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Sample records for congenital renal dysplasia

  1. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a cause of renal dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Chan, Maren; Hecht, Jonathan L; Boyd, Theonia; Rosen, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most frequently encountered viral infections of the fetus and induces a wide range of histologic and clinical manifestations. Congenital abnormalities are typically restricted to the central nervous system despite evidence of CMV inclusions occurring in most epithelial cells. Although tissue injury and even glomerulonephritis have been observed in congenital CMV infections, renal multicystic dysplasia has not been reported. Herein, we describe a case of unilateral renal dysplasia in a 19-week fetus with concurrent CMV infection. We believe the present case to be the first description of a virus apparently inducing renal multicystic dysplasia. PMID:17638423

  2. Multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, V P; Ratnakar, K S

    2001-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia, the most common form of cystic renal disease in the newborn period, is a clinically important consequence of abnormal nephrogenesis. It usually presents as an abdominal mass. The dysplasias are usually unilateral, but it can be bilateral, segmental or focal. The clinical presentation usually depends on the extent of the dysplastic involvement and the degree of the associated urinary obstruction. Here, we present a case of histologically multicystic renal dysplasia, which is ?bilateral. The left kidney showed typical radiological, gross and histopathological features of multicystic dysplasia, but the right kidney showed only radiological features of dysplastic cystic kidney. PMID:11479648

  3. Transumbilical Multiport Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy for Congenital Renal Dysplasia in Children: Midterm Follow-Up from a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Hong; Qi, Teng; Li, Shuai; Pu, Jiarui; Cao, Guoqing; Tang, Shaotao; Zheng, Liduan; Tong, Qiangsong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical utility and efficiency of transumbilical multiport laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (TMLN) for the treatment of congenital renal dysplasia in children by analyzing consecutive cases from a single institution. Methods: Sixteen children underwent TMLN procedure due to dysplastic kidney between January 2010 and December 2011. The surgery was transperitoneally performed through three transumbilical incisions for two 5-mm and one 3-mm ports, which duplicated the standard laparoscopic steps with the usual laparoscopic instruments. Demographic, perioperative, and follow-up data were analyzed. Results: TMLN was performed in all patients, without additional ports or conversion to open surgery. The mean operation time was 108.4 min (range 90–125), and the blood loss was minimal. There were no severe intraoperative or post-operative complications. The post-operative recovery was uneventful in all patients. No urinary incontinence or umbilical hernias occurred. The cosmetic result was excellent as the incision scar was hidden inside the belly button. Conclusion: TMLN is a safe and efficient procedure for the management of congenital renal dysplasia in children with good cosmesis. Future randomized studies with a larger number of cases and a longer follow-up are warranted to elucidate the benefits and limitations of TMLN in children. PMID:24400291

  4. Multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with multicystic renal dysplasia, postaxial polydactyly and lumbosacral meningocoele. Difficulties in nosological classification and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Witters, I; Moerman, Ph; Natens, R; Van Assche, F A; Fryns, J P

    2002-01-01

    In this report we describe a 17 weeks old female fetus with a lumbosacral meningocoele, multicystic renal dysplasia (Potter type IIb) and postaxial polydactyly type A at the left hand and left foot. There was no hepatic fibrosis. Although multicystic renal dysplasia and postaxial polydactyly are often present in the Meckel syndrome, a lumbosacral neural tube defect is not a typical finding in this syndrome. PMID:12150214

  5. Increased expression of platelet-derived growth factor A and collagenous matrix proteins in congenital multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Liapis, H; Yu, H; Flath, A; Steinhardt, G F

    1997-01-01

    The expression of platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGF-A), and its spatial and temporal relationship to interstitial collagens in kidneys with congenital multicystic dysplasia using in situ hybridization, have been examined. Seventeen dysplastic kidneys (16 weeks to 7 months) and 20 normal age-matched controls were used in the study. Increased PDGF-A mRNA was detected in dysplastic compared to normal kidneys in all age groups including extensively fibrotic postnatal kidneys. An abundant PDGF-A mRNA signal was seen within the epithelial cells of cystically dilated or dysplastic tubules and within interstitial fibroblasts and disorganized primitive mesenchyme. A comparable amount of PDGF-A protein was detected by Western blotting. Procollagen I and III mRNA were increased in fibroblasts surrounding cystic and dysplastic tubules. We conclude that tubular epithelial production of PDGF-A may induce collagenous matrix production by adjacent fibroblasts, while marked up-regulation of PDGF-A by interstitial cells may be responsible for sustainable fibrogenic effects in the fetal kidney contributing to renal maldevelopment. PMID:9200407

  6. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments. PMID:26489825

  7. Renal dysplasia in boxers and Finnish harriers.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, A; Karlstam, E

    2000-09-01

    Puppies from two litters of dogs were found to have severe polyuria and polydipsia. Four of the dogs were investigated by means of clinical examination, haematological and biochemical analysis, and urinalysis. A modified water deprivation response test was also performed in two of the dogs. Renal changes on postmortem examination in three of the dogs were found to be consistent with renal dysplasia. A possible explanation for the finding of hyposthenuria and the extreme polyuria and polydipsia in association with renal dysplasia may be lack of response to antidiuretic hormone owing to anomalous maturation of the renal tubules. Six other puppies from the two litters of dogs did not show any clinical signs of polyuria and polydipsia, although postmortem examination in one of them also revealed renal dysplasia. The clinical features of renal dysplasia may therefore vary greatly between individuals. PMID:11023130

  8. Bilateral diffuse cystic renal dysplasia in a 9-day-old Thoroughbred filly

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Torres, Carlos E.; Hewson, Joanne; Stämpfli, Simon; Stalker, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    A 9-day-old Thoroughbred filly was presented for diarrhea and lethargy. Diagnostic test results were compatible with severe renal dysfunction. Diffuse cystic lesions of both kidneys were identified on ultrasonographic examination. Postmortem examination confirmed the presence of multiple renal cysts. Congenital nephropathy compatible with bilateral diffuse cystic renal dysplasia was diagnosed. PMID:24489392

  9. [Multicystic renal dysplasia and Wilms tumor].

    PubMed

    Muguerza, R; Martínez-Urrutia, M J; López Pereira, P; Picazo, L; Blesa, E; Jaureguizar, E

    1996-10-01

    We review a case of multicystic right dysplasia containing nodular renal blastema in a 3-year-old girl with left Wilms tumor. In relation to this finding the management of the asymptomatic multicystic dysplastic kidney in discussed. PMID:9131988

  10. The Good and Bad of β-Catenin in Kidney Development and Renal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Felix J.; Sarin, Sanjay; Evans, J. Colin; Bridgewater, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Congenital renal malformations are a major cause of childhood and adult onset chronic kidney disease. Identifying the etiology of these renal defects is often challenging since disruptions in the processes that drive kidney development can result from disruptions in environmental, genetic, or epigenetic cues. β-catenin is an intracellular molecule involved in cell adhesion, cell signaling, and regulation of gene transcription. It plays essential roles in kidney development and in the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. Here, we review the function of β-catenin during kidney development and in the genesis of renal dysplasia. PMID:26734608

  11. Fibromuscular Dysplasia Presenting with Bilateral Renal Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Doody, O.; Adam, W. R.; Foley, P. T.; Lyon, S. M.

    2009-03-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) describes a group of conditions which cause nonatheromatous arterial stenoses, most commonly of the renal and carotid arteries, typically in young women. We report a rare case of bilateral segmental renal infarction secondary to FMD in a young male patient. His initial presentation with loin pain and pyrexia resulted in a delay in the definitive diagnosis of FMD. He was successfully treated with bilateral balloon angioplasty. The delayed diagnosis in this patient until the condition had progressed to bilateral renal infarcts highlights the need for prompt investigation and diagnosis of suspected cases of FMD.

  12. Bilateral renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter in a septic neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Gilday, Rebecca A; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Tryon, Kimberly A; Lohmann, Katharina L

    2015-03-01

    A Canadian warmblood foal treated for septic polyarthritis was diagnosed with bilateral congenital renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter at 2 weeks of age based on abdominal ultrasound and postmortem examination. Intermittent abdominal pain throughout the course of treatment was attributed to hydronephrosis and hydroureter. PMID:25750445

  13. Bilateral renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter in a septic neonatal foal

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca A.; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Tryon, Kimberly A.; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    A Canadian warmblood foal treated for septic polyarthritis was diagnosed with bilateral congenital renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter at 2 weeks of age based on abdominal ultrasound and postmortem examination. Intermittent abdominal pain throughout the course of treatment was attributed to hydronephrosis and hydroureter. PMID:25750445

  14. Clinico-pathological profile of 22 cases of cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sompal; Gupta, Ruchika; Nigam, Sonu; Khurana, Nita; Aggarwal, Satish Kumar; Chaturvedi, K Uma; Mandal, Ashish Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysplasia is one of the major renal developmental anomaly characterized by abnormal structural organization and development of metanephric elements. It is usually detected antenatally or in early childhood. The kidney may be multicystic, aplastic, hypoplastic or duplex. We studied 22 cases of cystic renal dysplasia diagnosed over a period often years to identify the spectrum of morphological changes in dysplastic kidney, with special emphasis on mesenchymal changes. Clinical, radiological and gross morphologicalfeatures were noted. Microscopic features were studied in detail, including the epithelial and mesenchymal changes. Twenty-one of the 22 cases studied were children. One case was a 21-year-old adult, which is a rare age at presentation. Male to female ratio was 1.1:1. One of our patients had contra-lateral ureteric stenosis, a rare anomaly reported with renal dysplasia. Ten patients, all autopsy cases, had multi-system congenital anomalies. As cystic renal dysplasia is not a hereditary disease, it must be differentiated from polycystic kidney disease. Other differential diagnoses are cystic nephroma and cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma. Histopathological examination is the final diagnostic tool since radiological features alone may not be sufficient to exclude other cystic renal lesions. Cartilage may not be seen in all cases of renal dysplasia. Once diagnosed, other associated anomalies should also be looked for. PMID:17474245

  15. Optimal management of renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gottsäter, Anders; Lindblad, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory angiopathy of unknown cause affecting medium-sized (most commonly renal) arteries and causing renovascular hypertension. The most common medial multifocal type of FMD (with the “string of beads” appearance) is more than four times more prevalent in females than in males. FMD accounts for up to 10% of cases of renovascular hypertension. Compared with patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, patients with FMD are younger, have fewer risk factors for atherosclerosis, and a lower occurrence of atherosclerosis in other vessels. The etiology is multifactorial, including vessel wall ischemia and smoking, as well as hormonal and genetic factors. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography is still the gold standard for exclusion or confirmation of renal artery stenosis caused by FMD, at least in young patients, who more often have lesions in branches of the renal artery. For FMD patients with atherosclerosis and those who are older (>50–55 years), significant renal artery stenosis may be confirmed or excluded with ultrasonography. The FMD lesion is typically truncal or distal, whereas atherosclerotic lesions are more often proximal or ostial. Treatment options are medical, endovascular (percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty [PTRA]), and surgical. Invasive treatment should be considered when hypertension cannot be controlled with antihypertensive drugs and in patients with impaired renal function or ischemic nephropathy. PTRA has become the treatment of choice and normally yields good results, especially in unifocal disease and young patients. Pressure gradients are normally completely abolished, and there is no indication for stent placement. Surgical revascularization is indicated after PTRA complications; thrombosis, perforation, progressive dissection, repeated PTRA failure or restenosis. Centralization of handling is recommended. PMID:25114536

  16. Cystic dysplasia of the epididymis: a disorder of mesonephric differentiation associated with renal maldevelopment.

    PubMed

    Nistal, Manuel; González-Peramato, Pilar; Sousa, Grevelyn; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez, José Ignacio; Cajaiba, Mariana M

    2010-06-01

    The occurrence of congenital epididymal malformations with a cystic component has not been fully characterized. Most epididymal cysts occur later in life and are likely acquired. In addition, congenital malformations of the male excretory system are extremely uncommon in fetuses and neonates, and epididymal dysplastic changes have not been reported in these cases. In this study, we report 20 cases (including 19 fetal/neonatal autopsies and one surgical specimen from an older child) showing the same spectrum of histological findings in the epididymis, characterized by cystic ductal dilation with dysplastic ducts of variable diameters and irregular shapes, with ill-defined walls. Efferent ductules also showed dysplastic features. In addition, 18 cases had either renal and/or urinary tract anomalies, including renal dysplasia (eight), pelvicaliceal dilation (eight), renal agenesis (four) and hypoplasia (one), ureteral agenesis (two) and hypoplasia (one), urethra and bladder agenesis (two), prostate agenesis (two), and autosomal recessive polycystic renal disease (two). Our observations led to the recognition of a peculiar, not previously described congenital lesion of the epididymis, and we propose the term cystic dysplasia of the epididymis for this anomaly. Similar to what is observed in other male genital system anomalies (including malformations of the rete testis, vas deferens, and seminal vesicles), most lesions occurred in association with renal and/or urinary tract malformations, suggesting a spectrum of congenital malformations. The shared embryological origin of these structures may explain their simultaneous occurrence, possibly related to disrupted mesonephric duct development. PMID:20361206

  17. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia. PMID:17650728

  18. Histomorphology of renal dysplasia--an autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Nandita; Menon, Santosh; Radotra, B D

    2006-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of pediatric autopsies in the past 18 years was done with the aim of studying the histomorphology of renal dysplasia. Renal dysplasia comprised 150 (3.66%) of the 4,099 pediatric autopsies from 20 weeks of gestation to 1 year of life. Primitive ducts with the fibromuscular collar, the sine qua non of renal dysplasia, was seen in all cases. Lobar disorganization and cysts were seen in all cases except for the 7 cases of hypodysplasia. Other elements were seen in varying proportions: cartilage in 33.7%, bone in 1.08%, thickening of basement membrane of the primitive ducts in 64.13%, extramedullary hematopoiesis in 98.9%, nerve twigs in 72.8%, and nodular renal blastema in 2.17% cases. In unilateral multicystic dysplasia/renal agenesis, the contralateral kidney showed abnormalities in 44.45% and 47.37% of cases, respectively. PMID:16908457

  19. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN CAIRN TERRIERS WITH PRECLINICAL RENAL DYSPLASIA

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Gabriela S.; Rhodes, James; Cianciolo, Rachel; Casal, Margret L.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia is a hereditary disease characterized by abnormal differentiation of renal tissue. The ultrasonographic appearance of dysplastic canine kidneys has been reported in the late stage of the disease where inflammatory and degenerative changes are already present and the dogs are in chronic renal failure. In this study, we describe the ultrasonographic appearance of the kidneys of five related Cairn Terriers affected with renal dysplasia before the onset of clinical or laboratory evidence of renal failure. Common findings included poor corticomedullary definition and multifocal hyperechoic speckles in the renal medulla, or a diffusely hyperechoic medulla. Severity of ultrasonographic changes was related to the severity of histopathologic findings. The ability to detect dysplastic changes before clinical signs develop makes ultrasound a potentially useful screening method for canine renal dysplasia. PMID:20806879

  20. Ultrasonographic findings of renal dysplasia in cocker spaniels: eight cases.

    PubMed

    Felkai, C; Vörös, K; Vrabély, T; Vetési, F; Karsai, F; Papp, L

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study of eight young Cocker Spaniels aged 9-24 months was performed to describe the ultrasonographic findings of histologically confirmed renal dysplasia. Ultrasonography revealed kidneys of significantly (p < 0.001) reduced volume in all dogs. During qualitative evaluation, two different types of sonographic alterations could be seen. In one type of the ultrasound alterations, corticomedullary demarcation was distinct and the renal cortex was remarkably thin, which was best seen in the dorsal (frontal) imaging plane. In the other type of the ultrasound appearance, overall increased echogenicity with poor corticomedullary demarcation was noticed, and the kidneys could hardly be separated from their surroundings. These features were best recognised in the sagittal (coronal) imaging plane. In one dog with secondary hypercalcaemia, a hyperechoic corticomedullary area was also seen. Post-mortem histological diagnosis revealed renal dysplasia and secondary fibrosis. Based on ultrasound findings alone, renal dysplasia (renal familial disease) can be suspected when small kidneys with thin echogenic cortex are present in young dogs. An ultrasound image, similar to that of fibrotic kidneys (increased overall echogenicity and reduced corticomedullary definition) cannot be differentiated from chronic inflammatory disease and from end-stage kidneys. Therefore, ultrasound-guided biopsy or post-mortem histology is necessary for the definitive diagnosis of renal dysplasia. This is the first study reporting on the ultrasound appearance of renal dysplasia in Cocker Spaniel dogs. PMID:9557317

  1. Expression of laminin and fibronectin in renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Santosh; Kakkar, Nandita; Radotra, B D

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is a matter of debate. Recent theories have conceptualized the role of extracellular matrix proteins in the genesis of renal dysplasia. During normal nephrogenesis, collagen type I and III and fibronectins are lost and laminin and syndecan appear once proper induction has occurred. Any deviation from the normal pattern is said to lead to dysplasia. In this study, the expressions of adhesive glycoproteins, laminin, and fibronectin were studied immunohistochemically in 25 autopsy cases of renal dysplasia and normal age-matched control cases. These cases of renal dysplasia were categorized into 3 groups based on the period of gestation: 20 to 26 weeks, 27 to 33 weeks, and 34 to 40 weeks. The immunohistochemical findings were graded from 0 to 4+ based on the visual intensity. Chi-square analysis was used to calculate the difference in expressions of laminin and fibronectin in cases and controls as a whole and within and between age groups. Immunostaining for laminin in all age groups showed a significant difference in expression between dysplastic kidneys (less expression) and normal controls (greater expression). In the case of fibronectin expression, all but 1 group showed a significant difference, with dysplastic kidneys showing more and normal controls showing less expression. The inference derived is that laminin expression decreases and fibronectin expression increases in renal dysplasia compared with normal nephrogenesis. PMID:15630524

  2. Multicystic renal dysplasia in a Japanese black bull.

    PubMed

    Ushigaki, K; Uchida, K; Murakami, T; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S

    1999-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia was found in a 6-day-old Japanese black bull. Grossly, both kidneys were markedly small (2.0 x 3.5 cm) with numerous cysts ranging from 1 to 8 mm in diameter. Histopathologically, both kidneys consisted of many irregularly enlarged cysts, immature glomeruli, small ducts and anomalous stromal connective tissues containing focal persistent mesenchyme characterized by a proliferation of stellate cells with myxomatous area. These features are compatible with those of multicystic renal dysplasia in humans and other mammals. PMID:10458111

  3. Bilateral cystic dysplasia of the rete testis with renal adysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Harvey, Isabelle; Jovanovic, Mubina; Oligny, Luc L; Fournet, Jean-Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Cystic dyplasia of the rete testis (CDRT) is an uncommon, generally unilateral lesion characterized by anastomosing cystic spaces lined by a flattened simple cuboidal epithelium in the rete testis. In the literature this lesion often is associated with an ipsilateral urogenital lesion such as renal agenesia or multicystic dysplasia of the kidney, in order of frequency. The pathogenesis is explained by some authors by their common embryologic origin. We are reporting the finding of bilateral CDRT associated with ultrasound-diagnosed renal adysplasia in a 20-week gestational age fetus with oligohydramnios. Although CDRT has been referred to as being associated with multicystic renal dysplasia or renal agenesis, the present case appears to be unique in combining all the malformations together. PMID:16822083

  4. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity associated with intestinal neuronal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Berger, S; Ziebell, P; OFFsler, M; Hofmann-von Kap-herr, S

    1998-09-01

    A close relation between different forms of dysganglionosis such as intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) type B and aganglionosis has been established. No systematic analysis of other malformations and diseases accompanying IND has been made as yet. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity were analyzed in 109 patients with IND seen at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Mainz from 1977 to 1996. IND was associated with Hirschsprung's disease in 47 cases; 22 children with IND had other abdominal malformations, including anal atresia, rectal stenosis, sigmoidal stenosis, ileal atresia, pyloric stenosis, and esophageal atresia. A cystic bowel duplication, a choledochal cyst, and a persisting urachus were also found. Extra-abdominal malformations such as Down's syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, aortic stenosis, and malformations of vertebral bodies were seen. Twin siblings of children with IND were either healthy (n=3) or died in utero (n=1). Seventeen children with IND developed severe intra-abdominal complications during the perinatal period such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), meconium ileus, or bowel perforations. NEC was frequently associated with preterm birth. Bowel perforations were seen in mature and preterm newborns with IND. Taken together, IND is found in a variety of obstructive bowel diseases. This may support the hypothesis that IND is a secondary phenomenon or that congenital atresias and stenoses of the digestive tract have a pathogenesis similar to that of intestinal innervation disturbances. IND may also be a part of complex malformation patterns since it occurs with a number of extraintestinal and non-obstructive intestinal malformations. PMID:9716673

  5. Multicystic renal dysplasia detected by prenatal ultrasonography. Natural history and results of conservative management.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, A M; Anderson, P A; Williams, M P

    1992-05-01

    In a review of 44 infants with multicystic renal dysplasia diagnosed prenatally by ultrasonography, contralateral anomalies, bilateral disease and other non-urinary congenital anomalies were rare. In approximately two-thirds of infants the lesion was impalpable and in 2 cases involution had occurred prenatally. All but 5 were managed conservatively and without complications, and partial or complete involution of the lesion occurred in more than 50% during follow-up. It was concluded that the natural history of this anomaly is usually benign and that conservative management is advisable. PMID:1623386

  6. Pathology of renal dysplasia and bladder aplasia-hypoplasia in a flock of sheep.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, D; Jeffrey, M; Jones, T; Morgan, G; Green, R

    1993-10-01

    Congenital renal disease was detected in a flock of sheep in the English Midlands over 2 successive years (1982 and 1983). A Suffolk ram was removed from the flock and test mated to unrelated Suffolk ewes in another flock; 14 of the resulting 43 lambs born in 1984 had an identical congenital renal disease. Kidneys were examined microscopically from 60 clinically affected neonatal lambs. Kidneys from 7 of the 60 clinically affected neonatal lambs (1, 1983; 6, 1984) were examined ultrastructurally and compared with kidneys from 3 healthy unrelated neonatal lambs. Most affected lambs examined (52/60) had bilaterally small kidneys (< or = 2 g) with fine intracortical cysts and distinct cortical and medullary zones. Kidneys were either grossly normal (3/60 lambs) or multicystic and of normal size to markedly enlarged (5/60 lambs). The bladder was absent or vestigial in most lambs. Microscopically, poorly differentiated ("primitive") tubules were present in renal cortex and medulla. Proximal convoluted tubules, where present, were formed by epithelial cells with distinctive round weakly autofluorescent intracytoplasmic inclusions with the ultrastructural appearance of atypical lysosomes. Loops of Henle, distal convoluted tubules, and juxtaglomerular-peripolar cell complexes were largely absent. Glomerular changes were minimal. Cystic dilatation of nephrons was restricted to proximal convoluted tubules lined by vacuolated epithelium. This distinctive congenital renal dysplasia of sheep was most likely inherited as a dominant trait with complete penetrance. PMID:8286460

  7. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kim, Helen J.; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W.; Stevenson, David A.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  8. Multicystic renal dysplasia: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Kiran; Varshney, Manoranjan; Aziz, Mehar; Maheshwari, Veena; Basha, Mahfooz; Gaur, Kavita; Ghani, Imran

    2011-01-01

    A 3-year-old male child had left-sided abdominal lump for 4 months. Radiological examination revealed a cystic mass in the left kidney. A tentative diagnosis of multicystic nephroma was made on clinical and radiological examination. Cytology was inconclusive. Nephrectomy was done. A final diagnosis of multicystic dysplasia was made on histological examination. PMID:22696732

  9. [Renal dysplasia: clinico-pathologic review].

    PubMed

    Cunha, A S; de Sousa, J F; Garcia, C

    1992-05-01

    Histology records from 63 nephrectomies were reviewed; 22 patients had unilateral totally dysplastic kidneys and 5 had polar or segmental dysplasia. A clinicopathological study of these cases was undertaken. In the first group, there was a slight male preponderance and 75% of the patients presented were under two years of age. Urinary tract infection was the most common complaint. 4 patients were diagnosed in utero by ultrasound and 5 infants presented an abdominal mass. Hypertension was documented in a newborn baby. Ipsilateral lower urinary tract anomalies were found in 12 patients and those of the contralateral kidney in 2 children. There were 3 cases of extrarenal anomalies. Histological examination revealed 13 cases of multicystic dysplasia and 9 of solid dysplasia. Metaplastic cartilage was found in 1 case. In the group of segmental dysplasia, age ranging from 27 weeks' gestation to 8 years, at the time of the diagnosis. They all had duplex kidneys and 4 had ureterocele. Histological study in these cases was similar to the one found in the previous series, although superimposed inflammatory changes were more pronounced. Some of the theories regarding the pathogenesis of this disorder are reviewed and the importance of its diagnosis is emphasised. PMID:1502940

  10. Multicystic renal dysplasia: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Alam, Kiran; Varshney, Manoranjan; Aziz, Mehar; Maheshwari, Veena; Basha, Mahfooz; Gaur, Kavita; Ghani, Imran

    2011-01-01

    A 3-year-old male child had left-sided abdominal lump for 4 months. Radiological examination revealed a cystic mass in the left kidney. A tentative diagnosis of multicystic nephroma was made on clinical and radiological examination. Cytology was inconclusive. Nephrectomy was done. A final diagnosis of multicystic dysplasia was made on histological examination. PMID:22696732

  11. Surgical Treatment of Renal Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Child.

    PubMed

    Hoksbergen, Arjan W J; Renwarin, Lennaert; Wisselink, Willem

    2015-01-01

    During a routine checkup in a 10-year-old male with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, blood pressure of 180/120 mmHg was found. Physical examination was completely normal. Ultrasound examination showed poststenotic dilatation of the left renal artery which was confirmed by CT-angiography showing a short, high grade stenosis of the left renal artery. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of the stenosis was not successful and therefore the stenosis was excised with reimplantation of the renal artery in the aorta. Pathological examination of the excised segment showed media-type Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD). Six years after surgery, the kidney is completely normal regarding size and function. There are no signs of restenosis of the left renal artery. Nevertheless, the hypertension remained although less severe and requiring less medication. PMID:26078908

  12. Surgical Treatment of Renal Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Child

    PubMed Central

    Hoksbergen, Arjan W. J.; Renwarin, Lennaert; Wisselink, Willem

    2015-01-01

    During a routine checkup in a 10-year-old male with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, blood pressure of 180/120 mmHg was found. Physical examination was completely normal. Ultrasound examination showed poststenotic dilatation of the left renal artery which was confirmed by CT-angiography showing a short, high grade stenosis of the left renal artery. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of the stenosis was not successful and therefore the stenosis was excised with reimplantation of the renal artery in the aorta. Pathological examination of the excised segment showed media-type Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD). Six years after surgery, the kidney is completely normal regarding size and function. There are no signs of restenosis of the left renal artery. Nevertheless, the hypertension remained although less severe and requiring less medication. PMID:26078908

  13. The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. II. The significance of lateral and medial ectopy of the ureteric orifice.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R D; Stephens, F D; Cussen, L J

    1981-09-01

    Renal hypoplasia and dysplasia may be primary malformations linked to a panureteric bud deformity or result from damage to the developing nephrons caused by abnormal urodynamic pressures, Kidneys with misplaced ureteric orifices were graded, according to histologic criteria, on the hypodysplasia scale. With lateral ectopy of the ureteric orifices with and without congenital urethral obstruction, the grades correlated with specific orifice positions. The grades of kidneys with caudal ectopy of the ureters indicated a more general correlation. Dysgenesis of the bud and nephrogenic mesenchyme may account for the renal hypodysplasia when the ureteric orifice is found to be ectopic. PMID:7275560

  14. Bilateral renal dysplasia, nephroblastomatosis, and bronchial stenosis. A new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria Matilde; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Whittington, Elizabeth E

    2015-06-01

    Bilateral nephroblastomatosis (NB) is an uncommon renal anomaly characterized by multiple confluent nephrogenic rests scattered through both kidneys, with only a limited number of cases reported in the medical literature. Some of these children may have associated either Perlman or Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and others do not demonstrate syndromic features. We report a full-term boy with anteverted nose, bilateral bronchial stenosis due to lack of cartilage, bilateral obstructive renal dysplasia and NB with glomeruloid features. The infant had visceromegaly, but neither gigantism nor hemihypertrophy. Immunohistochemistry for PAX2 (Paired box gene-2) and WT-1 (Wilms Tumor 1) were strongly positive in the areas of NB. GLEPP-1 (Glomerular Epithelial Protein) did not stain the areas of NB with a glomeruloid appearance, but was positive in the renal glomeruli as expected. We found neither associated bronchial stenosis nor the histology of NB resembling giant glomeruli in any of the reported cases of NB. PMID:25871299

  15. Bilateral Renal Dysplasia, Nephroblastomatosis, and Bronchial Stenosis. A New Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Maria Matilde; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Whittington, Elizabeth E.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral nephroblastomatosis (NB) is an uncommon renal anomaly characterized by multiple confluent nephrogenic rests scattered through both kidneys, with only a limited number of cases reported in the medical literature. Some of these children may have associated either Perlman or Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome and others do not demonstrate syndromic features. We report a full-term boy with anteverted nose, bilateral bronchial stenosis due to lack of cartilage, bilateral obstructive renal dysplasia and NB with glomeruloid features. The infant had visceromegaly, but neither gigantism nor hemihypertrophy. Immunohistochemistry for PAX2 (Paired box gene-2) and WT-1 (Wilms Tumor 1) were strongly positive in the areas of NB. GLEPP-1 (Glomerular Epithelial Protein) did not stain the areas of NB with a glomeruloid appearance, but was positive in the renal glomeruli as expected. We found neither associated bronchial stenosis nor the histology of NB resembling giant glomeruli in any of the reported cases of NB. PMID:25871299

  16. [Potter sequence in a neonate with bilateral renal dysplasia with genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Dyrek, I; Gajda, B; Osuch-Jaczewska, R; Gruszka, L; Mocny, J; Gaida, H; Trzesiok, K; Pogorzelec, B; Pilch-Kucia, H; Mańka, B

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe a neonate with Potter sequence due to bilateral renal dysplasia and discuss its genetic implications. Although this congenital anomaly of the kidneys may occur sporadically, it is now accepted that this condition has an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with a penetrance of 50-90% and variable expression. Potter sequence is not compatible with extrauterine life; therefore, in case of maternal oligohydramnios, ultrasound should be performed in the second trimester in order to make a prenatal diagnosis, as well as to permit genetic counseling. As Potter sequence is frequently associated with clinically silent anomalies of the kidneys, ultrasound examination of the kidneys and urinary tract should also be performed in all family members. PMID:11436690

  17. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia–renal agenesis–cervicothoracic somite dysplasia): a rare cause of primary amenorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    The agenesis of the Müllerian duct is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhoea after Turner syndrome. The abnormal development of Müllerian duct often associates with the urinary tract and skeletal abnormalities. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia–renal agenesis–cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association is a unique and rare developmental disorder with four common features of uterine hypoplasia or aplasia, renal agenesis or ectopy, vertebral anomalies and short stature. We report a case of young female with primary amenorrhoea. She had well-developed secondary sexual characteristics along with multiple congenital developmental abnormalities such as the absence of uterus, ectopic kidney, cervical vertebral fusion, hemivertebrae, scoliosis, cervical rib, facial asymmetry and growth retardation. Our case highlights the rarity and clinical importance of this syndrome. For the evaluation of primary amenorrhoea in a female with well-developed secondary sexual characteristics, congenital anomalies should be ruled out before hormone and karyotype analyses. PMID:27099773

  18. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia-renal agenesis-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia): a rare cause of primary amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Shruti

    2016-04-01

    The agenesis of the Müllerian duct is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhoea after Turner syndrome. The abnormal development of Müllerian duct often associates with the urinary tract and skeletal abnormalities. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia-renal agenesis-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association is a unique and rare developmental disorder with four common features of uterine hypoplasia or aplasia, renal agenesis or ectopy, vertebral anomalies and short stature. We report a case of young female with primary amenorrhoea. She had well-developed secondary sexual characteristics along with multiple congenital developmental abnormalities such as the absence of uterus, ectopic kidney, cervical vertebral fusion, hemivertebrae, scoliosis, cervical rib, facial asymmetry and growth retardation. Our case highlights the rarity and clinical importance of this syndrome. For the evaluation of primary amenorrhoea in a female with well-developed secondary sexual characteristics, congenital anomalies should be ruled out before hormone and karyotype analyses. PMID:27099773

  19. Spectrum of pediatric developmental and genetic renal lesions and associated congenital malformations--an autopsy study from north India.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Nandita; Menon, Santosh; Radotra, B D

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric developmental and genetic renal lesions are a known cause of mortality in the perinatal/neonatal period. These lesions are associated with a wide range of extrarenal congenital malformations that influence the outcome of the patients. In this autopsy study, we have analyzed the spectrum of pediatric developmental and genetic renal lesions and their associated congenital malformations. A total of 4,099 autopsies (20 weeks of gestation to 1 year of life) were reviewed, of which 158 cases (3.85%) of pediatric developmental (143 cases) and genetic renal lesions (15 cases) were found. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was the commonest genetic lesion. Primitive ducts with cuffing of immature mesenchyme--the sine qua non of renal dysplasia--was found in all cases of dysplasia. Associated congenital malformations were seen in all cases and thus a thorough search for them is mandatory. Ductal plate malformation was found in all cases of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and in 1 case of bilateral multicystic dysplasia. PMID:16754487

  20. Congenital generalised bone dysplasias: a clinical, radiological, and epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P E; Hauge, M

    1989-01-01

    The point prevalence at birth of generalised bone dysplasias was estimated by a study of all children born between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1983 in the county of Fyn (Denmark). Additionally the population prevalence on 31 December 1983 of all patients with generalised bone dysplasias in this county was determined. The county is a well defined, representative subregion of Denmark which demographically comprises a cross section of about 9% of the Danish population. In total, bone dysplasias were found to be more frequent than generally assumed. Achondroplasia was, however, less common with a point prevalence at birth of 1.3 per 100,000, while osteogenesis imperfecta (21.8), multiple epiphyseal dysplasia tarda (9.0), achondrogenesis (6.4), osteopetrosis (5.1), and thanatophoric dysplasia (3.8) were found more frequently. It is striking how many bone dysplasias are still erroneously classified as achondroplasia. Correct diagnosis is important for a valid prognosis, for treatment, and for genetic counselling. The diagnosis relies almost exclusively on the radiographical findings. PMID:2783977

  1. The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. I. Quantification of hypoplasia and dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R D; Stephens, F D; Cussen, L J

    1981-09-01

    In order to assess the relative effects of abnormal ureteric orifice position and abnormal urodynamics on the morphogenesis of hypoplasia and dysplasia in kidneys obtained from infants, we devised a method of quantifying the renal structures. The method was based on radial glomerular counts which ranged from zero to normal (seven to nine), a score for dysplastic structures, and the ratio of normal to abnormal tissues present. These three values, when plotted against each other, correlated closely. The glomerular count, with occasional minor adjustment for inconsistencies, was the best parameter of hypodysplasia. Severe to moderate grades of hypodysplasias fell in the low and middle ranges and hypoplasia through to normal in the highest range. By grading kidneys in this way, we were able to compare the effects of ureteral ectopy and abnormal urinary dynamics on the developing kidney. PMID:7024184

  2. Fibromuscular Dysplasia-Related Renal Artery Stenosis Associated with Aneurysm: Successive Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serter, Selim Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memis, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease. FMD of the renal arteries is one of the leading causes of curable hypertension. The simultaneous occurrence of FMD and renal artery aneurysm has been described previously. In this case, we present a fibrodysplastic lesion and an aneurysm in a renal artery treated with a percutanous transluminal angioplasty and coil embolization.

  3. Stromal β-catenin overexpression contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Felix J; Sarin, Sanjay; Dabas, Pari; Karolak, Michele; Oxburgh, Leif; Bridgewater, Darren

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysplasia, the leading cause of renal failure in children, is characterized by disrupted branching of the collecting ducts and primitive tubules, with an expansion of the stroma, yet a role for the renal stroma in the genesis of renal dysplasia is not known. Here, we demonstrate that expression of β-catenin, a key transcriptional co-activator in renal development, is markedly increased in the expanded stroma in human dysplastic tissue. To understand its contribution to the genesis of renal dysplasia, we generated a mouse model that overexpresses β-catenin specifically in stromal progenitors, termed β-cat(GOF-S) . Histopathological analysis of β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed a marked expansion of fibroblast cells surrounding primitive ducts and tubules, similar to defects observed in human dysplastic kidneys. Characterization of the renal stroma in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed altered stromal cell differentiation in the expanded renal stroma demonstrating that this is not renal stroma but instead a population of stroma-like cells. These cells overexpress ectopic Wnt4 and Bmp4, factors necessary for endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Characterization of the renal vasculature demonstrated disrupted endothelial cell migration, organization, and vascular morphogenesis in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice. Analysis of human dysplastic tissue demonstrated a remarkably similar phenotype to that observed in our mouse model, including altered stromal cell differentiation, ectopic Wnt4 expression in the stroma-like cells, and disrupted endothelial cell migration and vessel formation. Our findings demonstrate that the overexpression of β-catenin in stromal cells is sufficient to cause renal dysplasia. Further, the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is one of disrupted stromal differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time the contribution of stromal β-catenin overexpression to the genesis of renal

  4. Congenital anomalies in the teratological collection of Museum Vrolik in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. II: Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Oostra, R J; Baljet, B; Dijkstra, P F; Hennekam, R C

    1998-05-01

    The Museum Vrolik collection of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology of the University of Amsterdam, founded by Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859) and his son Willem Vrolik (1801-1863), consists of more than five thousand specimens of human and animal anatomy, embryology, pathology, and congenital anomalies. Recently, the collection of congenital anomalies was recatalogued and redescribed according to contempory syndromological views. The original descriptions, as far as preserved, were compared with the clinical and radiographical findings. In 18 specimens the following skeletal dysplasias were diagnosed: achondrogenesis, achondroplasia, Blomstrand chondrodysplasia, Majewski syndrome, osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, osteogenesis imperfecta type I, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, and thanatophoric dysplasia with and without cloverleaf skull. Radiography did not yield a diagnosis in 4 specimens. The use of additional diagnostical techniques, such as MRI and CT scanning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in these specimens, is currently being investigated. PMID:9605285

  5. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  6. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III). PMID:27512242

  7. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  8. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  9. Placental Insufficiency Associated with Loss of Cited1 Causes Renal Medullary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Duncan B.; Boyle, Scott C.; Sams, Rebecca S.; Mazuruk, Bogdan; Zhang, Li; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that placental insufficiency affects embryonic patterning of the kidney and leads to a decreased number of functioning nephrons in adulthood; however, there is circumstantial evidence that placental insufficiency may also affect renal medullary growth, which could account for cases of unexplained renal medullary dysplasia and for abnormalities in renal function among infants who had experienced intrauterine growth retardation. We observed that mice with late gestational placental insufficiency associated with genetic loss of Cited1 expression in the placenta had renal medullary dysplasia. This was not caused by lower urinary tract obstruction or by defects in branching of the ureteric bud during early nephrogenesis but was associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and increased apoptosis in the expanding renal medulla. Loss of placental Cited1 was required for Cited1 mutants to develop renal dysplasia, and this was not dependent on alterations in embryonic Cited1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that renal medullary dysplasia in Cited1 mutant mice is a direct consequence of decreased tissue oxygenation resulting from placental insufficiency. PMID:19297558

  10. Partial Renal Embolization for Pediatric Renovascular Hypertension Secondary to Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Ishijima, Hideyuki; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minako; Ito, Kazuto; Endo, Keigo

    1997-09-15

    We report a 7-year-old boy with renovascular hypertension showing multiple stenoses and microaneurysms of the dorsal branch of the left renal artery caused by fibromuscular dysplasia. Hypertension was successfully treated with transcatheter alcohol and gelatin sponge embolization of the dorsal branch and its distribution. The vertebral branch remained intact. No severe complication was encountered. Loss of renal function by renal scintigraphy was minimal. The patient remains asymptomatic at 1 year.

