylene blue, a good inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, antagonized both arterial relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation in response to sodium nitroprusside, glyceryl trinitrate, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and acetylcholine. In contrast, cyanide inhibited only the responses to sodium nitroprusside. Increasing concentrations of methylene blue depressed resting arterial levels of cyclic GMP and caused slowly developing but marked contractions whereas cyanide was without effect. Contractile responses to phenylephrine, potassium and U46619 were potentiated by methylene blue but not by cyanide. Preincubation of dilute solutions of cyanide containing sodium nitroprusside in oxygenated Krebs' buffer at 37 degrees C for 15 min before addition to bath chambers depressed relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation caused by sodium nitroprusside markedly. Similar treatment of glyceryl trinitrate, however, failed to alter its effects in arterial rings. A chemical inactivation of sodium nitroprusside by cyanide appears to account for the specific inhibitory action of cyanide on arterial responses to sodium nitroprusside. This study indicates clearly that cyanide does not share the properties of methylene blue as an inhibitor of arterial relaxation elicited by vasodilators that stimulate cyclic GMP formation.

  11. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  12. [Congenital myasthenic syndromes; French experience].

    PubMed

    Eymard, Bruno; Hantaï, Daniel; Fournier, Emmanuel; Nicole, Sophie; Sternberg, Damien; Richard, Pascale; Fardeau, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes CMS) form a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases characterized by abnormal neuromuscular transmission. The associated muscular weakness is exacerbated by exertion and usually starts during infancy/childhood In 2002 a national Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes Network was created in France, composed of neurologists, neuropediatricians, pathologists, molecular geneticists and neurobiologists. The network has now identified nearly 300 cases of CMS, as well as three new culprit genes. Based on our personal experience and data from the most recent studies, we describe the 18 principal culprit genes so far identified, along with diagnostic pitfalls, the disease course, prognosis and treatment. The underlying genetic defect remains to be identified in nearly half of CMS patients. PMID:26263703

  13. Surgical correction of congenital megaprepuce.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, M U; Rance, C H

    1999-01-01

    Congenital megaprepuce (CMP) is a rare entity. Two infant boys presented with a tight congenital phimosis resulting in an excessively baggy, urine-filled prepuce and a swollen scrotum. Compression of the scrotum resulted in drainage of urine. We feel this to be a separate entity from a buried penis and recommend early surgery. The phimotic tip of the foreskin was excised and the inner layer preserved to cover the full length of the penile shaft. The outer layer of the foreskin, in reality the penoscrotal junction, was anchored to the base of the penile shaft. A V-shaped edge of ventral skin was excised and the edges approximated, giving the appearance of median raphe. The final appearance was that of a circumcised penis. A third patient awaits operation. PMID:10631746

  14. [Radiological evaluation of congenital tumors].

    PubMed

    Aguado del Hoyo, A; Ruiz Martín, Y; Lancharro Zapata, Á; Marín Rodríguez, C; Gordillo Gutiérrez, I

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we consider tumors that are diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first three months of life. This is a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with special biological and epidemiological characteristics that differentiate them from tumors arising in children or adults. In the last two decades, the prenatal detection of congenital tumors has increased due to the generalized use of prenatal sonographic screening. Advances in imaging techniques, especially in fetal magnetic resonance imaging, have enabled improvements in the diagnosis, follow-up, clinical management, and perinatal treatment of these tumors. This image-based review of the most common congenital tumors describes their histologic types, locations, and characteristics on the different imaging techniques used. PMID:26115799

  15. Congenital Anomalies of the Nose.

    PubMed

    Funamura, Jamie L; Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-04-01

    Congenital anomalies of the nose range from complete aplasia of the nose to duplications and nasal masses. Nasal development is the result of a complex embryologic patterning and fusion of multiple primordial structures. Loss of signaling proteins or failure of migration or proliferation can result in structural anomalies with significant cosmetic and functional consequences. Congenital anomalies of the nose can be categorized into four broad categories: (1) aplastic or hypoplastic, (2) hyperplastic or duplications, (3) clefts, and (4) nasal masses. Our knowledge of the embryologic origin of these anomalies helps dictate subsequent work-up for associated conditions, and the appropriate treatment or surgical approach to manage newborns and children with these anomalies. PMID:27097134

  16. [Congenital ranula in a newborn].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, M K; Hückel, D; Hamala, D

    2007-05-01

    Ranulas are cystic lesions in the floor of the mouth. They are either retention cysts of the excretory duct of the sublingual gland or pseudocysts formed by excretory duct rupture followed by extravasation and accumulation of mucus in the surrounding tissue. We report the case of a premature newborn with a congenital ranula in the floor of mouth. The ranula caused no discomfort or complications, so that immediate intervention was not necessary. The cyst resolved completely by the age of 4 months. Complications in newborns especially include airway obstruction and feeding difficulties. Surgical treatment options are needle aspiration, excision of the ranula, marsupialization, cryosurgery, and--in addition to excision of the cyst--removal of the ipsilateral sublingual gland. Sclerotherapy has shown good results as well. As many congenital cysts resolve or rupture spontaneously, they should be observed for potential resolution for several months in uncomplicated cases. PMID:16770600

  17. Are parenchymal AVMs congenital lesions?

    PubMed

    Morales-Valero, Saul F; Bortolotti, Carlo; Sturiale, Carmelo; Sturiale, Carmelo L; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    A long-held dogma in neurosurgery is that parenchymal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital. However, there is no strong evidence supporting this theory. An increasing number of documented cases of de novo formation of parenchymal AVMs cast doubt on their congenital nature and suggest that indeed the majority of these lesions may form after birth. Further evidence suggesting the postnatal development of parenchymal AVMs comes from the exceedingly rare diagnosis of these lesions in utero despite the widespread availability of high-resolution imaging modalities such as ultrasound and fetal MRI. The exact mechanism of AVM formation has yet to be elucidated, but most likely involves genetic susceptibility and environmental triggering factors. In this review, the authors report 2 cases of de novo AVM formation and analyze the evidence suggesting that they represent an acquired condition. PMID:25175439

  18. Congenital scoliosis – Quo vadis?

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Ujjwal K; Goel, Vivek; Harshavardhana, Nanjanduppa; Webb, John K

    2010-01-01

    Congenital spinal vertebral anomalies can present as scoliosis or kyphosis or both. The worldwide prevalence of the vertebral anomalies is 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. Vertebral anomalies can range from hemi vertebrae (HV) which may be single or multiple, vertebral bar with or without HV, block vertebrae, wedge shaped or butterfly vertebrae. Seventy per cent of congenital vertebral anomalies result in progressive deformities. The risk factors for progression include: type of defect, site of defect (junctional regions) and patient's age at the time of diagnosis. The key to success in managing these spinal deformities is early diagnosis and anticipation of progression. One must intervene surgically to halt the progression of deformity and prevent further complications associated with progressive deformity. Planning for surgery includes a preoperative MRI scan to rule out spinal anomalies such as diastematomyelia. The goals of surgical treatment for congenital spinal deformity are to achieve a straight growing spine, a normal standing sagittal profile, and a short fusion segment. The options of surgery include in situ fusion, convex hemi epiphysiodesis and hemi vertebra excision. These basic surgical procedures can be combined with curve correction, instrumentation and short segment fusion. Most surgeons prefer posterior (only) surgery for uncomplicated HV excision and short segment fusion. These surgical procedures can be performed through posterior, anterior or combined approaches. The advocates of combined approaches suggest greater deformity correction possibilities with reduced incidence of pseudoarthrosis and minimize crankshaft phenomenon. We recommend posterior surgery for curves involving only an element of kyphosis or modest deformity, whereas combined anterior and posterior approach is indicated for large or lordotic deformities. In the last decade, the use of growing rods and vertebral expandable prosthetic titanium rib has improved the armamentarium of the

  19. Congenital malformations in diabetic offspring.

    PubMed

    Temesio, P; Belitzky, R; Gallego, L; Martell, M; Pose, S V

    1977-01-01

    A retrospective study of 215 deliveries in diabetic mothers at Hospital de Clínicas (Montevideo, Uruguay) has been performed. Presence of congenital malformations (CM) was considered in relation to age of the mothers, class of maternal diabetes, maternal angiopathy, treatment and metabolic control. The prevalence of CM in the series was 9.8%. None of the factors analyzed seems to be statistically linked to the prevalence of CM. PMID:613685

  20. Congenital Portosystemic Shunt: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Timpanaro, Tiziana; Passanisi, Stefano; Sauna, Alessandra; Trombatore, Claudia; Pennisi, Monica; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Smilari, Pierluigi; Greco, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital portosystemic venous malformations are rare abnormalities in which the portal blood drains into a systemic vein and which are characterized by extreme clinical variability. Case Presentations. The authors present two case reports of a congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (Type II). In the first patient, apparently nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, proved to be secondary to hypoglycemic episodes related to the presence of a portosystemic shunt, later confirmed on imaging. During portal vein angiography, endovascular embolization of the portocaval fistula achieved occlusion of the anomalous venous tract. In the second patient, affected by Down's syndrome, the diagnosis of a portosystemic malformation was made by routine ultrasonography, performed to rule out concurrent congenital anomalies. Because of the absence of symptoms, we chose to observe this patient. Conclusions. These two case reports demonstrate the clinical heterogeneity of this malformation and the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As part of a proper workup, clinical evaluation must always be followed by radiographic diagnosis. PMID:25709849

  1. Congenital talipes equinovarus associated with hereditary congenital common peroneal nerve neuropathy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Matar, Hosam E; Garg, Neeraj K

    2016-03-01

    We present a unique case of a congenital hereditary common peroneal nerve neuropathy with congenital idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus that had been treated with the Ponseti method with satisfactory outcome at 5-year follow-up, along with a literature review. PMID:26588839

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and other compounds made from these sugar molecules (carbohydrates). Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency usually becomes apparent after ... isomaltase deficiency, congenital Merck Manual for Healthcare Professionals: Carbohydrate ... Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency The American ...

  3. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD. PMID:25497206

  4. CONGENITAL PSEUDARTHROSIS OF THE CLAVICLE

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, Marina Juliana Pita Sassioto Silveira; dos Reis Braga, Susana; Akkari, Miguel; Prado, José Carlos Lopes; Santili, Cláudio

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pseudarthrosis of the clavicle (PCC) is a rare affection, that can be diagnosed at birth and represent a disturbance of union of the ossification centers. It's more common in girls and in the right side. This study objectives to proceed a revision about the subject, that was searched in online database of LILACS and MEDLINE. We found 56 articles till present data. Besides be a bit infrequent, the PCC must not be missed or even forgotten, especially as differential diagnosis with acute fracture of the clavicle at birth by trauma in the childbirth. The diagnostic is relatively easy and the treatment can be just observation or even surgical. PMID:27047839

  5. Congenital duodenal obstruction: causes and imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, Michael F; Tracy, Elisabeth T; Maxfield, Charles M

    2016-07-01

    Bilious emesis is a common cause for evaluation in pediatric radiology departments. There are several causes of congenital duodenal obstruction, most of which require elective surgical correction, but the potential of malrotation with midgut volvulus demands prompt imaging evaluation. We review the various causes of congenital duodenal obstruction with an emphasis on the approach to imaging evaluation and diagnosis. PMID:27324508

  6. Arrhythmias in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Robert M.; Tseng, Zian H.

    2014-01-01

    Late after surgical repair of complex congenital heart disease, atrial arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death are a major cause of mortality. The six cases in this article highlight common challenges in the management of arrhythmias in the adult congenital heart disease population. PMID:25197326

  7. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  8. Optimum treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Ville, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection affects 0.7% of live births and is the leading cause of congenital neurological handicaps of infectious origin. However, systematic screening of this infection has not been implemented in pregnancy or at birth in any country. This apparent paradox has been justified by the unavailability of an efficient vaccine and by the scarcity of data available on the treatment of congenital CMV. However, in the last decade interesting new data on the management of this congenital infection has emerged including new results on both neonatal and postnatal treatments. This review provides an update on the potential benefits of antiviral treatment and on passive immunisation both in the neonatal and the antenatal periods. These suggest a benefit to a proactive approach for neonatal and prenatal congenital infections. PMID:27043943

  9. [Maternal imagination and congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Van Heiningen, Teunis Willem

    2011-01-01

    Since antiquity philosophers and scientists tried to explain the cause of congenital malformations. In early modern medicine maternal imagination was largely accepted as their true cause, This concept was rejected by Blondel, a London physician. Around 1750 Wolff introduced the Hemmungsbildung as the cause of congenital malformations, a concept adopted in 1781 by Blumenbach. Later on Soemmerring (1784), Crichton (1785) and Meckel the younger adopted Blumenbach's concept. In 1824 Suringar further developed it. More and more the excessive development of fetal blood vessels or nerves was rejected as a possible cause, although from time to time these ideas were adopted again. In the early 1800s Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1811) and Vrolik (1817) developed a classification of monstra. These attempts urged Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (Etienne's son) and Vrolik the younger (Gerard's son) to develop it further. Nevertheless, around 1840 Vrolik had to admit that although we are well acqainted with the various malformations, we are still ignorant of the primary cause of these phenomena. Meanwhile the dispute between the adherents of the theory of preformation and those who had adopted the concept of epigenesis exercised many minds. In the second half of the eighteenth century the latter theory became more and more adopted and this fact cleared the way for the ideas introduced by Wolff and Blumenbach, because it was consistent with the idea of a gradual development of fetal structures. PMID:22073754

  10. Congenital PCB poisoning: a reevaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    A review of the literature reveals a need to clarify the pathologic physiology of congenital polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) poisoning, which is characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, brown staining of the skin and mucous membranes as in Addison's disease, natal teeth, widely open fontanelles and sagittal suture and apparent overgrowth of the gingiva. The skull abnormalities may represent irregular calcification, with natal teeth appearing because the bone of the mandible is penetrated more easily than usual. Some fetuses were poisoned at the time the mothers ingested the oil; others were affected in the subsequent years from residual contamination in the mothers' bodies. The misadventure in Japan was repeated in Taiwan in 1979. The seven congenital cases in Taiwan reported thus far seem to differ from those in Japan. In Taiwan the noses were somewhat black, two of the infants did not have low birth weight and the osseous abnormalities of the skull and gingival hyperplasia were not observed. Systematic followup studies should be made in Taiwan of the children born within 2 years of maternal poisoning with PCBs. Special attention should be given to age at first dentition and skull-X-rays for spotty calcification, among other measures of physical, neurologic and intellectual development.

  11. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    de Die-Smulders, C E; Smeets, H J; Loots, W; Anten, H B; Mirandolle, J F; Geraedts, J P; Höweler, C J

    1997-01-01

    We report a rare case of paternally transmitted congenital myotonic dystrophy (DM). The proband is a 23 year old, mentally retarded male who suffers severe muscular weakness. He presented with respiratory and feeding difficulties at birth. His two sibs suffer from childhood onset DM. Their late father had the adult type of DM, with onset around 30 years. Only six other cases of paternal transmission of congenital DM have been reported recently. We review the sex related effects on transmission of congenital DM. Decreased fertility of males with adult onset DM and contraction of the repeat upon male transmission contribute to the almost absent occurrence of paternal transmission of congenital DM. Also the fathers of the reported congenitally affected children showed, on average, shorter CTG repeat lengths and hence less severe clinical symptoms than the mothers of children with congenital DM. We conclude that paternal transmission of congenital DM is rare and preferentially occurs with onset of DM past 30 years in the father. Images PMID:9391889

  12. Critical congenital heart disease screening

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A.; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  13. HLA typing in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meenken, C; Rothova, A; de Waal, L P; van der Horst, A R; Mesman, B J; Kijlstra, A

    1995-01-01

    HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-D typing was performed in 47 mothers of patients suffering from ocular toxoplasmosis to investigate whether an immunogenetic predisposition exists for developing congenital toxoplasmosis in their offspring. No significant association between any HLA antigen was observed in the mothers of patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, although a total absence of the HLA-B51 antigen was found in this group. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C typing was also performed in their children (52 patients with ocular toxoplasmosis), to investigate a possible relation between the severity of ocular toxoplasmosis and an eventual immunogenetic factor. In the patients with ocular toxoplasmosis an increased frequency of the HLA-Bw62 antigen was observed in correlation with severe ocular involvement. PMID:7612565

  14. Critical congenital heart disease screening.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  15. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of congenital varicella syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tongsong, Theera; Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee

    2012-01-01

    Congenital varicella syndrome is a rare disorder occurring in less than 1% of maternal varicella during early pregnancy but is associated with high fetal morbidity and mortality. This case report aimed to describe the sonographic features of congenital varicella syndrome following maternal varicella. Well-documented maternal chicken pox was made at 12 weeks of gestation and prenatal ultrasound was performed at 16 weeks. Striking sonographic features included hydropic changes and disseminated calcifications in multiple organs, especially liver and myocardium. Elective termination of pregnancy was done at 17 weeks. The presence of disseminated calcifications could suggest the diagnosis of congenital varicella syndrome. PMID:22323269

  16. Ventricular Tachycardia in Congenital Pulmonary Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ruckdeschel, Emily Sue; Schuller, Joseph; Nguyen, Duy Thai

    2016-03-01

    With modern surgical techniques, there is significantly increased life expectancy for those with congenital heart disease. Although congenital pulmonary valve stenosis is not as complex as tetralogy of Fallot, there are many similarities between the 2 lesions, such that patients with either of these conditions are at risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Those patients who have undergone surgical palliation for congenital pulmonary stenosis are at an increased risk for development of ventricular arrhythmias and may benefit from a more aggressive evaluation for symptoms of palpitations or syncope. PMID:26920196

  17. Living with a Congenital Heart Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... well the heart’s chambers and valves are working. Health Insurance and Employment Adults who have congenital heart defects ... carefully consider how changing jobs will affect their health insurance coverage. Some health plans have waiting periods or ...

  18. Congenital urethrocutaneous fistula in an adolescent male

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Satish M.; Mody, Nikunj B.; Patil, Surendra B.; Sadawarte, Pranam

    2015-01-01

    A urethrocutaneous fistula is a common complication after hypospadias repair, but congenital fistula is a rare anomaly. We present a 16-year-old boy with this unusual anomaly. Its etiology, embryology, and management are discussed in brief. PMID:26424989

  19. Congenital and Genetic Disease in Domestic Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, John J.

    1972-01-01

    Reviews observations on domestic animals that have led to the identification of environmental teratogens, and have provided insight into the pathogenesis of congenital defects and genetic diseases in man." (Author/AL)

  20. Missed congenital hypothyroidism in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Azam, Anita; Cutfield, Wayne; Mouat, Fran; Hofman, Paul L; Jefferies, Craig; Webster, Dianne; Gunn, Alistair Jan

    2012-10-01

    Newborn screening for congenital hypothyroidism has been remarkably effective, although rare cases of false negative screening have been reported in same sex twins, presumptively due to fetal blood exchange. We report a case in which the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism due to thyroid ectopia in a monozygotic twin was delayed by 8 months, with a normal newborn screening TSH level of 11 mIU/L blood (normal < 15 mIU/L) at 2 days of life. This is the first such case since the national New Zealand newborn screening programme introduced screening for congenital hypothyroidism in 1981 (30 years ago). Repeating thyroid studies at 14 days of age in same-sex twins has been advocated to avoid delayed diagnosis, but given the low risk, may not be cost effective. It is important to maintain a high index of suspicion in same-sex twin pregnancies of potential congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:22970836

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and walking. Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy also impairs brain development. People with this condition have a brain abnormality ... cobblestones). These changes in the structure of the brain lead to significantly delayed development of speech and motor skills and moderate to ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... congenital methemoglobinemia is caused by mutations in the CYB5R3 gene. This gene provides instruction for making an ... isoforms) of this enzyme are produced from the CYB5R3 gene. The soluble isoform is present only in ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: congenital mirror movement disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... throughout life, without other associated signs and symptoms. Intelligence and lifespan are not affected. People with congenital ... movement. Normally, signals from each half of the brain control movements on the opposite side of the ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: congenital insensitivity to pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a complete loss of the sense of smell (anosmia). Congenital insensitivity to pain is considered a ... to cells that detect sensations such as touch, smell, and pain. Related Information What does it mean ...

  5. Digenic mutations in severe congenital neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Germeshausen, Manuela; Zeidler, Cornelia; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Lanciotti, Marina; Ballmaier, Matthias; Welte, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Mutations in different genes have been described as causative for severe neutropenia, e.g. ELANE, HAX1 and G6PC3. Although congenital neutropenia is considered to be a group of monogenic disorders, the phenotypic heterogeneity even within the yet defined genetic subtypes points to additional genetic and/or epigenetic influences on the disease phenotype. We describe congenital neutropenia patients with mutations in two candidate genes each, including 6 novel mutations. Two of them had a heterozygous ELANE mutation combined with a homozygous mutation in G6PC3 or HAX1, respectively. The other 2 patients combined homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in G6PC3 or HAX1 with a heterozygous mutation in the respective other gene. Our results suggest that digenicity may underlie this disorder of myelopoiesis at least in some congenital neutropenia patients. PMID:20220065

  6. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  7. Genetics Home Reference: congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center: Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia University of Michigan Health System These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the diagnosis and management of various health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia) that can cause sudden death. People with congenital generalized lipodystrophy have a distinctive ... stenosis), and severe arrhythmia that can lead to sudden death. Related Information What does it mean if a ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B genotype determines risk for sudden death. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2008 Jan;43(1):77-86. ... Rand CM. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): kindred disorders of autonomic regulation. Respir ...

  10. METROPOLITAN ATLANTA CONGENITAL DEFECTS PROGRAM (MACDP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) was established in 1967 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with Emory University and the Georgia Mental Health Institute as the nation's first population-based active ascertainment birth defects surveillan...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: congenital myasthenic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy Resources (2 links) Muscular Dystrophy Association Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America: Congenital Myasthenia GeneReviews (1 link) ... for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a personal health condition should consult with ...

  12. The "harlequin" sign and congenital Horner's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D A; Bibby, K; Woodruff, G

    1997-01-01

    When trying to establish the likely anatomical site (preganglionic or postganglionic) of a lesion causing congenital Horner's syndrome, the distribution of facial flushing (the "harlequin" sign), may be seen. In babies and young children, facial flushing is a relatively simple clinical sign to demonstrate, compared with facial sweating. In unilateral facial flushing the areas that do not flush are almost always identical to the anhidrotic areas. However, neither facial flushing nor testing the pupil reactions with pholedrine or hydroxyamphetamine can be relied on to predict the probable site of any lesion causing congenital Horner's syndrome. Two patients with congenital Horner's syndrome are presented which demonstrated the "harlequin" sign and in whom clinical examination and pharmacological testing gave conflicting evidence for localisation of the site of the causative lesion. The presentation of congenital Horner's syndrome should be investigated and include MRI or CT to exclude a serious underlying cause. Images PMID:9219751

  13. Congenital anomalies after assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Pinborg, Anja; Henningsen, Anna-Karina Aaris; Malchau, Sara Sofie; Loft, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Worldwide, more than 5 million children have been born after assisted reproductive technology (ART), and in many developed countries ART infants represent more than 1% of the birth cohorts. It is well known that ART children are at increased risk of congenital malformations even after adjustment for known confounders such as maternal age. The proportion of ART children is not negligible, and knowledge about the causes of the higher risk of congenital malformations is crucial to develop prevention strategies to reduce the future risk in ART children. The aim of this review is to summarize the literature on the association between ART and congenital anomalies with respect to subfertility, fertility treatment other than ART, and different ART methods including intracytoplasmic sperm injection, blastocyst culture, and cryotechniques. Trends over time in ART and congenital anomalies will also be discussed. PMID:23290686

  14. Screening programme for congenital toxoplasmosis in France.

    PubMed

    Thulliez, P

    1992-01-01

    The high prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in France led to the establishment of a national screening programme. Preventive measures were progressively introduced, and these became compulsory in 1978 with the result that the incidence of congenital toxoplasmosis is now markedly reduced. Further improvements may include more systematic sampling from women before pregnancy, better and adequate health education and centralized notification of both maternal and congenital cases of toxoplasmosis. PMID:1290073

  15. Cutaneous mastocytosis associated with congenital alopecia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cho Rok; Kim, Hyun-Je; Jung, Mi-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Dong-Youn; Lee, Joo-Heung; Yang, Jun-Mo

    2012-07-01

    Mastocytosis is a rare disorder that shows accumulation of mast cells in tissues. Atypical clinical features may mimic impetigo, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and carcinoid syndrome; however, only 1 case of scarring alopecia associated with mastocytosis has been reported. We present the first case of cutaneous mastocytosis associated with congenital alopecia areata in a 3-year-old Korean girl. This case showed an atypical clinical presentation of congenital alopecia areata, but histopathological results confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis. PMID:22356916

  16. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  17. An unusual presentation of congenital bronchoesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Atalabi, O M; Falade, A G; Obajimi, O M; Akinyinka, O O; Lagundoye, S B; Ibinaiye, P O

    2004-01-01

    We present the case of a 5-week-old neonate with multiple congenital abnormalities including a broncho-oesophageal fistula, which showed radiological features suggestive of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Emergency limited barium swallow done was initially reported as a case of diaphragmatic hernia. Autopsy revealed pus within the right lung, and a fistulous connection between the oesophagus and an intralobar sequestrated lung. No diaphragmatic hernia or intra-abdominal organ abnormality were seen, and an occipital meningomyelocoele was also confirmed. PMID:15171538

  18. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Merke, Deborah P; Poppas, Dix P

    2014-01-01

    The management of congenital adrenal hyperplasia involves suppression of adrenal androgen production, in addition to treatment of adrenal insufficiency. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia is especially challenging because changes in the hormonal milieu during puberty can lead to inadequate suppression of adrenal androgens, psychosocial issues often affect adherence to medical therapy, and sexual function plays a major part in adolescence and young adulthood. For these reasons, treatment regimen reassessment is indicated during adolescence. Patients with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia require reassessment regarding the need for glucocorticoid drug treatment. No clinical trials have compared various regimens for classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia in adults, thus therapy is individualised and based on the prevention of adverse outcomes. Extensive patient education is key during transition from paediatric care to adult care and should include education of females with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia regarding their genital anatomy and surgical history. Common issues for these patients include urinary incontinence, vaginal stenosis, clitoral pain, and cosmetic concerns; for males with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, common issues include testicular adrenal rest tumours. Transition from paediatric to adult care is most successful when phased over many years. Education of health-care providers on how to successfully transition patients is greatly needed. PMID:24622419

  19. Approach to the diagnosis of congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    North, Kathryn N; Wang, Ching H; Clarke, Nigel; Jungbluth, Heinz; Vainzof, Mariz; Dowling, James J; Amburgey, Kimberly; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Beggs, Alan H; Sewry, Caroline; Laing, Nigel G; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decade there have been major advances in defining the genetic basis of the majority of congenital myopathy subtypes. However the relationship between each congenital myopathy, defined on histological grounds, and the genetic cause is complex. Many of the congenital myopathies are due to mutations in more than one gene, and mutations in the same gene can cause different muscle pathologies. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Myopathies performed a literature review and consulted a group of experts in the field to develop a summary of (1) the key features common to all forms of congenital myopathy and (2) the specific features that help to discriminate between the different genetic subtypes. The consensus statement was refined by two rounds of on-line survey, and a three-day workshop. This consensus statement provides guidelines to the physician assessing the infant or child with hypotonia and weakness. We summarise the clinical features that are most suggestive of a congenital myopathy, the major differential diagnoses and the features on clinical examination, investigations, muscle pathology and muscle imaging that are suggestive of a specific genetic diagnosis to assist in prioritisation of genetic testing of known genes. As next generation sequencing becomes increasingly used as a diagnostic tool in clinical practise, these guidelines will assist in determining which sequence variations are likely to be pathogenic. PMID:24456932

  20. [Congenital thoracic defects demonstrated by radiophotography].

