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Sample records for congenital renal dysplasia

  1. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a cause of renal dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Chan, Maren; Hecht, Jonathan L; Boyd, Theonia; Rosen, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most frequently encountered viral infections of the fetus and induces a wide range of histologic and clinical manifestations. Congenital abnormalities are typically restricted to the central nervous system despite evidence of CMV inclusions occurring in most epithelial cells. Although tissue injury and even glomerulonephritis have been observed in congenital CMV infections, renal multicystic dysplasia has not been reported. Herein, we describe a case of unilateral renal dysplasia in a 19-week fetus with concurrent CMV infection. We believe the present case to be the first description of a virus apparently inducing renal multicystic dysplasia. PMID:17638423

  2. Multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, V P; Ratnakar, K S

    2001-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia, the most common form of cystic renal disease in the newborn period, is a clinically important consequence of abnormal nephrogenesis. It usually presents as an abdominal mass. The dysplasias are usually unilateral, but it can be bilateral, segmental or focal. The clinical presentation usually depends on the extent of the dysplastic involvement and the degree of the associated urinary obstruction. Here, we present a case of histologically multicystic renal dysplasia, which is ?bilateral. The left kidney showed typical radiological, gross and histopathological features of multicystic dysplasia, but the right kidney showed only radiological features of dysplastic cystic kidney. PMID:11479648

  3. Transumbilical Multiport Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy for Congenital Renal Dysplasia in Children: Midterm Follow-Up from a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Hong; Qi, Teng; Li, Shuai; Pu, Jiarui; Cao, Guoqing; Tang, Shaotao; Zheng, Liduan; Tong, Qiangsong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical utility and efficiency of transumbilical multiport laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (TMLN) for the treatment of congenital renal dysplasia in children by analyzing consecutive cases from a single institution. Methods: Sixteen children underwent TMLN procedure due to dysplastic kidney between January 2010 and December 2011. The surgery was transperitoneally performed through three transumbilical incisions for two 5-mm and one 3-mm ports, which duplicated the standard laparoscopic steps with the usual laparoscopic instruments. Demographic, perioperative, and follow-up data were analyzed. Results: TMLN was performed in all patients, without additional ports or conversion to open surgery. The mean operation time was 108.4 min (range 90–125), and the blood loss was minimal. There were no severe intraoperative or post-operative complications. The post-operative recovery was uneventful in all patients. No urinary incontinence or umbilical hernias occurred. The cosmetic result was excellent as the incision scar was hidden inside the belly button. Conclusion: TMLN is a safe and efficient procedure for the management of congenital renal dysplasia in children with good cosmesis. Future randomized studies with a larger number of cases and a longer follow-up are warranted to elucidate the benefits and limitations of TMLN in children. PMID:24400291

  4. Multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with multicystic renal dysplasia, postaxial polydactyly and lumbosacral meningocoele. Difficulties in nosological classification and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Witters, I; Moerman, Ph; Natens, R; Van Assche, F A; Fryns, J P

    2002-01-01

    In this report we describe a 17 weeks old female fetus with a lumbosacral meningocoele, multicystic renal dysplasia (Potter type IIb) and postaxial polydactyly type A at the left hand and left foot. There was no hepatic fibrosis. Although multicystic renal dysplasia and postaxial polydactyly are often present in the Meckel syndrome, a lumbosacral neural tube defect is not a typical finding in this syndrome. PMID:12150214

  5. Increased expression of platelet-derived growth factor A and collagenous matrix proteins in congenital multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Liapis, H; Yu, H; Flath, A; Steinhardt, G F

    1997-01-01

    The expression of platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGF-A), and its spatial and temporal relationship to interstitial collagens in kidneys with congenital multicystic dysplasia using in situ hybridization, have been examined. Seventeen dysplastic kidneys (16 weeks to 7 months) and 20 normal age-matched controls were used in the study. Increased PDGF-A mRNA was detected in dysplastic compared to normal kidneys in all age groups including extensively fibrotic postnatal kidneys. An abundant PDGF-A mRNA signal was seen within the epithelial cells of cystically dilated or dysplastic tubules and within interstitial fibroblasts and disorganized primitive mesenchyme. A comparable amount of PDGF-A protein was detected by Western blotting. Procollagen I and III mRNA were increased in fibroblasts surrounding cystic and dysplastic tubules. We conclude that tubular epithelial production of PDGF-A may induce collagenous matrix production by adjacent fibroblasts, while marked up-regulation of PDGF-A by interstitial cells may be responsible for sustainable fibrogenic effects in the fetal kidney contributing to renal maldevelopment. PMID:9200407

  6. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments. PMID:26489825

  7. Renal dysplasia in boxers and Finnish harriers.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, A; Karlstam, E

    2000-09-01

    Puppies from two litters of dogs were found to have severe polyuria and polydipsia. Four of the dogs were investigated by means of clinical examination, haematological and biochemical analysis, and urinalysis. A modified water deprivation response test was also performed in two of the dogs. Renal changes on postmortem examination in three of the dogs were found to be consistent with renal dysplasia. A possible explanation for the finding of hyposthenuria and the extreme polyuria and polydipsia in association with renal dysplasia may be lack of response to antidiuretic hormone owing to anomalous maturation of the renal tubules. Six other puppies from the two litters of dogs did not show any clinical signs of polyuria and polydipsia, although postmortem examination in one of them also revealed renal dysplasia. The clinical features of renal dysplasia may therefore vary greatly between individuals. PMID:11023130

  8. Bilateral diffuse cystic renal dysplasia in a 9-day-old Thoroughbred filly

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Torres, Carlos E.; Hewson, Joanne; Stämpfli, Simon; Stalker, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    A 9-day-old Thoroughbred filly was presented for diarrhea and lethargy. Diagnostic test results were compatible with severe renal dysfunction. Diffuse cystic lesions of both kidneys were identified on ultrasonographic examination. Postmortem examination confirmed the presence of multiple renal cysts. Congenital nephropathy compatible with bilateral diffuse cystic renal dysplasia was diagnosed. PMID:24489392

  9. [Multicystic renal dysplasia and Wilms tumor].

    PubMed

    Muguerza, R; Martínez-Urrutia, M J; López Pereira, P; Picazo, L; Blesa, E; Jaureguizar, E

    1996-10-01

    We review a case of multicystic right dysplasia containing nodular renal blastema in a 3-year-old girl with left Wilms tumor. In relation to this finding the management of the asymptomatic multicystic dysplastic kidney in discussed. PMID:9131988

  10. The Good and Bad of β-Catenin in Kidney Development and Renal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Felix J.; Sarin, Sanjay; Evans, J. Colin; Bridgewater, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Congenital renal malformations are a major cause of childhood and adult onset chronic kidney disease. Identifying the etiology of these renal defects is often challenging since disruptions in the processes that drive kidney development can result from disruptions in environmental, genetic, or epigenetic cues. β-catenin is an intracellular molecule involved in cell adhesion, cell signaling, and regulation of gene transcription. It plays essential roles in kidney development and in the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. Here, we review the function of β-catenin during kidney development and in the genesis of renal dysplasia. PMID:26734608

  11. Fibromuscular Dysplasia Presenting with Bilateral Renal Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Doody, O.; Adam, W. R.; Foley, P. T.; Lyon, S. M.

    2009-03-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) describes a group of conditions which cause nonatheromatous arterial stenoses, most commonly of the renal and carotid arteries, typically in young women. We report a rare case of bilateral segmental renal infarction secondary to FMD in a young male patient. His initial presentation with loin pain and pyrexia resulted in a delay in the definitive diagnosis of FMD. He was successfully treated with bilateral balloon angioplasty. The delayed diagnosis in this patient until the condition had progressed to bilateral renal infarcts highlights the need for prompt investigation and diagnosis of suspected cases of FMD.

  12. Bilateral renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter in a septic neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Gilday, Rebecca A; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Tryon, Kimberly A; Lohmann, Katharina L

    2015-03-01

    A Canadian warmblood foal treated for septic polyarthritis was diagnosed with bilateral congenital renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter at 2 weeks of age based on abdominal ultrasound and postmortem examination. Intermittent abdominal pain throughout the course of treatment was attributed to hydronephrosis and hydroureter. PMID:25750445

  13. Bilateral renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter in a septic neonatal foal

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca A.; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Tryon, Kimberly A.; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    A Canadian warmblood foal treated for septic polyarthritis was diagnosed with bilateral congenital renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter at 2 weeks of age based on abdominal ultrasound and postmortem examination. Intermittent abdominal pain throughout the course of treatment was attributed to hydronephrosis and hydroureter. PMID:25750445

  14. Clinico-pathological profile of 22 cases of cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sompal; Gupta, Ruchika; Nigam, Sonu; Khurana, Nita; Aggarwal, Satish Kumar; Chaturvedi, K Uma; Mandal, Ashish Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysplasia is one of the major renal developmental anomaly characterized by abnormal structural organization and development of metanephric elements. It is usually detected antenatally or in early childhood. The kidney may be multicystic, aplastic, hypoplastic or duplex. We studied 22 cases of cystic renal dysplasia diagnosed over a period often years to identify the spectrum of morphological changes in dysplastic kidney, with special emphasis on mesenchymal changes. Clinical, radiological and gross morphologicalfeatures were noted. Microscopic features were studied in detail, including the epithelial and mesenchymal changes. Twenty-one of the 22 cases studied were children. One case was a 21-year-old adult, which is a rare age at presentation. Male to female ratio was 1.1:1. One of our patients had contra-lateral ureteric stenosis, a rare anomaly reported with renal dysplasia. Ten patients, all autopsy cases, had multi-system congenital anomalies. As cystic renal dysplasia is not a hereditary disease, it must be differentiated from polycystic kidney disease. Other differential diagnoses are cystic nephroma and cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma. Histopathological examination is the final diagnostic tool since radiological features alone may not be sufficient to exclude other cystic renal lesions. Cartilage may not be seen in all cases of renal dysplasia. Once diagnosed, other associated anomalies should also be looked for. PMID:17474245

  15. Optimal management of renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gottsäter, Anders; Lindblad, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory angiopathy of unknown cause affecting medium-sized (most commonly renal) arteries and causing renovascular hypertension. The most common medial multifocal type of FMD (with the “string of beads” appearance) is more than four times more prevalent in females than in males. FMD accounts for up to 10% of cases of renovascular hypertension. Compared with patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, patients with FMD are younger, have fewer risk factors for atherosclerosis, and a lower occurrence of atherosclerosis in other vessels. The etiology is multifactorial, including vessel wall ischemia and smoking, as well as hormonal and genetic factors. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography is still the gold standard for exclusion or confirmation of renal artery stenosis caused by FMD, at least in young patients, who more often have lesions in branches of the renal artery. For FMD patients with atherosclerosis and those who are older (>50–55 years), significant renal artery stenosis may be confirmed or excluded with ultrasonography. The FMD lesion is typically truncal or distal, whereas atherosclerotic lesions are more often proximal or ostial. Treatment options are medical, endovascular (percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty [PTRA]), and surgical. Invasive treatment should be considered when hypertension cannot be controlled with antihypertensive drugs and in patients with impaired renal function or ischemic nephropathy. PTRA has become the treatment of choice and normally yields good results, especially in unifocal disease and young patients. Pressure gradients are normally completely abolished, and there is no indication for stent placement. Surgical revascularization is indicated after PTRA complications; thrombosis, perforation, progressive dissection, repeated PTRA failure or restenosis. Centralization of handling is recommended. PMID:25114536

  16. Cystic dysplasia of the epididymis: a disorder of mesonephric differentiation associated with renal maldevelopment.

    PubMed

    Nistal, Manuel; González-Peramato, Pilar; Sousa, Grevelyn; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez, José Ignacio; Cajaiba, Mariana M

    2010-06-01

    The occurrence of congenital epididymal malformations with a cystic component has not been fully characterized. Most epididymal cysts occur later in life and are likely acquired. In addition, congenital malformations of the male excretory system are extremely uncommon in fetuses and neonates, and epididymal dysplastic changes have not been reported in these cases. In this study, we report 20 cases (including 19 fetal/neonatal autopsies and one surgical specimen from an older child) showing the same spectrum of histological findings in the epididymis, characterized by cystic ductal dilation with dysplastic ducts of variable diameters and irregular shapes, with ill-defined walls. Efferent ductules also showed dysplastic features. In addition, 18 cases had either renal and/or urinary tract anomalies, including renal dysplasia (eight), pelvicaliceal dilation (eight), renal agenesis (four) and hypoplasia (one), ureteral agenesis (two) and hypoplasia (one), urethra and bladder agenesis (two), prostate agenesis (two), and autosomal recessive polycystic renal disease (two). Our observations led to the recognition of a peculiar, not previously described congenital lesion of the epididymis, and we propose the term cystic dysplasia of the epididymis for this anomaly. Similar to what is observed in other male genital system anomalies (including malformations of the rete testis, vas deferens, and seminal vesicles), most lesions occurred in association with renal and/or urinary tract malformations, suggesting a spectrum of congenital malformations. The shared embryological origin of these structures may explain their simultaneous occurrence, possibly related to disrupted mesonephric duct development. PMID:20361206

  17. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia. PMID:17650728

  18. Histomorphology of renal dysplasia--an autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Nandita; Menon, Santosh; Radotra, B D

    2006-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of pediatric autopsies in the past 18 years was done with the aim of studying the histomorphology of renal dysplasia. Renal dysplasia comprised 150 (3.66%) of the 4,099 pediatric autopsies from 20 weeks of gestation to 1 year of life. Primitive ducts with the fibromuscular collar, the sine qua non of renal dysplasia, was seen in all cases. Lobar disorganization and cysts were seen in all cases except for the 7 cases of hypodysplasia. Other elements were seen in varying proportions: cartilage in 33.7%, bone in 1.08%, thickening of basement membrane of the primitive ducts in 64.13%, extramedullary hematopoiesis in 98.9%, nerve twigs in 72.8%, and nodular renal blastema in 2.17% cases. In unilateral multicystic dysplasia/renal agenesis, the contralateral kidney showed abnormalities in 44.45% and 47.37% of cases, respectively. PMID:16908457

  19. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN CAIRN TERRIERS WITH PRECLINICAL RENAL DYSPLASIA

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Gabriela S.; Rhodes, James; Cianciolo, Rachel; Casal, Margret L.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia is a hereditary disease characterized by abnormal differentiation of renal tissue. The ultrasonographic appearance of dysplastic canine kidneys has been reported in the late stage of the disease where inflammatory and degenerative changes are already present and the dogs are in chronic renal failure. In this study, we describe the ultrasonographic appearance of the kidneys of five related Cairn Terriers affected with renal dysplasia before the onset of clinical or laboratory evidence of renal failure. Common findings included poor corticomedullary definition and multifocal hyperechoic speckles in the renal medulla, or a diffusely hyperechoic medulla. Severity of ultrasonographic changes was related to the severity of histopathologic findings. The ability to detect dysplastic changes before clinical signs develop makes ultrasound a potentially useful screening method for canine renal dysplasia. PMID:20806879

  20. Ultrasonographic findings of renal dysplasia in cocker spaniels: eight cases.

    PubMed

    Felkai, C; Vörös, K; Vrabély, T; Vetési, F; Karsai, F; Papp, L

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study of eight young Cocker Spaniels aged 9-24 months was performed to describe the ultrasonographic findings of histologically confirmed renal dysplasia. Ultrasonography revealed kidneys of significantly (p < 0.001) reduced volume in all dogs. During qualitative evaluation, two different types of sonographic alterations could be seen. In one type of the ultrasound alterations, corticomedullary demarcation was distinct and the renal cortex was remarkably thin, which was best seen in the dorsal (frontal) imaging plane. In the other type of the ultrasound appearance, overall increased echogenicity with poor corticomedullary demarcation was noticed, and the kidneys could hardly be separated from their surroundings. These features were best recognised in the sagittal (coronal) imaging plane. In one dog with secondary hypercalcaemia, a hyperechoic corticomedullary area was also seen. Post-mortem histological diagnosis revealed renal dysplasia and secondary fibrosis. Based on ultrasound findings alone, renal dysplasia (renal familial disease) can be suspected when small kidneys with thin echogenic cortex are present in young dogs. An ultrasound image, similar to that of fibrotic kidneys (increased overall echogenicity and reduced corticomedullary definition) cannot be differentiated from chronic inflammatory disease and from end-stage kidneys. Therefore, ultrasound-guided biopsy or post-mortem histology is necessary for the definitive diagnosis of renal dysplasia. This is the first study reporting on the ultrasound appearance of renal dysplasia in Cocker Spaniel dogs. PMID:9557317

  1. Expression of laminin and fibronectin in renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Santosh; Kakkar, Nandita; Radotra, B D

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is a matter of debate. Recent theories have conceptualized the role of extracellular matrix proteins in the genesis of renal dysplasia. During normal nephrogenesis, collagen type I and III and fibronectins are lost and laminin and syndecan appear once proper induction has occurred. Any deviation from the normal pattern is said to lead to dysplasia. In this study, the expressions of adhesive glycoproteins, laminin, and fibronectin were studied immunohistochemically in 25 autopsy cases of renal dysplasia and normal age-matched control cases. These cases of renal dysplasia were categorized into 3 groups based on the period of gestation: 20 to 26 weeks, 27 to 33 weeks, and 34 to 40 weeks. The immunohistochemical findings were graded from 0 to 4+ based on the visual intensity. Chi-square analysis was used to calculate the difference in expressions of laminin and fibronectin in cases and controls as a whole and within and between age groups. Immunostaining for laminin in all age groups showed a significant difference in expression between dysplastic kidneys (less expression) and normal controls (greater expression). In the case of fibronectin expression, all but 1 group showed a significant difference, with dysplastic kidneys showing more and normal controls showing less expression. The inference derived is that laminin expression decreases and fibronectin expression increases in renal dysplasia compared with normal nephrogenesis. PMID:15630524

  2. Multicystic renal dysplasia in a Japanese black bull.

    PubMed

    Ushigaki, K; Uchida, K; Murakami, T; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S

    1999-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia was found in a 6-day-old Japanese black bull. Grossly, both kidneys were markedly small (2.0 x 3.5 cm) with numerous cysts ranging from 1 to 8 mm in diameter. Histopathologically, both kidneys consisted of many irregularly enlarged cysts, immature glomeruli, small ducts and anomalous stromal connective tissues containing focal persistent mesenchyme characterized by a proliferation of stellate cells with myxomatous area. These features are compatible with those of multicystic renal dysplasia in humans and other mammals. PMID:10458111

  3. Bilateral cystic dysplasia of the rete testis with renal adysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Harvey, Isabelle; Jovanovic, Mubina; Oligny, Luc L; Fournet, Jean-Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Cystic dyplasia of the rete testis (CDRT) is an uncommon, generally unilateral lesion characterized by anastomosing cystic spaces lined by a flattened simple cuboidal epithelium in the rete testis. In the literature this lesion often is associated with an ipsilateral urogenital lesion such as renal agenesia or multicystic dysplasia of the kidney, in order of frequency. The pathogenesis is explained by some authors by their common embryologic origin. We are reporting the finding of bilateral CDRT associated with ultrasound-diagnosed renal adysplasia in a 20-week gestational age fetus with oligohydramnios. Although CDRT has been referred to as being associated with multicystic renal dysplasia or renal agenesis, the present case appears to be unique in combining all the malformations together. PMID:16822083

  4. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity associated with intestinal neuronal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Berger, S; Ziebell, P; OFFsler, M; Hofmann-von Kap-herr, S

    1998-09-01

    A close relation between different forms of dysganglionosis such as intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) type B and aganglionosis has been established. No systematic analysis of other malformations and diseases accompanying IND has been made as yet. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity were analyzed in 109 patients with IND seen at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Mainz from 1977 to 1996. IND was associated with Hirschsprung's disease in 47 cases; 22 children with IND had other abdominal malformations, including anal atresia, rectal stenosis, sigmoidal stenosis, ileal atresia, pyloric stenosis, and esophageal atresia. A cystic bowel duplication, a choledochal cyst, and a persisting urachus were also found. Extra-abdominal malformations such as Down's syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, aortic stenosis, and malformations of vertebral bodies were seen. Twin siblings of children with IND were either healthy (n=3) or died in utero (n=1). Seventeen children with IND developed severe intra-abdominal complications during the perinatal period such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), meconium ileus, or bowel perforations. NEC was frequently associated with preterm birth. Bowel perforations were seen in mature and preterm newborns with IND. Taken together, IND is found in a variety of obstructive bowel diseases. This may support the hypothesis that IND is a secondary phenomenon or that congenital atresias and stenoses of the digestive tract have a pathogenesis similar to that of intestinal innervation disturbances. IND may also be a part of complex malformation patterns since it occurs with a number of extraintestinal and non-obstructive intestinal malformations. PMID:9716673

  5. Multicystic renal dysplasia detected by prenatal ultrasonography. Natural history and results of conservative management.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, A M; Anderson, P A; Williams, M P

    1992-05-01

    In a review of 44 infants with multicystic renal dysplasia diagnosed prenatally by ultrasonography, contralateral anomalies, bilateral disease and other non-urinary congenital anomalies were rare. In approximately two-thirds of infants the lesion was impalpable and in 2 cases involution had occurred prenatally. All but 5 were managed conservatively and without complications, and partial or complete involution of the lesion occurred in more than 50% during follow-up. It was concluded that the natural history of this anomaly is usually benign and that conservative management is advisable. PMID:1623386

  6. Pathology of renal dysplasia and bladder aplasia-hypoplasia in a flock of sheep.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, D; Jeffrey, M; Jones, T; Morgan, G; Green, R

    1993-10-01

    Congenital renal disease was detected in a flock of sheep in the English Midlands over 2 successive years (1982 and 1983). A Suffolk ram was removed from the flock and test mated to unrelated Suffolk ewes in another flock; 14 of the resulting 43 lambs born in 1984 had an identical congenital renal disease. Kidneys were examined microscopically from 60 clinically affected neonatal lambs. Kidneys from 7 of the 60 clinically affected neonatal lambs (1, 1983; 6, 1984) were examined ultrastructurally and compared with kidneys from 3 healthy unrelated neonatal lambs. Most affected lambs examined (52/60) had bilaterally small kidneys (< or = 2 g) with fine intracortical cysts and distinct cortical and medullary zones. Kidneys were either grossly normal (3/60 lambs) or multicystic and of normal size to markedly enlarged (5/60 lambs). The bladder was absent or vestigial in most lambs. Microscopically, poorly differentiated ("primitive") tubules were present in renal cortex and medulla. Proximal convoluted tubules, where present, were formed by epithelial cells with distinctive round weakly autofluorescent intracytoplasmic inclusions with the ultrastructural appearance of atypical lysosomes. Loops of Henle, distal convoluted tubules, and juxtaglomerular-peripolar cell complexes were largely absent. Glomerular changes were minimal. Cystic dilatation of nephrons was restricted to proximal convoluted tubules lined by vacuolated epithelium. This distinctive congenital renal dysplasia of sheep was most likely inherited as a dominant trait with complete penetrance. PMID:8286460

  7. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kim, Helen J.; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W.; Stevenson, David A.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  8. [Renal dysplasia: clinico-pathologic review].