  11. Renal Artery Stenosis in a Young Female without Fibromuscular Dysplasia with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Paloma; Cholankeril, Matthew; Goldberg, Daniel; Koneru, Jayanth; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is rare in young patients without fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). RAS is primarily classified as having two major etiologies, namely, atherosclerosis and FMD, with 90% and 10%, respectively. We report a case of a female in her mid 20s who developed hypertension due to RAS with no evidence of FMD or underlying renal dysfunction and underwent successful angioplasty and stenting. PMID:27398034

  12. Ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia clefting (EEC) syndrome: a rare cause of congenital lacrimal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Elmann, Solly; Hanson, Sarah A; Bunce, Christopher N; Shinder, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with a medical history significant for ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia clefting (EEC) syndrome was referred for evaluation of congenital left-sided epiphora. The patient had undergone successful right external dacryocystorhinostomy at age 5 to treat congenital right-sided epiphora. On examination, several ocular anomalies were noted, including absence of the upper eyelid puncta, absence of the left inferior punctum, a left lacrimal fistula opening at the left caruncle, increased left tear lake, bilateral hypoplastic meibomian glands, mild conjunctival injection, and thin eyelid cilia and brow hair. Systemic findings included cleft lip and palate status-post repair, ectrodactyly of the hands and feet, adontia and microdontia, a pointed nose, and lightly pigmented, dry hair and skin. The patient underwent examination under anesthesia and left conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy with insertion of a Jones tube with resolution of lacrimation postoperatively. To the authors' knowledge, this is the second report detailing management of congenital lacrimal anomalies in EEC syndrome, and the first describing management of punctal atresia with conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy and Jones tube placement. PMID:24801258

  13. Congenital renal tumor: metanephric adenoma, nephrogenic rest, or malignancy?

    PubMed

    Yin, Minzhi; Cai, Jiaoyang; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2015-01-01

    We report a renal tumor detected by prenatal ultrasound and resected at 2 months of age. This 9-cm, solid mass was composed of tubular and papillary structures lined by small, uniform epithelial cells. There was local invasion into renal parenchyma and a tumor deposit in a hilar lymph node. The tumor was immunopositive for WT1, pankeratin, and CD10; focally positive for CK7; and negative for EMA and TFE3. Based on morphology and immunophenotype, the favored diagnosis was metanephric adenoma over Wilms tumor, renal cell carcinoma, and nephrogenic rest. However, metanephric adenoma only occasionally occurs in children and has never been reported prenatally. Alternatively, this tumor might be a congenital Wilms tumor that differentiated completely. Although the nature of the tumor remains unconfirmed, resection appears to have been curative; the patient remains disease-free 18 months following surgery alone. PMID:25734608

  14. Congenital Seminal Vesicle Cyst Associated with Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Soo; Rim, Joung Sik

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A seminal vesicle cyst in combination with ipsilateral renal agenesis is rarely encountered. We present cases of this disease entity with symptoms, which were treated with a laparoscopic approach as a minimally invasive surgical treatment. Materials and Methods We experienced 4 patients with seminal vesicle cysts and ipsilateral renal agenesis. The mean age was 45.8 years. Chief complaints were perineal pain and hematospermia. Seminal vesicle cysts and remnant ureters were excised by laparoscopic surgery with transperitoneal approaches. Results The mean operative time was 133.8 minutes. The mean hospital stay was 6.8 days. There were no operative complications or transfusions. Conclusion In our report, patients of congenital seminal vesicle cyst associated with renal agenesis are presented. Laparoscopy is considered a minimal invasive management of these combined anomalies, providing a good image and an easy approach. PMID:19718406

  15. Nodular renal blastoma in kidney with multicystic dysplasia. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Corsi, A; Boldrini, R; Caione, P; Bosman, C

    1995-04-01

    The clinico-pathologic association of nodular renal blastema, multicystic kidney and obstructive uropathy has been recently identified. We report on a female patient diagnosed as having unilater multicystic dysplasia by prenatal ultrasonography. The patient was nephrectomized at the age of 6 1/2 months. Examination of the resected kidney revealed multiple unilocular cysts in the cortex and hypoplasia of the homolateral ureter; histological study confirmed the presence of multiple cysts limited to the renal cortex, and revealed, among them, multiple cortical metanephric blastema cells islands. Our case supports a relationship between nodular renal blastema, cortical cysts and obstructive uropathy; ureter hypoplasia could cause intraluminal back pressure, with consequent abnormal development of the ampullae, normally endowed in nephronic anlagens induction, cystic tubular ectasia and persistence of nodular renal blastema. The peripheral location of renal nodular blastema and cysts supports a late error in nephrogenesis, at the time of formation of the last generation of nephrons. PMID:8532415

  16. Renal dysplasia in infants: appearance on 99mTc DMSA scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Roach, P J; Paltiel, H J; Perez-Atayde, A; Tello, R J; Davis, R T; Treves, S T

    1995-01-01

    Infantile renal dysplasias, including multicystic dysplastic kidneys (MCDK), are reported rarely to accumulate radiopharmaceuticals on renal scintigraphy. 99mTc DMSA is a highly sensitive tracer for detecting functioning renal cortical tissue and may be more suited to studying renal dysplasia than 99mTc DTPA. We reviewed the ultrasound studies and 99mTc DMSA scintigrams of 42 infants (age range 1-12 months) with known or suspected MCDK. Overall, uptake on 99mTc DMSA scintigraphy was evident in 6/41 (15%) dysplastic kidneys. Of the 18 patients who underwent nephrectomy, histopathological examination revealed that uptake correlated closely with the presence of mature renal cortical tissue in the affected kidney. Our study shows that a small, but significant number of MCDK will show low-grade uptake on DMSA scintigraphy. This finding may be relevant given the reliance placed on renal scintigraphy in planning treatment for infants with suspected MCDK, particularly with the increasing trend for the non-operative management of this condition. PMID:7491206

  17. PGM3 Mutations Cause a Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation with Severe Immunodeficiency and Skeletal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Backe, Paul H.; Sorte, Hanne S.; Mørkrid, Lars; Chokshi, Niti Y.; Erichsen, Hans Christian; Gambin, Tomasz; Elgstøen, Katja B.P.; Bjørås, Magnar; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Krüger, Marcus; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Patel, Ankita; Raymond, Kimiyo M.; Sasa, Ghadir S.; Krance, Robert A.; Martinez, Caridad A.; Abraham, Shirley M.; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Hall, Patricia; Forbes, Lisa R.; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Nishimura, Gen; Rustad, Cecilie F.; Abrahamsen, Tore G.; Rønnestad, Arild; Osnes, Liv T.; Egeland, Torstein; Rødningen, Olaug K.; Beck, Christine R.; Boerwinkle, Eric A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.; Lausch, Ekkehart; Hanson, I. Celine

    2014-01-01

    Human phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3) catalyzes the conversion of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc)-6-phosphate into GlcNAc-1-phosphate during the synthesis of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-GlcNAc, a sugar nucleotide critical to multiple glycosylation pathways. We identified three unrelated children with recurrent infections, congenital leukopenia including neutropenia, B and T cell lymphopenia, and progression to bone marrow failure. Whole-exome sequencing demonstrated deleterious mutations in PGM3 in all three subjects, delineating their disease to be due to an unsuspected congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). Functional studies of the disease-associated PGM3 variants in E. coli cells demonstrated reduced PGM3 activity for all mutants tested. Two of the three children had skeletal anomalies resembling Desbuquois dysplasia: short stature, brachydactyly, dysmorphic facial features, and intellectual disability. However, these additional features were absent in the third child, showing the clinical variability of the disease. Two children received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of cord blood and bone marrow from matched related donors; both had successful engraftment and correction of neutropenia and lymphopenia. We define PGM3-CDG as a treatable immunodeficiency, document the power of whole-exome sequencing in gene discoveries for rare disorders, and illustrate the utility of genomic analyses in studying combined and variable phenotypes. PMID:24931394

  18. Diagnosis of rare association of orthotopic multicystic dysplasia with crossed fused renal ectopia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Linnan; Koshy, June; Spevak, Melissa R; Benson, Jane E; Bosemani, Thangamadhan

    2014-01-01

    Orthotopic multicystic dysplastic kidney with crossed fused ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly. This congenital anomaly may give an appearance of a solitary kidney morphology during the initial imaging evaluation. A solitary kidney should be carefully evaluated for the presence of duplication, horseshoe configuration, or crossed renal ectopy. Vesicoureteral reflux is a common finding associated with a multicystic dysplastic kidney. We present an infant with an orthotopic multicystic dysplastic kidney and an inferiorly placed crossed fused ectopic kidney. The presence of a complex congenital anomaly may warrant further evaluation with cross-sectional imaging to depict the anatomy and structure. PMID:24839577

  19. Diagnosis of Rare Association of Orthotopic Multicystic Dysplasia with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Linnan; Koshy, June; Spevak, Melissa R.; Benson, Jane E.; Bosemani, Thangamadhan

    2014-01-01

    Orthotopic multicystic dysplastic kidney with crossed fused ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly. This congenital anomaly may give an appearance of a solitary kidney morphology during the initial imaging evaluation. A solitary kidney should be carefully evaluated for the presence of duplication, horseshoe configuration, or crossed renal ectopy. Vesicoureteral reflux is a common finding associated with a multicystic dysplastic kidney. We present an infant with an orthotopic multicystic dysplastic kidney and an inferiorly placed crossed fused ectopic kidney. The presence of a complex congenital anomaly may warrant further evaluation with cross-sectional imaging to depict the anatomy and structure. PMID:24839577

  20. Morphological and functional analyses of two infants with obstructive renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kenichiro; Sekine, Takashi; Nishimura, Riki; Kanamori, Yutaka; Yanagisawa, Atsuhiro; Sakai, Kiyohide; Nagata, Michio; Igarashi, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Renal dysplasia associated with urinary tract obstruction comprises two distinct phenotypes, i.e., multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) and obstructive renal dysplasia (ORD). MCDK is a common manifestation in infants with renal dysplasia, which is characterized by multiloculated thin-walled cysts with no functional parenchyma and an atretic ureter owing to pyelocalyceal occlusion early in fetal life. In contrast, ORD is an extremely rare condition which is caused by severe obstruction of the distal ureter or urethra. Here, we report two infants with ORD. Both patients manifested unilateral kidney enlargement with multiple cortical cysts, mild hydronephrosis, and marked dilatation of the ipsilateral ureter. Contralateral kidneys and urinary tracts revealed no apparent radiological abnormalities. Serial ultrasonographic studies of fetal and neonatal kidneys in both cases revealed that ureteral dilatation was evident at gestational week 16 and 27, respectively, and most of the cortical cysts disappeared within 1-3 months after birth. The functions of the affected kidneys were severely impaired but evident at the time of birth. These manifestations were consistent with a diagnosis of ORD, and were distinct from the features of MCDK. Our observation of fetal and infantile kidneys in these two cases provides us with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of ORD. PMID:21455661

  1. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF binding protein gene expression in multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Matsell, D G; Bennett, T; Armstrong, R A; Goodyer, P; Goodyer, C; Han, V K

    1997-01-01

    Multicystic dysplastic kidney disease is the most common form of renal dysplasia that leads to ESRD in children. This study describes the histopathological changes of multicystic dysplasia that occur from early fetal life to the postnatal period. At 14 wk gestation, early cystic enlargement of various segments of the nephron have been identified, in addition to a displaced metanephric blastema adjacent to zones of normal nephrogenesis. At later stages, the predominant features include cyst enlargement with marked fibromuscular collars, architectural disorganization, and replacement of the interstitium with a disarray of mesenchymal tissue. This study investigated the expression of the mRNA encoding the insulin-like growth factors (IGF) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) and have demonstrated IGF-II, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 to be altered. Apart from their expression in the displaced metanephric blastema, both IGF-II and IGFBP-2 were overexpressed in abnormal tissue elements in all kidneys from fetal to postnatal life. IGF-II gene expression was localized to mesenchymal tissue, specifically in the periductal fibromuscular collars. IGFBP-2 mRNA was found to be expressed exclusively in the cyst epithelia of all cysts at all ages studied, whereas IGFBP-3 mRNA was absent from these epithelia. This study details the failure of normal IGF expression in the development of multicystic renal dysplasia and suggests a role for the IGF system in the progressive histopathological changes of this disorder. PMID:9013452

  2. Bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia with potter sequence. A case with penile agenesis.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Ahmet; Ermis, Bahri; Numanoglu, Varim; Bahadir, Burak; Seckiner, Ilker

    2006-11-01

    Hereditary renal adysplasia (HRA) is a rare autosomal dominant condition. Patients have several other anomalies including Potter facies, thoracic, cardiac, and extremity deformities. The case present dysmorphic facial features such as hypertelorism, prominent epicanthic folds, a flat and broad nose, choanal stenosis, low-set ears, and a receding chin. He had femoral bowing, hypoplastic right tibia and agenesis of the right foot. He had rich and thick skin. He had also a dysplastic empty scrotum, penile agenesis, and anal atresia. The autopsy revealed pulmonary hypoplasia, ventricular septal defect, bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia, agenesis of both ureter and bladder, intraabdominal testicles, and a single umbilical artery. The penile agenesis was first reported, and including the consanguinity in the parents might further delineate the bilateral multicystic HRA. Vater/caudal regression anomalies, Mullerian duct/aplasia, unilateral renal agenesis, and cervicothoracic somite anomalies association, and Coloboma, heart anomaly, choanal atresia, retardation, genital and ear anomalies syndrome has been considered in differential diagnosis. PMID:17106555

  3. [Multicystic renal dysplasia: changes in the contralateral urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Navascues del Río, J A; Luque Mialdea, R; Cerdá Berrocal, J; Martín Crespo, R; Arrojo Vila, F

    1996-06-01

    We have treated seven children with multicystic dysplastic kidney during the last 15 years. Three of then presented contralateral upper urinary tract anomalies. Four cases were diagnosed during prenatal period and three during the first term of life. We did analytic kidney function evaluation, ultrasound examination, voiding cystourethrography, radionuclide scan, gammagraphy, excretory urography and urinary cultures in all cases. We have found a vesicoureteral reflux with a bifid pelvis associated in the same child and two other cases with nonobstructive hydronephrosis. The child with vesicoureteral reflux presented also ipsilateral anomalies like a bladder diverticulum and an incomplete urethral duplication. One child with hydronephrosis opposite to the multicystic dysplastic kidney, also presented a bowel malrotation and a congenital cardiopathy, as extra-urologic associated anomalies. PMID:8928684

  4. Gene expression and cell turnover in human renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A S; Winyard, P J

    2000-01-01

    Kidney malformations are common causes of chronic renal failure in children. Dysplastic kidneys represent a unique model of perturbed epithelial-mesenchymal interaction which leads to the formation of malformed branching tubules surrounded by undifferentiated and metaplastic mesenchymal cells. We have found that human dysplastic epithelia express PAX2 (a transcription factor), BCL2 (a survival factor) and galectin-3 (a cell adhesion/signaling molecule). These genes are implicated in oncogenesis and their persistent expression may drive proliferation of dysplastic cysts, hence explaining the massive growth of some multicystic dysplastic kidneys. We have also detected prominent apoptosis in undifferentiated tissues around dysplastic epithelia, and this may provide a potential mechanism for the well-documented regression of dysplastic kidneys. Hence, although these kidneys may not have any excretory function, it is incorrect to consider them as 'end stage organs' because they are highly active in terms of cell turnover and gene expression; furthermore, these processes can be correlated with patterns of tissue growth and involution. Further elucidation of 'molecular lesions' in renal malformations may lead to novel therapies to enhance the differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:10668206

  5. Insights into the renal pathogenesis in Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia: A renal histological characterization and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Sanjay; Javidan, Ashkan; Boivin, Felix; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Lukic, Dusan; Svajger, Bruno; Chu, Stephanie; Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Rosenblum, Norman D; Bridgewater, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is a pleiotropic disorder caused by mutations in the SWI/SNF2-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like-1 (SMARCAL1) gene, with multiple clinical features, notably end-stage renal disease. Here we characterize the renal pathology in SIOD patients. Our analysis of SIOD patient renal biopsies demonstrates the tip and collapsing variants of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Additionally, electron microscopy revealed numerous glomerular abnormalities most notably in the podocyte and Bowman's capsule. To better understand the role of SMARCAL1 in the pathogenesis of FSGS, we defined SMARCAL1 expression in the developing and mature kidney. In the developing fetal kidney, SMARCAL1 is expressed in the ureteric epithelium, stroma, metanephric mesenchyme, and in all stages of the developing nephron, including the maturing glomerulus. In postnatal kidneys, SMARCAL1 expression is localized to epithelial tubules of the nephron, collecting ducts, and glomerulus (podocytes and endothelial cells). Interestingly, not all cells within the same lineage expressed SMARCAL1. In renal biopsies from SIOD patients, TUNEL analysis detected marked increases in DNA fragmentation. Our results highlight the cells that may contribute to the renal pathogenesis in SIOD. Further, we suggest that disruptions in genomic integrity during fetal kidney development contribute to the pathogenesis of FSGS in SIOD patients. PMID:25319549

  6. Timing and Outcome of Renal Replacement Therapy in Patients with Congenital Malformations of the Kidney and Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Verrina, Enrico; Bjerre, Anna; Wanner, Christoph; Heaf, James Goya; Zurriaga, Oscar; Hoitsma, Andries; Niaudet, Patrick; Palsson, Runolfur; Ravani, Pietro; Jager, Kitty J.; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the leading cause of ESRD in children, but the proportion of patients with individual CAKUT entities progressing to ESRD during adulthood and their long-term clinical outcomes are unknown. This study assessed the age at onset of renal replacement therapy (RRT) and patient and renal graft survival in patients with CAKUT across the entire age range. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients with CAKUT were compared with age-matched patients who were undergoing RRT for other renal disorders on the basis of data from the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry. Competing risk and Cox regression analyses were conducted. Results Of 212,930 patients commencing RRT from 1990 to 2009, 4765 (2.2%) had renal diagnoses consistent with CAKUT. The proportion of incident RRT patients with CAKUT decreased from infancy to childhood and then increased until age 15–19 years, followed by a gradual decline throughout adulthood. Median age at RRT start was 31 years in the CAKUT cohort and 61 years in the non-CAKUT cohort (P<0.001). RRT was started earlier (median, 16 years) in patients with isolated renal dysplasia than in those with renal hypoplasia and associated urinary tract disorders (median, 29.5–39.5 years). Patients with CAKUT survived longer than age- and sex-matched non-CAKUT controls because of lower cardiovascular mortality (10-year survival rate, 76.4% versus 70.7%; P<0.001). Conclusions CAKUT leads to ESRD more often at adult than pediatric age. Treatment outcomes differ from those of acquired kidney diseases and vary within CAKUT subcategories. PMID:23085722

  7. Initial pathological events in renal dysplasia with urinary tract obstruction in utero.

    PubMed

    Shibata, S; Shigeta, M; Shu, Y; Watanabe, T; Nagata, M

    2001-10-01

    Multicystic dysplastic kidneys (MCDK) and obstructive renal dysplasia (ORD) are two different phenotypes of dysplasia commonly associated with urinary tract obstruction. However, the mechanisms whereby obstruction in the developing kidney leads to each dysplasia are unknown. In the present study, 16 fetal MCDKs and 3 fetal ORDs (18-35 weeks of gestation) were analyzed with light microscopy, point-counting morphometry, immunohistochemistry with a podocyte marker, and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, reconstructions of dysplastic nephrons were done via serial section analysis. Early stages of MCDK and ORD similarly revealed numerous cyst formations, predominantly in the subcapsular nephrogenic zone. Occasionally, glomerular tuft remnants with mature podocyte phenotypes were observed in cysts, suggesting the acquisition of filtration. Three dimensionally, basic nephron structures were installed in the cystic nephrons, namely the macula densa with a primary loop structure. Cysts developed in the once-induced nephrons due to fluid retention in both MCDK and ORD. In utero urinary tract obstruction may cause urine retention in functioning nephrons and lead to glomerular cysts in the nephrogenic zone. These findings were common to MCDK and ORD, albeit at different sites of obstruction. Expansion of glomerular cysts with tubular dilatation (cysts) disturbs the subsequent nephrogenesis and may contribute to the misdevelopment of fetal kidneys. PMID:11710644

  8. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  9. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  10. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or “Lobster claw” deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  11. [Fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Desbois, A C; Koskas, F; Cacoub, P

    2015-04-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia is a segmentary, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory vascular disease that may result in stenosis, occlusion, aneurysms or dissection of medium arteries. Renal involvement is the most frequent location, described in 60-100% of patients. Renal stenosis can be asymptomatic or complicated with arterial hypertension or less frequently with renal insufficiency. Carotid and vertebral involvements are less frequent (10-35%). Surgical management of fibromuscular dysplasia is now less common because of the better efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Thus, histologic characteristics are no longer relevant prognostic criteria. Clinical features and outcome vary according to angiographic presentation (focal or multifocal disease), with an increased recovery rate of hypertension with focal lesions. In the presence of renal fibromuscular dysplasia, only symptomatic patients are revascularized (recent or resistant hypertension) or patients with asymmetric renal size or impaired renal function. Transluminal angioplasty is the first-line treatment except for patients with complex lesions or stenosis associated with aneurysm. PMID:25455952

  12. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C; Sørensen, S S; Haedersdal, M

    2015-11-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK and delays SCC development in mice. We investigated the effect of repeated PDT over 5 years for primary prophylaxis of skin dysplasia. These data represent an interim analysis of an on-going randomized controlled trial. During 2008-2011, 25 renal transplant recipients with clinically normal skin were randomized to split-side PDT of the face, forearm and hand, the contralateral side serving as untreated control. Patients received PDT on inclusion and at 6-monthly intervals for 5 years. Blinded evaluation was performed at each visit. We found that prophylactic PDT significantly delayed onset of AK compared with untreated skin, p = 0.020. At 3-year follow-up, we observed AK in 63% of patients in untreated skin areas compared with 28% of patients in PDT-treated skin, with a total number of cumulated AKs in untreated skin (n = 43) compared with PDT-treated skin (n = 8), p = 0.005. These preliminary data indicate a novel approach to early prevention of skin dysplasia that may reduce morbidity from multiple AKs and SCCs in OTR. PMID:26018207

  13. No skeletal dysplasia in the Nariokotome boy KNM-WT 15000 (Homo erectus)--a reassessment of congenital pathologies of the vertebral column.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Regula; Haeusler, Martin

    2013-03-01

    The Nariokotome boy skeleton KNM-WT 15000 is the most complete Homo erectus fossil and therefore is key for understanding human evolution. Nevertheless, since Latimer and Ohman (2001) reported on severe congenital pathology in KNM-WT 15000, it is questionable whether this skeleton can still be used as reference for Homo erectus skeletal biology. The asserted pathologies include platyspondylic and diminutive vertebrae implying a disproportionately short stature; spina bifida; condylus tertius; spinal stenosis; and scoliosis. Based on this symptom complex, the differential diagnosis of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, an extremely rare form of skeletal dysplasia, has been proposed. Yet, our reanalysis of these pathologies shows that the shape of the KNM-WT 15000 vertebrae matches that of normal modern human adolescents. The vertebrae are not abnormally flat, show no endplate irregularities, and thus are not platyspondylic. As this is the hallmark of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda and related forms of skeletal dysplasia, the absence of platyspondyly refutes axial dysplasia and disproportionate dwarfism. Furthermore, we neither found evidence for spina bifida occulta nor manifesta, whereas the condylus tertius, a developmental anomaly of the cranial base, is not related to skeletal dysplasias. Other fossils indicate that the relatively small size of the vertebrae and the narrow spinal canal are characteristics of early hominins rather than congenital pathologies. Except for the recently described signs of traumatic lumbar disc herniation, the Nariokotome boy fossil therefore seems to belong to a normal Homo erectus youth without pathologies of the axial skeleton. PMID:23283736

  14. Genetic variations in complement factors in patients with congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinping; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A; Shirotani-Ikejima, Hiroko; Eura, Yuka; Hirai, Hidenori; Honda, Shigenori; Kokame, Koichi; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri; von Krogh, Anne-Sophie; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Lämmle, Bernhard; Miyata, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The congenital form of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is caused by genetic mutations in ADAMTS13. Some, but not all, congenital TTP patients manifest renal insufficiency in addition to microangiopathic hemolysis and thrombocytopenia. We included 32 congenital TTP patients in the present study, which was designed to assess whether congenital TTP patients with renal insufficiency have predisposing mutations in complement regulatory genes, as found in many patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). In 13 patients with severe renal insufficiency, six candidate complement or complement regulatory genes were sequenced and 11 missense mutations were identified. One of these missense mutations, C3:p.K155Q mutation, is a rare mutation located in the macroglobulin-like 2 domain of C3, where other mutations predisposing for aHUS cluster. Several of the common missense mutations identified in our study have been reported to increase disease-risk for aHUS, but were not more common in patients with as compared to those without renal insufficiency. Taken together, our results show that the majority of the congenital TTP patients with renal insufficiency studied do not carry rare genetic mutations in complement or complement regulatory genes. PMID:26830967

  15. A patient with Mullerian abnormalities, renal dysplasia, cervical spine fusion, cataracts and intellectual disability: MURCS-plus?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tiong Yang; Whitelaw, Charlotte; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2007-10-01

    We report a 15-year-old girl with features of the MURCS (Mullerian abnormalities, renal agenesis/ectopy and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association and birth defects not typically associated with MURCS. In addition to seizures and intellectual disability, she has cortical brain heterotopia, bilateral subclinical cataracts, submucous cleft palate and patent ductus arteriosus. We propose that this patient represents a more severe form of MURCS, or 'MURCS-plus', which may represent a defect of or insult to mesodermal morphogenesis. PMID:17786121

  16. Congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries: case report using MDCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Matusz, Petru; Miclăuş, Graţian Dragoslav; Banciu, Christian Dragoş; Sas, Ioan; Joseph, Shamfa C; Pirtea, Laurenţiu Cornel; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    A congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries is a rare congenital abnormality that can occur in the presence of multiple other anomalies. We describe an atypical case of a right congenital solitary kidney with three renal arteries (RA) one main RA and two additional renal arteries in a 75-year-old woman with uterine didelphys. The main RA had an intraluminal diameter larger than the diameter of the additional renal arteries (AdRAs) at the origin (0.53 cm for the main RA; 0.49 cm and 0.32 cm for the two AdRAs). Both the AdRAs had a greater length than the main RA (3.51 cm for the main RA; 3.70 cm and 4.77 cm for the two AdRAs). The calculated volume of the kidney was 283 cm³, while the volume of the renal parenchyma was 258 cm³. Knowledge of this variant is extremely important in clinical practice as it has been found to be associated with proteinuria, hypertension and renal insufficiency. PMID:26429179

  17. Renal artery stenosis in association with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Jameela A.; Roebuck, Derek J.; Tullus, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe 8 cases of renal artery stenosis (RAS) in children with congenital anomalies of the renal tract. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 78 children with RAS who were followed up at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom between 2003 and 2012. We used an interventional radiology database to identify all patients who had RAS confirmed by digital subtraction angiography and examined all cases of congenital anomaly of the renal tract that had been diagnosed during childhood. Results: We documented the following renal anomalies: multicystic dysplastic kidney (n=2), renal hypoplasia (n=1), congenital solitary kidney with hydronephrosis (n=1), and unilateral vesicoureteric reflux with poorly functioning kidneys (n=2). The anomaly was unknown in 2 cases. Seven children had unilateral nephrectomy at a median age of 2.5 years (range, 0.4-10 years) for various urological abnormalities. All children were confirmed to have RAS after presentation with hypertension at a median age of 10 (3.5-16.2) years. Angioplasty was performed in 7 children, of which 6 achieved control of their blood pressure on reduced medications. Conclusion: We highlight the association between RAS and other renal anomalies, which indicates that they could share a common genetic background. PMID:25316474

  18. Characteristics of hearing loss in HDR (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia) syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Looij, Marjolein A J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Beetz, Rolf; Thakker, Rajesh V; Christie, Paul T; Feenstra, Lou W; van Zanten, Bert G A

    2006-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the zinc finger transcription factor GATA3 causes the triad of hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia, known by its acronym HDR syndrome. The purpose of the current study was to describe in detail the auditory phenotype in human HDR patients and compare these to audiometrical and histological data previously described in a mouse model of this disease. Pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, speech in noise, auditory brainstem responses and transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions were measured in 2 patients affected by HDR syndrome. Both patients were affected by a moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Speech reception thresholds were shifted and speech recognition in noise was disturbed. No otoacoustic emissions could be generated in either patient. Auditory brainstem response interpeak intervals were normal. The human and murine audiological phenotypes seem to correspond well. Hearing loss in HDR syndrome is moderate to severe, seems to be slightly worse at the higher end of the frequency spectrum and may be progressive with age. The absence of otoacoustic emissions and the loss of frequency selectivity suggest an important role for outer hair cells in causing the hearing loss. PMID:16988501

  19. Novel NEK8 Mutations Cause Severe Syndromic Renal Cystic Dysplasia through YAP Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Grampa, Valentina; Odye, Gweltas; Thomas, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Filhol, Emilie; Niel, Olivier; Silbermann, Flora; Lebreton, Corinne; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Devisme, Louise; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capri, Yline; Khung-Savatovsky, Suonavy; Sigaudy, Sabine; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Benmerah, Alexandre; Terzi, Fabiola; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of genetic multi-systemic disorders related to dysfunction of the primary cilium, a sensory organelle present at the cell surface that regulates key signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis. In order to identify novel genes whose mutations would cause severe developmental ciliopathies, >500 patients/fetuses were analyzed by a targeted high throughput sequencing approach allowing exome sequencing of >1200 ciliary genes. NEK8/NPHP9 mutations were identified in five cases with severe overlapping phenotypes including renal cystic dysplasia/hypodysplasia, situs inversus, cardiopathy with hypertrophic septum and bile duct paucity. These cases highlight a genotype-phenotype correlation, with missense and nonsense mutations associated with hypodysplasia and enlarged cystic organs, respectively. Functional analyses of NEK8 mutations in patient fibroblasts and mIMCD3 cells showed that these mutations differentially affect ciliogenesis, proliferation/apoptosis/DNA damage response, as well as epithelial morphogenesis. Notably, missense mutations exacerbated some of the defects due to NEK8 loss of function, highlighting their likely gain-of-function effect. We also showed that NEK8 missense and loss-of-function mutations differentially affect the regulation of the main Hippo signaling effector, YAP, as well as the expression of its target genes in patient fibroblasts and renal cells. YAP imbalance was also observed in enlarged spheroids of Nek8-invalidated renal epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, as well as in cystic kidneys of Jck mice. Moreover, co-injection of nek8 MO with WT or mutated NEK8-GFP RNA in zebrafish embryos led to shortened dorsally curved body axis, similar to embryos injected with human YAP RNA. Finally, treatment with Verteporfin, an inhibitor of YAP transcriptional activity, partially rescued the 3D spheroid defects of Nek8-invalidated cells and the abnormalities of NEK8-overexpressing zebrafish embryos

  20. Novel NEK8 Mutations Cause Severe Syndromic Renal Cystic Dysplasia through YAP Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Grampa, Valentina; Delous, Marion; Zaidan, Mohamad; Odye, Gweltas; Thomas, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Filhol, Emilie; Niel, Olivier; Silbermann, Flora; Lebreton, Corinne; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Devisme, Louise; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capri, Yline; Khung-Savatovsky, Suonavy; Sigaudy, Sabine; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Benmerah, Alexandre; Terzi, Fabiola; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-03-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of genetic multi-systemic disorders related to dysfunction of the primary cilium, a sensory organelle present at the cell surface that regulates key signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis. In order to identify novel genes whose mutations would cause severe developmental ciliopathies, >500 patients/fetuses were analyzed by a targeted high throughput sequencing approach allowing exome sequencing of >1200 ciliary genes. NEK8/NPHP9 mutations were identified in five cases with severe overlapping phenotypes including renal cystic dysplasia/hypodysplasia, situs inversus, cardiopathy with hypertrophic septum and bile duct paucity. These cases highlight a genotype-phenotype correlation, with missense and nonsense mutations associated with hypodysplasia and enlarged cystic organs, respectively. Functional analyses of NEK8 mutations in patient fibroblasts and mIMCD3 cells showed that these mutations differentially affect ciliogenesis, proliferation/apoptosis/DNA damage response, as well as epithelial morphogenesis. Notably, missense mutations exacerbated some of the defects due to NEK8 loss of function, highlighting their likely gain-of-function effect. We also showed that NEK8 missense and loss-of-function mutations differentially affect the regulation of the main Hippo signaling effector, YAP, as well as the expression of its target genes in patient fibroblasts and renal cells. YAP imbalance was also observed in enlarged spheroids of Nek8-invalidated renal epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, as well as in cystic kidneys of Jck mice. Moreover, co-injection of nek8 MO with WT or mutated NEK8-GFP RNA in zebrafish embryos led to shortened dorsally curved body axis, similar to embryos injected with human YAP RNA. Finally, treatment with Verteporfin, an inhibitor of YAP transcriptional activity, partially rescued the 3D spheroid defects of Nek8-invalidated cells and the abnormalities of NEK8-overexpressing zebrafish embryos

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital renal and urinary tract malformations.

    PubMed

    Hindryckx, A; De Catte, L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and the urinary tract are the most common sonographically identified -malformations in the prenatal period. Obstructive uropathies account for the majority of cases. The aim of prenatal diagnosis and management is to detect those anomalies having impact on the prognosis of the affected child and -requiring early postnatal evaluation or treatment to minimize adverse outcomes. In this paper, we summarize the embryology of kidneys and urinary tract, the normal sonographic appearance through-out pregnancy and the prenatal diagnosis of their congenital malformations. PMID:24753862

  2. Misexpression of Six2 is Associated with Heritable Frontonasal Dysplasia and Renal Hypoplasia in 3H1 Br Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fogelgren, Ben; Kuroyama, Mari C.; McBratney-Owen, Brandeis; Spence, Allyson A.; Melahn, Laura E.; Anawati, Mireille K.; Cabatbat, Chantelle; Alarcon, Vernadeth B.; Marikawa, Yusuke; Lozanoff, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A radiation-induced mouse mutant, Brachyrrhine (Br), exhibits frontonasal dysplasia and renal hypoplasia, two malformations associated with deficiencies in mesenchymal condensation. The purpose of this study was to resolve the Br locus, evaluate possible candidate genes, and identify developmental defects in the mutant chondrocranium. Linkage analysis mapped the Br mutation to a critical region distal to D17Mit76 which contains only one gene, the transcription factor Six2. Sequence analysis of the Six2 gene, including 1.5 kb of the promoter, failed to reveal the Br mutation. However, homozygous Br/Br embryos showed almost complete absence of Six2 mRNA and protein in craniofacial and renal tissues while heterozygous Br/+ embryos displayed intermediate Six2 levels. Mutant embryos displayed malformations of neural crest-derived structures of the anterior cranium where Six2 is normally expressed. These data suggest a mutation in a novel cis-acting regulatory region inhibits Six2 expression and is associated with frontonasal dysplasia and renal hypoplasia. PMID:18570229

  3. A rare case of renal hydatidosis in a child with congenital solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Tirnea, Livius; Minciu, Radu; Olariu, Tudor Rares; Dumitrascu, Victor; Neghina, Adriana Maria; Neghina, Raul

    2014-08-01

    Hydatid cyst of a solitary congenital kidney is a rare entity because of the small percentage of cases with renal hydatidosis and the reduced number of cases with this renal anomaly. We report a case presenting this extremely rare combination and having a favorable outcome. The diagnosis was confirmed based on an association of imagistic techniques and positive serology. The case was managed using a minimal invasive surgical technique (PAIR) that reduced the operative risks. Additionally, an antihelminthic agent (albendazole) was administered. To our knowledge, this is the first case with such comorbidity and treated through percutaneous approach. PMID:25149385

  4. Combined Cerebral and Renal Near-Infrared Spectroscopy After Congenital Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gil-Anton, Javier; Redondo, Silvia; Garcia Urabayen, Diego; Nieto Faza, Manuel; Sanz, Irene; Pilar, Javier

    2015-08-01

    The maintenance of an adequate oxygen supply to tissues after congenital heart surgery is essential for good outcomes. The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for estimating central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) using both cerebral and renal measurements, explore its relation with cardiac output measurements and check its ability to detect low cardiac output. A prospective observational pilot study was conducted in patients weighing <10 kg undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Spectroscopy probes were placed on the forehead and renal area, and serial cardiac output measurements were obtained by femoral transpulmonary thermodilution over the first 24 h after surgery. In the 15 patients studied, ScvO2 was correlated with cerebral (r = 0.58), renal (r = 0.60) and combined (r = 0.71) measurements. Likewise, the systolic index was correlated with the NIRS signals: cerebral (r = 0.60), renal (r = 0.50) and combined (r = 0.66). Statistically significant differences were found in the NIRS measures registered in the 29 low cardiac output events detected by thermodilution: cerebral: 62 % (59-65) versus 69 % (63-76); renal: 83 % (70-89) versus 89 % (83-95); and combined 64 % (60-69) versus 72 % (67-76). In our series, combined cerebral and renal monitoring was correlated with central venous oxygen saturation and cardiac output; low cardiac output detection associated a different spectroscopy pattern. PMID:25764508

  5. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria M

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel-Joubert, short rib, Bardet-Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  6. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel–Joubert, short rib, Bardet–Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  7. Congenital renal anomaly: evaluation with 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, S.; Kawamura, J.; Tomoyoshi, T.; Yoshida, O.

    1983-05-01

    Technetium 99m-2,3, dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) preferentially accumulates in the renal cortex, demonstrating functioning cortical mass. We used 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy in ten patients with horseshoe kidneys and five patients with unilateral fused kidneys. The results show that 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy reliably establishes the diagnosis of horseshoe kidney and clearly shows the isthmus, which is very essential for proper management. The technique also aids in the definitive assessment of separate kidney function and of total radionuclide uptake is possible using 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy.

  8. Double homozygous missense mutations in DACH1 and BMP4 in a patient with bilateral cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schild, Raphael; Knüppel, Tanja; Konrad, Martin; Bergmann, Carsten; Trautmann, Agnes; Kemper, Markus J; Wu, Kongming; Yaklichkin, Sergey; Wang, Jing; Pestell, Richard; Müller-Wiefel, Dirk E; Schaefer, Franz; Weber, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Renal hypodysplasia (RHD) is characterized by small and/or disorganized kidneys following abnormal organogenesis. Mutations in several genes have been identified recently to be associated with RHD in humans, including BMP4, a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of growth factors. DACH1 has been proposed as a candidate gene for RHD because of its involvement in the EYA-SIX-DACH network of renal developmental genes. Here, we present a patient with renal dysplasia carrying homozygous missense mutations in both BMP4 (p.N150K) and DACH1 (p.R684C). The genotype-phenotype correlation in the family hints at an oligogenic mode of inheritance of the disease in this kindred. Functional analyses of the identified DACH1 mutation in HEK293T cells demonstrated enhanced suppression of the TGF-β pathway suggesting that both mutations could act synergistically in the development of the phenotype in this patient. This finding provides a model for RHD as an oligo-/polygenic disorder and supports a role for DACH1 in the development of RHD in humans. PMID:23262432

  9. A Novel De Novo GATA Binding Protein 3 Mutation in a Turkish Boy with Hypoparathyroidism, Deafness, and Renal Dysplasia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Gül; Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Nakamura, Akie; Fukami, Maki; Hatun, Şükrü

    2015-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR; OMIM 146255) syndrome is a rare disease, inherited dominantly and found to be related with GATA3 (GATA binding protein 3) gene mutations. A 13-year and 8-month-old boy who presented with hypocalcemia was diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism. He also had dysmorphic facial features, renal anomaly (pelvic kidney), and mild sensorineural hearing loss. His cranial computed tomography revealed multiple calcifications in bilateral centrum semiovale, corona radiata, and basal ganglions suggesting a persistent hypoparathyroidism. Thus, the presence of triad of HDR syndrome was considered, and genetic analysis using a next-generation sequencer identified a novel de novo missense mutation in exon 4 p.R276Q (c.827G>A) of GATA3 gene. This is the second patient who was reported to have a mutation in GATA3 gene from Turkey. In conclusion, although HDR syndrome is a rare condition, it should be kept in mind in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Classical triad can easily be identified if patients diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism are also evaluated with a urinary tract ultrasound and an audiometer. PMID:26777049

  10. Responses of Proximal Tubular Cells to Injury in Congenital Renal Disease: Fight or Flight

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.; Forbes, Michael S.; Galarreta, Carolina I.; Thornhill, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic kidney disease in children results from congenital or inherited disorders, which can be studied in mouse models. Following 2 weeks of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the adult mouse, nephron loss is due to proximal tubular mitochondrial injury and cell death. In neonatal mice, proximal tubular cell death is delayed beyond 2 weeks of complete UUO, and release of partial UUO allows remodeling of remaining nephrons. Progressive cyst expansion develops in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a common inherited renal disorder. The PCY mutant mouse (which develops late-onset PKD) develops thinning of the glomerulotubular junction in parallel with growth of cysts in adulthood. Renal insufficiency in nephropathic cystinosis, a rare inherited renal disorder, results from progressive tubular cystine accumulation. In the Ctns knock out mouse (a model of cystinosis), proximal tubular cells become flattened, with loss of mitochondria and thickening of tubular basement membrane. In each model, persistent obstructive or metabolic stress leads ultimately to the formation of atubular glomeruli. The initial “fight” response (proximal tubular survival) switches to a “flight” response (proximal tubular cell death) with ongoing oxidative injury and mitochondrial damage. Therapies should be directed at reducing proximal tubular mitochondrial oxidative injury to enhance repair and regeneration. PMID:23949631

  11. The nasopalpebral lipoma-coloboma syndrome: a new autosomal dominant dysplasia-malformation syndrome with congenital nasopalpebral lipomas, eyelid colobomas, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Penchaszadeh, V B; Velasquez, D; Arrivillaga, R

    1982-04-01

    We describe a new autosomal dominant dysplasia-malformation syndrome from eight affected individuals in three generations of a Venezuelan family. It is characterized by congenital symmetrical upper lid and nasopalpebral lipomas, bilateral symmetrical upper and lower palpebral colobomas located at the junction of the inner and middle thirds of the lids, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia. Affected individuals have a broad forehead, window's peak, abnormal pattern of eyebrows and eyelashes, and maldevelopment of the lacrimal punctae. Interorbital distance is normal, but interpupillary distance is increased due to divergent strabismus originating from visual interference from inner canthal masses. Persistent epiphora, conjunctival hyperemia, and corneal (and less frequently lens) opacities are a secondary consequence of the defect of the lacrimal punctae and the inability to close the lids completely. The syndrome has complete penetrance and a rather narrow range of expressivity. The primary defect could involve a dysplasia of adipose tissue leading to nasopalpebral and upper lid lipomas during embryogenesis, with the rest of the malformations being secondary to interference of morphogenesis of the mid-upperface developmental field from the lipomatous hamartomas. Alternatively, a central rather than a peripheral mechanism of malformation might be considered, such as defective migration of neural crest cells. PMID:7091184

  12. The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. III. Complete and incomplete urinary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R D; Stephens, F D; Cussen, L J

    1981-09-01

    We graded obstructed kidneys of infants on the hypodysplasia scale to assess the influence of complete and partial obstruction on the pathogenesis of hypodysplasia. Kidneys with complete obstruction exhibited severe grades; those with partial ureteral obstruction had near normal grades. Those kidneys subjected to partial urethral obstruction ranged from mild to severe grades which correlated with degrees of lateral ectopy of the urethral office. Renal parenchymal development was impaired by complete obstruction but was tolerant to incomplete obstruction. Abnormal orifice positions associated with urethral obstructions were considered to be manifestations of ectopic ureteric buds and the hypodysplasia to be evidence of abnormal induction of abnormal renal blastema. PMID:7196894

  13. A Case of Cryptorchidism with Ipsilateral Congenital Unilateral Absence of the Vas Deferens and Contralateral Renal Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young Dong; Hong, Young Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an uncommon anomaly and this clinical condition is responsible for up to 1-2% of male infertility. It can be either unilateral or bilateral and the associated anomalies include cryptorchidism, seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts anomalies, and renal anomalies such as renal agenesis. We hereby present a case of congenital unilateral absence of vas deferens, which was found incidentally during an evaluation of undescended testis in a patient with ipsilateral renal agenesis. Case Presentation. A 10-month-old boy was referred to the urology clinic with an undescended right testis. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography showed agenesis of the right kidney and the absence of right vas deferens and epididymis was confirmed during laparoscopic orchiectomy performed due to short right spermatic cord. There were no other concomitant anomalies of the genitourinary system observed in evaluation. Conclusion. Congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens with cryptorchidism and renal agenesis is a rare diagnostic entity. Cryptorchidism or absent vas deferens found incidentally should lead the physician to evaluate the status of the contralateral vas deferens and conduct a renal tract ultrasound study. PMID:27597925