    PubMed

    Jonescu, N; Ionescu, G C

    1991-01-01

    Costal congenital defects are malformations or anomalies of dimension, location or structure of the ribs, generated by disturbances of prenatal development. These anomalies appear in mesoderm which also gives rise to skeleton, muscles, serums, conjunctive tissues, circulatory system and urogenital apparatus. Of the 59,225 persons examined, 502 had costal congenital defects. The presence of azygos lobe (Wrisberg's lobe) in 158 cases (0.26%), of right aortic (arcs high dextroposition of cross) in 2 cases and (3%000) dextroposition of heart in 6 cases (10%000), out of which a situs inversus (complete cardiovascular transposition) were noticed as congenital defects with common origin in embryonic mesoderm. Medical radiophotography can be used as a method in detecting congenital costal defects. Other defects in other organs can be also detected. The congenital costal defects found in an rf examined population, representing a part of the total of congenital malformations, may be one of their indirect epidemiologic indices. Their existence may lead to the explanation of the symptomatology of the nervous compressive type on brachiocephalic vascular, etc. plexus. As some of the defects are an excess of osseous and cartilaginous matter, they may be used, when indicated, as autografts. PMID:1823198

  1. [Aftereffects of congenital infections in infants].

    PubMed

    Burdzenidze, E; Zhvania, M

    2006-12-01

    Congenital infections are among the most pressing health care problems. Congenital infections are not reason of congenital malformation and perinatal mortality only, but also pathologies that can be revealed during first year of life. Frequency for congenital viral infection displayed from birth varies between 23% and 92%. The aim of the study was the investigation of inherent infection consequences (citomegaloviral infection, herpes infection and chlamidia) in children in different age groups. Under our observation were 81 children with congenital infections. Among them 29 were with citomegaloviral infection, 17 with herpes infection; 15 chlamidia infection and 22 infections mix (citomegalovirus + herpes, citomegalovirus + chlamidia and chlamidia + herpes). In all observed children neurological simptomatic such as neuro-reflectory hyperexcitability syndrom, hypertension-hydrocephalic syndrom, musculary dystonia syndrom, hydrocephaly, retardation of psychomotor development etc. were present. After birth the worst prevalent are pathologies of cardiovascular system: functional cardiopathy, carditis, congenital heart disease (among them multivalvular disease), affection of hepatobilliar system, organs of vision and hearing etc are present also. PMID:17261890

  2. Functional Assessment for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed. PMID:24653734

  3. Congenital Cystic Lesions of the Lung: Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation and Bronchopulmonary Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Sfakianaki, Anna K; Copel, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cystic lesions of the lung in fetuses are rare. The most common malformations of the lower respiratory tract are congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and bronchopulmonary sequestration. With the increased use of obstetric ultrasound, cystic lung lesions are detected more often antenatally, which allows for proper planning of peripartum and neonatal management. This article discusses a range of diagnostic and management options. PMID:22866187

  4. Congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa with congenital aural atresia and mastoiditis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital cholesteatoma may be expected in abnormally developed ear, it may cause bony erosion of the middle ear cleft and extend to the infratemporal fossa. We present the first case of congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa in a patient with congenital aural atresia that has been complicated with acute mastoiditis. Case presentation A sixteen year old Egyptian male patient presented with congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa with congenital aural atresia complicated with acute mastoiditis. Two weeks earlier, the patient suffered pain necessitating hospital admission, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a soft tissue mass in the right infratemporal fossa. On presentation to our institute, Computerized tomography was done as a routine, it proved the diagnosis of mastoiditis, pure tone audiometry showed an air-bone gap of 60 dB. Cortical mastoidectomy was done for treatment of mastoiditis, removal of congenital cholesteatoma was carried out with reconstruction of external auditory canal. Follow-up of the patient for 2 years and 3 months showed a patent, infection free external auditory canal with an air-bone gap has been reduced to 35db. One year after the operation; MRI was done and it showed no residual or recurrent cholesteatoma. Conclusions Congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa in cases of congenital aural atresia can be managed safely even if it was associated with mastoiditis. It is an original case report of interest to the speciality of otolaryngology. PMID:22731118

  5. Congenital neuroblastoma with placental involvement.

    PubMed

    Kume, Ayako; Morikawa, Teppei; Ogawa, Makiko; Yamashita, Aki; Yamaguchi, Shunichi; Fukayama, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    We describe an extremely rare case of congenital neuroblastoma with placental involvement. A fetus with a left abdominal mass detected during ultrasonography at 23 weeks' gestation developed hydrops fetalis by 26 weeks' gestation. The mother developed hypertension at 26 5/7 weeks' gestation. Based on a clinical diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension, labor was induced at 26 6/7 weeks. However, intrauterine fetal death was diagnosed during delivery. Postmortern examination revealed a solid tumor at the site of the left adrenal gland. Histological examination of the tumor revealed dense proliferation of small round tumor cells with sparse cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei. Some tumor-cell complexes contained abundant neurofibrils and Hormer-Wright rosettes were observed. A diagnosis of neuroblastoma of the left adrenal gland was made. The liver was markedly enlarged and was extensively replaced by neuroblastoma cells. In addition, small nests of tumor cells were detected in the blood vessels of various organs including the heart, lung, spleen, kidneys, stomach, small and large intestine, thyroid gland, testis, spinal cord, and bone marrow. Histological examination of the enlarged placenta revealed numerous neuroblastoma cells in the villous fetal capillary spaces. The present case was unusual in that the tumor cells were found not only in the chorionic villi, but also in the intervillous space of the maternal vascular system. However, there was no clinical evidence of maternal metastasis. PMID:25550872

  6. Clinical genetics of congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Szinnai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is a state of insufficient thyroid hormone supply to the organism, starting in utero. Two forms of permanent primary or thyroidal CH are known. Thyroid dysgenesis (TD) describes a spectrum of defects of thyroid organogenesis. Five monogenetic forms due to mutations in TSHR, PAX8, NKX2-1, FOXE1 and NKX2-5 have been identified so far. Thyroid dyshormonogenesis comprises defects at every step of thyroid hormone synthesis. Mutations in 7 genes are well described causing iodine transport defect (SLC5A5), iodine organification defect (TPO, DUOX2, DUOXA2, SLC26A4), thyroglobulin (TG) synthesis or transport defect or iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD/DEHAL1) deficiency. The new consensus guidelines for CH recommend genetic counseling for each family with an affected child. Mode of inheritance, recurrence rate and possible associated malformations in the context of syndromic forms should be outlined. Molecular genetic studies should be preceded by a detailed phenotypic description of the patient's thyroid disease and a detailed family history. This review summarizes clinical, biochemical and radiological phenotypes and molecular aspects of the known genetic forms of TD and thyroid dyshormonogenesis relevant for genetic counseling and molecular studies. PMID:25231445

  7. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Unresolved Issues.

    PubMed

    Yau, Mabel; Khattab, Ahmed; Poppas, Dix; Ghizzoni, Lucia; New, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a family of disorders that comes from enzymatic deficiencies in cortisol production, with 21-hydroxylase deficiency causing ∼90% of cases. Distinction is made between the severe classical form and milder nonclassical form of CAH. Molecular genetic analysis is used to confirm the hormonal diagnosis. A high rate of genotype-phenotype disconcordance has been found in 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The goal of treatment is to replace with synthetic glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids and suppress adrenal androgen production. The treatment of patients affected with nonclassical CAH, particularly males, remains controversial. Variable synthetic glucocorticoids are used and new modes of glucocorticoid delivery are under investigation. To improve height, growth hormone and other adjuvant therapies are employed. Long-term outcomes of genital surgery using modern techniques in females affected with classical CAH continue to be investigated. Prenatal treatment with dexamethasone is available to avoid ambiguous genitalia in these females. Although studies have shown its safety to mother and fetus, prenatal treatment is still regarded as experimental. Currently, prenatal diagnosis of CAH can only be obtained through invasive methods. Recently, the detection of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma has made it possible to make this diagnosis earlier and noninvasively. PMID:27211889

  8. Symptoms of autism among children with congenital deafblindness.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2014-05-01

    Associations between congenital deafness or blindness and autism have been found. The main consequences of congenital sensory impairment, being barriers for communication, language and social interaction development, may lead to symptoms of autism. To date only few studies have been reported concerning individuals with congenital deafblindness. This study examines symptoms of autism among 71 children with congenital deafblindness using the Autism Behavior Checklist. The cohort of children with congenital deafblindness was found to have symptoms of autism on a level similar to children with another developmental disorder than autism for example intellectual disability. No association was found between severity of congenital sensory impairment and severity or type of symptoms of autism. PMID:24127166

  9. Congenital von Willebrand's disease and clinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hassan, S; Qureshi, W; Donthireddy, V; Kuriakose, P

    2013-03-01

    Data from case reports and systematic reviews suggest an association of Hypothyroidism and Acquired von Willebrand's syndrome. It is not known if congenital von Willebrand's disease is associated with hypothyroidism in a similar way. The aim of this study was to identify the association of congenital von Willebrand's disease (VWD) with clinical hypothyroidism. A total of 350 cases of congenital VWD were initially screened from our institution database from 1985 to 2010. A careful review of patient records was carried out to see if patients truly had congenital VWD and coexisting clinical hypothyroidism. Patients with uncertain diagnoses or other bleeding disorders were excluded, leading to 197 patients remaining in the final sample. A random age- and sex-matched parallel control group was also obtained from the hospital database. Of 197 patients (mean age 43.8 ± 17.5 years, women 72%) of congenital VWD, 32/197 (16%) were diagnosed with clinical hypothyroidism, while only 11/197 (5.6%) of the matched controls were clinically hypothyroid. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated that VWD was an independent predictor of developing clinical hypothyroidism (OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.65-7.22, P = 0.001). The proportion of patients diagnosed with clinical hypothyroidism was more in the VWD group (P < 0.0001). Our analysis shows a strong association of clinical hypothyroidism in patients with congenital VWD, but future studies will be required to delineate a pathological mechanism. In our opinion, clinicians should consider checking thyroid function in the newly diagnosed and established cases of congenital VWD. PMID:23171382

  10. Congenital malaria in Urabá, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital malaria has been considered a rare event; however, recent reports have shown frequencies ranging from 3% to 54.2% among newborns of mothers who had suffered malaria during pregnancy. There are only a few references concerning the epidemiological impact of this entity in Latin-America and Colombia. Objective The aim of the study was to measure the prevalence of congenital malaria in an endemic Colombian region and to determine some of its characteristics. Methods A prospective, descriptive study was carried out in the mothers who suffered malaria during pregnancy and their newborns. Neonates were clinically evaluated at birth and screened for Plasmodium spp. infection by thick smear from the umbilical cord and peripheral blood, and followed-up weekly during the first 21 days of postnatal life through clinical examinations and thick smears. Results 116 newborns were included in the study and 80 umbilical cord samples were obtained. Five cases of congenital infection were identified (four caused by P. vivax and one by P. falciparum), two in umbilical cord blood and three in newborn peripheral blood. One case was diagnosed at birth and the others during follow-up. Prevalence of congenital infection was 4.3%. One of the infected newborns was severely ill, while the others were asymptomatic and apparently healthy. The mothers of the newborns with congenital malaria had been diagnosed with malaria in the last trimester of pregnancy or during delivery, and also presented placental infection. Conclusions Congenital malaria may be a frequent event in newborns of mothers who have suffered malaria during pregnancy in Colombia. An association was found between congenital malaria and the diagnosis of malaria in the mother during the last trimester of pregnancy or during delivery, and the presence of placental infection. PMID:21846373

  11. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease. PMID:26413101

  12. Congenital Scoliosis in Smith–Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Liang, Jinqian; Sheng, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex and rare congenital condition that is characterized by minor craniofacial anomalies, short stature, sleep disturbances, behavioral, and neurocognitive abnormalities, as well as variable multisystemic manifestations. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome. This study is to present a case of scoliosis occurring in the setting of SMS and explore the possible mechanisms between the 2 diseases. The patient is a 13-year-old Chinese female with congenital scoliosis and Tetralogy of Fallot, mental retardation, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertrophy of tonsil, conductive hearing loss, and agenesis of the epiglottis. An interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization at chromosome 17p11.2 revealed a heterozygous deletion, confirming a molecular diagnosis of SMS. She underwent a posterior correction at thoracic 1-lumbar 1 (T1-L1) levels, using the Moss-SI spinal system. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was clinically pain free and well balanced. Plain radiographs showed solid spine fusion with no loss of correction. Congenital cardiac disease, immunodeficiency, and severe behavioral problems can affect the surgical outcome following spine fusion and need to be taken into consideration for the surgeon and anesthesiologist. Scoliosis is not uncommon among patients with SMS, and there is a potential association between congenital scoliosis and SMS. The potential mechanisms in the pathogenesis of congenital scoliosis of SMS included retinoic acid-induced 1 (RAI1) microdeletion and RAI1 gene point mutation. PMID:25929900

  13. Congenital lacrimal fistula: A major review.

    PubMed

    Chaung, Jia Quan; Sundar, Gangadhara; Ali, Mohammad Javed

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and summarize the etiopathogenesis, symptomatology, systemic associations, management, complications and clinical outcomes of congenital lacrimal fistulae. The authors performed an electronic database (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library) search of all articles published in English on congenital lacrimal fistulae. Congenital subsets of patients from series of mixed lacrimal fistulae were included in the review. These articles were reviewed along with their relevant cross-references. Data reviewed included demographics, presentations, investigations, management, complications and outcomes. The prevalence of congenital lacrimal fistulae is reported to be around 1 in 2000 live births. They are frequently unilateral, although familial cases tend to be bilateral. Lacrimal and systemic anomalies have been associated with lacrimal fistulae. Exact etiopathogenesis is unknown but mostly believed to be an accessory out budding from the lacrimal drainage system during embryogenesis. Treatment is indicated when significant epiphora or discharge is present and is mostly achieved by various fistulectomy techniques with or without a dacryocystorhinostomy. Congenital lacrimal fistulae are a distinct clinical entity with unique features. Surgical management can be challenging and successful outcomes are usually achieved with widely accepted protocols. PMID:27191932

  14. Congenital scoliosis: an up-to-date

    PubMed Central

    Burnei, G; Gavriliu, S; Vlad, C; Georgescu, I; Ghita, RA; Dughilă, C; Japie, EM; Onilă, A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis represents a spinal malformation due to defects of formation, segmentation or mixed ones. It is characterized by a longitudinal and rotational imbalance. 54 patients were analyzed and 39 out of them were operated by various approaches with anterior and posterior instrumentations during 2000 and 2012. The impossibility to appoint some patients encountered in the daily practice into the known classifications, allowed us to purpose two categories of congenital scoliosis related to the predominance of spinal deviances in the coronal and transversal views. No certain etiology of congenital scoliosis has been identified until today. The susceptibility of some polygenic defects is obvious due to the presence of a sum of defects associated to most of the congenital scoliosis cases and the rarity of the presence of a unique defect. The diagnosis requires a thorough clinical and imaging examination in order to establish an individualized therapeutic strategy. The treatment of congenital scoliosis is different from the adolescent idiopathic one. Therapeutic criteria are significantly different. It is essential to assess the difference in growth of the concavity related to the convexity when choosing a particular procedure. The magnitude of the curve and the progressive rate are fundamental issues to the surgeon PMID:26351546

  15. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  16. Newborn screening for congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2006-11-01

    Most neonates born with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) have normal appearance and no detectable physical signs. Hypothyroidism in the newborn period is almost always overlooked and delayed diagnosis leads to the most severe outcome of CH, mental retardation, emphasizing the importance of neonatal screening. Blood spot T4 or TSH or both can be used in neonatal screening for CH. The latter, which is more sensitive, is not cost effective, so the first two are used in different programs in the world. TSH screening was shown to be more specific in the diagnosis of CH; T4 screening is more sensitive in detecting newborns especially with rare hypothalamic-pituitary hypothyroidism, but less specific with a high frequency of false positives mainly in low birth weight and premature infants. The time at which the sample is taken may vary between centers, with the majority taking blood from a heel prick after 24 hours of age to minimize the false positive high TSH due to the physiological neonatal TSH surge that elevates TSH levels and causes dynamic T4 and T3 changes in the first 1 or 2 days after birth. Early discharge of mothers postpartum has increased the ratio of false positive TSH elevations. Although transient hypothyroidism may occur frequently, all suspected infants should be treated as having CH for the first 3 years of life, taking into account the risks of mental retardation. A reevaluation after 3 years is needed in such patients. The goal of initial therapy in CH is to minimize neonatal central nervous system exposure to hypothyroidism by normalizing thyroid function, as reflected by T4 and TSH levels, as rapidly as possible. Iodine deficiency is the most important cause of CH worldwide. Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis and is present in soil, water and air. Prevention of iodine deficiency can be by iodized salt, iodized oil, iodized bread or iodine tablets. PMID:17220056

  17. Flying and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Macartney, F J

    1984-03-01

    Only those congenital defects carrying a very low risk of complication (either before or after surgical correction) were considered. Atrial Septal Defects--(a) Ostium primum defects should be treated with caution either before or after surgical correction because of the risk of progressive conduction disorders and mitral regurgitation. (b) Ostium secundum defects could be considered for licensing (if the defect is small) or with surgical repair if the right ventricular systolic pressure is normal. (c) Sinus venosus defects--if too small to require surgical repair, licensing may be considered provided ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring shows no evidence of arrhythmias. Surgery increases the risk of sino-atrial disease, thus licensing should be permitted only where there is no evidence of arrhythmia and adequate cardiological follow-up is possible. Ventricular Septal Defects--Subjects with very small defects not requiring surgical closure may be considered for licensing. Subjects who have had surgical closure have a risk of arrhythmias and should be carefully evaluated. Pulmonary Stenosis--If mild (either before or after surgery) may be licensed, but regular assessment perhaps including right heart catheterization is needed to demonstrate stability of the lesion. Persistent Ductus Arteriosus--Surgical closure should be recommended on diagnosis and need not affect licensing. Isolated Bicuspid Aortic Valve--Need not debar from licensing, but careful annual examination (with electrocardiogram 2-D echocardiography and fluroscopy ) is required to detect calcification, stenosis or regurgitation. Coarctation of aorta--Subjects who have had a repair before the age of 12 years may be considered for licensing after examination of other risk factors (blood pressure at rest and on exercise in particular). Those repaired over the age of 12 may be considered for restricted licensing if normotensive. These recommendations will need review in the light of further long

  18. Handicapping Conditions Associated with the Congenital Rubella Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, McCay; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence of impairments diagnosed among children with congenital rubella syndrome. Approximately 73 percent are hearing impaired, at least 35 percent have congenital heart disorders, and 33 percent have visual defects. (Author)

  19. Prenatal detection of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome with encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Laxmi Devi; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) causes secondary morphological changes which can be detected on ultrasound. Here we report a case of congenital high airway obstruction with an occipital encephalocele detected at 23 weeks of gestation. PMID:27081227

  20. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... stationary night blindness autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder of the retina , which is ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 1 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 is a disorder characterized ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 2 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 is a disorder characterized ...

  3. What proportion of congenital abnormalities can be prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Czeizel, A E; Intôdy, Z; Modell, B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To estimate the proportion of preventable congenital abnormalities in Hungary. DESIGN--Analysis of available Hungarian data-bases and of the effectiveness of primary, secondary, and tertiary preventive methods. SETTING--Databases of ad hoc epidemiological studies and of the Hungarian congenital abnormality registry. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence at birth and prevalence after prevention in 73 congenital abnormality types or groups. RESULTS--Preventive methods are available for 51 (70%) of the 73 congenital abnormality types or groups evaluated. The birth prevalence of all congenital abnormalities could be reduced from 65 to 26 per 1000; thus 39 per 1000 (60%) are preventable. Without congenital dislocation of the hip, which is unusually common in Hungary, the preventable proportion of congenital abnormalities is 52%. CONCLUSION--Many congenital abnormalities can be prevented, but as they do not represent a single pathological category there is no single strategy for their prevention. Images p502-a p503-a PMID:8448464

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

    PubMed

    Do, A Young; Kim, Jung-Sun; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mesoblastic nephroma is a rare renal tumor that is diagnosed during pregnancy and is associated with polyhydramnios, prematurity, and neonatal hypertension. Differential diagnoses include Wilms tumor, adrenal neuroblastoma, and other abdominal tumors. We report a case of congenital mesoblastic nephroma detected by prenatal ultrasonography as a large fetal renal mass with polyhydramnios at 32 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonography showed a 6×6-cm complex, solid, hyperechoic, round mass in the right kidney. At 35 weeks of gestation, the patient was admitted with preterm premature rupture of membranes and the baby was delivered vaginally. Postnatal ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a heterogeneous solid mass on the right kidney. At the end of the first week of life, a right nephrectomy was performed and subsequent pathological examination confirmed a cellular variant of congenital mesoblastic nephroma with a high mitotic count. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy was administered. The newborn was discharged in good condition. PMID:26430667

  5. Congenital myopathies: clinical and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Thaha, Fazil; Gayathri, N; Nalini, A

    2011-01-01

    Congenital myopathies (CMs), a group of relatively non-progressive disorders presents with weakness and hypotonia of varying severity, morphologically recognized by specific structural abnormalities within the myofiber. This report presents the clinical and Histopathological features of 40 patients with CMs. Centronuclear myopathy was the commonest (40%) followed by congenital fiber type disproportion (37.5%). Other less common CMs included: myotubular myopathy (5%), nemaline myopathy (5%), central core disease (5%), multicore disease (2.5%) and congenital myopathy with tubular aggregate (5%). Immunolabeling to desmin corresponded to morphological changes within the myofibers while vimentin was negative in all the patients. There is no combined role of these proteins in the disease process. PMID:22234203

  6. Congenital cholesteatoma: delayed diagnosis and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Goh, B S; Faizah, A R; Salina, H; Asma, A; Saim, L

    2010-09-01

    This is a retrospective review of congenital cholesteatoma cases that were managed surgically. There were 5 cases. The age of presentation ranged from 5 to 18 year old. Three patients presented with complication of the disease. Three patients had intact tympanic membrane, two had perforation at the anterior superior quadrant. All patients had cholesteatoma medial to tympanic membrane. Four cases had extensive ossicular erosion with preoperative hearing worse than 40 dB. Four cases underwent canal wall down mastoid surgery and one underwent canal wall up surgery. One patient had recurrence which required revision surgery. In conclusion, congenital cholesteatoma presented late due to the silent nature of disease in its early stage. Extensive disease, ossicular destruction with risk of complication at presentation were marked in our study. Hence, more aggressive surgical intervention is recommended in the management of congenital cholesteatoma. PMID:21939167

  7. Congenital narrowing of the cervical spinal canal.

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, J T

    1975-01-01

    The clinical and laboratory findings in six patients with congenital narrowing of the cervical spinal canal and neurological symptoms are described. A variable age of onset and an entirely male occurrence were found. Signs and symptoms of spinal cord dysfunction predominated in all but one patient. Symptoms were produced in five patients by increased physical activity alone. Congenital narrowing of the cervical spinal canal may result in cord compression without a history of injury and occasionally without evidence of significant bony degenerative changes. The clinical features may be distinguishable from those found in cervical spondylosis without congenital narrowing. Intermittent claudication of the cervical spinal cord appears to be an important feature of this syndrome. Surgery improved four out of five people. PMID:1219087

  8. Deprivation amblyopia and congenital hereditary cataract.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Behzad; Stacy, Rebecca C; Kruger, Joshua; Cestari, Dean M

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision associated with decreased visual acuity, poor or absent stereopsis, and suppression of information from one eye.(1,2) Amblyopia may be caused by strabismus (strabismic amblyopia), refractive error (anisometropic amblyopia), or deprivation from obstructed vision (deprivation amblyopia). 1 In the developed world, amblyopia is the most common cause of childhood visual impairment, 3 which reduces quality of life 4 and also almost doubles the lifetime risk of legal blindness.(5, 6) Successful treatment of amblyopia greatly depends on early detection and treatment of predisposing disorders such as congenital cataract, which is the most common cause of deprivational amblyopia. Understanding the genetic causes of congenital cataract leads to more effective screening tests, early detection and treatment of infants and children who are at high risk for hereditary congenital cataract. PMID:24138041