    PubMed

    Cunha, A S; de Sousa, J F; Garcia, C

    1992-05-01

    Histology records from 63 nephrectomies were reviewed; 22 patients had unilateral totally dysplastic kidneys and 5 had polar or segmental dysplasia. A clinicopathological study of these cases was undertaken. In the first group, there was a slight male preponderance and 75% of the patients presented were under two years of age. Urinary tract infection was the most common complaint. 4 patients were diagnosed in utero by ultrasound and 5 infants presented an abdominal mass. Hypertension was documented in a newborn baby. Ipsilateral lower urinary tract anomalies were found in 12 patients and those of the contralateral kidney in 2 children. There were 3 cases of extrarenal anomalies. Histological examination revealed 13 cases of multicystic dysplasia and 9 of solid dysplasia. Metaplastic cartilage was found in 1 case. In the group of segmental dysplasia, age ranging from 27 weeks' gestation to 8 years, at the time of the diagnosis. They all had duplex kidneys and 4 had ureterocele. Histological study in these cases was similar to the one found in the previous series, although superimposed inflammatory changes were more pronounced. Some of the theories regarding the pathogenesis of this disorder are reviewed and the importance of its diagnosis is emphasised. PMID:1502940

  9. Multicystic renal dysplasia: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Alam, Kiran; Varshney, Manoranjan; Aziz, Mehar; Maheshwari, Veena; Basha, Mahfooz; Gaur, Kavita; Ghani, Imran

    2011-01-01

    A 3-year-old male child had left-sided abdominal lump for 4 months. Radiological examination revealed a cystic mass in the left kidney. A tentative diagnosis of multicystic nephroma was made on clinical and radiological examination. Cytology was inconclusive. Nephrectomy was done. A final diagnosis of multicystic dysplasia was made on histological examination. PMID:22696732

  10. Multicystic renal dysplasia: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Kiran; Varshney, Manoranjan; Aziz, Mehar; Maheshwari, Veena; Basha, Mahfooz; Gaur, Kavita; Ghani, Imran

    2011-01-01

    A 3-year-old male child had left-sided abdominal lump for 4 months. Radiological examination revealed a cystic mass in the left kidney. A tentative diagnosis of multicystic nephroma was made on clinical and radiological examination. Cytology was inconclusive. Nephrectomy was done. A final diagnosis of multicystic dysplasia was made on histological examination. PMID:22696732

  11. Surgical Treatment of Renal Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Child.

    PubMed

    Hoksbergen, Arjan W J; Renwarin, Lennaert; Wisselink, Willem

    2015-01-01

    During a routine checkup in a 10-year-old male with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, blood pressure of 180/120 mmHg was found. Physical examination was completely normal. Ultrasound examination showed poststenotic dilatation of the left renal artery which was confirmed by CT-angiography showing a short, high grade stenosis of the left renal artery. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of the stenosis was not successful and therefore the stenosis was excised with reimplantation of the renal artery in the aorta. Pathological examination of the excised segment showed media-type Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD). Six years after surgery, the kidney is completely normal regarding size and function. There are no signs of restenosis of the left renal artery. Nevertheless, the hypertension remained although less severe and requiring less medication. PMID:26078908

  12. Surgical Treatment of Renal Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Child

    PubMed Central

    Hoksbergen, Arjan W. J.; Renwarin, Lennaert; Wisselink, Willem

    2015-01-01

    During a routine checkup in a 10-year-old male with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, blood pressure of 180/120 mmHg was found. Physical examination was completely normal. Ultrasound examination showed poststenotic dilatation of the left renal artery which was confirmed by CT-angiography showing a short, high grade stenosis of the left renal artery. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of the stenosis was not successful and therefore the stenosis was excised with reimplantation of the renal artery in the aorta. Pathological examination of the excised segment showed media-type Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD). Six years after surgery, the kidney is completely normal regarding size and function. There are no signs of restenosis of the left renal artery. Nevertheless, the hypertension remained although less severe and requiring less medication. PMID:26078908

  13. The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. II. The significance of lateral and medial ectopy of the ureteric orifice.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R D; Stephens, F D; Cussen, L J

    1981-09-01

    Renal hypoplasia and dysplasia may be primary malformations linked to a panureteric bud deformity or result from damage to the developing nephrons caused by abnormal urodynamic pressures, Kidneys with misplaced ureteric orifices were graded, according to histologic criteria, on the hypodysplasia scale. With lateral ectopy of the ureteric orifices with and without congenital urethral obstruction, the grades correlated with specific orifice positions. The grades of kidneys with caudal ectopy of the ureters indicated a more general correlation. Dysgenesis of the bud and nephrogenic mesenchyme may account for the renal hypodysplasia when the ureteric orifice is found to be ectopic. PMID:7275560

  14. Bilateral renal dysplasia, nephroblastomatosis, and bronchial stenosis. A new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria Matilde; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Whittington, Elizabeth E

    2015-06-01

    Bilateral nephroblastomatosis (NB) is an uncommon renal anomaly characterized by multiple confluent nephrogenic rests scattered through both kidneys, with only a limited number of cases reported in the medical literature. Some of these children may have associated either Perlman or Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and others do not demonstrate syndromic features. We report a full-term boy with anteverted nose, bilateral bronchial stenosis due to lack of cartilage, bilateral obstructive renal dysplasia and NB with glomeruloid features. The infant had visceromegaly, but neither gigantism nor hemihypertrophy. Immunohistochemistry for PAX2 (Paired box gene-2) and WT-1 (Wilms Tumor 1) were strongly positive in the areas of NB. GLEPP-1 (Glomerular Epithelial Protein) did not stain the areas of NB with a glomeruloid appearance, but was positive in the renal glomeruli as expected. We found neither associated bronchial stenosis nor the histology of NB resembling giant glomeruli in any of the reported cases of NB. PMID:25871299

  15. Bilateral Renal Dysplasia, Nephroblastomatosis, and Bronchial Stenosis. A New Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Maria Matilde; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Whittington, Elizabeth E.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral nephroblastomatosis (NB) is an uncommon renal anomaly characterized by multiple confluent nephrogenic rests scattered through both kidneys, with only a limited number of cases reported in the medical literature. Some of these children may have associated either Perlman or Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome and others do not demonstrate syndromic features. We report a full-term boy with anteverted nose, bilateral bronchial stenosis due to lack of cartilage, bilateral obstructive renal dysplasia and NB with glomeruloid features. The infant had visceromegaly, but neither gigantism nor hemihypertrophy. Immunohistochemistry for PAX2 (Paired box gene-2) and WT-1 (Wilms Tumor 1) were strongly positive in the areas of NB. GLEPP-1 (Glomerular Epithelial Protein) did not stain the areas of NB with a glomeruloid appearance, but was positive in the renal glomeruli as expected. We found neither associated bronchial stenosis nor the histology of NB resembling giant glomeruli in any of the reported cases of NB. PMID:25871299

  16. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia–renal agenesis–cervicothoracic somite dysplasia): a rare cause of primary amenorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    The agenesis of the Müllerian duct is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhoea after Turner syndrome. The abnormal development of Müllerian duct often associates with the urinary tract and skeletal abnormalities. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia–renal agenesis–cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association is a unique and rare developmental disorder with four common features of uterine hypoplasia or aplasia, renal agenesis or ectopy, vertebral anomalies and short stature. We report a case of young female with primary amenorrhoea. She had well-developed secondary sexual characteristics along with multiple congenital developmental abnormalities such as the absence of uterus, ectopic kidney, cervical vertebral fusion, hemivertebrae, scoliosis, cervical rib, facial asymmetry and growth retardation. Our case highlights the rarity and clinical importance of this syndrome. For the evaluation of primary amenorrhoea in a female with well-developed secondary sexual characteristics, congenital anomalies should be ruled out before hormone and karyotype analyses. PMID:27099773

  17. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia-renal agenesis-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia): a rare cause of primary amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Shruti

    2016-04-01

    The agenesis of the Müllerian duct is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhoea after Turner syndrome. The abnormal development of Müllerian duct often associates with the urinary tract and skeletal abnormalities. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia-renal agenesis-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association is a unique and rare developmental disorder with four common features of uterine hypoplasia or aplasia, renal agenesis or ectopy, vertebral anomalies and short stature. We report a case of young female with primary amenorrhoea. She had well-developed secondary sexual characteristics along with multiple congenital developmental abnormalities such as the absence of uterus, ectopic kidney, cervical vertebral fusion, hemivertebrae, scoliosis, cervical rib, facial asymmetry and growth retardation. Our case highlights the rarity and clinical importance of this syndrome. For the evaluation of primary amenorrhoea in a female with well-developed secondary sexual characteristics, congenital anomalies should be ruled out before hormone and karyotype analyses. PMID:27099773

  18. [Potter sequence in a neonate with bilateral renal dysplasia with genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Dyrek, I; Gajda, B; Osuch-Jaczewska, R; Gruszka, L; Mocny, J; Gaida, H; Trzesiok, K; Pogorzelec, B; Pilch-Kucia, H; Mańka, B

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe a neonate with Potter sequence due to bilateral renal dysplasia and discuss its genetic implications. Although this congenital anomaly of the kidneys may occur sporadically, it is now accepted that this condition has an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with a penetrance of 50-90% and variable expression. Potter sequence is not compatible with extrauterine life; therefore, in case of maternal oligohydramnios, ultrasound should be performed in the second trimester in order to make a prenatal diagnosis, as well as to permit genetic counseling. As Potter sequence is frequently associated with clinically silent anomalies of the kidneys, ultrasound examination of the kidneys and urinary tract should also be performed in all family members. PMID:11436690

  19. Spectrum of pediatric developmental and genetic renal lesions and associated congenital malformations--an autopsy study from north India.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Nandita; Menon, Santosh; Radotra, B D

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric developmental and genetic renal lesions are a known cause of mortality in the perinatal/neonatal period. These lesions are associated with a wide range of extrarenal congenital malformations that influence the outcome of the patients. In this autopsy study, we have analyzed the spectrum of pediatric developmental and genetic renal lesions and their associated congenital malformations. A total of 4,099 autopsies (20 weeks of gestation to 1 year of life) were reviewed, of which 158 cases (3.85%) of pediatric developmental (143 cases) and genetic renal lesions (15 cases) were found. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was the commonest genetic lesion. Primitive ducts with cuffing of immature mesenchyme--the sine qua non of renal dysplasia--was found in all cases of dysplasia. Associated congenital malformations were seen in all cases and thus a thorough search for them is mandatory. Ductal plate malformation was found in all cases of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and in 1 case of bilateral multicystic dysplasia. PMID:16754487

  20. Congenital generalised bone dysplasias: a clinical, radiological, and epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P E; Hauge, M

    1989-01-01

    The point prevalence at birth of generalised bone dysplasias was estimated by a study of all children born between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1983 in the county of Fyn (Denmark). Additionally the population prevalence on 31 December 1983 of all patients with generalised bone dysplasias in this county was determined. The county is a well defined, representative subregion of Denmark which demographically comprises a cross section of about 9% of the Danish population. In total, bone dysplasias were found to be more frequent than generally assumed. Achondroplasia was, however, less common with a point prevalence at birth of 1.3 per 100,000, while osteogenesis imperfecta (21.8), multiple epiphyseal dysplasia tarda (9.0), achondrogenesis (6.4), osteopetrosis (5.1), and thanatophoric dysplasia (3.8) were found more frequently. It is striking how many bone dysplasias are still erroneously classified as achondroplasia. Correct diagnosis is important for a valid prognosis, for treatment, and for genetic counselling. The diagnosis relies almost exclusively on the radiographical findings. PMID:2783977

  1. The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. I. Quantification of hypoplasia and dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R D; Stephens, F D; Cussen, L J

    1981-09-01

    In order to assess the relative effects of abnormal ureteric orifice position and abnormal urodynamics on the morphogenesis of hypoplasia and dysplasia in kidneys obtained from infants, we devised a method of quantifying the renal structures. The method was based on radial glomerular counts which ranged from zero to normal (seven to nine), a score for dysplastic structures, and the ratio of normal to abnormal tissues present. These three values, when plotted against each other, correlated closely. The glomerular count, with occasional minor adjustment for inconsistencies, was the best parameter of hypodysplasia. Severe to moderate grades of hypodysplasias fell in the low and middle ranges and hypoplasia through to normal in the highest range. By grading kidneys in this way, we were able to compare the effects of ureteral ectopy and abnormal urinary dynamics on the developing kidney. PMID:7024184

  2. Fibromuscular Dysplasia-Related Renal Artery Stenosis Associated with Aneurysm: Successive Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serter, Selim Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memis, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease. FMD of the renal arteries is one of the leading causes of curable hypertension. The simultaneous occurrence of FMD and renal artery aneurysm has been described previously. In this case, we present a fibrodysplastic lesion and an aneurysm in a renal artery treated with a percutanous transluminal angioplasty and coil embolization.

  3. Stromal β-catenin overexpression contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Felix J; Sarin, Sanjay; Dabas, Pari; Karolak, Michele; Oxburgh, Leif; Bridgewater, Darren

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysplasia, the leading cause of renal failure in children, is characterized by disrupted branching of the collecting ducts and primitive tubules, with an expansion of the stroma, yet a role for the renal stroma in the genesis of renal dysplasia is not known. Here, we demonstrate that expression of β-catenin, a key transcriptional co-activator in renal development, is markedly increased in the expanded stroma in human dysplastic tissue. To understand its contribution to the genesis of renal dysplasia, we generated a mouse model that overexpresses β-catenin specifically in stromal progenitors, termed β-cat(GOF-S) . Histopathological analysis of β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed a marked expansion of fibroblast cells surrounding primitive ducts and tubules, similar to defects observed in human dysplastic kidneys. Characterization of the renal stroma in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed altered stromal cell differentiation in the expanded renal stroma demonstrating that this is not renal stroma but instead a population of stroma-like cells. These cells overexpress ectopic Wnt4 and Bmp4, factors necessary for endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Characterization of the renal vasculature demonstrated disrupted endothelial cell migration, organization, and vascular morphogenesis in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice. Analysis of human dysplastic tissue demonstrated a remarkably similar phenotype to that observed in our mouse model, including altered stromal cell differentiation, ectopic Wnt4 expression in the stroma-like cells, and disrupted endothelial cell migration and vessel formation. Our findings demonstrate that the overexpression of β-catenin in stromal cells is sufficient to cause renal dysplasia. Further, the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is one of disrupted stromal differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time the contribution of stromal β-catenin overexpression to the genesis of renal

  4. Congenital anomalies in the teratological collection of Museum Vrolik in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. II: Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Oostra, R J; Baljet, B; Dijkstra, P F; Hennekam, R C

    1998-05-01

    The Museum Vrolik collection of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology of the University of Amsterdam, founded by Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859) and his son Willem Vrolik (1801-1863), consists of more than five thousand specimens of human and animal anatomy, embryology, pathology, and congenital anomalies. Recently, the collection of congenital anomalies was recatalogued and redescribed according to contempory syndromological views. The original descriptions, as far as preserved, were compared with the clinical and radiographical findings. In 18 specimens the following skeletal dysplasias were diagnosed: achondrogenesis, achondroplasia, Blomstrand chondrodysplasia, Majewski syndrome, osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, osteogenesis imperfecta type I, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, and thanatophoric dysplasia with and without cloverleaf skull. Radiography did not yield a diagnosis in 4 specimens. The use of additional diagnostical techniques, such as MRI and CT scanning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in these specimens, is currently being investigated. PMID:9605285

  5. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  6. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III). PMID:27512242

  7. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  8. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  9. Placental Insufficiency Associated with Loss of Cited1 Causes Renal Medullary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Duncan B.; Boyle, Scott C.; Sams, Rebecca S.; Mazuruk, Bogdan; Zhang, Li; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that placental insufficiency affects embryonic patterning of the kidney and leads to a decreased number of functioning nephrons in adulthood; however, there is circumstantial evidence that placental insufficiency may also affect renal medullary growth, which could account for cases of unexplained renal medullary dysplasia and for abnormalities in renal function among infants who had experienced intrauterine growth retardation. We observed that mice with late gestational placental insufficiency associated with genetic loss of Cited1 expression in the placenta had renal medullary dysplasia. This was not caused by lower urinary tract obstruction or by defects in branching of the ureteric bud during early nephrogenesis but was associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and increased apoptosis in the expanding renal medulla. Loss of placental Cited1 was required for Cited1 mutants to develop renal dysplasia, and this was not dependent on alterations in embryonic Cited1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that renal medullary dysplasia in Cited1 mutant mice is a direct consequence of decreased tissue oxygenation resulting from placental insufficiency. PMID:19297558

  10. Partial Renal Embolization for Pediatric Renovascular Hypertension Secondary to Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Ishijima, Hideyuki; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minako; Ito, Kazuto; Endo, Keigo

    1997-09-15

    We report a 7-year-old boy with renovascular hypertension showing multiple stenoses and microaneurysms of the dorsal branch of the left renal artery caused by fibromuscular dysplasia. Hypertension was successfully treated with transcatheter alcohol and gelatin sponge embolization of the dorsal branch and its distribution. The vertebral branch remained intact. No severe complication was encountered. Loss of renal function by renal scintigraphy was minimal. The patient remains asymptomatic at 1 year.

  11. Renal Artery Stenosis in a Young Female without Fibromuscular Dysplasia with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Paloma; Cholankeril, Matthew; Goldberg, Daniel; Koneru, Jayanth; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is rare in young patients without fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). RAS is primarily classified as having two major etiologies, namely, atherosclerosis and FMD, with 90% and 10%, respectively. We report a case of a female in her mid 20s who developed hypertension due to RAS with no evidence of FMD or underlying renal dysfunction and underwent successful angioplasty and stenting. PMID:27398034

  12. Ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia clefting (EEC) syndrome: a rare cause of congenital lacrimal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Elmann, Solly; Hanson, Sarah A; Bunce, Christopher N; Shinder, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with a medical history significant for ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia clefting (EEC) syndrome was referred for evaluation of congenital left-sided epiphora. The patient had undergone successful right external dacryocystorhinostomy at age 5 to treat congenital right-sided epiphora. On examination, several ocular anomalies were noted, including absence of the upper eyelid puncta, absence of the left inferior punctum, a left lacrimal fistula opening at the left caruncle, increased left tear lake, bilateral hypoplastic meibomian glands, mild conjunctival injection, and thin eyelid cilia and brow hair. Systemic findings included cleft lip and palate status-post repair, ectrodactyly of the hands and feet, adontia and microdontia, a pointed nose, and lightly pigmented, dry hair and skin. The patient underwent examination under anesthesia and left conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy with insertion of a Jones tube with resolution of lacrimation postoperatively. To the authors' knowledge, this is the second report detailing management of congenital lacrimal anomalies in EEC syndrome, and the first describing management of punctal atresia with conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy and Jones tube placement. PMID:24801258

  13. Congenital Seminal Vesicle Cyst Associated with Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Soo; Rim, Joung Sik

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A seminal vesicle cyst in combination with ipsilateral renal agenesis is rarely encountered. We present cases of this disease entity with symptoms, which were treated with a laparoscopic approach as a minimally invasive surgical treatment. Materials and Methods We experienced 4 patients with seminal vesicle cysts and ipsilateral renal agenesis. The mean age was 45.8 years. Chief complaints were perineal pain and hematospermia. Seminal vesicle cysts and remnant ureters were excised by laparoscopic surgery with transperitoneal approaches. Results The mean operative time was 133.8 minutes. The mean hospital stay was 6.8 days. There were no operative complications or transfusions. Conclusion In our report, patients of congenital seminal vesicle cyst associated with renal agenesis are presented. Laparoscopy is considered a minimal invasive management of these combined anomalies, providing a good image and an easy approach. PMID:19718406

  14. Congenital renal tumor: metanephric adenoma, nephrogenic rest, or malignancy?

    PubMed

    Yin, Minzhi; Cai, Jiaoyang; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2015-01-01

    We report a renal tumor detected by prenatal ultrasound and resected at 2 months of age. This 9-cm, solid mass was composed of tubular and papillary structures lined by small, uniform epithelial cells. There was local invasion into renal parenchyma and a tumor deposit in a hilar lymph node. The tumor was immunopositive for WT1, pankeratin, and CD10; focally positive for CK7; and negative for EMA and TFE3. Based on morphology and immunophenotype, the favored diagnosis was metanephric adenoma over Wilms tumor, renal cell carcinoma, and nephrogenic rest. However, metanephric adenoma only occasionally occurs in children and has never been reported prenatally. Alternatively, this tumor might be a congenital Wilms tumor that differentiated completely. Although the nature of the tumor remains unconfirmed, resection appears to have been curative; the patient remains disease-free 18 months following surgery alone. PMID:25734608

  15. Nodular renal blastoma in kidney with multicystic dysplasia. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Corsi, A; Boldrini, R; Caione, P; Bosman, C

    1995-04-01

    The clinico-pathologic association of nodular renal blastema, multicystic kidney and obstructive uropathy has been recently identified. We report on a female patient diagnosed as having unilater multicystic dysplasia by prenatal ultrasonography. The patient was nephrectomized at the age of 6 1/2 months. Examination of the resected kidney revealed multiple unilocular cysts in the cortex and hypoplasia of the homolateral ureter; histological study confirmed the presence of multiple cysts limited to the renal cortex, and revealed, among them, multiple cortical metanephric blastema cells islands. Our case supports a relationship between nodular renal blastema, cortical cysts and obstructive uropathy; ureter hypoplasia could cause intraluminal back pressure, with consequent abnormal development of the ampullae, normally endowed in nephronic anlagens induction, cystic tubular ectasia and persistence of nodular renal blastema. The peripheral location of renal nodular blastema and cysts supports a late error in nephrogenesis, at the time of formation of the last generation of nephrons. PMID:8532415

  16. Renal dysplasia in infants: appearance on 99mTc DMSA scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Roach, P J; Paltiel, H J; Perez-Atayde, A; Tello, R J; Davis, R T; Treves, S T

    1995-01-01

    Infantile renal dysplasias, including multicystic dysplastic kidneys (MCDK), are reported rarely to accumulate radiopharmaceuticals on renal scintigraphy. 99mTc DMSA is a highly sensitive tracer for detecting functioning renal cortical tissue and may be more suited to studying renal dysplasia than 99mTc DTPA. We reviewed the ultrasound studies and 99mTc DMSA scintigrams of 42 infants (age range 1-12 months) with known or suspected MCDK. Overall, uptake on 99mTc DMSA scintigraphy was evident in 6/41 (15%) dysplastic kidneys. Of the 18 patients who underwent nephrectomy, histopathological examination revealed that uptake correlated closely with the presence of mature renal cortical tissue in the affected kidney. Our study shows that a small, but significant number of MCDK will show low-grade uptake on DMSA scintigraphy. This finding may be relevant given the reliance placed on renal scintigraphy in planning treatment for infants with suspected MCDK, particularly with the increasing trend for the non-operative management of this condition. PMID:7491206

  17. PGM3 Mutations Cause a Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation with Severe Immunodeficiency and Skeletal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Backe, Paul H.; Sorte, Hanne S.; Mørkrid, Lars; Chokshi, Niti Y.; Erichsen, Hans Christian; Gambin, Tomasz; Elgstøen, Katja B.P.; Bjørås, Magnar; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Krüger, Marcus; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Patel, Ankita; Raymond, Kimiyo M.; Sasa, Ghadir S.; Krance, Robert A.; Martinez, Caridad A.; Abraham, Shirley M.; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Hall, Patricia; Forbes, Lisa R.; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Nishimura, Gen; Rustad, Cecilie F.; Abrahamsen, Tore G.; Rønnestad, Arild; Osnes, Liv T.; Egeland, Torstein; Rødningen, Olaug K.; Beck, Christine R.; Boerwinkle, Eric A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.; Lausch, Ekkehart; Hanson, I. Celine

    2014-01-01

    Human phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3) catalyzes the conversion of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc)-6-phosphate into GlcNAc-1-phosphate during the synthesis of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-GlcNAc, a sugar nucleotide critical to multiple glycosylation pathways. We identified three unrelated children with recurrent infections, congenital leukopenia including neutropenia, B and T cell lymphopenia, and progression to bone marrow failure. Whole-exome sequencing demonstrated deleterious mutations in PGM3 in all three subjects, delineating their disease to be due to an unsuspected congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). Functional studies of the disease-associated PGM3 variants in E. coli cells demonstrated reduced PGM3 activity for all mutants tested. Two of the three children had skeletal anomalies resembling Desbuquois dysplasia: short stature, brachydactyly, dysmorphic facial features, and intellectual disability. However, these additional features were absent in the third child, showing the clinical variability of the disease. Two children received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of cord blood and bone marrow from matched related donors; both had successful engraftment and correction of neutropenia and lymphopenia. We define PGM3-CDG as a treatable immunodeficiency, document the power of whole-exome sequencing in gene discoveries for rare disorders, and illustrate the utility of genomic analyses in studying combined and variable phenotypes. PMID:24931394

  18. Diagnosis of rare association of orthotopic multicystic dysplasia with crossed fused renal ectopia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Linnan; Koshy, June; Spevak, Melissa R; Benson, Jane E; Bosemani, Thangamadhan

    2014-01-01

    Orthotopic multicystic dysplastic kidney with crossed fused ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly. This congenital anomaly may give an appearance of a solitary kidney morphology during the initial imaging evaluation. A solitary kidney should be carefully evaluated for the presence of duplication, horseshoe configuration, or crossed renal ectopy. Vesicoureteral reflux is a common finding associated with a multicystic dysplastic kidney. We present an infant with an orthotopic multicystic dysplastic kidney and an inferiorly placed crossed fused ectopic kidney. The presence of a complex congenital anomaly may warrant further evaluation with cross-sectional imaging to depict the anatomy and structure. PMID:24839577

  19. Diagnosis of Rare Association of Orthotopic Multicystic Dysplasia with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Linnan; Koshy, June; Spevak, Melissa R.; Benson, Jane E.; Bosemani, Thangamadhan

    2014-01-01

    Orthotopic multicystic dysplastic kidney with crossed fused ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly. This congenital anomaly may give an appearance of a solitary kidney morphology during the initial imaging evaluation. A solitary kidney should be carefully evaluated for the presence of duplication, horseshoe configuration, or crossed renal ectopy. Vesicoureteral reflux is a common finding associated with a multicystic dysplastic kidney. We present an infant with an orthotopic multicystic dysplastic kidney and an inferiorly placed crossed fused ectopic kidney. The presence of a complex congenital anomaly may warrant further evaluation with cross-sectional imaging to depict the anatomy and structure. PMID:24839577