  14. A Case of Cryptorchidism with Ipsilateral Congenital Unilateral Absence of the Vas Deferens and Contralateral Renal Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Young Dong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an uncommon anomaly and this clinical condition is responsible for up to 1-2% of male infertility. It can be either unilateral or bilateral and the associated anomalies include cryptorchidism, seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts anomalies, and renal anomalies such as renal agenesis. We hereby present a case of congenital unilateral absence of vas deferens, which was found incidentally during an evaluation of undescended testis in a patient with ipsilateral renal agenesis. Case Presentation. A 10-month-old boy was referred to the urology clinic with an undescended right testis. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography showed agenesis of the right kidney and the absence of right vas deferens and epididymis was confirmed during laparoscopic orchiectomy performed due to short right spermatic cord. There were no other concomitant anomalies of the genitourinary system observed in evaluation. Conclusion. Congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens with cryptorchidism and renal agenesis is a rare diagnostic entity. Cryptorchidism or absent vas deferens found incidentally should lead the physician to evaluate the status of the contralateral vas deferens and conduct a renal tract ultrasound study. PMID:27597925

  15. Is fibromuscular dysplasia underdiagnosed? A comparison of the prevalence of FMD seen in CORAL trial participants versus a single institution population of renal donor candidates.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nicholas J; Matsumoto, Alan H; Angle, John F; Baheti, Aparna; Sabri, Saher S; Park, Auh W; Stone, James R; Patrie, James T; Dworkin, Lance; Cooper, Christopher J; Murphy, Timothy P; Cutlip, Donald E

    2014-10-01

    Renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) may be underdiagnosed. We evaluated the prevalence of FMD in CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) renal artery stent trial participants, in which FMD was an exclusion criterion for inclusion. We also evaluated the prevalence of FMD in a relatively healthy population of patients undergoing computed tomographic angiographic (CTA) screening for renal donor evaluation. All renal donor CTAs performed at our institution from January 2003 through November 2011 were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of FMD along with patient sex and age. These results were compared to angiographic core lab (ACL) findings for the CORAL trial. The CORAL ACL database contained 997 patients (mean age 69.3 years; 50% female). Fifty-eight (5.8%) CORAL trial patients (mean age 71.8 years; 75.9% female) demonstrated incidental FMD. The renal donor cohort included 220 patients (mean age 40.5 years; 64.5% female). Five (2.3%) demonstrated FMD (mean age 48.6 years; all female). The odds of FMD in the CORAL cohort were 2.65 times that seen in the renal donor cohort (95% CI: 1.12, 7.57). In C: onclusion, the 5.8% prevalence of renal artery FMD in the CORAL trial population, the presence of which was biased against, suggests underdiagnosis. PMID:25082538

  16. Two mutations in human BICC1 resulting in Wnt pathway hyperactivity associated with cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marine R-C; Clauin, Séverine; Pfister, Yvan; Di Maïo, Massimo; Ulinski, Tim; Constam, Daniel; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Bicaudal C homologue 1 (Bicc1) knockout in mice causes polycystic kidney disease and pancreas development defects, including a reduction in insulin-producing β-cells and ensuing diabetes. We therefore screened 137 patients with renal abnormalities or association of early-onset diabetes and renal disease for genetic alterations in BICC1. We identified two heterozygous mutations, one nonsense in the first K Homology (KH) domain and one missense in the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain. In mice, Bicc1 blocks canonical Wnt signaling, mostly via its SAM domain. We show that the human BICC1, similar to its mouse counterpart, blocks canonical Wnt signaling. The nonsense mutation identified results in a complete loss of Wnt inhibitory activity. The point mutation in the SAM domain has a similar effect to a complete SAM domain deletion, resulting in a 22% loss of activity. PMID:21922595

  17. Intrarenal mature cystic teratoma associated with renal dysplasia: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Otani, M; Tsujimoto, S; Miura, M; Nagashima, Y

    2001-07-01

    We report a case of intrarenal teratoma in a 6-year-old boy. Two years before his operation, multicystic masses had been found in the left side of his abdomen. In the operation, three main cystic masses were located in the upper and lower poles of the left kidney, which were removed in pieces. Histologically, the cyst wall was lined mainly with keratinizing squamous epithelium with hair follicles, shafts and sebaceous glands. The adjacent renal parenchyma showed atrophy, with partially dysplastic and angiomyolipoma-like lesions. Based on these findings, the lesion was diagnosed as mature cystic teratoma of dermoid cyst type. Extragonadal teratoma occurs predominantly along the median line of the body. Intrarenal teratoma is extremely rare; however, it should be distinguished from teratoid Wilms' tumor and other renal cystic lesions. PMID:11472570

  18. Renal dysplasia unrelated to claudin-16 deficiency in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, A; Ozaki, K; Miyazaki; Tanabe, Y; Takeuchi, T; Narama, I

    2007-07-01

    Renal lesions of the type usually found in claudin-16 (CL-16) defective Japanese Black cattle (homozygous for CL-16 deficiency) were identified in six animals of this breed, aged 28-59 months, which were either heterozygous for CL-16 deficiency (type 1) or normal, as judged by a DNA-based test associated with the CL-16 gene. Histopathologically, all six cases showed elongated focal lesions which ran through the cortex to terminate in the outer zone of the medulla. The lesions contained components that included: (1) immature tubules, (2) small irregularly shaped tubules with thickening of the basement membrane, (3) mesenchymal cells in an increased interstitium, (4) small atrophic glomeruli, and (5) immature glomeruli. The glomeruli were noticeably reduced in number, and large glomeruli with an increased number of mesangial cells were observed throughout the entire cortical area. Cystic dilation of tubules and flattening of the epithelium were noted in all areas of the kidney. Histopathologically, the renal lesions in the six cases were indistinguishable from those reported previously in cattle homozygous for CL-16 deficiency. These findings demonstrate that such renal lesions in Japanese Black cattle are not necessarily associated with homozygous deletion of the CL-16 gene. PMID:17537453

  19. Bilateral Renal Agenesis/Hypoplasia/Dysplasia (BRAHD): Postmortem Analysis of 45 Cases with Breakpoint Mapping of Two De Novo Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Jean; Howatson, Alan; Whiteford, Margo; Branney, Peter; Evans, Margaret; Fantes, Judy; FitzPatrick, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bilateral renal agenesis/hypoplasia/dysplasia (BRAHD) is a relatively common, lethal malformation in humans. Established clinical risk factors include maternal insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and male sex of the fetus. In the majority of cases, no specific etiology can be established, although teratogenic, syndromal and single gene causes can be assigned to some cases. Methodology/Principal Findings 45 unrelated fetuses, stillbirths or infants with lethal BRAHD were ascertained through a single regional paediatric pathology service (male∶female 34∶11 or 3.1∶1). The previously reported phenotypic overlaps with VACTERL, caudal dysgenesis, hemifacial microsomia and Müllerian defects were confirmed. A new finding is that 16/45 (35.6%; m∶f 13∶3 or 4.3∶1) BRAHD cases had one or more extrarenal malformations indicative of a disoder of laterality determination including; incomplete lobulation of right lung (seven cases), malrotation of the gut (seven cases) and persistence of the left superior vena cava (five cases). One such case with multiple laterality defects and sirelomelia was found to have a de novo apparently balanced reciprocal translocation 46,XY,t(2;6)(p22.3;q12). Translocation breakpoint mapping was performed by interphase fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) using nuclei extracted from archival tissue sections in both this case and an isolated bilateral renal agenesis case associated with a de novo 46,XY,t(1;2)(q41;p25.3). Both t(2;6) breakpoints mapped to gene-free regions with no strong evidence of cis-regulatory potential. Ten genes localized within 500 kb of the t(1;2) breakpoints. Wholemount in-situ expression analyses of the mouse orthologs of these genes in embryonic mouse kidneys showed strong expression of Esrrg, encoding a nuclear steroid hormone receptor. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Esrrg was restricted to proximal ductal tissue within the embryonic kidney. Conclusions/Significance The previously

  20. Occult Congenital Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction in Two Adults Presenting with Collecting System Rupture After Blunt Renal Trauma: A Case Report Series

    PubMed Central

    Hoffner, Haley E.; Dagrosa, Lawrence M.; Pais, Vernon M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report two adult cases of congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction detected incidentally in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma. CT images are provided to describe the presentation, while review of the literature and management of renal trauma are discussed.

  1. Unilateral Congenital Lacrimal Fistula with Renal Agenesis and Pelvic Kidney: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Altun, A.; Kurna, S. A.; Sengor, T.; Altun, G.; Oflaz, A.; Sonmez, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented to the clinic of ophthalmology because of watering and discharge from his left lower eyelid. The inspection examination revealed an orifice that was associated with congenital lacrimal fistula (CLF). He underwent a complete ophthalmologic and systemic evaluation to explore possible associated findings. Systemic evaluation revealed multiple renal anomalies: right renal agenesis and left ectopic pelvic kidney. This case is unique because this is the first reported case of CLF accompanied with ectopic pelvic kidney in the literature. PMID:26090250

  2. Potter sequence complicated by congenital cystic lesion of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Mizuno, Katsumi; Horie, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Yamaoka, Akiko; Mizutani, Kayo; Takeuchi, Toshio; Iikura, Yoji

    2002-07-01

    We report a case complicated by oligohydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, bilateral renal dysplasia, and cystic lesion of the bladder. He was clinically compatible with Potter sequence. Congenital cystic bladder is the rarest form of the bladder. We can find no report of Potter sequence complicated by cystic lesion of the bladder. This lesion was similar to multilocular bladder. The diagnosis was confirmed it by autopsy, magnetic resonance imaging, and urography after his death. PMID:12152145

  3. Recurrence of proteinuria following renal transplantation in congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Tarak; Garola, Robert E; Kestila, Marjo; Tryggvason, Karl; Ruotsalainen, Vesa; Sharma, Mukut; Savin, Virginia J; Jalanko, Hannu; Warady, Bradley A

    2006-05-01

    We report a Caucasian boy of Italian descent with congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (NPHS1, CNF, MIM 256300) who developed recurrence of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia on the seventh post-operative day following living related renal transplantation from his paternal aunt. The allograft biopsy was normal except for effacement of podocyte foot processes on electron microscopy. He was treated by the substitution of mycophenolate mofetil with cyclophosphamide for 12 weeks, in addition to cyclosporine, prednisone and daclizumab. His proteinuria resolved quickly following the initiation of cyclophosphamide treatment, and he remains in remission 4 years after receiving his transplant. His native and allograft kidneys were evaluated for nephrin expression by immunohistochemistry, DNA analysis for the NPHS1 mutation, serum for the presence of auto-antibodies to nephrin by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fetal glomeruli immunofluorescence assay, and serum for glomerular permeability to albumin (Palb) activity using a functional in vitro assay for Palb. Nephrin expression was completely absent in the native kidney, while it was decreased in the allograft compared with normal. DNA analysis of the NPHS1 gene revealed mutations 3248G>T and 3250delG in exon 24, causing G1083V and 1084Vfs, respectively, inherited from his father, and 3478C>T in exon 27, that leads to R1160X, inherited from his mother. Serum was negative for auto-antibodies to nephrin. Interestingly, the Palb activity was increased at the time of recurrence of proteinuria following transplantation (Palb 0.73+/-0.10) and remained elevated when retested more than 3 years later (Palb 0.54+/-0.09). This is the first report of increased Palb activity in recurrence of proteinuria following transplantation in NPHS1. We speculate the role of increased Palb activity in the recurrence of proteinuria following transplantation in NPHS1. PMID:16518627

  4. Prevalence, implication, and determinants of worsening renal function after surgery for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Kuwata, Seiko; Kurishima, Clara; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Ishido, Hirotaka; Masutani, Satoshi; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating data in adults indicate the prognostic importance of worsening renal function (WRF) during treatment of acute heart failure. Venous congestion appears to play a dominant role in WRF; however, data regarding WRF in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are limited. The present study was conducted to elucidate the prevalence and characteristics of WRF after surgery for CHD in children. We also tested our hypothesis that, similar to adult heart failure, venous congestion is an important determinant of WRF independent of cardiac output in this population. Fifty-five consecutive pediatric patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery for CHD were studied (median age 0.7 years; range 3 days to 17 years). The degree of WRF was assessed by the difference between the maximum levels of postoperative serum creatinine (Cr) and preoperative serum Cr. There was a high prevalence of WRF in the present cohort: an increase in Cr level was observed in 47 patients (85 %) and a Cr increase ≥0.3 mg/dL was seen in 23 (42 %). Importantly, WRF was significantly associated with a worse clinical outcome of a longer stay in the intensive care unit and hospital (both p < 0.05), even after controlling for age and operative factors. In addition, multivariate regression analysis revealed that central venous pressure, rather than cardiac output, was an independent determinant of WRF. Postoperative management to relieve venous congestion may help ameliorate or prevent WRF and thereby improve outcomes in patients with CHD. PMID:26266633

  5. Multicystic congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

    PubMed

    Drut, Ricardo

    2002-01-01

    This report describes an unusual example of congenital mesoblastic nephroma cellular variant that presented in a 1-week-old neonate as a multicystic tumor of the kidney. Extensive pseudocystic cavitation resulted from progressive accumulation of ground substance in a loosely myxoid tissue composed of stellate- and spindle-shaped cells that compressed and infiltrated renal tissue. The cells of the tumor were positive for vimentin and smooth muscle actin. The patient is alive and well 16 years after surgery. Differential diagnosis from segmental cystic dysplasia, cystic intralobar nephrogenic rest, cystic nephroma, cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma, cystic nephroblastoma, and cystic clear cell sarcoma of the kidney, all of which may present at this age, is discussed. PMID:11927972

  6. Campomelic dysplasia and malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Andreia; Teixeira, Filomena; Camacho, Maria Carmo; Alves, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Campomelic dysplasia (CD) is a rare clinical entity, usually fatal in the first year of life. It is characterised by bowing and angulations of long bones, along with other congenital anomalies. The occurrence of malignant hyperthermia is rare, but it has been associated with skeletal dysplasias. The authors present the case of a boy, born at 40 weeks of gestational age, with multiple congenital anomalies and subsequently diagnosed with CD, who died at 16 months of age as a consequence of malignant hyperthermia. PMID:22691592

  7. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical dysplasia is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are many types of HPV. Some types lead to cervical dysplasia or cancer. ...

  8. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... following early in life: blood-filtering treatments called dialysis a kidney transplant Children with dysplasia in only ... mild dysplasia of both kidneys may not need dialysis or a kidney transplant for several years. Kidney ...

  9. Interstitial 1q23.3q24.1 deletion in a patient with renal malformation, congenital heart disease, and mild intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Hackmann, Karl; Klink, Barbara; Weber, Julia Sara; Mayer, Brigitte; Schröck, Evelin; Tzschach, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Interstitial deletions including chromosome region 1q23.3q24.1 are rare. Only eight patients with molecularly characterized deletions have been reported to date. Their phenotype included intellectual disability/developmental delay, growth retardation, microcephaly, congenital heart disease, and renal malformations. We report on a female patient with mild developmental delay, congenital heart disease, and bilateral renal hypoplasia in whom an interstitial de novo deletion of approximately 2.7 Mb in 1q23.3q24.1 was detected by array CGH. This is the smallest deletion described in this region so far. Genotype-phenotype comparison with previously published patients allowed us to propose LMX1A and RXRG as potential candidate genes for intellectual disability, PBX1 as a probable candidate gene for renal malformation, and enabled us to narrow down a chromosome region associated with microcephaly. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27255444

  10. Fetal and Postnatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Unilateral Cystic Renal Dysplasia in a Neonate with Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vineet; Bornstein, Eran; Schacht, Robert; Lala, Shailee; Milla, Sarah

    2014-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is an autosomal dominant condition associated with mutations in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 genes. Clinical manifestations are multisystemic, and they often include lesions in the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and bones. TSC2 gene mutations can be seen concomitantly with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene mutations. We present a case of a fetus with prenatal diagnosis of TS that had unique asymmetrical distribution of renal cystic disease. We describe the extensive work up with both fetal and neonatal magnetic resonance imaging with correlating images of the unilateral polycystic renal disease in addition to typical TS brain findings. PMID:24495558

  11. Potential Usefulness of 99mTc-DMSA for Radio-Guided Surgery in Pediatric Renal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Demetrio; Di Franco, Davide; Cacciaguerra, Sebastiano; Ruggeri, Antonella; Russo, Simona; Fornito, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of an ectopic/hypoplastic kidney removed by radio-guided surgery. A 7-year-old girl, with a history of vaginal drainage of urine, underwent renal scintigraphy with Tc-DMSA. SPECT/CT revealed a focal uptake in the pelvis, corresponding to hypoplastic kidney as confirmed by MRI. Based on SPECT/CT findings, the patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, using Tc-DMSA scan to help the surgeon to detect the small ectopic kidney. Intraoperatory histological report confirmed the renal origin of the specimen. PMID:26462041

  12. Congenital Anomalies in Infant with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Zahra; Yavarikia, Alireza; Torabian, Saadat

    2012-01-01

    Objective Congenital hypothyroidism is characterized by inadequate thyroid hormone production in newborn infants. Many infants with CH have co-occurring congenital malformations. This is an investigation on the frequency and types of congenital anomalies in infants with congenital hypothyroidism born from May 2006-2010 in Hamadan, west province of Iran. Methods The Iranian neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism was initiated in May 2005. This prospective descriptive study was conducted in infants diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism being followed up in Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic of Besat Hospital, a tertiary care centre in Hamadan. Cases included all infants with congenital hypothyroidism diagnosed through newborn screening program or detected clinically. Anomalies were identified by clinical examination, echocardiography, and X-ray of the hip during the infant’s first year of life. Results A total of 150 infants with biochemically confirmed primary congenital hypothyroidism (72 females and 78 males) were recruited during the period between May 2006-2010. Overall, 30 (20%) infants had associated congenital anomalies. The most common type of anomaly was Down syndrome. Seven infants (3.1%) had congenital cardiac anomalies such as: ASD (n=3), VSD (n=2), PS (n =1), PDA (n=1). Three children (2.6%) had developmental dysplasia of the hip (n=3). Conclusion The overall frequency of Down syndrome, cardiac malformation and other birth defect was high in infants with CH. This reinforces the need to examine all infants with congenital hypothyroidism for the presence of associated congenital anomalies. PMID:23074545

  13. Inappropriate tall stature and renal ectopy in a male patient with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to a novel missense mutation in the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Adriana; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Spagnuolo, Maria Immacolata; Spadaro, Raffaella; Giugliano, Michela; Mukai, Tokuo; Valerio, Giuliana

    2005-05-15

    Mutations in DAX-1 gene cause congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC). We present a male patient affected by X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita due to a novel DAX-1 missense mutation. The mutation V287G affects the C-terminal end of the DAX-1 protein which plays an important role in functioning of the receptor. In addition, our patient presented an inappropriate tall stature and renal ectopy, which have not been described in AHC so far. PMID:15800903

  14. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  15. Severe pancreas hypoplasia and multicystic renal dysplasia in two human fetuses carrying novel HNF1beta/MODY5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Haumaitre, Cécile; Fabre, Mélanie; Cormier, Sarah; Baumann, Clarisse; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Cereghini, Silvia

    2006-08-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the HNF1beta/vHNF1/TCF2 gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY5), associated with severe renal disease and abnormal genital tract. Here, we characterize two fetuses, a 27-week male and a 31.5-week female, carrying novel mutations in exons 2 and 7 of HNF1beta, respectively. Although these mutations were predicted to have different functional consequences, both fetuses displayed highly similar phenotypes. They presented one of the most severe phenotypes described in HNF1beta carriers: bilateral enlarged polycystic kidneys, severe pancreas hypoplasia and abnormal genital tract. Consistent with this, we detected high levels of HNF1beta transcripts in 8-week human embryos in the mesonephros and metanephric kidney and in the epithelium of pancreas. Renal histology and immunohistochemistry analyses of mutant fetuses revealed cysts derived from all nephron segments with multilayered epithelia and dysplastic regions, accompanied by a marked increase in the expression of beta-catenin and E-cadherin. A significant proportion of cysts still expressed the cystic renal disease proteins, polycystin-1, polycystin-2, fibrocystin and uromodulin, implying that cyst formation may result from a deregulation of cell-cell adhesion and/or the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. Both fetuses exhibited a severe pancreatic hypoplasia with underdeveloped and disorganized acini, together with an absence of ventral pancreatic-derived tissue. beta-catenin and E-cadherin were strongly downregulated in the exocrine and endocrine compartments, and the islets lacked the transporter essential for glucose-sensing GLUT2, indicating a beta-cell maturation defect. This study provides evidence of differential gene-dosage requirements for HNF1beta in normal human kidney and pancreas differentiation and increases our understanding of the etiology of MODY5 disorder. PMID:16801329

  16. Dysplasia of the contralateral hip in patients with unilateral late-detected congenital dislocation of the hip: 50 years' follow-up of 48 patients.

    PubMed

    Terjesen, T

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of dysplasia in the 'normal' contralateral hip in patients with unilateral developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH) and to evaluate the long-term prognosis of such hips. A total of 48 patients (40 girls and eight boys) were treated for late-detected unilateral DDH between 1958 and 1962. After preliminary skin traction, closed reduction was achieved at a mean age of 17.8 months (4 to 65) in all except one patient who needed open reduction. In 25 patients early derotation femoral osteotomy of the contralateral hip had been undertaken within three years of reduction, and later surgery in ten patients. Radiographs taken during childhood and adulthood were reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 50.9 years (43 to 55) at the time of the latest radiological review. In all, eight patients (17%) developed dysplasia of the contralateral hip, defined as a centre-edge (CE) angle < 20° during childhood or at skeletal maturity. Six of these patients underwent surgery to improve cover of the femoral head; the dysplasia improved in two after varus femoral osteotomy and in two after an acetabular shelf operation. During long-term follow-up the dysplasia deteriorated to subluxation in two patients (CE angles 4° and 5°, respectively) who both developed osteoarthritis (OA), and one of these underwent total hip replacement at the age of 49 years. In conclusion, the long-term prognosis for the contralateral hip was relatively good, as OA occurred in only two hips (4%) at a mean follow-up of 50 years. Regular review of the 'normal' side is indicated, and corrective surgery should be undertaken in those who develop subluxation. PMID:25183584

  17. Unknown syndrome: ischiadic hypoplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and a pattern of minor congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Braegger, C; Bottani, A; Hallé, F; Giedion, A; Leumann, E; Seger, R; Willi, U; Schinzel, A

    1991-01-01

    We report a 6 year old male with a pattern of malformations and anomalies including intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, a pattern of craniofacial anomalies (flat face, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, strabismus, short nose, low set ears), hypospadias and cryptorchidism, bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly between fingers 2 to 5 and toes 2 to 4, postaxial polydactyly of the fingers and toes, severe conductive hearing loss, hypoplasia of the ischiadic bones, complex renal dysfunction, hypogammaglobulinaemia with proneness to bacterial infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and recurrent pseudomembranous enterocolitis. The parents are cousins of Turkish origin. Images PMID:1999836

  18. Holoprosencephaly with caudal dysplasia. Pseudo-trisomy 13 or a distinct entity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.P.B.; Aylsworth, A.S.; Timmons, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    We have studied three chromosomally normal patients with multiple anomalies that include holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia. Each has features found in patients with pseudo-trisomy 13, though each lacks malformations common in that syndrome. Patients 1 and 2 did not have polydactyly and patients 2 and 3 had no congenital heart malformation. Patient 1 is also unusual in that he does not have typical holoprosencephalic facies and is alive at age 25 months. We have also identified two other similar patients in the London Dysmorphology Database, each of which had holoprosencephaly, congenital heart malformation, and imperforate anus. Isolated caudal dysplasia and holoprosencephaly are both causally heterogeneous. They have been reported together rarely in patients with several different syndromes including chromosomal abnormalities, monogenic syndromes, teratogenic insults, and syndromes of unknown cause. Over thirty cases of {open_quotes}pseudo-trisomy 13{close_quotes} have now been reported and eight of these have had features of caudal dysplasia. There have been four with imperforate anus or anal stenosis, one with lumbosacral vertebral anomaly, and three others with bilateral renal agenesis or hypoplasia. Based on our patients and this review of other reported and unreported cases, we suggest that caudal dysplasia may be a significant clinical feature of pseudo-trisomy 13. Alternatively, holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia with a normal karyotype may represent a similar though distinct entity. Some may have submicroscopic chromosomal deletions. Molecular studies of regions known to be associated with holoprosencephaly are currently in progress on tissue from Patient 1. We hope these observations will stimulate reports of similarly affected patients to allow better definition of pseudo-trisomy 13 and other overlap syndromes.

  19. Congenital Seminal Vesicle Cyst and Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis (Zinner Syndrome): A Rare Association and Its Evolution from Early Childhood to Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaki, Aikaterini; Vidal, Isabelle; Merlini, Laura; Hanquinet, Sylviane

    2015-01-01

    Zinner syndrome, the association of congenital seminal vesicle cyst and ipsilateral renal agenesis, is more often reported in adults or older adolescents. We present a case of a boy, followed up in our hospital since birth for right renal agenesis who at the age of 4 years presented a right paravesical cyst on ultrasound. The cyst was initially considered as an ureterocele. The diagnosis of Zinner syndrome was made later, at the age of 15 years by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging; at that moment the cyst had increased in size and had changed in aspect. This malformation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pelvic cyst in male patients with renal agenesis. PMID:26788458

  20. Ectodermal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the skin, hair, nails, teeth, or sweat glands. Causes There are many different types of ... equally. Symptoms People with ectodermal dysplasia may not sweat or may have decreased sweating because of a ...

  1. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN); Precancerous changes of the cervix; Cervical cancer - dysplasia ... lesion (SIL). On the Pap smear report, these changes will be described as: Low-grade (LSIL) High- ...

  2. Ultrasonography of nondevelopmental dysplasia of the hips.

    PubMed

    Grissom, L E; Harcke, H T

    1997-01-01

    We examined 45 infants with nondevelopmental dysplasia of the hip (non-DDH), including congenital deficiency of the femur (CDF) (20 infants), neuromuscular syndrome (five infants), skeletal dysplasia (15 infants), and infection (five infants), and present the sonographic findings. Dysmorphic proximal femora, coxa vara, and abnormal echogenicity of the soft tissue and cartilage are features which differentiate patients with non-DDH from those with typical DDH. PMID:8995174

  3. Congenital giant plexiform neurofibroma with occipital calvarial dysplasia in association with meningoencephalocele in neurofibromatosis Type 1 and segmental neurofibromatosis: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Dadlani, Ravi; Sadanand, Venkatraman; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2013-11-01

    Giant plexiform neurofibroma (GPNF) of the scalp is an extremely rare lesion reported in association with neurofibromatosis. Occipital location of GPNF is even more infrequent, especially in association with occipital dysplasia (OD). The authors report 2 pediatric cases of GPNF associated with OD. The first case had an associated meningoencephalocele, and the second had large vascular channels within the lesion and the dominant ipsilateral transverse sinus lying in the center of the calvarial defect. The authors present these 2 unusual cases with a review of literature and discuss the radiological findings, theories of etiopathogenesis of the OD, and management dilemmas. PMID:24032991

  4. Oculomotor-corpus callosum dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Acers, T E; Blackwell, C

    1982-01-01

    An infant with congenital bilateral ophthalmoplegia with levator and pupillary sparing is presented. The eyes are fixed in a divergent position with no apparent motility. The baby is otherwise clinically normal and is developing in a normal fashion except for delayed growth pattern. Visual attention is present and he fixates with either eye. Computed tomography demonstrates an associated dysplasia of the corpus callosum and an abnormal ventricular system. Neuroendocrine studies performed at one year of age demonstrate subnormal levels of growth hormone. It is postulated that this represents an embryodysgenesis involving the developing mesencephalic tegmentum (oculomotor nuclei) and the diencephalic lamina reuniens (corpus callosum). It is the first reported case of congenital ophthalmoplegia with corpus callosum dysplasia. The "embryodysgenic" relationship with other forebrain-ocular anomalies has been alluded to and remains speculative. PMID:7182958

  5. [Multilocular renal cyst in adults: a diagnosis by exclusion?].

    PubMed

    Redondo Martínez, E; Rey López, A

    1991-05-01

    The clinical and the gross and microscopic features of two multicystic masses in adult female patients are described. These met the Powell and Boggs and Kimelstiel criteria for multilocular renal cyst (MRC). MRC may be the common process and the gross expression of different disease entities with different biological significance which must be distinguished clinically and anatomopathologically. We present the data for differential diagnosis of conditions that may present as MRC: partially differentiated cystic nephroblastoma, mesoblastic congenital cystic nephroma, lymphangioma (more common in infants), cystic renal carcinoma and sarcoma, segmental polycystic kidney (more common in adults) and segmental renal dysplasia. The diagnosis of multilocular renal cyst should be made only after discarding the foregoing conditions. PMID:2064438

  6. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  7. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome plus; a contiguous gene constellation of congenital anomalies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    A term female infant was referred to the University Hospital because of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral choanal stenosis. Her examination revealed bilateral pre-auricular pits, branchial fistulae, cupped shaped ears, and bilateral athelia. She failed ABR screening; her creatinine was elevated to 1.5 mgs% and renal ultra-sonography showed reduced kidney size bilaterally. She was the product of her mother`s third pregnancy. The first produced a now normal 5 year old son. The second pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios and resulted in a premature delivery at 27 weeks gestation. The infant expired secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia. The mother had bilateral neurosensory deafness, pre-auricular pits, cupped shaped ears, lacrimal stenois and bilateral athelia. She wore dentures having earlier been diagnosed with dentogeneis imperfecta. She was shorter than her three normal sisters and had experienced academic problems throughout her school years. The maternal grandfather had an adult onset neurosensory hearing loss, but he and the maternal grandmother exhibited no other features of the BOR syndrome. Althelia was present only in the mother and daughter. The mother clearly has BOR syndrome transmitted to one, and possibly two, of her three offspring. The additional features of athelia, choanal stenosis and dentogenesis imperfecta are thought to represent additional autosomal dominant traits. Greenberg described an infant with athelia and choanal atresia. By family linkage studies, the BOR syndrome has been mapped to 8q13-21 with no recombination observed with loci D8S530 and D8S279. Given a normal prophase karyotype in the proband, it is speculated that a sub-microscopic deletion at 8q13-21 is the likely basis for the constellation of birth defects seen in this mother and daughter. Analysis of D8S530 and D8S279 is currently underway in this family.

  8. Diagnostic and surgical challenge: middle ear dermoid cyst in 12 month old with branchio-oto-renal syndrome and multiple middle-ear congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D R; Whittemore, K; Poe, D; Robson, C D; Perez-Atayde, A R

    2011-10-01

    Described is the first case report, to our knowledge, of a middle-ear dermoid in a child with branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. Radiographic, pathologic, and intraoperative figures are shown. This was a diagnostic and surgical challenge as the presentation was similar to a congenital cholesteatoma and the child had numerous significant temporal bone abnormalities. After the intraoperative findings suggested a non-destructive process, the treatment strategy was altered. This case reiterates the need for a cautious, flexible operative approach in a syndromic child. Included is a relevant review of the literature and a detailed clinical analysis. PMID:21868107

  9. Fibrous dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Fibrous dysplasia is a bone disease that destroys and replaces normal bone with fibrous ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bone Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  10. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dimes National Kidney Foundation Urology Care Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Kidney Dysplasia Page Content On this page: What is ...

  11. Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction: physiopathology, decoupling of tout court pelvic dilatation-obstruction semantic connection, biomarkers to predict renal damage evolution.

    PubMed

    Alberti, C

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of fetal ultrasonography results in a frequent antenatally observation of hydronephrosis, ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) accounting for the greatest fraction of congenital obstructive nephropathy. UPJO may be considered, in most cases, as a functional obstructive condition, depending on defective fetal smooth muscle/nerve development at this level, with lack of peristaltic wave propagation--aperistaltic segment--and, therefore, poor urine ejection from the renal pelvis into the ureter. The UPJO-related physiopathologic events are, at first, the compliant dilatation of renal pelvis that, acting as hydraulic buffer, protects the renal parenchyma from the rising intrapelvic pressure-related potential damages, and, subsequently, beyond such phase of dynamic balance, the tubular cell stretch-stress induced by increased intratubular pressure and following parenchymal inflammatory lesions: inflammatory infiltrates, fibroblast proliferation, activation of myofibroblasts, tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), several chemo- and cytokines, growth factors, prostaglandins and eicosanoids, angiotensin-II are the main pathogenetic mediators of the obstructive nephropathy. Apoptosis of tubular cells is the major cause of the tubular atrophy, together with epithelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation. Some criticisms on tout court semantic renal pelvis dilatation-obstruction connection have been raised considering that the renal pelvis expansion isn't, in any case, linked to an ostructive condition, as it may be verified by diuretic (furosemide) renogram together with scintiscan-based evaluation of differential renal function. In this regard, rather than repetitive invasive nuclear procedures that expose the children to ionizing radiations, an intriguing noninvasive strategy, based on the evaluation of urinary biomarkers and urinary proteome, can define the UPJO-related possible progress of parenchymal lesions

  12. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure. PMID:25556185

  13. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Overview What is arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (say: “uh-rith-mo-jen-ic right ven-trick- ...

  14. Birth prevalence rates of skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Dott, B; Roth, M P; Alembik, Y

    1989-02-01

    This study establishes the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias which can be diagnosed in the perinatal period or during pregnancy. Using a population-based register of congenital anomalies, a prevalence rate of 3.22 0/000 was observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.64 0/000, 1/15,000 births), thanatophoric dysplasia and achondrogenesis (0.28 0/000). The mutation rate for achondroplasia was higher in our material than in the other studies: 3.3 x 10(-5) per gamete per generation. Our study demonstrates that prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound is possible in some skeletal dysplasias. PMID:2785882

  15. Thanatophoric Dysplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jyoti; Jain, Rekha; Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) is a congenital, sporadic and the most lethal skeletal dysplasia caused by new mutation in the FGFR3 gene. At birth, it is characterized by shortening of the limbs (micromelia), small conical thorax, platyspondyly (flat vertebral bodies) and macrocephaly. TD is divided into two clinically defined subtypes: type I and II with some clinical overlap between the two subtypes. They can be differentiated by the skull shape and femur morphology. Ultrasound examination in the second trimester is often straight forward in diagnosing the congenital anomaly. We report a case of pre term fresh stillborn baby with dysmorphic facies, macrocephaly, micromelia with short stubby fingers and deep skin creases, narrow thorax and protuberant abdomen which delivered at our hospital. The ultrasound examination showed shortening of long bones with femur shaped like telephone receiver. Dysmorphic facial features and skeletal abnormalities in the baby lead us to make the diagnosis of TD type I. Because of the rarity of this condition we report this case of thanatophoric dysplasia with a short review of literature. PMID:26675119

  16. Upper pole multicystic dysplasia and ureteropelvic junction obstruction associated with obstructive-refluxing megaureter in a neonate with a single kidney.

    PubMed

    Neulander, Endre Z; Katz, Tiberiu; Kaneti, Jacob

    2010-12-01

    A 20-day-old male neonate presented with fever and hydronephrosis. Evaluation revealed that the patient had a single left kidney and a rare combination of multiple congenital malformations: upper pole segmental multicystic dysplasia, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, and an obstructive and refluxing megaureter (ureterovesical junction obstruction). We performed percutaneous drainage of the infected and obstructed upper collecting system and then used a sequential approach to manage the patient's anomalies. First, we performed an upper pole partial nephrectomy and pyeloplasty with a modified Y ureterostomy. Second, when the child was older, we performed ureterovesical reimplantation with ureteral tailoring. Currently, after 5 years of follow up, the patient has stable renal function. PMID:21172113

  17. Skeletal Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Synoposis The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  18. Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care, it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence, and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities, and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  19. Twenty-one-year-old male with congenital anomalies, obstructive uropathy and chronic renal failure: is this a case of Townes Brocks syndrome?

    PubMed

    Unuigbe, E I; Azubike, C A; Okaka, E I; Osarenkhoe, J O; Onuora, V C

    2007-03-01

    Townes Brocks syndrome is an autosomal dominant multiple malformations syndrome comprising of ear anomalies/hearing loss, limb defects, anal, genitourinary, eye, spine anomalies, heart defects and sometimes mental retardation. This report presents the case of a 21-year-old secondary school leaver as a likely case of Townes-Brocks syndrome. He was born with congenital abnormalities consisting of fixed flexion deformities of hands, wrist and elbows, urethral meatal stenosis, scoliosis and aortic stenosis. He was diagnosed with obstructive uropathy at the age of 19 years and subsequently developed chronic renal failure. The report aims to highlight the need for early recognition of potentially preventable conditions, which, if left unattended to, can lead to unnecessary fatality. PMID:17668723

  20. Severity grading in radial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Vilkki, S K

    2014-11-01

    A functional scoring method to grade the usefulness and quality of the upper limbs in congenital radial dysplasia is presented. It is based on the author's examinations of 44 arms with congenital deficiency of the radius. The hand (H), wrist (W) and proximal parts (P) of the extremity are each scored from 0 to 10 points for severity. The scoring is expressed similarly to the TNM (tumour, nodes, metastasis) tumour classification, for example as H5W4P2. The maximum severity index is 30 points. A severity grade of mild is between 1 and 8 points, moderate between 9 and 16 points and severe 17 points and over. In the author's series, the grades were mild in eight, moderate in 21 and severe in 15 cases. The functional severity grading should allow better comparison of radially deficient limbs and the results of treatment between groups of patients. PMID:24401744

  1. Cervical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix is preceded by a series of premalignant changes described as mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. These premalignant states are identified by cervical cytology, diagnosed by colposcopy and if effectively treated, can prevent invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix. Because of the apparent biological variation of the premalignant states, even the most aggressive cervical screening program cannot be expected to eliminate all invasive squamous cancer of the cervix. Optimal results of a cervical screening program will be achieved when all women under 35 years of age and sexually active have an annual cytological smear; the cytology is screened by a laboratory with high quality control; the patient's positive cytology is accurately assessed by an experienced colposcopist, and the premalignant lesion is effectively treated. PMID:21283455

  2. A novel phenotype in N-glycosylation disorders: Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura skeletal dysplasia due to pathogenic variants in ALG9.

    PubMed

    Tham, Emma; Eklund, Erik A; Hammarsjö, Anna; Bengtson, Per; Geiberger, Stefan; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Malmgren, Helena; Nilsson, Daniel; Grigelionis, Gintautas; Conner, Peter; Lindgren, Peter; Lindstrand, Anna; Wedell, Anna; Albåge, Margareta; Zielinska, Katarzyna; Nordgren, Ann; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; Nishimura, Gen; Grigelioniene, Giedre

    2016-02-01

    A rare lethal autosomal recessive syndrome with skeletal dysplasia, polycystic kidneys and multiple malformations was first described by Gillessen-Kaesbach et al and subsequently by Nishimura et al. The skeletal features uniformly comprise a round pelvis, mesomelic shortening of the upper limbs and defective ossification of the cervical spine. We studied two unrelated families including three affected fetuses with Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura syndrome using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing, comparative genome hybridization and homozygosity mapping. All affected patients were shown to have a novel homozygous splice variant NM_024740.2: c.1173+2T>A in the ALG9 gene, encoding alpha-1,2-mannosyltransferase, involved in the formation of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor of N-glycosylation. RNA analysis demonstrated skipping of exon 10, leading to shorter RNA. Mass spectrometric analysis showed an increase in monoglycosylated transferrin as compared with control tissues, confirming that this is a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). Only three liveborn children with ALG9-CDG have been previously reported, all with missense variants. All three suffered from intellectual disability, muscular hypotonia, microcephaly and renal cysts, but none had skeletal dysplasia. Our study shows that some pathogenic variants in ALG9 can present as a lethal skeletal dysplasia with visceral malformations as the most severe phenotype. The skeletal features overlap with that previously reported for ALG3- and ALG12-CDG, suggesting that this subset of glycosylation disorders constitutes a new diagnostic group of skeletal dysplasias. PMID:25966638

  3. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia may be associated with 17q12 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goumy, Carole; Laffargue, Fanny; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Kemeny, Stéphen; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetiti; Gallot, Denis; Francannet, Christine; Tchirkov, Andrei; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Vago, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions of 17q12 encompassing TCF2 are associated with maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5, cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, Mullerian aplasia in females and variable cognitive impairment. We report on a patient with a de novo 17q12 microdeletion, 1.8 Mb in size, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The 5-year-old male patient presented multicystic renal dysplasia kidneys, minor facial dysmorphic features and skeletal anomalies, but neither developmental delay nor behavioral abnormalities. CDH has been previously associated with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome only in one prenatal case. The present study reinforces the hypothesis that CDH is part of the phenotype for 17q12 microdeletion and that 17q12 encompasses candidate(s) gene(s) involved in diaphragm development. We suggest that PIGW, a gene involved in an early step of GPI biosynthesis, could be a strong candidate gene for CDH. PMID:25425496

  4. Oculodentodigital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-01-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  5. Oculodentodigital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-03-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  6. [Renal volumetric echography in the newborn infant with an agenetic, dysplastic or obstructive contralateral kidney].

    PubMed

    Uroz-Tristán, J; Pérez Candela, V; García-Anguiano Duque, F; Busto Ferrer, C; Domínguez Ortega, F; Arteaga García, R; Sanchís Solera, L; de la Iglesia Iñigo, S; Valenciano Fuentes, B

    1994-07-01

    In newborn babies with congenital renal pathology type agenesia, dysplasia or obstruction is very important to know if there is intrautero vicariant growing of the contralateral kidney. To find out that we have proceeded to be ultrasound volume measurement of the normal renal unit, as this is a valuable parameter related to compensatory mechanisms. We have studied by ultrasounds 28 renal units (16 right, 12 left) in newborns with contralateral pathology: pyeloureteral stenosis in 10 cases, multicystic kidney in 13 cases, renal agenesia in 3 cases, obstructive ureterocele in 1 case and another one with ureterovesical stenosis. We considered renal function, length of the larger renal axis width and depth of the kidney mass. Renal function was normal in all cases. Analysis of objectives results show a clear difference between the volume of normal Kidneys in children with contralateral pathology and the control group constituted by 42 renal unit in normal newborns without urological pathology. We conclude with the real evidence of compensatory growing of the normal contralateral kidney during intrautero periods. PMID:7999515

  7. Pseudoachondroplastic Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jeff W

    1999-01-01

    Lamellar inclusions of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in growth plate chondrocytes, first identified (1972) in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Iowa, has become the cytochemical hallmark for the pseudoachondroplastic dysplasia (PSACH) phenotype, linking an endoplasmic reticulum storage disorder with the osteochondrodysplasia. Since this original observation, great advances have been made, leading to the molecular understanding of this altered longitudinal bone growth anomaly. A PSACH canine model suggested that abatement of cumulative vertical growth of growth plate chondrocytes seen in PSACH results from (1) altered extracellular matrix constraints for horizontal growth and (2) uncoupling of endochondral and perichondral growth that causes metaphyseal flaring. PSACH, an autosomal dominant disease, is linked to mutation of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene. Amino acid substitutions, deletions, or additions is proposed to alter COMP structure that cause its retention in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of growth plate chondrocytes, leading to (1) compositional and structural change of the extracellular matrix, and (2) altered cellular proliferation and volume expansion. Normal growth and development occurs in COMP gene knockout mice that do not synthesis COMP, demonstrating that a mutant COMP, not absence of COMP, is required for the PSACH phenotype. The mechanism by which mutant COMP induces a PSACH phenotype remains to be elucidated. At the University of Iowa a cell culture system has been developed whereby mutant COMP transgenes are introduced into chondrocytes and the expressed product COMP is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. This readily manipulated system makes it possible to decipher systematically the system's cellular secretory processing pathway, in order to clarify the mechanism(s) by which the mutant COMP is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum. Concurrent with this is the development of transgenic mice

  8. Evolutive leukoencephalopathy in congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Krakar, Goran; Đaković, Ivana; Delin, Sanja; Bošnjak, Vlatka Mejaški

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is the most common infectious cause of congenital brain injury. Type and severity of congenital cytomegalovirus infection-related brain abnormalities depend on the developmental stage of the central nervous system at the time of fetal infection. The aim of this study was to follow the course of leukoencephalopathy in a patient with congenital cytomegalovirus infection. We describe brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a boy with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection performed at the age of 3 weeks, 13 months, and 4 and 7 years. Neonatal brain MRI showed most of characteristic findings in congenital cytomegalovirus infection with most prominent white matter abnormalities and cortical dysplasia. MRI follow-up images showed that cortical dysgenesis remained unchanged and static, whereas white matter abnormalities evolved over the years. We propose that leukoencephalopathy in congenital cytomegalovirus infection is not only nonprogressive or static but even evolutive and suggests both underlying disruption and delay of myelination. PMID:24453153

  9. A recessive syndrome of intellectual disability, moderate overgrowth, and renal dysplasia predisposing to Wilms tumor is caused by a mutation in FIBP gene.