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. PMID:26471823

  10. Air pollution and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Agay-Shay, Keren; Friger, Michael; Linn, Shai; Peled, Ammatzia; Amitai, Yona; Peretz, Chava

    2013-07-01

    Environmental factors such as ambient air pollution have been associated with congenital heart defects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between gestational exposure to air pollution and the risk of congenital heart defects. We conducted a registry-based cohort study with a total of 135,527 live- and still-births in the Tel-Aviv region during 2000-2006. We used a Geographic Information System-based spatiotemporal approach with weekly inverse distance weighting modeling to evaluate associations between gestational exposure to ambient air pollution during weeks 3-8 of pregnancy and the risk for congenital heart defects. The following pollutants were studied: carbon monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, ozone, sulfur-dioxide and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm and 2.5 μm (PM10, PM2.5 respectively). Logistic models, adjusted for socio-demographic covariates were used to evaluate the associations. We found that maternal exposure to increased concentrations of PM10 was associated with multiple congenital heart defects (adjusted OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.10 for 10 μg/m(3) increment). An inverse association was observed between concentrations of PM2.5 and isolated patent ductus arteriosus (adjusted OR 0.78, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.91 for 5 µg/m(3) increment). Sensitivity analyses showed that results were consistent. Generally there were no evidence for an association between gaseous air pollutants and congenital heart defects.Our results for PM10 and congenital heart defects confirm results from previous studies. The results for PM2.5 need further investigations. PMID:23623715

  11. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  12. Congenital angiomyoma of the tongue: case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y-H; Jang, Y-W; Pai, H; Kim, S-G

    2010-01-01

    Angiomyomas of the oral cavity are rare benign vascular neoplasms. In particular, the congenital form has not been reported before in the English language literature. We present a congenital angiomyoma of the tongue that was found on the posterior middle of the tongue in an infant. On MRI, the mass showed an isointense signal to muscle on the T1 weighted image and a slightly hyperintense signal on the T2 weighted image. Immunohistochemically, tumour cells were positive to desmin and smooth muscle actin, but negative to vimentin and S100. The treatment was surgical excision and no recurrence was found during the 26 month follow-up period. PMID:20841464

  13. Recurrent congenital fibrosarcoma with heart metastases.

    PubMed

    Lohi, Olli; Vornanen, Martine; Kähkönen, Marketta; Vettenranta, Kim; Parto, Katriina; Arola, Mikko

    2012-07-01

    Congenital fibrosarcomas are malignant tumors that arise in soft tissues. In infants this unique tumor does not commonly metastasize, even though there may be local recurrences. We report here a boy who had congenital fibrosarcoma in his right foot, which was completely excised at the age of 3 days. Four months later, a solitary encapsulated metastasis emerged in thoracic chest wall, which was operated. During adjuvant chemotherapy he developed histologically confirmed fibrosarcoma metastases in the heart. After extended treatment with cyclophosphamide/topotecan and gemcitabine/docetaxel, the heart tumors disappeared and he has been in complete remission for 3 years. PMID:22217490

  14. Pediatric congenital vertebral artery arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Shownkeen, Harish; Bova, Davide; Chenelle, Andrew G; Origitano, Thomas C

    2003-05-01

    Vertebral arteriovenous fistulas are rare in children and the congenital form has been seldom reported in the literature. Prior to using endovascular therapy techniques, only surgery was the main treatment. The most common endovascular treatment is through the use of detachable balloons. This report describes the clinical and radiological findings of a congenital vertebral artery fistula in a 20-month-old child. Balloons could not be safely employed; therefore, embolization was performed with Guglielmi detachable microcoils. We review the history and treatment of these lesions, their clinical presentation, and imaging features, including their outcome, with particular attention to the pediatric population. PMID:12695869

  15. Congenital myasthenic syndromes and transient myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Anna; Szabó, Hajnalka; Gergev, Gyurgyinka; Karcagi, Veronika; Szabó, Nóra; Endreffy, Emoke; Túri, Sándor; Sztriha, László

    2013-05-30

    Hypotonia in the neonatal period and early infancy is a common clinical finding. It can be caused by various heterogeneous disorders of different origin which might lead to diagnostic difficulties. Disorders of the neuromuscular junction, such as congenital myasthenic syndromes and neonatal transient myasthenia gravis are among the aetiologies. We report on a case of congenital myasthenia caused by mutation in the long cytoplasmic loop of the epsilon subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and a neonate of a myasthenic mother diagnosed with transient myasthenia gravis. PMID:23909021

  16. Congenital nephrotic syndrome. Gallium-67 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Trepashko, D.W.; Gelfand, M.J.; Pan, C.C.

    1988-11-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a rare disorder. Heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema occur during the first 3 months of life. Initial cases were reported from Finland and sporadic cases have occurred elsewhere. Finnish cases demonstrated an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern; currently, Finnish and non-Finnish types are recognized. The clinical course consists of failure to thrive, frequent infections, declining renal function, and early death by age 4 years from sepsis or uremia. Recently renal transplantation has improved the prognosis of patients with this disease. An abnormal Ga-67 scan in a case of congenital nephrotic syndrome is presented.

  17. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments. PMID:26489825

  18. NEW BORN SCREENING IN PREVENTING CONGENITAL HYPOTHYROIDISM.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mazahir; Zia, Aisha; Siddiqui, Saad Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Congenital Hypothyroidism is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation which is highly prevalent in our society due to lack of a national neonatal screening program, lack of education of the parents, increased consanguinity, and lack of suspicion from doctor's leads to delayed diagnosis and an increased incidence of congenital hypothyroidism in our society. This Menace can be easily tackled with a mass neonatal screening program and effective legislation which would make sure that serious efforts are being made to eradicate this preventable disease from Pakistan. PMID:27004363

  19. Congenital syphilis: subtle presentation of fulminant disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M L; Lynn, A W; Klein, L E; Balkowiec, K S

    1997-02-01

    The incidence of congenital syphilis has experienced a fourfold to fivefold increase in 6 years. It is a completely preventable disease whose clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic infection, to fulminant sepsis, to death. Congenital syphilis was diagnosed in a 6-week-old infant whose mother was negative for the disease by prenatal screen. The otherwise well child presented with a generalized, papulosquamous eruption of 3 weeks' duration but within hours multisystem failure developed from overwhelming treponemal sepsis. Factors related to increased incidence, problems in serodiagnosis, manifestations of the early versus late forms of the disease, and recommendations for evaluation and treatment are illustrated by this patient and are discussed. PMID:9039217

  20. Toward postnatal reversal of ocular congenital malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Aniridia is a panocular disorder that severely affects vision in early life. Most cases are caused by dominantly inherited mutations or deletions of the PAX6 gene, which encodes a transcription factor that is essential for the development of the eye and the central nervous system. In this issue of the JCI, Gregory-Evans and colleagues demonstrate that early postnatal topical administration of an ataluren-based formulation reverses congenital malformations in the postnatal mouse eye, providing evidence that manipulation of PAX6 after birth may lead to corrective tissue remodeling. These findings offer hope that ataluren administration could be a therapeutic paradigm applicable to some major congenital eye defects. PMID:24355915

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension and Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Roth, Todd S; Aboulhosn, Jamil A

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) is a frequent complication in adults with congenital heart disease. Regardless of etiology, the optimal treatment strategy for this difficult population is challenging. The new frontier of targeted PAH therapies has demonstrated improved functional capacity in the various phenotypes of PAH-CHD, with work currently in progress scrutinizing outcomes. In those who fail conventional medical therapy, heart and heart-lung (block) transplantation become the final therapeutic options, with the role of ventricular assist devices and the total artificial heart still under investigation in this group. PMID:27443136

  2. Canine congenital portosystemic shunts: Disconnections dissected.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, L; van Steenbeek, F G

    2016-05-01

    Canine congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) are vascular anomalies that connect the portal vein with the systemic circulation, therefore bypassing the hepatic parenchyma. Portosystemic shunts exist in two different subtypes: extrahepatic and intrahepatic. This congenital disorder is also described in mice, cat, sheep and man. Research has been focused on pathophysiology, diagnostics and treatment of CPSS and this has resulted in increased knowledge, although the aetiology of the disease remains unclear. This review focuses on the aetiology and genetic basis of both intra- and extrahepatic shunts. PMID:27061656

  3. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K.; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  4. Radiographic findings in congenital lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, M.; Boxt, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    Because lead crosses the placenta throughout pregnancy, the fetus is at risk for lead poisoning. A full term, asymptomatic child was born with congenital lead poisoning secondary to maternal pica. Radiographic findings of a dense cranial vault, lead lines, and delayed skeletal and deciduous dental development were noted at birth. After chelation therapy, when the patient was seven months old, radiographs revealed normal skeletal maturation. Tooth eruption did not occur until 15 months of age. Newborn infants with these radiographic findings should be screened for subclinical, congenital lead poisoning.

  5. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails.

    PubMed

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  6. Symptoms of Autism among Children with Congenital Deafblindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Associations between congenital deafness or blindness and autism have been found. The main consequences of congenital sensory impairment, being barriers for communication, language and social interaction development, may lead to symptoms of autism. To date only few studies have been reported concerning individuals with congenital deafblindness.…

  7. 38 CFR 4.9 - Congenital or developmental defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Congenital or developmental defects. 4.9 Section 4.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.9 Congenital or developmental defects. Mere congenital or developmental defects,...

  8. Undiagnosed congenital hypothyroidism in a newborn treated with dopamine infusion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuanxing; Sun, Yueling; Qiang, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Medications administered during the neonatal period may mask the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism. Herein, we report a case of undiagnosed congenital hypothyroidism while the infant was on treatment with dopamine. Given the inhibitory effect of dopamine on thyroid-stimulating hormone, a high index of suspicion for potential congenital hypothyroidism is needed in such neonates. PMID:25724212

  9. Subclinical Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection and Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Arthur J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    When the hearing sensitivity of children with subclinical congenital cytomegalovirus infection was evaluated and compared with that of a group of matched control subjects, nine of the 18 infected subjects were found to have some hearing loss, ranging from slight high-frequency impairments to a severe-to-profound unilateral loss. (MYS)

  10. Genetics Home Reference: severe congenital neutropenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alter BP, Link DC, Stein S, Rodger E, Bolyard AA, Aprikyan AA, Bonilla MA, Dror Y, Kannourakis G, Newburger PE, ... PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Schäffer AA, Klein C. Genetic heterogeneity in severe congenital neutropenia: ...

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-07-28

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  12. NATIONAL CONGENITAL RUBELLA SYNDROME REGISTRY (NCRSR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The system compiles information on all U.S. congenital rubella syndrome cases. The registry includes cases reported to CDC since 1969. Information collected includes demographic data, laboratory results, and disease symptoms. These data are used to calculate incidence rates and o...

  13. Why prevent, diagnose and treat congenital toxoplasmosis?

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Rima; Kieffer, Francois; Sautter, Mari; Hosten, Tiffany; Pelloux, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Evidence that prevention, diagnosis and treatment of toxoplasmosis is beneficial developed as follows: antiparasitic agents abrogate Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite growth, preventing destruction of infected, cultured, mammalian cells and cure active infections in experimental animals, including primates. They treat active infections in persons who are immune-compromised, limit destruction of retina by replicating parasites and thereby treat ocular toxoplasmosis and treat active infection in the fetus and infant. Outcomes of untreated congenital toxoplasmosis include adverse ocular and neurologic sequelae described in different countries and decades. Better outcomes are associated with treatment of infected infants throughout their first year of life. Shorter intervals between diagnosis and treatment in utero improve outcomes. A French approach for diagnosis and treatment of congenital toxoplasmosis in the fetus and infant can prevent toxoplasmosis and limit adverse sequelae. In addition, new data demonstrate that this French approach results in favorable outcomes with some early gestation infections. A standardized approach to diagnosis and treatment during gestation has not yet been applied generally in the USA. Nonetheless, a small, similar experience confirms that this French approach is feasible, safe, and results in favorable outcomes in the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study cohort. Prompt diagnosis, prevention and treatment reduce adverse sequelae of congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:19430661

  14. Congenital cardiac anomalies in an English bulldog.

    PubMed

    McConkey, Marina J

    2011-11-01

    A 4-year-old male castrated English bulldog was referred to the Atlantic Veterinary College for evaluation of exercise intolerance, multiple syncopal episodes, and a grade IV/VI heart murmur. The dog was shown to have 3 congenital cardiac anomalies: atrial septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia, and subaortic stenosis. Medical management consisted of exercise restriction, atenolol, pimobendan, and taurine. PMID:22547849

  15. Prevalence of congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Alessandra; Bianco, Flaviana; D'Amico, Adele; Moroni, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Bruno, Claudio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mora, Marina; Astrea, Guja; Magri, Francesca; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pini, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Minetti, Carlo; Mongini, Tiziana; Ricci, Enzo; Gorni, Ksenija; Battini, Roberta; Villanova, Marcello; Politano, Luisa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Muntoni, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Pane, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We provide a nationwide population study of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy. Methods: Cases were ascertained from the databases in all the tertiary referral centers for pediatric neuromuscular disorders and from all the genetic diagnostic centers in which diagnostic tests for these forms are performed. Results: The study includes 336 patients with a point prevalence of 0.563 per 100,000. Mutations were identified in 220 of the 336 (65.5%). The cohort was subdivided into diagnostic categories based on the most recent classifications on congenital muscular dystrophies. The most common forms were those with α-dystroglycan glycosylation deficiency (40.18%) followed by those with laminin α2 deficiency (24.11%) and collagen VI deficiency (20.24%). The forms of congenital muscular dystrophy related to mutations in SEPN1 and LMNA were less frequent (6.25% and 5.95%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study provides for the first time comprehensive epidemiologic information and point prevalence figures for each of the major diagnostic categories on a large cohort of congenital muscular dystrophies. The study also reflects the diagnostic progress in this field with an accurate classification of the cases according to the most recent gene discoveries. PMID:25653289

  16. Congenital Tuberculosis Complicated by Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Osowicki, Joshua; Wang, Shiqi; McKenzie, Christopher; Marshall, Carolyn; Gard, Jye; Ke Juin, Wong; Steer, Andrew C; Connell, Tom G

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a male infant with congenital tuberculosis in a nonendemic setting complicated by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, who was treated successfully with antituberculous therapy and corticosteroids. We review the pediatric literature concerning the unusual association of these 2 rare conditions. PMID:26398869

  17. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  18. Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Lynne A.; Krasnewich, Donna

    2013-01-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a rapidly growing group of inborn errors of metabolism that result from defects in the synthesis of glycans. Glycosylation is a major post-translational protein modification and an estimated 2% of the human genome encodes proteins for glycosylation. The molecular bases for the current 60…

  19. [Laparoscopic decapsulation of congenital splenic cyst].

    PubMed

    Visnjić, Stjepan; Zupancić, Bozidar; Car, Andrija; Roić, Goran

    2007-01-01

    Nonparasitic splenic cysts are uncommon and may be congenital or post-traumatic in origin. Complications may include enlargement with pain, rupture, and infection. The laparoscopy is widely accepted method in the treatment of this condition with numerous approaches. A technique of partial decapsulation-fenestration designed to minimize the risk of splenic loss and cyst recurrence is presented. PMID:18018710

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... AE, Tyynelä J. Cathepsin D deficiency underlies congenital human neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis. Brain. 2006 Jun;129(Pt 6):1438-45. Epub 2006 May 2. Citation on PubMed Steinfeld ... deficiency is associated with a human neurodegenerative disorder. Am J Hum Genet. 2006 Jun; ...

  2. Asymptomatic Congenital Absence of Lateral Pedal Rays.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio; Roda, Simone; Chessa, Angelo; Pezzoni, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Complete absence of 1 or more pedal rays is a rare condition. In the present report, the case of an adult male with complete congenital absence of his right fourth and fifth pedal rays is described. The condition had been asymptomatic until he had sustained an acute third metatarsal fracture and was satisfactorily treated with cast immobilization. PMID:26359621

  3. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M. Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  4. Congenital toxoplasmosis and prenatal care state programs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Control programs have been executed in an attempt to reduce vertical transmission and the severity of congenital infection in regions with a high incidence of toxoplasmosis in pregnant women. We aimed to evaluate whether treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin associated with a lack of monitoring for toxoplasmosis seroconversion affects the prognosis of patients. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study with 246 newborns (NB) at risk for congenital toxoplasmosis in Goiânia (Brazil) between October 2003 and October 2011. We analyzed the efficacy of maternal treatment with spiramycin. Results A total of 40.7% (66/162) of the neonates were born seriously infected. Vertical transmission associated with reactivation during pregnancy occurred in 5.5% (9/162) of the NB, with one showing severe infection (systemic). The presence of specific immunoglobulins (fetal IgM and NB IgA) suggested the worst prognosis. Treatment of pregnant women by spiramycin resulted in reduced vertical transmission. When infected pregnant women did not undergo proper treatment, the risk of severe infection (neural-optical) in NB was significantly increased. Fetal IgM was associated with ocular impairment in 48.0% (12/25) of the fetuses and neonatal IgA-specific was related to the neuro-ophthalmologic and systemic forms of the disease. When acute toxoplasmosis was identified in the postpartum period, a lack of monitoring of seronegative pregnant women resulted in a higher risk of severe congenital infection. Conclusion Treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin reduces the possibility of transmission of infection to the fetus. However, a lack of proper treatment is associated with the onset of the neural-optical form of congenital infection. Primary preventive measures should be increased for all pregnant women during the prenatal period and secondary prophylaxis through surveillance of seroconversion in seronegative pregnant woman should be introduced to reduce the

  5. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Elizabeth; Lesage, Flore; Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Hewitt, Richard; Janes, Sam M; Deprest, Jan A; Coppi, Paolo De

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper airway obstruction could take advantage from a de novo tissue engineering approach. Moreover, the international acceptance of the EXIT procedure as a means of securing the precarious neonatal airway, together with the advent of fetal surgery as a method of heading off postnatal co-morbidities, offers the revolutionary possibility of extending the clinical indication for tissue-engineered airway transplantation to infants affected by diverse severe congenital laryngotracheal malformations. This article outlines the necessary basic components for regenerative medicine solutions in this potential clinical niche. PMID:27301606

  6. Congenital lobar emphysema: Pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chinya, Abhishek; Pandey, Prince Raj; Sinha, Shandip Kumar; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) is a rare but life-threatening congenital anomaly leading to respiratory distress in early childhood. Diagnosis requires a strong clinical suspicion. We report a case of a 31/2-month-old infant who was initially diagnosed with pneumonia requiring multiple hospital admissions. After computed tomography of the thorax, a diagnosis on CLE was made. The child was planned for surgery in the next available routine operation theatre. However, suddenly in the evening, she developed respiratory distress and needed emergency surgical intervention. The child improved dramatically after surgery, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Early diagnosis and treatment in such cases can lead to dramatic results. PMID:27185998

  7. Minor congenital anomalies and ataxic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of minor congenital anomalies was examined in 36 patients with ataxic cerebral palsy, in unaffected family members, and in 100 unrelated control subjects. None of the control subjects or family members had more than four anomalies, and 25 of 36 (69%) of the patients had more than four. The distribution of anomalies differed considerably, with 60% of the index cases having seven or more, and 94% of the controls having three or less. The number occurring in the patients was significantly more than in their relatives. Of the 25 patients with more than four anomalies, 16 (64%) had undergone potentially adverse perinatal or early postnatal events. Thus minor congenital anomalies were considerably more frequent in those with ataxic cerebral palsy than in related or unrelated control subjects. These anomalies may be markers of early prenatal factors that contributed to the adverse outcome either directly or by predisposing to perinatal difficulties. PMID:2751330

  8. Congenital and hereditary visual impairment in Greenland.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, T

    1994-04-01

    Thirty-eight cases of congenital visual impairment (CVI) were reported in the Inuit population of Greenland over a period of 40 years (1950-1989), corresponding to a frequency of 86 per 100,000 live born children. The two most common causes of blindness were optic atrophy and cerebral visual impairment due to brain disorders of various etiologies. This finding is in accordance with recently published data from the Nordic countries. On the other hand, retinopathy of prematurity and congenital cataract were rare causes of CVI in Greenland. Fifteen out of the 38 cases had unknown etiology. Genetic disorders accounted for 7/38 of the cases. A separate examination of registered cases with probable genetic visual impairment, irrespective of birth year, disclosed 25 patients. New mutations seemed to be the most reasonable explanation for isolated cases of aniridia, lens ectopia, and Down syndrome, while inbreeding was a possible contributory factor in a few autosomal recessive conditions. PMID:8018221

  9. Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenail.

    PubMed

    Fierro-Arias, Leonel; Morales-Martínez, André; Zazueta-López, Rosa María; Ramírez-Dovala, Silvia; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Ponce-Olivera, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Congenital malalignment of the great toenail (CMA) is a disorder of the anatomic orientation of the ungual apparatus, in which the longitudinal axis of the nail plate is not parallel with the axis of the distal phalanx but is deflected sideways. This disorder is understood to arise from multiple factors. Although many theories have been proposed about its origin, its pathogenesis is not fully known. Besides the cosmetic impact, this disorder causes such problems in the medium and long term as onychocryptosis and difficulty in motion. Some cases may regress spontaneously, although persistent cases may require a specialized surgical approach. Congenital malalignment of the great toenail is poorly understood and described medical condition that is often treated incorrectly; thus, reviewing the subject is important. A symptombased clinical classification system is proposed to guide diagnosis and treatment modality decisions. PMID:26861519

  10. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevi and Neurocutaneous Melanosis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Catarina; Pardal, Francisco; Brito, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The major medical concern with giant congenital melanocytic nevi CMN is high risk of developing cutaneous melanoma, leptomeningeal melanoma, and neurocutaneous melanocytosis. Case Report. A 30-year-old woman with a giant congenital melanocytic nevus covering nearly the entire right thoracodorsal region and multiple disseminated melanocytic nevi presented with neurological symptoms. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large expansive lesion in the left frontal region. Postsurgically pathological diagnosis revealed characteristics of melanoma. Immunohistochemical examination showed S100(+), HMB45(+), MelanA(+), and MiTF(+). She received radiotherapy with temozolomide followed by two more chemotherapy cycles with temozolomide. She followed a rapidly progressive course, reflecting widespread leptomeningeal infiltration, and she died of multiorgan failure seven months after diagnosis of cerebral melanoma. Discussion. This patient was diagnosed as having a neurocutaneous melanosis with malignant widespread leptomeningeal infiltration. Diffuse spinal involvement is unusual and is described in only another patient. PMID:25722729

  11. Genetic Aspects of Congenital and Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, Philip F.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital and idiopathic scoliosis represent disabling conditions of the spine. While congenital scoliosis (CS) is caused by morphogenic abnormalities in vertebral development, the cause(s) for idiopathic scoliosis is (are) likely to be varied, representing alterations in skeletal growth, neuromuscular imbalances, disturbances involving communication between the brain and spine, and others. Both conditions are characterized by phenotypic and genetic heterogeneities, which contribute to the difficulties in understanding their genetic basis that investigators face. Despite the differences between these two conditions there is observational and experimental evidence supporting common genetic mechanisms. This paper focuses on the clinical features of both CS and IS and highlights genetic and environmental factors which contribute to their occurrence. It is anticipated that emerging genetic technologies and improvements in phenotypic stratification of both conditions will facilitate improved understanding of the genetic basis for these conditions and enable targeted prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:24278672

  12. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sermer, Mathew; Silversides, Candice K

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in paediatric congenital heart surgery, there are a growing number of women with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching childbearing age. Pregnancy, however, is associated with haemodynamic stresses which can result in cardiac decompensation in women with CHD. Many women with CHD are aware of their cardiac condition prior to pregnancy, and preconception counselling is an important aspect of their care. Preconception counselling allows women to make informed pregnancy decisions, provides an opportunity for modifications of teratogenic medications and, when necessary, repair of cardiac lesions prior to pregnancy. Less commonly, the haemodynamic changes of pregnancy unmask a previously unrecognised heart lesion. In general, pregnancy outcomes are favourable for women with CHD, but there are some cardiac lesions that carry high risk for both the mother and the baby, and this group of women require care by an experienced multidisciplinary team. This review discusses preconception counselling including contraception, an approach to risk stratification and management recommendations in women with some common CHDs.

  13. Congenital myasthenic syndromes: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Andrew G.; Shen, Xin-Ming; Selcen, Duygu; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital myasthenic syndromes are diverse disorders linked by abnormal signal transmission at the motor endplate that stem from defects in single or multiple proteins. Multiple endplate proteins are affected by mutations of single enzymes required for protein glycosylation, and deletion of PREPL exerts its effect by activating adaptor protein 1. Finally, neuromuscular transmission is also impaired in some congenital myopathies. The specific diagnosis of some syndromes is facilitated by clinical clues pointing to a disease gene. In absence of such clues, exome sequencing is a useful tool for finding the disease gene. Deeper understanding of disease mechanisms come from structural and in vitro electrophysiologic studies of the patient endplate, and from engineering the mutant and wild-type gene into a suitable expression system that can be interrogated by appropriate electrophysiologic and biochemical studies. Most CMS are treatable. Importantly, however, some medication beneficial in one syndrome can be detrimental in another. PMID:25792100

  14. Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome – Finish Type

    PubMed Central

    Spahiu, Lidvana; Merovci, Besart; Jashari, Haki; Këpuska, Arbnore Batalli; Rugova, Blerta Elezi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Identification of the NPHS1 gene, which encodes nephrin, was followed by many studies demonstrating its mutation as a frequent cause of congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS). While this gene is found in 98% of Finnish children with this syndrome, non-Finnish cases have lower level of incidence ranging from 39 to 80%. Case report: This report describes the clinical presentation of a two-week-old neonate who presented with periorbital and lower extremities edema, abdominal distention, heavy proteinuria, serum hypoproteinemia and failure to thrive. Genetic analysis revealed NHPS1 gene mutation leading to CNS-Finnish type diagnosis. Conclusion: Through this case we want to create awareness about diagnosis and treatment challenges in developing countries for rare congenital diseases. PMID:27594755

  15. Congenital immature teratoma of the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Rickert, C H; Probst-Cousin, S; Louwen, F; Feldt, B; Gullotta, F

    1997-10-01

    Congenital intracranial tumors are very rare and only account for 0.5-1.5% of all childhood brain tumors. Even rarer are those with prenatal manifestation. The most common of these present at birth are teratomas, which show divergent differentiation with 90% of them containing tissues from all three germ layers. We report a rare case of an intrauterine congenital immature teratoma in a female fetus at 23 weeks of gestation, which was sonographically diagnosed in vivo by detection of the tumor and associated craniomegaly. Because of the poor prognosis, termination of the pregnancy was induced by Rivanol instillation. The cerebral tumor was confirmed at autopsy and was not associated with any other malformations. Histological and immunohistochemical features of this tumor are presented. PMID:9403206

  16. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in the older child.