  20. Morphological and functional analyses of two infants with obstructive renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kenichiro; Sekine, Takashi; Nishimura, Riki; Kanamori, Yutaka; Yanagisawa, Atsuhiro; Sakai, Kiyohide; Nagata, Michio; Igarashi, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Renal dysplasia associated with urinary tract obstruction comprises two distinct phenotypes, i.e., multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) and obstructive renal dysplasia (ORD). MCDK is a common manifestation in infants with renal dysplasia, which is characterized by multiloculated thin-walled cysts with no functional parenchyma and an atretic ureter owing to pyelocalyceal occlusion early in fetal life. In contrast, ORD is an extremely rare condition which is caused by severe obstruction of the distal ureter or urethra. Here, we report two infants with ORD. Both patients manifested unilateral kidney enlargement with multiple cortical cysts, mild hydronephrosis, and marked dilatation of the ipsilateral ureter. Contralateral kidneys and urinary tracts revealed no apparent radiological abnormalities. Serial ultrasonographic studies of fetal and neonatal kidneys in both cases revealed that ureteral dilatation was evident at gestational week 16 and 27, respectively, and most of the cortical cysts disappeared within 1-3 months after birth. The functions of the affected kidneys were severely impaired but evident at the time of birth. These manifestations were consistent with a diagnosis of ORD, and were distinct from the features of MCDK. Our observation of fetal and infantile kidneys in these two cases provides us with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of ORD. PMID:21455661

  1. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF binding protein gene expression in multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Matsell, D G; Bennett, T; Armstrong, R A; Goodyer, P; Goodyer, C; Han, V K

    1997-01-01

    Multicystic dysplastic kidney disease is the most common form of renal dysplasia that leads to ESRD in children. This study describes the histopathological changes of multicystic dysplasia that occur from early fetal life to the postnatal period. At 14 wk gestation, early cystic enlargement of various segments of the nephron have been identified, in addition to a displaced metanephric blastema adjacent to zones of normal nephrogenesis. At later stages, the predominant features include cyst enlargement with marked fibromuscular collars, architectural disorganization, and replacement of the interstitium with a disarray of mesenchymal tissue. This study investigated the expression of the mRNA encoding the insulin-like growth factors (IGF) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) and have demonstrated IGF-II, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 to be altered. Apart from their expression in the displaced metanephric blastema, both IGF-II and IGFBP-2 were overexpressed in abnormal tissue elements in all kidneys from fetal to postnatal life. IGF-II gene expression was localized to mesenchymal tissue, specifically in the periductal fibromuscular collars. IGFBP-2 mRNA was found to be expressed exclusively in the cyst epithelia of all cysts at all ages studied, whereas IGFBP-3 mRNA was absent from these epithelia. This study details the failure of normal IGF expression in the development of multicystic renal dysplasia and suggests a role for the IGF system in the progressive histopathological changes of this disorder. PMID:9013452

  2. Bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia with potter sequence. A case with penile agenesis.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Ahmet; Ermis, Bahri; Numanoglu, Varim; Bahadir, Burak; Seckiner, Ilker

    2006-11-01

    Hereditary renal adysplasia (HRA) is a rare autosomal dominant condition. Patients have several other anomalies including Potter facies, thoracic, cardiac, and extremity deformities. The case present dysmorphic facial features such as hypertelorism, prominent epicanthic folds, a flat and broad nose, choanal stenosis, low-set ears, and a receding chin. He had femoral bowing, hypoplastic right tibia and agenesis of the right foot. He had rich and thick skin. He had also a dysplastic empty scrotum, penile agenesis, and anal atresia. The autopsy revealed pulmonary hypoplasia, ventricular septal defect, bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia, agenesis of both ureter and bladder, intraabdominal testicles, and a single umbilical artery. The penile agenesis was first reported, and including the consanguinity in the parents might further delineate the bilateral multicystic HRA. Vater/caudal regression anomalies, Mullerian duct/aplasia, unilateral renal agenesis, and cervicothoracic somite anomalies association, and Coloboma, heart anomaly, choanal atresia, retardation, genital and ear anomalies syndrome has been considered in differential diagnosis. PMID:17106555

  3. [Multicystic renal dysplasia: changes in the contralateral urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Navascues del Río, J A; Luque Mialdea, R; Cerdá Berrocal, J; Martín Crespo, R; Arrojo Vila, F

    1996-06-01

    We have treated seven children with multicystic dysplastic kidney during the last 15 years. Three of then presented contralateral upper urinary tract anomalies. Four cases were diagnosed during prenatal period and three during the first term of life. We did analytic kidney function evaluation, ultrasound examination, voiding cystourethrography, radionuclide scan, gammagraphy, excretory urography and urinary cultures in all cases. We have found a vesicoureteral reflux with a bifid pelvis associated in the same child and two other cases with nonobstructive hydronephrosis. The child with vesicoureteral reflux presented also ipsilateral anomalies like a bladder diverticulum and an incomplete urethral duplication. One child with hydronephrosis opposite to the multicystic dysplastic kidney, also presented a bowel malrotation and a congenital cardiopathy, as extra-urologic associated anomalies. PMID:8928684

  4. Gene expression and cell turnover in human renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A S; Winyard, P J

    2000-01-01

    Kidney malformations are common causes of chronic renal failure in children. Dysplastic kidneys represent a unique model of perturbed epithelial-mesenchymal interaction which leads to the formation of malformed branching tubules surrounded by undifferentiated and metaplastic mesenchymal cells. We have found that human dysplastic epithelia express PAX2 (a transcription factor), BCL2 (a survival factor) and galectin-3 (a cell adhesion/signaling molecule). These genes are implicated in oncogenesis and their persistent expression may drive proliferation of dysplastic cysts, hence explaining the massive growth of some multicystic dysplastic kidneys. We have also detected prominent apoptosis in undifferentiated tissues around dysplastic epithelia, and this may provide a potential mechanism for the well-documented regression of dysplastic kidneys. Hence, although these kidneys may not have any excretory function, it is incorrect to consider them as 'end stage organs' because they are highly active in terms of cell turnover and gene expression; furthermore, these processes can be correlated with patterns of tissue growth and involution. Further elucidation of 'molecular lesions' in renal malformations may lead to novel therapies to enhance the differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:10668206

  5. Insights into the renal pathogenesis in Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia: A renal histological characterization and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Sanjay; Javidan, Ashkan; Boivin, Felix; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Lukic, Dusan; Svajger, Bruno; Chu, Stephanie; Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Rosenblum, Norman D; Bridgewater, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is a pleiotropic disorder caused by mutations in the SWI/SNF2-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like-1 (SMARCAL1) gene, with multiple clinical features, notably end-stage renal disease. Here we characterize the renal pathology in SIOD patients. Our analysis of SIOD patient renal biopsies demonstrates the tip and collapsing variants of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Additionally, electron microscopy revealed numerous glomerular abnormalities most notably in the podocyte and Bowman's capsule. To better understand the role of SMARCAL1 in the pathogenesis of FSGS, we defined SMARCAL1 expression in the developing and mature kidney. In the developing fetal kidney, SMARCAL1 is expressed in the ureteric epithelium, stroma, metanephric mesenchyme, and in all stages of the developing nephron, including the maturing glomerulus. In postnatal kidneys, SMARCAL1 expression is localized to epithelial tubules of the nephron, collecting ducts, and glomerulus (podocytes and endothelial cells). Interestingly, not all cells within the same lineage expressed SMARCAL1. In renal biopsies from SIOD patients, TUNEL analysis detected marked increases in DNA fragmentation. Our results highlight the cells that may contribute to the renal pathogenesis in SIOD. Further, we suggest that disruptions in genomic integrity during fetal kidney development contribute to the pathogenesis of FSGS in SIOD patients. PMID:25319549

  6. Timing and Outcome of Renal Replacement Therapy in Patients with Congenital Malformations of the Kidney and Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Verrina, Enrico; Bjerre, Anna; Wanner, Christoph; Heaf, James Goya; Zurriaga, Oscar; Hoitsma, Andries; Niaudet, Patrick; Palsson, Runolfur; Ravani, Pietro; Jager, Kitty J.; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the leading cause of ESRD in children, but the proportion of patients with individual CAKUT entities progressing to ESRD during adulthood and their long-term clinical outcomes are unknown. This study assessed the age at onset of renal replacement therapy (RRT) and patient and renal graft survival in patients with CAKUT across the entire age range. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients with CAKUT were compared with age-matched patients who were undergoing RRT for other renal disorders on the basis of data from the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry. Competing risk and Cox regression analyses were conducted. Results Of 212,930 patients commencing RRT from 1990 to 2009, 4765 (2.2%) had renal diagnoses consistent with CAKUT. The proportion of incident RRT patients with CAKUT decreased from infancy to childhood and then increased until age 15–19 years, followed by a gradual decline throughout adulthood. Median age at RRT start was 31 years in the CAKUT cohort and 61 years in the non-CAKUT cohort (P<0.001). RRT was started earlier (median, 16 years) in patients with isolated renal dysplasia than in those with renal hypoplasia and associated urinary tract disorders (median, 29.5–39.5 years). Patients with CAKUT survived longer than age- and sex-matched non-CAKUT controls because of lower cardiovascular mortality (10-year survival rate, 76.4% versus 70.7%; P<0.001). Conclusions CAKUT leads to ESRD more often at adult than pediatric age. Treatment outcomes differ from those of acquired kidney diseases and vary within CAKUT subcategories. PMID:23085722

  7. Initial pathological events in renal dysplasia with urinary tract obstruction in utero.

    PubMed

    Shibata, S; Shigeta, M; Shu, Y; Watanabe, T; Nagata, M

    2001-10-01

    Multicystic dysplastic kidneys (MCDK) and obstructive renal dysplasia (ORD) are two different phenotypes of dysplasia commonly associated with urinary tract obstruction. However, the mechanisms whereby obstruction in the developing kidney leads to each dysplasia are unknown. In the present study, 16 fetal MCDKs and 3 fetal ORDs (18-35 weeks of gestation) were analyzed with light microscopy, point-counting morphometry, immunohistochemistry with a podocyte marker, and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, reconstructions of dysplastic nephrons were done via serial section analysis. Early stages of MCDK and ORD similarly revealed numerous cyst formations, predominantly in the subcapsular nephrogenic zone. Occasionally, glomerular tuft remnants with mature podocyte phenotypes were observed in cysts, suggesting the acquisition of filtration. Three dimensionally, basic nephron structures were installed in the cystic nephrons, namely the macula densa with a primary loop structure. Cysts developed in the once-induced nephrons due to fluid retention in both MCDK and ORD. In utero urinary tract obstruction may cause urine retention in functioning nephrons and lead to glomerular cysts in the nephrogenic zone. These findings were common to MCDK and ORD, albeit at different sites of obstruction. Expansion of glomerular cysts with tubular dilatation (cysts) disturbs the subsequent nephrogenesis and may contribute to the misdevelopment of fetal kidneys. PMID:11710644

  8. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  9. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  10. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or “Lobster claw” deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  11. [Fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Desbois, A C; Koskas, F; Cacoub, P

    2015-04-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia is a segmentary, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory vascular disease that may result in stenosis, occlusion, aneurysms or dissection of medium arteries. Renal involvement is the most frequent location, described in 60-100% of patients. Renal stenosis can be asymptomatic or complicated with arterial hypertension or less frequently with renal insufficiency. Carotid and vertebral involvements are less frequent (10-35%). Surgical management of fibromuscular dysplasia is now less common because of the better efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Thus, histologic characteristics are no longer relevant prognostic criteria. Clinical features and outcome vary according to angiographic presentation (focal or multifocal disease), with an increased recovery rate of hypertension with focal lesions. In the presence of renal fibromuscular dysplasia, only symptomatic patients are revascularized (recent or resistant hypertension) or patients with asymmetric renal size or impaired renal function. Transluminal angioplasty is the first-line treatment except for patients with complex lesions or stenosis associated with aneurysm. PMID:25455952

  12. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C; Sørensen, S S; Haedersdal, M

    2015-11-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK and delays SCC development in mice. We investigated the effect of repeated PDT over 5 years for primary prophylaxis of skin dysplasia. These data represent an interim analysis of an on-going randomized controlled trial. During 2008-2011, 25 renal transplant recipients with clinically normal skin were randomized to split-side PDT of the face, forearm and hand, the contralateral side serving as untreated control. Patients received PDT on inclusion and at 6-monthly intervals for 5 years. Blinded evaluation was performed at each visit. We found that prophylactic PDT significantly delayed onset of AK compared with untreated skin, p = 0.020. At 3-year follow-up, we observed AK in 63% of patients in untreated skin areas compared with 28% of patients in PDT-treated skin, with a total number of cumulated AKs in untreated skin (n = 43) compared with PDT-treated skin (n = 8), p = 0.005. These preliminary data indicate a novel approach to early prevention of skin dysplasia that may reduce morbidity from multiple AKs and SCCs in OTR. PMID:26018207

  13. No skeletal dysplasia in the Nariokotome boy KNM-WT 15000 (Homo erectus)--a reassessment of congenital pathologies of the vertebral column.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Regula; Haeusler, Martin

    2013-03-01

    The Nariokotome boy skeleton KNM-WT 15000 is the most complete Homo erectus fossil and therefore is key for understanding human evolution. Nevertheless, since Latimer and Ohman (2001) reported on severe congenital pathology in KNM-WT 15000, it is questionable whether this skeleton can still be used as reference for Homo erectus skeletal biology. The asserted pathologies include platyspondylic and diminutive vertebrae implying a disproportionately short stature; spina bifida; condylus tertius; spinal stenosis; and scoliosis. Based on this symptom complex, the differential diagnosis of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, an extremely rare form of skeletal dysplasia, has been proposed. Yet, our reanalysis of these pathologies shows that the shape of the KNM-WT 15000 vertebrae matches that of normal modern human adolescents. The vertebrae are not abnormally flat, show no endplate irregularities, and thus are not platyspondylic. As this is the hallmark of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda and related forms of skeletal dysplasia, the absence of platyspondyly refutes axial dysplasia and disproportionate dwarfism. Furthermore, we neither found evidence for spina bifida occulta nor manifesta, whereas the condylus tertius, a developmental anomaly of the cranial base, is not related to skeletal dysplasias. Other fossils indicate that the relatively small size of the vertebrae and the narrow spinal canal are characteristics of early hominins rather than congenital pathologies. Except for the recently described signs of traumatic lumbar disc herniation, the Nariokotome boy fossil therefore seems to belong to a normal Homo erectus youth without pathologies of the axial skeleton. PMID:23283736

  14. Genetic variations in complement factors in patients with congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinping; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A; Shirotani-Ikejima, Hiroko; Eura, Yuka; Hirai, Hidenori; Honda, Shigenori; Kokame, Koichi; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri; von Krogh, Anne-Sophie; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Lämmle, Bernhard; Miyata, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The congenital form of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is caused by genetic mutations in ADAMTS13. Some, but not all, congenital TTP patients manifest renal insufficiency in addition to microangiopathic hemolysis and thrombocytopenia. We included 32 congenital TTP patients in the present study, which was designed to assess whether congenital TTP patients with renal insufficiency have predisposing mutations in complement regulatory genes, as found in many patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). In 13 patients with severe renal insufficiency, six candidate complement or complement regulatory genes were sequenced and 11 missense mutations were identified. One of these missense mutations, C3:p.K155Q mutation, is a rare mutation located in the macroglobulin-like 2 domain of C3, where other mutations predisposing for aHUS cluster. Several of the common missense mutations identified in our study have been reported to increase disease-risk for aHUS, but were not more common in patients with as compared to those without renal insufficiency. Taken together, our results show that the majority of the congenital TTP patients with renal insufficiency studied do not carry rare genetic mutations in complement or complement regulatory genes. PMID:26830967

  15. A patient with Mullerian abnormalities, renal dysplasia, cervical spine fusion, cataracts and intellectual disability: MURCS-plus?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tiong Yang; Whitelaw, Charlotte; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2007-10-01

    We report a 15-year-old girl with features of the MURCS (Mullerian abnormalities, renal agenesis/ectopy and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association and birth defects not typically associated with MURCS. In addition to seizures and intellectual disability, she has cortical brain heterotopia, bilateral subclinical cataracts, submucous cleft palate and patent ductus arteriosus. We propose that this patient represents a more severe form of MURCS, or 'MURCS-plus', which may represent a defect of or insult to mesodermal morphogenesis. PMID:17786121

  16. Renal artery stenosis in association with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Jameela A.; Roebuck, Derek J.; Tullus, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe 8 cases of renal artery stenosis (RAS) in children with congenital anomalies of the renal tract. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 78 children with RAS who were followed up at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom between 2003 and 2012. We used an interventional radiology database to identify all patients who had RAS confirmed by digital subtraction angiography and examined all cases of congenital anomaly of the renal tract that had been diagnosed during childhood. Results: We documented the following renal anomalies: multicystic dysplastic kidney (n=2), renal hypoplasia (n=1), congenital solitary kidney with hydronephrosis (n=1), and unilateral vesicoureteric reflux with poorly functioning kidneys (n=2). The anomaly was unknown in 2 cases. Seven children had unilateral nephrectomy at a median age of 2.5 years (range, 0.4-10 years) for various urological abnormalities. All children were confirmed to have RAS after presentation with hypertension at a median age of 10 (3.5-16.2) years. Angioplasty was performed in 7 children, of which 6 achieved control of their blood pressure on reduced medications. Conclusion: We highlight the association between RAS and other renal anomalies, which indicates that they could share a common genetic background. PMID:25316474

  17. Congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries: case report using MDCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Matusz, Petru; Miclăuş, Graţian Dragoslav; Banciu, Christian Dragoş; Sas, Ioan; Joseph, Shamfa C; Pirtea, Laurenţiu Cornel; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    A congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries is a rare congenital abnormality that can occur in the presence of multiple other anomalies. We describe an atypical case of a right congenital solitary kidney with three renal arteries (RA) one main RA and two additional renal arteries in a 75-year-old woman with uterine didelphys. The main RA had an intraluminal diameter larger than the diameter of the additional renal arteries (AdRAs) at the origin (0.53 cm for the main RA; 0.49 cm and 0.32 cm for the two AdRAs). Both the AdRAs had a greater length than the main RA (3.51 cm for the main RA; 3.70 cm and 4.77 cm for the two AdRAs). The calculated volume of the kidney was 283 cm³, while the volume of the renal parenchyma was 258 cm³. Knowledge of this variant is extremely important in clinical practice as it has been found to be associated with proteinuria, hypertension and renal insufficiency. PMID:26429179

  18. Characteristics of hearing loss in HDR (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia) syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Looij, Marjolein A J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Beetz, Rolf; Thakker, Rajesh V; Christie, Paul T; Feenstra, Lou W; van Zanten, Bert G A

    2006-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the zinc finger transcription factor GATA3 causes the triad of hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia, known by its acronym HDR syndrome. The purpose of the current study was to describe in detail the auditory phenotype in human HDR patients and compare these to audiometrical and histological data previously described in a mouse model of this disease. Pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, speech in noise, auditory brainstem responses and transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions were measured in 2 patients affected by HDR syndrome. Both patients were affected by a moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Speech reception thresholds were shifted and speech recognition in noise was disturbed. No otoacoustic emissions could be generated in either patient. Auditory brainstem response interpeak intervals were normal. The human and murine audiological phenotypes seem to correspond well. Hearing loss in HDR syndrome is moderate to severe, seems to be slightly worse at the higher end of the frequency spectrum and may be progressive with age. The absence of otoacoustic emissions and the loss of frequency selectivity suggest an important role for outer hair cells in causing the hearing loss. PMID:16988501

  19. Novel NEK8 Mutations Cause Severe Syndromic Renal Cystic Dysplasia through YAP Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Grampa, Valentina; Odye, Gweltas; Thomas, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Filhol, Emilie; Niel, Olivier; Silbermann, Flora; Lebreton, Corinne; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Devisme, Louise; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capri, Yline; Khung-Savatovsky, Suonavy; Sigaudy, Sabine; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Benmerah, Alexandre; Terzi, Fabiola; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of genetic multi-systemic disorders related to dysfunction of the primary cilium, a sensory organelle present at the cell surface that regulates key signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis. In order to identify novel genes whose mutations would cause severe developmental ciliopathies, >500 patients/fetuses were analyzed by a targeted high throughput sequencing approach allowing exome sequencing of >1200 ciliary genes. NEK8/NPHP9 mutations were identified in five cases with severe overlapping phenotypes including renal cystic dysplasia/hypodysplasia, situs inversus, cardiopathy with hypertrophic septum and bile duct paucity. These cases highlight a genotype-phenotype correlation, with missense and nonsense mutations associated with hypodysplasia and enlarged cystic organs, respectively. Functional analyses of NEK8 mutations in patient fibroblasts and mIMCD3 cells showed that these mutations differentially affect ciliogenesis, proliferation/apoptosis/DNA damage response, as well as epithelial morphogenesis. Notably, missense mutations exacerbated some of the defects due to NEK8 loss of function, highlighting their likely gain-of-function effect. We also showed that NEK8 missense and loss-of-function mutations differentially affect the regulation of the main Hippo signaling effector, YAP, as well as the expression of its target genes in patient fibroblasts and renal cells. YAP imbalance was also observed in enlarged spheroids of Nek8-invalidated renal epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, as well as in cystic kidneys of Jck mice. Moreover, co-injection of nek8 MO with WT or mutated NEK8-GFP RNA in zebrafish embryos led to shortened dorsally curved body axis, similar to embryos injected with human YAP RNA. Finally, treatment with Verteporfin, an inhibitor of YAP transcriptional activity, partially rescued the 3D spheroid defects of Nek8-invalidated cells and the abnormalities of NEK8-overexpressing zebrafish embryos

  20. Novel NEK8 Mutations Cause Severe Syndromic Renal Cystic Dysplasia through YAP Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Grampa, Valentina; Delous, Marion; Zaidan, Mohamad; Odye, Gweltas; Thomas, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Filhol, Emilie; Niel, Olivier; Silbermann, Flora; Lebreton, Corinne; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Devisme, Louise; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capri, Yline; Khung-Savatovsky, Suonavy; Sigaudy, Sabine; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Benmerah, Alexandre; Terzi, Fabiola; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-03-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of genetic multi-systemic disorders related to dysfunction of the primary cilium, a sensory organelle present at the cell surface that regulates key signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis. In order to identify novel genes whose mutations would cause severe developmental ciliopathies, >500 patients/fetuses were analyzed by a targeted high throughput sequencing approach allowing exome sequencing of >1200 ciliary genes. NEK8/NPHP9 mutations were identified in five cases with severe overlapping phenotypes including renal cystic dysplasia/hypodysplasia, situs inversus, cardiopathy with hypertrophic septum and bile duct paucity. These cases highlight a genotype-phenotype correlation, with missense and nonsense mutations associated with hypodysplasia and enlarged cystic organs, respectively. Functional analyses of NEK8 mutations in patient fibroblasts and mIMCD3 cells showed that these mutations differentially affect ciliogenesis, proliferation/apoptosis/DNA damage response, as well as epithelial morphogenesis. Notably, missense mutations exacerbated some of the defects due to NEK8 loss of function, highlighting their likely gain-of-function effect. We also showed that NEK8 missense and loss-of-function mutations differentially affect the regulation of the main Hippo signaling effector, YAP, as well as the expression of its target genes in patient fibroblasts and renal cells. YAP imbalance was also observed in enlarged spheroids of Nek8-invalidated renal epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, as well as in cystic kidneys of Jck mice. Moreover, co-injection of nek8 MO with WT or mutated NEK8-GFP RNA in zebrafish embryos led to shortened dorsally curved body axis, similar to embryos injected with human YAP RNA. Finally, treatment with Verteporfin, an inhibitor of YAP transcriptional activity, partially rescued the 3D spheroid defects of Nek8-invalidated cells and the abnormalities of NEK8-overexpressing zebrafish embryos

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital renal and urinary tract malformations.