    PubMed

    Akawi, Nadia; Ben-Salem, Salma; Lahti, Laura; Partanen, Juha; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2016-08-01

    Clinical classification of overgrowth syndromes represents a challenge since a wide spectrum of disorders result in marked overgrowth. Therefore, there is a continuous effort to identify the genetic basis of these disorders that will eventually facilitate their molecular classification. Here, we have identified the genetic etiology and the pathogenetic mechanism underlying a rare autosomal recessive overgrowth syndrome in three affected siblings. The overgrowth phenotype in the patients was accompanied by developmental delay, learning disabilities, and variable congenital abnormalities. To elucidate the genetic etiology of the disorder, whole-genome genotyping and whole-exome sequencing were used. The disease was mapped to 3p21.1-p14.2 and 11q13.1-q13.4, where an in-frame insertion (c.175_176insTAA) in FIBP gene was revealed. The resulting indel (p.H59LN) was predicted to change the protein conformation with likely deleterious effect on its function as one of the fibroblast growth factor signaling mediators. In vitro cellular proliferation assay and in situ hypridization in vivo were then performed to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. The patients' skin fibroblasts showed an increased proliferation capacity compared to the controls' explaining the observed overgrowth phenotype. In addition, we detected Fibp expression most notably in the brains of mice embryos suggesting a possible effect on cognitive functions early in development. To date, only one patient has been reported with a homozygous nonsense mutation in FIBP exhibiting an overgrowth syndrome with multiple congenital abnormalities. Taken all together, these findings provide convincing evidence implicating FIBP aberrations in the newly recognized overgrowth syndrome and expand the associated phenotypes to include possible Wilms tumor predisposition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27183861

  10. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  11. Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome associated with renal dysplasia and embryonal tumor: localization of the gene to Xqcen-q21.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Benzie, R M; Hunter, A G; Allanson, J E; Mackenzie, A E

    We report 6 affected males in a 5-generation family with x-linked Simpson-Golabi-Behmel (SGB) syndrome. All had pre- and postnatal overgrowth with 2 adult males attaining heights over 195 cm. Other features included "coarse" face with hypertelorism, broad nasal root, cleft palate, full lips with a midline groove of the lower lip, grooved tongue with tongue tie, prominent mandible, congenital heart defects, arrhythmias, supernumerary nipples, splenomegaly, large dysplastic kidneys, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, skeletal abnormalities and postaxial hexadactyly. All affected individuals were of normal intelligence. One boy died at age 19 months of a neuroblastoma. The putative origin of the gene in this family was the maternal great grandmother of the propositus. Eight carrier females, who showed varying manifestations of the gene, have been identified. Anthropometric analysis has identified preliminary characteristic craniofacial dimensions in this syndrome. Molecular studies have shown a maximal lod score of 2.81 with no recombinants observed for the SGB-DXYS68 pairing, mapping the disorder to Xqcen-Xq21.3. PMID:1605222

  12. Isolation of cosmids corresponding to the chromosome breakpoints of a de novo autosomal translocation, t(6;19)(p21;q13.1), in a patient with multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Groenen, P M; Garcia, E; Thoelen, R; Aly, M; Schoenmakers, E F; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J P; Van de Ven, W J

    1996-01-01

    Hydronephrosis caused by pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) is a frequent urological malformation assumed to result from a deficient development of the ureteric bud. The exact etiology of pelvi-ureteric junction stenosis is unknown, but there is convincing evidence for a genetic cause, with linkage analysis predicting a hereditary hydronephrosis locus on chromosome 6p. We encountered a patient with a de novo autosomal t(6;19)(p21;q13.1) and attendant bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia (MRD), bilateral PUJO resulting in massive hydronephrosis, and an associated von Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster disorder. On the basis of the presumption that in this patient the putative hydronephrosis gene might be disrupted by the translocation, we sought to isolate DNA from the breakpoint regions as the initial step in a strategy to identify genes affected by the t(6; 19). Using sequential rounds of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmids selected from a detailed integrated map of the long arm of chromosome 19, we have identified a cosmid clone that spans the breakpoint. The position of the breakpoint was further localized by Southern blot analysis. Using a vectorette PCR approach, rearranged DNA fragments were isolated and, by comparative nucleotide sequence analysis, these were shown to contain ectopic sequences. A cosmid clone containing these ectopic sequences was isolated and shown by CASH (chromosome assignment using somatic cell hybrids) and FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) analysis to map to the short arm of chromosome 6 and to span the breakpoint found in the MRD patient. The isolated cosmid clones are useful reagents for analysis of other MRD patients and for the search for genes at or flanking the breakpoints. PMID:9067426

  13. Two-stage release in Streeter's dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Zohaib Gulzar; Rao, Irfan; Anwer, Wahid; Yaseen, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Streeter's dysplasia is a rare disorder of congenital constricting bands, occurring in 1-10 000 birth, with no sex predilection. In severe cases, it is associated with autoamputation of distal extremities such as fingers and toes. Recent advances have made it possible, in developed countries, to recognise this condition in the prenatal period and to initiate prompt intrauterine management, however, these, being uncommon procedures, need technical advances and experienced hands. In developing countries, recognition of the condition with timely management of primary and associated abnormalities required. We present a case of a 4-month-old child with type IV Streeter's dysplasia associated with right flexible clubfoot, who underwent successful two-stage release of symptomatic constricting bands from bilateral legs. PMID:25899511

  14. Congenital cardiac anomalies in an English bulldog.

    PubMed

    McConkey, Marina J

    2011-11-01

    A 4-year-old male castrated English bulldog was referred to the Atlantic Veterinary College for evaluation of exercise intolerance, multiple syncopal episodes, and a grade IV/VI heart murmur. The dog was shown to have 3 congenital cardiac anomalies: atrial septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia, and subaortic stenosis. Medical management consisted of exercise restriction, atenolol, pimobendan, and taurine. PMID:22547849

  15. Neonatal vascularization and oxygen tension regulate appropriate perinatal renal medulla/papilla maturation.

    PubMed

    Phua, Yu Leng; Gilbert, Thierry; Combes, Alexander; Wilkinson, Lorine; Little, Melissa H

    2016-04-01

    Congenital medullary dysplasia with obstructive nephropathy is a common congenital disorder observed in paediatric patients and represents the foremost cause of renal failure. However, the molecular processes regulating normal papillary outgrowth during the postnatal period are unclear. In this study, transcriptional profiling of the renal medulla across postnatal development revealed enrichment of non-canonical Wnt signalling, vascular development, and planar cell polarity genes, all of which may contribute to perinatal medulla/papilla maturation. These pathways were investigated in a model of papillary hypoplasia with functional obstruction, the Crim1(KST264/KST264) transgenic mouse. Postnatal elongation of the renal papilla via convergent extension was unaffected in the Crim1(KST264/KST264) hypoplastic renal papilla. In contrast, these mice displayed a disorganized papillary vascular network, tissue hypoxia, and elevated Vegfa expression. In addition, we demonstrate the involvement of accompanying systemic hypoxia arising from placental insufficiency, in appropriate papillary maturation. In conclusion, this study highlights the requirement for normal vascular development in collecting duct patterning, development of appropriate nephron architecture, and perinatal papillary maturation, such that disturbances contribute to obstructive nephropathy. PMID:26800422

  16. HDR Syndrome (Hypoparathyroidism, Sensorineural Deafness and Renal Disease) Accompanied by Hirschsprung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sepahi, Mohsen Akhavan; Baraty, Behrouz; Shooshtary, Fatemeh Khalifeh

    2010-01-01

    Background HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal disease) is an autosomal dominant condition, defined by the triad hypoparathyroidism, renal dysplasia and hearing loss. Hirschsprung (HSCR) disease is a variable congenital absence of ganglion cells of the enteric nervous system resulting in degrees of functional bowel obstruction. Rarer chromosomal anomalies are reported in combination with Hirschsprung disease like DiGeorge syndrome, mosaic trisomy 8, XXY chromosomal constitution, partial duplication of chromosome 2q, tetrasomy 9p, and 20p deletion. Case Presentation Here, we describe an 8 year-old girl with HDR syndrome accompanied by Hirschsprung disease. Although the association of Hirschsprung disease with chromosomal anomalies has been reported, according to our knowledge, this is the first report of associated HSCR with HDR syndrome. PMID:23056694

  17. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Clinical Overview for the Dental Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Halai, Tina; Stevens, Claire

    2015-10-01

    The term ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is used to describe a group of rare congenital disorders characterized by abnormalities of two or more ectodermal structures such as the skin, hair, nails, teeth and sweat glands. This paper will give an overview of the aetiology of ED and describe the manifestations and dental management of this condition. In particular, the important role of the dental practitioner in the identification and management of patients with ED will be highlighted. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Dental practitioners should be aware of the oral features of ectodermal dysplasia and be able to make timely referrals and provide appropriate continuing care for these patients. PMID:26685476

  18. Unusual association between cardiac, skeletal, urogenital and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Goryaeva, Maria; Sykes, Mark Christopher; Lau, Benjamin; West, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with an array of congenital abnormalities. She has been diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease (PCKD) with no detectable mutations in PKD1 or PKD2, spina bifida occulta, thoracic skeletal abnormalities, a uterus didelphys and a patent foramen ovale (PFO). There are several associations reported in the literature that include abnormalities similar to the patient's, but none describe her presentation in its entirety. The MURCS association is characterised by (MU)llerian duct aplasia, (R)enal dysplasia and (C)ervical (S)omite anomalies and goes some way in explaining these condition. Patients with both MURCS and PCKD have not been described in current literature. Through this report, we hope to bring a potential diagnosis to light and provide the patient with an improved understanding of her health. PMID:27402585

  19. Developmental Genetics and Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Uy, Natalie; Reidy, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are common birth defects and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in children. There is a wide spectrum of renal abnormalities, from mild hydronephrosis to more severe cases, such as bilateral renal dysplasia. The etiology of the majority of cases of CAKUT remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence that genomic imbalance contributes to the pathogenesis of CAKUT. Advances in human and mouse genetics have contributed to increased understanding of the pathophysiology of CAKUT. Mutations in genes involved in both transcription factors and signal transduction pathways involved in renal development are associated with CAKUT. Large cohort studies suggest that copy number variants, genomic, or de novo mutations may explain up to one-third of all cases of CAKUT. One of the major challenges to the use of genetic information in the clinical setting remains the lack of strict genotype-phenotype correlation. However, identifying genetic causes of CAKUT may lead to improved diagnosis of extrarenal complications. With the advent of decreasing costs for whole genome and exome sequencing, future studies focused on genotype-phenotype correlations, gene modifiers, and animal models of gene mutations will be needed to translate genetic advances into improved clinical care. PMID:27617142

  20. Compensatory Growth of Congenital Solitary Kidneys in Pigs Reflects Increased Nephron Numbers Rather Than Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Vuuren, Stefan H.; Sol, Chalana M.; Broekhuizen, Roel; Lilien, Marc R.; Oosterveld, Michiel J. S.; Nguyen, Tri Q.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with unilateral MultiCystic Kidney Dysplasia (MCKD) or unilateral renal agenesis (URA) have a congenital solitary functioning kidney (CSFK) that is compensatory enlarged. The question whether this enlargement is due to increased nephron numbers and/or to nephron hypertrophy is unresolved. This question is of utmost clinical importance, since hypertrophy is associated with a risk of developing hypertension and proteinuria later in life with consequent development of CKD and cardiovascular disease. Methodology/Principal Findings In a cohort of 32,000 slaughter pigs, 7 congenital solitary functioning kidneys and 7 control kidneys were identified and harvested. Cortex volume was measured and with a 3-dimensional stereologic technique the number and volume of glomeruli was determined and compared. The mean total cortex volume was increased by more than 80% and the mean number of glomeruli per kidney was 50% higher in CSFKs than in a single control kidney, equaling 75% of the total nephron number in both kidneys of control subjects. The mean total glomerular volume in the CSFKs was not increased relative to the controls. Conclusions/Significance Thus, in pigs, compensatory enlargement of a CSFK is based on increased nephron numbers. Extrapolation of these findings to the human situation suggests that patients with a CSFK might not be at increased risk for developing hyperfiltration-associated renal and cardiovascular disease in later life due to a lower nephron number. PMID:23185419

  1. Treatment of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A

    2011-04-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common orthopaedic developmental disorder of dogs. This paper reviews the treatment options available for management of the condition in the skeletally immature and adult dog. PMID:21906059

  2. Renal outcome in adults with renal insufficiency and irregular asymmetric kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Neild, Guy H; Thomson, Gill; Nitsch, Dorothea; Woolfson, Robin G; Connolly, John O; Woodhouse, Christopher RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background The commonest cause of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) in children and young adults is congenital malformation of the kidney and urinary tract. In this retrospective review, we examine whether progression to ESRF can be predicted and whether treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) can delay or prevent this. Methods We reviewed 78 patients with asymmetric irregular kidneys as a consequence of either primary vesico-ureteric reflux or renal dysplasia (Group 1, n = 44), or abnormal bladder function (Group 2, n = 34). Patients (median age 24 years) had an estimated GFR (eGFR) < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 with at least 5 years of follow up (median 143 months). 48 patients received ACEI. We explored potential prognostic factors that affect the time to ESRF using Cox-regression analyses. Results At start, mean (SE) creatinine was 189 (8) μmol/l, mean eGFR 41 (1) ml/min 1.73 m2, mean proteinuria 144 (14) mg/mmol creatinine (1.7 g/24 hrs). Of 78 patients, 36 (46%) developed ESRF, but none of 19 with proteinuria less than 50 mg/mmol and only two of 18 patients with eGFR above 50 ml/min did so. Renal outcome between Groups 1 and 2 appeared similar with no evidence for a difference. A benefit in favour of treatment with ACEI was observed above an eGFR of 40 ml/min (p = 0.024). Conclusion The similar outcome of the two groups supports the nephrological nature of progressive renal failure in young men born with abnormal bladders. There is a watershed GFR of 40–50 ml/min at which ACEI treatment can be successful at improving renal outcome. PMID:15462683

  3. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jhamb, Aakarsh; Mohanty, Sujata; Jhamb, Parul A

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia can present clinically in varied forms which may appear as collision of different pathologic processes. We report a rare case of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia with coexisting epithelial lined cyst and superimposed osteomyelitis with sequestrum formation. Its clinical features and management with possible hypotheses are described along with the post operative course. Pertinent literature has been reviewed with emphasis on pathogenesis of this unique occurrence. PMID:23248490

  4. First trimester prenatal diagnosis of chondroectodermal dysplasia (Ellis-van Creveld syndrome) with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dugoff, L; Thieme, G; Hobbins, J C

    2001-01-01

    Chondroectodermal dysplasia (Ellis-van Creveld syndrome) is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by short-limb dwarfism, postaxial polydactyly, ectodermal defects, and congenital heart disease. This condition is most prevalent in the Amish population of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA, occurring in 1/5000 births and in 1/60,000 births in the general population. This report presents a case of ultrasonographic detection of chondroectodermal dysplasia at 12 weeks of gestation. PMID:11244665

  5. The birth prevalence rates for the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Orioli, I M; Castilla, E E; Barbosa-Neto, J G

    1986-08-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias that can be recognised in the perinatal period. Using the data base of the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC), for the years 1978 to 1983, on 349 470 births (live and stillbirths), a crude prevalence rate of 2.3/10 000 was observed. However, several indications of under-registration suggest that the real value is about twice that observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia, with a prevalence rate between 0.5 and 1.5/10 000 births, the thanatophoric dysplasia/achondrogenesis group (0.2 and 0.5/10 000 births), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.4/10 000 births). The mutation rate for autosomal dominant achondroplasia was estimated at between 1.72 and 5.57 X 10(-5) per gamete per generation. PMID:3746832

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Greenberg dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop properly, causing a distinctive spotted appearance called moth-eaten bone, which is visible on x-ray ... Greenberg dysplasia is also called hydrops-ectopic calcification-moth-eaten skeletal dysplasia (HEM), which reflects the condition's ...

  7. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  8. Novel perspectives for investigating congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT).

    PubMed

    Renkema, Kirsten Y; Winyard, Paul J; Skovorodkin, Ilya N; Levtchenko, Elena; Hindryckx, An; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Weber, Stefanie; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Vainio, Seppo; Schedl, Andreas; Schaefer, Franz; Knoers, Nine V A M; Bongers, Ernie M H F

    2011-12-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the commonest cause of chronic kidney disease in children. Structural anomalies within the CAKUT spectrum include renal agenesis, kidney hypo-/dysplasia, multicystic kidney dysplasia, duplex collecting system, posterior urethral valves and ureter abnormalities. While most CAKUT cases are sporadic, familial clustering of CAKUT is common, emphasizing a strong genetic contribution to CAKUT origin. Animal experiments demonstrate that alterations in genes crucial for kidney development can cause experimental CAKUT, while expression studies implicate mislocalization and/or aberrant levels of the encoded proteins in human CAKUT. Further insight into the pathogenesis of CAKUT will improve strategies for early diagnosis, follow-up and treatment. Here, we outline a collaborative approach to identify and characterize novel factors underlying human CAKUT. This European consortium will share the largest collection of CAKUT patients available worldwide and undertake multidisciplinary research into molecular and genetic pathogenesis, with extension into translational studies to improve long-term patient outcomes. PMID:22121240

  9. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed. PMID:27607320

  10. Hereditary renal adysplasia: new observations and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Moerman, P; Fryns, J P; Sastrowijoto, S H; Vandenberghe, K; Lauweryns, J M

    1994-01-01

    Renal agenesis and dysplasia are frequently regarded by pathologists, even pediatric pathologists, as sporadic malformations. We report six fetal autopsy cases of hereditary renal adysplasia (HRA): two pairs of siblings, one case with paternal unilateral renal agenesis, and one case with an autosomal balanced 6p/19q translocation. The main purpose of this paper is to emphasize that nonsyndromal renal agenesis and dysplasia are pathogenetically related and often inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and variable expression. A subsidiary purpose is to present a case of bilateral multicystic dysplasia with a balanced 6p/19q translocation. This observation further supports the assignment of one of the loci for HRA to chromosome 6p. PMID:8065999

  11. Prevalence and risk factors for renal scars in children with febrile UTI and/or VUR: A cross-sectional observational study of 565 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, Warren T.; Shah, Anjana; Yang, Mary; Kwon, Jeannie; Villanueva, Carlos; Traylor, Janelle; Pritzker, Karen; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Haley, Robert W.; Bush, Nicol Corbin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine prevalence and risk factors for renal scar in children referred for urologic assessment of febrile UTI and/or VUR. Methods Pre-determined risk factors for renal scar were prospectively recorded in consecutive patients referred for UTI/VUR. Age, gender, VUR grade, and reported number of febrile and non-febrile UTIs were analyzed with logistic regression to determine risk for focal cortical defects on non-acute DMSA. Results Of 565 consecutive children, 24 (4%) had congenital renal dysplasia and 84 (15.5%) had focal defect(s). VUR, especially grades IV–V, recurrent febrile UTI, and older age increased risk. For any age child with the same number of UTIs, VUR increased odds of renal defect 5.4-fold (OR = 5.4, 95% CI = 2.7–10.6, AUC = 0.759). Conclusions Focal DMSA defects were present in 15.5% of 565 consecutive children referred for febrile UTI and/or VUR; 4% had presumed congenital reflux nephropathy without cortical defect. All VUR grades increased risk for these defects, as did recurrent febrile UTIs and older age. However, 43% with grades IV–V VUR and 76% with recurrent UTI had normal DMSA. PMID:23465483

  12. Use of pimobendan in feline congenital heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, Shannon

    2013-12-01

    A 6-month-old domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of sudden lethargy and tachypnea following ovariohysterectomy. Upon failure of improvement with supportive care, a cardiologist identified congenital tricuspid dysplasia with signs of heart failure. Furosemide, enalapril, and pimobendan were used to reduce clinical signs and improve length and quality of life. PMID:24293678

  13. Use of pimobendan in feline congenital heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    A 6-month-old domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of sudden lethargy and tachypnea following ovariohysterectomy. Upon failure of improvement with supportive care, a cardiologist identified congenital tricuspid dysplasia with signs of heart failure. Furosemide, enalapril, and pimobendan were used to reduce clinical signs and improve length and quality of life. PMID:24293678

  14. Evolution of the term and definition of dysplasia of the hip - a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Musielak, Bartosz; Idzior, Maciej; Jóźwiak, Marek

    2015-10-12

    There is no consensus on the definition of dysplasia of the hip (DH). Past and present concepts used to describe DH do not form a complete view of the pathology. Moreover, some authors still present the disease as congenital, not developmental. This prompted authors to analyze the evolution of the definition of DH. Based on the biomedical databases 500 articles and books in the field of hip dysplasia were found and analyzed. Fifteen definitions of hip dysplasia met inclusion criteria, subsequently were analyzed and presented in chronological order. The analysis revealed that currently there is no single, universal definition of hip dysplasia in the aspect of morphological, clinical, and radiological studies. Despite the widely-used term of DH, it is described imprecisely and in different ways. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a multidisciplinary definition of this pathology covering all aspects of hip disorders considered valid in modern orthopaedics. PMID:26528350

  15. Thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 with cloverleaf skull in a dichorionic twin.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Torres, V M

    2015-01-01

    Here is reported for the first time, a case of thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 with cloverleaf skull in a (Mexican) dichorionic female twin. The patient's main clinical and radiographic findings included severe limb shortening, narrow thorax shape; short ribs, marked platyspondyly, curved short femurs, and a cloverleaf skull. The female twin sib had normal growth parameters and phenotypic appearance. According to the literature, cloverleaf skull in thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 is rare, even more so in dichorionic twins. Moreover, the present observation confirms that thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 patients may show phenotypic heterogeneity related to cloverleaf skull and other congenital anomalies. Therefore, a careful family history along with clinical, radiological, and molecular investigations is suggested, in order to achieve an accurate parental counseling for thanatophoric dysplasia. PMID:26043509

  16. The wide spectrum of the asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cortina, H; Beltran, J; Olague, R; Ceres, L; Alonso, A; Lanuza, A

    1979-04-19

    Seven cases of A. T. D. are presented. Radiological findings were extraordinarily diverse. The prognosis of the disease is difficult for each individual case, because of the frequent pulmonary complications and cystic renal lesions are not always directly related to the severity of the bone changes. The authors believe that the term "thoracic-pelvic-phalangeal dysplasia" proposed by Langer, is the most adequate, since it points to the key factors in the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:450492

  17. Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (tufting enteropathy).

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Salomon, Julie; Ruemmele, Frank; de Serres, Natacha Patey-Mariaud; Brousse, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), also known as tufting enteropathy, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset severe intractable diarrhea causing sometimes irreversible intestinal failure. To date, no epidemiological data are available, however, the prevalence can be estimated at around 1/50,000-100,000 live births in Western Europe. The prevalence seems higher in areas with high degree of consanguinity and in patients of Arabic origin. Infants develop within the first days after birth a watery diarrhea persistent in spite of bowel rest and parenteral nutrition. Some infants are reported to have associated choanal rectal or esophageal atresia. IED is thought to be related to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. Nonspecific punctuated keratitis was reported in more than 60% of patients. Histology shows various degree of villous atrophy, with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria but specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium with disorganization of surface enterocytes with focal crowding, resembling tufts. Several associated specific features were reported, including abnormal deposition of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) in the basement membrane, increased expression of desmoglein and ultrastructural changes in the desmosomes, and abnormal distribution of alpha2beta1 integrin adhesion molecules. One model of transgenic mice in which the gene encoding the transcription factor Elf3 is disrupted have morphologic features resembling IED. Parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggest an autosomal recessive transmission but the causative gene(s) have not been yet identified making prenatal diagnosis unavailable. Some infants have a milder phenotype than others but in most patients, the severity of the intestinal malabsorption even with enteral feeding make them totally dependent on daily long-term parenteral nutrition with a subsequent risk of complications

  18. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown. There are many insights, however, from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding DDH was performed. There is a predominance of left-sided (64.0%) and unilateral disease (63.4%). The incidence per 1000 live births ranges from 0.06 in Africans in Africa to 76.1 in Native Americans. There is significant variability in incidence within each racial group by geographic location. The incidence of clinical neonatal hip instability at birth ranges from 0.4 in Africans to 61.7 in Polish Caucasians. Predictors of DDH are breech presentation, positive family history, and gender (female). Children born premature, with low birth weights, or to multifetal pregnancies are somewhat protected from DDH. Certain HLA A, B, and D types demonstrate an increase in DDH. Chromosome 17q21 is strongly associated with DDH. Ligamentous laxity and abnormalities in collagen metabolism, estrogen metabolism, and pregnancy-associated pelvic instability are well-described associations with DDH. Many studies demonstrate an increase of DDH in the winter, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Swaddling is strongly associated with DDH. Amniocentesis, premature labor, and massive radiation exposure may increase the risk of DDH. Associated conditions are congenital muscular torticollis and congenital foot deformities. The opposite hip is frequently abnormal when using rigorous radiographic assessments. The role of acetabular dysplasia and adult hip osteoarthritis is complex. Archeological studies demonstrate that the epidemiology of DDH may be changing. PMID:24977057

  19. "Baby rattle" pelvis dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cormier-Daire, V; Savarirayan, R; Lachman, R S; Neidich, J A; Grace, K; Rimoin, D L; Wilcox, W R

    2001-04-15

    We report an apparently previously undescribed lethal skeletal dysplasia, clinically resembling achondrogenesis, but with distinct radiologic and chondro-osseous morphologic features. These comprise bifid distal ends of the long bones of the limbs, absent vertebral body ossification, a unique "baby rattle" pelvic configuration with tall and broad ilia, absent endochondral ossification, regions of mesenchymal cells within the resting cartilage, and abnormal mesenchymal ossification. PMID:11337746

  20. Thanatophoric dysplasia: A review.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, H

    2016-01-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia is a well-known cause of potentially lethal short-limbed dwarfism in the newborn. The diagnosis is usually made by the recognition of characteristic radiological changes and confirmed at autopsy by demonstration of specific morphological and histological changes in the brain. This review is based upon the author's personal experience and archived data of 19 cases and concerns the clinical and radiographic manifestations, autopsy findings, molecular pathogenesis and the approach to antenatal diagnosis. PMID:27245526

  1. Mesenchymal dysplasia of placenta.

    PubMed

    Balachandran Nair, Krishna G; Srinish, Minu; Balan, Preesha; Sadasivan, Santha

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) in a 26-year-old patient is reported. Ultrasound scan at 17 weeks of gestation showed placenta with multiple cystic spaces and a normal appearing fetus. Following delivery of a term live baby, histological examination of the placenta was suggestive of PMD. The early recognition of this rare condition by characteristic ultrasonographic findings is herein emphasized and hence that PMD is distinguished from molar pregnancy. PMID:26275269

  2. Familial Cleidocranial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, MK; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia or mutational dysostosis or cleidocranial dysostosis is a generalized skeletodental dysplastic disorder, inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The expression of this disorder can vary widely in severity, even within the same family. This is a relatively rare disease and has no standard effective treatment option as of yet. Here we present a case report of affected mother and son with classical manifestations of the disease.

  3. de la Chapelle dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Whitley, C B; Burke, B A; Granroth, G; Gorlin, R J

    1986-09-01

    Since the description by de la Chapelle and colleagues of two sibs with a unique skeletal dysplasia, two additional cases have occurred, one in the original Finnish family and one sporadic patient born to unrelated parents of Belgian descent. The original Finnish family has later had a fourth child, a normal daughter who was found to be unaffected upon radiographic examination in the 19th week of gestation. These additional findings are compatible with recessive inheritance. Physical features common to these four patients include cleft palate, small thorax, moderately severe micromelia with small hands, and equinovarus deformity. In each case, the ulnae and fibulae were reduced to an almost triangular osseous remnant. Other long bones were short and bowed. Neonatal death occurred in all cases and may be attributed to a consistent triad of respiratory tract malformations: laryngeal stenosis, tracheobronchomalacia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. Clinical and radiographic features are sufficiently unique to distinguish de la Chapelle dysplasia from other disorders in the spectrum of neonatal lethal osteochondrodysplasias. Lacunar halos were identified as a distinctive histopathologic feature also observed in achondrogenesis but not in several other skeletal dysplasias. PMID:3799721

  4. [Congenital thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-03-01

    Congenital thrombophilia is a thrombotic diathesis caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities in blood coagulation factors or their inhibitory factors associated with physiological thrombus formation. Patients with congenital thrombophilia often present with unusual clinical episodes of venous thrombosis (occasionally combined with pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism) at a young age and recurrence in atypical vessels, such as the mesenteric vein and superior sagittal sinus, often with a family history of this condition. Studies in Japan as well as in western countries have shown congenital thrombophilia to be caused by a wide variety of genetic abnormalities in natural anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S. However, there may still be many unknown causes of hereditary thrombosis. We recently reported a case of hereditary thrombosis induced by a novel mechanism of antithrombin resistance, that is, congenital thrombophilia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the coagulation factor prothrombin. PMID:27076244

  5. Congenital toxoplasmosis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital toxoplasmosis is a group of symptoms that occur when an unborn baby (fetus) is infected with the parasite ... Toxoplasmosis infection can be passed to a developing baby if the mother becomes infected while pregnant. The ...

  6. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  7. Congenital cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following birth defects: Chondrodysplasia syndrome Congenital rubella Conradi-Hünermann syndrome Down syndrome (trisomy 21) Ectodermal ... Images Eye Cataract - close-up of the eye Rubella syndrome Cataract References Dahan E. Pediatric cataract surgery. ...

  8. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fact that this disease can be cured with antibiotics if caught early, rising rates of syphilis among pregnant women in the United States have increased the number of infants born with congenital syphilis.

  9. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  10. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at birth. ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; ...

  11. Systemic Hypertension and Transient Ischemic Attack in a 6-Year-Old Girl with Fibromuscular Dysplasia Treated with Percutaneous Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Foa-Torres, Gustavo; Ganame, Javier; Juaneda, Ernesto; Peirone, Alejandro; Barcudi, Maria Silvina; Achaval, Alberto

    2010-02-15

    We describe a 6-year-old girl with arterial hypertension secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia with stenoses of both renal arteries and transient ischemic attack due to extracranial right internal carotid artery subtotal occlusion as well as left internal carotid artery stenosis. She was treated with percutaneous angioplasty of both renal and both carotid arteries.

  12. Congenital nephrotic syndrome. Gallium-67 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Trepashko, D.W.; Gelfand, M.J.; Pan, C.C.

    1988-11-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a rare disorder. Heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema occur during the first 3 months of life. Initial cases were reported from Finland and sporadic cases have occurred elsewhere. Finnish cases demonstrated an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern; currently, Finnish and non-Finnish types are recognized. The clinical course consists of failure to thrive, frequent infections, declining renal function, and early death by age 4 years from sepsis or uremia. Recently renal transplantation has improved the prognosis of patients with this disease. An abnormal Ga-67 scan in a case of congenital nephrotic syndrome is presented.

  13. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  14. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Pat; Magliocca, Kelly R; Lee, Janice S

    2012-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of the natural history and molecular abnormalities, many questions remain surrounding the progression and management of fibrous dysplasia (FD). In the absence of comorbidities, the expected behavior of craniofacial FD (CFD) is to be slow growing and without functional consequence. Understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms contributing to the various phenotypes of this condition, as well as the predictors of the different behaviors of FD lesions, must be improved. Long-term follow-up of patients with CFD is vital because spontaneous recovery is unlikely, and the course of disease can be unpredictable. PMID:22771278

  15. [Successful treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection with valganciclovir].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yu; Miyajima, Tasuku; Shimura, Masaru; Morichi, Shinichiro; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Ioi, Hiroaki; Oana, Shingo; Yamanaka, Gaku; Kawashima, Hisashi; Hoshika, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs frequently in neonates. However, there are no screening tests or definitive treatments for this infection in Japan. We report a case of a 21-day-old Japanese boy with congenital CMV infection. He was referred to our hospital for treatment of congenital bilateral deafness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed cortical dysplasia of the temporal poles, enlarged ventricles, and areas of abnormal intensity in the white matter. He was given a diagnosis of congenital CMV infection based on the detection of CMV DNA in his urine and the umbilical cord. After the administration of valganciclovir, no CMV DNA was detected in his serum, and brain MRI and electroencephalogram findings, motor development, and deafness improved. Further investigation is needed to establish a screening test and treatment for congenital CMV infection in Japan. PMID:22352032

  16. Spectrum of HNF1B Mutations in a Large Cohort of Patients Who Harbor Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Decramer, Stéphane; Pawtowski, Audrey; Morinière, Vincent; Bandin, Flavio; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lebre, Anne-Sophie; Faguer, Stanislas; Guigonis, Vincent; Antignac, Corinne; Salomon, Rémi

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is a transcription factor that is critical for the development of kidney and pancreas. In humans, mutations in HNF1B lead to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pancreas atrophy, and maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 and genital malformations. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report HNF1B screening in a cohort of 377 unrelated cases with various kidney phenotypes (hyperechogenic kidneys with size not more than +3 SD, multicystic kidney disease, renal agenesis, renal hypoplasia, cystic dysplasia, or hyperuricemic tubulointerstitial nephropathy not associated with UMOD mutation). Results: We found a heterozygous mutation in 75 (19.9%) index cases, consisting of a deletion of the whole gene in 42, deletion of one exon in one, and small mutations in 32. Eighteen mutations were novel. De novo mutations accounted for 66% of deletions and 40% of small mutations. In patients who carried HNF1B mutation and for whom we were able to study prenatal ultrasonography (56 probands), isolated hyperechogenic kidneys with normal or slightly enhanced size were the more frequent (34 of 56) phenotype before birth. Various other prenatal renal phenotypes were associated with HNF1B mutations, at a lesser frequency. Diabetes developed in four probands. Hyperuricemia and hypomagnesemia, although not systematically investigated, were frequently associated. Conclusions: This large series showed that the severity of the renal disease associated with HNF1B mutations was extremely variable (from prenatal renal failure to normal renal function in adulthood) and was not correlated with the genotype. PMID:20378641

  17. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  18. Coronary Artery Manifestations of Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Michelis, Katherine C.; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Kadian-Dodov, Daniella; d’Escamard, Valentina; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) involving the coronary arteries is an uncommon but important condition that can present as acute coronary syndrome, left ventricular dysfunction, or potentially sudden cardiac death. Although the classic angiographic “string of beads” that may be observed in renal artery FMD does not occur in coronary arteries, potential manifestations include spontaneous coronary artery dissection, distal tapering or long, smooth narrowing that may represent dissection, intramural hematoma, spasm, or tortuosity. Importantly, FMD must be identified in at least one other noncoronary arterial territory to attribute any coronary findings to FMD. Although there is limited evidence to guide treatment, many lesions heal spontaneously; thus, a conservative approach is generally preferred. The etiology is poorly understood, but there are ongoing efforts to better characterize FMD and define its genetic and molecular basis. This report reviews the clinical course of FMD involving the coronary arteries and provides guidance for diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:25190240

  19. Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia: a potentially lethal bone dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Kamoda, T; Nakajima, R; Matsui, A; Nishimura, G

    2001-02-01

    We report a Japanese boy, who is considered as having Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia, a rare, as yet undefined, skeletal dysplasia. The diagnosis was warranted by the constellation of skeletal abnormalities - mild platyspondyly, hypoplastic ilia, broad proximal femora with prominent lesser trochanters, mild brachymetacarpalia and, most importantly, rhizomelic shortening of the upper limbs with lateral bowing, medial cortical thickening, and medial metaphyseal notching of the humeri. Our patient, unlike previously reported patients, had respiratory distress and died suddenly of unknown cause in late infancy. Our experience may imply the heterogeneity or phenotypic variability of Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia. PMID:11214690

  20. [Congenital syphilis].

    PubMed

    Tabák, Réka; Tabák, Adám; Várkonyi, Viktória

    2010-01-10

    Syphilis has been a re-emerging disease in the past few decades. As a consequence, the prevalence of congenital syphilis is expected to be on the rise. Maternal syphilis may be related to several pathologies, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or congenital syphilis in the child. Infants that acquire syphilis in utero are frequently asymptomatic, and the organ damage caused by the infection may be apparent only years later. Syphilis is a curable disease, and most of its complications in the infant can be prevented by screening and treating the mother. Every newborn potentially infected should be treated with penicillin immediately starting on the day of birth. PMID:20061233

  1. Brain Herniation in Neurofibromatosis with Dysplasia of Occipital Bone and Posterior Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Vithal; Mahore, Amit; Patil, Manoj; Sathe, Prashant; Kaswa, Amol; Gore, Sandeep; Dharurkar, Pralhad; Kawale, Juhi

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old female, a known case of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), presented with a congenital swelling in the left occipital region. She had developed recent onset dysphagia and localized occipital headache. Neuroradiology revealed a left occipital meningoencephalocele and a left parapharyngeal meningocele. This was associated with ventriculomegaly. She was advised on cranioplasty along with duraplasty which she denied. She agreed to a lumbar-peritoneal shunt. She described a dramatic improvement in her symptoms following the lumbar-peritoneal shunt. Occipital dysplasias, though uncommon, have been reported in the literature. We review this case and its management and discuss relevant literature on occipital dysplasias in NF1. PMID:26600957

  2. Valvular dysplasia and congestive heart failure in a juvenile African penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Allyson; Frasca, Salvatore; Mishra, Neha; Tuttle, Allison D

    2014-12-01

    Abstract: An aquarium-housed, 6-mo-old African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) presented with acute respiratory distress. Auscultation revealed a grade II-III systolic murmur in the absence of adventitial sounds, and an enlarged heart without pulmonary edema was seen radiographically. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed atrioventricular (AV) valvular dysplasia and ventricular enlargement. The penguin was treated with enalapril, furosemide, and pimobendan but died within 3 wk of detection of the murmur. Congenital dysplasia of the right AV valve with right atrial and ventricular dilation and ventricular hypertrophy were diagnosed on postmortem examination. PMID:25632699

  3. Association of syndactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip and palate: report of two sibs from Turkey.

    PubMed Central

    Oğur, G; Yüksel, M

    1988-01-01

    Two Turkish sibs, products of a second cousin marriage, with tetramelic syndactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip and palate, renal anomalies, and mental retardation are reported. Similarities between these two brothers and previously reported cases and their mode of transmission are discussed. Images PMID:2832607

  4. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  5. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." PMID:25726292

  6. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, RK

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  7. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  8. Pagetoid polyostotic fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Rashmi Maruti; Pathak, Jigna; Swain, Niharika; Mohanty, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign skeletal lesion occurring due to mutation of Gs α gene and involves one or multiple bones. We present a case of a 30-year-old female patient, with a 1-year history of swelling under her right eye that had gradually increased in size. Extraoral examination revealed a diffuse swelling extending anteroposteriorly from preauricular region to nasolabial fold, frontonasal region and superoinferiorly from zygoma to body of mandible, causing ipsilateral proptosis and contralateral deviation of nose. Intraoral examination showed obliteration of right upper and lower buccal vestibule. CT disclosed expansile lytic lesions involving multiple skull bones, jaws, sternum, rib and thoracic vertebrae. Histopathology displayed broad and interconnected trabeculae connected to the host bone exhibiting reversal lines resembling the mosaic pattern of Paget's disease. These features suggested pagetoid polyostotic FD. The patient underwent cosmetic recontouring and is under regular follow-up postoperatively. PMID:25969488

  9. Anal Dysplasia Screening

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review considered the role of the anal Pap test as a screening test for anal dysplasia in patients at high risk of anal SCC. The screening process is now thought to be improved with the addition of testing for the human papillomavirus (HPV) in high-risk populations. High-resolution anoscopy (a method to view the rectal area, using an anoscope, a lighted instrument inserted into the rectum) rather than routine anoscopy-guided biopsy, is also now considered to be the diagnostic standard. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Anal cancer, like cervical cancer, is a member of a broader group of anogenital cancers known to be associated with sexually transmitted viral HPV infection. Human papillomavirus is extremely prevalent, particularly in young, sexually active populations. Sexual practices involving receptive anal intercourse lead to significantly elevated risk for anal dysplasia and cancer, particularly in those with immune dysfunctions. Anal cancer is rare. It occurs at a rate of about 1 to 2 per 100,000 in the general population. It is the least common of the lower gastrointestinal cancers, representing about 4% of them, in contrast to colorectal cancers, which remain the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy. Certain segments of the population, however, such as HIV-positive men and women, other chronic immune-suppressed patients (e.g., after a transplant), injection drug users, and women with genital dysplasia /cancer, have a high susceptibility to anal cancer. Those with the highest identified risk for anal cancer are HIV-positive homosexual and bisexual men, at a rate of 70 per 100,000 men. The risk for anal cancer is reported to be increasing dramatically in HIV-positive males and females, particularly since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s. The introduction of effective viral therapy has been said to have transformed the AIDS epidemic in developed countries into a chronic

  10. Genetics Home Reference: osteoglophonic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... images. Premature fusion of certain bones in the skull (craniosynostosis) typically occurs in osteoglophonic dysplasia . The craniosynostosis ... in the medical literature as a tower-shaped skull , or a relatively mild version of a deformity ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: campomelic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a severe disorder that affects development of the skeleton, reproductive system, and other parts of the body. ... those that are important for development of the skeleton and reproductive organs. Most cases of campomelic dysplasia ...