    PubMed Central

    Booker, P D; Meerstadt, P W; Bush, G H

    1981-01-01

    Five children aged between 9 months and 7 years were admitted to hospital each with an unsuspected congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In 4 the diagnosis was pneumonia with a secondary pleural effusion or lung abscess. Initial investigations were unhelpful to the admitting physician; two of the children had had a previous chest x-ray which was normal. For 3 children the correct diagnosis was only made at necropsy. It is suggested that the possibility of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia be considered in any patient who has an indefinable diaphragm and cystic lesion on his chest x-ray film. Barium studies with the patient in Trendelenburg's position are of value in excluding the presence of bowel in the chest. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7247437

  17. Congenital lobar emphysema: Pitfalls in diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Chinya, Abhishek; Pandey, Prince Raj; Sinha, Shandip Kumar; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) is a rare but life-threatening congenital anomaly leading to respiratory distress in early childhood. Diagnosis requires a strong clinical suspicion. We report a case of a 31/2-month-old infant who was initially diagnosed with pneumonia requiring multiple hospital admissions. After computed tomography of the thorax, a diagnosis on CLE was made. The child was planned for surgery in the next available routine operation theatre. However, suddenly in the evening, she developed respiratory distress and needed emergency surgical intervention. The child improved dramatically after surgery, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Early diagnosis and treatment in such cases can lead to dramatic results. PMID:27185998

  18. Orbital expansion of the congenitally anophthalmic socket.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, S M; Sapp, N; Collin, R

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Congenital anophthalmos is a rare condition in which intervention at an early age can stimulate orbital expansion and maximise facial symmetry. Much is still unknown, however, regarding the degree of soft tissue and bony orbital growth achieved using the orbital expanders presently available. METHODS--A retrospective review of 59 congenitally anophthalmic orbits in 42 patients was carried out. RESULTS--The soft tissue and bony orbital expansion achieved using serial solid shapes is reported, and experience with hydrophilic expanders and inflatable silicone expanders is reviewed. CONCLUSION--Although serially fitted solid shapes in the orbit lead to increased expansion of orbital soft tissue and bone compared with no orbital implant, further orbital tissue enlargement is required. The inflatable silicone expander may allow more rapid and extensive orbital tissue expansion, but design changes are needed to achieve this. PMID:7662633

  19. Congenital Cataracts and their Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2008-01-01

    Cataract can be defined as any opacity of the crystalline lens. Congenital cataract is particularly serious because it has the potential for inhibiting visual development, resulting in permanent blindness. Inherited cataracts represent a major contribution to congenital cataracts, especially in developed countries. While cataract represents a common end stage of mutations in a potentially large number of genes acting through varied mechanisms in practice most inherited cataracts have been associated with a subgroup of genes encoding proteins of particular importance for the maintenance of lens transparency and homeostasis. The increasing availability of more detailed information about these proteins and their functions and is making it possible to understand the pathophysiology of cataracts and the biology of the lens in general. PMID:18035564

  20. Congenital amusia in childhood: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Marie-Andrée; Moreau, Patricia; McNally-Gagnon, Andréane; Mignault Goulet, Geneviève; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Here we describe the first documented case of congenital amusia in childhood. AS is a 10-year-old girl who was referred to us by her choir director for persisting difficulties in singing. We tested her with the child version of the Montreal Battery for the Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) which confirmed AS's severe problems with melodic and rhythmic discrimination and memory for melodies. The disorder appears to be limited to music since her audiometry as well as her intellectual and language skills are normal. Furthermore, the musical disorder is associated to a severe deficit in detecting small pitch changes. The electrical brain responses point to an anomaly in the early stages of auditory processing, such as reflected by an abnormal mismatch negativity (MMN) response to small pitch changes. In singing, AS makes more pitch than time errors. Thus, despite frequent and regular musical practice, AS's profile is similar to the adult form of congenital amusia. PMID:21453912

  1. Congenital malaria in a European country

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Ana Rita; Prata, Filipa; Mouzinho, Ana; Marques, José Gonçalo

    2012-01-01

    A newborn of 26 days, born in Lisbon, Portugal, presented with fever, anaemia and thrombocytopaenia. She was admitted considering neonatal sepsis, but Plasmodium vivax was identified in the second peripheral blood smear performed. Parenteral quinine was started with good evolution. Despite clinicians’ unfamiliarity with congenital malaria in non-endemic areas, this diagnosis, although rare, should not be forgotten in the evaluation of newborns/infants born to women from endemic areas or with recent trip to these areas. PMID:23234823

  2. Congenital anorectal abnormalities in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Prassinos, N N; Papazoglou, L G; Adamama-Moraitou, K K; Galatos, A D; Gouletsou, P; Rallis, T S

    2003-07-19

    Congenital anorectal abnormalities were diagnosed in three male and three female dogs. One dog had anal stenosis, three had a persistent anal membrane, and the other two had an imperforate anus associated with a rectovaginal fistula. Five of the dogs were treated surgically, and four of them which were followed up for periods ranging from one to five years continued to pass faeces normally. PMID:12892267

  3. Acardiac anceps: a rare congenital anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Aruna; Agarwal, Rohini; Saxena, Pikee; Barla, Jaya

    2014-01-01

    Acardiac twin is a rare congenital anomaly and is exclusively associated with monochorionic twin pregnancies. The abnormalities occur due to abnormal communication between the two fetuses in the form of arterioarterial and venovenous communications, resulting in a grossly abnormal acardiac twin with reduction anomalies mainly of the upper body and gross oedema. Since no two acardiac twins are alike, this case report will add to the acardiac twin anomaly spectrum. PMID:24717594

  4. Management of complications of congenital hand disorders.

    PubMed

    Comer, Garet C; Ladd, Amy L

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews treatment and presents complications seen in the treatment of 7 common congenital hand differences, including syndactyly, camptodactyly, ulnar and radial polydactyly, thumb hypoplasia, radial longitudinal deficiency, and epidermolysis bullosa. The management of these conditions is challenging but has evolved over the last several decades with refined understanding of the disease processes and treatments. The goal of this article is to synthesize prior knowledge and provide further insights into these conditions that will help the surgeon avoid treatment complications. PMID:25934210

  5. Gene therapy in monogenic congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xuan; Goddard, Melissa A; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2016-04-15

    Current treatment options for patients with monogenetic congenital myopathies (MCM) ameliorate the symptoms of the disorder without resolving the underlying cause. However, gene therapies are being developed where the mutated or deficient gene target is replaced. Preclinical findings in animal models appear promising, as illustrated by gene replacement for X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) in canine and murine models. Prospective applications and approaches to gene replacement therapy, using these disorders as examples, are discussed in this review. PMID:26454198

  6. Congenital Diarrheal Disorders: An Updated Diagnostic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Terrin, Gianluca; Tomaiuolo, Rossella; Passariello, Annalisa; Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice; Di Costanzo, Margherita; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Canani, Roberto Berni

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs) are a group of inherited enteropathies with a typical onset early in the life. Infants with these disorders have frequently chronic diarrhea of sufficient severity to require parenteral nutrition. For most CDDs the disease-gene is known and molecular analysis may contribute to an unequivocal diagnosis. We review CDDs on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the significant contribution of molecular analysis in the complex, multistep diagnostic work-up. PMID:22605972

  7. Severe congenital malaria acquired in utero.

    PubMed

    Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R; Hasanuddin, Afdal; Fobia, Wendelina; Sugiarto, Paulus; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel A; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2010-04-01

    Vertical transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is under-recognized and usually associated with asymptomatic low-level parasitemia at birth. We report symptomatic congenital malaria presenting as a neonatal sepsis syndrome. The presence at birth of a high asexual parasitemia, gametocytemia, and splenomegaly indicated in utero rather than intrapartum transmission. The neonate was successfully treated with intravenous artesunate followed by oral dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, without apparent adverse effects. PMID:20348499

  8. Severe Congenital Malaria Acquired in utero

    PubMed Central

    Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R.; Hasanuddin, Afdal; Fobia, Wendelina; Sugiarto, Paulus; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel A.; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is under-recognized and usually associated with asymptomatic low-level parasitemia at birth. We report symptomatic congenital malaria presenting as a neonatal sepsis syndrome. The presence at birth of a high asexual parasitemia, gametocytemia, and splenomegaly indicated in utero rather than intrapartum transmission. The neonate was successfully treated with intravenous artesunate followed by oral dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, without apparent adverse effects. PMID:20348499

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi congenital transmission in wild bats.

    PubMed

    Añez, Néstor; Crisante, Gladys; Soriano, Pascual J

    2009-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi congenital transmission in wild bats (Molossus molossus), associated with infected Rhodnius prolixus in a natural habitat from a rural locality in western Venezuela, is reported. T. cruzi blood circulating trypomastigotes in a pregnant bat were detected by parasitological methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays carried out in samples from the heart and the fetus of the same infected female, revealed the presence of T. cruzi-specific DNA in both of the tissues, demonstrating transmission of the infection from the mother to the offspring. Eighty percent of the captured bats and 100% of the examined fetuses from pregnant specimens were shown to be infected by T. cruzi, indicating that M. molossus is a very susceptible species for this parasite, and that T. cruzi congenital transmission is a common phenomenon in nature. To our knowledge, this seems to be the first report on congenital T. cruzi transmission in wild bats in Venezuela. The circulation of T. cruzi lineage I in the study area was demonstrated by typing the isolates from bats and triatomine bugs captured in the same habitat. The potential epidemiological implication of these findings in areas where Chagas disease is endemic is discussed. PMID:18823929

  10. Polycystic Ovaries Associated with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lucis, O. J.; Hobkirk, R.; Hollenberg, C. H.; MacDonald, S. A.; Blahey, P.

    1966-01-01

    Polycystic ovaries were found in a 16-year-old female with congenital absence of vagina, male-like external genitalia, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Masculinization was sufficiently severe to cause the patient to be reared as a male. Biochemical studies of ovarian tissue revealed hyperactivity and an imbalance of enzyme systems concerned with steroid-hormone biosynthesis, which led to production of large amounts of androgens. The pathway towards estrogens was preserved but less efficient than normal. Urinary steroid metabolites before and after hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy revealed an absence of Porter-Silber chromogens and tetrahydrocortisone. Excretion of aldosterone was normal and that of corticosterone slightly higher than normal. The patterns of urinary 17-ketosteroids, pregnanediol, pregnanetriol and pregnanetriolone were similar to those commonly seen in congenital adrenal hyperplasia with steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Urinary estrogens after panhysterectomy were low, being in the post-menopausal range. The pathogenesis of polycystic ovaries and their possible contribution to masculinization are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5901591

  11. Anesthetic management of congenital epulis in neonate

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Rohith; Shenoy, Thrivikram; Nataraj, Madagondapalli Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    The most common cause of difficult intubation in pediatrics is due to congenital anomalies of airway. We report a case of neonate with congenital epulis (CE) who presented with a difficult airway. A 7-day old neonate weighted 3.2 kg with a large mass occupying the oral cavity that was diagnosed as congenital epulis was scheduled for excision biopsy. The mass was large, mobile, and moving in and out with no clear pedicle. An intravenous line was inserted and secured. The airway was then assessed while the patient was awake and an assistant displaced the mass and a laryngoscope was placed to visualize the larynx easily. After preoxygenation, inhalation induction of anesthesia was accomplished using sevoflurane in oxygen. Endotracheal intubation was performed with conventional laryngoscopy. The baby made uneventful recovery after the surgical procedure. In conclusion, epulis presents a real challenge to anesthesiologists. It can be excised either under local or general anesthesia, depending on the size of its pedicle. If done under general anesthesia, assessment of the airway is mandatory for better airway management and safe endotracheal intubation. PMID:25885516

  12. Bone conduction hearing in congenital aural atresia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichun; Gao, Na; Yin, Yanbo; Yang, Lin; Xie, Youzhou; Chen, Ying; Dai, Peidong; Zhang, Tianyu

    2016-07-01

    Previous researches focusing on BC hearing mechanisms proved that the two routes, (1) EAC sound radiation and (2) inertial of ossicular chain, partially contribute to normal BC hearing. Therefore, the BC hearing for those patients with congenital aural atresia should partially decrease theoretically due to their abnormal anatomy. However, there are not many studies which mention these patients' BC hearing up till now. The objective of this study is to investigate congenital aural atresia patient's BC hearing by analysis of pre-surgical audiogram and to study their potential BC hearing mechanisms using animal modeling and their ABR measurements. The study methoed involves analyzing 75 patients' pre-operative audiogram. Then we produced an animal model by surgery to measure their BC hearing threshold changes. Clinical data showed that those patients had some BC hearing loss; and there were 25 cases (25/75, 33.3 %) which present with typical Carhart's Notch. The animal experiments proved that inertia of ossicular chain contribute to partial BC hearing, which demonstrated that the inertia produced more affects on high frequencies by comparing with low frequencies. The patients with congenital aural atresia present BC hearing loss, which could be mainly ascribed to the absence of inertia of ossicular chain. PMID:26205153

  13. Congenital urinary tract obstruction: the long view.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2015-07-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy, therefore, results from combined developmental and obstructive kidney injury. Because of inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by magnetic resonance imaging should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  14. Congenital Urinary Tract Obstruction: The Long View

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy therefore results from combined developmental and obstructive renal injury. Due to inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by MRI should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  15. Two Cases of Malleostapedotomy in Congenital Oval Window Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Da Hee; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomaly of the oval window with an abnormal facial nerve course is an uncommon embryological defect, which is related to the underdevelopment of second branchial arch derivatives. Some treatments for improving hearing levels are available; these include hearing aids, vestibulotomy, neo-oval window formation, and stapes surgeries, including incudostapedotomy and malleostapedotomy. However, surgery for congenital anomalies of the oval window has rarely been described, usually in very small series of patients. We describe two cases of congenital anomalies of the oval window with aberrant facial nerve courses. One was a 40-year-old male diagnosed with unilateral congenital oval window atresia; the other was a 10-year-old male diagnosed with bilateral congenital oval window atresia. We also describe the clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes of malleostapedotomy for congenital anomalies of the oval window with aberrant facial nerve courses. PMID:24653925

  16. Congenital labial mucocele: rare presentation of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, Igor Henrique; Cardoso, Samantha; Carvalho, Camila Nunes; Carvalho, Alessandra Albuquerque Tavares; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucoceles are common lesions characterized by accumulation of mucus following rupture of a minor salivary gland duct. However, congenital mucoceles are a rare and distinctive oral condition observed in newborns. This case report details the features of a congenital labial nodule diagnosed as congenital mucocele. These lesions are rare in the oral cavity and should be diagnosed in the delivery room, but many cases are referred for further evaluation. Management is simple, and recurrence is not expected. PMID:26943092

  17. Follicular atrophoderma in association with congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, W; Webb, D W; White, J E

    1995-01-01

    Follicular atrophoderma has always been associated with other congenital malformations including, Conradi-Hünermann syndrome, Bazex's syndrome and keratosis palmaris et plantaris dissipata. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia has usually been associated with neurofibromatosis. We report a case of follicular atrophoderma in association with congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia: a previously unreported association with, in our case, a good outcome for the pseudarthrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7636827

  18. Isolated Partial Congenital Absence of the Pericardium: A Familial Presentation.

    PubMed

    Palau, Patricia; Domínguez, Eloy; García-González, Pilar; Gallego, Jorge; Bosch, María José; Sieso, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    Congenital defects of the pericardium are uncommon heart abnormalities. Most of the patients are asymptomatic and are usually diagnosed incidentally. Complications are more common in partial absence than in complete absence of the pericardium; thus, this congenital defect should be identified because of the associated risk of sudden death. We report the first mention in the literature, to our knowledge, of a 3-generation familial presentation of isolated congenital partial absence of the pericardium with similar physical examination and radiological findings. PMID:26774230

  19. Congenital Rubella Syndrome with Blueberry Muffin Lesions and Extensive Metaphysitis

    PubMed Central

    Nangia, Sushma; Dubey, Bhavna Sharma

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) in a newborn. The baby had blueberry muffin skin lesions, long bone metaphysitis and congenital heart defects. With this case report we would like to highlight the existence of congenital rubella syndrome in the community, prompt the clinicians to make a diagnosis of CRS in children with suggestive clinical signs, and to create awareness against this vaccine- preventable disease and consideration to include MMR vaccination in nation immunization schedule. PMID:25654000

  20. Congenital rubella syndrome with blueberry muffin lesions and extensive metaphysitis.

    PubMed

    Ajij, Mohemmed; Nangia, Sushma; Dubey, Bhavna Sharma

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) in a newborn. The baby had blueberry muffin skin lesions, long bone metaphysitis and congenital heart defects. With this case report we would like to highlight the existence of congenital rubella syndrome in the community, prompt the clinicians to make a diagnosis of CRS in children with suggestive clinical signs, and to create awareness against this vaccine- preventable disease and consideration to include MMR vaccination in nation immunization schedule. PMID:25654000

  1. Etiology of reduced visual acuity in congenital nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Spierer, A

    1991-10-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the etiologic factor of reduced visual acuity in congenital nystagmus. Fourteen children with congenital nystagmus and reduced visual acuity were examined, using a modified "E" game test. Their success rate in identifying vertical lines was compared with their success rate in identifying horizontal lines. The children identified both vertical and horizontal lines with a similar rate of success. These results may indicate that poor vision in congenital nystagmus patients is partly the result of amblyopia. PMID:1755616

  2. [Congenital dislocation of the knee: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Gómez, L; Sánchez Gimeno, J; García Barrecheguren, E; Marulanda Del Valle, K; Almonte Adón, K; Guerrero Laleona, C

    2015-01-01

    Congenital dislocation of the knee is a rare disease. The diagnosis is made at birth by clinical findings, and confirmed radiologically. It has been associated with various etiologies from intrauterine fetal malpositions to genetic disorders. The prognosis depends on early treatment and whether there are other congenital anomalies. We report two new cases of congenital dislocation of the knee, observed in our hospital during the period of a month, diagnosed immediately after birth, and both with a good clinical outcome. PMID:24767460

  3. Congenital cytomegalovirus: implications for maternal-child nursing.

    PubMed

    Alex, Marion Rita

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Despite its prevalence and devastating consequences, there is limited public and professional awareness about it. This practice-focused article presents two stories describing the family experience of congenital CMV; a literature review describing incidence and epidemiology of congenital CMV; sequelae including infection; the extent of public awareness about congenital CMV; and risk reduction approaches. Implications for maternal-child nurses, whose work uniquely situates them with populations of childbearing women, are discussed. PMID:24201241

  4. Prevalence of congenitally missing permanent teeth in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Sadeghi, Mohammad Ali; Ghorbanizadeh, Sajad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hypodontia or congenitally missing teeth is among dental anomalies with different prevalence in each region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of congenitally missing permanent teeth in Iranian population. Materials and Methods: A descriptive, retrospective and cross-sectional study was done. Panoramic radiographs of 2422 Iranian patients (1539 girls and 883 boys), 7-25 years old, were collected. The radiographs were studied for evidence of congenitally missing teeth. Data were analyzed using Paired t-test, Mann-Whitney test, Fisher exact test and Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: Prevalence of congenitally missing teeth was totally 45.7% and 34.8% for third molars. The most frequent congenitally missing teeth was mandibular second premolars (23.34%) followed by maxillary second premolars (22.02%). Upper jaw showed significantly higher number of congenitally missing teeth (P value < 0.001). According to Chi-square test, congenital missing teeth was found approximately 10.9% in both females and males and there were no statistically significant difference between sexes (P = 0.19). Conclusion: The prevalence of congenitally missing teeth (CMT) in Iranian permanent dentition was 10.9%. The most common congenitally missing teeth were mandibular second premolar fallowed by maxillary second premolars. PMID:23814548

  5. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5–3), plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5–3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5–3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins may differ

  6. Identifying Gaps in Technology for Congenital Interventions: Analysis of a Needs Survey from Congenital Interventional Cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Shibbani, Kamel; Kenny, Damien; McElhinney, Doff; Hijazi, Ziyad M; Moran, Tim

    2016-06-01

    We carried out a device-needs survey to evaluate the gaps in device and equipment availability for congenital interventional cardiologists. As the complexity and demand for more complete solutions to congenital heart lesions increase, there is a growing need for modification and development of devices and equipment to support this endeavor. The survey was sent out via e-mail to members of the Congenital Cardiovascular Interventional Study Consortium and the Society for Cardiac Angiography and Interventions with a reach of over 350 congenital interventionalists. Responses were received from 68 cardiologists in 8 countries. In terms of the most desired device, 41 % ranked bioresorbable stents as their first choice from a list of 12 possible devices. Similarly, 23 % ranked large covered stents as their first choice. Twenty-seven percent of participants believed bioresorbable stents would have the greatest potential to improve morbidity of their patients, with another 27 % reporting that covered stents would have the greatest impact. Fifty percent of participants reported that they would like to see large covered stents available in their country. These data point toward a perceived need for the development/approval of bioresorbable stents for the pediatric age group, as well as the need to approve the use of large covered stents in the pediatric age group in the USA. PMID:27064094

  7. Enhanced heat discrimination in congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Hocine; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2015-04-15

    There is substantial evidence that congenitally blind individuals perform better than normally sighted controls in a variety of auditory, tactile and olfactory discrimination tasks. However, little is known about the capacity of blind individuals to make fine discriminatory judgments in the thermal domain. We therefore compared the capacity to detect small temperature increases in innocuous heat in a group of 12 congenitally blind and 12 age and sex-matched normally sighted participants. In addition, we also tested for group differences in the effects of spatial summation on temperature discrimination. Thermal stimuli were delivered with either a 2.56 or 9 cm(2) Peltier-based thermode. We applied for 5-8s lasting non-painful thermal stimuli to the forearm and asked participants to detect small increments in temperature (ΔT = 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 or 1.6°C) that occurred at random time intervals. Blank trials (ΔT = 0°C) were also included to test for false positive responses. We used signal detection theory model to analyze the data. Our data revealed that blind participants have a higher accuracy than the sighted (d': Blind=2.4 ± 1.0, Sighted=1.8 ± 0.7, p=0.025), regardless of the size of the stimulated skin surface or magnitude of the temperature shift. Increasing the size of the stimulated skin area increased the response criterion in the blind (p=0.022) but not in the sighted. Together, these findings show that congenitally blind individuals have enhanced temperature discrimination accuracy and are more susceptible to spatial summation of heat. PMID:25639543

  8. Intelligence Quotient (IQ) in Congenital Strabismus*

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Abbas; Fallahi, Mohammad Reza; Tamannaifard, Shima; Vajebmonfared, Sara; Zonozian, Saideh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate intelligence quotient (IQ) in patients with congenital strabismus. Methods All patients with congenital strabismus scheduled for surgery were enrolled consecutively over a one year period in a cross-sectional study and were evaluated for verbal, performance and total IQ scores, and compared to the mean normal IQ of 100±15. Results During the study period, 109 patients with mean age of 18.4±10.5 (range, 4-63) years were included. Educational status in most patients (80%) was less than high-school. Most patients (80%) lived in urban areas and 46 patients (42.2%) had some degrees of unilateral or bilateral amblyopia. Mean verbal IQ was 87.2±19.6 (range, 45-127), performance IQ was 81±15.5 (range, 44-111) and total IQ was 83.5±18.3 (range, 40-120). Total IQ was significantly lower in comparison to the normal population (P<0.01) and significantly higher in urban as compared to rural residents (85.1±19.5 versus 77.3±10.8 respectively, P=0.02). Patients with coexisting amblyopia and alternate deviation had lower IQ levels. Verbal IQ was insignificantly higher in myopes than emmetropes and hyperopes. IQ was better with vertical deviations and was higher in esotropes than exotropes; however, these differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion Patients with congenital strabismus in this study had lower mean IQ scores than the normal population which may be due to genetic background or acquired causes secondary to strabismus. PMID:23943689

  9. Current concepts in congenital portosystemic shunts.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Kelley M Thieman

    2015-05-01

    Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) are vascular abnormalities that allow portal blood to bypass the liver and join systemic circulation. Laboratory and imaging studies are performed preoperatively to diagnose CPSS and hopefully identify an anatomic location of the shunt. CPSS can be found in different locations in both small and large breed dogs. Most CPSS are best managed surgically. The goal of surgical management of CPSS is to slowly redirect blood from the shunting vessel through the portal vasculature while avoiding portal hypertension. Many surgical management methods are available, including open and less invasive procedures, such as laparoscopy and embolization. PMID:25737000

  10. Impaired memory for pitch in congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nathalie; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-07-01

    We examined memory for pitch in congenital amusia in two tasks. In one task, we varied the pitch distance between the target and comparison tone from 4 to 9 semitones and inserted either a silence or 6 interpolated tones between the tones to be compared. In a second task, we manipulated the number of pitches to be retained in sequences of length 1, 3, or 5. Amusics' sensitivity to pitch distance was exacerbated by the presence of interpolated tones, and amusics' performance was more strongly affected by the number of pitches to maintain in memory than controls. A pitch perception deficit could not account for the pitch memory deficit of amusics. PMID:19673791