    PubMed

    Hindryckx, A; De Catte, L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and the urinary tract are the most common sonographically identified -malformations in the prenatal period. Obstructive uropathies account for the majority of cases. The aim of prenatal diagnosis and management is to detect those anomalies having impact on the prognosis of the affected child and -requiring early postnatal evaluation or treatment to minimize adverse outcomes. In this paper, we summarize the embryology of kidneys and urinary tract, the normal sonographic appearance through-out pregnancy and the prenatal diagnosis of their congenital malformations. PMID:24753862

  2. Misexpression of Six2 is Associated with Heritable Frontonasal Dysplasia and Renal Hypoplasia in 3H1 Br Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fogelgren, Ben; Kuroyama, Mari C.; McBratney-Owen, Brandeis; Spence, Allyson A.; Melahn, Laura E.; Anawati, Mireille K.; Cabatbat, Chantelle; Alarcon, Vernadeth B.; Marikawa, Yusuke; Lozanoff, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A radiation-induced mouse mutant, Brachyrrhine (Br), exhibits frontonasal dysplasia and renal hypoplasia, two malformations associated with deficiencies in mesenchymal condensation. The purpose of this study was to resolve the Br locus, evaluate possible candidate genes, and identify developmental defects in the mutant chondrocranium. Linkage analysis mapped the Br mutation to a critical region distal to D17Mit76 which contains only one gene, the transcription factor Six2. Sequence analysis of the Six2 gene, including 1.5 kb of the promoter, failed to reveal the Br mutation. However, homozygous Br/Br embryos showed almost complete absence of Six2 mRNA and protein in craniofacial and renal tissues while heterozygous Br/+ embryos displayed intermediate Six2 levels. Mutant embryos displayed malformations of neural crest-derived structures of the anterior cranium where Six2 is normally expressed. These data suggest a mutation in a novel cis-acting regulatory region inhibits Six2 expression and is associated with frontonasal dysplasia and renal hypoplasia. PMID:18570229

  3. A rare case of renal hydatidosis in a child with congenital solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Tirnea, Livius; Minciu, Radu; Olariu, Tudor Rares; Dumitrascu, Victor; Neghina, Adriana Maria; Neghina, Raul

    2014-08-01

    Hydatid cyst of a solitary congenital kidney is a rare entity because of the small percentage of cases with renal hydatidosis and the reduced number of cases with this renal anomaly. We report a case presenting this extremely rare combination and having a favorable outcome. The diagnosis was confirmed based on an association of imagistic techniques and positive serology. The case was managed using a minimal invasive surgical technique (PAIR) that reduced the operative risks. Additionally, an antihelminthic agent (albendazole) was administered. To our knowledge, this is the first case with such comorbidity and treated through percutaneous approach. PMID:25149385

  4. Combined Cerebral and Renal Near-Infrared Spectroscopy After Congenital Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gil-Anton, Javier; Redondo, Silvia; Garcia Urabayen, Diego; Nieto Faza, Manuel; Sanz, Irene; Pilar, Javier

    2015-08-01

    The maintenance of an adequate oxygen supply to tissues after congenital heart surgery is essential for good outcomes. The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for estimating central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) using both cerebral and renal measurements, explore its relation with cardiac output measurements and check its ability to detect low cardiac output. A prospective observational pilot study was conducted in patients weighing <10 kg undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Spectroscopy probes were placed on the forehead and renal area, and serial cardiac output measurements were obtained by femoral transpulmonary thermodilution over the first 24 h after surgery. In the 15 patients studied, ScvO2 was correlated with cerebral (r = 0.58), renal (r = 0.60) and combined (r = 0.71) measurements. Likewise, the systolic index was correlated with the NIRS signals: cerebral (r = 0.60), renal (r = 0.50) and combined (r = 0.66). Statistically significant differences were found in the NIRS measures registered in the 29 low cardiac output events detected by thermodilution: cerebral: 62 % (59-65) versus 69 % (63-76); renal: 83 % (70-89) versus 89 % (83-95); and combined 64 % (60-69) versus 72 % (67-76). In our series, combined cerebral and renal monitoring was correlated with central venous oxygen saturation and cardiac output; low cardiac output detection associated a different spectroscopy pattern. PMID:25764508

  5. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel–Joubert, short rib, Bardet–Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  6. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria M

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel-Joubert, short rib, Bardet-Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  7. Congenital renal anomaly: evaluation with 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, S.; Kawamura, J.; Tomoyoshi, T.; Yoshida, O.

    1983-05-01

    Technetium 99m-2,3, dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) preferentially accumulates in the renal cortex, demonstrating functioning cortical mass. We used 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy in ten patients with horseshoe kidneys and five patients with unilateral fused kidneys. The results show that 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy reliably establishes the diagnosis of horseshoe kidney and clearly shows the isthmus, which is very essential for proper management. The technique also aids in the definitive assessment of separate kidney function and of total radionuclide uptake is possible using 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy.

  8. Double homozygous missense mutations in DACH1 and BMP4 in a patient with bilateral cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schild, Raphael; Knüppel, Tanja; Konrad, Martin; Bergmann, Carsten; Trautmann, Agnes; Kemper, Markus J; Wu, Kongming; Yaklichkin, Sergey; Wang, Jing; Pestell, Richard; Müller-Wiefel, Dirk E; Schaefer, Franz; Weber, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Renal hypodysplasia (RHD) is characterized by small and/or disorganized kidneys following abnormal organogenesis. Mutations in several genes have been identified recently to be associated with RHD in humans, including BMP4, a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of growth factors. DACH1 has been proposed as a candidate gene for RHD because of its involvement in the EYA-SIX-DACH network of renal developmental genes. Here, we present a patient with renal dysplasia carrying homozygous missense mutations in both BMP4 (p.N150K) and DACH1 (p.R684C). The genotype-phenotype correlation in the family hints at an oligogenic mode of inheritance of the disease in this kindred. Functional analyses of the identified DACH1 mutation in HEK293T cells demonstrated enhanced suppression of the TGF-β pathway suggesting that both mutations could act synergistically in the development of the phenotype in this patient. This finding provides a model for RHD as an oligo-/polygenic disorder and supports a role for DACH1 in the development of RHD in humans. PMID:23262432

  9. A Novel De Novo GATA Binding Protein 3 Mutation in a Turkish Boy with Hypoparathyroidism, Deafness, and Renal Dysplasia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Gül; Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Nakamura, Akie; Fukami, Maki; Hatun, Şükrü

    2015-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR; OMIM 146255) syndrome is a rare disease, inherited dominantly and found to be related with GATA3 (GATA binding protein 3) gene mutations. A 13-year and 8-month-old boy who presented with hypocalcemia was diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism. He also had dysmorphic facial features, renal anomaly (pelvic kidney), and mild sensorineural hearing loss. His cranial computed tomography revealed multiple calcifications in bilateral centrum semiovale, corona radiata, and basal ganglions suggesting a persistent hypoparathyroidism. Thus, the presence of triad of HDR syndrome was considered, and genetic analysis using a next-generation sequencer identified a novel de novo missense mutation in exon 4 p.R276Q (c.827G>A) of GATA3 gene. This is the second patient who was reported to have a mutation in GATA3 gene from Turkey. In conclusion, although HDR syndrome is a rare condition, it should be kept in mind in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Classical triad can easily be identified if patients diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism are also evaluated with a urinary tract ultrasound and an audiometer. PMID:26777049

  10. Responses of Proximal Tubular Cells to Injury in Congenital Renal Disease: Fight or Flight

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.; Forbes, Michael S.; Galarreta, Carolina I.; Thornhill, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic kidney disease in children results from congenital or inherited disorders, which can be studied in mouse models. Following 2 weeks of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the adult mouse, nephron loss is due to proximal tubular mitochondrial injury and cell death. In neonatal mice, proximal tubular cell death is delayed beyond 2 weeks of complete UUO, and release of partial UUO allows remodeling of remaining nephrons. Progressive cyst expansion develops in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a common inherited renal disorder. The PCY mutant mouse (which develops late-onset PKD) develops thinning of the glomerulotubular junction in parallel with growth of cysts in adulthood. Renal insufficiency in nephropathic cystinosis, a rare inherited renal disorder, results from progressive tubular cystine accumulation. In the Ctns knock out mouse (a model of cystinosis), proximal tubular cells become flattened, with loss of mitochondria and thickening of tubular basement membrane. In each model, persistent obstructive or metabolic stress leads ultimately to the formation of atubular glomeruli. The initial “fight” response (proximal tubular survival) switches to a “flight” response (proximal tubular cell death) with ongoing oxidative injury and mitochondrial damage. Therapies should be directed at reducing proximal tubular mitochondrial oxidative injury to enhance repair and regeneration. PMID:23949631

  11. The nasopalpebral lipoma-coloboma syndrome: a new autosomal dominant dysplasia-malformation syndrome with congenital nasopalpebral lipomas, eyelid colobomas, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Penchaszadeh, V B; Velasquez, D; Arrivillaga, R

    1982-04-01

    We describe a new autosomal dominant dysplasia-malformation syndrome from eight affected individuals in three generations of a Venezuelan family. It is characterized by congenital symmetrical upper lid and nasopalpebral lipomas, bilateral symmetrical upper and lower palpebral colobomas located at the junction of the inner and middle thirds of the lids, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia. Affected individuals have a broad forehead, window's peak, abnormal pattern of eyebrows and eyelashes, and maldevelopment of the lacrimal punctae. Interorbital distance is normal, but interpupillary distance is increased due to divergent strabismus originating from visual interference from inner canthal masses. Persistent epiphora, conjunctival hyperemia, and corneal (and less frequently lens) opacities are a secondary consequence of the defect of the lacrimal punctae and the inability to close the lids completely. The syndrome has complete penetrance and a rather narrow range of expressivity. The primary defect could involve a dysplasia of adipose tissue leading to nasopalpebral and upper lid lipomas during embryogenesis, with the rest of the malformations being secondary to interference of morphogenesis of the mid-upperface developmental field from the lipomatous hamartomas. Alternatively, a central rather than a peripheral mechanism of malformation might be considered, such as defective migration of neural crest cells. PMID:7091184

  12. A Case of Cryptorchidism with Ipsilateral Congenital Unilateral Absence of the Vas Deferens and Contralateral Renal Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young Dong; Hong, Young Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an uncommon anomaly and this clinical condition is responsible for up to 1-2% of male infertility. It can be either unilateral or bilateral and the associated anomalies include cryptorchidism, seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts anomalies, and renal anomalies such as renal agenesis. We hereby present a case of congenital unilateral absence of vas deferens, which was found incidentally during an evaluation of undescended testis in a patient with ipsilateral renal agenesis. Case Presentation. A 10-month-old boy was referred to the urology clinic with an undescended right testis. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography showed agenesis of the right kidney and the absence of right vas deferens and epididymis was confirmed during laparoscopic orchiectomy performed due to short right spermatic cord. There were no other concomitant anomalies of the genitourinary system observed in evaluation. Conclusion. Congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens with cryptorchidism and renal agenesis is a rare diagnostic entity. Cryptorchidism or absent vas deferens found incidentally should lead the physician to evaluate the status of the contralateral vas deferens and conduct a renal tract ultrasound study. PMID:27597925

  13. A Case of Cryptorchidism with Ipsilateral Congenital Unilateral Absence of the Vas Deferens and Contralateral Renal Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Young Dong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an uncommon anomaly and this clinical condition is responsible for up to 1-2% of male infertility. It can be either unilateral or bilateral and the associated anomalies include cryptorchidism, seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts anomalies, and renal anomalies such as renal agenesis. We hereby present a case of congenital unilateral absence of vas deferens, which was found incidentally during an evaluation of undescended testis in a patient with ipsilateral renal agenesis. Case Presentation. A 10-month-old boy was referred to the urology clinic with an undescended right testis. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography showed agenesis of the right kidney and the absence of right vas deferens and epididymis was confirmed during laparoscopic orchiectomy performed due to short right spermatic cord. There were no other concomitant anomalies of the genitourinary system observed in evaluation. Conclusion. Congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens with cryptorchidism and renal agenesis is a rare diagnostic entity. Cryptorchidism or absent vas deferens found incidentally should lead the physician to evaluate the status of the contralateral vas deferens and conduct a renal tract ultrasound study. PMID:27597925

  14. The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. III. Complete and incomplete urinary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R D; Stephens, F D; Cussen, L J

    1981-09-01

    We graded obstructed kidneys of infants on the hypodysplasia scale to assess the influence of complete and partial obstruction on the pathogenesis of hypodysplasia. Kidneys with complete obstruction exhibited severe grades; those with partial ureteral obstruction had near normal grades. Those kidneys subjected to partial urethral obstruction ranged from mild to severe grades which correlated with degrees of lateral ectopy of the urethral office. Renal parenchymal development was impaired by complete obstruction but was tolerant to incomplete obstruction. Abnormal orifice positions associated with urethral obstructions were considered to be manifestations of ectopic ureteric buds and the hypodysplasia to be evidence of abnormal induction of abnormal renal blastema. PMID:7196894

  15. Is fibromuscular dysplasia underdiagnosed? A comparison of the prevalence of FMD seen in CORAL trial participants versus a single institution population of renal donor candidates.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nicholas J; Matsumoto, Alan H; Angle, John F; Baheti, Aparna; Sabri, Saher S; Park, Auh W; Stone, James R; Patrie, James T; Dworkin, Lance; Cooper, Christopher J; Murphy, Timothy P; Cutlip, Donald E

    2014-10-01

    Renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) may be underdiagnosed. We evaluated the prevalence of FMD in CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) renal artery stent trial participants, in which FMD was an exclusion criterion for inclusion. We also evaluated the prevalence of FMD in a relatively healthy population of patients undergoing computed tomographic angiographic (CTA) screening for renal donor evaluation. All renal donor CTAs performed at our institution from January 2003 through November 2011 were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of FMD along with patient sex and age. These results were compared to angiographic core lab (ACL) findings for the CORAL trial. The CORAL ACL database contained 997 patients (mean age 69.3 years; 50% female). Fifty-eight (5.8%) CORAL trial patients (mean age 71.8 years; 75.9% female) demonstrated incidental FMD. The renal donor cohort included 220 patients (mean age 40.5 years; 64.5% female). Five (2.3%) demonstrated FMD (mean age 48.6 years; all female). The odds of FMD in the CORAL cohort were 2.65 times that seen in the renal donor cohort (95% CI: 1.12, 7.57). In C: onclusion, the 5.8% prevalence of renal artery FMD in the CORAL trial population, the presence of which was biased against, suggests underdiagnosis. PMID:25082538

  16. Two mutations in human BICC1 resulting in Wnt pathway hyperactivity associated with cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marine R-C; Clauin, Séverine; Pfister, Yvan; Di Maïo, Massimo; Ulinski, Tim; Constam, Daniel; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Bicaudal C homologue 1 (Bicc1) knockout in mice causes polycystic kidney disease and pancreas development defects, including a reduction in insulin-producing β-cells and ensuing diabetes. We therefore screened 137 patients with renal abnormalities or association of early-onset diabetes and renal disease for genetic alterations in BICC1. We identified two heterozygous mutations, one nonsense in the first K Homology (KH) domain and one missense in the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain. In mice, Bicc1 blocks canonical Wnt signaling, mostly via its SAM domain. We show that the human BICC1, similar to its mouse counterpart, blocks canonical Wnt signaling. The nonsense mutation identified results in a complete loss of Wnt inhibitory activity. The point mutation in the SAM domain has a similar effect to a complete SAM domain deletion, resulting in a 22% loss of activity. PMID:21922595

  17. Intrarenal mature cystic teratoma associated with renal dysplasia: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Otani, M; Tsujimoto, S; Miura, M; Nagashima, Y

    2001-07-01

    We report a case of intrarenal teratoma in a 6-year-old boy. Two years before his operation, multicystic masses had been found in the left side of his abdomen. In the operation, three main cystic masses were located in the upper and lower poles of the left kidney, which were removed in pieces. Histologically, the cyst wall was lined mainly with keratinizing squamous epithelium with hair follicles, shafts and sebaceous glands. The adjacent renal parenchyma showed atrophy, with partially dysplastic and angiomyolipoma-like lesions. Based on these findings, the lesion was diagnosed as mature cystic teratoma of dermoid cyst type. Extragonadal teratoma occurs predominantly along the median line of the body. Intrarenal teratoma is extremely rare; however, it should be distinguished from teratoid Wilms' tumor and other renal cystic lesions. PMID:11472570

  18. Renal dysplasia unrelated to claudin-16 deficiency in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, A; Ozaki, K; Miyazaki; Tanabe, Y; Takeuchi, T; Narama, I

    2007-07-01

    Renal lesions of the type usually found in claudin-16 (CL-16) defective Japanese Black cattle (homozygous for CL-16 deficiency) were identified in six animals of this breed, aged 28-59 months, which were either heterozygous for CL-16 deficiency (type 1) or normal, as judged by a DNA-based test associated with the CL-16 gene. Histopathologically, all six cases showed elongated focal lesions which ran through the cortex to terminate in the outer zone of the medulla. The lesions contained components that included: (1) immature tubules, (2) small irregularly shaped tubules with thickening of the basement membrane, (3) mesenchymal cells in an increased interstitium, (4) small atrophic glomeruli, and (5) immature glomeruli. The glomeruli were noticeably reduced in number, and large glomeruli with an increased number of mesangial cells were observed throughout the entire cortical area. Cystic dilation of tubules and flattening of the epithelium were noted in all areas of the kidney. Histopathologically, the renal lesions in the six cases were indistinguishable from those reported previously in cattle homozygous for CL-16 deficiency. These findings demonstrate that such renal lesions in Japanese Black cattle are not necessarily associated with homozygous deletion of the CL-16 gene. PMID:17537453

  19. Bilateral Renal Agenesis/Hypoplasia/Dysplasia (BRAHD): Postmortem Analysis of 45 Cases with Breakpoint Mapping of Two De Novo Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Jean; Howatson, Alan; Whiteford, Margo; Branney, Peter; Evans, Margaret; Fantes, Judy; FitzPatrick, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bilateral renal agenesis/hypoplasia/dysplasia (BRAHD) is a relatively common, lethal malformation in humans. Established clinical risk factors include maternal insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and male sex of the fetus. In the majority of cases, no specific etiology can be established, although teratogenic, syndromal and single gene causes can be assigned to some cases. Methodology/Principal Findings 45 unrelated fetuses, stillbirths or infants with lethal BRAHD were ascertained through a single regional paediatric pathology service (male∶female 34∶11 or 3.1∶1). The previously reported phenotypic overlaps with VACTERL, caudal dysgenesis, hemifacial microsomia and Müllerian defects were confirmed. A new finding is that 16/45 (35.6%; m∶f 13∶3 or 4.3∶1) BRAHD cases had one or more extrarenal malformations indicative of a disoder of laterality determination including; incomplete lobulation of right lung (seven cases), malrotation of the gut (seven cases) and persistence of the left superior vena cava (five cases). One such case with multiple laterality defects and sirelomelia was found to have a de novo apparently balanced reciprocal translocation 46,XY,t(2;6)(p22.3;q12). Translocation breakpoint mapping was performed by interphase fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) using nuclei extracted from archival tissue sections in both this case and an isolated bilateral renal agenesis case associated with a de novo 46,XY,t(1;2)(q41;p25.3). Both t(2;6) breakpoints mapped to gene-free regions with no strong evidence of cis-regulatory potential. Ten genes localized within 500 kb of the t(1;2) breakpoints. Wholemount in-situ expression analyses of the mouse orthologs of these genes in embryonic mouse kidneys showed strong expression of Esrrg, encoding a nuclear steroid hormone receptor. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Esrrg was restricted to proximal ductal tissue within the embryonic kidney. Conclusions/Significance The previously

  20. Occult Congenital Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction in Two Adults Presenting with Collecting System Rupture After Blunt Renal Trauma: A Case Report Series

    PubMed Central

    Hoffner, Haley E.; Dagrosa, Lawrence M.; Pais, Vernon M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report two adult cases of congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction detected incidentally in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma. CT images are provided to describe the presentation, while review of the literature and management of renal trauma are discussed.

  1. Unilateral Congenital Lacrimal Fistula with Renal Agenesis and Pelvic Kidney: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Altun, A.; Kurna, S. A.; Sengor, T.; Altun, G.; Oflaz, A.; Sonmez, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented to the clinic of ophthalmology because of watering and discharge from his left lower eyelid. The inspection examination revealed an orifice that was associated with congenital lacrimal fistula (CLF). He underwent a complete ophthalmologic and systemic evaluation to explore possible associated findings. Systemic evaluation revealed multiple renal anomalies: right renal agenesis and left ectopic pelvic kidney. This case is unique because this is the first reported case of CLF accompanied with ectopic pelvic kidney in the literature. PMID:26090250

  2. Potter sequence complicated by congenital cystic lesion of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Mizuno, Katsumi; Horie, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Yamaoka, Akiko; Mizutani, Kayo; Takeuchi, Toshio; Iikura, Yoji

    2002-07-01

    We report a case complicated by oligohydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, bilateral renal dysplasia, and cystic lesion of the bladder. He was clinically compatible with Potter sequence. Congenital cystic bladder is the rarest form of the bladder. We can find no report of Potter sequence complicated by cystic lesion of the bladder. This lesion was similar to multilocular bladder. The diagnosis was confirmed it by autopsy, magnetic resonance imaging, and urography after his death. PMID:12152145

  3. Recurrence of proteinuria following renal transplantation in congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Tarak; Garola, Robert E; Kestila, Marjo; Tryggvason, Karl; Ruotsalainen, Vesa; Sharma, Mukut; Savin, Virginia J; Jalanko, Hannu; Warady, Bradley A

    2006-05-01

    We report a Caucasian boy of Italian descent with congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (NPHS1, CNF, MIM 256300) who developed recurrence of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia on the seventh post-operative day following living related renal transplantation from his paternal aunt. The allograft biopsy was normal except for effacement of podocyte foot processes on electron microscopy. He was treated by the substitution of mycophenolate mofetil with cyclophosphamide for 12 weeks, in addition to cyclosporine, prednisone and daclizumab. His proteinuria resolved quickly following the initiation of cyclophosphamide treatment, and he remains in remission 4 years after receiving his transplant. His native and allograft kidneys were evaluated for nephrin expression by immunohistochemistry, DNA analysis for the NPHS1 mutation, serum for the presence of auto-antibodies to nephrin by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fetal glomeruli immunofluorescence assay, and serum for glomerular permeability to albumin (Palb) activity using a functional in vitro assay for Palb. Nephrin expression was completely absent in the native kidney, while it was decreased in the allograft compared with normal. DNA analysis of the NPHS1 gene revealed mutations 3248G>T and 3250delG in exon 24, causing G1083V and 1084Vfs, respectively, inherited from his father, and 3478C>T in exon 27, that leads to R1160X, inherited from his mother. Serum was negative for auto-antibodies to nephrin. Interestingly, the Palb activity was increased at the time of recurrence of proteinuria following transplantation (Palb 0.73+/-0.10) and remained elevated when retested more than 3 years later (Palb 0.54+/-0.09). This is the first report of increased Palb activity in recurrence of proteinuria following transplantation in NPHS1. We speculate the role of increased Palb activity in the recurrence of proteinuria following transplantation in NPHS1. PMID:16518627

  4. Prevalence, implication, and determinants of worsening renal function after surgery for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Kuwata, Seiko; Kurishima, Clara; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Ishido, Hirotaka; Masutani, Satoshi; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating data in adults indicate the prognostic importance of worsening renal function (WRF) during treatment of acute heart failure. Venous congestion appears to play a dominant role in WRF; however, data regarding WRF in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are limited. The present study was conducted to elucidate the prevalence and characteristics of WRF after surgery for CHD in children. We also tested our hypothesis that, similar to adult heart failure, venous congestion is an important determinant of WRF independent of cardiac output in this population. Fifty-five consecutive pediatric patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery for CHD were studied (median age 0.7 years; range 3 days to 17 years). The degree of WRF was assessed by the difference between the maximum levels of postoperative serum creatinine (Cr) and preoperative serum Cr. There was a high prevalence of WRF in the present cohort: an increase in Cr level was observed in 47 patients (85 %) and a Cr increase ≥0.3 mg/dL was seen in 23 (42 %). Importantly, WRF was significantly associated with a worse clinical outcome of a longer stay in the intensive care unit and hospital (both p < 0.05), even after controlling for age and operative factors. In addition, multivariate regression analysis revealed that central venous pressure, rather than cardiac output, was an independent determinant of WRF. Postoperative management to relieve venous congestion may help ameliorate or prevent WRF and thereby improve outcomes in patients with CHD. PMID:26266633

  5. Multicystic congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

    PubMed

    Drut, Ricardo

    2002-01-01

    This report describes an unusual example of congenital mesoblastic nephroma cellular variant that presented in a 1-week-old neonate as a multicystic tumor of the kidney. Extensive pseudocystic cavitation resulted from progressive accumulation of ground substance in a loosely myxoid tissue composed of stellate- and spindle-shaped cells that compressed and infiltrated renal tissue. The cells of the tumor were positive for vimentin and smooth muscle actin. The patient is alive and well 16 years after surgery. Differential diagnosis from segmental cystic dysplasia, cystic intralobar nephrogenic rest, cystic nephroma, cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma, cystic nephroblastoma, and cystic clear cell sarcoma of the kidney, all of which may present at this age, is discussed. PMID:11927972

  6. Campomelic dysplasia and malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Andreia; Teixeira, Filomena; Camacho, Maria Carmo; Alves, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Campomelic dysplasia (CD) is a rare clinical entity, usually fatal in the first year of life. It is characterised by bowing and angulations of long bones, along with other congenital anomalies. The occurrence of malignant hyperthermia is rare, but it has been associated with skeletal dysplasias. The authors present the case of a boy, born at 40 weeks of gestational age, with multiple congenital anomalies and subsequently diagnosed with CD, who died at 16 months of age as a consequence of malignant hyperthermia. PMID:22691592

  7. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical dysplasia is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are many types of HPV. Some types lead to cervical dysplasia or cancer. ...