  12. Guide to Understanding Fibrous Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is usually involved. It can also result in cranial nerve problems. If the temporal bone is affected, the ... paralysis or dizziness. However, any of our 12 cranial nerves can be involved with fibrous dysplasia. The more ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: craniometaphyseal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Craniofacial Association International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, UCLA National ... F, Sørensen ES, Kaartinen MT, McKee MD. Pyrophosphate inhibits mineralization of osteoblast cultures by binding to mineral, up-regulating osteopontin, and ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: acromicric dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACROMICRIC DYSPLASIA Sources for This Page Faivre L, Le Merrer M, Baumann C, Polak M, Chatelain P, ... or Free article on PubMed Central Klein C, Le Goff C, Topouchian V, Odent S, Violas P, Glorion ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: metatropic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a skeletal disorder characterized by short stature (dwarfism) with other skeletal abnormalities. The term "metatropic" is ... my area? Other Names for This Condition metatropic dwarfism metatropic dysplasia type 1 Related Information How are ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: frontonasal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Frontonasal dysplasia 3 KidsHealth from Nemours: Cleft Lip and Palate MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Head and Face Reconstruction ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Centers for Disease Control and ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: frontometaphyseal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowed limbs, an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), and abnormalities of the fingers and hands. Characteristic ... and genetic heterogeneity in frontometaphyseal dysplasia: severe progressive scoliosis in two families. Am J Med Genet A. ...

  18. Renal cell carcinoma arising in a regressed multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Rackley, R R; Angermeier, K W; Levin, H; Pontes, J E; Kay, R

    1994-11-01

    Controversy surrounds the management of multicystic dysplastic kidney. Recent advances in radiological imaging have resulted in a higher incidence of its detection, and they provide an accurate noninvasive means of diagnosis and followup. Consequently, the need for surgical removal of these lesions is being reevaluated. We report a case of renal cell carcinoma arising from solid renal dysplasia associated with a regressed multicystic dysplastic kidney. We emphasize the potential risk of nonoperative management of these lesions and further define the spectrum of malignant degeneration associated with renal dysplasia. PMID:7933196

  19. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-04-01

    'Acro-renal syndrome' refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  20. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-01-01

    ‘Acro-renal syndrome’ refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  1. Schimke immune-osseous dysplasia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Ashraf; Eid, Riham; Sarhan, Amr; Hammad, Ayman; El-Refaey, Ahmed Mahmoud; El-Mougy, Atef; Zedan, Mohammed Magdy; ElHusseini, Fatma

    2015-09-01

    Schimke immune-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spondylo-epiphyseal dysplasia (SED), progressive renal insufficiency beginning as steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and defective cellular immunity. This article reports a case from Egypt with a mild form of SIOD. A 14.5-year-old male patient presented with disproportionate short stature, SRNS (focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis), laboratory evidence of cellular immune deficiency and radiologic characteristics of SED. He died at the age of 16.5 years with bone marrow failure and severe pneumonia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of SIOD to be reported from Egypt. PMID:26354575

  2. Dentin Dysplasia in Notum Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Read, R W; Hansen, G M; Powell, D R; Kantaputra, P N; Zambrowicz, B; Brommage, R

    2016-07-01

    Secreted WNT proteins control cell differentiation and proliferation in many tissues, and NOTUM is a secreted enzyme that modulates WNT morphogens by removing a palmitoleoylate moiety that is essential for their activity. To better understand the role this enzyme in development, the authors produced NOTUM-deficient mice by targeted insertional disruption of the Notum gene. The authors discovered a critical role for NOTUM in dentin morphogenesis suggesting that increased WNT activity can disrupt odontoblast differentiation and orientation in both incisor and molar teeth. Although molars in Notum(-/-) mice had normal-shaped crowns and normal mantle dentin, the defective crown dentin resulted in enamel prone to fracture during mastication and made teeth more susceptible to endodontal inflammation and necrosis. The dentin dysplasia and short roots contributed to tooth hypermobility and to the spread of periodontal inflammation, which often progressed to periapical abscess formation. The additional incidental finding of renal agenesis in some Notum (-/-) mice indicated that NOTUM also has a role in kidney development, with undiagnosed bilateral renal agenesis most likely responsible for the observed decreased perinatal viability of Notum(-/-) mice. The findings support a significant role for NOTUM in modulating WNT signaling pathways that have pleiotropic effects on tooth and kidney development. PMID:26926082

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

    PubMed

    Do, A Young; Kim, Jung-Sun; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mesoblastic nephroma is a rare renal tumor that is diagnosed during pregnancy and is associated with polyhydramnios, prematurity, and neonatal hypertension. Differential diagnoses include Wilms tumor, adrenal neuroblastoma, and other abdominal tumors. We report a case of congenital mesoblastic nephroma detected by prenatal ultrasonography as a large fetal renal mass with polyhydramnios at 32 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonography showed a 6×6-cm complex, solid, hyperechoic, round mass in the right kidney. At 35 weeks of gestation, the patient was admitted with preterm premature rupture of membranes and the baby was delivered vaginally. Postnatal ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a heterogeneous solid mass on the right kidney. At the end of the first week of life, a right nephrectomy was performed and subsequent pathological examination confirmed a cellular variant of congenital mesoblastic nephroma with a high mitotic count. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy was administered. The newborn was discharged in good condition. PMID:26430667

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of frontonasal dysplasia with anterior encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Esmer, Aytul Çorbacıoğlu; Kalelioğlu, İbrahim; Kayserili, Hülya; Yüksel, Atıl; Has, Recep

    2013-01-01

    Frontonasal dysplasia is a rare congenital anomaly affecting the eyes, nose and forehead, and occurs sporadically in most of the cases. A 24-year-old woman was referred to our unit at 27 weeks gestation due to the preliminary diagnosis of encephalocele. The sagittal and axial sonography of the fetal face depicted a midline mass measuring 3.8 × 4.2 cm, projecting anteriorly between the fetal orbits and extending from the the upper aspects of the forehead to the nasal bridge, which was consistent with the frontal (anterior) encephalocele. There were prominent hypertelorism and two facial clefts, and the nostrils were extremely separated. Following genetic counseling, the couple requested termination of pregnancy. Fetal pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of frontonasal dysplasia and anterior encephalocele with no additional major malformation. The fetal karyotype was normal and no mutation in the ALX1 gene was found, excluding ALX1-related frontonasal dysplasia in the differential diagnosis. Fetuses with neural tube defect may suffer from associated syndromes and disorders, as with our case. The presence of frontonasal dyplasia should be considered when an anterior encephalocele is detected by ultrasonography. PMID:24592072

  5. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure. PMID:26704658

  6. Epidemiology of fibromuscular dysplasia: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shivapour, Daniel M; Erwin, Phillip; Kim, Esther Sh

    2016-08-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of medium sized arteries that has been described in multiple anatomic territories with a wide variety of manifestations (e.g. beading, stenosis, occlusion, aneurysm, or dissection). While the first case of FMD is thought to have been described over 75 years ago, the causes, natural history, and epidemiology of FMD in the general population remain incompletely understood. This article reviews important historical and contemporary contributions to the FMD literature that inform our current understanding of the prevalence and epidemiology of this important disorder. A particular focus is given to studies which form the basis for FMD prevalence estimates. Prevalence estimates for renal FMD are derived from renal transplant donor studies and sub-studies of clinical trials of renal artery stenting; however, it is unclear how well these estimates generalize to the overall population as a whole. Newer data are emerging examining the genetic associations and environmental interactions with FMD. Significant contributions to the understanding of FMD have come from the United States Registry for Fibromuscular Dysplasia; however, many unanswered questions remain, and future studies are required to further characterize FMD epidemiology in general populations and advance our understanding of this important disorder. PMID:27067138

  7. Dental and maxillofacial characteristics of six Japanese individuals with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Erika; Suda, Naoto; Baba, Yoshiyuki; Fukuoka, Hiroki; Ogawa, Takuya; Ohkuma, Mizue; Ahiko, Nozomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Tengan, Toshimoto; Shiga, Momotoshi; Tsuji, Michiko; Moriyama, Keiji

    2013-03-01

    Objective : Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome is a congenital anomaly characterized by ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly, cleft lip and palate, and lacrimal duct anomalies. Because this syndrome is frequently accompanied by a congenital lack of teeth, narrow palate, and malocclusion, comprehensive orthodontic intervention is required. Design : To highlight the specific dental and maxillofacial characteristics of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome, six Japanese individuals diagnosed with the syndrome are described here. Patients : The subjects consisted of two boys and four girls (age range, 6.0 to 13.9 years) diagnosed with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome by medical and dental specialists. Their conditions included ectodermal dysplasia (hypodontia, microdontia, enamel hypoplasia, and abnormalities in hair and nails), cleft lip and/or palate, and ectrodactyly. Cephalograms, panoramic x-rays, and dental casts were taken; systemic complications were recorded at the first visit to our dental hospital. Results : All individuals had severe oligodontia with 9 to 18 missing teeth. The missing teeth were mainly maxillary and mandibular incisors and second bicuspids, arranged in a symmetrical manner. Cephalometric analysis showed retruded and short maxilla due to cleft lip and/or palate. It is interesting that all individuals showed a characteristically shaped mandibular symphysis with a retruded point B. It is likely that this unusual symphyseal morphology is due to the lack of mandibular incisors. Conclusions : This study demonstrates the presence of severe oligodontia in the incisal and premolar regions and describes a characteristic maxillary and mandibular structure in Japanese individuals with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome. PMID:22236363

  8. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Overview What is congenital adrenal hyperplasia? Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH, is a disorder that affects the adrenal glands. The adrenal ...

  9. Epidermal nevus syndrome associated with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, CNS lipoma, and aplasia cutis.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Miguel; Aneiros, Angel; Monteagudo, Benigno; Santos-García, Diego; Suárez-Amor, Oscar; Ramírez-Santos, Aquilina

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal nevus syndrome is a rare congenital sporadic neurocutaneous disorder characterized by an epidermal nevus and various developmental abnormalities of the skin, eyes, nervous, cardiovascular and urogenital systems. We describe a patient with an extensive epidermal nevus associated with various organ abnormalities, particularly polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, central nervous system lipoma, and aplasia cutis. Our patient demonstrates the polymorphic spectrum of involvement in epidermal nevus syndrome. PMID:19951625

  10. Ureaplasma and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gancia, Paolo; Delogu, Antonio; Pomero, Giulia

    2014-03-01

    Advances in neonatal intensive care have greatly improved survival rates for children born in a very early stage of lung development (i.e. less than 26 weeks of gestation). In these premature babies, even low levels of oxygen and methods of minimally invasive ventilation may disrupt the growth of the distal airways, a condition described as "new" bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Ureaplasma infection can occur in utero or in the perinatal period in premature infants, in some of which the infection with these organisms triggers an important lung pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic response, and may increase the risk of developing BPD. The inflammation may be worsened by exposure to oxygen and mechanical ventilation. At present, clinical studies have not clarified the role of Ureaplasma in the pathogenesis of BPD and there is insufficient evidence to determine whether antibiotic treatment of Ureaplasma has influence on the development of BPD and its comorbidities. Future research in the context of well-designed and controlled clinical trials of adequate statistical power should focus on how to determine whether the treatment of Ureaplasma decreases lung inflammation, reduces rates of BPD, and improves long-term neurodevelopment. PMID:24709455

  11. Ectodermal dysplasia: a genetic review.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Seema; Prashanth, S

    2012-09-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. It is a genetic disorder affecting the development or function of the teeth, hair, nails and sweat glands. Depending on the particular syndrome ectodermal dysplasia can also affect the skin, the lens or retina of the eye, parts of the inner ear, the development of fingers and toes, the nerves and other parts of the body. Each syndrome usually involves a different combination of symptoms, which can range from mild to severe. The history and lessons learned from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) may serve as an example for unraveling of the cause and pathogenesis of other ectodermal dysplasia syndromes by demonstrating that phenotypically identical syndromes can be caused by mutations in different genes (EDA, EDAR, EDARADD), that mutations in the same gene can lead to different phenotypes and that mutations in the genes further downstream in the same signaling pathway (NEMO) may modify the phenotype quite profoundly. The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss the etiology, genetic review, clinical manifestations and treatment options of this hereditary disorder. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Prashanth S. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):197-202. PMID:25206167

  12. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prashanth, S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. It is a genetic disorder affecting the development or function of the teeth, hair, nails and sweat glands. Depending on the particular syndrome ectodermal dysplasia can also affect the skin, the lens or retina of the eye, parts of the inner ear, the development of fingers and toes, the nerves and other parts of the body. Each syndrome usually involves a different combination of symptoms, which can range from mild to severe. The history and lessons learned from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) may serve as an example for unraveling of the cause and pathogenesis of other ectodermal dysplasia syndromes by demonstrating that phenotypically identical syndromes can be caused by mutations in different genes (EDA, EDAR, EDARADD), that mutations in the same gene can lead to different phenotypes and that mutations in the genes further downstream in the same signaling pathway (NEMO) may modify the phenotype quite profoundly. The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss the etiology, genetic review, clinical manifestations and treatment options of this hereditary disorder. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Prashanth S. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):197-202. PMID:25206167

  13. Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity (Beighton type): A unique South African disorder.

    PubMed

    Honey, E M

    2016-01-01

    Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity (SEMD-JL) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia in which stunted stature, articular hypermobility and spinal malalignment are the major manifestations. Structural cardiac abnormalities are sometimes present. Approximately 30 affected children have been recognised previously in the Afrikaans-speaking community in South Africa, and in several, mutations in the B3GALT6 gene have been incriminated. In this article, case details of three additional affected children in two families are documented, and four additional families are mentioned. The Pierre-Robin sequence and unilateral renal agenesis are previously unreported concomitants. The mutational status where known is recorded. PMID:27245527

  14. Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia Associated with Undifferentiated Carcinoma and a Novel SMARCAL1 Mutation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Clinton; Badu-Nkansah, Akosua; Hunley, Tracy; Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Cortez, David; Frangoul, Haydar

    2013-01-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood with classical features of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, renal failure, and T cell immunodeficiency. SIOD has been associated with several malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma and osteosarcoma. About half of SIOD patients have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1). This gene encodes an annealing helicase and replication stress response protein that localizes to damage-stalled DNA replication forks. We report a child with SIOD and a novel S859P missense mutation in SMARCAL1 who developed undifferentiated carcinoma of the sinus. PMID:23630135

  15. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD. PMID:25497206

  16. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  17. The nature of fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia has been regarded as a developmental skeletal disorder characterized by replacement of normal bone with benign cellular fibrous connective tissue. It has now become evident that fibrous dysplasia is a genetic disease caused by somatic activating mutation of the Gsα subunit of G protein-coupled receptor resulting in upregulation of cAMP. This leads to defects in differentiation of osteoblasts with subsequent production of abnormal bone in an abundant fibrous stroma. In addition there is an increased production of IL-6 by mutated stromal fibrous dysplastic cells that induce osteoclastic bone resorption. PMID:19895712

  18. New patterns in genetic and congenital otonephropathies.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, L; Thompson, P; Wood, R P

    1979-02-01

    In a series of chronic renal and congenitally deaf patients 24 were identified as having inborn renal and otologic disease. Sixteen patients, representing 14 families, had genetic disorders. Only two had the features of Alport's syndrome. The patients were classified as follows: 1) Probable Alport's--2 patients (1 family); 2) Atypical hereditary nephritis and sensorineural hearing loss--7 patients; 3) Renal and inner ear anomalies--1 patient; 4) Renal, inner ear and multiple anomalies--4 patients. The temporal bone pathology in one case showed primary neural atrophy and a mild Mondini malformation. In another a Scheibe defect and unusual calcific structures were found in the cochlear duct. 5) Renal, external or middle ear and multiple anomalies--6 patients (5 families); 6 Renal, middle and inner ear anomalies and multiple anomalies--2 patients. A temporal bone obtained from one case showed combined middle and inner ear defects. In the other, who had a chromosome defect, predominantly middle ear anomalies were found. 7) Nephrotic syndrome and congenital hearing loss--1 patient; 8) Unclassified--1 patient. Some cases represent entities apparently not previously described. Probably most interesting is the delineation of hereditary nephritis and deafness distinct from Alport's disease. PMID:423658

  19. Antenatal diagnosis of renal duplication by ultrasonography: report on four cases at a referral center.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Edward Enéas D; Martins, Marília G; Rios, Lívia T; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Oliveira, Ricardo V; Nardozza, Luciano M; Moron, Antonio F

    2013-01-01

    Duplication of the renal collecting system is the commonest major congenital malformation of the urinary tract, with an incidence of 1% among live births. Antenatal diagnosing of renal duplication and an associated ureterocele is infrequent. We report four cases of prenatally diagnosed unilateral duplication of the renal collecting system. In two of them, the renal duplication was associated with an ectopic ureterocele. PMID:24469664

  20. Pediatric renal transplantation: 13 years of experience--report from the Chilean Cooperative Multicenter Group.

    PubMed

    Rosati, P; Pinto, V; Delucchi, A; Salas, P; Cano, F; Zambrano, P; Lagos, E; Rodriguez, E; Hevia, P; Ramirez, K; Quiero, X; Azócar, M; Rodriguez, S; Aguiló, J; Varela, M; Ferrario, M; Ramirez, R; Palacios, J M; Turu, I; Jimenez, O; Godoy, J; Gaete, J; Maluenda, X; Villegas, R

    2005-04-01

    Between 1989 and 2002, 178 renal transplants were performed in 168 pediatric patients in Chile. The mean age was 10.9 +/- 3.7 years (range 1 to 17.9). End-state renal disease etiologies were: congenital renal hypoplasia/dysplasia, chronic glomerulonephritis, and reflux nephropathy. Seventy received a graft from a living donor (LD), and 108 from a cadaveric donor (CD). Only 9% received antibody induction. Acute rejection episodes were reported in 76 patients: 38% in LD recipients and 48% in CD recipients (P = NS). One-, 3-, and 5-year graft survivals were 88%, 84%, and 76%, respectively, for LD and 86%, 79%, and 68% for CD recipients. Actuarial graft survival was significantly better among those patients with serum creatinine < 1 mg/dL at 1 year posttransplant compared with those with creatinine > 1 mg/dL (P < .05). The graft survival rate has improved from the first period (1989 to 1996) to the second period (1997 to 2002); (P = .05). Patient survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 98%, 98%, and 98%, respectively, for LD, and 95%, 94%, and 94% for CD. Global height/age Z-score decreased from -0.7 at birth to -1.5 when dialysis started, and to -2.4 at the time of transplantation. The Z-score height/age at 1, 3, and 5 years posttransplantation was -2.25, -2.24, and -2.5. No significant differences were observed in transplant outcomes comparing patients younger than 7 years with those older ones. In conclusion, pediatric renal transplant has been performed in Chile with acceptable morbidity. The patient and graft survivals are similar to the reported international experience. In the last period there was a significant improvement in graft survival. PMID:15866676

  1. Congenital neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Evans, A. R.

    1965-01-01

    The clinical histories and post-mortem findings in five cases of neuroblastoma are described, and an account given of the microscopic characteristics of the tumours. In four of the cases the tumour was present at birth and was probably so in the fifth case. In only one case was the presence of the malignant tumour a significant factor in causing death. The differential diagnosis of such tumours is discussed. The accumulated evidence of many recorded cases suggests that neuroblastoma, becoming manifest in the early months or weeks of life, and congenital tumour, would be included in such a group, and has an appreciably better prognosis than has this same tumour when it becomes manifest in later childhood. The literature is briefly reviewed to illustrate this aspect of prognosis and possible reasons for it are indicated. Images PMID:14247705

  2. Congenital Cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Walker, David; Shinners, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Congenital cholesteatoma is one of the more common causes of the onset of childhood conductive hearing loss unrelated to middle ear effusion. If undiagnosed, the disease can progress to irreversibly destroy the conductive hearing architecture, as well as the surrounding skull base of the lateral temporal bone. When diagnosed early, the growth can be removed and the conductive hearing mechanism preserved in the vast majority of patients. Because most children are asymptomatic, the burden falls on primary care providers to perform pneumatic otoscopy and visualize all quadrants of the tympanic membrane even in young children who frequently resist attempts to conduct a thorough examination to rule out suspicious lesions. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e167-e170.]. PMID:27171804

  3. Congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    For most people, music, like language, is acquired effortlessly in early life. But a few percent of the population have lifelong difficulties in the perception and production of music. In this chapter we discuss psycho-acoustic and behavioral studies that have attempted to delineate the nature of the auditory perceptual deficits in this group and consider whether these difficulties extend outside the musical domain. Finally, we review structural imaging studies in this group which point to subtle anomalies in temporal and frontal areas. We suggest that amusia can be considered a disorder of neural development, which has relatively specific consequences at the behavioral level. Studies of congenital amusia provide a unique window on the neurocognitive architecture of music processing. PMID:23622169

  4. Congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Pankaj; Philip, Rajeev; Saran, Sanjay; Gutch, Manish; Razi, Mohd Sayed; Agroiya, Puspalata; Gupta, Keshavkumar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the one of the most common preventable cause of mental retardation. In the majority of patients, CH is caused by an abnormal development of the thyroid gland (thyroid dysgenesis) that is a sporadic disorder and accounts for 85% of cases and the remaining 15% of cases are caused by dyshormonogenesis. The clinical features of congenital hypothyroidism are so subtle that many newborn infants remain undiagnosed at birth and delayed diagnosis leads to the most severe outcome of CH, mental retardation, emphasizing the importance of neonatal screening. Dried capillary blood is used for screening and it is taken from heel prick optimally between 2 and 5 days of age. Blood spot TSH or thyroxine (T4) or both are being used for CH screening in different programs around the world. Neonates with abnormal thyroid screening tests should be recalled immediately for examination and a venipuncture blood sample should be drawn for confirmatory serum testing. Confirmatory serum should be tested for TSH and free T4, or total T4. Serum TSH and T4 undergo dynamic changes in the first weeks of life; it is important to compare serum results with age-normal reference ranges. Treatment should be started promptly and infant should be rendered euthyroid as early as possible, as there is an inverse relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and the age at diagnosis. Levothyroxine (l-thyroxine) is the treatment of choice and American academy of pediatrics and European society of pediatric endocrinology recommend 10-15μgm/kg/day as initial dose. The immediate goal of therapy is to normalize T4 within 2 weeks and TSH within one month. The overall goal of treatment is to ensure growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes as close as possible to their genetic potential. PMID:25729683

  5. Genetics Home Reference: oculodentodigital dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Paznekas W, Seki A, Taffet S, Jabs EW, Delmar M, Musa H. Functional characterization of connexin43 mutations found in patients with oculodentodigital dysplasia. Circ Res. 2005 May 27;96(10):e83-91. Epub 2005 May 5. Citation on PubMed Vreeburg M, de Zwart-Storm EA, Schouten MI, Nellen RG, ...

  6. Ocular manifestations of frontonasal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Roarty, J D; Pron, G E; Siegel-Bartelt, J; Posnick, J C; Buncic, J R

    1994-01-01

    The ophthalmologic findings associated with frontonasal dysplasia have not been defined previously in a large series of untreated children. We reviewed the ophthalmic manifestations of a series of patients with frontonasal dysplasia who were seen as part of their craniofacial evaluation. All had undergone a complete ophthalmologic examination before any manipulation of either the orbits or the soft tissues of the orbital contents. From 1986 to 1991, 23 patients with frontonasal dysplasia were seen; ophthalmologic abnormalities were found in 20 (87 percent). Abnormalities included significant refractive errors, strabismus, nystagmus, and eyelid ptosis. Three patients had amblyopia, a treatable cause of visual loss, from strabismus or anisometropia. Ten eyes in seven patients (30 percent) had severe structural anomalies, such as optic nerve hypoplasia, optic nerve colobomas, microphthalmia, cataract, corneal dermoid, or inflammatory retinopathy, that resulted in an acuity of 20/100 or worse. The high incidence of ocular abnormalities indicates that early assessment by an ophthalmologist should be part of the initial evaluation of patients with frontonasal dysplasia to detect treatable visual or ocular problems. PMID:8278482

  7. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  8. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  9. Vojta method in the treatment of developmental hip dysplasia – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kiebzak, Wojciech; Żurawski, Arkadiusz; Dwornik, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Background Developmental dysplasia of the hip joint is one of the most common congenital defects and often results in functional and structural disorders. Such cases particularly demand optimizing therapeutic effects and maximally reducing the duration of therapy. Purpose The aim of this case report is to present the therapeutic process in a child with developmental hip dysplasia. Case report This is a case report of a female child with a birth weight of 2,800 g and an Apgar score of 9 points born to a gravida 3 para 3 mother at 37 weeks. The child was delivered by cesarean section, and the pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios. Subluxation of the left hip joint was diagnosed by an orthopedist in the third month of life. The treatment followed was the Vojta method (the first phase of reflex turning and reflex crawling). Results During the 6 weeks of the Vojta treatment, the left half of the femoral head was centralized, and the process of formation of the hip joint acetabulum was influenced effectively enough to change the acetabulum’s Graff type from the baseline D to IIb after 41 days of treatment. Conclusion The diagnostic work-up of congenital hip joint dysplasia should involve a physiotherapist who will investigate the child’s neuromuscular coordination, in addition to a neonatologist and a pediatrician. The therapy for a disorder of hip joint development of neuromotor origin should involve the application of global patterns according to Vojta. Children with congenital dysplasia of the hip joint should commence rehabilitation as early as possible. PMID:27578980

  10. [Renal failure and cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Correas, J-M; Joly, D; Chauveau, D; Richard, S; Hélénon, O

    2011-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases often are discovered at the time of initial work-up of renal failure through ultrasound or family history, or incidentally at the time of an imaging test. Hereditary diseases include autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD), tuberous sclerosis (TS) and medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD). Autosomal dominant PKD is characterized by large renal cysts developing in young adults. Renal failure is progressive and becomes severe around 50-60 years of age. Atypical cysts (hemorrhagic or hyperdense) are frequent on CT and MRI examinations. Imaging plays a valuable role in the management of acute complications such as cyst hemorrhage or infection. Autosomal recessive PKD is often detected in neonates, infants or young adults. It is characterized by renal enlargement due to the presence of small cysts and liver disease (fibrosis and biliary ductal dilatation). Late manifestation or slow progression of autosomal recessive PKD may be more difficult to distinguish from autosomal dominant PKD. These cystic kidney diseases should not be confused with non-hereditary incidental multiple renal cysts. In tuberous sclerosis, renal cysts are associated with angiomyolipomas and sometimes pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Renal failure is inconstant. Other hereditary cystic kidney diseases, including MCKD and nephronophtisis, are usually associated with renal failure. Non-hereditary cystic kidney diseases include multicystic renal dysplasia (due to complete pelvi-ureteric atresia or hydronephrosis), acquired multicystic kidney disease (chronic renal failure, chronic hemodialysis) and varied cystic kidney diseases (multicystic renal disease, glomerulocystic kidney disease, microcystic kidney disease). PMID:21549887

  11. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Maynika V; LaFranchi, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) occurs in approximately 1:2,000 to 1:4,000 newborns. The clinical manifestations are often subtle or not present at birth. This likely is due to trans-placental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone, while many infants have some thyroid production of their own. Common symptoms include decreased activity and increased sleep, feeding difficulty, constipation, and prolonged jaundice. On examination, common signs include myxedematous facies, large fontanels, macroglossia, a distended abdomen with umbilical hernia, and hypotonia. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Thyroid dysgenesis accounts for 85% of permanent, primary CH, while inborn errors of thyroid hormone biosynthesis (dyshormonogeneses) account for 10-15% of cases. Secondary or central CH may occur with isolated TSH deficiency, but more commonly it is associated with congenital hypopitiutarism. Transient CH most commonly occurs in preterm infants born in areas of endemic iodine deficiency. In countries with newborn screening programs in place, infants with CH are diagnosed after detection by screening tests. The diagnosis should be confirmed by finding an elevated serum TSH and low T4 or free T4 level. Other diagnostic tests, such as thyroid radionuclide uptake and scan, thyroid sonography, or serum thyroglobulin determination may help pinpoint the underlying etiology, although treatment may be started without these tests. Levothyroxine is the treatment of choice; the recommended starting dose is 10 to 15 mcg/kg/day. The immediate goals of treatment are to rapidly raise the serum T4 above 130 nmol/L (10 ug/dL) and normalize serum TSH levels. Frequent laboratory monitoring in infancy is essential to ensure optimal neurocognitive outcome. Serum TSH and free T4 should be measured every 1-2 months in the first 6 months of life and every 3-4 months thereafter. In general, the prognosis

  12. Skeletal dysplasias: A radiographic approach and review of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are not uncommon entities and a radiologist is likely to encounter a suspected case of dysplasia in his practice. The correct and early diagnosis of dysplasia is important for management of complications and for future genetic counselling. While there is an exhaustive classification system on dysplasias, it is important to be familiar with the radiological features of common dysplasias. In this article, we enumerate a radiographic approach to skeletal dysplasias, describe the essential as well as differentiating features of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias and conclude by presenting working algorithms to either definitively diagnose a particular dysplasia or suggest the most likely differential diagnoses to the referring clinician and thus direct further workup of the patient. PMID:25349664

  13. Skeletal dysplasias: A radiographic approach and review of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2014-10-28

    Skeletal dysplasias are not uncommon entities and a radiologist is likely to encounter a suspected case of dysplasia in his practice. The correct and early diagnosis of dysplasia is important for management of complications and for future genetic counselling. While there is an exhaustive classification system on dysplasias, it is important to be familiar with the radiological features of common dysplasias. In this article, we enumerate a radiographic approach to skeletal dysplasias, describe the essential as well as differentiating features of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias and conclude by presenting working algorithms to either definitively diagnose a particular dysplasia or suggest the most likely differential diagnoses to the referring clinician and thus direct further workup of the patient. PMID:25349664

  14. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported. PMID:26197921

  15. Hip dysplasia screening - epidemiological data from Valcea County

    PubMed Central

    Colta, RC; Stoicanescu, C; Nicolae, M; Oros, S; Burnei, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale::In its most severe form, developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common congenital malformations. Uncorrected developmental dysplasia of the hip is associated with long-term morbidity such as gait abnormalities, chronic pain, and degenerative arthritis. Aims: (1) to identify the risks and predisposing factors involved in DDH (2) to define the incidence of the disease locally; (3) to emphasize the importance of ultrasonography in early diagnosis of DDH. Methods and results:1021 newborns in the Neonatal Department of Valcea County Emergency Hospital were analyzed. The information contained in the observation sheets was collected and upon this, the ultrasound was performed accordingly to Graf’s classification. The following parameters were analyzed: sex, area of origin, gestational age, birthweight, type of delivery, parturition. Out of 1021 newborns, 27 had an abnormal ultrasound examination. 20 infants were diagnosed with DDH. Regarding the risk factors: cephalic delivery was associated with a lower risk/ the lowest of DDH (with p=0.045 for the right hip and p=0.001 for the left hip). Increased gestational age and increased birthweight were incriminating factors in the occurrence of DDH. Discussion:Ultrasound imaging has become an accepted tool for accurately diagnosing DDH. PMID:27489571

  16. Fibrous dysplasia of the orbit.

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, K; McFadzean, R

    1994-01-01

    Twelve patients with fibrous dysplasia of the orbit are reviewed and the ophthalmic findings described. Three case histories are presented in detail. Six patients were managed conservatively; four have shown radiological progression of the disease. Six patients underwent surgery. A conservative procedure, comprising debulking dysplastic bone, was carried out in four--all required further surgery including radical excision in two patients. Two subjects had primary radical operations. No recurrence was encountered in the four patients who had undergone radical surgery. It would appear that fibrous dysplasia is not a disease confined to adolescence but may continue into adulthood, and even middle age. Patients may never require surgery, but require follow up for late progression. If surgical intervention is deemed necessary, an attempt should be made to excise all dysplastic bone, since progression of the disease after conservative surgery is relatively common. Images PMID:8199111

  17. [Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: definitions and classifications].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Luna, M; Moreno Hernando, J; Botet Mussons, F; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Herranz Carrillo, G; Rite Gracia, S; Salguero García, E; Echaniz Urcelay, I

    2013-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is the most common sequelae related to very low birth weight infants, mostly with those of extremely low birth weight. Even with advances in prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome associated with prematurity, there is still no decrease in the incidence in this population, although a change in its clinical expression and severity has been observed. There are, however, differences in its frequency between health centres, probably due to a non-homogeneously used clinical definition. In this article, the Committee of Standards of the Spanish Society of Neonatology wishes to review the current diagnosis criteria of bronchopulmonary dysplasia to reduce, as much as possible, these inter-centre differences. PMID:23582451

  18. Rootless teeth: Dentin dysplasia type I

    PubMed Central

    Fulari, Sangamesh G; Tambake, Deepti P

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of hereditary disturbance of dentine, Dentin dysplasia type I is presented, which is characterized by short or total absence of roots, obliterated pulp chambers, and peri-apical radiolucencies. It affects both primary and secondary dentition. Management of patients with dentinal dysplasia is difficult and requires a multidisciplinary approach. An overview of dentin dysplasia and its management along with a case report is discussed. PMID:24403801

  19. Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia: Prosthetic and Endodontic Management

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Alok; Rahangdale, Tripty

    2010-01-01

    Individuals affected by ectodermal dysplasia syndromes have abnormalities of the glands, tooth buds, hair follicles, and nail development. Oral finding in ectodermal dysplasia patient are significant and can include multiple abnormalities of the dentition such as anodontia, hy-podontia or malformed and widely spaced peg like teeth, loss of occlusal vertical dimension, protuberant lips and lack of normal alveolar ridge development. This clinical report describes a combined surgical, pedodontic, and prosthodontic approach for the treatment of a patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

  20. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad A; Afifi, Ashraf M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency present at birth. Babies with CH who are not identified and treated promptly develop severe mental retardation. Most of the babies with CH do not manifest the typical known signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, and this is most likely due to transplacental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone in addition to some residual neonatal thyroid function, as might be seen with thyroid hypoplasia, an ectopic gland, or mild dyshormonogenesis. Screening for CH has enabled the virtual eradication of the devastating effects of mental retardation due to sporadic CH in most developed countries of the world. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Permanent CH refers to a persistent deficiency of thyroid hormone that requires life-long treatment. Transient CH refers to a temporary deficiency of thyroid hormone that is discovered at birth but recovers to normal in the first few months or years of life. In the last several decades, there have been exciting advances in our understanding of fetal and neonatal thyroid physiology. In addition, advances in molecular biology have helped in understanding the early events in thyroid gland embryogenesis, mechanisms of thyroid action in the brain, the molecular basis for many of the inborn errors of thyroid hormonogenesis, and thyroid hormone action. However, many questions and challenges are still not answered. For example, the increasing numbers of surviving small and premature neonates with abnormalities in thyroid function need definite diagnostic criteria and whether they require medical therapy. Another challenge is the dilemma of finding the best screening methodology that is sensitive and cost effective. PMID:22570946

  1. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  2. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease. PMID:20822331

  3. Neonatal Incidence of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Eli; Eidelman, Mark; Katzman, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The advantages of sonographic examination are well known, but its main disadvantage is that it might lead to overdiagnosis, which might cause overtreatment. Variations in the incidence of developmental dysplasia of the hip are well known. We ascertained the incidence of neonatal sonographic developmental dysplasia of the hip without considering the development of those joints during followup. All 45,497 neonates (90,994 hips) born in our institute between January 1992 and December 2001 were examined clinically and sonographically during the first 48 hours of life. Sonography was performed according to Graf’s method, which considers mild hip sonographic abnormalities as Type IIa. We evaluated the different severity type incidence pattern and its influence on the total incidence during and between the investigated years. According to our study, sonographic Type IIa has major effects on the incidence of overall developmental dysplasia of the hip with a correlation coefficient of 0.95, whereas more severe sonographic abnormalities show relatively stable incidence patterns. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288551

  4. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. A congenital ... rare. Symptoms A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the following: Brown ...

  5. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart disease is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Congenital heart disease (CHD) can describe a number of different problems affecting the heart. It is the most common ...

  6. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ACHA Search The futures of adults with congenital heart disease made brighter by their pasts Get Involved 2016 ... conference theme is "The Changing Landscape of Adult Congenital Heart Disease." Join Us Help us improve the quality of ...

  7. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  8. [Cystic kidney dysplasia of variable expression--prenatal ultrasound, cytogenetic and patho-anatomic findings based on 3 case examples].

    PubMed

    Tennstedt, C; Bollmann, R; Chaoui, R; Cobet, G; Körner, H; Kirchmair, F

    1994-01-01

    The present study reports on 3 cases of cystic renal dysplasias of Potter II type with variable characteristics and different clinical symptoms. The prenatal sonography revealed multicystically altered kidneys in the 19th to 33 rd week of gestation. Amniotic fluid cells and fetale lymphocytes were investigated to exclude possible chromosomal disorders. In case one, a unilateral cystic renal dysplasia was diagnosed by sonography in the 19th week of gestation. The chromosome analysis revealed one additional and altered chromosome 22 (partial trisomy). In case two, a bilateral cystic renal disease with oligohydramnios was distinguished in week 21 of gestation. In both cases, the pregnancies underwent artificial abortions and the stillborn infants were subjected to post mortem examinations. The patho-anatomical examinations confirmed the results of prenatal diagnoses and the classification of the cystic renal alteration as renal dysplasia of Potter II type. In case two, extrarenal malformations were found additionally. In case three, sonography revealed a unilateral multicystic kidney. In this case, there had not been any clinical symptoms in the prenatal stage, neither originating from the affected organ nor from other disorders. After delivery at predicted day a unilateral nephrectomy was performed because of space-consuming growth inside the abdominal cavity. PMID:7871919

  9. Ectrodactyly and Lethal Pulmonary Acinar Dysplasia Associated with Homozygous FGFR2 Mutations Identified by Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher P; Nataren, Nathalie J; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Schwarz, Quenten; Chong, Chan-Eng; Lee, Young K; Bruno, Damien L; Lipsett, Jill; McPhee, Andrew J; Schreiber, Andreas W; Feng, Jinghua; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-09-01

    Ectrodactyly/split hand-foot malformation is genetically heterogeneous with more than 100 syndromic associations. Acinar dysplasia is a rare congenital lung lesion of unknown etiology, which is frequently lethal postnatally. To date, there have been no reports of combinations of these two phenotypes. Here, we present an infant from a consanguineous union with both ectrodactyly and autopsy confirmed acinar dysplasia. SNP array and whole-exome sequencing analyses of the affected infant identified a novel homozygous Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) missense mutation (p.R255Q) in the IgIII domain (D3). Expression studies of Fgfr2 in development show localization to the affected limbs and organs. Molecular modeling and genetic and functional assays support that this mutation is at least a partial loss-of-function mutation, and contributes to ectrodactyly and acinar dysplasia only in homozygosity, unlike previously reported heterozygous activating FGFR2 mutations that cause Crouzon, Apert, and Pfeiffer syndromes. This is the first report of mutations in a human disease with ectrodactyly with pulmonary acinar dysplasia and, as such, homozygous loss-of-function FGFR2 mutations represent a unique syndrome. PMID:27323706

  10. Congenital Intralabyrinthine Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sanjay; Prasad, Kiran; Azadarmaki, Roya

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma is presented. High-resolution computerized tomographic scans and intraoperative photomicrographs display features of intralabyrinthine extension. We discuss pathogenetic theories for the development of congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma. The distinction of this condition from congenital cholesteatoma with labyrinthine erosion is discussed. PMID:25057421

  11. Congenital sternoclavicular dermoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Willaert, Annelore; Bruninx, Liesje; Hens, Greet; Hauben, Esther; Devriendt, Koen; Vander Poorten, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    We report a case series of 8 patients, presenting with a congenital sinus in the region of the sternoclavicular joint. This rare malformation has only been reported in the Japanese dermatological literature under the name of "congenital dermoid fistula of the anterior chest region". It has to be distinguished from other congenital anomalies and requires complete excision. PMID:26810293

  12. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  13. [DTPA-99mTc in pediatric renal disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Abós Olivares, M D; Banzo Marraco, J; Teijeiro Vidal, J; Mateo Navarro, A; Carreras Delgado, J L; García López, F

    1980-01-01

    99MTc is an ideal nuclide for Pediatric use. Combined with DTPA is an adequate agent for renal studies. 15 patients with ages ranging from eight days to eleven years were studied (10 patients with congenital malformation and five with renal tumour). The dosimetric advantages, the obtention with a single nuclide dose of multiple images and the diagnostic usefulness in congenital malformation and renal tumour suggest their use. PMID:7369638

  14. [Cystic renal pathology].