  11. Congenital lobar emphysema: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Mulvany, James Jackson; Weatherall, Andrew; Charlton, Amanda; Selvadurai, Hiran

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE), a rare condition that usually presents in the neonatal period, can be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the treating clinician. If unrecognised, it is a significant risk at the time of anaesthetic induction. We describe a case of CLE in a 3-month-old boy who was initially treated for suspected aspiration pneumonia at the referring hospital. We highlight the importance of careful consideration of common childhood respiratory illness as well as pneumothorax in the differential diagnosis, and the significance of appropriate preoperative anaesthetic management. We also emphasise the importance of acknowledging a mother's concerns when taking a paediatric history. PMID:27335360

  12. Congenital Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Espiritu, Nora; Aguirre, Lino; Jave, Oswaldo; Sanchez, Luis; Kirwan, Daniela E.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in a Peruvian infant. His mother was diagnosed with disseminated TB, and treatment commenced 11 days postpartum. The infant was diagnosed with TB after 40 days and died at 2 months and 2 days of age. Congenital transmission of TB to the infant was suspected, because direct postpartum transmission was considered unlikely; also, thorough screening of contacts for TB was negative. Spoligotyping confirmed that both mother and baby were infected with identical strains of the Beijing family (SIT1). PMID:24821847

  13. Adrenal steroidogenesis and congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Adina F; Auchus, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids (primarily aldosterone), glucocorticoids (primarily cortisol), and adrenal androgens (primarily dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate) occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal-recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-Hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for more than 90% of CAH cases and, when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. PMID:26038201

  14. Haemostatic defects in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, P; Värendh, G; Lundström, N R

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of defects of the haemostatic mechanism in 41 children with cyanotic congenital heart disease concluded that such abnormalities were common and normally involved factors synthesised in the liver, that is the vitamin K dependent factors (rothrombin, factors VII and IX) and factor V. No evidence was found of activation of the coagulation or fibrinolytic systems. The defects can be explained by deficient synthesis resulting from systemic hypoxia as well as from sluggishness of the local microcirculation caused by high blood viscosity. Vitamin K parenterally had no demonstrable effect. Replacement of these factors, possibly combined with measures to improve the microcirculation, therefore, appears to be the appropriate treatment. PMID:426953

  15. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Donders, Jacobus; Mullarkey, Sr Kathryn; Allchin, Joel

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with bilateral congenital perisylvian syndrome as evidenced by polymicrogyria in the left and right frontotemporal regions, pseudobulbar paresis, seizures, and spastic diplegia. This is the first description of comprehensive neuropsychological assessment in a child with this syndrome. The results reflect significant impairments in auditory processing and independent learning and retention, but relatively preserved cognitive performance on interactive tasks involving frequent feedback and redirection. The findings are interpreted in the context of the neuropathology of this syndrome, with an emphasis on pragmatic implications for rehabilitation. PMID:18618376

  16. Genetic causes of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Julia; Yu, Lan; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a moderately prevalent birth defect that, despite advances in neonatal care, is still a significant cause of infant death, and surviving patients have significant morbidity. The goal of ongoing research to elucidate the genetic causes of CDH is to develop better treatment and ultimately prevention. CDH is a complex developmental defect that is etiologically heterogeneous. This review summarizes the recurrent genetic causes of CDH including aneuploidies, chromosome copy number variants, and single gene mutations. It also discusses strategies for genetic evaluation and genetic counseling in an era of rapidly evolving technologies in clinical genetic diagnostics. PMID:25447988

  17. Genetic aspects of human congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pober, BR

    2010-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common major malformation affecting 1/3000–1/4000 births, which continues to be associated with significant perinatal mortality. Much current research is focused on elucidating the genetics and pathophysiology contributing to CDH to develop more effective therapies. The latest data suggest that many cases of CDH are genetically determined and also indicate that CDH is etiologically heterogeneous. The present review will provide a brief summary of diaphragm development and model organism work most relevant to human CDH and will primarily describe important human phenotypes associated with CDH and also provide recommendations for diagnostic evaluation of a fetus or infant with CDH. PMID:18510546

  18. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Oster, Matthew E; Kochilas, Lazaros

    2016-03-01

    Screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the United States Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Since that time, CCHD screening with pulse oximetry has become nearly universal for newborns born in the United States. There are various algorithms in use. Although the goal of the screening program is to identify children who may have CCHD, most newborns who have a low oxygen saturation will not have CCHD. Further study is needed to determine optimal guidelines for CCHD screening in special settings such as the neonatal intensive care unit, areas in high altitude, and home births. PMID:26876122

  19. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria in three siblings.

    PubMed

    Bari, Arfan Ul

    2007-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with marked skin photosensitivity, hypertrichosis, blistering, scarring, milia formation and dyspigmentation of the photo-exposed areas. Three adult siblings (two sisters and one brother) are presented here with variable degree of skin manifestations. During early childhood, all the siblings started showing signs of photosensitivity with darkening of urine color followed by skin blistering over the face and hands. The oldest showed severe sclerodermiform mutilation and the youngest exhibited an initial involvement with hypertrichosis. None of them had any history of convulsions, acute abdominal pain or joint pain. Woods lamp examination and laboratory investigations confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:17921617

  20. [Congenital neck mass. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Proto, F; Sarría-Echegaray, P; Epprecht-González, M P; Alba-Mesquida, J

    2016-01-01

    Congenital neck masses are a challenge for general practitioners and specialists. Although some of them are diagnosed in utero, most of them remain silent until complications appear in the adult age. The anatomical location, consistency and age are determinants in guiding the possible diagnosis. A midline infrahyoid mass may be a thyroglossal cyst, however a lateral neck mass is more possible to result in a brachial cyst. Complementary imaging studies are essential such as pathological tests like needle aspiration fine needle aspiration (FNA). PMID:26558520

  1. Congenital bilateral eversion of the eyelids.

    PubMed

    Isawumi, Michaeline A; Adeoti, Caroline O; Umar, Ismaila O; Oluwatimilehin, Ilesanmi O; Raji, Ralph A

    2008-01-01

    The authors report a case of congenital bilateral eversion of the eyelids with secondary conjunctival prolapse in a 4-hour-old neonate. Conservative treatment with hypertonic normal saline, lubricants, antibiotics, and padding was instituted. No surgery was performed. Complete eye opening was achieved by the 10th day after birth. Medical management is advantageous in that it is inexpensive, noninvasive, and can be performed even in a center with poor surgical facilities, as is commonly encountered in developing countries. The sociopsychological aspect of the disease, possible pathophysiology, and treatment are discussed. PMID:19043951

  2. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yau, Mabel; Khattab, Ahmed; New, Maria I

    2016-06-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a monogenic disorder of adrenal steroidogenesis. To prevent genital ambiguity, in girls, prenatal dexamethasone treatment is administered early in the first trimester. Prenatal genetic diagnosis of CAH and fetal sex determination identify affected female fetuses at risk for genital virilization. Advancements in prenatal diagnosis are owing to improved understanding of the genetic basis of CAH and improved technology. Cloning of the CYP21A2 gene ushered in molecular genetic analysis as the current standard of care. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis allows for targeted treatment and avoids unnecessary treatment of males and unaffected females. PMID:27241964

  3. Congenital Heart Disease and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Mike John; Shapiro, Adam J; Kennedy, Marcus Peter

    2016-03-01

    Through the better understanding of the genetics and clinical associations of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), an autosomal recessive disorder of ciliary motility and mucociliary clearance, the association between PCD and heterotaxic congenital heart disease (CHD) has been established. In parallel, research into the cause of CHD has elucidated further the role of ciliary function on the development of normal cardiovascular structure. Increased awareness by clinicians regarding this elevated risk of PCD in patients with CHD will allow for more comprehensive screening and identification of cases in this high-risk group with earlier diagnosis leading to improved health outcomes. PMID:26545972

  4. Primary congenital pulmonary hypoplasia of a neonate.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jui-Sheng; Lee, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Chin-Hsuan; Li, Fen-Yau; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Soong, Wen-Jue; Chen, Sue-Jen; Tang, Ren-Bin

    2012-02-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia is a rare but usually lethal disease. We report a full-term male neonate who presented with respiratory failure immediately after birth. Chest X-ray revealed a small lung volume despite advanced ventilator support. Respiratory failure persisted and this baby died at 40.5 hours of age. The autopsy showed a lung-to-birth weight ratio of 0.69% and a radial alveoli count of 2.97. All this information confirmed the diagnosis of primary congenital pulmonary hypoplasia. PMID:22340744

  5. Congenital Malformations Leading to Paradoxical Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan

    2016-05-01

    The absolute separation of the right and left circulations and the filtration of blood by the pulmonary circulation are essential to prevent the passage of thrombotic material from the venous system into the systemic arterial circulation. Any breach of the intracardiac septae or circumvention of the pulmonary capillary network may cause a paradoxical embolus. The most common causes are atrial septal defects and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. This article discusses unusual connections and pathways related to congenital malformations. Although anticoagulation is necessary to prevent paradoxical emboli, the hematologic disturbances and the most appropriate therapy in these patients warrant further investigation. PMID:27150173

  6. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  7. Atrial Macroreentry in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Darragh J; Sanders, Prashanthan; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C

    2015-01-01

    Macroreentrant atrial tachycardia is a common complication following surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD), and is often highly symptomatic with potentially significant hamodynamic consequences. Medical management is often unsuccessful, requiring the use of invasive procedures. Cavotricuspid isthmus dependent flutter is the most common circuit but atypical circuits also exist, involving sites of surgical intervention or areas of scar related to abnormal hemodynamics. Ablation can be technically challenging, due to complex anatomy, and difficulty with catheter stability. A thorough assessment of the pa-tients status and pre-catheter ablation planning is critical to successfully managing these patients. PMID:25308809

  8. Reconstruction of Congenital Defects of the Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Eldor, Liron; Friedman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital absence of the vagina is a relatively rare condition most commonly associated with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. Historically, several reconstructive techniques have been described to provide for functional vaginal reconstruction on these patients, both operative and nonoperative. Although there are many advantages and disadvantages of the various procedures, one experience with the use of split thickness skin grafts to reconstruct the vagina has produced acceptable functional results with limited donor site morbidity. Careful planning and timing of this form of reconstruction can produce predictable results in patients who are nearing sexual maturity. PMID:22547971

  9. CONGENITAL ERYTHROPOIETIC PORPHYRIA: TWO CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Koley, Sankha; Saoji, Vikrant

    2011-01-01

    Porphyrias form a group of disorders caused due to defects in the haem synthetic pathway. Congenital erythropoietic porphyia (CEP) is the rarest of the bullous porphyrias (less than 200 cases have been reported till recent times) and a clinician may not see a case during his professional life. We present two cases of CEP. One child with CEP presented with typical infancy-onset blistering, photosensitivity, red urine, and erythrodontia, with hypertrichosis of the upper arms and back. The other child of CEP presented with childhood-onset blistering, mutilation, and hypertrichosis on the face. PMID:21572804

  10. Autism in a Child with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Phillip I.

    1983-01-01

    A case study is described in which early infantile autism was diagnosed in a child with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMU) infection. It is suggested that congenital infection should be considered as an etiological agent in autism. The case's synergistic effect of CMU-induced brain damage, deafness, and maternal deprivation in noted. (CL)

  11. Triangular congenital cataract morphology associated with prenatal methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michael E; Schloff, Susan; Bothun, Erick D

    2009-08-01

    Bilateral congenital cataracts are often characterized by morphology, etiology, and related conditions. We report a case of unique congenital cataracts with triangular morphology and associated prenatal methamphetamine exposure. Although this association is likely coincidental, the cataract's morphology in light of the specific timing of prenatal drug use deserves reporting. PMID:19464935

  12. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis associated with central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Godil, M A; Galvin-Parton, P; Monte, D; Zerah, M; Purandare, A; Lane, A H; Wilson, T A

    2000-08-01

    We describe a child who has central diabetes insipidus associated with congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis without any apparent anterior pituitary dysfunction. This association further strengthens the concept that congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis may be a microform of holoprosencephaly. PMID:10931423

  13. Precalcaneal congenital fibrolipomatous hamartomas: report of occurrence in half brothers.

    PubMed

    Fangman, William L; Prose, Neil S

    2004-01-01

    Precalcaneal congenital fibrolipomatous hamartomas are uncommon, congenital, nontender papules located on the medial plantar aspects of the heel. We report the occurrence of this rare disorder in two half brothers, suggesting that it may occur in a familial pattern. PMID:15575850

  14. Congenital nystagmus cosegregating with a balanced 7;15 translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, M A; Jeffery, S; Lee, N; Hogg, C

    1993-01-01

    We report a family in which autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus cosegregates with a balanced 7;15 translocation. Ophthalmic investigation showed predominantly horizontal nystagmus with a small rotatory component and no significant loss of visual function. This finding suggests a possible localisation for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus (McKusick 164100). Images PMID:8326501

  15. Congenital heart surgery in Houston. The early years.

    PubMed Central

    Takach, T J; Ott, D A

    1997-01-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, major advances in medicine significantly influenced the development and application of surgery as treatment for congenital heart disease. The Texas Medical Center in Houston was at the forefront of these pioneering efforts and thus played an important role in the development of the art and science of congenital heart surgery. Images PMID:9339518

  16. Neurotized Congenital Melanocytic Nevus Resembling a Pigmented Neurofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nidhi; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Kar, Rakhee; Sylvia, Mary Theresa; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus and pigmented neurofibroma (PNF) are close mimics and pose a clinicopathological challenge. We present a case of pigmented hypertrichotic plaque over lumbosacral region and discuss the differential diagnosis and its clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemistry features which may aid in differentiation. We highlight the difficulties faced in differentiating neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus from pigmented neurofibroma. PMID:25657396

  17. What Are the Treatments for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Treatments for CAH ... pepubs/cah.pdf (PDF - 751 KB) [top] Screening, Technology and Research in Genetics ... Endocrine Society. (2010). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to steroid 21- ...

  18. A Retrospective Study of Congenital Cardiac Abnormality Associated with Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ucpunar, Hanifi; Sevencan, Ahmet; Balioglu, Mehmet Bulent; Albayrak, Akif; Polat, Veli

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To identify the incidence of congenital cardiac abnormalities in patients who had scoliosis and underwent surgical treatment for scoliosis. Overview of Literature Congenital and idiopathic scoliosis (IS) are associated with cardiac abnormalities. We sought to establish and compare the incidence of congenital cardiac abnormalities in patients with idiopathic and congenital scoliosis (CS) who underwent surgical treatment for scoliosis. Methods Ninety consecutive scoliosis patients, who underwent surgical correction of scoliosis, were classified as CS (55 patients, 28 female [51%]) and IS (35 patients, 21 female [60%]). The complete data of the patients, including medical records, plain radiograph and transthoracic echocardiography were retrospectively assessed. Results We found that mitral valve prolapse was the most common cardiac abnormality in both patients with IS (nine patients, 26%) and CS (13 patients, 24%). Other congenital cardiac abnormalities were atrial septal aneurysm (23% of IS patients, 18% of CS patients), pulmonary insufficiency (20% of IS patients, 4% of CS patients), aortic insufficiency (17% of IS patients), atrial septal defect (11% of IS patients, 13% of CS patients), patent foramen ovale (15% of CS patients), dextrocardia (4% of CS patients), bicuspid aortic valve (3% of IS patients), aortic stenosis (2% of CS patients), ventricular septal defect (2% of CS patients), and cardiomyopathy (2% of CS patients). Conclusions We determined the increased incidence of congenital cardiac abnormalities among patients with congenital and IS. Mitral valve prolapse appeared to be the most prevalent congenital cardiac abnormality in both groups. PMID:27114761

  19. Mental and Behavioral Disorders among People with Congenital Deafblindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The population of people with congenital deafblindness faces challenges concerning communication and mobility. Due to the significance of the sensory loss it is difficult to diagnose mental and behavioral disorders. This article investigates the prevalence of mental and behavioral disorders among 95 congenitally deafblind adults. Seventy-four…

  20. Characteristics of Individuals with Congenital and Acquired Deaf-Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, Dawn M.; Hirdes, John P.; Stolee, Paul; Strong, J. Graham; Poss, Jeff; Tjam, Erin Y.; Bowman, Lindsay; Ashworth, Melody

    2009-01-01

    Using a standardized assessment instrument, the authors compared 182 adults with congenital deaf-blindness and those with acquired deaf-blindness. They found that those with congenital deaf-blindness were more likely to have impairments in cognition, activities of daily living, and social interactions and were less likely to use speech for…

  1. Spontaneous resolution of isolated congenital megacystis: the incredible shrinking bladder

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Emilie K.; Nelson, Caleb P.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated congenital megacystis represents a rare variant of fetal megacystis without other associated anomalies. The etiology is unclear, and various management strategies have been proposed. We report a case of isolated congenital megacystis that resolved over the first year of life with observation alone. Considerations for the evaluation and management of this rare entity are discussed. PMID:22910450

  2. Marrow hypoplasia associated with congenital neurologic anomalies in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Drachtman, R; Weinblatt, M; Sitarz, A; Gold, A; Kochen, J

    1990-10-01

    Two siblings with congenital neurologic structural anomalies and delayed-onset selective bone marrow hypoplasia in a previously undescribed constellation of symptoms are presented. Differences between these cases and other well known syndromes are discussed. The importance of this association is the implication that children with congenital neurologic abnormalities may be at increased risk for the development of hypoplastic hematopoietic conditions. PMID:2264478

  3. Consensus statement on standard of care for congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching H; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D; Connolly, Anne M; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee. PMID:21078917

  4. [Successful treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection with valganciclovir].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yu; Miyajima, Tasuku; Shimura, Masaru; Morichi, Shinichiro; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Ioi, Hiroaki; Oana, Shingo; Yamanaka, Gaku; Kawashima, Hisashi; Hoshika, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs frequently in neonates. However, there are no screening tests or definitive treatments for this infection in Japan. We report a case of a 21-day-old Japanese boy with congenital CMV infection. He was referred to our hospital for treatment of congenital bilateral deafness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed cortical dysplasia of the temporal poles, enlarged ventricles, and areas of abnormal intensity in the white matter. He was given a diagnosis of congenital CMV infection based on the detection of CMV DNA in his urine and the umbilical cord. After the administration of valganciclovir, no CMV DNA was detected in his serum, and brain MRI and electroencephalogram findings, motor development, and deafness improved. Further investigation is needed to establish a screening test and treatment for congenital CMV infection in Japan. PMID:22352032

  5. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  6. Early Developmental Outcomes of Children With Congenital HHV-6 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Caroline B.; Canfield, Richard L.; Davidson, Philip; Lofthus, Gerry; Schnabel, Kenneth; Carnahan, Jennifer; Shelley, Lynne; Wang, Hongyue

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine if congenital human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) infection influences early neurodevelopment. METHODS: We enrolled 57 newborns with HHV-6 congenital infection and 242 control newborns without congenital infection into a prospective, double-blind study with 4 visits between 4 and 30 months of age. Assessments included the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence, the Visual Expectation Paradigm, and the Mental Development Index (MDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II. Newborn audiology screening and follow-up audiology examinations were completed at 12 to 24 months. RESULTS: No differences were noted in baseline characteristics between infants with HHV-6 congenital infection and control infants. No clinical syndrome due to congenital infection with HHV-6 was evident at birth. No differences were identified on the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence or the Visual Expectation Paradigm between the two groups. In 39 infants with HHV-6 congenital infection, the mean ± SD Bayley Scale of Infant Development II MDI score was 103.4 ± 8.9 at 12 months of age. The matched control infants had a mean score of 105.4 ± 12.4. After controlling for covariates, HHV-6 congenital infection was associated with lower scores on the Bayley Scale of Infant Development II MDI at 12 months of age (mean difference: 4.3 [95% confidence interval: 0.4 to 8.1]; P = .03) compared with infants without HHV-6 congenital infection. CONCLUSIONS: Congenital HHV-6 infection may have a detrimental effect on neurodevelopment at 12 months of age and requires further study given that congenital infection with HHV-6 is present in ∼1 in every 101 births. PMID:25367540

  7. Congenital Nasopharyngeal Teratoma in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Mirshemirani, Alireza; Khaleghnejad, Ahmad; Mohajerzadeh, Leila; Samsami, Majid; Hasas-yeganeh, Shaghayegh

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital germ cell tumors are uncommon. The most common site of teratoma is in the sacrococcygeal region. Teratoma arising from the head and neck comprises less than 10% of reported cases and of these, nasopharyngeal lesions are rare. Teratomas are generally benign, and have a well recognized clinical and histopathological entity. We present a case of nasopharyngeal teratoma (NPT) associated with a wide cleft palate. Case Presentation A 20 day old female neonate with a teratoma of the nasopharyngeal area, and wide cleft palate was referred to our center. The protruded mass which measured 6×4×3cm, was of soft consistency, blocked the airway, and prevented oral feeding. Preoperative evaluation and imaging was performed and mass was excised 2 days after admission. Pathology revealed a well-differentiated mature solid teratoma (hairy polyp). The patient had no complication in the post-operative period. Cleft palate was surgically repaired when 2 years old. She is now a six year old girl with normal development. Conclusion Congenital nasopharyngeal teratomas are usually benign. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and should be undertaken on an urgent basis, especially in a patient who presents with signs and symptoms of airway obstruction. PMID:23056797

  8. New patterns in genetic and congenital otonephropathies.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, L; Thompson, P; Wood, R P

    1979-02-01

    In a series of chronic renal and congenitally deaf patients 24 were identified as having inborn renal and otologic disease. Sixteen patients, representing 14 families, had genetic disorders. Only two had the features of Alport's syndrome. The patients were classified as follows: 1) Probable Alport's--2 patients (1 family); 2) Atypical hereditary nephritis and sensorineural hearing loss--7 patients; 3) Renal and inner ear anomalies--1 patient; 4) Renal, inner ear and multiple anomalies--4 patients. The temporal bone pathology in one case showed primary neural atrophy and a mild Mondini malformation. In another a Scheibe defect and unusual calcific structures were found in the cochlear duct. 5) Renal, external or middle ear and multiple anomalies--6 patients (5 families); 6 Renal, middle and inner ear anomalies and multiple anomalies--2 patients. A temporal bone obtained from one case showed combined middle and inner ear defects. In the other, who had a chromosome defect, predominantly middle ear anomalies were found. 7) Nephrotic syndrome and congenital hearing loss--1 patient; 8) Unclassified--1 patient. Some cases represent entities apparently not previously described. Probably most interesting is the delineation of hereditary nephritis and deafness distinct from Alport's disease. PMID:423658

  9. Evaluation of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Francesca; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana

    2016-03-01

    The clinical approach to adults with congenital heart diseases (ACHDs) is unique in cardiovascular medicine because these patients encompass a broad range of presentations. Each patient, despite having similar diagnosis, will be anatomically and physiologically unlike others within ACHD population, in relation to the type of repair, age at repair, associated defects, with specific long-term risk factors and complications. Furthermore, as many patients will not complain of symptoms, clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing must also be based on the underlying main diagnostic category, with complete standardized lesion-specific clinical protocols, investigating all known risk factors specific for each congenital heart disease and performed as part of screening for significant long-term complications. The first part of this review will focus on clinical history, physical examination, and the most important diagnostic testing in ACHD population. The second part of the article will focus on some clinical issues we have to face in our daily practice, such as heart failure, cyanosis, and pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, as survival rates of ACHD population continue to improve and patients with this condition live longer, we will briefly report on a new clinical concern regarding the impact of acquired morbidities like coronary artery disease that appear to be of greater importance in defining outcome in older patients with ACHD. PMID:26957402

  10. Pathology of congenital syphilis in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Froberg, M K; Fitzgerald, T J; Hamilton, T R; Hamilton, B; Zarabi, M

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a model for congenital syphilis in the rabbit. This report provides additional information on newborn tissue pathology in animals that were infected in utero. A total of 35 pregnancies were evaluated, each containing 6 to 12 newborns. In the infected group, the mortality was approximately 50%; of the live newborns, half appeared normal and half were hyperreflexic, weak, and runty. Gross pathology in the sickly newborns was quite prevalent and involved enlarged spleens with isolated spots of necrosis; enlarged livers that were overtly congested and hemorrhagic and had numerous granular, white spots; and brains with hemorrhage in the occipital area. Histopathology was apparent in different tissues. Lymphocytes, plasma cells, and vacuolated macrophages were prominent in livers, spleens, brains, and bones. A few actively motile treponemes were visualized by dark-field microscopy within extracts of spleen and within cerebrospinal fluid. Low numbers of treponemes were also demonstrated in sections of brain and liver by using the Warthin-Starry silver stain technique. Blood hematocrits were decreased, and extramedullary hematopoiesis was prominent within spleens and livers; this is consistent with anemia. This rabbit model exhibits many of the same pathologic features commonly found in human congenital syphilis. Images PMID:8406873

  11. [Congenital heart defects in adulthood : Supraventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Hebe, J

    2016-06-01

    Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) based on congenital substrates, such as accessory pathways or dual atrioventricular nodal properties, occur with an increased probability linked to specific congenital heart defects (CHDs). In the literature, the association of Ebstein's anomaly with accessory pathways and with Mahaim fibers is most prominent. Compared with patients with otherwise normal hearts, the clinical relevance of SVT is typically more severe and therefore antiarrhythmia treatment is a necessity in many cases. Diagnostics, pharmaceutical treatment, and interventional therapy of SVT in patients with CHD are often demanding owing to anatomical, hemodynamic, and electro-anatomical peculiarities. The use of antiarrhythmic medication is often limited because of intolerable side effects and a lack of reliability in suppressing arrhythmia relapses in the long term. Within the last 15-20 years catheter ablation has thus become established as the first-choice treatment for SVT, even in patients with CHD. However, rates of success, recurrence, and risks are still inferior to those observed in patients with a normally functioning heart owing to the co-existence of vascular and cardiac anomalies, surgically created alterations, an unusual electro-anatomy, and lower tolerance to hemodynamic changes. Successful treatment in patients with CHDs and SVT requires a deep understanding and knowledge of all the disciplines discussed above and should only be practiced in dedicated centers, as patient numbers are small and therefore experience is limited. PMID:27225166