  8. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... following early in life: blood-filtering treatments called dialysis a kidney transplant Children with dysplasia in only ... mild dysplasia of both kidneys may not need dialysis or a kidney transplant for several years. Kidney ...

  9. Interstitial 1q23.3q24.1 deletion in a patient with renal malformation, congenital heart disease, and mild intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Hackmann, Karl; Klink, Barbara; Weber, Julia Sara; Mayer, Brigitte; Schröck, Evelin; Tzschach, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Interstitial deletions including chromosome region 1q23.3q24.1 are rare. Only eight patients with molecularly characterized deletions have been reported to date. Their phenotype included intellectual disability/developmental delay, growth retardation, microcephaly, congenital heart disease, and renal malformations. We report on a female patient with mild developmental delay, congenital heart disease, and bilateral renal hypoplasia in whom an interstitial de novo deletion of approximately 2.7 Mb in 1q23.3q24.1 was detected by array CGH. This is the smallest deletion described in this region so far. Genotype-phenotype comparison with previously published patients allowed us to propose LMX1A and RXRG as potential candidate genes for intellectual disability, PBX1 as a probable candidate gene for renal malformation, and enabled us to narrow down a chromosome region associated with microcephaly. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27255444

  10. Fetal and Postnatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Unilateral Cystic Renal Dysplasia in a Neonate with Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vineet; Bornstein, Eran; Schacht, Robert; Lala, Shailee; Milla, Sarah

    2014-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is an autosomal dominant condition associated with mutations in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 genes. Clinical manifestations are multisystemic, and they often include lesions in the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and bones. TSC2 gene mutations can be seen concomitantly with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene mutations. We present a case of a fetus with prenatal diagnosis of TS that had unique asymmetrical distribution of renal cystic disease. We describe the extensive work up with both fetal and neonatal magnetic resonance imaging with correlating images of the unilateral polycystic renal disease in addition to typical TS brain findings. PMID:24495558

  11. Potential Usefulness of 99mTc-DMSA for Radio-Guided Surgery in Pediatric Renal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Demetrio; Di Franco, Davide; Cacciaguerra, Sebastiano; Ruggeri, Antonella; Russo, Simona; Fornito, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of an ectopic/hypoplastic kidney removed by radio-guided surgery. A 7-year-old girl, with a history of vaginal drainage of urine, underwent renal scintigraphy with Tc-DMSA. SPECT/CT revealed a focal uptake in the pelvis, corresponding to hypoplastic kidney as confirmed by MRI. Based on SPECT/CT findings, the patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, using Tc-DMSA scan to help the surgeon to detect the small ectopic kidney. Intraoperatory histological report confirmed the renal origin of the specimen. PMID:26462041

  12. Congenital Anomalies in Infant with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Zahra; Yavarikia, Alireza; Torabian, Saadat

    2012-01-01

    Objective Congenital hypothyroidism is characterized by inadequate thyroid hormone production in newborn infants. Many infants with CH have co-occurring congenital malformations. This is an investigation on the frequency and types of congenital anomalies in infants with congenital hypothyroidism born from May 2006-2010 in Hamadan, west province of Iran. Methods The Iranian neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism was initiated in May 2005. This prospective descriptive study was conducted in infants diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism being followed up in Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic of Besat Hospital, a tertiary care centre in Hamadan. Cases included all infants with congenital hypothyroidism diagnosed through newborn screening program or detected clinically. Anomalies were identified by clinical examination, echocardiography, and X-ray of the hip during the infant’s first year of life. Results A total of 150 infants with biochemically confirmed primary congenital hypothyroidism (72 females and 78 males) were recruited during the period between May 2006-2010. Overall, 30 (20%) infants had associated congenital anomalies. The most common type of anomaly was Down syndrome. Seven infants (3.1%) had congenital cardiac anomalies such as: ASD (n=3), VSD (n=2), PS (n =1), PDA (n=1). Three children (2.6%) had developmental dysplasia of the hip (n=3). Conclusion The overall frequency of Down syndrome, cardiac malformation and other birth defect was high in infants with CH. This reinforces the need to examine all infants with congenital hypothyroidism for the presence of associated congenital anomalies. PMID:23074545

  13. Inappropriate tall stature and renal ectopy in a male patient with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to a novel missense mutation in the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Adriana; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Spagnuolo, Maria Immacolata; Spadaro, Raffaella; Giugliano, Michela; Mukai, Tokuo; Valerio, Giuliana

    2005-05-15

    Mutations in DAX-1 gene cause congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC). We present a male patient affected by X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita due to a novel DAX-1 missense mutation. The mutation V287G affects the C-terminal end of the DAX-1 protein which plays an important role in functioning of the receptor. In addition, our patient presented an inappropriate tall stature and renal ectopy, which have not been described in AHC so far. PMID:15800903

  14. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  15. Severe pancreas hypoplasia and multicystic renal dysplasia in two human fetuses carrying novel HNF1beta/MODY5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Haumaitre, Cécile; Fabre, Mélanie; Cormier, Sarah; Baumann, Clarisse; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Cereghini, Silvia

    2006-08-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the HNF1beta/vHNF1/TCF2 gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY5), associated with severe renal disease and abnormal genital tract. Here, we characterize two fetuses, a 27-week male and a 31.5-week female, carrying novel mutations in exons 2 and 7 of HNF1beta, respectively. Although these mutations were predicted to have different functional consequences, both fetuses displayed highly similar phenotypes. They presented one of the most severe phenotypes described in HNF1beta carriers: bilateral enlarged polycystic kidneys, severe pancreas hypoplasia and abnormal genital tract. Consistent with this, we detected high levels of HNF1beta transcripts in 8-week human embryos in the mesonephros and metanephric kidney and in the epithelium of pancreas. Renal histology and immunohistochemistry analyses of mutant fetuses revealed cysts derived from all nephron segments with multilayered epithelia and dysplastic regions, accompanied by a marked increase in the expression of beta-catenin and E-cadherin. A significant proportion of cysts still expressed the cystic renal disease proteins, polycystin-1, polycystin-2, fibrocystin and uromodulin, implying that cyst formation may result from a deregulation of cell-cell adhesion and/or the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. Both fetuses exhibited a severe pancreatic hypoplasia with underdeveloped and disorganized acini, together with an absence of ventral pancreatic-derived tissue. beta-catenin and E-cadherin were strongly downregulated in the exocrine and endocrine compartments, and the islets lacked the transporter essential for glucose-sensing GLUT2, indicating a beta-cell maturation defect. This study provides evidence of differential gene-dosage requirements for HNF1beta in normal human kidney and pancreas differentiation and increases our understanding of the etiology of MODY5 disorder. PMID:16801329

  16. Dysplasia of the contralateral hip in patients with unilateral late-detected congenital dislocation of the hip: 50 years' follow-up of 48 patients.

    PubMed

    Terjesen, T

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of dysplasia in the 'normal' contralateral hip in patients with unilateral developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH) and to evaluate the long-term prognosis of such hips. A total of 48 patients (40 girls and eight boys) were treated for late-detected unilateral DDH between 1958 and 1962. After preliminary skin traction, closed reduction was achieved at a mean age of 17.8 months (4 to 65) in all except one patient who needed open reduction. In 25 patients early derotation femoral osteotomy of the contralateral hip had been undertaken within three years of reduction, and later surgery in ten patients. Radiographs taken during childhood and adulthood were reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 50.9 years (43 to 55) at the time of the latest radiological review. In all, eight patients (17%) developed dysplasia of the contralateral hip, defined as a centre-edge (CE) angle < 20° during childhood or at skeletal maturity. Six of these patients underwent surgery to improve cover of the femoral head; the dysplasia improved in two after varus femoral osteotomy and in two after an acetabular shelf operation. During long-term follow-up the dysplasia deteriorated to subluxation in two patients (CE angles 4° and 5°, respectively) who both developed osteoarthritis (OA), and one of these underwent total hip replacement at the age of 49 years. In conclusion, the long-term prognosis for the contralateral hip was relatively good, as OA occurred in only two hips (4%) at a mean follow-up of 50 years. Regular review of the 'normal' side is indicated, and corrective surgery should be undertaken in those who develop subluxation. PMID:25183584

  17. Unknown syndrome: ischiadic hypoplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and a pattern of minor congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Braegger, C; Bottani, A; Hallé, F; Giedion, A; Leumann, E; Seger, R; Willi, U; Schinzel, A

    1991-01-01

    We report a 6 year old male with a pattern of malformations and anomalies including intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, a pattern of craniofacial anomalies (flat face, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, strabismus, short nose, low set ears), hypospadias and cryptorchidism, bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly between fingers 2 to 5 and toes 2 to 4, postaxial polydactyly of the fingers and toes, severe conductive hearing loss, hypoplasia of the ischiadic bones, complex renal dysfunction, hypogammaglobulinaemia with proneness to bacterial infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and recurrent pseudomembranous enterocolitis. The parents are cousins of Turkish origin. Images PMID:1999836

  18. Holoprosencephaly with caudal dysplasia. Pseudo-trisomy 13 or a distinct entity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.P.B.; Aylsworth, A.S.; Timmons, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    We have studied three chromosomally normal patients with multiple anomalies that include holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia. Each has features found in patients with pseudo-trisomy 13, though each lacks malformations common in that syndrome. Patients 1 and 2 did not have polydactyly and patients 2 and 3 had no congenital heart malformation. Patient 1 is also unusual in that he does not have typical holoprosencephalic facies and is alive at age 25 months. We have also identified two other similar patients in the London Dysmorphology Database, each of which had holoprosencephaly, congenital heart malformation, and imperforate anus. Isolated caudal dysplasia and holoprosencephaly are both causally heterogeneous. They have been reported together rarely in patients with several different syndromes including chromosomal abnormalities, monogenic syndromes, teratogenic insults, and syndromes of unknown cause. Over thirty cases of {open_quotes}pseudo-trisomy 13{close_quotes} have now been reported and eight of these have had features of caudal dysplasia. There have been four with imperforate anus or anal stenosis, one with lumbosacral vertebral anomaly, and three others with bilateral renal agenesis or hypoplasia. Based on our patients and this review of other reported and unreported cases, we suggest that caudal dysplasia may be a significant clinical feature of pseudo-trisomy 13. Alternatively, holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia with a normal karyotype may represent a similar though distinct entity. Some may have submicroscopic chromosomal deletions. Molecular studies of regions known to be associated with holoprosencephaly are currently in progress on tissue from Patient 1. We hope these observations will stimulate reports of similarly affected patients to allow better definition of pseudo-trisomy 13 and other overlap syndromes.

  19. Congenital Seminal Vesicle Cyst and Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis (Zinner Syndrome): A Rare Association and Its Evolution from Early Childhood to Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaki, Aikaterini; Vidal, Isabelle; Merlini, Laura; Hanquinet, Sylviane

    2015-01-01

    Zinner syndrome, the association of congenital seminal vesicle cyst and ipsilateral renal agenesis, is more often reported in adults or older adolescents. We present a case of a boy, followed up in our hospital since birth for right renal agenesis who at the age of 4 years presented a right paravesical cyst on ultrasound. The cyst was initially considered as an ureterocele. The diagnosis of Zinner syndrome was made later, at the age of 15 years by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging; at that moment the cyst had increased in size and had changed in aspect. This malformation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pelvic cyst in male patients with renal agenesis. PMID:26788458

  20. Ectodermal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the skin, hair, nails, teeth, or sweat glands. Causes There are many different types of ... equally. Symptoms People with ectodermal dysplasia may not sweat or may have decreased sweating because of a ...

  1. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN); Precancerous changes of the cervix; Cervical cancer - dysplasia ... lesion (SIL). On the Pap smear report, these changes will be described as: Low-grade (LSIL) High- ...

  2. Ultrasonography of nondevelopmental dysplasia of the hips.

    PubMed

    Grissom, L E; Harcke, H T

    1997-01-01

    We examined 45 infants with nondevelopmental dysplasia of the hip (non-DDH), including congenital deficiency of the femur (CDF) (20 infants), neuromuscular syndrome (five infants), skeletal dysplasia (15 infants), and infection (five infants), and present the sonographic findings. Dysmorphic proximal femora, coxa vara, and abnormal echogenicity of the soft tissue and cartilage are features which differentiate patients with non-DDH from those with typical DDH. PMID:8995174

  3. Congenital giant plexiform neurofibroma with occipital calvarial dysplasia in association with meningoencephalocele in neurofibromatosis Type 1 and segmental neurofibromatosis: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Dadlani, Ravi; Sadanand, Venkatraman; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2013-11-01

    Giant plexiform neurofibroma (GPNF) of the scalp is an extremely rare lesion reported in association with neurofibromatosis. Occipital location of GPNF is even more infrequent, especially in association with occipital dysplasia (OD). The authors report 2 pediatric cases of GPNF associated with OD. The first case had an associated meningoencephalocele, and the second had large vascular channels within the lesion and the dominant ipsilateral transverse sinus lying in the center of the calvarial defect. The authors present these 2 unusual cases with a review of literature and discuss the radiological findings, theories of etiopathogenesis of the OD, and management dilemmas. PMID:24032991

  4. Oculomotor-corpus callosum dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Acers, T E; Blackwell, C

    1982-01-01

    An infant with congenital bilateral ophthalmoplegia with levator and pupillary sparing is presented. The eyes are fixed in a divergent position with no apparent motility. The baby is otherwise clinically normal and is developing in a normal fashion except for delayed growth pattern. Visual attention is present and he fixates with either eye. Computed tomography demonstrates an associated dysplasia of the corpus callosum and an abnormal ventricular system. Neuroendocrine studies performed at one year of age demonstrate subnormal levels of growth hormone. It is postulated that this represents an embryodysgenesis involving the developing mesencephalic tegmentum (oculomotor nuclei) and the diencephalic lamina reuniens (corpus callosum). It is the first reported case of congenital ophthalmoplegia with corpus callosum dysplasia. The "embryodysgenic" relationship with other forebrain-ocular anomalies has been alluded to and remains speculative. PMID:7182958

  5. [Multilocular renal cyst in adults: a diagnosis by exclusion?].

    PubMed

    Redondo Martínez, E; Rey López, A

    1991-05-01

    The clinical and the gross and microscopic features of two multicystic masses in adult female patients are described. These met the Powell and Boggs and Kimelstiel criteria for multilocular renal cyst (MRC). MRC may be the common process and the gross expression of different disease entities with different biological significance which must be distinguished clinically and anatomopathologically. We present the data for differential diagnosis of conditions that may present as MRC: partially differentiated cystic nephroblastoma, mesoblastic congenital cystic nephroma, lymphangioma (more common in infants), cystic renal carcinoma and sarcoma, segmental polycystic kidney (more common in adults) and segmental renal dysplasia. The diagnosis of multilocular renal cyst should be made only after discarding the foregoing conditions. PMID:2064438

  6. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  7. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome plus; a contiguous gene constellation of congenital anomalies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    A term female infant was referred to the University Hospital because of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral choanal stenosis. Her examination revealed bilateral pre-auricular pits, branchial fistulae, cupped shaped ears, and bilateral athelia. She failed ABR screening; her creatinine was elevated to 1.5 mgs% and renal ultra-sonography showed reduced kidney size bilaterally. She was the product of her mother`s third pregnancy. The first produced a now normal 5 year old son. The second pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios and resulted in a premature delivery at 27 weeks gestation. The infant expired secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia. The mother had bilateral neurosensory deafness, pre-auricular pits, cupped shaped ears, lacrimal stenois and bilateral athelia. She wore dentures having earlier been diagnosed with dentogeneis imperfecta. She was shorter than her three normal sisters and had experienced academic problems throughout her school years. The maternal grandfather had an adult onset neurosensory hearing loss, but he and the maternal grandmother exhibited no other features of the BOR syndrome. Althelia was present only in the mother and daughter. The mother clearly has BOR syndrome transmitted to one, and possibly two, of her three offspring. The additional features of athelia, choanal stenosis and dentogenesis imperfecta are thought to represent additional autosomal dominant traits. Greenberg described an infant with athelia and choanal atresia. By family linkage studies, the BOR syndrome has been mapped to 8q13-21 with no recombination observed with loci D8S530 and D8S279. Given a normal prophase karyotype in the proband, it is speculated that a sub-microscopic deletion at 8q13-21 is the likely basis for the constellation of birth defects seen in this mother and daughter. Analysis of D8S530 and D8S279 is currently underway in this family.

  8. Diagnostic and surgical challenge: middle ear dermoid cyst in 12 month old with branchio-oto-renal syndrome and multiple middle-ear congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D R; Whittemore, K; Poe, D; Robson, C D; Perez-Atayde, A R

    2011-10-01

    Described is the first case report, to our knowledge, of a middle-ear dermoid in a child with branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. Radiographic, pathologic, and intraoperative figures are shown. This was a diagnostic and surgical challenge as the presentation was similar to a congenital cholesteatoma and the child had numerous significant temporal bone abnormalities. After the intraoperative findings suggested a non-destructive process, the treatment strategy was altered. This case reiterates the need for a cautious, flexible operative approach in a syndromic child. Included is a relevant review of the literature and a detailed clinical analysis. PMID:21868107

  9. Fibrous dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Fibrous dysplasia is a bone disease that destroys and replaces normal bone with fibrous ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bone Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  10. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dimes National Kidney Foundation Urology Care Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Kidney Dysplasia Page Content On this page: What is ...

  11. Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction: physiopathology, decoupling of tout court pelvic dilatation-obstruction semantic connection, biomarkers to predict renal damage evolution.

    PubMed

    Alberti, C

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of fetal ultrasonography results in a frequent antenatally observation of hydronephrosis, ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) accounting for the greatest fraction of congenital obstructive nephropathy. UPJO may be considered, in most cases, as a functional obstructive condition, depending on defective fetal smooth muscle/nerve development at this level, with lack of peristaltic wave propagation--aperistaltic segment--and, therefore, poor urine ejection from the renal pelvis into the ureter. The UPJO-related physiopathologic events are, at first, the compliant dilatation of renal pelvis that, acting as hydraulic buffer, protects the renal parenchyma from the rising intrapelvic pressure-related potential damages, and, subsequently, beyond such phase of dynamic balance, the tubular cell stretch-stress induced by increased intratubular pressure and following parenchymal inflammatory lesions: inflammatory infiltrates, fibroblast proliferation, activation of myofibroblasts, tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), several chemo- and cytokines, growth factors, prostaglandins and eicosanoids, angiotensin-II are the main pathogenetic mediators of the obstructive nephropathy. Apoptosis of tubular cells is the major cause of the tubular atrophy, together with epithelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation. Some criticisms on tout court semantic renal pelvis dilatation-obstruction connection have been raised considering that the renal pelvis expansion isn't, in any case, linked to an ostructive condition, as it may be verified by diuretic (furosemide) renogram together with scintiscan-based evaluation of differential renal function. In this regard, rather than repetitive invasive nuclear procedures that expose the children to ionizing radiations, an intriguing noninvasive strategy, based on the evaluation of urinary biomarkers and urinary proteome, can define the UPJO-related possible progress of parenchymal lesions

  12. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure. PMID:25556185

  13. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Overview What is arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (say: “uh-rith-mo-jen-ic right ven-trick- ...

  14. Birth prevalence rates of skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Dott, B; Roth, M P; Alembik, Y

    1989-02-01

    This study establishes the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias which can be diagnosed in the perinatal period or during pregnancy. Using a population-based register of congenital anomalies, a prevalence rate of 3.22 0/000 was observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.64 0/000, 1/15,000 births), thanatophoric dysplasia and achondrogenesis (0.28 0/000). The mutation rate for achondroplasia was higher in our material than in the other studies: 3.3 x 10(-5) per gamete per generation. Our study demonstrates that prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound is possible in some skeletal dysplasias. PMID:2785882

  15. Thanatophoric Dysplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jyoti; Jain, Rekha; Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) is a congenital, sporadic and the most lethal skeletal dysplasia caused by new mutation in the FGFR3 gene. At birth, it is characterized by shortening of the limbs (micromelia), small conical thorax, platyspondyly (flat vertebral bodies) and macrocephaly. TD is divided into two clinically defined subtypes: type I and II with some clinical overlap between the two subtypes. They can be differentiated by the skull shape and femur morphology. Ultrasound examination in the second trimester is often straight forward in diagnosing the congenital anomaly. We report a case of pre term fresh stillborn baby with dysmorphic facies, macrocephaly, micromelia with short stubby fingers and deep skin creases, narrow thorax and protuberant abdomen which delivered at our hospital. The ultrasound examination showed shortening of long bones with femur shaped like telephone receiver. Dysmorphic facial features and skeletal abnormalities in the baby lead us to make the diagnosis of TD type I. Because of the rarity of this condition we report this case of thanatophoric dysplasia with a short review of literature. PMID:26675119

  16. Upper pole multicystic dysplasia and ureteropelvic junction obstruction associated with obstructive-refluxing megaureter in a neonate with a single kidney.

    PubMed

    Neulander, Endre Z; Katz, Tiberiu; Kaneti, Jacob

    2010-12-01

    A 20-day-old male neonate presented with fever and hydronephrosis. Evaluation revealed that the patient had a single left kidney and a rare combination of multiple congenital malformations: upper pole segmental multicystic dysplasia, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, and an obstructive and refluxing megaureter (ureterovesical junction obstruction). We performed percutaneous drainage of the infected and obstructed upper collecting system and then used a sequential approach to manage the patient's anomalies. First, we performed an upper pole partial nephrectomy and pyeloplasty with a modified Y ureterostomy. Second, when the child was older, we performed ureterovesical reimplantation with ureteral tailoring. Currently, after 5 years of follow up, the patient has stable renal function. PMID:21172113

  17. Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care, it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence, and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities, and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  18. Skeletal Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Synoposis The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  19. Twenty-one-year-old male with congenital anomalies, obstructive uropathy and chronic renal failure: is this a case of Townes Brocks syndrome?

    PubMed

    Unuigbe, E I; Azubike, C A; Okaka, E I; Osarenkhoe, J O; Onuora, V C

    2007-03-01

    Townes Brocks syndrome is an autosomal dominant multiple malformations syndrome comprising of ear anomalies/hearing loss, limb defects, anal, genitourinary, eye, spine anomalies, heart defects and sometimes mental retardation. This report presents the case of a 21-year-old secondary school leaver as a likely case of Townes-Brocks syndrome. He was born with congenital abnormalities consisting of fixed flexion deformities of hands, wrist and elbows, urethral meatal stenosis, scoliosis and aortic stenosis. He was diagnosed with obstructive uropathy at the age of 19 years and subsequently developed chronic renal failure. The report aims to highlight the need for early recognition of potentially preventable conditions, which, if left unattended to, can lead to unnecessary fatality. PMID:17668723

  20. Severity grading in radial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Vilkki, S K

    2014-11-01

    A functional scoring method to grade the usefulness and quality of the upper limbs in congenital radial dysplasia is presented. It is based on the author's examinations of 44 arms with congenital deficiency of the radius. The hand (H), wrist (W) and proximal parts (P) of the extremity are each scored from 0 to 10 points for severity. The scoring is expressed similarly to the TNM (tumour, nodes, metastasis) tumour classification, for example as H5W4P2. The maximum severity index is 30 points. A severity grade of mild is between 1 and 8 points, moderate between 9 and 16 points and severe 17 points and over. In the author's series, the grades were mild in eight, moderate in 21 and severe in 15 cases. The functional severity grading should allow better comparison of radially deficient limbs and the results of treatment between groups of patients. PMID:24401744

  1. Cervical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix is preceded by a series of premalignant changes described as mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. These premalignant states are identified by cervical cytology, diagnosed by colposcopy and if effectively treated, can prevent invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix. Because of the apparent biological variation of the premalignant states, even the most aggressive cervical screening program cannot be expected to eliminate all invasive squamous cancer of the cervix. Optimal results of a cervical screening program will be achieved when all women under 35 years of age and sexually active have an annual cytological smear; the cytology is screened by a laboratory with high quality control; the patient's positive cytology is accurately assessed by an experienced colposcopist, and the premalignant lesion is effectively treated. PMID:21283455

  2. A novel phenotype in N-glycosylation disorders: Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura skeletal dysplasia due to pathogenic variants in ALG9.