    PubMed

    Rosi, P; Cesaroni, M; Bracarda, S; Rociola, W; Virgili, G

    1993-08-01

    Ultrasonography has a great interest in diagnosis of cystic kidney disorders for typical eco-pattern of this pathology. In this work we show the eco-pattern of the most common cystic kidney disorders. Particularly we examine simple cysts (typical, atypical, complicated), multicystic kidney dysplasia, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (infantile) autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (adult age). The so-called neoplastic cysts (multiloculated cysts, multiloculated cysts nephroma, cystic nephroblastoma), medullar cysts (medullary sponge kidney, medullary cystic disease), parapyelic cysts, acquired cystic kidney disease in renal failure patients, parasitic cysts, epidermoid cysts. About this disorders we present the more typical and expressive ultrasonographic appearance and we define the role and the opportunity of diagnostic setting by echography, moreover ultrasonography allows us to make a differential diagnosis between cystic kidney disorders and other kidney disease. PMID:8353538

  15. Ultrasonography in Diagnosis of Congenital Absence of the Vas Deferens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Liang, Chaozhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an important cause of obstructive azoospermia, and the lack of an imaging diagnostic test is a critical problem. The aim of this study is to discuss the use of ultrasonography in congenital absence of vas deferens, including dysplasia of the epididymis and the seminal vesical. Material/Methods Five fresh spermatic cord specimens were detected by ultrasonography (US) to evaluate the image of the spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens. Fifty normal males had scrotal US to confirm whether the normal spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens can be detected and to measure the internal and external diameter on the long axis view. Forty-six males clinically diagnosed as having congenital absence of vas deferens underwent scrotal US to evaluate the spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens and the epididymis. The seminal vesicals were detected with transrectal ultrasonography. We evaluated images of the vas deferens, epididymis, and seminal vesical. Results Scrotal ultrasonography can distinguish the vas deferens from the other cord-like structures in the spermatic cord, and the vas deferens has a characteristic image. Scrotal ultrasonography detected all 50 normal males and measured the diameter. No statistically significant difference was found between the left and right measurements. In the 46 patients, the following anomalies were observed: 1) 42 cases of congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens; 2) 2 cases of congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens; and 3) 1 case of congenital segmental absence of the vas deferens. All 46 cases were accompanied with epididymis and seminal vesical anomalies. Conclusions The spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens can be detected by US, which is a valuable tool in diagnosis of congenital absence of the vas deferens. Seminal vesical and epididymis anomalies often associated with congenital absence of the vas deferens were revealed by ultrasonography. PMID

  16. Ectodermal dysplasia in identical twins

    PubMed Central

    Puttaraju, Gurkar Haraswarupa; Visveswariah, Paranjyothi Magadi

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is typically inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, characterized by deformity of at least two or more of the ectodermal structures - hair, teeth, nails and sweat glands. Two cases of hereditary HED involving identical male twins, is being documented for the rarity of its occurrence with special attention given to genetics, pathophysiology, clinical, intraoral manifestations and to the methods to improve the masticatory function, the facial esthetics and psychology of patients affected by this disease. PMID:23956595

  17. Craniometadiaphyseal dysplasia, wormian bone type.

    PubMed

    Santolaya, J M; Hall, C M; García-Miñaur, S; Delgado, A

    1998-05-18

    We report on a 4-year-old boy with craniometadiaphyseal dysplasia (CMDD), wormian bone type. Component manifestations include a large head with prominent forehead, skull changes showing multiple wormian bones, wide long tubular bones without the usual metaphyseal flare, wide and short tubular bones without the normal diaphyseal constriction, and wide ribs and clavicles. In addition to these findings, the propositus, his brother, his father, and a paternal aunt all have parietal protuberances, which seem not related to CMDD. Parental consanguineity supports the autosomal recessive transmission of the condition. PMID:9605592

  18. The Retroperitoneal Laparoscopic Renal Capsulectomy for Spontaneous Renal Subcapsular Fluid Collection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wu, Kaijie; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Zhishang; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Linlin; He, Dalin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection may occur as a rare presentation of nephritic syndrome, and distension of the renal capsula and Gerota fascia due to massive fluid accumulation may cause pain. In addition, hypertension secondary to renal ischemia and activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system may also occur. The objective of this study is to evaluate the surgical outcome of retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy for patients with this disease. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 10 female patients with spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection, diagnosed with B ultrasound and enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. Eight patients first underwent percutaneous renal subcapsular drainage, which seemed to be less effective, and then all patients underwent retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy. The volume of renal subcapsular fluid was documented, the fluid was examined by routine biochemical tests, and the excised renal capsules underwent pathological examination individually. The postoperative drainage time for each patient was documented, and follow-up was conducted 1, 3, 6, 12 months, and 2 years postoperatively. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy was successfully performed in all patients with no major complications. The average volume of renal subcapsular fluid was 436 milliliter (mL, 180–880 mL) in light yellow color, and the concentration of creatinine and urea nitrogen was quite similar to that of serum. The pathological findings revealed fibrous dysplasia of the renal capsule with chronic infiltration of inflammatory cells. The average drainage time was 11.5 days (5–30 days) postoperatively. All patients recovered 1 month after the operation and there were no recurrences with a mean follow-up period of 12 months (6–24 months). The reason for spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection is unknown, and the aim of treatment is mainly to alleviate symptoms. In our

  19. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  20. Renal Anomalies Associated with Ectopic Neurohypophysis

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Samim; Şişmek, Damla Gökşen; Önder, Asan; Darcan, Şükran

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Although the etiology of ectopic neurohypophysis that leads to pituitary hormone deficiencies is not yet clearly understood, birth trauma or genetic factors have been considered responsible. Concurrent cranial and extracranial congenital anomalies have been reported in such cases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of renal anomalies in nonsyndromic cases with ectopic neurohypophysis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of 20 patients with ectopic neurohypophysis who were followed up between January 1990 and December 2007 in a tertiary University Hospital. Results: Renal anomalies were identified in three (15%) cases including unilateral renal agenesis in one case, renal hypoplasia in one case, and double collecting system and unilateral renal agenesis in one case. Conclusions: In the present study, the increased frequency of renal anomalies in cases of ectopic neurohypophysis was highlighted, and it was emphasized that there might be common genetic factors that lead to such associations. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21750632

  1. Renal failure in Hay-Wells syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dhanya; Sugathan, Dileep K; Railey, Mohammed; Alrukhaimi, Mona

    2013-11-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is a group of disorders involving developmental defects of the ectodermal structures, with abnormalities in the skin, hair, nails and sweat glands. Ankyloblepharon - ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome, also known as Hay-Wells syndrome, is characterized by eyelid fusion, ED and cleft lip/palate. We report a 15-year-old Omani boy with AEC syndrome who presented with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Genitourinary anomalies including hypospadiasis, posterior urethral stricture and bilateral vesicoureteric reflux were noted. These led to secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and ESRD. Screening for genitourinary anomalies and renal function tests must be performed in all patients with ED to facilitate early detection of renal disease and appropriate management. PMID:24231488

  2. Renal branching morphogenesis: morphogenetic and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Blake, Joshua; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2014-12-01

    The human kidney is composed of an arborized network of collecting ducts, calyces and urinary pelvis that facilitate urine excretion and regulate urine composition. The renal collecting system is formed in utero, completed by the 34th week of gestation in humans, and dictates final nephron complement. The renal collecting system arises from the ureteric bud, a derivative of the intermediate-mesoderm derived nephric duct that responds to inductive signals from adjacent tissues via a process termed ureteric induction. The ureteric bud subsequently undergoes a series of iterative branching and remodeling events in a process called renal branching morphogenesis. Altered signaling that disrupts patterning of the nephric duct, ureteric induction, or renal branching morphogenesis leads to varied malformations of the renal collecting system collectively known as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and is the most frequently detected congenital renal aberration in infants. Here, we describe critical morphogenetic and cellular events that govern nephric duct specification, ureteric bud induction, renal branching morphogenesis, and cessation of renal branching morphogenesis. We also highlight salient molecular signaling pathways that govern these processes, and the investigative techniques used to interrogate them. PMID:25080023

  3. DYSPLASIA OF HIP DEVELOPMENT: UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Guarniero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The term “developmental dysplasia of the hip” (DDH) includes a wide spectrum of abnormalities that affect the hip during its growth, ranging from dysplasia to joint dislocation and going through different degrees of coxofemoral subluxation. The incidence of DDH is variable, and depends on a number of factors, including geographical location. Approximately one in 1,000 newborn infants may present hip dislocation and around 10 in 1,000 present hip instability. Brazil has an incidence of five per 1,000 in terms of findings of a positive Ortolani sign, which is the early clinical sign for detecting the disorder. The risk factors for DDH include: female sex, white skin color, primiparity, young mother, breech presentation at birth, family history, oligohydramnios, newborns with greater weight and height, and deformities of the feet or spine. Hip examinations should be routine for newborns, and should be emphasized in maternity units. Among newborns and infants, the diagnosis of DDH is preeminently clinical and is made using the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers. Conventional radiography is of limited value for confirming the diagnosis of DDH among newborns, and ultrasound of the hip is the ideal examination. The treatment of DDH is challenging, both for pediatric orthopedists and for general practitioners. The objectives of the treatment include diagnosis as early as possible, joint reduction and stabilization of the hip in a secure position. Classically, treatment options are divided according to different age groups, at the time of diagnosis. PMID:27022528

  4. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  5. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    PubMed

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  6. Dentin dysplasia: single-tooth involvement?

    PubMed

    Naik, Veena V; Kale, Alka D

    2009-03-01

    Dentin dysplasia is a genetic defect of dentin formation inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation with abnormal pulpal morphology. Once thought to be a single entity, dentin dysplasia has now been divided into type I (radicular) and II (coronal). Type I is by far the more common. Both types include multiple/generalized involvement of primary and permanent dentition. Combinations of both types have also been described in the literature. Four distinct forms of dentin dysplasia type I and 1 form of dentin dysplasia type II are identified. Although there seems to be no need to identify more than 2 distinct types of this relatively rare inherited defect of human dentin, the possible existence of additional forms of the disease cannot be ruled out. Here is a case report of dentin dysplasia in a single tooth, with crown and roots of normal dimensions, associated with severe pain and mobility and histologically involving both coronal and radicular dentin. Focal odontoblastic dysplasia or dentin dysplasia type III could be the new entity. PMID:19417880

  7. Coexistence of renal artery stenosis, primary antiphospholipid syndrome and polycythaemia vera: an exceptional association.

    PubMed

    Zahra Ha-ou-Nou, F; Boumzebra, D; Essaadouni, L

    2014-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis is the narrowing of the renal artery which causes hypertension and atrophy of the affected kidney, ultimately leading to renal failure if not treated and most often caused by atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia. Recently, renal artery stenosis has also been documented in patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome and in very few cases with myeloproliferative disease. In this paper, we describe a 31-year-old female with a history of gangrene affecting the toes with severe hypertension (200/110 mmHg), whose investigations revealed a combination of renal artery stenosis, primary antiphospholipid syndrome and polycythaemia vera. PMID:24197551

  8. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  9. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  10. The "pirate sign" in fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Singnurkar, Amit; Rush, Chris

    2006-11-01

    Fibrous dysplasia commonly involves the skull in both its monostotic and polyostotic variants. We present two cases of fibrous dysplasia involving the sphenoid wing, which were strikingly similar in their bone scan appearance. Both patients demonstrated intense increased uptake of Tc-99m MDP in a pattern reminding us of a "pirate wearing an eyepatch." We propose that this characteristic appearance of fibrous dysplasia of the sphenoid wing be called the "pirate sign." A review of the literature revealed several other pathologic conditions that have been reported to involve the sphenoid bone and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abnormal bone tracer uptake in this region. PMID:17053398

  11. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  12. Autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: I. An undescribed dysplasia/malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bustos, T; Simosa, V; Pinto-Cisternas, J; Abramovits, W; Jolay, L; Rodriguez, L; Fernandez, L; Ramela, M

    1991-12-15

    We describe 27 individuals of 7 families related to each other with high probability who showed manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia and other anomalies affecting females as severely as males with variable expressivity. All parents were normal. These families were detected in a relatively isolated and inbred population with very small neighbouring communities from a Caribbean Sea island, Margarita Island, in Northeastern Venezuela (Nueva Esparta State). The clinical picture common to all patients could not be classified within the heterogeneous group of known ectodermal dysplasias and the published cases do not resemble our patients. We believe that this condition constitutes a newly recognized autosomal recessive dysplasia/malformation syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:1776626

  13. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Orson W.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2008-09-01

    Calcium stones are commonly encountered in patients with congenital distal renal tubular acidosis, a disease of renal acidification caused by mutations in either the vacuolar H+-ATPase (B1 or a4 subunit), anion exchanger-1, or carbonic anhydrase II. Based on the existing database, we present two hypotheses. First, heterozygotes with mutations in B1 subunit of H+-ATPase are not normal but may harbor biochemical abnormalities such as renal acidification defects, hypercalciuria, and hypocitraturia which can predispose them to kidney stone formation. Second, we propose at least two mechanisms by which mutant B1 subunit can impair H+-ATPase: defective pump assembly and defective pump activity.

  14. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Acute arterial occlusion - kidney Acute kidney failure Aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Blood clots Renal cell carcinoma Renal venogram X-ray Update Date 4/7/2014 Updated by: Jason ... Failure Kidney Tests X-Rays Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  15. Renal venogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008:chap 6. Rankin S. Renal parenchymal disease, including renal failure, renovascular disease and transportation. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 39. Read ... arteriography Renal vein thrombosis Tumor Venogram Wilms ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... structures including the skin , hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands. Most people with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia have a reduced ability to sweat (hypohidrosis) because they have fewer sweat glands than ...

  17. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: septo-optic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Septo-optic dysplasia is a disorder of early brain development. Although its signs and symptoms vary, this condition ... in the brain. In the early stages of brain development, these structures may form abnormally or fail to ...

  19. Right Renal Vein Aplasia Associated With Diverted Renal Venous Drainage Through Lower Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Bozlar, Ugur; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Bedir, Selahattin; Ors, Fatih; Coskun, Unsal; Aydur, Emin

    2008-07-15

    We report a unique anomalous renal venous drainage on a 25-year-old man who had congenital absence of the right renal vein and an aberrant venous drainage through the lower pole of the kidney into the inferior vena cava. To our knowledge, this anomaly has not been previously reported in the peer-reviewed literature. State-of-the-art imaging findings are presented.

  20. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. A congenital ... A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the ... Hair Regular or uneven borders Smaller affected areas near the ...

  1. Congenital CMV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... CMV Babies Born with CMV (Congenital CMV Infection) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Detection and Intervention Helping Children With Congenital CMV Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  2. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  3. Late-presenting developmental dysplasia of the hip in Jordanian males

    PubMed Central

    Samarah, Omar Q.; Hadidi, Fadi A. Al; Hamdan, Mohammad Q.; Hantouly, Ashraf T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the pattern of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in late presenting Jordanian male patients and identify the risk factors and associated findings. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1145 male patients who attended the Pediatric Orthopedic Clinic for a DDH check up. This study was carried out in the Orthopedic Section, Special Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan between March 2011 and October 2014. Data was collected from medical records, and x-ray measurements were evaluated. Results: Of the 1145 male patients, 43 (3.75%) with 70 involved hips were diagnosed with late- presenting DDH. Being a first-born baby resulted in 41.9% increased risk for DDH. Cesarian delivery was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip dislocation (p=0.004) while normal delivery was significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia (p=0.004). No predictable risk factors were found in 44.2% patients with DDH. Bilateral cases were more common than unilateral cases: (26 [60.5%] versus 17 [39.5%]). Limited abduction was a constant finding in all dislocated hips (p<0.001). Associated conditions, such as club foot and congenital muscular torticollis were not observed. Conclusion: Cesarian section is a significant risk for dislocated hips while normal delivery is significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia. Bilateral DDH is more common than the unilateral. Club foot and torticollis were not observed in this series. PMID:26837397

  4. Congenital hip dislocation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is ...

  5. Parietal bone agenesis and associated multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    de Heer, Inge M; van Nesselrooij, Bernadette P M; Spliet, Willem; Vermeij-Keers, Christl

    2003-03-01

    Congenital defects of the calvaria in general and the parietal bones in particular are rare diseases. The latter are of three kinds: 1) cranioschisis, 2) craniodysostosis, and 3) foramina parietalia permagna (FPP). Here, we describe an exceptional anomaly, namely, complete absence of one parietal bone and dysplasia of the other. Agenesis has been reported twice before in the literature. In these cases, the calvarial defect was the only congenital anomaly. In contrast, the patient described in this article exhibited many other congenital deformities, namely, iris coloboma, facial dysmorphism, a large ventricular septal defect of the heart, and a horseshoe kidney. Some of these deformities are associated with neural crest development. Chromosomal analysis was normal in both blood and fibroblasts, and fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis failed to demonstrate a 22q11 deletion as seen in DiGeorge syndrome, a neural crest-related disease complex. Since 2000, the third group of congenital defects of the parietal bones, FPP, has been associated with mutations of the MSX-2 gene. In our case, a genetic analysis of this gene was performed, but no mutations or deletions of MSX-2 were detected. PMID:12621289

  6. [Thirty-eight cases of dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Cormier, F; Cormier, J-M

    2005-07-01

    Dysplasia of the renal and cervical arteries are well known, but dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is less frequent and has specific presentation. There have been few reports on the different types of presentations. We report a series of 38 cases and present the characteristic features together with a comparison with data in the literature. These non-atheromatous non-inflammatory lesions of the arterial wall occurred either in a context of fibromuscular disease which cause is unknown (30/38 patients) or in patients with genetic disease such as neurofibromatosis (3/38) or Ehlers-Danlos disease (5/38). The fibromuscular disease presented three aspects with specific characteristics. a) stenosing lesions found predominantly in women with a different morphology than in the other localization (usually associated): irregular diffuse stenosis discovered in patients with hypertension, or ischemic digestive symptoms (6/14 patients). b) Aneurysms, also found predominantly in women, but less frequently associated with other dysplasias. These aneurysms were generally sacciform. Unlike data in the literature, our series only included rupture in 1/8 cases. The aneurysm was discovered during the exploration of abdominal pain or hypertension. c) The third type of fibromuscular disease concerned dissections which were observed in the male population, (except one case of segmental dysplasia), and presented with signs of digestive ischemia in the other seven patients, four in an emergency context requiring immediate treatment. Two genetic diseases were observed. a) Neurofibromatosis led to dysplasia analogous to fibromuscular disease, but with abnormal nerve formations in the wall. For the three cases observed, one involved only the visceral arteries and the two others thoraco-abdominal coarctation. b) We had five patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery. For three there was a fusiform dilatation and in one small aneurysms

  7. Congenital myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nizamani, Noor Bakht; Talpur, Khalid Iqbal; Memon, Mariya Nazish

    2013-07-01

    Congenital myasthenia gravis is caused by genetic mutations affecting neuromuscular transmission, characterized by muscle weakness usually starting in childhood. A two and a half years old male child presented with bilateral ptosis and hoarseness of voice. The symptoms progressed giving the clinical impression of congenital myasthenia gravis. A series of tests were done including Ice Pack Test, acetylcholine receptor antibody test, trial of steroids and finally neostigmine test which confirmed the diagnosis. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing congenital myasthenia gravis and highlights the potential benefits of neostigmine test in its diagnosis. PMID:23823963

  8. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  9. Placentomegaly and placental mesenchymal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Minakshi; Siwatch, Sujata; Jain, Vanita; Nijhawan, Raje

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old primigravida presented to the labour ward at 37 weeks gestation referred with intrauterine growth restriction, oligohydramnios and placentomegaly. Differential diagnoses of placentomegaly were considered. Her antenatal blood screening tests were normal. There were no fetal malformations. However, triple screen and fetal karyotype were not done as patient presented late in pregnancy. The patient soon went into spontaneous labour and delivered a girl weighing 2.15 kg with a normal Apgar score. The cord was long and twisted; placenta was bulky, 1.7 kg, with prominent grape-like vesicles involving whole placenta with a rim of normal placenta at the periphery. Microscopy showed some areas of multiple villi with marked hydropic changes and myxoid degeneration, preserved vasculature and no trophoblastic proliferation. Placental mesenchymal dysplasia was thus diagnosed. The baby had no evidence of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. The child is now 3 years old with normal development and is doing well. PMID:23266781

  10. [The role of connective tissue dysplasia in the forming of mitral valve prolapse].

    PubMed

    Filipenko, P S; Malookaia, Iu S

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue (CT) is a multifunctional universal structure of great importance to the human organism. Constituting about 50% of the body mass, CT forms a frame (skeleton) and outer cover (skin), as well as the inner medium, through which all structural elements receive nutrients and extract metabolic products. The great number of links, constituting the CT system, each of which is controlled genetically and is liable to genetic lesions, creates conditions for heterogeneity of malformations and diseases involving CT. Non-differentiated CT dysplasia (NDCTD) is a genetically heterogenous group, presenting a basis for various chronic diseases. NDCTD may present the cause of dysplastic changes in the CT of different organs and systems. Thanks to modern diagnostic techniques, NDCTD is revealed frequently. NDCTD is underlied by molecular-, onto-, and pathogenetic mechanisms, leading to structural and functional changes in CT. This CT "weakness" is manifested by the peculiarities of the structure of various organs and systems. Mesenchimal heart dysplasias are the most widespread visceral markers of the given CT pathology. CT dysplasias of the heart are often combined with varied manifestations of system CT anomaly. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most wide-spread and well-studied minor heart anomalies. Primary MVP is a hereditary or congenital pathology and is not connected with a particular disease. It is a genetic pathology--CT dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance. Patients with MVP have an increased expression of Bw35 antigen of HLA system, which causes dysmetabolism of collagen in the mitral cusps. It has been revealed that tissue deficiency of magnesium is associated with antigen expression and correlates with clinical symptoms in MVP. Exogenic factors influencing MVP have been described. PMID:17294876

  11. Neuromotor outcomes in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Tsakalidis, Christos; Kyriakidou, Maria; Mitsiakos, Georgios; Chatziioanidis, Helias; Porpodi, Maria; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Nikolaides, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    We examine the neuromotor outcomes of preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Two hundred and nineteen infants (gestational age, ≤ 32 weeks; birth weight, ≤ 1500 g) were studied. Neuromotor development was assessed using the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination. All potential risk factors associated with neuromotor scores (P < 0.015) were included in the generalized linear model (multiple linear regression) to determine if bronchopulmonary dysplasia had an independent relationship with neuromotor scores. Infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia had lower global scores at ages 6 and 12 months. After adjustment for confounding factors, scores of infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia were reduced by 13.2 units, whereas scores for those with periventricular leukomalacia were reduced by 11.1 units, at age 6 months. At age 12 months, scores for those with periventricular leukomalacia were reduced by 11.9 units. Duration of hospital stay reduced scores by 0.1 for each additional day increase in hospital. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia constitutes a major cause of poor neuromotor outcomes at age 6 months, but improvements in motor outcomes occur over time. PMID:21147386

  12. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  13. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  14. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  15. Mutations Preventing Regulated Exon Skipping in MET Cause Osteofibrous Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gray, Mary J; Kannu, Peter; Sharma, Swarkar; Neyt, Christine; Zhang, Dongping; Paria, Nandina; Daniel, Philip B; Whetstone, Heather; Sprenger, Hans-Georg; Hammerschmidt, Philipp; Weng, Angela; Dupuis, Lucie; Jobling, Rebekah; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Dray, Michael; Su, Peiqiang; Wilson, Megan J; Kapur, Raj P; McCarthy, Edward F; Alman, Benjamin A; Howard, Andrew; Somers, Gino R; Marshall, Christian R; Manners, Simon; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Rathjen, Karl E; Karol, Lori A; Crawford, Haemish; Markie, David M; Rios, Jonathan J; Wise, Carol A; Robertson, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    The periosteum contributes to bone repair and maintenance of cortical bone mass. In contrast to the understanding of bone development within the epiphyseal growth plate, factors that regulate periosteal osteogenesis have not been studied as intensively. Osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) is a congenital disorder of osteogenesis and is typically sporadic and characterized by radiolucent lesions affecting the cortical bone immediately under the periosteum of the tibia and fibula. We identified germline mutations in MET, encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, that segregate with an autosomal-dominant form of OFD in three families and a mutation in a fourth affected subject from a simplex family and with bilateral disease. Mutations identified in all families with dominant inheritance and in the one simplex subject with bilateral disease abolished the splice inclusion of exon 14 in MET transcripts, which resulted in a MET receptor (MET(Δ14)) lacking a cytoplasmic juxtamembrane domain. Splice exclusion of this domain occurs during normal embryonic development, and forced induction of this exon-exclusion event retarded osteoblastic differentiation in vitro and inhibited bone-matrix mineralization. In an additional subject with unilateral OFD, we identified a somatic MET mutation, also affecting exon 14, that substituted a tyrosine residue critical for MET receptor turnover and, as in the case of the MET(Δ14) mutations, had a stabilizing effect on the mature protein. Taken together, these data show that aberrant MET regulation via the juxtamembrane domain subverts core MET receptor functions that regulate osteogenesis within cortical diaphyseal bone. PMID:26637977

  16. Complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed cleidocranial dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Zeng, Binghui; Yu, Dongsheng; Jing, Xiangyi; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yiming

    2015-09-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare congenital disorder, typically characterized by persistently open skull sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, and supernumerary teeth. Mutations in the gene encoding the runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) protein are responsible for approximately two thirds of CCD patients. We report a 20-year-old CCD patient presenting not only with typical skeletal changes, but also complex dental anomalies. A previously undiagnosed odontoma, 14 supernumerary teeth, a cystic lesion, and previously unreported fused primary teeth were discovered on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Mutation analysis identified the causal c.578G>A (p.R193Q) mutation in the RUNX2 gene. At 20 years of age, the patient had already missed the optimal period for dental intervention. This report describes the complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed CCD patient, and emphasizes the significance of CBCT assessment for the detection of dental anomalies and the importance of early treatment to achieve good outcomes. PMID:26389062

  17. Complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed cleidocranial dysplasia patient

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Zeng, Binghui; Yu, Dongsheng; Jing, Xiangyi; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare congenital disorder, typically characterized by persistently open skull sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, and supernumerary teeth. Mutations in the gene encoding the runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) protein are responsible for approximately two thirds of CCD patients. We report a 20-year-old CCD patient presenting not only with typical skeletal changes, but also complex dental anomalies. A previously undiagnosed odontoma, 14 supernumerary teeth, a cystic lesion, and previously unreported fused primary teeth were discovered on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Mutation analysis identified the causal c.578G>A (p.R193Q) mutation in the RUNX2 gene. At 20 years of age, the patient had already missed the optimal period for dental intervention. This report describes the complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed CCD patient, and emphasizes the significance of CBCT assessment for the detection of dental anomalies and the importance of early treatment to achieve good outcomes. PMID:26389062

  18. Mutations Preventing Regulated Exon Skipping in MET Cause Osteofibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Mary J.; Kannu, Peter; Sharma, Swarkar; Neyt, Christine; Zhang, Dongping; Paria, Nandina; Daniel, Philip B.; Whetstone, Heather; Sprenger, Hans-Georg; Hammerschmidt, Philipp; Weng, Angela; Dupuis, Lucie; Jobling, Rebekah; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Dray, Michael; Su, Peiqiang; Wilson, Megan J.; Kapur, Raj P.; McCarthy, Edward F.; Alman, Benjamin A.; Howard, Andrew; Somers, Gino R.; Marshall, Christian R.; Manners, Simon; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Rathjen, Karl E.; Karol, Lori A.; Crawford, Haemish; Markie, David M.; Rios, Jonathan J.; Wise, Carol A.; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The periosteum contributes to bone repair and maintenance of cortical bone mass. In contrast to the understanding of bone development within the epiphyseal growth plate, factors that regulate periosteal osteogenesis have not been studied as intensively. Osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) is a congenital disorder of osteogenesis and is typically sporadic and characterized by radiolucent lesions affecting the cortical bone immediately under the periosteum of the tibia and fibula. We identified germline mutations in MET, encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, that segregate with an autosomal-dominant form of OFD in three families and a mutation in a fourth affected subject from a simplex family and with bilateral disease. Mutations identified in all families with dominant inheritance and in the one simplex subject with bilateral disease abolished the splice inclusion of exon 14 in MET transcripts, which resulted in a MET receptor (METΔ14) lacking a cytoplasmic juxtamembrane domain. Splice exclusion of this domain occurs during normal embryonic development, and forced induction of this exon-exclusion event retarded osteoblastic differentiation in vitro and inhibited bone-matrix mineralization. In an additional subject with unilateral OFD, we identified a somatic MET mutation, also affecting exon 14, that substituted a tyrosine residue critical for MET receptor turnover and, as in the case of the METΔ14 mutations, had a stabilizing effect on the mature protein. Taken together, these data show that aberrant MET regulation via the juxtamembrane domain subverts core MET receptor functions that regulate osteogenesis within cortical diaphyseal bone. PMID:26637977

  19. Ectodermal dysplasia associated with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Volpato, Maria Carmen Palma Faria; de Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; Palma, Vinicius Canavarros; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia and sickle cell anaemia are inherited disorders that affect, respectively, the tissues derived from the embryonic ectoderm and the production of erythrocytes by the bone marrow. The simultaneous occurrence of both disorders is extremely rare. This is a case of both ectodermal dysplasia and sickle cell anaemia reported in a 6-year-old. The patient had been diagnosed with sickle cell anaemia for only six months when he sought treatment presenting with the following: hypotrichosis, dry skin, periocular hyperpigmentation, protruding lips, hypodontia, and morphologically altered teeth. The clinical features combined with his medical history led to the diagnosis of ectodermal dysplasia. Dentists should be prepared to recognise patterns that escape normality to aid in the diagnosis of systemic changes, even in patients with other previous diagnoses. PMID:25343049

  20. Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: evidence for autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed

    Kassner, E G; Haller, J O; Reddy, V H; Mitarotundo, A; Katz, I

    1976-12-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia is a syndrome that encompasses cranial hyperostosis, abnormal tubulation of cylindrical bones, and other skeletal and extraskeletal abnormalities. The most striking features are overgrowth of the supraorbital ridges which results in a Mephistophelian facial appearance and a radiographic configuration of the skull that has been likened to a soldier's helmet. Most patients have severe hearing loss, defective dentition, poorly developed musculature, and joint contractures. Dominant inheritance has been suggested in previous reports, but an appropriate pedigree has been documented in only one family. This paper describes three additional patients in two unrelated families: (1) an 8-year-old boy whose mother has mild metaphyseal dysplasia and several minor skeletal abnormalities that have occurred in patients with the syndrome; and (2) two maternal half-brothers. These cases provide additional evidence that frontometaphyseal dysplasia is an autosomal dominant trait with variable penetrance. PMID:998829

  1. The Retroperitoneal Laparoscopic Renal Capsulectomy for Spontaneous Renal Subcapsular Fluid Collection: A Case-Series Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wu, Kaijie; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Zhishang; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Linlin; He, Dalin

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection may occur as a rare presentation of nephritic syndrome, and distension of the renal capsula and Gerota fascia due to massive fluid accumulation may cause pain. In addition, hypertension secondary to renal ischemia and activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system may also occur. The objective of this study is to evaluate the surgical outcome of retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy for patients with this disease.We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 10 female patients with spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection, diagnosed with B ultrasound and enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. Eight patients first underwent percutaneous renal subcapsular drainage, which seemed to be less effective, and then all patients underwent retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy. The volume of renal subcapsular fluid was documented, the fluid was examined by routine biochemical tests, and the excised renal capsules underwent pathological examination individually. The postoperative drainage time for each patient was documented, and follow-up was conducted 1, 3, 6, 12 months, and 2 years postoperatively.Retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy was successfully performed in all patients with no major complications. The average volume of renal subcapsular fluid was 436 milliliter (mL, 180-880 mL) in light yellow color, and the concentration of creatinine and urea nitrogen was quite similar to that of serum. The pathological findings revealed fibrous dysplasia of the renal capsule with chronic infiltration of inflammatory cells. The average drainage time was 11.5 days (5-30 days) postoperatively. All patients recovered 1 month after the operation and there were no recurrences with a mean follow-up period of 12 months (6-24 months).The reason for spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection is unknown, and the aim of treatment is mainly to alleviate symptoms. In our experience, retroperitoneal

  2. Duplex scan sonography of renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rabbia, C; Valpreda, S

    2003-06-01

    Renal artery stenosis is the most common cause of potentially remediable secondary hypertension. The most common causes include atherosclerosis and fibromuscular dysplasia. Particularly the atherosclerotic form is a progressive disease that may lead to gradual and silent loss of renal functional tissue. Thus, early diagnosis of renal artery stenosis is an important clinical objective since interventional therapy may improve or cure hypertension and preserve renal function. Screening for renal artery stenosis is indicated in the suspicion of renovascular hypertension or ischemic nephropathy in order to identify patients in which an endoluminal or a surgical revascularization is advisable. In the recent years many noninvasive tests have been proposed and evaluated in the clinical practice, in alternative to arteriography. These include nuclear scan, color Doppler sonography, CT angiography and MR angiography. Sonography is usually the first diagnostic modality for the non invasive evaluation of renal vascular disease with 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity when performed in dedicated laboratories. Despite sonography is highly affected by operator dependence, and it takes a lot of time to train good operators, actually is the best screening test because it is not expensive, non invasive and accurate. When a discrepancy exists between the clinical data and the results of US, other tests are mandatory. PMID:12865875

  3. Glenoid Dysplasia: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Josef K; Galvin, Joseph W; Grassbaugh, Jason A; Parada, Stephen A; Li, Xinning

    2016-06-01

    ➤Subtle forms of glenoid dysplasia may be more common than previously thought and likely predispose some patients to symptomatic posterior shoulder instability. Severe glenoid dysplasia is a rare condition with characteristic radiographic findings involving the posteroinferior aspect of the glenoid that often remains asymptomatic.➤Instability symptoms related to glenoid dysplasia may develop over time with increased activities or trauma. Physical therapy focusing on rotator cuff strengthening and proprioceptive control should be the initial management.➤Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic arthrograms are useful for detecting subtle glenoid dysplasia by revealing the presence of an abnormally thickened or hypertrophic posterior part of the labrum, increased capsular volume, glenoid retroversion, and posteroinferior glenoid deficiency.➤Open and arthroscopic labral repair and capsulorrhaphy procedures have been described for symptomatic posterior shoulder instability. Glenoid retroversion of >10° may be a risk factor for failure following soft-tissue-only procedures for symptomatic glenoid dysplasia.➤Osseous procedures are categorized as either glenoid reorientation (osteotomy) or glenoid augmentation (bone graft), and no predictable results have been demonstrated for any surgical strategy. Glenoid osteotomies have been described for increased retroversion, with successful results, although others have noted substantial complications and poor outcomes.➤In severe glenoid dysplasia, the combination of bone deficiency and retroversion makes glenoid osteotomy extremely challenging. Bone grafts placed in a lateralized position to create a blocking effect may increase the risk of the development of arthritis, while newer techniques that place the graft in a congruent position may decrease this risk. PMID:27252441

  4. Denosumab Treatment for Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, AM; Chong, WH; Yao, J; Gafni, RI; Kelly, MH; Chamberlain, CE; Bassim, C; Cherman, N; Ellsworth, M; Kasa-Vubu, JZ; Farley, FA; Molinolo, AA; Bhattacharyya, N; Collins, MT

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a skeletal disease caused by somatic activating mutations of the cAMP-regulating protein, Gsα. These mutations lead to replacement of normal bone by proliferative osteogenic precursors, resulting in deformity, fracture, and pain. Medical treatment has been ineffective in altering the disease course. RANK ligand (RANKL) is a cell surface protein involved in many cellular processes, including osteoclastogenesis, and is reported to be overexpressed in FD-like bone cells. Denosumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody to RANKL approved for treatment of osteoporosis and prevention of skeletal-related events from bone metastases. We present the case of a 9-year-old boy with severe FD who was treated with denosumab for a rapidly expanding femoral lesion. Immunohistochemical staining on a pre-treatment bone biopsy specimen revealed marked RANKL expression. He was started on monthly denosumab, with an initial starting dose of 1 mg/kg and planned 0.25 mg/kg dose escalations every three months. Over seven months of treatment he showed marked reduction in pain, bone turnover markers, and tumor growth rate. Denosumab did not appear to impair healing of a femoral fracture that occurred while on treatment. With initiation of treatment he developed hypophosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism, necessitating supplementation with phosphorus, calcium and calcitriol. Bone turnover markers (BTM) showed rapid and sustained suppression. With discontinuation there was rapid and dramatic rebound of BTM) with CTX (reflecting osteoclast activity) exceeding pre-treatment levels, and accompanied by severe hypercalcemia. In this child, denosumab lead to dramatic reduction of FD expansion and FD-related bone pain. Denosumab was associated with clinically significant disturbances of mineral metabolism both while on treatment and after discontinuation. Denosumab treatment of FD warrants further study to confirm efficacy and determine potential morbidity, as well as

  5. Congenital Urinary Tract Obstruction: The Long View

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy therefore results from combined developmental and obstructive renal injury. Due to inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by MRI should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  6. Maxillofacial fibrous dysplasia: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Markov, Peter; Syed, Ali Zakir; Markova, Christiana; Mendes, Rui Amaral

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented for orthodontic treatment, with a chief symptom of a 'shifting bite' and concurrent facial asymmetry with aesthetic concerns. The patient had previously received treatment from several general dentists and several specialists, without accurate diagnosis. Radiological investigation coupled with biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. Proper diagnosis led to changes in the treatment plan and gave the patient realistic expectations about the options she had for the outcome of treatment. Prompt diagnosis by dental practitioners is critical to patient satisfaction and successful outcome; therefore, it is important to familiarise ourselves with the signs, symptoms and proper course of management of fibrous dysplasia. PMID:27358102

  7. Ultrasonic demonstration of fetal skeletal dysplasia. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Muller, L M; Cremin, B J

    1985-02-01

    Reports on prenatal diagnosis in cases of skeletal dysplasia have mostly been in high-risk mothers with a suspect genetic background where the fetal lesion could probably be predetermined. We deal with routine ultrasonographic appraisal of the fetal skeleton when dysplasia is not initially suspected, and relate our experience of the lethal forms of this condition. During the 4-year period 1981-1984, 6 cases of skeletal dysplasia, including thanatophoric dysplasia, achondrogenesis, the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (chondro-ectodermal dysplasia) and osteogenesis imperfecta, were detected; the ultrasonographic findings are discussed. PMID:3885435

  8. Squamous Dysplasia of the Urinary Bladder: A Consecutive Cystectomy Series.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Joshua I; Kaag, Matthew; Raman, Jay D; Chan, Wilson; Tran, Truc; Kunchala, Sudhir; DeGraff, David; Chen, Guoli

    2016-06-01

    Squamous dysplasia of the urinary bladder is uncommon and may represent a precursor to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Though significant focus has been devoted to squamous differentiation in invasive bladder cancer, relatively little attention has been given to squamous dysplasia. We methodically reviewed microscopic slides from a consecutive cystectomy series at our institution (n = 303; 2001-2014), with special attention given to squamous dysplasia and squamous differentiation within association invasive carcinoma. Of these 303 cases, 3% (9 cases) had squamous dysplasia. The majority (89%; 8/9) had a similar morphological appearance to squamous dysplasia of the head and neck (ie, cytological atypia, architectural disturbances, and abnormal keratinization). Invasive carcinoma was present in 230 of the cystectomy cases. Of these 230 cases with invasive carcinoma, 4% (8 cases) also had squamous dysplasia. The invasive carcinoma had evidence of squamous differentiation in all cases with concurrent squamous dysplasia. Concurrent flat urothelial carcinoma in situ was present in 3 of the 8 cases with both invasive carcinoma and squamous dysplasia. Squamous dysplasia was not associated with clinical outcomes data, including death from bladder cancer and bladder cancer recurrence. The data from this study indicate that squamous dysplasia is uncommon in the cystectomy setting, frequently has the morphology of head and neck dysplasia, and is often associated with invasive carcinoma with squamous differentiation. PMID:26860905

  9. The Bone Dysplasia Ontology: integrating genotype and phenotype information in the skeletal dysplasia domain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Skeletal dysplasias are a rare and heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting skeletal development. Patients with skeletal dysplasias suffer from many complex medical issues including degenerative joint disease and neurological complications. Because the data and expertise associated with this field is both sparse and disparate, significant benefits will potentially accrue from the availability of an ontology that provides a shared conceptualisation of the domain knowledge and enables data integration, cross-referencing and advanced reasoning across the relevant but distributed data sources. Results We introduce the design considerations and implementation details of the Bone Dysplasia Ontology. We also describe the different components of the ontology, including a comprehensive and formal representation of the skeletal dysplasia domain as well as the related genotypes and phenotypes. We then briefly describe SKELETOME, a community-driven knowledge curation platform that is underpinned by the Bone Dysplasia Ontology. SKELETOME enables domain experts to use, refine and extend and apply the ontology without any prior ontology engineering experience--to advance the body of knowledge in the skeletal dysplasia field. Conclusions The Bone Dysplasia Ontology represents the most comprehensive structured knowledge source for the skeletal dysplasias domain. It provides the means for integrating and annotating clinical and research data, not only at the generic domain knowledge level, but also at the level of individual patient case studies. It enables links between individual cases and publicly available genotype and phenotype resources based on a community-driven curation process that ensures a shared conceptualisation of the domain knowledge and its continuous incremental evolution. PMID:22449239

  10. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract. PMID:27043388

  11. [Renal elastography].