  12. A Case of Congenital Leukemia Cutis

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jae; Kim, Yong Seok; Yu, Hee Joon

    2008-01-01

    Congenital leukemia is a rare condition diagnosed at birth to 6 weeks of life with an estimated incidence of 4.7 per million live births. In a review, about 25~30% of cases were well documented as leukemia cutis. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant presented with asymptomatic multiple erythematous to bluish patches and nodules, which had developed about two months ago. Biopsy of the cutaneous lesions revealed immature cells which are overall monotonous with large kidney shaped nucleus, prominent nucleoli and moderate cytoplasm. These atypical cells stained positive for leukocyte common antigen, lysozyme and CD68. With this result, a congenital leukemia cutis was diagnosed. Six months later, she underwent cord blood stem cell transplantation. Seven months after the cord blood stem cell transplantation, the bone marrow examination revealed a normal result. Leukemia can be presented in the skin, the eruption may be nonspecific and it may precede systemic involvement. The recognition is important because early diagnosis can lead to appropriate treatment, followed by better prognosis. PMID:27303164

  13. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  14. Computerized screening of children congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Amir A; Hancq, Joel; Dutoit, Thierry; Gharehbaghi, Arash; Kocharian, Armen; Kiani, A

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for automated screening of congenital heart diseases in children through heart sound analysis techniques. Our method relies on categorizing the pathological murmurs based on the heart sections initiating them. We show that these pathelogical murmur categories can be identified by examining the heart sound energy over specific frequency bands, which we call, Arash-Bands. To specify the Arash-Band for a category, we evaluate the energy of the heart sound over all possible frequency bands. The Arash-Band is the frequency band that provides the lowest error in clustering the instances of that category against the normal ones. The energy content of the Arash-Bands for different categories constitue a feature vector that is suitable for classification using a neural network. In order to train, and to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we use a training data-bank, as well as a test data-bank, collectively consisting of ninety samples (normal and abnormal). Our results show that in more than 94% of cases, our method correctly identifies children with congenital heart diseases. This percentage improves to 100%, when we use the Jack-Knife validation method over all the 90 samples. PMID:18718691

  15. Risk factors predisposing to congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Ul Haq, Faheem; Jalil, Fatima; Hashmi, Saman; Jumani, Maliha Iqbal; Imdad, Aamer; Jabeen, Mehnaz; Hashmi, Javad Tauseef; Irfan, Furqan Bin; Imran, Muhammad; Atiq, Mehnaz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with multiple risk factors, consanguinity may be one such significant factor. The role of consanguinity in the etiology of CHD is supported by inbreeding studies, which demonstrate an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance of some congenital heart defects. This study was done to find out the risk factors for CHD. Methods: A case-control study was done on pediatric patients at a tertiary care hospital, Aga Khan University Hospital, located in Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 500 patients, 250 cases and 250 controls were included in the study. Results: Amongst the 250 cases (i.e. those diagnosed with CHD), 122 patients (48.8%) were born of consanguineous marriages while in the controls (i.e. non-CHD) only 72 patients (28.9%) showed a consanguinity amongst parents. On multivariate analysis, consanguinity emerged as an independent risk factor for CHD; adjusted odds ratio 2.59 (95% C. I. 1.73 - 3.87). Other risk factors included low birth weight, maternal co-morbidities, family history of CHD and first born child. On the other hand, medications used by the mother during the index pregnancy, maternal age and gender of the child did not significantly increase the risk of developing CHD. Conclusions: Analyses of our results show that parental consanguinity, family history of CHD, maternal co-morbidities, first born child and low birth weight are independent risk factors for CHD. PMID:21976868

  16. Congenital peripheral developing odontoma accompanied by congenital teratomatous fibroma in a 9-month-old boy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Toshinari; Yagi, Masaatsu; Mizuki, Harumi; Takeda, Yasunori

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral odontoma is rare, and only two cases of congenital peripheral odontoma have been reported. Congenital oral fibroma is also rare. We describe a unique case of congenital peripheral developing odontoma accompanied by congenital teratomatous fibroma in an infant. Both tumors were difficult to detect on radiography. Two small masses were seen in the median anterior portion of the palatal mucosa of a 9-month-old boy. The masses had been present since birth and were surgically removed at age 28 months, when one of the masses had grown to a diameter of 8 mm. Histopathologic examination showed a fibrous lesion and a tooth germ-like rounded lesion composed of dental papilla, enamel organ, dentin, and cementum. Although congenital odontoma is rare, it should be considered when selecting appropriate treatment, as early radiographic detection is difficult. PMID:23485607

  17. Adult congenital heart disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension: the Texas Adult Congenital Heart Program experience.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wayne J; Parekh, Dhaval R; Safdar, Zeenat

    2011-11-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a common structural defect of the heart or major blood vessels. Patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) have medical needs that are distinct from those of pediatric patients with CHD, and the transition into adult health care is important for management of the patient with ACHD. A large proportion of patients with CHD develop diseases and complications associated with the long-term stress of intracardiac shunts. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a significant complication of some CHD lesions. The treatment of these patients remains challenging due to their combined heart and lung disease, and multidisciplinary care is ofen necessitated for a variety of secondary conditions. A number of treatment options are available for the management of PAH associated with CHD, including prostanoids, phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, and endothelin receptor antagonists. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of such ACHD patients with PAH. PMID:22104452

  18. De novo mutations in congenital heart disease with neurodevelopmental and other congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Homsy, Jason; Zaidi, Samir; Shen, Yufeng; Ware, James S; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Karczewski, Konrad J; DePalma, Steven R; McKean, David; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Josh; Jin, Sheng Chih; Deanfield, John; Giardini, Alessandro; Porter, George A; Kim, Richard; Bilguvar, Kaya; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Tikhonova, Irina; Mane, Shrikant; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Qi, Hongjian; Vardarajan, Badri; Ma, Lijiang; Daly, Mark; Roberts, Amy E; Russell, Mark W; Mital, Seema; Newburger, Jane W; Gaynor, J William; Breitbart, Roger E; Iossifov, Ivan; Ronemus, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Kaltman, Jonathan R; Seidman, Jonathan G; Brueckner, Martina; Gelb, Bruce D; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Lifton, Richard P; Seidman, Christine E; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-12-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients have an increased prevalence of extracardiac congenital anomalies (CAs) and risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDDs). Exome sequencing of 1213 CHD parent-offspring trios identified an excess of protein-damaging de novo mutations, especially in genes highly expressed in the developing heart and brain. These mutations accounted for 20% of patients with CHD, NDD, and CA but only 2% of patients with isolated CHD. Mutations altered genes involved in morphogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation, including multiple mutations in RBFOX2, a regulator of mRNA splicing. Genes mutated in other cohorts examined for NDD were enriched in CHD cases, particularly those with coexisting NDD. These findings reveal shared genetic contributions to CHD, NDD, and CA and provide opportunities for improved prognostic assessment and early therapeutic intervention in CHD patients. PMID:26785492

  19. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect. PMID:27323105

  20. Congenital malformation and maternal occupational exposure to glycol ethers. Occupational Exposure and Congenital Malformations Working Group.

    PubMed

    Cordier, S; Bergeret, A; Goujard, J; Ha, M C; Aymé, S; Bianchi, F; Calzolari, E; De Walle, H E; Knill-Jones, R; Candela, S; Dale, I; Dananché, B; de Vigan, C; Fevotte, J; Kiel, G; Mandereau, L

    1997-07-01

    Glycol ethers are found in a wide range of domestic and industrial products, many of which are used in women's work environments. Motivated by concern about their potential reproductive toxicity, we have evaluated the risk of congenital malformations related to glycol ether exposure during pregnancy as part of a multicenter case-control study, conducted in six regions in Europe. The study comprised 984 cases of major congenital malformations and 1,134 controls matched for place and date of birth. Interviews of the mothers provided information about occupation during pregnancy, sociodemographic variables, and other potential risk factors (medical history, tobacco, alcohol, drugs). A chemist specializing in glycol ethers evaluated exposure during pregnancy, using the job description given by the mother, without knowledge of case or control status. We classified malformations into 22 subgroups. The overall odds ratio (OR) of congenital malformation associated with glycol ether exposure was 1.44 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.90], after adjustment for several potential confounders. The association with exposure to glycol ethers appeared particularly strong in three subgroups: neural tube defects (OR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.16-3.24), multiple anomalies (OR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.24-3.23), and cleft lip (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.11-3.73). In this last subgroup, risk, especially of an isolated defect, tended to increase with level of exposure. PMID:9209847

  1. Congenital joint laxity and dwarfism: A feed-associated congenital anomaly of beef calves in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ribble, Carl S.; Janzen, Eugene D.; Proulx, Julien G.

    1989-01-01

    Five feeding trials were performed on three ranches to determine if a distinctive, recurring, congenital anomaly in beef calves was associated with feeding clover or grass silage without supplementation to pregnant cows overwinter. The anomaly, termed congenital joint laxity and dwarfism, was characterized at birth by generalized joint laxity, disproportionate dwarfism, and occasionally, superior brachygnathia. The anomaly had been documented for several consecutive years on these ranches and affected 2-46% of the calf crop. Pregnant cows were divided randomly into feeding groups, and the number of abnormal calves in each group was tabulated. Supplementation of the overwinter grass/clover silage diet with hay (2.5-4.5 kg/head/day) and rolled barley (0.75-1.5 kg/head/day) eliminated the problem. Supplementation of grain, without hay, was not as effective. Varying the proportions of grass and clover in the silage, and the age of the silage, did not alter the teratogenic potency of silage. Vitamin D3 supplementation did not reduce the risk of the condition. The definitive cause of congenital joint laxity and dwarfism was not determined. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17423291

  2. Three dimensional echocardiography in congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Shirali, Girish S.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is a new, rapidly evolving modality for cardiac imaging. Important technological advances have heralded an era where practical 3DE scanning is becoming a mainstream modality. We review the modes of 3DE that can be used. The literature has been reviewed for articles that examine the applicability of 3DE to congenital heart defects to visualize anatomy in a spectrum of defects ranging from atrioventricular septal defects to mitral valve abnormalities and Ebstein's anomaly. The use of 3DE color flow to obtain echocardiographic angiograms is illustrated. The state of the science in quantitating right and left ventricular volumetrics is reviewed. Examples of novel applications including 3DE transesophageal echocardiography and image-guided interventions are provided. We also list the limitations of the technique, and discuss potential future developments in the field. PMID:20300232

  3. Genetic Factors in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Holder, A. M.; Klaassens, M.; Tibboel, D.; de Klein, A.; Lee, B.; Scott, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a relatively common birth defect associated with high mortality and morbidity. Although the exact etiology of most cases of CDH remains unknown, there is a growing body of evidence that genetic factors play an important role in the development of CDH. In this review, we examine key findings that are likely to form the basis for future research in this field. Specific topics include a short overview of normal and abnormal diaphragm development, a discussion of syndromic forms of CDH, a detailed review of chromosomal regions recurrently altered in CDH, a description of the retinoid hypothesis of CDH, and evidence of the roles of specific genes in the development of CDH. PMID:17436238

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Dermal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, Sharif; Mohan, Yedathore; Malik, Asif; Malik, Ghaus; Gonik, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) is an uncommon form of spinal dysraphism. Although postdelivery identification in the neonate is aided by several associated physical examination findings, establishing this diagnosis prenatally has proven to be elusive. Case Report We present a case of CDS where the prenatal findings at 20 weeks gestation led to the diagnosis, which was confirmed postnatally. The associated protrusion of fibrotic membranes through the sinus tract helped in the identification of this lesion prenatally, but created confusion with a more common type of lesion, an open neural tube defect. This is the first case report in the literature describing prenatal diagnosis of fetal CDS. Conclusion Prenatal diagnosis with postnatal confirmation of CDS leads to early intervention, better long-term outcomes, and lesser complications. PMID:26199797

  5. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria with Undescended Testis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep; Harith, Arun Kumar; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders of heme biosynthesis pathway that are characterized by acute neurovisceral symptoms, skin lesions, or both. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an extremely rare disease with a mutation in the gene that codes for uroporphyrinogen III synthase leading to accumulation of porphyrin in different tissues and marked cutaneous photosensitivity. We report a case of CEP with infancy onset blistering, photosensitivity, red colored urine, and teeth along with scarring. Examination revealed an undescended testis of the left side. Mutation analysis revealed mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (UROS) resulting in c. 56 A > G (Tyr19Cys). The presence of undescended testis with a rare mutation in a case of CEP which itself is an extremely rare condition make the case interesting. PMID:27512208

  6. Congenital urethrovaginal fistula with transverse vaginal septum.

    PubMed

    Amer, Mohamed Ibrahim; Ahmed, Mortada El-Sayed; Ali, Ali Hagag

    2016-08-01

    Congenital urethrovaginal fistula is an extremely rare genitourinary anomaly. Literature search identified only five reported cases, all of which were associated with urogenital abnormalities. Transverse vaginal septum is another rare condition, resulting from abnormalities in the vertical fusion between the vaginal components of the Mullerian ducts and the urogenital sinus; and associated fistulous connection of the vagina with the urethra is even rarer. Herein we describe the case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with dyspareunia, and a 1-year history of infertility, who was found to have a urethrovaginal fistula with low transverse vaginal septum. The patient was successfully treated with excision of the septum and closure of the urethrovaginal fistula. PMID:27170419

  7. Epidermolysis bullosa and congenital pyloric atresia

    PubMed Central

    Mithwani, Anwar Adil; Hashmi, Asif; Adil, Salman

    2013-01-01

    The association between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and pyloric atresia (PA) is rare but well documented. Herein, we report a case of EB associated with congenital PA. A female baby, weighing 1480 g, was born vaginally to a 31-year-old gravida 7 lady at 33 weeks of gestation. Polyhydramnios was detected on antenatal assessment. The parents were non-consanguineous Saudis with no family history of significant illness. At birth, well-demarcated areas of peeled skin were present over knees, left leg and periumbilical region. Systemic examination revealed no other abnormality. On second day, the patient developed recurrent vomiting and abdominal distension. An abdominal X-ray revealed a single gastric gas bubble suggesting pyloric obstruction. Following gastroduodenostomy, the baby developed severe sepsis with multiorgan dysfunction and expired on 25th day of life. Skin biopsy showed cleavage within lamina lucida. PMID:24068383

  8. [Clinical aspects of congenital maxillofacial deformities].

    PubMed

    Sólya, Kitti; Dézsi, Csilla; Vanya, Melinda; Szabó, János; Sikovanyecz, János; Kozinszky, Zoltán; Szili, Károly

    2015-09-13

    The cleft lip and palate deformity is one of the most common type of congenital abnormalities. The aim of this paper is to summarise the literature knowledge about cleft lip and/or palate. The authors review and discuss international literature data on the prevention, genetic and environmental predisposing factors, anatomical and embryological features, as well as pre- and post-natal diagnosis and treatment of these deformities. The aetiology is multifactorial, driven by both genetic and environmental factors which lead to multifaceted phenotypes and clinical features of these malformations. The lack of the multidisciplinary knowledge about prenatal diagnosis, prevention, genetic aspects and treatment strategy could result in serious diagnostic errors, hence clinical teamwork is critically important to solve the problems of this pathology. Only the professional teamwork and multidisciplinary cooperation can guarantee the optimal level of health care and better quality of life for these patients and their families. PMID:26552024

  9. Congenital varicella syndrome: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ki Hoon; Park, Yun-Jung; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji-Sung; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2016-07-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a teratogen that can cross the placenta and cause the congenital varicella syndrome (CVS), which is characterised by multi-system anomalies. There have been 130 reported cases of CVS from 1947 to 2013. The estimated incidence of CVS was 0.59% and 0.84% for women infected with VZV during the entire pregnancy and for those infected the first 20 weeks of pregnancy, respectively. Nine cases were reported at 21-27 weeks of gestation and one case was identified at 36 weeks. Herpes zoster caused CVS in two cases. Regarding treatment, varicella zoster immunoglobulin treatment, irrespective of gestational age, should be considered in addition to antiviral drugs for women who have been exposed to or infected with virus. PMID:26965725

  10. [Congenital defects of tibia and fibula].

    PubMed

    de Meulemeester, F R; Verbout, A J

    1988-12-01

    This study comprised 7 patients with longitudinal anomalies of the knee and leg classified in accordance with the 'classification of congenital limb deficiencies' introduced by Frantz and O'Rahilly. The anomalies were paraxial hemimelia of the fibula (4 instances), paraxial hemimelia of the tibia (6 instances). In the absence of the proximal tibia, therapy consisted of knee reconstruction according to Brown. In the absence of the distal part of the tibia a proximal tibiofibular synostosis was performed. In one instance corrective osteotomy of the tibia was required in the absence of the fibula. Exarticulation according to Syme was resorted in order to cope with an incorrigible abnormal position of the foot and for leg length inequality. The therapy should aim at giving the child walking ability at a normal time. Exarticulation has to be preferred to amputation in the treatment of these patients. PMID:3238675

  11. Deringing procedure for congenital pulmonary vein stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Victor, S; Nayak, V M

    1995-01-01

    We operated on a 14-year-old boy who had an echocardiographic diagnosis of ventricular septal defect. At surgery we found, in addition, an anomalous and obstructive intraventricular muscle bundle. Detection of a continuous thrill over the right pulmonary veins, prior to cardiopulmonary bypass, led to exploration of the left atrium. The ostia of the right superior and inferior pulmonary veins were impeded by circumferential membranous rings of endocardium with central stenotic openings. Excision of these annular rings relieved the obstruction. The left lung was drained by a long intrapericardial common venous channel that entered the left atrium through a stenotic ostium; excision of an annular ridge of endocardium restored normal flow. The patient remains asymptomatic after 23 months. The case is reported for the new deringing technique and the rarity of successful correction of congenital pulmonary vein stenosis. Images PMID:7647600

  12. Neonatal screening for congenital hypothyroidism in Japan.

    PubMed

    Minamitani, Kanshi; Inomata, Hiroaki

    2012-10-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism may cause irreversible intellectual disability or failure to thrive if left untreated. Because this disorder can be prevented by early identification and early treatment, newborn mass screening started in 1979 in Japan. A guideline for mass screening for this disease was prepared in 1998. Currently, approximately 100% of newborns undergo this mass screening. The screening results show significant improvement of the intellectual outcome of patients with this disease, with almost no patients having irreversible intellectual disturbance or failure to thrive. However, there are issues of a delayed increase in thyroid stimulating hormone, management of latent hypothyroidism, and detection of central hypothyroidism. In recent years, as studies on this disease have advanced at the molecular level, many causative genes have been reported, clarification of the etiology, pathology, and clinical features has progressed, and new findings have been obtained. PMID:23330249

  13. Congenital muscular torticollis and positional plagiocephaly.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Alice A; Tritasavit, Sophie; Graham, John M

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of observational studies, child health practitioners in primary care settings should consider the diagnosis of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT)in infants with risk factors from birth history for intrauterine malpositioning or constraint (C). On the basis of observational studies, CMT is often associated with other conditions, including positional plagiocephaly and gross motor delays from weakened truncal muscles and/or lack of head control in early infancy (C). On the basis of observational studies, child health practitioners should counsel parents that infants should be on their stomachs frequently whenever they are awake and under direct adult supervision to develop their prone motor skills (C). On the basis of consensus, early identification of CMT(with or without positional plagiocephaly) and prompt referral to a physical therapist experienced in the treatment of CMT should be considered to avoid more costly or invasive treatments, such as cranial orthoses or surgery (D). PMID:24488831

  14. Congenital absence of pulmonary valve leaflets.

    PubMed Central

    Buendia, A; Attie, F; Ovseyevitz, J; Zghaib, A; Zamora, C; Zavaleta, D; Vargas-Barron, J; Richheimer, R

    1983-01-01

    Congenital absence of pulmonary valve leaflets is an uncommon condition usually associated with ventricular septal defect and an obstructive pulmonary valve ring. Twenty-one patients with these malformations are described. Twenty had an associated ventricular septal defect with ventriculoarterial concordance, and one also had transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, and obstructive pulmonary valve ring. The clinical features, cardiac catheterisation findings, and angiocardiographic results are presented. Twelve patients underwent cardiac surgery. Three patients died, one in the early, and the other two in the late postoperative period. The results, according to the surgical technique employed and postoperative cardiac catheterisation findings, showed that patients in whom the bioprostheses were implanted in the pulmonary position had a better late follow-up. Images PMID:6860509

  15. Laryngeal obstruction in congenital plasminogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Cohen, Shlomo; Cymberknoh, Malena Cohen; Gross, Menachem; Hirshoren, Nir; Shoseyov, David

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 congenital plasminogen deficiency (CPD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease which causes formation of fibrin pseudomembranes that affect multiple systems/organs: the eyes, respiratory system, urinary and genital systems, gastrointestinal system, and the central nervous system. We present a rare manifestation of the disease-severe upper airway obstruction due to a rapidly growing mass in the supraglottic region-6 months after dental treatment under general anesthesia. The management of such a manifestation has not been discussed in the current literature. Due to deterioration in his clinical status, the patient eventually underwent both a tracheotomy in order to bypass the obstruction, and excision of the supraglottic mass. Within a few days the mass recurred with complete obstruction of the upper airway. PMID:22328462

  16. Congenital Muscular Dystrophies: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Enrico; D'Amico, Adele; Gualandi, Francesca; Petrini, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders with onset at birth or in infancy in which the muscle biopsy is compatible with a dystrophic myopathy. In the past 10 years, knowledge of neuromuscular disorders has dramatically increased, particularly with the exponential boost of disclosing the genetic background of CMDs. This review will highlight the clinical description of the most important forms of CMD, paying particular attention to the main keys for diagnostic approach. The diagnosis of CMDs requires the concurrence of expertise in multiple specialties (neurology, morphology, genetics, neuroradiology) available in a few centers worldwide that have achieved sufficient experience with the different CMD subtypes. Currently, molecular diagnosis is of paramount importance not only for phenotype-genotype correlations, genetic and prenatal counseling, and prognosis and aspects of management, but also concerning the imminent availability of clinical trials and treatments. PMID:22172424

  17. Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nimkarn, Saroj; Lin-Su, Karen; New, Maria I

    2011-10-01

    Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency is the most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The severity of this disorder depends on the extent of impaired enzymatic activity, which is caused by various mutations of the 21 hydroxylase gene. This article reviews adrenal steroidogenesis and the pathophysiology of 21 hydroxylase deficiency. The three forms of CAH are then discussed in terms of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment, and genetic basis. Prenatal diagnosis and treatment are also reviewed. The goal of therapy is to correct the deficiency in cortisol secretion and suppress androgen overproduction. Glucocorticoid replacement has been the mainstay of treatment for CAH, but new treatment strategies continue to be developed and studied. PMID:21981961

  18. Congenital Vertical Talus: Etiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a rare foot deformity. If left untreated, it causes significant disability, including pain and functional limitations. Although the etiology of vertical talus is likely heterogeneous, recent evidence strongly supports a genetic cause linking it to genes expressed during early limb development. Traditional management for vertical talus involves extensive surgeries that are associated with significant short- and long-term complications. A minimally invasive approach that relies on serial manipulation and casting to achieve most of the correction has been shown to produce excellent short-term results with regard to clinical and radiographic correction in both isolated and nonisolated cases of vertical talus. Although long-term studies are needed, achieving correction without extensive surgery may lead to more flexible and functional feet, much as Ponseti method has done for clubfeet. PMID:26337950

  19. Singing proficiency in congenital amusia: imitation helps.

    PubMed

    Tremblay-Champoux, Alexandra; Dalla Bella, Simone; Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Lebrun, Marie-Andrée; Peretz, Isabelle

    2010-09-01

    Singing out of tune characterizes congenital amusia. Here, we examine whether an aid to memory improves singing by studying vocal imitation in 11 amusic adults and 11 matched controls. Participants sang a highly familiar melody on the original lyrics and on the syllable /la/ in three conditions. First, they sang the melody from memory. Second, they sang it after hearing a model, and third, they sang in unison with the model. Results show that amusic individuals benefit from singing by imitation, whether singing after the model or in unison with the model. The amusics who were the most impaired in memory benefited most, particularly when singing on the syllable /la/. Nevertheless, singing remains poor on the pitch dimension; rhythm was intact and unaffected by imitation. These results point to memory as a source of impairment in poor singing, and to imitation as a possible aid for poor singers. PMID:21864199

  20. Neurosurgical management of congenital malformations of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Maher, Cormac O

    2011-08-01

    Congenital malformations encompass a diverse group of disorders that often present at birth, either as the result of genetic abnormalities, infection, errors of morphogenesis, or abnormalities in the intrauterine environment. Congenital disorders affecting the brain are now often diagnosed before delivery with the use of prenatal ultrasonography. Over the past several decades, there have been major advances in the understanding and management of these conditions. This review focuses on the most common cranial congenital malformations, limiting the discussion to the neurosurgically relevant aspects of arachnoid cysts, pineal cysts, Chiari malformations, and encephaloceles. PMID:21807319

  1. Global Challenges in the Management of Congenital Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Phoebe D.; Courtright, Paul; Wilson, M. Edward; Taylor, David Samuel; Lewallen, Susan; Ventura, Marcelo C.; Bowman, Richard; Woodward, Lee; Ditta, Lauren C.; Kruger, Stacey; Haddad, Danny; El Shakankiri, Nihal; Rai, Salma KC; Bailey, Tehara; Lambert, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Childhood cataracts have become a leading cause of preventable childhood blindness in many areas of the world. Here we summarize regional focus group discussions from the 4th Annual International Congenital Cataract Symposium on the current situation, challenges, and recommendations for the management of congenital cataracts in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, Central America, South America, and developed nations. Strategies for managing congenital cataracts must be adapted and developed according to regional conditions. A basic framework for acceptable outcomes must focus on developing systems to address the critical components of education, access, quality care, and good follow-up. PMID:25892047