    PubMed

    Tham, Emma; Eklund, Erik A; Hammarsjö, Anna; Bengtson, Per; Geiberger, Stefan; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Malmgren, Helena; Nilsson, Daniel; Grigelionis, Gintautas; Conner, Peter; Lindgren, Peter; Lindstrand, Anna; Wedell, Anna; Albåge, Margareta; Zielinska, Katarzyna; Nordgren, Ann; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; Nishimura, Gen; Grigelioniene, Giedre

    2016-02-01

    A rare lethal autosomal recessive syndrome with skeletal dysplasia, polycystic kidneys and multiple malformations was first described by Gillessen-Kaesbach et al and subsequently by Nishimura et al. The skeletal features uniformly comprise a round pelvis, mesomelic shortening of the upper limbs and defective ossification of the cervical spine. We studied two unrelated families including three affected fetuses with Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura syndrome using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing, comparative genome hybridization and homozygosity mapping. All affected patients were shown to have a novel homozygous splice variant NM_024740.2: c.1173+2T>A in the ALG9 gene, encoding alpha-1,2-mannosyltransferase, involved in the formation of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor of N-glycosylation. RNA analysis demonstrated skipping of exon 10, leading to shorter RNA. Mass spectrometric analysis showed an increase in monoglycosylated transferrin as compared with control tissues, confirming that this is a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). Only three liveborn children with ALG9-CDG have been previously reported, all with missense variants. All three suffered from intellectual disability, muscular hypotonia, microcephaly and renal cysts, but none had skeletal dysplasia. Our study shows that some pathogenic variants in ALG9 can present as a lethal skeletal dysplasia with visceral malformations as the most severe phenotype. The skeletal features overlap with that previously reported for ALG3- and ALG12-CDG, suggesting that this subset of glycosylation disorders constitutes a new diagnostic group of skeletal dysplasias. PMID:25966638

  3. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia may be associated with 17q12 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goumy, Carole; Laffargue, Fanny; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Kemeny, Stéphen; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetiti; Gallot, Denis; Francannet, Christine; Tchirkov, Andrei; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Vago, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions of 17q12 encompassing TCF2 are associated with maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5, cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, Mullerian aplasia in females and variable cognitive impairment. We report on a patient with a de novo 17q12 microdeletion, 1.8 Mb in size, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The 5-year-old male patient presented multicystic renal dysplasia kidneys, minor facial dysmorphic features and skeletal anomalies, but neither developmental delay nor behavioral abnormalities. CDH has been previously associated with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome only in one prenatal case. The present study reinforces the hypothesis that CDH is part of the phenotype for 17q12 microdeletion and that 17q12 encompasses candidate(s) gene(s) involved in diaphragm development. We suggest that PIGW, a gene involved in an early step of GPI biosynthesis, could be a strong candidate gene for CDH. PMID:25425496

  4. Oculodentodigital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-03-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  5. Oculodentodigital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-01-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  6. [Renal volumetric echography in the newborn infant with an agenetic, dysplastic or obstructive contralateral kidney].

    PubMed

    Uroz-Tristán, J; Pérez Candela, V; García-Anguiano Duque, F; Busto Ferrer, C; Domínguez Ortega, F; Arteaga García, R; Sanchís Solera, L; de la Iglesia Iñigo, S; Valenciano Fuentes, B

    1994-07-01

    In newborn babies with congenital renal pathology type agenesia, dysplasia or obstruction is very important to know if there is intrautero vicariant growing of the contralateral kidney. To find out that we have proceeded to be ultrasound volume measurement of the normal renal unit, as this is a valuable parameter related to compensatory mechanisms. We have studied by ultrasounds 28 renal units (16 right, 12 left) in newborns with contralateral pathology: pyeloureteral stenosis in 10 cases, multicystic kidney in 13 cases, renal agenesia in 3 cases, obstructive ureterocele in 1 case and another one with ureterovesical stenosis. We considered renal function, length of the larger renal axis width and depth of the kidney mass. Renal function was normal in all cases. Analysis of objectives results show a clear difference between the volume of normal Kidneys in children with contralateral pathology and the control group constituted by 42 renal unit in normal newborns without urological pathology. We conclude with the real evidence of compensatory growing of the normal contralateral kidney during intrautero periods. PMID:7999515

  7. Pseudoachondroplastic Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jeff W

    1999-01-01

    Lamellar inclusions of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in growth plate chondrocytes, first identified (1972) in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Iowa, has become the cytochemical hallmark for the pseudoachondroplastic dysplasia (PSACH) phenotype, linking an endoplasmic reticulum storage disorder with the osteochondrodysplasia. Since this original observation, great advances have been made, leading to the molecular understanding of this altered longitudinal bone growth anomaly. A PSACH canine model suggested that abatement of cumulative vertical growth of growth plate chondrocytes seen in PSACH results from (1) altered extracellular matrix constraints for horizontal growth and (2) uncoupling of endochondral and perichondral growth that causes metaphyseal flaring. PSACH, an autosomal dominant disease, is linked to mutation of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene. Amino acid substitutions, deletions, or additions is proposed to alter COMP structure that cause its retention in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of growth plate chondrocytes, leading to (1) compositional and structural change of the extracellular matrix, and (2) altered cellular proliferation and volume expansion. Normal growth and development occurs in COMP gene knockout mice that do not synthesis COMP, demonstrating that a mutant COMP, not absence of COMP, is required for the PSACH phenotype. The mechanism by which mutant COMP induces a PSACH phenotype remains to be elucidated. At the University of Iowa a cell culture system has been developed whereby mutant COMP transgenes are introduced into chondrocytes and the expressed product COMP is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. This readily manipulated system makes it possible to decipher systematically the system's cellular secretory processing pathway, in order to clarify the mechanism(s) by which the mutant COMP is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum. Concurrent with this is the development of transgenic mice

  8. Evolutive leukoencephalopathy in congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Krakar, Goran; Đaković, Ivana; Delin, Sanja; Bošnjak, Vlatka Mejaški

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is the most common infectious cause of congenital brain injury. Type and severity of congenital cytomegalovirus infection-related brain abnormalities depend on the developmental stage of the central nervous system at the time of fetal infection. The aim of this study was to follow the course of leukoencephalopathy in a patient with congenital cytomegalovirus infection. We describe brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a boy with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection performed at the age of 3 weeks, 13 months, and 4 and 7 years. Neonatal brain MRI showed most of characteristic findings in congenital cytomegalovirus infection with most prominent white matter abnormalities and cortical dysplasia. MRI follow-up images showed that cortical dysgenesis remained unchanged and static, whereas white matter abnormalities evolved over the years. We propose that leukoencephalopathy in congenital cytomegalovirus infection is not only nonprogressive or static but even evolutive and suggests both underlying disruption and delay of myelination. PMID:24453153

  9. A recessive syndrome of intellectual disability, moderate overgrowth, and renal dysplasia predisposing to Wilms tumor is caused by a mutation in FIBP gene.

    PubMed

    Akawi, Nadia; Ben-Salem, Salma; Lahti, Laura; Partanen, Juha; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2016-08-01

    Clinical classification of overgrowth syndromes represents a challenge since a wide spectrum of disorders result in marked overgrowth. Therefore, there is a continuous effort to identify the genetic basis of these disorders that will eventually facilitate their molecular classification. Here, we have identified the genetic etiology and the pathogenetic mechanism underlying a rare autosomal recessive overgrowth syndrome in three affected siblings. The overgrowth phenotype in the patients was accompanied by developmental delay, learning disabilities, and variable congenital abnormalities. To elucidate the genetic etiology of the disorder, whole-genome genotyping and whole-exome sequencing were used. The disease was mapped to 3p21.1-p14.2 and 11q13.1-q13.4, where an in-frame insertion (c.175_176insTAA) in FIBP gene was revealed. The resulting indel (p.H59LN) was predicted to change the protein conformation with likely deleterious effect on its function as one of the fibroblast growth factor signaling mediators. In vitro cellular proliferation assay and in situ hypridization in vivo were then performed to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. The patients' skin fibroblasts showed an increased proliferation capacity compared to the controls' explaining the observed overgrowth phenotype. In addition, we detected Fibp expression most notably in the brains of mice embryos suggesting a possible effect on cognitive functions early in development. To date, only one patient has been reported with a homozygous nonsense mutation in FIBP exhibiting an overgrowth syndrome with multiple congenital abnormalities. Taken all together, these findings provide convincing evidence implicating FIBP aberrations in the newly recognized overgrowth syndrome and expand the associated phenotypes to include possible Wilms tumor predisposition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27183861

  10. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  11. Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome associated with renal dysplasia and embryonal tumor: localization of the gene to Xqcen-q21.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Benzie, R M; Hunter, A G; Allanson, J E; Mackenzie, A E

    We report 6 affected males in a 5-generation family with x-linked Simpson-Golabi-Behmel (SGB) syndrome. All had pre- and postnatal overgrowth with 2 adult males attaining heights over 195 cm. Other features included "coarse" face with hypertelorism, broad nasal root, cleft palate, full lips with a midline groove of the lower lip, grooved tongue with tongue tie, prominent mandible, congenital heart defects, arrhythmias, supernumerary nipples, splenomegaly, large dysplastic kidneys, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, skeletal abnormalities and postaxial hexadactyly. All affected individuals were of normal intelligence. One boy died at age 19 months of a neuroblastoma. The putative origin of the gene in this family was the maternal great grandmother of the propositus. Eight carrier females, who showed varying manifestations of the gene, have been identified. Anthropometric analysis has identified preliminary characteristic craniofacial dimensions in this syndrome. Molecular studies have shown a maximal lod score of 2.81 with no recombinants observed for the SGB-DXYS68 pairing, mapping the disorder to Xqcen-Xq21.3. PMID:1605222

  12. Isolation of cosmids corresponding to the chromosome breakpoints of a de novo autosomal translocation, t(6;19)(p21;q13.1), in a patient with multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Groenen, P M; Garcia, E; Thoelen, R; Aly, M; Schoenmakers, E F; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J P; Van de Ven, W J

    1996-01-01

    Hydronephrosis caused by pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) is a frequent urological malformation assumed to result from a deficient development of the ureteric bud. The exact etiology of pelvi-ureteric junction stenosis is unknown, but there is convincing evidence for a genetic cause, with linkage analysis predicting a hereditary hydronephrosis locus on chromosome 6p. We encountered a patient with a de novo autosomal t(6;19)(p21;q13.1) and attendant bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia (MRD), bilateral PUJO resulting in massive hydronephrosis, and an associated von Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster disorder. On the basis of the presumption that in this patient the putative hydronephrosis gene might be disrupted by the translocation, we sought to isolate DNA from the breakpoint regions as the initial step in a strategy to identify genes affected by the t(6; 19). Using sequential rounds of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmids selected from a detailed integrated map of the long arm of chromosome 19, we have identified a cosmid clone that spans the breakpoint. The position of the breakpoint was further localized by Southern blot analysis. Using a vectorette PCR approach, rearranged DNA fragments were isolated and, by comparative nucleotide sequence analysis, these were shown to contain ectopic sequences. A cosmid clone containing these ectopic sequences was isolated and shown by CASH (chromosome assignment using somatic cell hybrids) and FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) analysis to map to the short arm of chromosome 6 and to span the breakpoint found in the MRD patient. The isolated cosmid clones are useful reagents for analysis of other MRD patients and for the search for genes at or flanking the breakpoints. PMID:9067426

  13. Two-stage release in Streeter's dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Zohaib Gulzar; Rao, Irfan; Anwer, Wahid; Yaseen, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Streeter's dysplasia is a rare disorder of congenital constricting bands, occurring in 1-10 000 birth, with no sex predilection. In severe cases, it is associated with autoamputation of distal extremities such as fingers and toes. Recent advances have made it possible, in developed countries, to recognise this condition in the prenatal period and to initiate prompt intrauterine management, however, these, being uncommon procedures, need technical advances and experienced hands. In developing countries, recognition of the condition with timely management of primary and associated abnormalities required. We present a case of a 4-month-old child with type IV Streeter's dysplasia associated with right flexible clubfoot, who underwent successful two-stage release of symptomatic constricting bands from bilateral legs. PMID:25899511

  14. Congenital cardiac anomalies in an English bulldog.

    PubMed

    McConkey, Marina J

    2011-11-01

    A 4-year-old male castrated English bulldog was referred to the Atlantic Veterinary College for evaluation of exercise intolerance, multiple syncopal episodes, and a grade IV/VI heart murmur. The dog was shown to have 3 congenital cardiac anomalies: atrial septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia, and subaortic stenosis. Medical management consisted of exercise restriction, atenolol, pimobendan, and taurine. PMID:22547849

  15. Neonatal vascularization and oxygen tension regulate appropriate perinatal renal medulla/papilla maturation.

    PubMed

    Phua, Yu Leng; Gilbert, Thierry; Combes, Alexander; Wilkinson, Lorine; Little, Melissa H

    2016-04-01

    Congenital medullary dysplasia with obstructive nephropathy is a common congenital disorder observed in paediatric patients and represents the foremost cause of renal failure. However, the molecular processes regulating normal papillary outgrowth during the postnatal period are unclear. In this study, transcriptional profiling of the renal medulla across postnatal development revealed enrichment of non-canonical Wnt signalling, vascular development, and planar cell polarity genes, all of which may contribute to perinatal medulla/papilla maturation. These pathways were investigated in a model of papillary hypoplasia with functional obstruction, the Crim1(KST264/KST264) transgenic mouse. Postnatal elongation of the renal papilla via convergent extension was unaffected in the Crim1(KST264/KST264) hypoplastic renal papilla. In contrast, these mice displayed a disorganized papillary vascular network, tissue hypoxia, and elevated Vegfa expression. In addition, we demonstrate the involvement of accompanying systemic hypoxia arising from placental insufficiency, in appropriate papillary maturation. In conclusion, this study highlights the requirement for normal vascular development in collecting duct patterning, development of appropriate nephron architecture, and perinatal papillary maturation, such that disturbances contribute to obstructive nephropathy. PMID:26800422

  16. HDR Syndrome (Hypoparathyroidism, Sensorineural Deafness and Renal Disease) Accompanied by Hirschsprung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sepahi, Mohsen Akhavan; Baraty, Behrouz; Shooshtary, Fatemeh Khalifeh

    2010-01-01

    Background HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal disease) is an autosomal dominant condition, defined by the triad hypoparathyroidism, renal dysplasia and hearing loss. Hirschsprung (HSCR) disease is a variable congenital absence of ganglion cells of the enteric nervous system resulting in degrees of functional bowel obstruction. Rarer chromosomal anomalies are reported in combination with Hirschsprung disease like DiGeorge syndrome, mosaic trisomy 8, XXY chromosomal constitution, partial duplication of chromosome 2q, tetrasomy 9p, and 20p deletion. Case Presentation Here, we describe an 8 year-old girl with HDR syndrome accompanied by Hirschsprung disease. Although the association of Hirschsprung disease with chromosomal anomalies has been reported, according to our knowledge, this is the first report of associated HSCR with HDR syndrome. PMID:23056694

  17. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Clinical Overview for the Dental Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Halai, Tina; Stevens, Claire

    2015-10-01

    The term ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is used to describe a group of rare congenital disorders characterized by abnormalities of two or more ectodermal structures such as the skin, hair, nails, teeth and sweat glands. This paper will give an overview of the aetiology of ED and describe the manifestations and dental management of this condition. In particular, the important role of the dental practitioner in the identification and management of patients with ED will be highlighted. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Dental practitioners should be aware of the oral features of ectodermal dysplasia and be able to make timely referrals and provide appropriate continuing care for these patients. PMID:26685476

  18. Unusual association between cardiac, skeletal, urogenital and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Goryaeva, Maria; Sykes, Mark Christopher; Lau, Benjamin; West, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with an array of congenital abnormalities. She has been diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease (PCKD) with no detectable mutations in PKD1 or PKD2, spina bifida occulta, thoracic skeletal abnormalities, a uterus didelphys and a patent foramen ovale (PFO). There are several associations reported in the literature that include abnormalities similar to the patient's, but none describe her presentation in its entirety. The MURCS association is characterised by (MU)llerian duct aplasia, (R)enal dysplasia and (C)ervical (S)omite anomalies and goes some way in explaining these condition. Patients with both MURCS and PCKD have not been described in current literature. Through this report, we hope to bring a potential diagnosis to light and provide the patient with an improved understanding of her health. PMID:27402585

  19. Developmental Genetics and Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Uy, Natalie; Reidy, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are common birth defects and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in children. There is a wide spectrum of renal abnormalities, from mild hydronephrosis to more severe cases, such as bilateral renal dysplasia. The etiology of the majority of cases of CAKUT remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence that genomic imbalance contributes to the pathogenesis of CAKUT. Advances in human and mouse genetics have contributed to increased understanding of the pathophysiology of CAKUT. Mutations in genes involved in both transcription factors and signal transduction pathways involved in renal development are associated with CAKUT. Large cohort studies suggest that copy number variants, genomic, or de novo mutations may explain up to one-third of all cases of CAKUT. One of the major challenges to the use of genetic information in the clinical setting remains the lack of strict genotype-phenotype correlation. However, identifying genetic causes of CAKUT may lead to improved diagnosis of extrarenal complications. With the advent of decreasing costs for whole genome and exome sequencing, future studies focused on genotype-phenotype correlations, gene modifiers, and animal models of gene mutations will be needed to translate genetic advances into improved clinical care. PMID:27617142

  20. Compensatory Growth of Congenital Solitary Kidneys in Pigs Reflects Increased Nephron Numbers Rather Than Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Vuuren, Stefan H.; Sol, Chalana M.; Broekhuizen, Roel; Lilien, Marc R.; Oosterveld, Michiel J. S.; Nguyen, Tri Q.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with unilateral MultiCystic Kidney Dysplasia (MCKD) or unilateral renal agenesis (URA) have a congenital solitary functioning kidney (CSFK) that is compensatory enlarged. The question whether this enlargement is due to increased nephron numbers and/or to nephron hypertrophy is unresolved. This question is of utmost clinical importance, since hypertrophy is associated with a risk of developing hypertension and proteinuria later in life with consequent development of CKD and cardiovascular disease. Methodology/Principal Findings In a cohort of 32,000 slaughter pigs, 7 congenital solitary functioning kidneys and 7 control kidneys were identified and harvested. Cortex volume was measured and with a 3-dimensional stereologic technique the number and volume of glomeruli was determined and compared. The mean total cortex volume was increased by more than 80% and the mean number of glomeruli per kidney was 50% higher in CSFKs than in a single control kidney, equaling 75% of the total nephron number in both kidneys of control subjects. The mean total glomerular volume in the CSFKs was not increased relative to the controls. Conclusions/Significance Thus, in pigs, compensatory enlargement of a CSFK is based on increased nephron numbers. Extrapolation of these findings to the human situation suggests that patients with a CSFK might not be at increased risk for developing hyperfiltration-associated renal and cardiovascular disease in later life due to a lower nephron number. PMID:23185419

  1. Treatment of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A

    2011-04-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common orthopaedic developmental disorder of dogs. This paper reviews the treatment options available for management of the condition in the skeletally immature and adult dog. PMID:21906059

  2. Renal outcome in adults with renal insufficiency and irregular asymmetric kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Neild, Guy H; Thomson, Gill; Nitsch, Dorothea; Woolfson, Robin G; Connolly, John O; Woodhouse, Christopher RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background The commonest cause of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) in children and young adults is congenital malformation of the kidney and urinary tract. In this retrospective review, we examine whether progression to ESRF can be predicted and whether treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) can delay or prevent this. Methods We reviewed 78 patients with asymmetric irregular kidneys as a consequence of either primary vesico-ureteric reflux or renal dysplasia (Group 1, n = 44), or abnormal bladder function (Group 2, n = 34). Patients (median age 24 years) had an estimated GFR (eGFR) < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 with at least 5 years of follow up (median 143 months). 48 patients received ACEI. We explored potential prognostic factors that affect the time to ESRF using Cox-regression analyses. Results At start, mean (SE) creatinine was 189 (8) μmol/l, mean eGFR 41 (1) ml/min 1.73 m2, mean proteinuria 144 (14) mg/mmol creatinine (1.7 g/24 hrs). Of 78 patients, 36 (46%) developed ESRF, but none of 19 with proteinuria less than 50 mg/mmol and only two of 18 patients with eGFR above 50 ml/min did so. Renal outcome between Groups 1 and 2 appeared similar with no evidence for a difference. A benefit in favour of treatment with ACEI was observed above an eGFR of 40 ml/min (p = 0.024). Conclusion The similar outcome of the two groups supports the nephrological nature of progressive renal failure in young men born with abnormal bladders. There is a watershed GFR of 40–50 ml/min at which ACEI treatment can be successful at improving renal outcome. PMID:15462683

  3. First trimester prenatal diagnosis of chondroectodermal dysplasia (Ellis-van Creveld syndrome) with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dugoff, L; Thieme, G; Hobbins, J C

    2001-01-01

    Chondroectodermal dysplasia (Ellis-van Creveld syndrome) is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by short-limb dwarfism, postaxial polydactyly, ectodermal defects, and congenital heart disease. This condition is most prevalent in the Amish population of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA, occurring in 1/5000 births and in 1/60,000 births in the general population. This report presents a case of ultrasonographic detection of chondroectodermal dysplasia at 12 weeks of gestation. PMID:11244665

  4. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jhamb, Aakarsh; Mohanty, Sujata; Jhamb, Parul A

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia can present clinically in varied forms which may appear as collision of different pathologic processes. We report a rare case of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia with coexisting epithelial lined cyst and superimposed osteomyelitis with sequestrum formation. Its clinical features and management with possible hypotheses are described along with the post operative course. Pertinent literature has been reviewed with emphasis on pathogenesis of this unique occurrence. PMID:23248490

  5. The birth prevalence rates for the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Orioli, I M; Castilla, E E; Barbosa-Neto, J G

    1986-08-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias that can be recognised in the perinatal period. Using the data base of the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC), for the years 1978 to 1983, on 349 470 births (live and stillbirths), a crude prevalence rate of 2.3/10 000 was observed. However, several indications of under-registration suggest that the real value is about twice that observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia, with a prevalence rate between 0.5 and 1.5/10 000 births, the thanatophoric dysplasia/achondrogenesis group (0.2 and 0.5/10 000 births), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.4/10 000 births). The mutation rate for autosomal dominant achondroplasia was estimated at between 1.72 and 5.57 X 10(-5) per gamete per generation. PMID:3746832

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Greenberg dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop properly, causing a distinctive spotted appearance called moth-eaten bone, which is visible on x-ray ... Greenberg dysplasia is also called hydrops-ectopic calcification-moth-eaten skeletal dysplasia (HEM), which reflects the condition's ...

  7. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  8. Novel perspectives for investigating congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT).