    PubMed

    Correas, Jean-Michel; Anglicheau, Dany; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    Renal elastography has become available with the development of noninvasive quantitative techniques (including shear-wave elastography), following the rapidly growing field of diagnosis and quantification of liver fibrosis, which has a demonstrated major clinical impact. Ultrasound or even magnetic resonance techniques are leaving the pure research area to reach the routine clinical use. With the increased incidence of chronic kidney disease and its specific morbidity and mortality, the noninvasive diagnosis of renal fibrosis can be of critical value. However, it is difficult to simply extend the application from one organ to the other due to a large number of anatomical and technical issues. Indeed, the kidney exhibits various features that make stiffness assessment more complex, such as the presence of various tissue types (cortex, medulla), high spatial orientation (anisotropy), local blood flow, fatty sinus with variable volume and echotexture, perirenal space with variable fatty content, and the variable depth of the organ. Furthermore, the stiffness changes of the renal parenchyma are not exclusively related to fibrosis, as renal perfusion or hydronephrosis will impact the local elasticity. Renal elastography might be able to diagnose acute or chronic obstruction, or to renal tumor or pseudotumor characterization. Today, renal elastography appears as a promising application that still requires optimization and validation, which is the contrary for liver stiffness assessment. PMID:26976058

  12. Renal hypertension: an unusual cause for a common problem.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Amjad; Ramanan, A V; Murphy, Paula; Saleem, Moin A

    2013-05-01

    A 9-year-old girl with longstanding headaches presented acutely with rash, which disappeared quickly on treatment with oral phenoxymethylpenicillin. It was attributed to streptococcal infection as group A streptococcus was isolated from throat swab. She was incidentally found to have high blood pressure on routine screening on admission. Subsequently, 'fibromuscular dysplasia' was confirmed on renal angiogram, which showed a characteristic beaded appearance. It is a good clinical practice to check blood pressure in any child seen for whatever reason. PMID:23371394

  13. Concomitant slide tracheoplasty and cardiac operation for congenital tracheal stenosis associated with VACTERL.

    PubMed

    Wu, En-Ting; Wang, Ching-Chia; Lin, Ming-Tai; Huang, Pei-Ming; Chen, Shyh-Jye; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Hwang, Haw-Kwei; Chen, Ming-Ren; Huang, Shu-Chien

    2013-10-01

    The association of congenital tracheal stenosis and tracheoesophageal (TE) fistula is rare. Here, we report 2 patients with tracheobronchial stenosis (complete cartilage ring) involving the lower trachea and right bronchus. Both patients had associated VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiovascular anomalies, TE, renal, and limb defects) congenital cardiac defects and tracheal diverticula after repair of the TE fistula in type C esophageal atresia. The stenotic segment began at the orifice of the TE fistula, which became diverticula after the TE fistula was repaired. Concomitant repair of congenital cardiac defects and a slide tracheoplasty with elimination of the diverticula were performed successfully. PMID:24088476

  14. Multiple congenital PSS in a dog: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jessica J; Kim, Stanley E; Reese, David J; Risselada, Marije; Ellison, Gary W

    2013-01-01

    A 4 yr old spayed female mixed-breed dog presented with a 2 yr history of recurring increases in liver enzymes. Two congenital portosystemic shunts (PSSs) were identified using computed tomography (CT) angiography, which included a portoazygous and portorenal extrahepatic shunt. Double right renal veins were also identified. The shunts were successfully identified and attenuated with cellophane banding. Multiple congenital PSS is a rare phenomenon, but should be considered during exploratory laparotomy for PSS and in dogs with poor response to surgical attenuation of a single PSS. CT proved to be a crucial part of accurate diagnosis and surgical planning for this dog with multiple congenital PSS. PMID:23690491

  15. Specific skeletal dysplasias in utero: sonographic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, D H; Rumack, C M; Manco-Johnson, M L; Manchester, D; Meier, P; Bramble, J; Clewell, W

    1986-04-01

    A retrospective study was performed of 13 short-limbed fetuses with lethal skeletal dysplasias that were evaluated with ultrasound (US) from 1981 to 1984. The specific diagnoses were thanatophoric dwarfism, achondrogenesis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and campomelic dwarfism. Death occurred in utero or within 2 weeks after delivery in all cases. US examination showed other associated abnormalities, including polyhydramnios, hydrops, shortened femurs, and CNS abnormalities. Radiographs confirmed these findings and provided more information regarding the shape of the limbs and thorax and the appearance of the spine. The probable diagnosis of lethal short-limbed dwarfism was made antenatally using US in eleven of the fetuses. Spinal appearance, thoracic shape, and associated hydrops and polyhydramnios were most helpful in determining the specific type of dysplasia present. Lethal short-limbed skeletal dysplasia may be diagnosed confidently in utero using US examination; however, obstetric plain film radiography may be required to determine the definitive type of dysplasia. In certain cases, US may be sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:3513248

  16. Antenatal diagnosis of lethal skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Tretter, A E; Saunders, R C; Meyers, C M; Dungan, J S; Grumbach, K; Sun, C C; Campbell, A B; Wulfsberg, E A

    1998-02-17

    Lethal skeletal dysplasias (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of rare but important genetic disorders characterized by abnormal growth and development of bone and cartilage. We describe the diagnosis and outcome of 29 cases of lethal skeletal dysplasias evaluated between January 1989 and December 1996 at the University of Maryland Medical Center and the Ultrasound Institute of Baltimore. Two cases presented at delivery with no prenatal care while the remaining 27 cases were identified by antenatal sonography. Final diagnoses included thanatophoric dysplasia (14), osteogenesis imperfecta, type II (6), achondrogenesis (2), short rib syndromes (3), campomelic syndrome (2), atelosteogenesis (1), and no evidence of a skeletal dysplasia (1). Twenty out of 27 pregnancies were terminated with an average at detection of 21.6 weeks. The other 7 pregnancies that went on to deliver had an average age at detection of 29.2 weeks. Fetal abnormalities in the terminated pregnancies were identified at a significantly earlier gestational age (P = 0.0016) than the pregnancies that continued. While the identification of LSD by sonography was excellent (26/27), only 13/27 (48%) were given an accurate specific antenatal diagnosis. In 8/14 (57%) cases with an inaccurate or nonspecific diagnosis there was a significant or crucial change in the genetic counseling. Thus, while antenatal sonography is an excellent method for discovering LSD, clinical examination, radiographs, and autopsy are mandatory for making a specific diagnosis. PMID:9489797

  17. IQ Measurement in Children with Skeletal Dysplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, John G.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    IQ studies on 68 children (5 months-15 years) with skeletal dysplasia (dwarfism) were reviewed to provide counseling to parents of newborn affected children. Results of the study show that this population performs intellectually in the same range as other children. Journal availability: see EC 115 198. (PHR)

  18. Follicular dysplasia of the adult doberman pinscher.

    PubMed

    Moura, Enio; Cirio, Silvana M

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the case of an adult female, red Doberman pinscher affected by permanent hypotrichosis, limited to the dorsolumbar region and sides of the trunk. The hypotrichosis began at approximately the age of 2 years and progressed slowly with no skin hyperpigmentation. The clinical and histopathological characteristics are of an uncommon form of follicular dysplasia. PMID:20194372

  19. Recurrent Monostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nilton; de Oliveira, Reinaldo José; Takehana, Denise; Deana, Naira Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a condition in which normal bone marrow is replaced by an abnormal proliferation of new fibrous connective tissue. Female patient, white, 20 years old, attended the dental clinic reporting a slow increase in volume in the right mandible region over the last 5 years. She was examined by imaging: the panoramic X-ray revealed a lesion with the appearance of ground glass while the cone-beam computed tomography showed an extensive lesion in the region of the right hemimandible. The histopathological examination was compatible with fibrous dysplasia. Bone gammagraphy was indicated, plus an endocrinological study to eliminate polyostotic forms, which produced a negative result. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the right hemimandible was diagnosed. Conservative surgery was carried out and after 1 year recurrence of the tumour was observed. We may conclude that conservative surgery might not be the best choice for treatment for monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the mandible and that other options must be considered, such as radical surgery or the use of bisphosphonates. In our study, we may also conclude that it is very important to explain to the patient the possibility of recurrence of the lesion and the need for monitoring with periodic imaging studies. PMID:27340572

  20. Recurrent Monostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Reinaldo José; Takehana, Denise; Deana, Naira Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a condition in which normal bone marrow is replaced by an abnormal proliferation of new fibrous connective tissue. Female patient, white, 20 years old, attended the dental clinic reporting a slow increase in volume in the right mandible region over the last 5 years. She was examined by imaging: the panoramic X-ray revealed a lesion with the appearance of ground glass while the cone-beam computed tomography showed an extensive lesion in the region of the right hemimandible. The histopathological examination was compatible with fibrous dysplasia. Bone gammagraphy was indicated, plus an endocrinological study to eliminate polyostotic forms, which produced a negative result. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the right hemimandible was diagnosed. Conservative surgery was carried out and after 1 year recurrence of the tumour was observed. We may conclude that conservative surgery might not be the best choice for treatment for monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the mandible and that other options must be considered, such as radical surgery or the use of bisphosphonates. In our study, we may also conclude that it is very important to explain to the patient the possibility of recurrence of the lesion and the need for monitoring with periodic imaging studies. PMID:27340572

  1. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively. PMID:26115617

  2. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  3. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with one or more heart defects has congenital heart disease . Surgery is needed if the defect could harm ... 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  4. Impact of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... complex lesions, limitations are common. Some children with congenital heart disease have developmental delay or other learning difficulties. What ... defects? Successful treatment requires highly specialized care. Severe congenital heart disease requires extensive financial resources both in and out ...

  5. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. PMID:27301600

  6. Analysis of Renal Anomalies in VACTERL Association

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bridget K.; Khromykh, Alina; Martinez, Ariel F.; Carney, Tyler; Hadley, Donald W.; Solomon, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    VACTERL association refers to a combination of congenital anomalies that can include: Vertebral anomalies, Anal atresia, Cardiac malformations, Tracheo-Esophageal fistula with esophageal atresia, Renal anomalies (typically structural renal anomalies), and Limb anomalies. We conducted a description of a case series to characterize renal findings in a cohort of patients with VACTERL association. Out of the overall cohort, 48 patients (with at least 3 component features of VACTERL and who had abdominal ultrasound performed) met criteria for analysis. Four other patients were additionally analyzed separately, with the hypothesis that subtle renal system anomalies may occur in patients who would not otherwise meet criteria for VACTERL association. Thirty-three (69%) of the 48 patients had a clinical manifestation affecting the renal system. The most common renal manifestation (RM) was vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in addition to a structural defect (present in 27%), followed by unilateral renal agenesis (24%), and then dysplastic/multicystic kidneys or duplicated collected system (18% for each). Twenty-two (88%) of the 25 patients with a structural RM had an associated anorectal malformation. Individuals with either isolated lower anatomic anomalies, or both upper and lower anatomic anomalies were not statistically more likely to have a structural renal defect than those with isolated upper anatomic anomalies (p=0.22, p=0.284 respectively). Given the high prevalence of isolated VUR in our cohort, we recommend a screening VCUG or other imaging modality be obtained to evaluate for VUR if initial renal US shows evidence of obstruction or renal scarring, as well as ongoing evaluation of renal health. PMID:25196458

  7. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  8. Chronic renal failure in a patient with bilateral ureterocele

    PubMed Central

    Dada, Samuel A.; Rafiu, Mojeed O.; Olanrewaju, Timothy O.

    2015-01-01

    Ureterocele is a congenital anomaly, in which there is mal-development of the caudal segments of the ureter. There is a female preponderance with most cases seen in Caucasians. Among the reported complications of this condition, chronic renal failure occurring in the setting of ureterocele has not been well documented. We report a case of a young girl with bilateral ureterocele presenting with chronic renal failure, whose management presented a diagnostic failure and inadequate treatment. PMID:26108593

  9. Post-mortem cytogenomic investigations in patients with congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Montenegro, Marilia Moreira; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Rocha, Mariana; Madia, Fabricia Andreia Rosa; Costa, Thais Virgínia Moura Machado; Milani, Cintia; Schultz, Regina; Gonçalves, Fernanda Toledo; Fridman, Cintia; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2016-08-01

    Congenital anomalies are the second highest cause of infant deaths, and, in most cases, diagnosis is a challenge. In this study, we characterize patterns of DNA copy number aberrations in different samples of post-mortem tissues from patients with congenital malformations. Twenty-eight patients undergoing autopsy were cytogenomically evaluated using several methods, specifically, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), microsatellite marker analysis with a MiniFiler kit, FISH, a cytogenomic array technique and bidirectional Sanger sequencing, which were performed on samples of different tissues (brain, heart, liver, skin and diaphragm) preserved in RNAlater, in formaldehyde or by paraffin-embedding. The results identified 13 patients with pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs). Of these, eight presented aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y (two presented inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism). In addition, other abnormalities were found, including duplication of the TYMS gene (18p11.32); deletion of the CHL1 gene (3p26.3); deletion of the HIC1 gene (17p13.3); and deletion of the TOM1L2 gene (17p11.2). One patient had a pathogenic missense mutation of g.8535C>G (c.746C>G) in exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene consistent with Thanatophoric Dysplasia type I. Cytogenomic techniques were reliable for the analysis of autopsy material and allowed the identification of inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of congenital malformations. PMID:27450648

  10. Congenital hyperinsulinism with hyperammonaemia

    PubMed Central

    Pschibul, Alex; Müller, Jörg; Fahnenstich, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism is considered to be the most frequent cause of persistent recurrent hypoglycaemia in infants. The clinical presentation and response to pharmacological treatment may vary significantly depending on the underlying pathology. We report a case of a female infant with mild but early onset of recurrent hypoglycaemia. Metabolic workup revealed hyperinsulinism combined with mild hyperammonaemia as well as elevation of α-ketoglutarate in urine. Genetic testing demonstrated a de novo mutation in exon 7 of the glutamate dehydrogenase gene on chromosome 10. Episodes of hypoglycaemia responded to treatment with diazoxide. The differential diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of congenital hyperinsulinism is discussed. PMID:22315648

  11. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  12. Congenital midline nasofrontal masses.

    PubMed

    Saettele, Megan; Alexander, Alan; Markovich, Brian; Morelli, John; Lowe, Lisa H

    2012-09-01

    Congenital midline nasal masses are uncommon anomalies including nasal dermoids/epidermoids, nasal glial heterotopias and encephaloceles. These lesions can occur at the nasal bridge, extend intranasally and have intracranial extension with communication to the subarachnoid space. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of these lesions is critically important for presurgical planning and prevention of potentially fatal complications. Neuroimaging is essential in the evaluation of congenital midline nasal masses to identify the specific type of lesion, evaluate for the presence of intracranial extension and allow for appropriate presurgical planning. PMID:22648391

  13. Congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-07-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  14. Congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  15. Fetal imaging in the skeletal dysplasias: overview and experience.

    PubMed

    Lachman, R S

    1994-01-01

    The skeletal dysplasias (osteochondrodysplasias) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by generalized abnormalities of skeletal growth and development. Of approximately 125 well-described skeletal dysplasias, about 50 are clinically apparent and identifiable at birth. The prevalence of these dysplasias in the newborn is quite frequent and has been estimated to be between 3-4.5 per 10,000, and the overall frequency of skeletal dysplasias among perinatal deaths to be about 9 per 1,000. Over the past 23 years we have acquired an enormous experience in the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry with skeletal dysplasias diagnosable at birth or earlier. More and more cases referred to the registry over the past 2 years have been diagnosed as abnormal by ultrasound during the second trimester. The results of our evaluation of almost 400 fetuses and stillborn babies with reference to detailed prenatal history and postmortem evaluation including radiographs, chondro-osseous morphology and even some biochemical and molecular studies are presented. The most common disorders diagnosed were osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), thanatophoric dysplasia, campomelic dysplasia and achondrogenesis type II. Twenty-two types of neonatally diagnosable skeletal dysplasias are discussed together with potential fetal (second trimester) ultrasound findings, the number of fetal ultrasound cases referred to this registry, the number of total cases of that disorder sent to our registry, and the inheritance pattern of that skeletal dysplasia. This information should prove helpful in the evaluation of future cases ascertained by ultrasonography in the second trimester. PMID:7700717

  16. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  17. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  18. Congenital alopecia universalis.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, P K; Laha, N N

    1989-09-01

    A case of congenital alopecia universalis without any other ectodermal defect and mental abnormality is described in a girl of eight years. There was no family history in any of the members. The child was born of a non-consanguineous marriage. PMID:2632563

  19. OPERATION FOR CONGENITAL CATARACT

    PubMed Central

    Barkan, Otto

    1949-01-01

    The traditional treatment of needling or discission of congenital cataract or membrane is open to many serious objections. Removal of the cataract by a modified form of linear extraction is recommended. The technique, with recent improvements which further assure extraction without hazard in early infancy, is described. PMID:18125222

  20. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  1. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  2. The dental management of troublesome twos: renal tubular acidosis and rampant caries

    PubMed Central

    B, Sandhyarani; Huddar, Dayanand; Patil, Anil; Sankeshwari, Banashree

    2013-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis is a group of disorders in which there is metabolic acidosis due to defect in renal tubular acidification mechanism to maintain normal plasma bicarbonate and blood pH. Irrespective of organ system involved, oral cavity often reflects the disease occurring anywhere in the body. Thus congenital chronic renal diseases, causing acid–base disturbances affects development and structure of the teeth. Chronic renal tubular acidosis causes enamel defects, dental caries, oral candidiasis, angular cheilitis, etc. We hereby present an unusual case report of a 4-year-old boy suffering from renal tubular acidosis associated with rampant caries, whose full mouth rehabilitation has been done. PMID:23667245

  3. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, R.L.; Campbell, F.; Brenbridge, A.N.

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis.

  4. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, R L; Campbell, F; Brenbridge, A N

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis. PMID:6462825

  5. PEX6 is Expressed in Photoreceptor Cilia and Mutated in Deafblindness with Enamel Dysplasia and Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Maha S; Heller, Raoul; Thoenes, Michaela; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Stern-Schneider, Gabi; Nürnberg, Peter; Karnati, Srikanth; Swan, Daniel; Fateen, Ekram; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Mostafa, Mostafa I; Thiele, Holger; Wolfrum, Uwe; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Bolz, Hanno J

    2016-02-01

    Deafblindness is part of several genetic disorders. We investigated a consanguineous Egyptian family with two siblings affected by congenital hearing loss and retinal degeneration, initially diagnosed as Usher syndrome type 1. At teenage, severe enamel dysplasia, developmental delay, and microcephaly became apparent. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing detected a homozygous missense mutation, c.1238G>T (p.Gly413Val), affecting a highly conserved residue of peroxisomal biogenesis factor 6, PEX6. Biochemical profiling of the siblings revealed abnormal and borderline plasma phytanic acid concentration, and cerebral imaging revealed white matter disease in both. We show that Pex6 localizes to the apical extensions of secretory ameloblasts and differentiated odontoblasts at early stages of dentin synthesis in mice, and to cilia of retinal photoreceptor cells. We propose PEX6, and possibly other peroxisomal genes, as candidate for the rare cooccurrence of deafblindness and enamel dysplasia. Our study for the first time links peroxisome biogenesis disorders to retinal ciliopathies. PMID:26593283

  6. Treatment of Dysplasia in Barrett Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Hernandez, Javier; Cirocco, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Barrett esophagus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage with a 5-year survival rate of 15%. Most of these patients present de novo and are not part of a surveillance program. Endoscopic screening with improvement in recognition of early lesions may change this pattern. In the past, patients diagnosed with dysplasia and mucosal cancer were best managed by esophagectomy. Endoscopic techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and radiofrequency ablation have resulted in high curative rates and a shift away from esophagectomy. This pathway is supported by the literature review of esophagectomies performed for mucosal disease, as well as pathologists' interpretation of endoscopic mucosal specimens, which document the low risk of lymph node metastasis. The role of endoscopic therapy for superficial submucosal disease continues to be a challenge. PMID:24570884

  7. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. A cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, R I; Wood, B P

    1980-07-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita is a form of primary short dwarfism, that is manifest at birth generally has not been regarded as a cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism. Seven neonates with severe dwarfism are presented. The first survived the newborn period, but the other six were early neonatal deaths. All displayed the clinical and radiologic features of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. The striking similarities between spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita and achondrogenesis type 2 are discussed. PMID:6773018

  8. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M.; Kowalczuk, M.; Simunovic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia is controversial in the orthopaedic community, as the outcome literature has been variable and inconclusive. We hypothesise that outcomes of hip arthroscopy may be diminished in the setting of hip dysplasia, but outcomes may be acceptable in milder or borderline cases of hip dysplasia. Methods A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating the outcome of hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia up to July 2015. Study parameters including sample size, definition of dysplasia, outcomes measures, and re-operation rates were obtained. Furthermore, the levels of evidence of studies were collected and quality assessment was performed. Results The systematic review identified 18 studies investigating hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, with 889 included patients. Criteria used by the studies to diagnose hip dysplasia and borderline hip dysplasia included centre edge angle in 72% of studies but the range of angles were quite variable. Although 89% of studies reported improved post-operative outcome scores in the setting of hip dysplasia, revision rates were considerable (14.1%), with 9.6% requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion The available orthopaedic literature suggests that although improved outcomes are seen in hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, there is a high rate of re-operation and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Furthermore, the criteria used to define hip dysplasia vary considerably among published studies. Cite this article: M. Yeung, M. Kowalczuk, N. Simunovic, O. R. Ayeni. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:225–231. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000533. PMID:27313136

  9. Steroid contraceptive use and cervical dysplasia: increased risk of progression.

    PubMed

    Stern, E; Forsythe, A B; Youkeles, L; Coffelt, C F

    1977-06-24

    In a prospective study of women with dysplasia of the cervix, there was an increase in severity of dysplasia and of conversion to cancer in situ in users of the contraceptive pill compared with users of other contraceptive methods. There was a delay in this adverse response. Nonreversal of dysplasia within the first 6 months of pill use is predictive of progression after prolonged exposure. PMID:867043

  10. [Crossed renal ectopia with fusion: report of two cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Claudia Maria Costa de; Santos, Daniela Costa de Oliveira; Gomes, Diego Morais; Choukroun, Gabriel; Kubrusly, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Renal ectopia is one of the most common renal abnormalities of kidney development. However, only a few cases of crossed fused renal ectopia have been reported in the literature. Although crossed renal ectopia is usually clinically silent, they is sometime responsible for infection and urinary stones and may be associated with a high incidence of ureteropelvic junction obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux and renal multicystic dysplasia. We report two new cases of crossed renal ectopia with fusion diagnosed in a context of kidney stones and urinary tract infection and review the mechanism and clinical features of this abnormality. We believe that Nephrologist must be familiar with this abnormality of kidney development, as a number of complications may appear during follow-up. PMID:23099835

  11. Irreversible Respiratory Failure in a Full-Term Infant with Features of Pulmonary Interstitial Glycogenosis as Well as Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Jiskoot-Ermers, Maresa E C; Antonius, Tim A J; Looijen-Salamon, Monika G; Wijnen, Marc H W A; Loza, Bettina F; Heijst, Arno F J van

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis (PIG) is a rare interstitial lung disease in the newborns. We report on the clinical presentation and pathological findings of a full-term male infant with pulmonary hypertension requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). An open lung biopsy demonstrated interstitial changes resembling pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis as well as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), without convincing evidence of maturational arrest, infection, alveolar proteinosis, or alveolar capillary dysplasia. The boy was treated with glucocorticoids and, after a few days, was weaned from ECMO. A few hours later, the patient died due to acute severe pulmonary hypertension with acute right ventricular failure. The etiology and underlying pathogenic mechanisms of PIG are unknown. The clinical outcomes are quite varied. Deaths have been reported when PIG exists with abnormal lung development and pulmonary vascular growth and congenital heart disease. No mortality has been reported in PIG together with BPD in full-term infants. In this article, we reported on a full-term infant with interstitial changes resembling PIG and BPD who expired despite no convincing evidence of an anatomical maturational arrest or congenital heart disease. PMID:26495172

  12. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia with Raynaud's phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. V. S. Hari; Aravinda, K.; Narayanan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign bone disorder characterized by alteration in bone morphology. Monostotic FD is the commonest variant and affects the craniofacial bones. Raynaud's phenomenon is recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes due to cold exposure. The disease is usually idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disorders. Raynaud's phenomenon is not described previously with FD. We recently encountered two interesting patients of craniofacial monostotic FD with Raynaud's phenomenon and report the same in this report. PMID:26283854

  13. Grading of cervical dysplasias by frozen section.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, S; Smart, G E; Livingstone, J R

    1985-09-14

    Grading of cervical dysplasias at colposcopy by means of rapid frozen section avoids the delay inevitable with paraffin sections. The immediacy of the diagnosis benefits the patient, who can be treated at her first visit. A comparison of grading by frozen sections with paraffin sections has confirmed the safety of the frozen method. Additional advantages are opportunities for optimum orientation and "rescue" of specimens, improved colposcopic training, and the facilitation of special investigations on fresh cervical tissue. PMID:2863606

  14. FGFR3-related condition: a skeletal dysplasia with similarities to thanatophoric dysplasia and SADDAN due to Lys650Met.

    PubMed

    Farmakis, Shannon G; Shinawi, Marwan; Miller-Thomas, Michelle; Radmanesh, Alireza; Herman, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene account for six related skeletal dysplasia conditions: achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, thanatophoric dysplasia types 1 and 2, SADDAN (severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans), and platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, San Diego type. This group of disorders has very characteristic clinical and radiologic features, which distinguish them from other skeletal dysplasias. They display a spectrum of severity in the skeletal findings, ranging from relatively mild hypochondroplasia to lethal thanatophoric dysplasia. We report a patient who has the missense FGFR3 mutation, Lys650Met, previously reported in association only with SADDAN, who exhibits some findings similar to both thanatophoric dysplasia (types 1 and 2) in addition to those findings characteristic of SADDAN. PMID:25119967

  15. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Avimadje, A M; Goupille, P; Zerkak, D; Begnard, G; Brunais-Besse, J; Valat, J P

    2000-01-01

    Monostotic fibrous dysplasia is exceedingly rare. We report a case in a 61-year-old woman with a history of recurrent low back pain and sciatica since 35 years of age. While walking, she suddenly experienced pain in her right thigh. The pain spread gradually to the buttock and calf on the same side, becoming increasingly severe. The time pattern was mechanical, with exacerbation during straining. Paresthesia developed over the dorsal aspect of the right foot. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were ineffective. Radiographs of the spine showed an expansile and heterogeneous lesion in the body of L2. Hyperactivity of L3 and L4 was seen on the bone scan. Computed tomography demonstrated heterogeneity of L2, L3, and L4, as well as hypertrophy of the neural arch of L3 and of the right posterior lamina and spinous process of L4. Alterations in L2, L3, and L4 were noted on the magnetic resonance imaging study, which showed no evidence of epidural involvement. Laboratory tests were normal. A surgical biopsy of L3 established the diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. Since the seminal description of fibrous dysplasia in 1891, only 21 cases of monostotic spinal involvement have been published. The spinal lesions can remain clinically silent or cause spinal pain with or without neurological symptoms. Radiographic findings are variable (heterogeneity, osteolysis, expansion without cortical violation or soft tissue involvement). Calcium and phosphate levels are normal. The diagnosis depends on examination of a vertebral biopsy specimen. PMID:10773971

  16. Optic disc anomalies and frontonasal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkins, P; Lees, M; Lawson, J; Reardon, W; Leitch, J; Thorogood, P; Winter, R; Taylor, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To document the optic disc abnormalities in patients with frontonasal dysplasia in association with basal encephalocele.
METHODS—Names and hospital numbers of patients with midline clefts were obtained from the ophthalmology and genetics database. Six patients were identified who had the following common findings: midline facial cleft with midline cleft lip and palate; hypertelorism; absent corpus callosum; basal (sphenoethmoidal) encephalocele; and pituitary deficiency (five out of six cases). Ophthalmic examination was performed with fundal photography where possible.
RESULTS—Two patients had unilateral and one a bilateral peripapillary staphyloma. Two patients had bilateral optic disc hypoplasia and one appeared to have a peripapillary staphyloma in one eye and a morning glory disc in the other.
CONCLUSION—Optic disc abnormalities were found in all patients with this constellation of clinical findings. This association appears to represent a distinct subgroup within the spectrum of frontonasal dysplasia. The presence of midline facial anomalies and any dysplastic disc should alert the physician as to the presence of an encephalocele.

 Keywords: frontonasal dysplasia; optic disc; encephalocele PMID:9602627

  17. Renal cell carcinoma arising in ipsilateral duplex system.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Harsh; Kundu, Reetu; Dalal, Usha

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract are common and include a wide anatomic spectrum. Duplex systems are one of the more common renal anomalies, with the majority being asymptomatic. Little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of these anomalies; however, certain causative genes have been implicated. The finding of renal cell carcinoma arising in a kidney with the duplication of pelvicalyceal system and ureters, as in the present case, is uncommon. The association between a duplex system and renal cell carcinoma may be more than a coincidence, requiring a deeper insight and further elucidation. PMID:26328175

  18. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  19. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  20. [Renal colic].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, J M

    1999-01-01

    The appropriate approach to renal colic, which should be known by the family doctor, is presented. The incidence of this condition in the emergency department of a large general hospital is described as well as the physiopathology of pain, its clinical aspects and the therapeutic attitudes. Renal colic is frequent, it is often possible to diagnose the clinical aspects and general practitioners have the competence for treatment. The use of analgesic drugs, in the correct dosage, is enough to relieve pain and suffering in most of the patients. PMID:10423866

  1. Fibrocartilaginous Dysplasia of the Bone: A Rare Variant of Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Fibrocartilaginous dysplasia (FCD) is a rare variant of fibrous dysplasia (FD) which frequently involves the long bones, and the proximal femur is the most commonly affected site. This benign, lytic, and expansile bone lesion causes progressive deformity in the bones and may lead to pathological fracture. Radiologically, this lesion may mimic cartilaginous benign and malignant bone tumors. Therefore, histopathological differentiation of FCD from other cartilaginous tumors is of the utmost importance. The treatment is often surgical, in the form of curettage and bone grafting or corrective osteotomy, to treat progressive deformity in the long bones. The risk of pathological fracture is high in FCD with bony deformity and often requires surgery. PMID:26918216

  2. [Prevalence of bone dysplasias in newborns at the Ruíz y Páez Hospital in Bolívar City. Venezuela. 1978-1990].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, O; Brito-Arreaza, A; Alvarez-Arratia, M C; Ramírez, N

    1991-01-01

    A congenital malformations surveillance program in effect at the Ruiz y Páez Hospital in Ciudad Bolívar since April 1978, has allowed us to detect 25 patients with osteochondrodysplasias (OCD) in a total of 70,152 newborns, up to August 1990, for a prevalence of one case of OCD every 2,806 newborns. The clinical entities found were: Achondroplasia, Thanatophoric Dysplasia, Osteogenesis Imperfecta II-A, Camptomelic Dysplasia, Kniest Dysplasia, Conradi-Hunnerman syndrome, Parenti-Fracaro type Achondrogenesis and Jeune Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia. The results presented in this paper indicate that this type of diseases represent a relatively important group of nosological entities adding up to more than 200 new annual cases in the country. This relatively high frequency, the different inheritance mechanisms involved, the variable complications and the high morbidity and mortality rate of these diseases, make the patients affected, a problematic group not receiving, in general, adequate medical attention regarding diagnosis, genetic counselling and treatment. PMID:1807399

  3. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Deshingkar, S A; Barpande, S R; Bhavthankar, J D

    2011-07-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  4. Congenital hemophagocytic reticulosis.

    PubMed

    Koto, A; Morecki, R; Santorineou, M

    1976-04-01

    A fatal case of an apparently congenital form of hemophagocytic reticulosis is reported. The onset was manifested by hyperbilirubinemia and hepatosplenomegaly which were present at birth and persisted throughout life. Fever, anemia and pancytopenia developed at 1 month of age and became progressively worse. A splenectomy was performed at the age of 3 months, but the child died one day later with disseminated intravascular coagulation and pulmonary hemorrhage. The literature is reviewed with regard to the relationship of this case to (familial) hemophagocytic reticulosis and malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis). It is suggested that congenital hemophagocytic reticulosis, as described here, (familial) hemophagocytic reticulosis in infants, and malignant histiocytosis in adults all represent the same basic disorder with different ages of onset and clinicopathologic manifestations. PMID:1266810

  5. Update on congenital glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Anil K; Chakrabarti, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Congenital glaucoma is a global problem and poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. A detailed evaluation under general anesthesia is advisable to establish the diagnosis and plan for management. Medical therapy has a limited role and surgery remains the primary therapeutic modality. While goniotomy or trabeculotomy ab externo is valuable in the management of congenital glaucoma, primary combined trabeculotomy–trabeculectomy offers the best hope of success in advanced cases. Trabeculectomy with antifibrotic agent and glaucoma drainage devices has a role in the management of refractory cases, and cyclodestructive procedures should be reserved for patients where these procedures have failed. Early diagnosis, prompt therapeutic intervention and proper refractive correction are keys to success. Management of residual vision and visual rehabilitation should be an integral part of the management of children with low vision and lifelong follow-up is a must. PMID:21150027

  6. Congenital scoliosis - Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ujjwal K; Goel, Vivek; Harshavardhana, Nanjanduppa; Webb, John K

    2010-04-01

    Congenital spinal vertebral anomalies can present as scoliosis or kyphosis or both. The worldwide prevalence of the vertebral anomalies is 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. Vertebral anomalies can range from hemi vertebrae (HV) which may be single or multiple, vertebral bar with or without HV, block vertebrae, wedge shaped or butterfly vertebrae. Seventy per cent of congenital vertebral anomalies result in progressive deformities. The risk factors for progression include: type of defect, site of defect (junctional regions) and patient's age at the time of diagnosis. The key to success in managing these spinal deformities is early diagnosis and anticipation of progression. One must intervene surgically to halt the progression of deformity and prevent further complications associated with progressive deformity. Planning for surgery includes a preoperative MRI scan to rule out spinal anomalies such as diastematomyelia. The goals of surgical treatment for congenital spinal deformity are to achieve a straight growing spine, a normal standing sagittal profile, and a short fusion segment. The options of surgery include in situ fusion, convex hemi epiphysiodesis and hemi vertebra excision. These basic surgical procedures can be combined with curve correction, instrumentation and short segment fusion. Most surgeons prefer posterior (only) surgery for uncomplicated HV excision and short segment fusion. These surgical procedures can be performed through posterior, anterior or combined approaches. The advocates of combined approaches suggest greater deformity correction possibilities with reduced incidence of pseudoarthrosis and minimize crankshaft phenomenon. We recommend posterior surgery for curves involving only an element of kyphosis or modest deformity, whereas combined anterior and posterior approach is indicated for large or lordotic deformities. In the last decade, the use of growing rods and vertebral expandable prosthetic titanium rib has improved the armamentarium of the

  7. Congenital midline cervical cleft.

    PubMed

    Agag, Richard; Sacks, Justin; Silver, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare disorder of the ventral neck that is clinically evident at birth and must be differentiated from the more common thyroglossal duct cyst. The case of CMCC presented here was associated with chromosomes 13/14 de novo Robertsonian translocations as well as midline deformities including a sacral tuft and a minor tongue-tie. The case is presented as well as discussion of histopathology, embryology, and surgical treatment. PMID:17214531

  8. Other congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Cobbett, J R

    1974-06-29

    The plastic surgeon is not a miracle worker, as so many of his patients believe. Nevertheless, he can do much to minimize the functional and cosmetic effect of many congenital deformities. If a moral can be drawn from this article it must be that the plastic surgeon should be given an early opportunity to see and assess the patients described here, if only to ease the anxiety in the minds of their parents by appropriate reassurance and discussion. PMID:4853507

  9. Congenital Cataract Screening.

    PubMed

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  10. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  11. Congenital anomalies of kidney and upper urinary tract in children with congenital hypothyroidism; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Rafeie, Mohammad; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Safi, Fatemeh; Amiri, Mohammad; Ebrahimimonfared, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) may be significantly associated with congenital malformations. However, there is little evidence on the relationship between renal and urinary tract anomalies and CH. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the renal and upper urinary tract anomalies in children with and without primary CH (PCH). Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 200 children aged 3 months to 1 year, referring to Amir-Kabir hospital, Arak, Iran. One hundred children with PCH, as the case group, and 100 children without CH, as the control group, were selected. For all children, ultrasonography and other diagnostic measures (if necessary) were performed to evaluate renal and upper urinary tract anomalies (ureter and bladder). Results: The frequency of renal and upper urinary tract anomalies among 43 children with primary CH, with 83 cases (72.8%), was significantly higher than the frequency of anomalies among the 19 children in the control group, with 31 cases (27.1%) (OR = 3; CI 95%: 1.6-5.4; P = 0.001). Among the anomalies studied, only the differences in frequency of uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) (OR = 6; CI 95%: 1.3-28; P = 0.018) and hydronephrosis (OR = 22; CI 95%: 5-95; P = 0.001) was significant between the two groups. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that PCH is significantly associated with the frequency of congenital anomalies of the kidneys and upper urinary tracts. However, further studies are recommended to determine the necessity of conducting screening programs for anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract in children with CH at birth. PMID:26693499

  12. Isolated congenital tracheal stenosis in a preterm newborn.

    PubMed

    Krause, Ulrich; Rödel, Ralph M W; Paul, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Severe tracheal stenosis, resulting in functional atresia of the trachea is a rare congenital malformation with an estimated occurrence of two in 100,000 newborns. If no esophagotracheal fistula is present to allow for spontaneous breathing, this condition is usually fatal. We report on a male infant born at 32 weeks of gestation. The patient presented with respiratory distress immediately after delivery due to severe congenital tracheal stenosis resulting in functional atresia of the trachea. Endotracheal intubation failed and even emergency tracheotomy did not allow ventilation of the patient lungs. The patient finally succumbed to prolonged hypoxia due to functional tracheal atresia. The etiology of tracheal atresia and tracheal stenosis is still unclear, but both conditions are frequently combined with other anomalies of the VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiovascular anomalies, tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, renal/radial anomalies and limb defects) and TACRD (tracheal agenesis, cardiac, renal and duodenal malformations) association. Conclusion Successful treatment of severe congenital tracheal stenosis and tracheal atresia depends on either prenatal diagnosis or recognition of this condition immediately after birth to perform tracheotomy without delay. Nevertheless, despite any efforts, the therapeutical results of severe tracheal stenosis and tracheal atresia are still unsatisfactory. PMID:21590265

  13. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital hepatic fibrosis congenital hepatic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the liver that is ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registry: Leber congenital amaurosis 9 National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis These resources from MedlinePlus ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  16. Congenital abnormalities of the urogenital tract: the clue is in the cord?

    PubMed

    Daoub, Ahmed; Drake, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the female urogenital tract are not uncommon, with an estimated incidence of 2-4% across the female population. Within this population, up to 40% will have associated renal tract abnormalities. A previously well 12-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain, vomiting and a palpable pelvic mass. Ultrasound and MR scans were performed. The imaging revealed a didelphys uterus, an obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis, characteristic of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome. The patient was noted at birth to have a single umbilical artery, which is associated with an increased risk of congenital abnormalities and useful information for the early identification of abnormalities that have implications for renal function and future fertility. PMID:25465462

  17. Mechanisms of compensatory renal growth.

    PubMed

    Cleper, Roxana

    2012-11-01

    Congenitally reduced renal mass- as with agenesis of one kidney, unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney or with premature birth with early arrest of nephrogenesis- as well as acquired loss of a significant part of kidney tissue- as with kidney donation, after surgery for tumor etc- set in motion compensatory processes with main target to meet metabolic body needs. The sensors for reduced renal mass have not yet been identified. The effectors of the compensatory process include a wide range of growth factors- IGF1, TGF-b1, HGF- and signaling molecules-mTOR- which has intricate reciprocal interactions. As nephrogenesis stops at 34-36 weeks of gestation and can't be restarted thereafter, the main result of this compensatory process is increase in glomerular size (glomerulomegaly) and tubular hypertrophy. Renal volume evaluation by ultrasound is a practical noninvasive tool for assessment of compensatory kidney growth. The increased nephron and kidney size induced by the compensatory process have potential detrimental long-term effect through stretch-induced glomerular cell activation of profibrogenic and vasoconstrictor pathways as well as tubular cell nephrotoxicity caused by abnormal activation of reabsorptive mechanisms including GLUT1 and megalin. Deep understanding of these potentially damage process might help in timely implementation of protective strategies. PMID:23469392

  18. Resistant Hypertension due to Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Male: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vakili, Hossein; Memaryan, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Roxana; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD) is a sporadic non-atherosclerotic disease. FMD has been established in nearly every arterial bed. However, the most frequent arteries affected are the renal and carotid arteries. Disease presentation may vary broadly, depending upon the arterial bed complication and the severity of illness. Hypertension, particularly resistant type, headache and dizziness are the most common presentations. String of beads appearance in angiographic views due to post-stenotic aneurysms is the characteristic view. It is most commonly described in young aged females; but in rare male cases has also been reported. Moreover, balloon angioplasty is standard and effective therapy for FMD. We present a young 28-year-old man who was referred for evaluation of resistant hypertension for nearly 3 years without comprehensive workup. The patient underwent renal artery angiography which confirmed beading narrowing of the right renal artery with significant stenosis at mid portion compatible with FMD; and balloon angioplasty was done. This case highlights that FMD should be kept in mind as a rare cause of resistant hypertension in young males; although it is most common in young females.

  19. Resistant Hypertension due to Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Male: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Hossein; Khaheshi, Isa; Memaryan, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Roxana; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2016-06-01

    Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD) is a sporadic non-atherosclerotic disease. FMD has been established in nearly every arterial bed. However, the most frequent arteries affected are the renal and carotid arteries. Disease presentation may vary broadly, depending upon the arterial bed complication and the severity of illness. Hypertension, particularly resistant type, headache and dizziness are the most common presentations. String of beads appearance in angiographic views due to post-stenotic aneurysms is the characteristic view. It is most commonly described in young aged females; but in rare male cases has also been reported. Moreover, balloon angioplasty is standard and effective therapy for FMD. We present a young 28-year-old man who was referred for evaluation of resistant hypertension for nearly 3 years without comprehensive workup. The patient underwent renal artery angiography which confirmed beading narrowing of the right renal artery with significant stenosis at mid portion compatible with FMD; and balloon angioplasty was done. This case highlights that FMD should be kept in mind as a rare cause of resistant hypertension in young males; although it is most common in young females. PMID:27504335

  20. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  1. Congenital defects in northern elephant seals stranded along the central California coast.