  2. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kimberly Y; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    On March 16, 2012, the Ethics of the Heart 2012: Ethical and Policy Challenges in Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Conference took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The first session focused on the ethics surrounding genetic testing in patients with congenital heart disease. Summarized here is the introductory presentation given by Dr Elizabeth Goldmuntz entitled "The Role of Genetic Testing in Congenital Heart Disease," followed by a case presentation given by Dr Lisa D'Alessandro. The case and the panel discussion that ensued highlight several ethical principles and challenges in this unique patient population. PMID:23799755

  3. Clinical aspects of congenital syphilis with Hutchinson’s triad

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa, Larissa; Galvão, Virgilio

    2011-01-01

    Congenital syphilis is an infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum transmitted by infected mother to her baby during pregnancy. Late congenital syphilis is recognised with 2 or more years after birth. One of the main aspects is observed with the triad of Hutchinson, characterised by the presence of interstitial keratitis, eighth nerve deafness and Hutchinson’s teeth. This manuscript reports a case of late congenital syphilis presenting with Hutchinson’s triad at an age of 7 years. These clinical features are related to syphilis present during pregnancy and at birth, however they commonly become apparent after 5-years of age. PMID:22670010

  4. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  5. Congenital rubella syndrome with positive serology and virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Ooi, H L; Cheong, S M; Yogeswery, S; Norizah, I; Zuridah, H; Kumarasamy, V; Chua, K B

    2006-06-01

    An effective live attenuated rubella vaccine was available since 1969 and congenital rubella syndrome can be prevented with appropriate vaccination. We report a baby with congenital rubella syndrome born in Klang valley to indicate that the Universal Rubella Vaccination Programme adopted by the Ministry of Health Malaysia since 2002 has yet to achieve its effect of eliminating transmission of rubella and preventing congenital rubella infection in the community. To our knowledge, the virus isolate represents the first successful isolation of rubella virus in this country and will serve as the reference strain for future comparison in molecular epidemiological tracking of rubella virus activity this country. PMID:16898324

  6. A congenital mucocele of the anterior dorsal tongue.

    PubMed

    Wong Chung, J E R E; Ensink, R J H; Thijs, H F H; van den Hoogen, F J A

    2014-07-01

    We report on a new-born with a congenital mucocele on the anterior dorsal side of the tongue. The presentation as well as the differential diagnosis of congenital oral swellings is discussed. Because of breastfeeding problems the mucinous swelling was incised and drained two days after birth. Immediately after drainage the swelling disappeared. Congenital oral swellings are rare. Most of them are mucoceles. Post-partum treatment is surgically, but spontaneous remission has been described. High incidence of recurrence should be taken into account when (micro-)marsupialization or incision as sole treatment is performed. PMID:24814234

  7. Congenital vascular malformations in scintigraphic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Pilecki, Stanisław; Gierach, Marcin; Gierach, Joanna; Świętaszczyk, Cyprian; Junik, Roman; Lasek, Władysław

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Congenital vascular malformations are tumour-like, non-neoplastic lesions caused by disorders of vascular tissue morphogenesis. They are characterised by a normal cell replacement cycle throughout all growth phases and do not undergo spontaneous involution. Here we present a scintigraphic image of familial congenital vascular malformations in two sisters. Material/Methods A 17-years-old young woman with a history of multiple hospitalisations for foci of vascular anomalies appearing progressively in the upper and lower right limbs, chest wall and spleen. A Parkes Weber syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical picture. Due to the occurrence of new foci of malformations, a whole-body scintigraphic examination was performed. A 12-years-old girl reported a lump in the right lower limb present for approximately 2 years, which was clinically identified as a vascular lesion in the area of calcaneus and talus. Phleboscintigraphy visualized normal radiomarker outflow from the feet via the deep venous system, also observed in the superficial venous system once the tourniquets were released. In static and whole-body examinations vascular malformations were visualised in the area of the medial cuneiform, navicular and talus bones of the left foot, as well as in the projection of right calcaneus and above the right talocrural joint. Conclusions People with undiagnosed disorders related to the presence of vascular malformations should undergo periodic follow-up to identify lesions that may be the cause of potentially serious complications and to assess the results of treatment. Presented scintigraphic methods may be used for both diagnosing and monitoring of disease progression. PMID:24567769

  8. A neonate with critical congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jarrett; Dawson, Emily; Williams, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is defined as a ductal-dependent congenital heart defect requiring surgical or percutaneous intervention via cardiac catheterization before 1 year of age. Most cases of CCHD can be diagnosed with prenatal ultrasound or fetal echocardiogram. If not prenatally diagnosed, CCHD can be stable in the newborn nursery due to persistent ductal patency, and the patient may only be diagnosed after ductal closure and development of cardiac symptoms at home. In this case, a 6-day-old female presented to the emergency department (ED) floppy with agonal respirations, poor capillary refill, and absent femoral pulses. On the day of presentation, the patient became increasingly fussy, refused feeding, and began to gasp. The patient was transported to the ED for evaluation, where a bedside echocardiogram revealed interrupted aortic arch (IAA), ventricular septal defect, minimal flow through a thread-like ductus arteriosus, and severely depressed cardiac function. IAA is very rare, with an incidence of three cases per 1 million live births. Patients require neonatal supportive care, continuous prostaglandin E1 infusion, and urgent referral for neonatal surgical repair in the first days to weeks of life. To reduce the volume of undiagnosed CCHD in the immediate newborn period, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Diseases in Newborns and Children (SACHDNC) recommended that CCHD screening via pulse oximetry be added to the recommended uniform screening panel. A positive screen results in an immediate referral for an echocardiogram. Fetal diagnosis, newborn screening, and/or careful clinical examination may have resulted in detection of IAA in our patient prior to ductal closure. PMID:24877491

  9. Aerobic Training in Patients with Congenital Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hedermann, Gitte; Vissing, Christoffer Rasmus; Heje, Karen; Preisler, Nicolai; Witting, Nanna; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congenital myopathies (CM) often affect contractile proteins of the sarcomere, which could render patients susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage. We investigated if exercise is safe and beneficial in patients with CM. Methods Patients exercised on a stationary bike for 30 minutes, three times weekly, for 10 weeks at 70% of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Creatine kinase (CK) was monitored as a marker of muscle damage. VO2max, functional tests, and questionnaires evaluated efficacy. Results Sixteen patients with CM were included in a controlled study. VO2max increased by 14% (range, 6–25%; 95% CI 7–20; p < 0.001) in the seven patients who completed training, and tended to decrease in a non-intervention group (n = 7; change -3.5%; range, -11–3%, p = 0.083). CK levels were normal and remained stable during training. Baseline Fatigue Severity Scale scores were high, 4.9 (SE 1.9), and tended to decrease (to 4.4 (SE 1.7); p = 0.08) with training. Nine patients dropped out of the training program. Fatigue was the major single reason. Conclusions Ten weeks of endurance training is safe and improves fitness in patients with congenital myopathies. The training did not cause sarcomeric injury, even though sarcomeric function is affected by the genetic abnormalities in most patients with CM. Severe fatigue, which characterizes patients with CM, is a limiting factor for initiating training in CM, but tends to improve in those who train. Trial Registration The Regional Committee on Health Research Ethics of the Capital Region of Denmark H-2-2013-066 and ClinicalTrials.gov H2-2013-066 PMID:26751952

  10. Congenital Aberrant Tearing: A Re-Look

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marilyn T.; Strömland, Kerstin; Ventura, Liana

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Congenital aberrant tearing is characterized by tearing when eating (“crocodile tears”), lack of emotional tearing, or both. Most reported cases are associated with Duane syndrome. In our previous studies we observed aberrant tearing in individuals with thalidomide embryopathy and Möbius sequence. This report summarizes the literature on the subject and adds 3 new studies that give information on this unusual condition. Methods Twenty-eight individuals with Möbius sequence were interviewed about tearing symptoms at a support group meeting in Italy. In Sweden 30 adults primarily from the original thalidomide series were reexamined. In this latter study, a Schirmer test was done at baseline and repeated 5 minutes after eating. Twenty families in Brazil who have children with Möbius sequence were questioned about tearing symptoms and exposure to misoprostol during pregnancy. Results In the 28 Italian individuals, either “crocodile tears” or lack of emotional tearing was noted in 7 cases. In the thalidomide study, 10 of 30 patients had tearing when eating and 7 had no emotional tearing. Low Schirmer scores or increased tearing after eating was noted in a few asymptomatic individuals. Among the 20 Brazilian children with Möbius sequence, 10 had some tearing abnormality. Conclusion Congenital anomalous lacrimation is rare but usually associated with Duane syndrome or abduction deficits, as in Möbius sequence and, less frequently, facial nerve palsy. Studies implicate an early insult in development at 4 to 6 weeks. At that time the facial nerve, sixth nerve, and lacrimal nucleus are in close proximity in the embryo. PMID:19277226

  11. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly due to a novel splice site mutation in the FBN2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Mehar, Virendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Kumar, Ravindra; Yadav, Summi; Singh, Kuldeep; Callewaert, Bert; Pathan, Shahnawaz; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by crumpled ears, congenital contractures, arachnodactyly and scoliosis. Only few cases have been described to date. Here we report a newborn with congenital contractures, crumpled ears and scoliosis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel fibrillin-2 mutation at the donor splice site of intron 28. We discuss the differential diagnosis of neonates with congenital contractures and review the current knowledge on congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

  12. Progressive Hearing Impairment in Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Arthur J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Audiological assessment of 86 children (mean age 38 months at last evaluation time) with congenital cytomegalovirus infection revealed progressive hearing loss in four of 12 Ss with sensorineural hearing impairments. Case descriptions documented the progression of the hearing loss. (Author)

  13. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: Clinical presentation, epidemiology, diagnosis and prevention

    PubMed Central

    van Zuylen, Wendy J; Hamilton, Stuart T; Naing, Zin; Hall, Beverly; Shand, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common congenital infection causing serious disease in infants. It is the leading infectious cause of sensorineural hearing loss and neurodevelopmental disability in developed countries. Despite the clinical importance of congenital cytomegalovirus, surveys show there is limited awareness and knowledge in the medical and general community about congenital cytomegalovirus infection. This article reviews the clinical features, global epidemiology, transmission and risk factors for cytomegalovirus infections. It also highlights several major advances made in recent years in the diagnosis and prevention of cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy. Although research is ongoing, no therapy is currently proven to prevent or treat maternal, fetal or neonatal cytomegalovirus infection. Education of women regarding hygiene measures can help prevent cytomegalovirus infection and are currently the best strategy to prevent congenital cytomegalovirus disease.

  14. Congenital Malaria in Calabar, Nigeria: The Molecular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Oduwole, Olabisi A.; Ejezie, G. C.; Odey, Friday A.; Oringanje, Chioma M.; Nwakanma, Davis; Bello, Segun; Oriero, Eniyou; Okebe, Joseph; Alaribe, Anyawu A.; Etuk, Saturday; Meremikwu, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been shown to be more sensitive in detecting low-level parasitemia than conventional blood film microscopy. We estimated the prevalence of congenital malaria using nested PCR amplification of the small subunit 18S RNA gene to detect low-level parasitemia and identify Plasmodium species in 204 mother–neonate pairs. Cord-blood parasitemia was detected in four babies by PCR, giving a prevalence of 2.0%. The newborns of primidgravidae were more susceptible to congenital malaria than those of multigravidae (P < 0.0001). There was a strong correlation between placental malaria and congenital malaria (odds ratio = 10.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.3–76.1, P = 0.0487). We conclude that the prevalence of congenital malaria in Calabar detected by PCR is lower than has been reported in this environment through microscopy. PMID:21363974

  15. Congenital hypothyroidism of dogs and cats: a review.

    PubMed

    Bojanic, K; Acke, E; Jones, B R

    2011-05-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is a rare and underdiagnosed congenital endocrine disorder in dogs and cats and the true incidence is unknown. The disorder may cause a range of clinical signs depending on the primary defect, which affect production of thyroid hormones; some cases present when adult. Hallmark clinical signs of congenital hypothyroidism are mental impairment and skeletal developmental abnormalities, resulting in disproportionate dwarfism; goitre may or may not be present. Documented causes of congenital hypothyroidism in dogs include deficiency of, or unresponsiveness to, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid dysgenesis, dyshormonogenesis and iodine deficiency. In cats, TSH unresponsiveness, thyroid dysgenesis, dyshormonogenesis and iodine deficiency have been confirmed. Adequate replacement therapy results in a successful outcome in the majority of cases, especially when started early in life, as permanent developmental abnormalities can be prevented. This review describes reported cases in dogs and cats, diagnostic investigation, and recommendations for treatment. PMID:21541884

  16. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  17. Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiac Catheterization In the last two decades, tremendous medical advances have been made. These allow congenital heart defects to be treated in the cath lab without surgery. Valvuloplasty or Balloon Valvotomy This procedure is done to open a ...

  18. Epidermal Choristoma of the Tongue Mimicking a Congenital Melanotic Macule.

    PubMed

    Curto-Barredo, Laia; Vicente, Asunción; Rovira, Carlota; García-Diez, Eloy; Pujol, Ramón M; González-Enseñat, Maria Antonia

    2015-01-01

    We report the fifth case of epidermal choristoma of the oral cavity in a Caucasian newborn with a congenital melanotic macule on the dorsum of the tongue. Epidermal choristoma is an exceedingly rare and benign condition probably caused by a developmental abnormality. It is identified according to the presence of normal skin in an abnormal location. Histologically it is identified according to areas of stratified epithelium and hyperpigmentation of the basal layer along with cutaneous adnexal structures (hair follicles, sebaceous or sweat glands). The clinical presentation is variable, but most of the cases described presented with a congenital lingual pigmented macule. These lesions should be included within the differential diagnosis of congenital lingual macules and distinguished from other entities such as congenital lingual melanotic macules and melanocytic lesions. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Epidermal choristoma is a benign condition that probably is underdiagnosed because it is a new and rare entity, and dermatologists should be aware of it. PMID:25529319

  19. Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries (CCTGA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Your Adult Congenital Heart Disease Quality of Life Birth Control Pregnancy and ... Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries (CCTGA)* *Please note: This article is directed to those who have not undergone ...

  20. [Long-range intelligence development of children with congenital hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Donczik, J; Hesse, V; Daute, K H; Mancke, S; Mohnike, K

    1991-11-01

    The intellectual development of 105 children with congenital hypothyroidism was assessed. In 70 children the assessment was repeated in several times. Correlations between development of intelligence and influence of biological and/or psychosocial risks were verified. PMID:1758137

  1. Optical coherence tomography in a patient with congenital vitreous cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dragnev, Daniel; Shanmugalingam, Sinnathamboo

    2014-01-01

    A case of congenital vitreous cyst is presented. An optical coherence tomography scan has been performed, which has shown that the cyst is free floating and is multilobular. Its content was hyper-reflective. PMID:24962488

  2. Parenting Styles and the Depressive Syndrome in Congenitally Blind Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Robert; West, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    The article discusses the effect on congenitally blind children of three types of parents: those who are overprotective, those who push the child toward independence too soon, and those who are "good enough." (Author)

  3. Congenital lobar emphysema. A rare cause of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tural-Kara, Tuğçe; Özdemir, Halil; Çiftçi, Ergin; İnce, Erdal

    2016-07-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema is a rare disease, which is characterized by pulmoner hyperinflation. Depending on the degree of bronchial obstruction, the clinical presentation may be variable. We report a rare case with congenital lobar emphysema in a 38-days-old male infant who presented with severe respiratory distress and hypertension. Air trapping in the left upper lung and significant mediastinal shift to the right were observed on the chest x-ray. Emphysematous changes were detected on the thorax computed tomography and considered as congenital lobar emphysema. The upper left lobectomy was successfully performed by pediatric surgeons. On postoperative follow up, no sign of respiratory distress occured and the patient was normotensive. In this report, a case with congenital lobar emphysema, which is a rare cause of respiratory distress and hypertension is discussed. PMID:27381542

  4. Prevalence of minor musculoskeletal anomalies in children with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    El Kholy, Mohamed; Fahmi, Marwa E; Nassar, Ayman E; Selim, Samia; Elsedfy, Heba H

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade a high frequency of extrathyroidal congenital anomalies has been reported in infants with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) detected by neonatal screening. In the present study the occurrence of additional congenital malformations (CM) in a cohort of children with confirmed primary CH due to thyroid dysgenesis was investigated. A high prevalence of extrathyroidal major congenital anomalies (15.9%), more than 5-fold higher than that reported in the Egyptian population (2.7%), was found. The cardiac and musculoskeletal systems were the most commonly involved, comprising 9.09 and 47.72% of all anomalies, respectively. The high prevalence of musculoskeletal anomalies in this study was mostly due to minor anomalies as brachydactyly and digitalization of thumbs. The type of dysgenesis (i.e. aplastic, ectopic or hypoplastic) as well as the severity of hypothyroidism, as assessed by TSH and T(4) levels at diagnosis, had no relation with the occurrence of extrathyroidal abnormalities. PMID:17587855

  5. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  6. Refractory cardiogenic shock in an infant with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Dolas, Amit

    2012-07-01

    Thyroid dysfunction causes remarkable cardiovascular derangements. Both systolic and diastolic dysfunction of the heart can occur in hypothyroidism leading to cardiac arrhythmia and congestive heart failure. Refractory cardiogenic shock and hypotension in congenital hypothyroidism is rare. We describe a 5-month-old female infant with congenital hypothyroidism and refractory cardiogenic shock. Cardiac function and hemodynamic stability were restored after starting levothyroxine therapy. PMID:23188956

  7. Multimodality 3-Dimensional Image Integration for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization procedures for patients with congenital and structural heart disease are becoming more complex. New imaging strategies involving integration of 3-dimensional images from rotational angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are employed to facilitate these procedures. We discuss the current use of these new 3D imaging technologies and their advantages and challenges when used to guide complex diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25114757

  8. Congenitally corrected transposition and degenerative severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Faganello, Giorgio; Nelson, Martin; Stuart, Graham

    2008-10-01

    Congenitally corrected transposition is a rare cardiac anomaly characterized by the combination of discordant atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial connections. Young patients with this lesion can present with congestive cardiac failure, usually secondary to a large ventricular septal defect or pulmonary stenosis. We report here our experience with a lady aged 79, admitted to our unit because of deterioration of her congestive cardiac failure as a consequence of uncorrected congenitally corrected transposition associated with degenerative severe aortic stenosis. PMID:18752714

  9. Ultrasonography in Diagnosis of Congenital Absence of the Vas Deferens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Liang, Chaozhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an important cause of obstructive azoospermia, and the lack of an imaging diagnostic test is a critical problem. The aim of this study is to discuss the use of ultrasonography in congenital absence of vas deferens, including dysplasia of the epididymis and the seminal vesical. Material/Methods Five fresh spermatic cord specimens were detected by ultrasonography (US) to evaluate the image of the spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens. Fifty normal males had scrotal US to confirm whether the normal spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens can be detected and to measure the internal and external diameter on the long axis view. Forty-six males clinically diagnosed as having congenital absence of vas deferens underwent scrotal US to evaluate the spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens and the epididymis. The seminal vesicals were detected with transrectal ultrasonography. We evaluated images of the vas deferens, epididymis, and seminal vesical. Results Scrotal ultrasonography can distinguish the vas deferens from the other cord-like structures in the spermatic cord, and the vas deferens has a characteristic image. Scrotal ultrasonography detected all 50 normal males and measured the diameter. No statistically significant difference was found between the left and right measurements. In the 46 patients, the following anomalies were observed: 1) 42 cases of congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens; 2) 2 cases of congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens; and 3) 1 case of congenital segmental absence of the vas deferens. All 46 cases were accompanied with epididymis and seminal vesical anomalies. Conclusions The spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens can be detected by US, which is a valuable tool in diagnosis of congenital absence of the vas deferens. Seminal vesical and epididymis anomalies often associated with congenital absence of the vas deferens were revealed by ultrasonography. PMID

  10. A Rare Case of Congenital Ranula in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Mneimneh, Sirin; Barazi, Randa; Rajab, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Ranula is a mucus extravasation cyst originating from the sublingual gland on the floor of the mouth. Congenital ranula is very rare. We report a case of a 4-month-old girl with a congenital ranula in the floor of mouth. The ranula was treated first by marsupialization, but the cyst recurred after 1 week. Excision of the ranula was done and was successful. PMID:27313929

  11. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  12. Indications for Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siân Pincott, E; Burch, M

    2011-01-01

    In this review we have looked at indications for cardiac transplantation in congenital heart disease. An outline of the general principles of the use of transplant as a management strategy both as a first line treatment and following other surgical interventions is discussed. We explore the importance of the timing of patient referral and the evaluations undertaken, and how the results of these may vary between patients with congenital heart disease and patients with other causes of end-stage heart failure. The potential complications associated with patients with congenital heart disease need to be both anticipated and managed appropriately by an experienced team. Timing of transplantation in congenital heart disease is difficult to standardize as the group of patients is heterogeneous. We discuss the role and limitations of investigations such as BNP, 6 minute walk, metabolic exercise testing and self estimated physical functioning. We also discuss the suitability for listing. It is clear that congenital heart patients should not be considered to be at uniform high risk of death at transplant. Morbidity varies greatly in the congenital patient population with the failing Fontan circulation having a far higher risk than a failing Mustard circulation. However the underlying issue of imbalance between donor organ supply and demand needs to be addressed as transplant teams are finding themselves in the increasingly difficult situation of supporting growing numbers of patients with a diverse range of pathologies with declining numbers of donor organs. PMID:22548027

  13. Cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in patients with congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Weon Wook; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Jeung Il; Ku, Ja Gyung; Lee, Hong Seok; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Yong-Ki; Lee, Jung Sub

    2008-07-01

    A possible association between congenital scoliosis and low mental status has been recognized, but there are no reports describing the mental status or cerebral metabolism in patients with congenital scoliosis in detail. We investigated the mental status using a mini-mental status exam as well as the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography in 12 patients with congenital scoliosis and compared them with those of 14 age-matched patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The mean mini-mental status exam score in the congenital scoliosis group was significantly lower than that in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis group. Group analysis found that various brain areas of patients with congenital scoliosis showed glucose hypometabolisms in the left prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10), right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9), left anterior cingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 24) and pulvinar of the left thalamus. From this study, we could find the metabolic abnormalities of brain in patients with congenital scoliosis and suggest the possible role of voxel-based analysis of brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. PMID:18446384

  14. Rubella and congenital rubella (German measles).

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean

    2005-01-01

    Rubella, also known as German measles, is usually a very mild infection that can have devastating effects in certain instances. It is a pleomorphic RNA virus in the Togaviridae family of the genus Rubivirus. It typically causes a scarletiniform rash, cervical lymphadenopathy, and mild constitutional symptoms, but in older children and adults, especially women, it may be more severe, with joint involvement and purpuric rash. Infection during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy results in congenital infection and/or miscarriage in 80-90% of cases. The congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) involves multiple organ systems and has a long period of active infection and virus shedding in the postnatal period. For these reasons, the rubella vaccine program was instituted in 1969, and the incidence of rubella infection in the United States has since declined by 99%. Rubella has been recognized as a disease for approximately 200 years, and it has since been found that humans are the only natural reservoir for the rubella virus. Virus is present in nasopharyngeal secretions, blood, feces, and urine during the clinical illness, although patients with subclinical disease are also infectious. The virus is spread via oral droplets and is shed in the nasopharynx for approximately 7 days before and after the rash is visible. CRS includes a configuration of anomalies, including nerve deafness, cataracts, cardiac anomalies (usually pulmonary artery and valvular stenosis, and patent ductus arteriosis), and mental retardation, with late complications including diabetes, thyroid disease, growth hormone deficiency, and progressive panencephalitis. In 1969, the first rubella vaccine was licensed for use, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began its National Congenital Rubella Syndrome Registry. As required under the National Childhood Injury Act, all healthcare providers in the United States who administer any vaccine shall, prior to administration of the vaccine, provide a

  15. Multiple congenital ocular anomalies in Icelandic horses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple congenital ocular anomalies (MCOA) syndrome is a hereditary congenital eye defect that was first described in Silver colored Rocky Mountain horses. The mutation causing this disease is located within a defined chromosomal interval, which also contains the gene and mutation that is associated with the Silver coat color (PMEL17, exon 11). Horses that are homozygous for the disease-causing allele have multiple defects (MCOA-phenotype), whilst the heterozygous horses predominantly have cysts of the iris, ciliary body or retina (Cyst-phenotype). It has been argued that these ocular defects are caused by a recent mutation that is restricted to horses that are related to the Rocky Mountain Horse breed. For that reason we have examined another horse breed, the Icelandic horse, which is historically quite divergent from Rocky Mountain horses. Results We examined 24 Icelandic horses and established that the MCOA syndrome is present in this breed. Four of these horses were categorised as having the MCOA-phenotype and were genotyped as being homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation. The most common clinical signs included megaloglobus, iris stromal hypoplasia, abnormal pectinate ligaments, iridociliary cysts occasionally extending into the peripheral retina and cataracts. The cysts and pectinate ligament abnormalities were observed in the temporal quadrant of the eyes. Fourteen horses were heterozygous for the PMEL17 mutation and were characterized as having the Cyst-phenotype with cysts and occasionally curvilinear streaks in the peripheral retina. Three additional horses were genotyped as PMEL17 heterozygotes, but in these horses we were unable to detect cysts or other forms of anomalies. One eye of a severely vision-impaired 18 month-old stallion, homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation was examined by light microscopy. Redundant duplication of non-pigmented ciliary body epithelium, sometimes forming cysts bulging into the posterior chamber and localized areas of

  16. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggrregated albumin (/sup 99m/Tc MAA) labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cutaneous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  17. [Congenital gastrointestinal tract obstructions (pictorial essay)].