    PubMed

    Renkema, Kirsten Y; Winyard, Paul J; Skovorodkin, Ilya N; Levtchenko, Elena; Hindryckx, An; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Weber, Stefanie; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Vainio, Seppo; Schedl, Andreas; Schaefer, Franz; Knoers, Nine V A M; Bongers, Ernie M H F

    2011-12-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the commonest cause of chronic kidney disease in children. Structural anomalies within the CAKUT spectrum include renal agenesis, kidney hypo-/dysplasia, multicystic kidney dysplasia, duplex collecting system, posterior urethral valves and ureter abnormalities. While most CAKUT cases are sporadic, familial clustering of CAKUT is common, emphasizing a strong genetic contribution to CAKUT origin. Animal experiments demonstrate that alterations in genes crucial for kidney development can cause experimental CAKUT, while expression studies implicate mislocalization and/or aberrant levels of the encoded proteins in human CAKUT. Further insight into the pathogenesis of CAKUT will improve strategies for early diagnosis, follow-up and treatment. Here, we outline a collaborative approach to identify and characterize novel factors underlying human CAKUT. This European consortium will share the largest collection of CAKUT patients available worldwide and undertake multidisciplinary research into molecular and genetic pathogenesis, with extension into translational studies to improve long-term patient outcomes. PMID:22121240

  9. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed. PMID:27607320

  10. Hereditary renal adysplasia: new observations and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Moerman, P; Fryns, J P; Sastrowijoto, S H; Vandenberghe, K; Lauweryns, J M

    1994-01-01

    Renal agenesis and dysplasia are frequently regarded by pathologists, even pediatric pathologists, as sporadic malformations. We report six fetal autopsy cases of hereditary renal adysplasia (HRA): two pairs of siblings, one case with paternal unilateral renal agenesis, and one case with an autosomal balanced 6p/19q translocation. The main purpose of this paper is to emphasize that nonsyndromal renal agenesis and dysplasia are pathogenetically related and often inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and variable expression. A subsidiary purpose is to present a case of bilateral multicystic dysplasia with a balanced 6p/19q translocation. This observation further supports the assignment of one of the loci for HRA to chromosome 6p. PMID:8065999

  11. Prevalence and risk factors for renal scars in children with febrile UTI and/or VUR: A cross-sectional observational study of 565 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, Warren T.; Shah, Anjana; Yang, Mary; Kwon, Jeannie; Villanueva, Carlos; Traylor, Janelle; Pritzker, Karen; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Haley, Robert W.; Bush, Nicol Corbin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine prevalence and risk factors for renal scar in children referred for urologic assessment of febrile UTI and/or VUR. Methods Pre-determined risk factors for renal scar were prospectively recorded in consecutive patients referred for UTI/VUR. Age, gender, VUR grade, and reported number of febrile and non-febrile UTIs were analyzed with logistic regression to determine risk for focal cortical defects on non-acute DMSA. Results Of 565 consecutive children, 24 (4%) had congenital renal dysplasia and 84 (15.5%) had focal defect(s). VUR, especially grades IV–V, recurrent febrile UTI, and older age increased risk. For any age child with the same number of UTIs, VUR increased odds of renal defect 5.4-fold (OR = 5.4, 95% CI = 2.7–10.6, AUC = 0.759). Conclusions Focal DMSA defects were present in 15.5% of 565 consecutive children referred for febrile UTI and/or VUR; 4% had presumed congenital reflux nephropathy without cortical defect. All VUR grades increased risk for these defects, as did recurrent febrile UTIs and older age. However, 43% with grades IV–V VUR and 76% with recurrent UTI had normal DMSA. PMID:23465483

  12. Use of pimobendan in feline congenital heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, Shannon

    2013-12-01

    A 6-month-old domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of sudden lethargy and tachypnea following ovariohysterectomy. Upon failure of improvement with supportive care, a cardiologist identified congenital tricuspid dysplasia with signs of heart failure. Furosemide, enalapril, and pimobendan were used to reduce clinical signs and improve length and quality of life. PMID:24293678

  13. Use of pimobendan in feline congenital heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    A 6-month-old domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of sudden lethargy and tachypnea following ovariohysterectomy. Upon failure of improvement with supportive care, a cardiologist identified congenital tricuspid dysplasia with signs of heart failure. Furosemide, enalapril, and pimobendan were used to reduce clinical signs and improve length and quality of life. PMID:24293678

  14. Evolution of the term and definition of dysplasia of the hip - a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Musielak, Bartosz; Idzior, Maciej; Jóźwiak, Marek

    2015-10-12

    There is no consensus on the definition of dysplasia of the hip (DH). Past and present concepts used to describe DH do not form a complete view of the pathology. Moreover, some authors still present the disease as congenital, not developmental. This prompted authors to analyze the evolution of the definition of DH. Based on the biomedical databases 500 articles and books in the field of hip dysplasia were found and analyzed. Fifteen definitions of hip dysplasia met inclusion criteria, subsequently were analyzed and presented in chronological order. The analysis revealed that currently there is no single, universal definition of hip dysplasia in the aspect of morphological, clinical, and radiological studies. Despite the widely-used term of DH, it is described imprecisely and in different ways. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a multidisciplinary definition of this pathology covering all aspects of hip disorders considered valid in modern orthopaedics. PMID:26528350

  15. Thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 with cloverleaf skull in a dichorionic twin.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Torres, V M

    2015-01-01

    Here is reported for the first time, a case of thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 with cloverleaf skull in a (Mexican) dichorionic female twin. The patient's main clinical and radiographic findings included severe limb shortening, narrow thorax shape; short ribs, marked platyspondyly, curved short femurs, and a cloverleaf skull. The female twin sib had normal growth parameters and phenotypic appearance. According to the literature, cloverleaf skull in thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 is rare, even more so in dichorionic twins. Moreover, the present observation confirms that thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 patients may show phenotypic heterogeneity related to cloverleaf skull and other congenital anomalies. Therefore, a careful family history along with clinical, radiological, and molecular investigations is suggested, in order to achieve an accurate parental counseling for thanatophoric dysplasia. PMID:26043509

  16. The wide spectrum of the asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cortina, H; Beltran, J; Olague, R; Ceres, L; Alonso, A; Lanuza, A

    1979-04-19

    Seven cases of A. T. D. are presented. Radiological findings were extraordinarily diverse. The prognosis of the disease is difficult for each individual case, because of the frequent pulmonary complications and cystic renal lesions are not always directly related to the severity of the bone changes. The authors believe that the term "thoracic-pelvic-phalangeal dysplasia" proposed by Langer, is the most adequate, since it points to the key factors in the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:450492

  17. Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (tufting enteropathy).

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Salomon, Julie; Ruemmele, Frank; de Serres, Natacha Patey-Mariaud; Brousse, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), also known as tufting enteropathy, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset severe intractable diarrhea causing sometimes irreversible intestinal failure. To date, no epidemiological data are available, however, the prevalence can be estimated at around 1/50,000-100,000 live births in Western Europe. The prevalence seems higher in areas with high degree of consanguinity and in patients of Arabic origin. Infants develop within the first days after birth a watery diarrhea persistent in spite of bowel rest and parenteral nutrition. Some infants are reported to have associated choanal rectal or esophageal atresia. IED is thought to be related to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. Nonspecific punctuated keratitis was reported in more than 60% of patients. Histology shows various degree of villous atrophy, with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria but specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium with disorganization of surface enterocytes with focal crowding, resembling tufts. Several associated specific features were reported, including abnormal deposition of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) in the basement membrane, increased expression of desmoglein and ultrastructural changes in the desmosomes, and abnormal distribution of alpha2beta1 integrin adhesion molecules. One model of transgenic mice in which the gene encoding the transcription factor Elf3 is disrupted have morphologic features resembling IED. Parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggest an autosomal recessive transmission but the causative gene(s) have not been yet identified making prenatal diagnosis unavailable. Some infants have a milder phenotype than others but in most patients, the severity of the intestinal malabsorption even with enteral feeding make them totally dependent on daily long-term parenteral nutrition with a subsequent risk of complications

  18. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown. There are many insights, however, from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding DDH was performed. There is a predominance of left-sided (64.0%) and unilateral disease (63.4%). The incidence per 1000 live births ranges from 0.06 in Africans in Africa to 76.1 in Native Americans. There is significant variability in incidence within each racial group by geographic location. The incidence of clinical neonatal hip instability at birth ranges from 0.4 in Africans to 61.7 in Polish Caucasians. Predictors of DDH are breech presentation, positive family history, and gender (female). Children born premature, with low birth weights, or to multifetal pregnancies are somewhat protected from DDH. Certain HLA A, B, and D types demonstrate an increase in DDH. Chromosome 17q21 is strongly associated with DDH. Ligamentous laxity and abnormalities in collagen metabolism, estrogen metabolism, and pregnancy-associated pelvic instability are well-described associations with DDH. Many studies demonstrate an increase of DDH in the winter, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Swaddling is strongly associated with DDH. Amniocentesis, premature labor, and massive radiation exposure may increase the risk of DDH. Associated conditions are congenital muscular torticollis and congenital foot deformities. The opposite hip is frequently abnormal when using rigorous radiographic assessments. The role of acetabular dysplasia and adult hip osteoarthritis is complex. Archeological studies demonstrate that the epidemiology of DDH may be changing. PMID:24977057

  19. Thanatophoric dysplasia: A review.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, H

    2016-01-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia is a well-known cause of potentially lethal short-limbed dwarfism in the newborn. The diagnosis is usually made by the recognition of characteristic radiological changes and confirmed at autopsy by demonstration of specific morphological and histological changes in the brain. This review is based upon the author's personal experience and archived data of 19 cases and concerns the clinical and radiographic manifestations, autopsy findings, molecular pathogenesis and the approach to antenatal diagnosis. PMID:27245526

  20. "Baby rattle" pelvis dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cormier-Daire, V; Savarirayan, R; Lachman, R S; Neidich, J A; Grace, K; Rimoin, D L; Wilcox, W R

    2001-04-15

    We report an apparently previously undescribed lethal skeletal dysplasia, clinically resembling achondrogenesis, but with distinct radiologic and chondro-osseous morphologic features. These comprise bifid distal ends of the long bones of the limbs, absent vertebral body ossification, a unique "baby rattle" pelvic configuration with tall and broad ilia, absent endochondral ossification, regions of mesenchymal cells within the resting cartilage, and abnormal mesenchymal ossification. PMID:11337746

  1. Mesenchymal dysplasia of placenta.

    PubMed

    Balachandran Nair, Krishna G; Srinish, Minu; Balan, Preesha; Sadasivan, Santha

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) in a 26-year-old patient is reported. Ultrasound scan at 17 weeks of gestation showed placenta with multiple cystic spaces and a normal appearing fetus. Following delivery of a term live baby, histological examination of the placenta was suggestive of PMD. The early recognition of this rare condition by characteristic ultrasonographic findings is herein emphasized and hence that PMD is distinguished from molar pregnancy. PMID:26275269

  2. Familial Cleidocranial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, MK; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia or mutational dysostosis or cleidocranial dysostosis is a generalized skeletodental dysplastic disorder, inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The expression of this disorder can vary widely in severity, even within the same family. This is a relatively rare disease and has no standard effective treatment option as of yet. Here we present a case report of affected mother and son with classical manifestations of the disease.

  3. de la Chapelle dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Whitley, C B; Burke, B A; Granroth, G; Gorlin, R J

    1986-09-01

    Since the description by de la Chapelle and colleagues of two sibs with a unique skeletal dysplasia, two additional cases have occurred, one in the original Finnish family and one sporadic patient born to unrelated parents of Belgian descent. The original Finnish family has later had a fourth child, a normal daughter who was found to be unaffected upon radiographic examination in the 19th week of gestation. These additional findings are compatible with recessive inheritance. Physical features common to these four patients include cleft palate, small thorax, moderately severe micromelia with small hands, and equinovarus deformity. In each case, the ulnae and fibulae were reduced to an almost triangular osseous remnant. Other long bones were short and bowed. Neonatal death occurred in all cases and may be attributed to a consistent triad of respiratory tract malformations: laryngeal stenosis, tracheobronchomalacia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. Clinical and radiographic features are sufficiently unique to distinguish de la Chapelle dysplasia from other disorders in the spectrum of neonatal lethal osteochondrodysplasias. Lacunar halos were identified as a distinctive histopathologic feature also observed in achondrogenesis but not in several other skeletal dysplasias. PMID:3799721

  4. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  5. Congenital cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following birth defects: Chondrodysplasia syndrome Congenital rubella Conradi-Hünermann syndrome Down syndrome (trisomy 21) Ectodermal ... Images Eye Cataract - close-up of the eye Rubella syndrome Cataract References Dahan E. Pediatric cataract surgery. ...

  6. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fact that this disease can be cured with antibiotics if caught early, rising rates of syphilis among pregnant women in the United States have increased the number of infants born with congenital syphilis.

  7. [Congenital thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-03-01

    Congenital thrombophilia is a thrombotic diathesis caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities in blood coagulation factors or their inhibitory factors associated with physiological thrombus formation. Patients with congenital thrombophilia often present with unusual clinical episodes of venous thrombosis (occasionally combined with pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism) at a young age and recurrence in atypical vessels, such as the mesenteric vein and superior sagittal sinus, often with a family history of this condition. Studies in Japan as well as in western countries have shown congenital thrombophilia to be caused by a wide variety of genetic abnormalities in natural anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S. However, there may still be many unknown causes of hereditary thrombosis. We recently reported a case of hereditary thrombosis induced by a novel mechanism of antithrombin resistance, that is, congenital thrombophilia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the coagulation factor prothrombin. PMID:27076244

  8. Congenital toxoplasmosis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital toxoplasmosis is a group of symptoms that occur when an unborn baby (fetus) is infected with the parasite ... Toxoplasmosis infection can be passed to a developing baby if the mother becomes infected while pregnant. The ...

  9. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at birth. ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; ...

  10. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  11. Systemic Hypertension and Transient Ischemic Attack in a 6-Year-Old Girl with Fibromuscular Dysplasia Treated with Percutaneous Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Foa-Torres, Gustavo; Ganame, Javier; Juaneda, Ernesto; Peirone, Alejandro; Barcudi, Maria Silvina; Achaval, Alberto

    2010-02-15

    We describe a 6-year-old girl with arterial hypertension secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia with stenoses of both renal arteries and transient ischemic attack due to extracranial right internal carotid artery subtotal occlusion as well as left internal carotid artery stenosis. She was treated with percutaneous angioplasty of both renal and both carotid arteries.

  12. Congenital nephrotic syndrome. Gallium-67 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Trepashko, D.W.; Gelfand, M.J.; Pan, C.C.

    1988-11-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a rare disorder. Heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema occur during the first 3 months of life. Initial cases were reported from Finland and sporadic cases have occurred elsewhere. Finnish cases demonstrated an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern; currently, Finnish and non-Finnish types are recognized. The clinical course consists of failure to thrive, frequent infections, declining renal function, and early death by age 4 years from sepsis or uremia. Recently renal transplantation has improved the prognosis of patients with this disease. An abnormal Ga-67 scan in a case of congenital nephrotic syndrome is presented.

  13. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  14. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Pat; Magliocca, Kelly R; Lee, Janice S

    2012-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of the natural history and molecular abnormalities, many questions remain surrounding the progression and management of fibrous dysplasia (FD). In the absence of comorbidities, the expected behavior of craniofacial FD (CFD) is to be slow growing and without functional consequence. Understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms contributing to the various phenotypes of this condition, as well as the predictors of the different behaviors of FD lesions, must be improved. Long-term follow-up of patients with CFD is vital because spontaneous recovery is unlikely, and the course of disease can be unpredictable. PMID:22771278

  15. [Successful treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection with valganciclovir].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yu; Miyajima, Tasuku; Shimura, Masaru; Morichi, Shinichiro; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Ioi, Hiroaki; Oana, Shingo; Yamanaka, Gaku; Kawashima, Hisashi; Hoshika, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs frequently in neonates. However, there are no screening tests or definitive treatments for this infection in Japan. We report a case of a 21-day-old Japanese boy with congenital CMV infection. He was referred to our hospital for treatment of congenital bilateral deafness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed cortical dysplasia of the temporal poles, enlarged ventricles, and areas of abnormal intensity in the white matter. He was given a diagnosis of congenital CMV infection based on the detection of CMV DNA in his urine and the umbilical cord. After the administration of valganciclovir, no CMV DNA was detected in his serum, and brain MRI and electroencephalogram findings, motor development, and deafness improved. Further investigation is needed to establish a screening test and treatment for congenital CMV infection in Japan. PMID:22352032

  16. Spectrum of HNF1B Mutations in a Large Cohort of Patients Who Harbor Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Decramer, Stéphane; Pawtowski, Audrey; Morinière, Vincent; Bandin, Flavio; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lebre, Anne-Sophie; Faguer, Stanislas; Guigonis, Vincent; Antignac, Corinne; Salomon, Rémi

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is a transcription factor that is critical for the development of kidney and pancreas. In humans, mutations in HNF1B lead to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pancreas atrophy, and maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 and genital malformations. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report HNF1B screening in a cohort of 377 unrelated cases with various kidney phenotypes (hyperechogenic kidneys with size not more than +3 SD, multicystic kidney disease, renal agenesis, renal hypoplasia, cystic dysplasia, or hyperuricemic tubulointerstitial nephropathy not associated with UMOD mutation). Results: We found a heterozygous mutation in 75 (19.9%) index cases, consisting of a deletion of the whole gene in 42, deletion of one exon in one, and small mutations in 32. Eighteen mutations were novel. De novo mutations accounted for 66% of deletions and 40% of small mutations. In patients who carried HNF1B mutation and for whom we were able to study prenatal ultrasonography (56 probands), isolated hyperechogenic kidneys with normal or slightly enhanced size were the more frequent (34 of 56) phenotype before birth. Various other prenatal renal phenotypes were associated with HNF1B mutations, at a lesser frequency. Diabetes developed in four probands. Hyperuricemia and hypomagnesemia, although not systematically investigated, were frequently associated. Conclusions: This large series showed that the severity of the renal disease associated with HNF1B mutations was extremely variable (from prenatal renal failure to normal renal function in adulthood) and was not correlated with the genotype. PMID:20378641

  17. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  18. Coronary Artery Manifestations of Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Michelis, Katherine C.; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Kadian-Dodov, Daniella; d’Escamard, Valentina; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) involving the coronary arteries is an uncommon but important condition that can present as acute coronary syndrome, left ventricular dysfunction, or potentially sudden cardiac death. Although the classic angiographic “string of beads” that may be observed in renal artery FMD does not occur in coronary arteries, potential manifestations include spontaneous coronary artery dissection, distal tapering or long, smooth narrowing that may represent dissection, intramural hematoma, spasm, or tortuosity. Importantly, FMD must be identified in at least one other noncoronary arterial territory to attribute any coronary findings to FMD. Although there is limited evidence to guide treatment, many lesions heal spontaneously; thus, a conservative approach is generally preferred. The etiology is poorly understood, but there are ongoing efforts to better characterize FMD and define its genetic and molecular basis. This report reviews the clinical course of FMD involving the coronary arteries and provides guidance for diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:25190240

  19. Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia: a potentially lethal bone dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Kamoda, T; Nakajima, R; Matsui, A; Nishimura, G

    2001-02-01

    We report a Japanese boy, who is considered as having Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia, a rare, as yet undefined, skeletal dysplasia. The diagnosis was warranted by the constellation of skeletal abnormalities - mild platyspondyly, hypoplastic ilia, broad proximal femora with prominent lesser trochanters, mild brachymetacarpalia and, most importantly, rhizomelic shortening of the upper limbs with lateral bowing, medial cortical thickening, and medial metaphyseal notching of the humeri. Our patient, unlike previously reported patients, had respiratory distress and died suddenly of unknown cause in late infancy. Our experience may imply the heterogeneity or phenotypic variability of Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia. PMID:11214690

  20. [Congenital syphilis].

    PubMed

    Tabák, Réka; Tabák, Adám; Várkonyi, Viktória

    2010-01-10

    Syphilis has been a re-emerging disease in the past few decades. As a consequence, the prevalence of congenital syphilis is expected to be on the rise. Maternal syphilis may be related to several pathologies, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or congenital syphilis in the child. Infants that acquire syphilis in utero are frequently asymptomatic, and the organ damage caused by the infection may be apparent only years later. Syphilis is a curable disease, and most of its complications in the infant can be prevented by screening and treating the mother. Every newborn potentially infected should be treated with penicillin immediately starting on the day of birth. PMID:20061233

  1. Brain Herniation in Neurofibromatosis with Dysplasia of Occipital Bone and Posterior Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Vithal; Mahore, Amit; Patil, Manoj; Sathe, Prashant; Kaswa, Amol; Gore, Sandeep; Dharurkar, Pralhad; Kawale, Juhi

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old female, a known case of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), presented with a congenital swelling in the left occipital region. She had developed recent onset dysphagia and localized occipital headache. Neuroradiology revealed a left occipital meningoencephalocele and a left parapharyngeal meningocele. This was associated with ventriculomegaly. She was advised on cranioplasty along with duraplasty which she denied. She agreed to a lumbar-peritoneal shunt. She described a dramatic improvement in her symptoms following the lumbar-peritoneal shunt. Occipital dysplasias, though uncommon, have been reported in the literature. We review this case and its management and discuss relevant literature on occipital dysplasias in NF1. PMID:26600957

  2. Valvular dysplasia and congestive heart failure in a juvenile African penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Allyson; Frasca, Salvatore; Mishra, Neha; Tuttle, Allison D

    2014-12-01

    Abstract: An aquarium-housed, 6-mo-old African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) presented with acute respiratory distress. Auscultation revealed a grade II-III systolic murmur in the absence of adventitial sounds, and an enlarged heart without pulmonary edema was seen radiographically. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed atrioventricular (AV) valvular dysplasia and ventricular enlargement. The penguin was treated with enalapril, furosemide, and pimobendan but died within 3 wk of detection of the murmur. Congenital dysplasia of the right AV valve with right atrial and ventricular dilation and ventricular hypertrophy were diagnosed on postmortem examination. PMID:25632699

  3. Association of syndactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip and palate: report of two sibs from Turkey.

    PubMed Central

    Oğur, G; Yüksel, M

    1988-01-01

    Two Turkish sibs, products of a second cousin marriage, with tetramelic syndactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip and palate, renal anomalies, and mental retardation are reported. Similarities between these two brothers and previously reported cases and their mode of transmission are discussed. Images PMID:2832607

  4. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." PMID:25726292

  5. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  6. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, RK

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  7. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  8. Pagetoid polyostotic fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Rashmi Maruti; Pathak, Jigna; Swain, Niharika; Mohanty, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign skeletal lesion occurring due to mutation of Gs α gene and involves one or multiple bones. We present a case of a 30-year-old female patient, with a 1-year history of swelling under her right eye that had gradually increased in size. Extraoral examination revealed a diffuse swelling extending anteroposteriorly from preauricular region to nasolabial fold, frontonasal region and superoinferiorly from zygoma to body of mandible, causing ipsilateral proptosis and contralateral deviation of nose. Intraoral examination showed obliteration of right upper and lower buccal vestibule. CT disclosed expansile lytic lesions involving multiple skull bones, jaws, sternum, rib and thoracic vertebrae. Histopathology displayed broad and interconnected trabeculae connected to the host bone exhibiting reversal lines resembling the mosaic pattern of Paget's disease. These features suggested pagetoid polyostotic FD. The patient underwent cosmetic recontouring and is under regular follow-up postoperatively. PMID:25969488

  9. Anal Dysplasia Screening

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review considered the role of the anal Pap test as a screening test for anal dysplasia in patients at high risk of anal SCC. The screening process is now thought to be improved with the addition of testing for the human papillomavirus (HPV) in high-risk populations. High-resolution anoscopy (a method to view the rectal area, using an anoscope, a lighted instrument inserted into the rectum) rather than routine anoscopy-guided biopsy, is also now considered to be the diagnostic standard. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Anal cancer, like cervical cancer, is a member of a broader group of anogenital cancers known to be associated with sexually transmitted viral HPV infection. Human papillomavirus is extremely prevalent, particularly in young, sexually active populations. Sexual practices involving receptive anal intercourse lead to significantly elevated risk for anal dysplasia and cancer, particularly in those with immune dysfunctions. Anal cancer is rare. It occurs at a rate of about 1 to 2 per 100,000 in the general population. It is the least common of the lower gastrointestinal cancers, representing about 4% of them, in contrast to colorectal cancers, which remain the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy. Certain segments of the population, however, such as HIV-positive men and women, other chronic immune-suppressed patients (e.g., after a transplant), injection drug users, and women with genital dysplasia /cancer, have a high susceptibility to anal cancer. Those with the highest identified risk for anal cancer are HIV-positive homosexual and bisexual men, at a rate of 70 per 100,000 men. The risk for anal cancer is reported to be increasing dramatically in HIV-positive males and females, particularly since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s. The introduction of effective viral therapy has been said to have transformed the AIDS epidemic in developed countries into a chronic

  10. Genetics Home Reference: frontonasal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Frontonasal dysplasia 3 KidsHealth from Nemours: Cleft Lip and Palate MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Head and Face Reconstruction ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Centers for Disease Control and ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: metatropic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a skeletal disorder characterized by short stature (dwarfism) with other skeletal abnormalities. The term "metatropic" is ... my area? Other Names for This Condition metatropic dwarfism metatropic dysplasia type 1 Related Information How are ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: osteoglophonic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... images. Premature fusion of certain bones in the skull (craniosynostosis) typically occurs in osteoglophonic dysplasia . The craniosynostosis ... in the medical literature as a tower-shaped skull , or a relatively mild version of a deformity ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: campomelic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a severe disorder that affects development of the skeleton, reproductive system, and other parts of the body. ... those that are important for development of the skeleton and reproductive organs. Most cases of campomelic dysplasia ...

  14. Guide to Understanding Fibrous Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is usually involved. It can also result in cranial nerve problems. If the temporal bone is affected, the ... paralysis or dizziness. However, any of our 12 cranial nerves can be involved with fibrous dysplasia. The more ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: craniometaphyseal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Craniofacial Association International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, UCLA National ... F, Sørensen ES, Kaartinen MT, McKee MD. Pyrophosphate inhibits mineralization of osteoblast cultures by binding to mineral, up-regulating osteopontin, and ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: acromicric dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACROMICRIC DYSPLASIA Sources for This Page Faivre L, Le Merrer M, Baumann C, Polak M, Chatelain P, ... or Free article on PubMed Central Klein C, Le Goff C, Topouchian V, Odent S, Violas P, Glorion ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: frontometaphyseal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowed limbs, an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), and abnormalities of the fingers and hands. Characteristic ... and genetic heterogeneity in frontometaphyseal dysplasia: severe progressive scoliosis in two families. Am J Med Genet A. ...

  18. Renal cell carcinoma arising in a regressed multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Rackley, R R; Angermeier, K W; Levin, H; Pontes, J E; Kay, R

    1994-11-01

    Controversy surrounds the management of multicystic dysplastic kidney. Recent advances in radiological imaging have resulted in a higher incidence of its detection, and they provide an accurate noninvasive means of diagnosis and followup. Consequently, the need for surgical removal of these lesions is being reevaluated. We report a case of renal cell carcinoma arising from solid renal dysplasia associated with a regressed multicystic dysplastic kidney. We emphasize the potential risk of nonoperative management of these lesions and further define the spectrum of malignant degeneration associated with renal dysplasia. PMID:7933196

  19. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-01-01

    ‘Acro-renal syndrome’ refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  20. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-04-01

    'Acro-renal syndrome' refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  1. Schimke immune-osseous dysplasia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Ashraf; Eid, Riham; Sarhan, Amr; Hammad, Ayman; El-Refaey, Ahmed Mahmoud; El-Mougy, Atef; Zedan, Mohammed Magdy; ElHusseini, Fatma

    2015-09-01

    Schimke immune-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spondylo-epiphyseal dysplasia (SED), progressive renal insufficiency beginning as steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and defective cellular immunity. This article reports a case from Egypt with a mild form of SIOD. A 14.5-year-old male patient presented with disproportionate short stature, SRNS (focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis), laboratory evidence of cellular immune deficiency and radiologic characteristics of SED. He died at the age of 16.5 years with bone marrow failure and severe pneumonia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of SIOD to be reported from Egypt. PMID:26354575

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

    PubMed

    Do, A Young; Kim, Jung-Sun; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mesoblastic nephroma is a rare renal tumor that is diagnosed during pregnancy and is associated with polyhydramnios, prematurity, and neonatal hypertension. Differential diagnoses include Wilms tumor, adrenal neuroblastoma, and other abdominal tumors. We report a case of congenital mesoblastic nephroma detected by prenatal ultrasonography as a large fetal renal mass with polyhydramnios at 32 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonography showed a 6×6-cm complex, solid, hyperechoic, round mass in the right kidney. At 35 weeks of gestation, the patient was admitted with preterm premature rupture of membranes and the baby was delivered vaginally. Postnatal ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a heterogeneous solid mass on the right kidney. At the end of the first week of life, a right nephrectomy was performed and subsequent pathological examination confirmed a cellular variant of congenital mesoblastic nephroma with a high mitotic count. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy was administered. The newborn was discharged in good condition. PMID:26430667

  3. Dentin Dysplasia in Notum Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Read, R W; Hansen, G M; Powell, D R; Kantaputra, P N; Zambrowicz, B; Brommage, R

    2016-07-01

    Secreted WNT proteins control cell differentiation and proliferation in many tissues, and NOTUM is a secreted enzyme that modulates WNT morphogens by removing a palmitoleoylate moiety that is essential for their activity. To better understand the role this enzyme in development, the authors produced NOTUM-deficient mice by targeted insertional disruption of the Notum gene. The authors discovered a critical role for NOTUM in dentin morphogenesis suggesting that increased WNT activity can disrupt odontoblast differentiation and orientation in both incisor and molar teeth. Although molars in Notum(-/-) mice had normal-shaped crowns and normal mantle dentin, the defective crown dentin resulted in enamel prone to fracture during mastication and made teeth more susceptible to endodontal inflammation and necrosis. The dentin dysplasia and short roots contributed to tooth hypermobility and to the spread of periodontal inflammation, which often progressed to periapical abscess formation. The additional incidental finding of renal agenesis in some Notum (-/-) mice indicated that NOTUM also has a role in kidney development, with undiagnosed bilateral renal agenesis most likely responsible for the observed decreased perinatal viability of Notum(-/-) mice. The findings support a significant role for NOTUM in modulating WNT signaling pathways that have pleiotropic effects on tooth and kidney development. PMID:26926082

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of frontonasal dysplasia with anterior encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Esmer, Aytul Çorbacıoğlu; Kalelioğlu, İbrahim; Kayserili, Hülya; Yüksel, Atıl; Has, Recep

    2013-01-01

    Frontonasal dysplasia is a rare congenital anomaly affecting the eyes, nose and forehead, and occurs sporadically in most of the cases. A 24-year-old woman was referred to our unit at 27 weeks gestation due to the preliminary diagnosis of encephalocele. The sagittal and axial sonography of the fetal face depicted a midline mass measuring 3.8 × 4.2 cm, projecting anteriorly between the fetal orbits and extending from the the upper aspects of the forehead to the nasal bridge, which was consistent with the frontal (anterior) encephalocele. There were prominent hypertelorism and two facial clefts, and the nostrils were extremely separated. Following genetic counseling, the couple requested termination of pregnancy. Fetal pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of frontonasal dysplasia and anterior encephalocele with no additional major malformation. The fetal karyotype was normal and no mutation in the ALX1 gene was found, excluding ALX1-related frontonasal dysplasia in the differential diagnosis. Fetuses with neural tube defect may suffer from associated syndromes and disorders, as with our case. The presence of frontonasal dyplasia should be considered when an anterior encephalocele is detected by ultrasonography. PMID:24592072

  5. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure. PMID:26704658

  6. Epidemiology of fibromuscular dysplasia: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shivapour, Daniel M; Erwin, Phillip; Kim, Esther Sh

    2016-08-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of medium sized arteries that has been described in multiple anatomic territories with a wide variety of manifestations (e.g. beading, stenosis, occlusion, aneurysm, or dissection). While the first case of FMD is thought to have been described over 75 years ago, the causes, natural history, and epidemiology of FMD in the general population remain incompletely understood. This article reviews important historical and contemporary contributions to the FMD literature that inform our current understanding of the prevalence and epidemiology of this important disorder. A particular focus is given to studies which form the basis for FMD prevalence estimates. Prevalence estimates for renal FMD are derived from renal transplant donor studies and sub-studies of clinical trials of renal artery stenting; however, it is unclear how well these estimates generalize to the overall population as a whole. Newer data are emerging examining the genetic associations and environmental interactions with FMD. Significant contributions to the understanding of FMD have come from the United States Registry for Fibromuscular Dysplasia; however, many unanswered questions remain, and future studies are required to further characterize FMD epidemiology in general populations and advance our understanding of this important disorder. PMID:27067138

  7. Dental and maxillofacial characteristics of six Japanese individuals with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Erika; Suda, Naoto; Baba, Yoshiyuki; Fukuoka, Hiroki; Ogawa, Takuya; Ohkuma, Mizue; Ahiko, Nozomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Tengan, Toshimoto; Shiga, Momotoshi; Tsuji, Michiko; Moriyama, Keiji

    2013-03-01

    Objective : Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome is a congenital anomaly characterized by ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly, cleft lip and palate, and lacrimal duct anomalies. Because this syndrome is frequently accompanied by a congenital lack of teeth, narrow palate, and malocclusion, comprehensive orthodontic intervention is required. Design : To highlight the specific dental and maxillofacial characteristics of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome, six Japanese individuals diagnosed with the syndrome are described here. Patients : The subjects consisted of two boys and four girls (age range, 6.0 to 13.9 years) diagnosed with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome by medical and dental specialists. Their conditions included ectodermal dysplasia (hypodontia, microdontia, enamel hypoplasia, and abnormalities in hair and nails), cleft lip and/or palate, and ectrodactyly. Cephalograms, panoramic x-rays, and dental casts were taken; systemic complications were recorded at the first visit to our dental hospital. Results : All individuals had severe oligodontia with 9 to 18 missing teeth. The missing teeth were mainly maxillary and mandibular incisors and second bicuspids, arranged in a symmetrical manner. Cephalometric analysis showed retruded and short maxilla due to cleft lip and/or palate. It is interesting that all individuals showed a characteristically shaped mandibular symphysis with a retruded point B. It is likely that this unusual symphyseal morphology is due to the lack of mandibular incisors. Conclusions : This study demonstrates the presence of severe oligodontia in the incisal and premolar regions and describes a characteristic maxillary and mandibular structure in Japanese individuals with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome. PMID:22236363

  8. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Overview What is congenital adrenal hyperplasia? Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH, is a disorder that affects the adrenal glands. The adrenal ...

  9. Epidermal nevus syndrome associated with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, CNS lipoma, and aplasia cutis.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Miguel; Aneiros, Angel; Monteagudo, Benigno; Santos-García, Diego; Suárez-Amor, Oscar; Ramírez-Santos, Aquilina

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal nevus syndrome is a rare congenital sporadic neurocutaneous disorder characterized by an epidermal nevus and various developmental abnormalities of the skin, eyes, nervous, cardiovascular and urogenital systems. We describe a patient with an extensive epidermal nevus associated with various organ abnormalities, particularly polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, central nervous system lipoma, and aplasia cutis. Our patient demonstrates the polymorphic spectrum of involvement in epidermal nevus syndrome. PMID:19951625

  10. Ureaplasma and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gancia, Paolo; Delogu, Antonio; Pomero, Giulia

    2014-03-01

    Advances in neonatal intensive care have greatly improved survival rates for children born in a very early stage of lung development (i.e. less than 26 weeks of gestation). In these premature babies, even low levels of oxygen and methods of minimally invasive ventilation may disrupt the growth of the distal airways, a condition described as "new" bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Ureaplasma infection can occur in utero or in the perinatal period in premature infants, in some of which the infection with these organisms triggers an important lung pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic response, and may increase the risk of developing BPD. The inflammation may be worsened by exposure to oxygen and mechanical ventilation. At present, clinical studies have not clarified the role of Ureaplasma in the pathogenesis of BPD and there is insufficient evidence to determine whether antibiotic treatment of Ureaplasma has influence on the development of BPD and its comorbidities. Future research in the context of well-designed and controlled clinical trials of adequate statistical power should focus on how to determine whether the treatment of Ureaplasma decreases lung inflammation, reduces rates of BPD, and improves long-term neurodevelopment. PMID:24709455

  11. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prashanth, S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. It is a genetic disorder affecting the development or function of the teeth, hair, nails and sweat glands. Depending on the particular syndrome ectodermal dysplasia can also affect the skin, the lens or retina of the eye, parts of the inner ear, the development of fingers and toes, the nerves and other parts of the body. Each syndrome usually involves a different combination of symptoms, which can range from mild to severe. The history and lessons learned from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) may serve as an example for unraveling of the cause and pathogenesis of other ectodermal dysplasia syndromes by demonstrating that phenotypically identical syndromes can be caused by mutations in different genes (EDA, EDAR, EDARADD), that mutations in the same gene can lead to different phenotypes and that mutations in the genes further downstream in the same signaling pathway (NEMO) may modify the phenotype quite profoundly. The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss the etiology, genetic review, clinical manifestations and treatment options of this hereditary disorder. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Prashanth S. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):197-202. PMID:25206167

  12. Ectodermal dysplasia: a genetic review.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Seema; Prashanth, S

    2012-09-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. It is a genetic disorder affecting the development or function of the teeth, hair, nails and sweat glands. Depending on the particular syndrome ectodermal dysplasia can also affect the skin, the lens or retina of the eye, parts of the inner ear, the development of fingers and toes, the nerves and other parts of the body. Each syndrome usually involves a different combination of symptoms, which can range from mild to severe. The history and lessons learned from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) may serve as an example for unraveling of the cause and pathogenesis of other ectodermal dysplasia syndromes by demonstrating that phenotypically identical syndromes can be caused by mutations in different genes (EDA, EDAR, EDARADD), that mutations in the same gene can lead to different phenotypes and that mutations in the genes further downstream in the same signaling pathway (NEMO) may modify the phenotype quite profoundly. The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss the etiology, genetic review, clinical manifestations and treatment options of this hereditary disorder. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Prashanth S. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):197-202. PMID:25206167

  13. Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia Associated with Undifferentiated Carcinoma and a Novel SMARCAL1 Mutation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Clinton; Badu-Nkansah, Akosua; Hunley, Tracy; Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Cortez, David; Frangoul, Haydar

    2013-01-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood with classical features of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, renal failure, and T cell immunodeficiency. SIOD has been associated with several malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma and osteosarcoma. About half of SIOD patients have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1). This gene encodes an annealing helicase and replication stress response protein that localizes to damage-stalled DNA replication forks. We report a child with SIOD and a novel S859P missense mutation in SMARCAL1 who developed undifferentiated carcinoma of the sinus. PMID:23630135

  14. Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity (Beighton type): A unique South African disorder.

    PubMed

    Honey, E M

    2016-01-01

    Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity (SEMD-JL) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia in which stunted stature, articular hypermobility and spinal malalignment are the major manifestations. Structural cardiac abnormalities are sometimes present. Approximately 30 affected children have been recognised previously in the Afrikaans-speaking community in South Africa, and in several, mutations in the B3GALT6 gene have been incriminated. In this article, case details of three additional affected children in two families are documented, and four additional families are mentioned. The Pierre-Robin sequence and unilateral renal agenesis are previously unreported concomitants. The mutational status where known is recorded. PMID:27245527

  15. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD. PMID:25497206

  16. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  17. The nature of fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia has been regarded as a developmental skeletal disorder characterized by replacement of normal bone with benign cellular fibrous connective tissue. It has now become evident that fibrous dysplasia is a genetic disease caused by somatic activating mutation of the Gsα subunit of G protein-coupled receptor resulting in upregulation of cAMP. This leads to defects in differentiation of osteoblasts with subsequent production of abnormal bone in an abundant fibrous stroma. In addition there is an increased production of IL-6 by mutated stromal fibrous dysplastic cells that induce osteoclastic bone resorption. PMID:19895712

  18. New patterns in genetic and congenital otonephropathies.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, L; Thompson, P; Wood, R P

    1979-02-01

    In a series of chronic renal and congenitally deaf patients 24 were identified as having inborn renal and otologic disease. Sixteen patients, representing 14 families, had genetic disorders. Only two had the features of Alport's syndrome. The patients were classified as follows: 1) Probable Alport's--2 patients (1 family); 2) Atypical hereditary nephritis and sensorineural hearing loss--7 patients; 3) Renal and inner ear anomalies--1 patient; 4) Renal, inner ear and multiple anomalies--4 patients. The temporal bone pathology in one case showed primary neural atrophy and a mild Mondini malformation. In another a Scheibe defect and unusual calcific structures were found in the cochlear duct. 5) Renal, external or middle ear and multiple anomalies--6 patients (5 families); 6 Renal, middle and inner ear anomalies and multiple anomalies--2 patients. A temporal bone obtained from one case showed combined middle and inner ear defects. In the other, who had a chromosome defect, predominantly middle ear anomalies were found. 7) Nephrotic syndrome and congenital hearing loss--1 patient; 8) Unclassified--1 patient. Some cases represent entities apparently not previously described. Probably most interesting is the delineation of hereditary nephritis and deafness distinct from Alport's disease. PMID:423658

  19. Antenatal diagnosis of renal duplication by ultrasonography: report on four cases at a referral center.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Edward Enéas D; Martins, Marília G; Rios, Lívia T; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Oliveira, Ricardo V; Nardozza, Luciano M; Moron, Antonio F

    2013-01-01

    Duplication of the renal collecting system is the commonest major congenital malformation of the urinary tract, with an incidence of 1% among live births. Antenatal diagnosing of renal duplication and an associated ureterocele is infrequent. We report four cases of prenatally diagnosed unilateral duplication of the renal collecting system. In two of them, the renal duplication was associated with an ectopic ureterocele. PMID:24469664

  20. Pediatric renal transplantation: 13 years of experience--report from the Chilean Cooperative Multicenter Group.

    PubMed

    Rosati, P; Pinto, V; Delucchi, A; Salas, P; Cano, F; Zambrano, P; Lagos, E; Rodriguez, E; Hevia, P; Ramirez, K; Quiero, X; Azócar, M; Rodriguez, S; Aguiló, J; Varela, M; Ferrario, M; Ramirez, R; Palacios, J M; Turu, I; Jimenez, O; Godoy, J; Gaete, J; Maluenda, X; Villegas, R

    2005-04-01

    Between 1989 and 2002, 178 renal transplants were performed in 168 pediatric patients in Chile. The mean age was 10.9 +/- 3.7 years (range 1 to 17.9). End-state renal disease etiologies were: congenital renal hypoplasia/dysplasia, chronic glomerulonephritis, and reflux nephropathy. Seventy received a graft from a living donor (LD), and 108 from a cadaveric donor (CD). Only 9% received antibody induction. Acute rejection episodes were reported in 76 patients: 38% in LD recipients and 48% in CD recipients (P = NS). One-, 3-, and 5-year graft survivals were 88%, 84%, and 76%, respectively, for LD and 86%, 79%, and 68% for CD recipients. Actuarial graft survival was significantly better among those patients with serum creatinine < 1 mg/dL at 1 year posttransplant compared with those with creatinine > 1 mg/dL (P < .05). The graft survival rate has improved from the first period (1989 to 1996) to the second period (1997 to 2002); (P = .05). Patient survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 98%, 98%, and 98%, respectively, for LD, and 95%, 94%, and 94% for CD. Global height/age Z-score decreased from -0.7 at birth to -1.5 when dialysis started, and to -2.4 at the time of transplantation. The Z-score height/age at 1, 3, and 5 years posttransplantation was -2.25, -2.24, and -2.5. No significant differences were observed in transplant outcomes comparing patients younger than 7 years with those older ones. In conclusion, pediatric renal transplant has been performed in Chile with acceptable morbidity. The patient and graft survivals are similar to the reported international experience. In the last period there was a significant improvement in graft survival. PMID:15866676

  1. Congenital neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Evans, A. R.

    1965-01-01

    The clinical histories and post-mortem findings in five cases of neuroblastoma are described, and an account given of the microscopic characteristics of the tumours. In four of the cases the tumour was present at birth and was probably so in the fifth case. In only one case was the presence of the malignant tumour a significant factor in causing death. The differential diagnosis of such tumours is discussed. The accumulated evidence of many recorded cases suggests that neuroblastoma, becoming manifest in the early months or weeks of life, and congenital tumour, would be included in such a group, and has an appreciably better prognosis than has this same tumour when it becomes manifest in later childhood. The literature is briefly reviewed to illustrate this aspect of prognosis and possible reasons for it are indicated. Images PMID:14247705

  2. Congenital Cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Walker, David; Shinners, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Congenital cholesteatoma is one of the more common causes of the onset of childhood conductive hearing loss unrelated to middle ear effusion. If undiagnosed, the disease can progress to irreversibly destroy the conductive hearing architecture, as well as the surrounding skull base of the lateral temporal bone. When diagnosed early, the growth can be removed and the conductive hearing mechanism preserved in the vast majority of patients. Because most children are asymptomatic, the burden falls on primary care providers to perform pneumatic otoscopy and visualize all quadrants of the tympanic membrane even in young children who frequently resist attempts to conduct a thorough examination to rule out suspicious lesions. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e167-e170.]. PMID:27171804

  3. Congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    For most people, music, like language, is acquired effortlessly in early life. But a few percent of the population have lifelong difficulties in the perception and production of music. In this chapter we discuss psycho-acoustic and behavioral studies that have attempted to delineate the nature of the auditory perceptual deficits in this group and consider whether these difficulties extend outside the musical domain. Finally, we review structural imaging studies in this group which point to subtle anomalies in temporal and frontal areas. We suggest that amusia can be considered a disorder of neural development, which has relatively specific consequences at the behavioral level. Studies of congenital amusia provide a unique window on the neurocognitive architecture of music processing. PMID:23622169

  4. Congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Pankaj; Philip, Rajeev; Saran, Sanjay; Gutch, Manish; Razi, Mohd Sayed; Agroiya, Puspalata; Gupta, Keshavkumar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the one of the most common preventable cause of mental retardation. In the majority of patients, CH is caused by an abnormal development of the thyroid gland (thyroid dysgenesis) that is a sporadic disorder and accounts for 85% of cases and the remaining 15% of cases are caused by dyshormonogenesis. The clinical features of congenital hypothyroidism are so subtle that many newborn infants remain undiagnosed at birth and delayed diagnosis leads to the most severe outcome of CH, mental retardation, emphasizing the importance of neonatal screening. Dried capillary blood is used for screening and it is taken from heel prick optimally between 2 and 5 days of age. Blood spot TSH or thyroxine (T4) or both are being used for CH screening in different programs around the world. Neonates with abnormal thyroid screening tests should be recalled immediately for examination and a venipuncture blood sample should be drawn for confirmatory serum testing. Confirmatory serum should be tested for TSH and free T4, or total T4. Serum TSH and T4 undergo dynamic changes in the first weeks of life; it is important to compare serum results with age-normal reference ranges. Treatment should be started promptly and infant should be rendered euthyroid as early as possible, as there is an inverse relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and the age at diagnosis. Levothyroxine (l-thyroxine) is the treatment of choice and American academy of pediatrics and European society of pediatric endocrinology recommend 10-15μgm/kg/day as initial dose. The immediate goal of therapy is to normalize T4 within 2 weeks and TSH within one month. The overall goal of treatment is to ensure growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes as close as possible to their genetic potential. PMID:25729683

  5. Genetics Home Reference: oculodentodigital dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Paznekas W, Seki A, Taffet S, Jabs EW, Delmar M, Musa H. Functional characterization of connexin43 mutations found in patients with oculodentodigital dysplasia. Circ Res. 2005 May 27;96(10):e83-91. Epub 2005 May 5. Citation on PubMed Vreeburg M, de Zwart-Storm EA, Schouten MI, Nellen RG, ...

  6. Ocular manifestations of frontonasal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Roarty, J D; Pron, G E; Siegel-Bartelt, J; Posnick, J C; Buncic, J R

    1994-01-01

    The ophthalmologic findings associated with frontonasal dysplasia have not been defined previously in a large series of untreated children. We reviewed the ophthalmic manifestations of a series of patients with frontonasal dysplasia who were seen as part of their craniofacial evaluation. All had undergone a complete ophthalmologic examination before any manipulation of either the orbits or the soft tissues of the orbital contents. From 1986 to 1991, 23 patients with frontonasal dysplasia were seen; ophthalmologic abnormalities were found in 20 (87 percent). Abnormalities included significant refractive errors, strabismus, nystagmus, and eyelid ptosis. Three patients had amblyopia, a treatable cause of visual loss, from strabismus or anisometropia. Ten eyes in seven patients (30 percent) had severe structural anomalies, such as optic nerve hypoplasia, optic nerve colobomas, microphthalmia, cataract, corneal dermoid, or inflammatory retinopathy, that resulted in an acuity of 20/100 or worse. The high incidence of ocular abnormalities indicates that early assessment by an ophthalmologist should be part of the initial evaluation of patients with frontonasal dysplasia to detect treatable visual or ocular problems. PMID:8278482

  7. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  8. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  9. Vojta method in the treatment of developmental hip dysplasia – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kiebzak, Wojciech; Żurawski, Arkadiusz; Dwornik, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Background Developmental dysplasia of the hip joint is one of the most common congenital defects and often results in functional and structural disorders. Such cases particularly demand optimizing therapeutic effects and maximally reducing the duration of therapy. Purpose The aim of this case report is to present the therapeutic process in a child with developmental hip dysplasia. Case report This is a case report of a female child with a birth weight of 2,800 g and an Apgar score of 9 points born to a gravida 3 para 3 mother at 37 weeks. The child was delivered by cesarean section, and the pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios. Subluxation of the left hip joint was diagnosed by an orthopedist in the third month of life. The treatment followed was the Vojta method (the first phase of reflex turning and reflex crawling). Results During the 6 weeks of the Vojta treatment, the left half of the femoral head was centralized, and the process of formation of the hip joint acetabulum was influenced effectively enough to change the acetabulum’s Graff type from the baseline D to IIb after 41 days of treatment. Conclusion The diagnostic work-up of congenital hip joint dysplasia should involve a physiotherapist who will investigate the child’s neuromuscular coordination, in addition to a neonatologist and a pediatrician. The therapy for a disorder of hip joint development of neuromotor origin should involve the application of global patterns according to Vojta. Children with congenital dysplasia of the hip joint should commence rehabilitation as early as possible. PMID:27578980

  10. [Renal failure and cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Correas, J-M; Joly, D; Chauveau, D; Richard, S; Hélénon, O

    2011-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases often are discovered at the time of initial work-up of renal failure through ultrasound or family history, or incidentally at the time of an imaging test. Hereditary diseases include autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD), tuberous sclerosis (TS) and medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD). Autosomal dominant PKD is characterized by large renal cysts developing in young adults. Renal failure is progressive and becomes severe around 50-60 years of age. Atypical cysts (hemorrhagic or hyperdense) are frequent on CT and MRI examinations. Imaging plays a valuable role in the management of acute complications such as cyst hemorrhage or infection. Autosomal recessive PKD is often detected in neonates, infants or young adults. It is characterized by renal enlargement due to the presence of small cysts and liver disease (fibrosis and biliary ductal dilatation). Late manifestation or slow progression of autosomal recessive PKD may be more difficult to distinguish from autosomal dominant PKD. These cystic kidney diseases should not be confused with non-hereditary incidental multiple renal cysts. In tuberous sclerosis, renal cysts are associated with angiomyolipomas and sometimes pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Renal failure is inconstant. Other hereditary cystic kidney diseases, including MCKD and nephronophtisis, are usually associated with renal failure. Non-hereditary cystic kidney diseases include multicystic renal dysplasia (due to complete pelvi-ureteric atresia or hydronephrosis), acquired multicystic kidney disease (chronic renal failure, chronic hemodialysis) and varied cystic kidney diseases (multicystic renal disease, glomerulocystic kidney disease, microcystic kidney disease). PMID:21549887