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Abdulhakim; Sevinç, Halil

    2004-03-01

    A wide spectrum of congenital anomalies may cause obstruction in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Neonates with complete upper intestinal obstruction do not usually require further radiological evaluation after radiography. Barium studies are sometimes needed. Barium studies and other comprehensive methods such as ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are usually complementary procedures which are not usually helpful and may even delay surgery, resulting in some complications and death. The decision to perform a given imaging examination should be considered carefully to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient. The diagnosis of low intestinal obstruction is usually apparent at abdominal radiography because of the presence of many dilated loops. The differentiation between ileal and colonic obstruction can be made with a contrast enema study. Dilute ionic, water-soluble contrast agents and non-balloon tip catheter of appropriate size is preferred for neonatal contrast enemas. Barium sulphate suspensions typically should not be used because of their potential to exacerbate the impaction of meconium plugs in meconium ileus, whereas water-soluble enemas can be therapeutic. PMID:15054709

  18. Cardiac findings in congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Wang, Ching H; Wahbi, Karim; Rosenthal, David; Duboc, Denis; Melacini, Paola

    2010-09-01

    Cardiac involvement (CI) in congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) has been only rarely investigated so far. By means of a systematic literature search we reviewed the literature about CI in CMD and found that CI is apparently absent in Ullrich CMD or CMD with integrin deficiency and only mild in Bethlem CMD. CI in merosin deficiency includes dilated cardiomyopathy and systolic dysfunction. CI in dystroglycanopathies seems most prevalent among all CMDs and includes dilated cardiomyopathy, systolic dysfunction, and myocardial fibrosis in Fukuyama CMD. Among the nonspecified dystroglycanopathies, CI manifests as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP) or systolic dysfunction. With CMD type 1C, as well as with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I, up to half of the patients develop dilated cardiomyopathy. In rigid-spine syndrome, predominantly the right heart is affected secondary to thoracic deformity. In patients who carry LMNA mutations, CI may manifest as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Overall, CI in patients with CMD varies considerably between the different CMD types from absent or mild CI to severe cardiac disease, particularly in merosin deficiency, dystroglycanopathies, and laminopathies. Patients with CMD with CI require regular cardiologic surveillance so that severe, treatable cardiac disease is not overlooked. PMID:20679303

  19. Recent advances in central congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Schoenmakers, Nadia; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Chatterjee, V Krishna; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-12-01

    Central congenital hypothyroidism (CCH) may occur in isolation, or more frequently in combination with additional pituitary hormone deficits with or without associated extrapituitary abnormalities. Although uncommon, it may be more prevalent than previously thought, affecting up to 1:16 000 neonates in the Netherlands. Since TSH is not elevated, CCH will evade diagnosis in primary, TSH-based, CH screening programs and delayed detection may result in neurodevelopmental delay due to untreated neonatal hypothyroidism. Alternatively, coexisting growth hormones or ACTH deficiency may pose additional risks, such as life threatening hypoglycaemia. Genetic ascertainment is possible in a minority of cases and reveals mutations in genes controlling the TSH biosynthetic pathway (TSHB, TRHR, IGSF1) in isolated TSH deficiency, or early (HESX1, LHX3, LHX4, SOX3, OTX2) or late (PROP1, POU1F1) pituitary transcription factors in combined hormone deficits. Since TSH cannot be used as an indicator of euthyroidism, adequacy of treatment can be difficult to monitor due to a paucity of alternative biomarkers. This review will summarize the normal physiology of pituitary development and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, then describe known genetic causes of isolated central hypothyroidism and combined pituitary hormone deficits associated with TSH deficiency. Difficulties in diagnosis and management of these conditions will then be discussed. PMID:26416826

  20. Twin pregnancy in the congenital malformed uterus.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Pentti K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency and outcome of twin pregnancies in women with uterine malformation were studied. The cohort comprised 13 (4.9%) women with twin pregnancy found among 263 women. They had 483 deliveries, 13 of them twins (2.7%; 95% CI 1.6-4.6%). Among 38 patients with unicornuate uterus 5 (6.8%) out of 74 deliveries were twins, 39 women with didelphic uterus 2 (3.2%) out of 62 deliveries and 147 women with septate or subseptate uterus 6 (2.3%) out of 264 deliveries were twins. The mean duration of gestation was 249 days (range 190-268 days), 5 (38%) out of 13 deliveries were premature, 25 out of 26 newborns were alive. Mean durations of gestation and mean weights of newborns did not differ when 7 cases with unicornuate or didelphic uterus were compared to 6 cases with complete or partial uterine septum. A congenital malformed uterus can bear twin pregnancy without severe complications apart from prematurity. PMID:26757792

  1. Recent advances in central congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Schoenmakers, Nadia; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Chatterjee, V Krishna; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-01-01

    Central congenital hypothyroidism (CCH) may occur in isolation, or more frequently in combination with additional pituitary hormone deficits with or without associated extrapituitary abnormalities. Although uncommon, it may be more prevalent than previously thought, affecting up to 1:16 000 neonates in the Netherlands. Since TSH is not elevated, CCH will evade diagnosis in primary, TSH-based, CH screening programs and delayed detection may result in neurodevelopmental delay due to untreated neonatal hypothyroidism. Alternatively, coexisting growth hormones or ACTH deficiency may pose additional risks, such as life threatening hypoglycaemia. Genetic ascertainment is possible in a minority of cases and reveals mutations in genes controlling the TSH biosynthetic pathway (TSHB, TRHR, IGSF1) in isolated TSH deficiency, or early (HESX1, LHX3, LHX4, SOX3, OTX2) or late (PROP1, POU1F1) pituitary transcription factors in combined hormone deficits. Since TSH cannot be used as an indicator of euthyroidism, adequacy of treatment can be difficult to monitor due to a paucity of alternative biomarkers. This review will summarize the normal physiology of pituitary development and the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis, then describe known genetic causes of isolated central hypothyroidism and combined pituitary hormone deficits associated with TSH deficiency. Difficulties in diagnosis and management of these conditions will then be discussed. PMID:26416826

  2. Adult duodenal intussusception associated with congenital malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Gardner-Thorpe, J; Hardwick, RH; Carroll, NR; Gibbs, P; Jamieson, NV; Praseedom, RK

    2007-01-01

    Enteroenteric intussusception is a condition in which full-thickness bowel wall becomes telescoped into the lumen of distal bowel. In adults, there is usually an abnormality acting as a lead point, usually a Meckels' diverticulum, a hamartoma or a tumour. Duodeno-duodenal intussusception is exceptionally rare because the retroperitoneal situation fixes the duodenal wall. The aim of this report is to describe the first published case of this condition. A patient with duodeno-duodenal intussusception secondary to an ampullary lesion is reported. A 66 year-old lady presented with intermittent abdominal pain, weight loss and anaemia. Ultrasound scanning showed dilated bile and pancreatic ducts. CT scanning revealed intussusception involving the full-thickness duodenal wall. The lead point was an ampullary villous adenoma. Congenital partial (type II) malrotation was found at operation and this abnormality permitted excessive mobility of the duodenal wall such that intussusception was possible. This condition can be diagnosed using enhanced CT. Intussusception can be complicated by bowel obstruction, ischaemia or bleeding, and therefore the underlying cause should be treated as soon as possible. PMID:17657849

  3. Congenital polyalveolar lobe in three foals.

    PubMed

    Hong, C B

    1996-07-01

    Three cases of congenital polyalveolar lobe (pulmonary hamartoma) were diagnosed in female Thoroughbred foals. Foal 1 was born at full term but died shortly afterwards. Foal 2 was aborted at the seventh month of gestation. Parturition was induced at the tenth month of gestation in foal 3 because it developed hydrops of the amnion and ascites. In all three foals, the polyalveolar lobe occurred on the right side and affected the entire right lung. In each case, the right lung formed a tumour-like mass, and expanded into the left chest cavity. The lung masses were pink to dark red and spongy to rubbery, with marked lobular patterns on the pleural and cut surfaces. The left lung was compressed and small. The right and left lungs weighed 0.9-6.3 kg and 80 g-0.3 kg, respectively. Microscopically, the polyalveolar lobe consisted of normal alveoli, bronchioli and blood vessels, but the alveolus:artery ratio was greater than normal. In the polyalveolar lobe of two foals the numbers of alveoli per artery were 65.2 and 52.5; in contrast, the corresponding values for three control lungs were 26.9, 26.5 and 27.6. Chronic passive congestion with generalized oedema was observed in foals 2 and 3. PMID:8878754

  4. Amaurosis fugax associated with congenital vascular defect

    PubMed Central

    Giltner, John W; Thomas, Edward R; Rundell, William K

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old female with no significant past medical history presented with loss of vision in the lower half of her left eye that lasted <5 minutes. No abnormalities were found on ocular or physical exam. Computed tomography angiography and carotid ultrasound were performed, which confirmed the diagnosis as amaurosis fugax with two abnormalities leading to the transient retinal vessel occlusion. First, it was found that the patient has a congenital vascular anomaly, which consisted most notably of a right-sided aortic arch. This vascular anomaly also consisted of abnormal branching of the left subclavian and common carotid arteries, predisposing the patient to turbulent blood flow and increased risk of the formation of an atherosclerotic plaque at the origin of the common carotid artery. This is an abnormal location for a plaque leading to amaurosis fugax compared to the most common location at the carotid bifurcation. Endarterectomy was not performed because of the difficult location of the plaque and tortuosity of the vessel. Rather, medical intervention with antiplatelet and lipid-lowering therapy was initiated to lower the risk of future retinal or cerebral thromboembolic events. PMID:27445507

  5. Nonclassical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cuhaci, Neslihan; Aydın, Cevdet; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Pınarlı, Ferda Alpaslan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) deficiency due to mutation of the CYP21A2 gene. Patients with nonclassical CAH (NC-CAH) are usually asymptomatic at birth and typically present in late childhood, adolescence, or adulthood with symptoms of excessive androgen secretion. Subfertility is relative in NC-CAH, but the incidence of spontaneous miscarriage is higher. Here, we report a previously undiagnosed female who gave birth to a normal male child and is planning to become pregnant again. Case Report. A 32-year-old female was referred to our clinic for obesity. Her medical history revealed that she had had three pregnancies. She was planning to become pregnant again. Her laboratory results revealed that she had NC-CAH. Since her husband is the son of her aunt and she had miscarriages and intrauterin exitus in her history, their genetic analyses were performed. Conclusion. Since most patients with NC-CAH have a severe mutation, these patients may give birth to a child with the classical CAH (C-CAH) if their partner is also carrying a severe mutation. Females with NC-CAH who desire pregnancy must be aware of the risk of having an infant with C-CAH. PMID:26558116

  6. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Konkay, Kaumudi; Kannan, Meena Angamuthu; Lingappa, Lokesh; Uppin, Megha S.; Challa, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC). Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E), enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with laminin α2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones) and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones. PMID:27570388

  7. Congenital Aniridia: Clinic, Genetics, Therapeutics, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Silva, R.; Falcão-Reis, F.; Rocha-Sousa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a rare condition related to a deficiency in the PAX6 gene expression, which may occur as a result of a family inheritance or a sporadic occurrence. Additionally, this condition may occur as an isolated ocular phenotype or in association with a systemic syndrome. The most common abnormality is iris hypoplasia; however, a panocular disease which also affects the cornea, anterior chamber of the eye, lens, and the posterior segment with presence of optic nerve and foveal hypoplasia is also evident. The development of keratopathy, glaucoma, and cataract is frequent and its presence has implications in the patient's visual acuity. Managing aniridia is challenging since the focus is on treating the previously mentioned disorders, and the outcomes are often disappointing. In this paper, we shall review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical characteristics of patients with aniridia. We shall also make a review of the therapeutic options for the several conditions affecting this syndrome and consider the genetics and prognostic factors. PMID:27355034

  8. Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, R D; Rodrigues, M M; Crawford, J S

    1978-01-01

    Congential fibrosis of the extraocular muscles is characterized by the replacement of normal contractile muscle tissue by fibrous tissue or fibrous bands in varying degrees. The clinical entities which result from the fibrous replacement can be classified under the following headings: general fibrosis syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the inferior rectus muscle with blepharoptosis, strabismus fixus, vertical retraction syndrome and congential unilateral fibrosis, enophthalmos and blepharoptosis. Genetic factors may or may not be apparent. One pedigree with general fibrosis syndrome was traced through five generations. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated replacement of normal muscle by collagen and dense fibrous tissue with occasional areas of degenerated skeletal muscle. The surgical mangement attempts to achieve some functional readjustment of the ocular and lid position as well as the abnormal head posture. The surgical results were considered satisfactory when compared with the original position of the eyes and the backward head tilt. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 9 C FIGURE 9 D PMID:754372

  9. A case of congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hashemipour, Mahin; Ghasemi, Mahmoud; Hovsepian, Silva

    2012-07-01

    Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), a rare disorder of steroid biosynthesis, is the most severe form of CAH. In this disorder the synthesis of glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids and sex steroids is impaired which result in adrenal failure, severe salt wasting crisis and hyperpigmentation in phenotypical female infants irrespective of genetic sex. In this report, we presented a 28-day-old phenotypic female infant, which referred with lethargy, failure to thrive and electrolyte abnormalities. Considering the clinical and biochemical findings, lipoid CAH was diagnosed and replacement therapy with standard doses of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid and sodium chloride was initiated. During follow-up, she had good clinical condition, but at 6 years of age, she refers with hypertension and adrenal insufficiency because of arbitrary drug discontinuation by mother. In ultrasonography an abdominal mass (the testicles) was reported. Chromosome study showed 46XY pattern. Orchiectomy was performed. We recommended that in cases with clinical presentation of adrenal insufficiency if there is not the facility to determine the karyotype, repeated ultrasonography perform during follow-up. In addition, investigating the genetic bases of the disorder would help us to determine the pathogenesis of lipoid CAH in our community. It would be helpful in prenatal diagnosis and treatment of the disorder to prevent its related comorbidities. PMID:22891154

  10. Noninvasive Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Ahmed; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Yau, Mabel; Barhan, Ariella; Zaidi, Mone; Lo, Y M Dennis; New, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    A major hallmark of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is genital ambiguity noted at birth in affected females, which leads to psychological and psychosexual issues in adult life. Attempts to correct genital ambiguity through surgical intervention have been partially successful. Fetal hyperandrogenemia and genital ambiguity have been shown to be preventable by prenatal administration of low-dose dexamethasone initiated before the 9th week of gestation. In 7 of 8 at-risk pregnancies, the unaffected fetus is unnecessarily exposed to dexamethasone for weeks until the diagnosis of classical CAH is ruled out by invasive procedures. This therapeutic dilemma calls for early prenatal diagnosis so that dexamethasone treatment can be directed to affected female fetuses only. We describe the utilization of cell-free fetal DNA in mothers carrying at-risk fetuses as early as 6 gestational weeks by targeted massively parallel sequencing of the genomic region including and flanking the CYP21A2 gene. Our highly personalized and innovative approach should permit the diagnosis of CAH before genital development begins, therefore restricting the purposeful administration of dexamethasone to mothers carrying affected females. PMID:26683339

  11. Congenital muscular dystrophy: from muscle to brain.

    PubMed

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Praticò, Andrea D; Ruggieri, Martino; Parano, Enrico; Rizzo, Renata; Corsello, Giovanni; Vitaliti, Giovanna; Pavone, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a wide group of muscular disorders that manifest with very early onset of muscular weakness, sometime associated to severe brain involvement.The histologic pattern of muscle anomalies is typical of dystrophic lesions but quite variable depending on the different stages and on the severity of the disorder.Recent classification of CMDs have been reported most of which based on the combination of clinical, biochemical, molecular and genetic findings, but genotype/phenotype correlation are in constant progression due to more diffuse utilization of the molecular analysis.In this article, the Authors report on CMDs belonging to the group of dystroglycanopathies and in particular on the most severe forms represented by the Fukuyama CMD, Muscle-Eye-Brain disease and Walker Walburg syndrome.Clinical diagnosis of infantile hypotonia is particularly difficult considering the different etiologic factors causing the lesions, the difficulty in localizing the involved CNS area (central vs. peripheral) and the limited role of the diagnostic procedures at this early age.The diagnostic evaluation is not easy mainly in differentiating the various types of CMDs, and represents a challenge for the neonatologists and pediatricians. Suggestions are reported on the way to reach a correct diagnosis with the appropriate use of the diagnostic means. PMID:27576556

  12. Walking dreams in congenital and acquired paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Saurat, Marie-Thérèse; Agbakou, Maité; Attigui, Patricia; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-12-01

    To test if dreams contain remote or never-experienced motor skills, we collected during 6 weeks dream reports from 15 paraplegics and 15 healthy subjects. In 9/10 subjects with spinal cord injury and in 5/5 with congenital paraplegia, voluntary leg movements were reported during dream, including feelings of walking (46%), running (8.6%), dancing (8%), standing up (6.3%), bicycling (6.3%), and practicing sports (skiing, playing basketball, swimming). Paraplegia patients experienced walking dreams (38.2%) just as often as controls (28.7%). There was no correlation between the frequency of walking dreams and the duration of paraplegia. In contrast, patients were rarely paraplegic in dreams. Subjects who had never walked or stopped walking 4-64 years prior to this study still experience walking in their dreams, suggesting that a cerebral walking program, either genetic or more probably developed via mirror neurons (activated when observing others performing an action) is reactivated during sleep. PMID:21704532

  13. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  14. Nifedipine in Congenital Hyperinsulinism - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khawash, Papiya; Hussain, Khalid; Flanagan, Sarah E; Chatterjee, Sudip; Basak, Dhananjoy

    2015-06-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is the commonest cause of persistent hypoglycemia in neonates. Diazoxide is the first-line drug in its treatment, but the more severe cases are usually diazoxide-resistant. Recessive ABCC8 and KCNJ11 mutations are responsible for most (82%) of the severe diazoxide-unresponsive CHI. Oral nifedipine has been effective in isolated cases of CHI. Successful treatment of diazoxide-unresponsive CHI with a combination of octreotide and nifedipine has been reported in a single isolated case so far. We report here a case of diazoxide-resistant CHI due to homozygous ABCC8 nonsense mutation. In this case, hypoglycaemia uncontrolled by pancreatectomy and octreotide alone showed a good response to a combination of nifedipine and octreotide. Octreotide was tapered off by one year age and thereafter the child is euglycaemic on oral nifedipine alone. Continuous glucose monitoring sensor was used as an aid to monitor glycaemic control and was found to be a safe and reliable option reducing the number of needle-pricks in small children. PMID:26316440

  15. Infertility, infertility treatment, and congenital malformations: Danish national birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bille, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether infertile couples (with a time to pregnancy of > 12 months), who conceive naturally or after treatment, give birth to children with an increased prevalence of congenital malformations. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Danish national birth cohort. Participants Three groups of liveborn children and their mothers: 50 897 singletons and 1366 twins born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy ≤ 12 months), 5764 singletons and 100 twins born of infertile couples who conceived naturally (time to pregnancy > 12 months), and 4588 singletons and 1690 twins born after infertility treatment. Main outcome measures Prevalence of congenital malformations determined from hospital discharge diagnoses. Results Compared with singletons born of fertile couples, singletons born of infertile couples who conceived naturally or after treatment had a higher prevalence of congenital malformations—hazard ratios 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.35) and 1.39 (1.23 to 1.57). The overall prevalence of congenital malformations increased with increasing time to pregnancy. When the analysis was restricted to singletons born of infertile couples, babies born after treatment had an increased prevalence of genital organ malformations (hazard ratio 2.32, 1.24 to 4.35) compared with babies conceived naturally. No significant differences existed in the overall prevalence of congenital malformations among twins. Conclusions Hormonal treatment for infertility may be related to the occurrence of malformations of genital organs, but our results suggest that the reported increased prevalence of congenital malformations seen in singletons born after assisted reproductive technology is partly due to the underlying infertility or its determinants. The association between untreated infertility and congenital malformations warrants further examination. PMID:16893903

  16. Prevention of congenital abnormalities by periconceptional multivitamin supplementation.

    PubMed Central

    Czeizel, A E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the effect of periconceptional multivitamin supplementation on neural tube defects and other congenital abnormality entities. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial of supplementation with multivitamins and trace elements. SETTING--Hungarian family planning programme. SUBJECTS--4156 pregnancies with known outcome and 3713 infants evaluated in the eighth month of life. INTERVENTIONS--A single tablet of a multivitamin including 0.8 mg of folic acid or trace elements supplement daily for at least one month before conception and at least two months after conception. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of major and mild congenital abnormalities. RESULTS--The rate of all major congenital abnormalities was significantly lower in the group given vitamins than in the group given trace elements and this difference cannot be explained totally by the significant reduction of neural tube defects. The rate of major congenital abnormalities other than neural tube defects and genetic syndromes was 9.0/1000 in pregnancies with known outcome in the vitamin group and 16.6/1000 in the trace element group; relative risk 1.85 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 3.38); difference, 7.6/1000. The rate of all major congenital abnormalities other than neural tube defects and genetic syndromes diagnosed up to the eighth month of life was 14.7/1000 informative pregnancies in the vitamin group and 28.3/1000 in the trace element group; relative risk 1.95 (1.23 to 3.09); difference, 13.6/1000. The rate of some congenital abnormalities was lower in the vitamin group than in the trace element group but the differences for each group of abnormalities were not significant. CONCLUSIONS--Periconceptional multivitamin supplementation can reduce not only the rate of neural tube defects but also the rate of other major non-genetic syndromatic congenital abnormalities. Further studies are needed to differentiate the chance effect and vitamin dependent effect. PMID:8324432

  17. Congenital Corneal Anesthesia and Neurotrophic Keratitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Nardella, Chiara; Tiberi, Eloisa; Sacchetti, Marta; Bruscolini, Alice; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis (NK) is a rare degenerative disease of the cornea caused by an impairment of corneal sensory innervation, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensitivity resulting in epithelial keratopathy, ulceration, and perforation. The aetiopathogenesis of corneal sensory innervation impairment in children recognizes the same range of causes as adults, although they are much less frequent in the pediatric population. Some extremely rare congenital diseases could be considered in the aetiopathogenesis of NK in children. Congenital corneal anesthesia is an extremely rare condition that carries considerable diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Typically the onset is up to 3 years of age and the cornea may be affected in isolation or the sensory deficit may exist as a component of a congenital syndrome, or it may be associated with systemic somatic anomalies. Accurate diagnosis and recognition of risk factors is important for lessening long-term sequelae of this condition. Treatment should include frequent topical lubrication and bandage corneal or scleral contact lenses. Surgery may be needed in refractory cases. The purpose of this review is to summarize and update data available on congenital causes and treatment of corneal hypo/anesthesia and, in turn, on congenital NK. PMID:26451380

  18. Clinical, Genetic and Environmental Factors Associated with Congenital Vertebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, P.F.; Raggio, C.L.; Blank, R.D.; McCarty, C.; Broeckel, U.; Pickart, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) pose a significant health problem because they can be associated with spinal deformities, such as congenital scoliosis and kyphosis, in addition to various syndromes and other congenital malformations. Additional information remains to be learned regarding the natural history of congenital scoliosis and related health problems. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the process of somite formation, which gives rise to vertebral bodies, there is a wide gap in our understanding of how genetic factors contribute to CVM development. Maternal diabetes during pregnancy most commonly contributes to the occurrence of CVM, followed by other factors such as hypoxia and anticonvulsant medications. This review highlights several emerging clinical issues related to CVM, including pulmonary and orthopedic outcome in congenital scoliosis. Recent breakthroughs in genetics related to gene and environment interactions associated with CVM development are discussed. The Klippel-Feil syndrome which is associated with cervical segmentation abnormalities is illustrated as an example in which animal models, such as the zebrafish, can be utilized to provide functional evidence of pathogenicity of identified mutations. PMID:23653580

  19. Enhanced chemosensory detection of negative emotions in congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Katrine D; Ptito, Maurice; Møller, Per; Kupers, Ron

    2015-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that congenitally blind individuals develop superior sensory abilities in order to compensate for their lack of vision. Substantial research has been done on somatosensory and auditory sensory information processing of the blind. However, relatively little information is available about compensatory plasticity in the olfactory domain. Although previous studies indicate that blind individuals have superior olfactory abilities, no studies so far have investigated their sense of smell in relation to social and affective communication. The current study compares congenitally blind and normal sighted individuals in their ability to discriminate and identify emotions from body odours. A group of 14 congenitally blind and 14 age- and sex-matched sighted control subjects participated in the study. We compared participants' abilities to detect and identify by smelling sweat from donors who had been watching excerpts from emotional movies showing amusement, fear, disgust, or sexual arousal. Our results show that congenitally blind subjects outperformed sighted controls in identifying fear from male donors. In addition, there was a strong tendency that blind individuals were also better in detecting disgust. Our findings reveal that congenitally blind individuals are better at identifying ecologically important emotions and provide new insights into the mechanisms of social and affective communication in blindness. PMID:25878902

  20. Congenital Corneal Anesthesia and Neurotrophic Keratitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mantelli, Flavio; Nardella, Chiara; Tiberi, Eloisa; Sacchetti, Marta; Bruscolini, Alice; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis (NK) is a rare degenerative disease of the cornea caused by an impairment of corneal sensory innervation, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensitivity resulting in epithelial keratopathy, ulceration, and perforation. The aetiopathogenesis of corneal sensory innervation impairment in children recognizes the same range of causes as adults, although they are much less frequent in the pediatric population. Some extremely rare congenital diseases could be considered in the aetiopathogenesis of NK in children. Congenital corneal anesthesia is an extremely rare condition that carries considerable diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Typically the onset is up to 3 years of age and the cornea may be affected in isolation or the sensory deficit may exist as a component of a congenital syndrome, or it may be associated with systemic somatic anomalies. Accurate diagnosis and recognition of risk factors is important for lessening long-term sequelae of this condition. Treatment should include frequent topical lubrication and bandage corneal or scleral contact lenses. Surgery may be needed in refractory cases. The purpose of this review is to summarize and update data available on congenital causes and treatment of corneal hypo/anesthesia and, in turn, on congenital NK. PMID:26451380