    PubMed

    Trupkiewicz, J G; Gulland, F M; Lowenstine, L J

    1997-04-01

    Eleven cases of congenital anomalies were identified in 210 (5%) juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) found stranded along the central California (USA) coast from 1 January 1988 to 31 December 1995. Seven individuals had mild-to-moderate hydrocephalus involving the lateral ventricles bilaterally, or the lateral and third ventricles. Two animals had severe cardiac anomalies: hypoplasia of the right ventricle with overriding aorta, and ventricular septal defect. Other anomalies included single cases of hydronephrosis, focal pulmonary dysplasia, and congenital epidermal angiomatosis. Common intercurrent disease processes were verminous pneumonia and arteritis, verminous enteritis and coliti, and splenic and hepatic hemosiderosis. The more severe anomalies were considered to be the cause of debilitation and stranding. Milder anomalies were found incidentally during routine gross necropsy and histopathologic examination. PMID:9131551

  2. Hip dysplasia in the skeletally mature patient.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rachel Y; Kaye, Ian David; Slover, James; Feldman, David

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hip development causes one-quarter to one-half of all hip disease. Dysplastic hips typically share characteristic anatomic abnormalities. The dysplastic acetabulum is typically shallow, lateralized, and anteverted with insufficient coverage anteriorly, superiorly, and laterally. The dysplastic proximal femur has a small femoral head with excessive femoral neck anteversion and a short neck with an increased neck shaft angle. These characteristic changes result in intraarticular pathology leading to hip arthritis. A variety of treatment options exist based on the degree of dysplasia and the amount of concomitant hip arthritis. Treatment options include hip arthroscopy, acetabular or femoral osteotomies, hip arthrodesis, and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25150325

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:15911019

  4. Oxygen Saturation Targeting and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Darlow, Brian A; Morley, Colin J

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen saturation targeting is widely used in neonatal intensive care, but the optimal target range in very preterm infants has been uncertain and is the subject of recent debate and research. This review briefly discusses the technology of oxygen monitoring and the role of oxygen toxicity in preterm infants. The background to the recent trials of oxygen saturation targeting in acute and continuing care of very preterm infants is reviewed, and the findings and implications of the recent trials, particularly with respect to bronchopulmonary dysplasia, are discussed. PMID:26593080

  5. A novel SMARCAL1 missense mutation that affects splicing in a severely affected Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Belinchón, Alberta; Fernández-Camblor, Carlota; Valenciano-Fuente, Blanca; Lapunzina, Pablo; Heath, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skeletal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, renal failure and immunodeficiency. In this work, we report the molecular studies undertaken in a severely affected SIOD patient that died at six years old due to nephropathy. The patient was screened for mutations using a targeted skeletal dysplasias panel. A homozygous novel missense mutation was identified, c.1615C > G (p.[Leu539Val]) that was predicted as mildly pathogenic by in silico pathogenicity prediction tools. However, splicing prediction software suggested that this variant may create a new splicing donor site in exon 9, which was subsequently confirmed using a minigene assay in HEK293 cells. Thus, the splicing alteration, c.1615C > G; r.1615c > g, 1615_1644del; (p.[Leu539_Ile548del]), results in the loss of 10 amino acids of the HARP-ATPase catalytic domain and the RPA-binding domain. Several studies have demonstrated a weak genotype-phenotype correlation among such patients. Thus, the molecular characterization has helped us to understand why a predicted weakly pathogenic missense mutation results in severe SIOD and should be considered in similar scenarios. PMID:27282802

  6. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  7. [Congenital myasthenic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Araga, Shigeru

    2008-06-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are rare heterogeneous disorders in which neuromuscular transmission is compromised by one or more specific mechanisms. CMS are clinically diagnosed by a history of fatigability and muscle weakness since infancy or early childhood, a decremental EMG response and the absence of acetylcholine receptor antibodies. CMS form a heterogeneous group of disorders which are classified as originating from presynaptic, synaptic or postsynaptic defects. Molecular genetic studies reveal a various type of mutations in synapse-associated genes. However, the genetic abnormalities of many CMS are still unresolved. This article outlines the classification of CMS and etiology of individual forms. PMID:18540366

  8. Precalcaneal Congenital Fibrolipomatous Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Hye; Park, Oun-Jae; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Won, Chong-Hyun; Chang, Sung-Eun; Choi, Jee-Ho; Moon, Kee-Chan

    2011-01-01

    Precalcaneal congenital fibrolipomatous hamartomas (PCFHs) are characterized clinically by the presence of unilateral or bilateral, asymptomatic nodules in the medial precalcaneal plantar region of the heel. They are skin colored and usually painless nodules. In most patients, the lesions appear within the first few months of life, but they may also be present at birth. Generally PCFHs are benign, but they can grow in proportion to the growth of the infants. Here, we report the case of a 4-month-old boy with a solitary, localized skin-colored nodule on the precalcaneal plantar region of his right heel, diagnosed as a PCFH. PMID:21738373

  9. Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Witchel, Selma Feldman; Azziz, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) due to P450c21 (21-hydroxylase deficiency) is a common autosomal recessive disorder. This disorder is due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which is located at chromosome 6p21. The clinical features predominantly reflect androgen excess rather than adrenal insufficiency leading to an ascertainment bias favoring diagnosis in females. Treatment goals include normal linear growth velocity and “on-time” puberty in affected children. For adolescent and adult women, treatment goals include regularization of menses, prevention of progression of hirsutism, and fertility. This paper will review key aspects regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of NCAH. PMID:20671993

  10. Congenital nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Begolli, Mirije; Begolli, Ilir; Gojani, Xhenane; Arenliu-Qosaj, Fatime; Berisha, Merita

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this case is to present a case of a two month old female with congenital nephritic syndrome, which is very rare. On admission, the baby showed marked edema and distended abdomen. She was diagnosed and treated with daily albumin infusions, antibiotics, diuretic, gamma globulin replacement, ACEI and NSAIDs. Parents were informed about the nature of the disease, prognosis, and advised for further medical care in a more advanced kidney transplantation centre. This was the first treatment of this condition in the Pediatric Clinic in Kosovo and it presented a challenge for us. PMID:22299306

  11. CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Burton E.

    1954-01-01

    Treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in infants is a matter of semi-emergency and should be done as soon as adequate preparations can be made because sometimes fatal complications develop swiftly. In preoperative preparation there is great advantage in thorough decompression of the abdominal viscera, stomach, bowel and bladder. As to operation, the author believes the abdominal approach has most to recommend it. In the postoperative period, continued gastric suction for a brief time, parenteral administration of fluids and use of a Mistogen tent with a high moist oxygen content will facilitate rapid recovery. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13209363

  12. Congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation is an essential process by which sugars are attached to proteins and lipids. Complete lack of glycosylation is not compatible with life. Because of the widespread function of glycosylation, inherited disorders of glycosylation are multisystemic. Since the identification of the first defect on N-linked glycosylation in the 1980s, there are over 40 different congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases. This review will include defects of N-linked glycosylation, O-linked glycosylation and disorders of combined N- and O-linked glycosylation. PMID:23776380

  13. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  14. Prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia: risks outweigh benefits.

    PubMed

    Miller, Walter L; Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2013-05-01

    Prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia by administering dexamethasone to a woman presumed to be carrying an at-risk fetus has been described as safe and effective in several reports. A review of data from animal experimentation and human trials indicates that first-trimester dexamethasone decreases birthweight; affects renal, pancreatic beta cell, and brain development; increases anxiety; and predisposes to adult hypertension and hyperglycemia. In human studies, first-trimester dexamethasone is associated with orofacial clefts, decreased birthweight, poorer verbal working memory, and poorer self-perception of scholastic and social competence. Numerous medical societies have cautioned that prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia with dexamethasone should only be done in prospective clinical research settings with institutional review board approval, and therefore is not appropriate for routine community practice. PMID:23123167

  15. Advances in the Care of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Viviane G; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-09-01

    The significant decline in mortality among children and adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with an increasing prevalence of CHD in adults, particularly those with moderate to severe defects. As a significant percentage of adolescents and young adults are lost to follow-up in the transition from pediatric to adult care, they may present for elective procedures with substantial CHD-associated morbidity. In addition to the specific cardiac defect, the procedures performed, and the current pathophysiological status, several factors should be considered when managing the adult with CHD. These include the type of setting (adult vs pediatric institution); surgeon (pediatric vs adult cardiac surgeon); coexisting diseases associated with CHD, such as coronary artery disease, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular accidents, myopathy, and coagulation disorders; acquired diseases of aging; pregnancy; and psychosocial functioning. The current status of the management of common and important congenital cardiac defects is also described. PMID:25542866

  16. Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Maeshima, Yohei; Mosterman, Barbara; Kalluri, Raghu

    2002-01-01

    During progression of chronic renal disease, qualitative and quantitative changes in the composition of tubular basement membranes (TBMs) and interstitial matrix occur. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated activation of tubular epithelial cells (TECs) is speculated to be a key contributor to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. To further understand the pathogenesis associated with renal fibrosis, we developed an in vitro Boyden chamber system using renal basement membranes that partially mimics in vivo conditions of TECs during health and disease. Direct stimulation of TECs with TGF-β1/epithelial growth factor results in an increased migratory capacity across bovine TBM preparations. This is associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9. Indirect chemotactic stimulation by TGF-β1/EGF or collagen type I was insufficient in inducing migration of untreated TECs across bovine TBM preparation, suggesting that basement membrane integrity and composition play an important role in protecting TECs from interstitial fibrotic stimuli. Additionally, neutralization of MMPs by COL-3 inhibitor dramatically decreases the capacity of TGF-β1-stimulated TECs to migrate through bovine TBM preparation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that basement membrane structure, integrity, and composition play an important role in determining interstitial influences on TECs and subsequent impact on potential aberrant cell-matrix interactions. PMID:12057905

  17. Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal calculi is reviewed in general terms followed by the results of investigation of 439 patients with renal calculi studied by the author at Toronto General Hospital over a 13-year period. Abnormalities of probable pathogenetic significance were encountered in 76% of patients. Idiopathic hypercalciuria was encountered in 42% of patients, primary hyperparathyroidism in 11%, urinary infection in 8% and miscellaneous disorders in 8%. The incidence of uric acid stones and cystinuria was 5% and 2% respectively. In the remaining 24% of patients in whom no definite abnormalities were encountered the mean urinary magnesium excretion was less than normal. Of 180 patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria, only 24 were females. In the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism, the importance of detecting minimal degrees of hypercalcemia is stressed; attention is also drawn to the new observation that the upper limit of normal for serum calcium is slightly lower in females than in males. The efficacy of various measures advocated for the prevention of renal calculi is also reviewed. In the author's experience the administration of thiazides has been particularly effective in the prevention of calcium stones. Thiazides cause a sustained reduction in urinary calcium excretion and increase in urinary magnesium excretion. These agents also appear to affect the skeleton by diminishing bone resorption and slowing down bone turnover. PMID:5438766

  18. Biological features of bronchial squamous dysplasia followed up by autofluorescence bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Hidehisa; Shibuya, Kiyoshi; Chiyo, Masako; Iyoda, Akira; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Sekine, Yasuo; Iizasa, Toshihiko; Saitoh, Yukio; Baba, Masayuki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Ohwada, Hidemi; Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2004-11-01

    Some dysplasias in the bronchial epithelium are thought to be precancerous lesions that can develop into squamous cell carcinomas. In this investigation, we assessed the biological behavior of bronchial squamous dysplasia in order to define which dysplasias have the potential to progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Using autofluorescence bronchoscopy, we followed up periodically localized dysplasias and examined for correlation between histological outcome and smoking status during the follow-up period, telomerase activity, Ki-67 labeling index, and p53 immunoreactivity of initial biopsy specimens. Ninety-nine dysplasias from 50 participants mainly with sputum cytology suspicious or positive for malignancy were followed up. Of 99 dysplasias, 3 dysplasias progressed to squamous cell carcinoma, 41 dysplasias remained as dysplasia, 6 dysplasias changed to metaplasia, 14 dysplasias changed to hyperplasia, and 35 dysplasias regressed to bronchitis or normal bronchial epithelium. There were no significant associations between histological outcome and smoking status. Mean initial telomerase activity and Ki-67 labeling index values in the dysplasias increased in proportion to the severity of the histological outcome at the second biopsy. There was also a significant difference between p53-positive and p53-negative dysplasia in terms of histological outcome at the second biopsy. Our results suggested that dysplasias with high telomerase activity, increased Ki-67 labeling index, and p53-positivity tended to remain as dysplasia and might have the potential to progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with dysplastic lesions with these characteristics should be carefully followed up. PMID:15474667

  19. Congenital Median Upper Lip Fistula

    PubMed Central

    al Aithan, Bandar

    2012-01-01

    Congenital median upper lip fistula (MULF) is an extremely rare condition resulting from abnormal fusion of embryologic structures. We present a new case of congenital medial upper lip fistula located in the midline of the philtrum of a 6 year old girl. PMID:22953305

  20. [Genetics of congenital lipodystrophies].

    PubMed

    Buffet, A; Lombes, M; Caron, P

    2015-10-01

    Congenital lipodystrophies are heterogeneous genetic diseases, leading to the loss of adipose tissue. This loss of adipose tissue can be generalized or partial, thus defining different phenotypes. These lipodystrophies have a major metabolic impact, secondary to lipotoxicity. This lipotoxicity is responsible for insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis. The severity of the metabolic impact correlates with the severity of the loss of adipose tissue. Mutations in 15 predisposition genes are currently described; BSCL2 and AGPT2 genes are the major genes in the generalized forms. On the contrary, LMNA and PPARG gene mutations are recovered in partial lipodystrophies forms. These different genes encode for proteins involved in adipocyte physiology, altering adipocyte differentiation, triglycerides synthesis and lysis or playing a major role in the lipid droplet formation. Congenital lipodystrophies treatment is based on the management of metabolic comorbidities but recombinant leptin therapy appears to have promising results. These different points have been recently discussed during the 2015 Endocrine Society Congress, notably by S. O'Rahilly and are highlighted in this review. PMID:26776286

  1. Congenital fiber type disproportion.

    PubMed

    Kissiedu, Juliana; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Type I muscle fiber atrophy in childhood can be encountered in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. Congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) is one such condition which presents as a nonprogressive muscle weakness. The diagnosis is often made after excluding other differential diagnostic considerations. We present a 2-year-9-month-old full term boy who presented at 2 months with an inability to turn his head to the right. Over the next couple of years, he showed signs of muscle weakness, broad based gait and a positive Gower's sign. He had normal levels of creatine kinase and normal electromyography. A biopsy of the vastus lateralis showed a marked variation in muscle fiber type. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-ase stains highlighted a marked type I muscle atrophy with rare scattered atrophic type II muscle fibers. No abnormalities were observed on the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or cytochrome oxidase stained sections. Ragged red fibers were not present on the trichrome stain. Abnormalities of glycogen or lipid deposition were not observed on the periodic acid-Schiff or Oil-Red-O stains. Immunostaining for muscular dystrophy associated proteins showed normal staining. Ultrastructural examination showed a normal arrangement of myofilaments, and a normal number and morphology for mitochondria. A diagnosis of CFTD was made after excluding other causes of type I atrophy including congenital myopathy. The lack of specific clinical and genetic disorder associated with CFTD suggests that it is a spectrum of a disease process and represents a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:26526626

  2. [Congenital defects and incapacity].

    PubMed

    Jouve de la Barreda, Nicolás

    2009-01-01

    As a whole the congenital defects constitute an important section of the medical attention affecting near 3% of the population. A 15% of spontaneous abortions take place of which the greater frequency corresponds to the chromosome anomalies (25%) and the monogenic mutations (20%) and in a lesser extent to the effects of teratogenic agents. Between the genetic causes determining the congenital defects the mutations that affect genes acting in the early stages of development occupy a main place. These alterations can affect to homeotic genes or monogenic systems that act during the critical phases of the organogenesis. It seems evident that an alteration in the expression of a necessary gene for the appearance of a morphogenetic change constitutes the angular stone to understand resurging of a malformation or discapacity. In the last years has been demonstrated the importance of the teratogenic or environmental agents on the delicate internal physiological balance during the critical stages of the development. In this context must be included the inductive environmental factors inducing epigenetic modifications in the early stage of the development of the embryos produced by fertilization in vitro. PMID:19799481

  3. [Congenital multiple arthrogryposis].

    PubMed

    Parsch, Klaus; Pietrzak, Szymon

    2007-03-01

    From 1975 to 2004 a total of 38 children handicapped by congenital multiple arthrogryposis were cared for. The congenital joint contractures demand a major effort in terms of surgical reconstruction. In the case of distal arthrogryposis the chances that patients will be able to walk without help are good, while those with amyoplasia are likely to be dependent on mobility aids throughout their lives. The ultimate goal of treatment for patients is to develop into self-confident adults who can cope with life despite their handicaps. The hip in arthrogryposis shows variable forms of pathology, ranging from the almost normal hip to hip contractures with dislocation. Its treatment has some limited advantages, but hardly improves mobility. The knee contractures are actively treated to allow patients to sit, stand and walk better. The club foot and the rocker-bottom foot need sophisticated conservative and operative treatments. If conservative manipulation of bilateral extension contractures of the elbow fails operative treatment is carried out on the dominant side. For shoulder, hand and finger contractures conservative manipulation brings about little improvement, and surgical approaches help hardly at all. PMID:17323063

  4. Cataracts in Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Veena; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Latkany, Paul; Troia, Robert N.; Jalbrzikowski, Jessica; Kasza, Kristen; Karrison, Ted; Cezar, Simone; Sautter, Mari; Greenwald, Mark J.; Mieler, William; Mets, Marilyn B.; Alam, Ambereen; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Roizen, Nancy; Rabiah, Peter; Del Monte, Monte A.; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and natural history of cataracts in children with congenital toxoplasmosis. Methods Children referred to the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) between 1981 and 2005 were examined by ophthalmologists at predetermined times according to a specific protocol. The clinical course and treatment of patients who developed cataracts was reviewed. Results In the first year of life, 134 of 173 children examined were treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and Leucovorin, while the remaining 39 were not treated. Cataracts occurred in 27 eyes of 20 patients (11.6%, 95% confidence interval [7.2%, 17.3%]). Fourteen cataracts were present at birth, and 13 developed postnatally. Locations of the cataracts included anterior polar (3 eyes), anterior subcapsular (6), nuclear (5), posterior subcapsular (7), and unknown (6). Thirteen cataracts were partial, 9 total, and 5 with unknown complexity. Twelve cataracts remained stable, 12 progressed, and progression was not known for 3. Five of 27 eyes had cataract surgery, with 2 of these developing glaucoma. Sixteen eyes of 11 patients had retinal detachment and cataract. All eyes with cataracts had additional ocular lesions. Conclusions In the NCCCTS cohort, 11.6% of patients were diagnosed with cataracts. There was considerable variability in the presentation, morphology, and progression of the cataracts. Associated intraocular pathology was an important cause of morbidity. PMID:18086432

  5. [Enzymopathic congenital hyperlactacidemia].

    PubMed

    Leroux, J P; Marsac, C; Saudubray, J M

    1976-01-01

    Congenital enzymopathic hyperlactacidemia results from a defect of utilisation of pyruvate either at the level of the pyruvate junction (pyruvate-carboxylase, pyruvate-dehydrogenase and Kreb's cycle), or at the level of the unidirectional enzymes on neo-glucogenesis and of neo-glycogenogenesis, e.g. glucose-6-phosphatase, phosphoenol-pyruvate-carboxykinase and glycogen synthetase. The enzymopathies which affect neoglucogenesis associate hyper-lactacidemia and fasting hypoglycemia and more or less marked hepatomegaly. Type I glycogenesis (von Gierke's disease) is the best known example. Enzymopathies which affect the pyruvate junction and the Krebs cycle, may be manifested in addition by: --either chronic neuropathies, e.g. Leigh's disease, recurrent ataxia, and moderate hyperalactacidemia,--or, as in congenital lactic acidoses, which have a rapid and severe prognosis with major hyperlactacidemia. Functional investigation, in particular, loading tests are of great value in orientation and justify the practice of tissue biopsy which permits the enzyme diagnosis. Recent, still unconfirmed knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases emphasizes the considerable importance of estimation of blood lactic acid in the investigation of metabolic acidoses of hereditary origin. PMID:184725

  6. Rab11 in dysplasia of Barrett's epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Goldenring, J. R.; Ray, G. S.; Lee, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus predisposes affected patients to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The development of adenocarcinoma proceeds along a progression through low- and high-grade dysplasia. Surveillance of Barrett's patients requires serial endoscopic investigations and grading mucosal biopsies. Unfortunately, grading of biopsies by conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining is fraught with significant interobserver variations. We have found in both biopsy and resection specimens that immunostaining for the small GTP binding protein Rab11 is increased in low-grade dysplastic cells. This staining is lost in high-grade dysplastic cells. These results suggest that low-grade dysplastic cells undergo an apical trafficking blockade, which is released as cells progress to the less differentiated phenotype of high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Examination of the SKGT-4 esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line demonstrated prominent mRNA and protein expression for Rab11. Rab11 immunostaining was present in SKGT-4 cells as a perinuclear nidus of punctate staining along with a more diffuse punctate pattern. Thus, Rab11 expression was present in a esophageal adenocarcinoma cells in culture. Markers of vesicle trafficking may be critical factors for grading of mucosal dysplastic transitions leading to adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10780572

  7. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  8. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  9. A complex case of congenital cystic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Cordiner, David S; Evans, Clair A; Brundler, Marie-Anne; McPhillips, Maeve; Murio, Enric; Darling, Mark; Taheri, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    This case outlines the potential complexity of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). It highlights the challenges involved in managing this condition, some of the complications faced and areas of uncertainty in the decision making process. With a paucity of published paediatric cases on this subject, this should add to the pool of information currently available. PMID:22605879

  10. Crossed Renal Ectopia without Fusion: An Uncommon Cause of Abdominal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Ratola, Ana; Almiro, Maria Miguel; Lacerda Vidal, Rita; Neves, Nuno; Bicho, Adelaide; Figueiredo, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Crossed renal ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly usually associated with fused kidneys (90%). Most cases are asymptomatic and remain undiagnosed. We report an unusual case of nonfused crossed renal ectopia. The 11-year-old adolescent female patient was admitted with abdominal pain, anorexia, weight loss, and periumbilical mass. Although the initial clinical suspicion was a tumoral lesion, abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance examination revealed crossed renal ectopia without fusion. The renal ectopy was incidentally diagnosed, as described in 20 to 30% of cases. In this case, the associated nonspecific symptoms were a coincidence. PMID:26290762

  11. Retrocaval ureter and contra lateral renal agenesis – a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Cardoza, Felix; Shambhulinga, C. K.; Rajeevan, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Associated congenital anomalies are seen in 21% of retrocaval ureter patients; among them, associated contralateral renal agenesis is a very rare entity. We report one such case of right circumcaval ureter with left renal agenesis, diagnosed after febrile UTI. Surgical correction with uretero-ureterostomy was successful. In literature very few such cases are reported and only one case with renal failure was reported. Unilateral renal agenesis cases complicated by associated such anomalies need definitive management and lifelong clinical monitoring to diagnose and prevent chronic kidney disease. PMID:27564299

  12. Retrocaval ureter and contra lateral renal agenesis - a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Felix; Shambhulinga, C K; Rajeevan, A T

    2016-01-01

    Associated congenital anomalies are seen in 21% of retrocaval ureter patients; among them, associated contralateral renal agenesis is a very rare entity. We report one such case of right circumcaval ureter with left renal agenesis, diagnosed after febrile UTI. Surgical correction with uretero-ureterostomy was successful. In literature very few such cases are reported and only one case with renal failure was reported. Unilateral renal agenesis cases complicated by associated such anomalies need definitive management and lifelong clinical monitoring to diagnose and prevent chronic kidney disease. PMID:27564299

  13. Cytodiagnosis of congenital mesoblastic nephroma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Medha Pradeep; Gosavi, Alka Vikas; Anvikar, Arti Rameshrao; Ramteerthakar, Nayan A; Lanjewar, Dhaneshwar N

    2013-03-01

    Mesoblastic nephroma (MN) is the most common renal tumor diagnosed in infancy. A case of congenital MN was diagnosed in a 6-month old child by fine-needle aspiration cytology. The smears were cellular and consisted of plump spindle cells arranged in clusters along with scattered naked nuclei in the background. Blastemal, epithelial, or glomeruloid structures were not seen. Considering the age and the cytomorphology, a diagnosis of cellular variant of MN was offered which was confirmed on histopathology. Unlike Wilms tumor, preoperative chemotherapy is not required for MN. Hence cytologic diagnosis is important. PMID:23417966

  14. The pathogenesis and diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, C L; Remedios, A M

    1995-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common developmental problem affecting the canine population. Despite extensive research into the condition, many questions remain unanswered and numerous misconceptions are present among the general public. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the development of hip dysplasia, factors modifying its development, and current diagnostic techniques. A computerized literature search was conducted for the period of January 1983 to April 1985 using the MEDLINE and CAB databases, and the keywords hip dysplasia, hip, dog, and canine. Other articles, wherever possible original research articles, published before 1983 were also reviewed. Animals affected by hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but quickly develop subluxation of the femoral head. Degenerative joint disease follows. Hip dysplasia is a complex, inherited, polygenic trait. Selective breeding of only normal dogs with normal littermates, parents, and grandparents is the recommended method of reducing the incidence in the general population. Gene expression in affected individuals may be modified by a number of environmental factors. These factors do not cause hip dysplasia, but they alter manifestations of the trait and its severity. Nutrition is a major environmental factor. Excess energy consumption increases the frequency and severity of hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed dogs. Food intake should be regulated to maintain a slender figure with the ribs and dorsal vertebral spines easily palpable, but not visible. Excess dietary calcium and vitamin D contribute to hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed individuals and should be avoided. High dose vitamin C supplementation in growing puppies does not prevent hip dysplasia, and this practice should be discontinued.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7585436

  15. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; MacKie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  16. Pulmonary Vein Stenosis in Neonates with Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Swier, Natasha L; Richards, Bernadette; Cua, Clifford L; Lynch, Susan K; Yin, Han; Nelin, Leif D; Smith, Charles V; Backes, Carl H

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a rare, often lethal anomaly associated with poor outcomes. Given the association between bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and cardiovascular complications, we tested the hypotheses that (1) a subgroup of neonates with severe BPD develop PVS (BPD-PVS) and have worse outcomes than do neonates with severe BPD alone (BPD); (2) among a cohort of neonates with severe BPD-associated pulmonary hypertension (BPD-PH), PVS is an additional risk factor for adverse outcomes and mortality. Study Design We performed a retrospective review of neonates with severe BPD, based on the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) criteria, at our institution between June 1, 2009, and June 30, 2013. PVS was determined based on serial review of echocardiograms performed during their hospitalization. Neonates with congenital heart disease or chromosomal anomalies were excluded. Results Of 213 patients with severe BPD, 10 (4.7%) were found to have PVS (BPD-PVS). Neonates with BPD-PVS had lower birth weight (634 ± 178 vs. 767 ± 165 g; p < 0.01) and were more likely to be intrauterine growth restricted (80 vs. 11%; p < 0.01) than neonates with BPD alone. Time on mechanical ventilation and length of hospitalization were longer in the BPD-PVS group than BPD group. Survival was lower in the BPD-PVS group than BPD group (5/10 [50%] vs. 196/203 [97%]; log-rank test p < 0.01). Among a subgroup of neonates with BPD-PH, survival was lower among infants with PVS than those without PVS (5/9 [56%] vs. 26/30 [86%]; log-rank test p = 0.01). Conclusions Compared with neonates with severe BPD alone, those with acquired PVS are at increased risk for worse outcomes, including higher mortality. Evidence-based recommendations regarding screening protocols and surveillance are needed in this high-risk subgroup of BPD neonates. PMID:26862723

  17. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  18. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Reema Sharma; Bora, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the triad of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia, and facial clefting along with some associated features. Presence of all the three major features in a single individual is extremely rare. We report a case of 4 year 11 months old child with EEC syndrome having ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and cleft palate and ectrodactyly with some associated features. Clinical features, diagnosis and role of a dentist in the multidisciplinary treatment approach have been elaborated in this case report. PMID:25231046

  19. Fetal biometry of skeletal dysplasias: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, L; Jeanty, P

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-three diagnostic centers worldwide contributed 127 cases of 17 skeletal dysplasias. Discriminant analysis showed that the femur length was the best biometric parameter to distinguish among the five most common disorders in this series (thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, achondrogenesis, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia). Fifty-four percent of fetuses with femur length below 30% of the mean for gestational age had achondrogenesis. Seventy-eight percent of measurements between 40 and 60% of the mean for gestational age represented either thanatophoric dysplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Fetuses who had over 80% of the mean for gestational age had predominantly hypochondroplasia, achondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta type III. PMID:7880297

  20. Fetal biometry of skeletal dysplasias: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, L; Jeanty, P

    1994-12-01

    Twenty-three diagnostic centers worldwide contributed 127 cases of 17 skeletal dysplasias. Discriminant analysis showed that the femur length was the best biometric parameter to distinguish among the five most common disorders in this series (thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, achondrogenesis, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia). Fifty-four percent of fetuses with femur length below 30% of the mean for gestational age had achondrogenesis. Seventy-eight percent of measurements between 40 and 60% of the mean for gestational age represented either thanatophoric dysplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Fetuses who had over 80% of the mean for gestational age had predominantly hypochondroplasia, achondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta type III. PMID:7877211

  1. Cleidocranial dysplasia: A report of two cases with brief review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kusum; Goswami, Mridula

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a genetic disorder primarily causing dysplasia of bones and teeth with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Affected individuals presented with several skeletal and dental abnormalities mainly hypoplasia of clavicles, open fontanelles, short stature, retention of primary teeth, supernumerary teeth, delayed eruption of permanent teeth, multiple impacted permanent teeth etc. The present series of two cases illustrates the clinical and radiological features of pediatric patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. The early diagnosis of the condition helps in proper orientation of the treatment thereby offering better quality of life to such patients. PMID:27195196

  2. [Anesthetic management of a patient with metatropic dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Marie; Niiyama, Yukitoshi; Nawa, Yuko; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2013-02-01

    A 5-year-old girl with metatropic dysplasia was scheduled for an operation of posterior cervical fusion. This disease is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by long trunk and short limbs and severe scoliosis. As she had been suspected to have a difficult airway, we attempted fiberoptic intubation with a nasopharyngeal airway to prevent airway obstruction. The nasopharyngeal airway ensured a patent airway sufficient oxygenation, and anesthesia. Thus, it was possible to perform a fiberoptic intubation via the opposite nostril with no adverse event. The combination of a nasopharyngeal airway and fiberoptic guided tracheal intubation is a reliable and safe procedure for small children with metatropic dysplasia and difficult airway. PMID:23479930

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies: a European register-based study.

    PubMed

    Wemakor, Anthony; Casson, Karen; Garne, Ester; Bakker, Marian; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahoney, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Boyle, Breidge; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Dolk, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Evidence of an association between early pregnancy exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and congenital heart defects (CHD) has contributed to recommendations to weigh benefits and risks carefully. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of association between first trimester exposure to SSRIs and specific CHD and other congenital anomalies (CA) associated with SSRI exposure in the literature (signals). A population-based case-malformed control study was conducted in 12 EUROCAT CA registries covering 2.1 million births 1995-2009 including livebirths, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. Babies/fetuses with specific CHD (n = 12,876) and non-CHD signal CA (n = 13,024), were compared with malformed controls whose diagnosed CA have not been associated with SSRI in the literature (n = 17,083). SSRI exposure in first trimester pregnancy was associated with CHD overall (OR adjusted for registry 1.41, 95% CI 1.07-1.86, fluoxetine adjOR 1.43 95% CI 0.85-2.40, paroxetine adjOR 1.53, 95% CI 0.91-2.58) and with severe CHD (adjOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.02-2.39), particularly Tetralogy of Fallot (adjOR 3.16, 95% CI 1.52-6.58) and Ebstein's anomaly (adjOR 8.23, 95% CI 2.92-23.16). Significant associations with SSRI exposure were also found for ano-rectal atresia/stenosis (adjOR 2.46, 95% CI 1.06-5.68), gastroschisis (adjOR 2.42, 95% CI 1.10-5.29), renal dysplasia (adjOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.61-5.61), and clubfoot (adjOR 2.41, 95% CI 1.59-3.65). These data support a teratogenic effect of SSRIs specific to certain anomalies, but cannot exclude confounding by indication or associated factors. PMID:26148560

  4. PAX2 mutations in fetal renal hypodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Martinovic-Bouriel, Jelena; Benachi, Alexandra; Bonnière, Maryse; Brahimi, Nora; Esculpavit, Chantal; Morichon, Nicole; Vekemans, Michel; Antignac, Corinne; Salomon, Rémi; Encha-Razavi, Féréchté; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Gubler, Marie-Claire

    2010-04-01

    Papillorenal syndrome also known as renal-coloboma syndrome (OMIM 120330) is an autosomal dominant condition comprising optic nerve anomaly and renal oligomeganephronic hypoplasia. This reduced number of nephron generations with compensatory glomerular hypertrophy leads towards chronic insufficiency with renal failure. We report on two fetuses with PAX2 mutations presenting at 24 and 18 weeks' gestation, respectively, born into two different sibships. In our first patient, termination of pregnancy was elected for anhydramnios and suspicion of renal agenesis in the healthy couple with an unremarkable previous clinical history. This fetus had bilateral asymmetric kidney anomalies including a small multicystic left kidney, and an extremely hypoplastic right kidney. Histology showed dysplastic lesions in the left kidney, contrasting with rather normal organization in the hypoplastic right kidney. Ocular examination disclosed bilateral optic nerve coloboma. The association of these anomalies, highly suggestive of the papillorenal syndrome, led us to perform the molecular study of the PAX2 gene. Direct sequencing of the PAX2 coding sequence identified a de novo single G deletion of nucleotide 935 in exon 3 of the PAX2 resulting in a frameshift mutation (c.392delG, p.Ser131Thrfs*28). In the second family, the presence of a maternally inherited PAX2 mutation led to a decision for termination of pregnancy. The 18-week gestation fetus presented the papillorenal syndrome including hypoplastic kidneys and optic nerve coloboma. In order to address the PAX2 involvement in isolated renal "disease," 18 fetuses fulfilling criteria were screened: 10/18 had uni- or bilateral agenesis, 6/18 had bilateral multicystic dysplasia with enlarged kidneys, and 2/18 presented bilateral severe hypodysplasia confirmed on fetopathological examination. To the best of our knowledge, our first patient represents an unreported fetal diagnosis of papillorenal syndrome, and another example of the

  5. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dessinioti, Cleo; Katsambas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia consists of a heterogenous group of inherited disorders due to enzymatic defects in the biosynthetic pathway of cortisol and/or aldosterone. This results in glucocorticoid deficiency, mineralocorticoid deficiency, and androgen excess. 95% of CAH cases are due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Clinical forms range from the severe, classical CAH associated with complete loss of enzyme function, to milder, non-classical forms (NCAH). Androgen excess affects the pilosebaceous unit, causing cutaneous manifestations such as acne, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism. Clinical differential diagnosis between NCAH and polycystic ovary syndrome may be difficult. In this review, the evaluation of patients with suspected CAH, the clinical presentation of CAH forms, with emphasis on the cutaneous manifestations of the disease, and available treatment options, will be discussed. PMID:22523607

  6. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  7. Ectodermal dysplasias: the p63 tail.

    PubMed

    Tadini, G; Santagada, F; Brena, M; Pezzani, L; Nannini, P

    2013-02-01

    Various combinations of limb anomalies, ectodermal dysplasias and orofacial clefts characterize heterozygous mutations in the transcription factor gene p63. The causative gene is crucial during embryonic ontogenesis, mostly in the development of limbs and other ectodermal derived tissues. The pattern of mutations in six different p63-related syndromes (EEC syndrome, AEC syndrome, ADULT syndrome, LMS syndrome, RHS syndrome, SHFM syndrome) shows genotype-phenotype correlations. The most frequent p63 mutation syndrome is the EEC syndrome, characterized by ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate. Ectodermal dysplasia is characterized by ectrodactyly often associated with syndactyly, sparse hair, dry skin, hypo-anodontia, dysplastic nails and alterations in sebaceous glands, mammary glands and nipples. The third hallmark of the EEC syndrome is orofacial clefting, in particular lip and palate. p63 mutations also cause the other five inherited syndromes: symptoms are overlapping, but each of these diseases has its own characteristic phenotypic features: for instance AEC syndrome (ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate) has as distinctive feature ankyloblepharon, while mammary glands and nipples hypoplasia are frequent findings in LMS syndrome and in ADULT syndrome (acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth syndrome). The latter can be distinguished from other p63 syndromes by the absence of orofacial clefting and by prominent ectodermal signs. The narrowest genotype-phenotype correlation is in the EEC and AEC syndromes. All EEC missense mutations are clustered in the DNA binding domain and do not bind to DNA; in contrast, all missens mutations reported in AEC syndrome are localized in the α-motif domain, and it has been demonstrated that they disrupt interaction with other proteins. LMS and ADULT syndrome have their own unique mutated amino-acid residues. Only two amino-acid residues are known to be mutated amongst ADULT syndrome: asparagines 6 and

  8. Congenital vertical talus: a review.

    PubMed

    McKie, Janay; Radomisli, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Congenital vertical talus, also known as congenital convex pes valgus, is an uncommon disorder of the foot, manifested as a rigid rocker-bottom flatfoot. Radiographically, it is defined by dorsal dislocation of the navicular on the talus. This condition requires surgical correction. If left untreated, this foot deformity results in a painful and rigid flatfoot with weak push-off power. This article provides an overview of this rare foot deformity, outlines appropriate workup of the disorder, and details current treatment options, with emphasis on the evolution of treatment of congenital vertical talus. PMID:19963176

  9. Cervical spinal deformity in craniometaphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Yamanaka, T; Tanaka, Y; Nakamura, S

    1987-03-01

    A child with craniometaphyseal dysplasia had the presenting symptoms of progressive quadriparesis. She exhibited proportionate tall stature, peculiar face with craniomegaly, genu valgum, and 46,XX,t(12;18)(q13;q12) chromosome aberration. Delayed physical development and mild mental retardation were also present. Subluxation of C-2 on C-3 and kyphosis of the cervical spine, and myelographic blockage at this level were noted. Treatment consisted of fusion of the C-2 to C5-6 vertebra following laminectomies of C-3 and C-4 with satisfactory results. Early detection and surgery for cervical spine deformity and cord compression are necessary to prevent profound neurological deficits in this disorder. PMID:3810462

  10. Guidelines for genetic skeletal dysplasias for pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasia (SD) is a kind of heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by abnormal growth, development, differentiation, and maintenance of the bone and cartilage. The patients with SD most likely to be seen by a pediatrician or orthopedic surgeon are those who present with short stature in childhood. Because each category has so many diseases, classification is important to understand SD better. In order to diagnose a SD accurately, clinical and radiographic findings should be evaluated in detail. In addition, genetic diagnosis of SD is important because there are so various SDs with complex phenotypes. To reach an exact diagnosis of SDs, cooperative approach by a clinician, a radiologist and a geneticist is important. This review aims to provide an outline of the diagnostic approach for children with disproportional short stature. PMID:26817005

  11. Hip Dysplasia in the Young Adult.

    PubMed

    Gala, Luca; Clohisy, John C; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a leading precursor of osteoarthritis and is seen in 20% to 40% of patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. An increase in mechanical stress on the cartilage matrix with failure of the acetabular labrum represents the major pathomechanism of degeneration. Because the prevalence of associated femoral deformities is high (>50%), the structural anatomy of the dysplastic hip must be assessed in multiple planes using radiographs and, if needed, advanced imaging modalities. Acetabular osteotomy (periacetabular and/or rotational) is the most commonly used procedure for the treatment of the majority of dysplastic hips in adults. Modern total hip replacement remains an excellent option for the more arthritic joints. Difficulties can arise from anatomical abnormalities and previous operations. PMID:26738905

  12. Guidelines for genetic skeletal dysplasias for pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal dysplasia (SD) is a kind of heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by abnormal growth, development, differentiation, and maintenance of the bone and cartilage. The patients with SD most likely to be seen by a pediatrician or orthopedic surgeon are those who present with short stature in childhood. Because each category has so many diseases, classification is important to understand SD better. In order to diagnose a SD accurately, clinical and radiographic findings should be evaluated in detail. In addition, genetic diagnosis of SD is important because there are so various SDs with complex phenotypes. To reach an exact diagnosis of SDs, cooperative approach by a clinician, a radiologist and a geneticist is important. This review aims to provide an outline of the diagnostic approach for children with disproportional short stature. PMID:26817005

  13. Cleidocranial Dysplasia with Autosomal Dominant Inheritance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  14. Cleidocranial dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-07-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  15. [Fibrous dysplasia of the skull. Radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Amato, C; Moschini, M; Colavita, N; Tagliaferri, G

    1993-09-01

    The authors examined 11 patients with fibrous dysplasia of the skull pointing out its radiologic features and preferential sites. Conventional radiology, CT and MR imaging were used. As for conventional radiology, tangential scans which of great value to depict the most typical morphologic patterns. Lesions of the skull base were most frequent in the sphenoid (7 of 11 cases), where 5 of 7 exhibited a sclerotic pattern. Bone changes in the skull vault were: mixed (3 cases), pagetoid (2 cases), "ground glass" (1 case) and lytic (1 case): none of these cases was of the sclerotic type. A typical feature of vault lesions was the widening of diploic space associated with expansion of the outer bone and integrity of the inner bone. Radiologic findings, often associated with suggestive clinical manifestations, always allowed a diagnostic hypothesis; histopathologic confirmation was needed only in a few cases (4 of 11 patients). PMID:8210526

  16. Focal cortical dysplasias in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate the presence of histological abnormalities in the brains of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggestive of a dysplastic process. In this study we identified areas of abnormal cortical thinning within the cerebral cortex of ASD individuals and examined the same for neuronal morphometric abnormalities by using computerized image analysis. Results The study analyzed celloidin-embedded and Nissl-stained serial full coronal brain sections of 7 autistic (ADI-R diagnosed) and 7 age/sex-matched neurotypicals. Sections were scanned and manually segmented before implementing an algorithm using Laplace’s equation to measure cortical width. Identified areas were then subjected to analysis for neuronal morphometry. Results of our study indicate the presence within our ASD population of circumscribed foci of diminished cortical width that varied among affected individuals both in terms of location and overall size with the frontal lobes being particularly involved. Spatial statistic indicated a reduction in size of neurons within affected areas. Granulometry confirmed the presence of smaller pyramidal cells and suggested a concomitant reduction in the total number of interneurons. Conclusions The neuropathology is consistent with a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Results from the medical literature (e.g., heterotopias) and our own study suggest that the genesis of this cortical malformation seemingly resides in the heterochronic divisions of periventricular germinal cells. The end result is that during corticogenesis radially migrating neuroblasts (future pyramidal cells) are desynchronized in their development from those that follow a tangential route (interneurons). The possible presence of a pathological mechanism in common among different conditions expressing an autism-like phenotype argue in favor of considering ASD a “sequence” rather than a syndrome. Focal cortical dysplasias in ASD may serve to

  17. Auditing hip ultrasound screening of infants at increased risk of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, C; Donoghue, V; Murphy, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Clinical examination, while useful, has been shown to be insufficient as the sole screening method in infants. Ultrasound examination at 8 weeks in high risk infants is an integral part of the screening process in some units. Aims: To show the efficiency of hip sonography in detection of developmental dysplasia of the hips in those without clinically dislocated hips. Methods: All infants born at the National Maternity Hospital between January 1994 and December 2001 were included. All those with clinically dislocated hips were treated by a Pavlik harness and referred for follow up to a paediatric orthopaedic surgeon. An 8 week hip ultrasound scan was performed for those infants with stable hips on examination but who met the following criteria: (1) a first degree relative with congenital dislocation of hips; (2) breech presentation at birth; and (3) a persistent "click" at birth in an otherwise stable hip. Results: During the period of study a total of 52 893 infants were born in the National Maternity Hospital. Based on the criteria above, 5485 hip ultrasound scans were performed. Of those scanned, 18 (0.33%) were found to have dislocated hips and 153 (2.78%) to have dysplasic hips. The 18 infants with dislocation were treated with Pavlik harness; the remaining 153 were followed up by serial ultrasound examinations but did not require active intervention. Conclusions: Among the population of infants at increased risk of developmental dysplasia of the hip, the hip screening programme identified 18 cases among 5485 infants; a rate of 3.2 per 1000. Hip sonography is therefore worthwhile. PMID:15908620

  18. Use of amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to differentiate cervical dysplasia (CIN).

    PubMed

    Santaella-Verdejo, Arturo; Gallegos, Belem; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro; Zenteno, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    Alterations in O-glycosylation of proteins in cell surfaces can originate disorder in cellular function, as well as in cell transformation and tumoral differentiation. In this work, we investigate changes in O-glycosylation in cervical intraepithelial dysplasia (CIN) at different stages of differentiation (CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III) using lectins specific for O-glycosidically linked glycans. Twenty cases with CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III dysplasias each, and 20 normal cases were studied by lectin histochemistry and evaluated under optical microscopy. The lectins from Glycine max and Griffonia simplicifolia showed no differences in their recognition pattern among the different CIN stages and normal tissue. Dolichos Biflorus lectin recognized CIN I dysplasia. Lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus showed increased reactivity in the presence of CIN II dysplasia, compared with CIN I and CIN III. These results suggest that subtle modifications in the O-glycosylation pattern could be considered in diagnosis or prognosis of cervical precancerous stages. PMID:17516251

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 links) Health Topic: Bone Diseases Health Topic: Dwarfism Health Topic: Immune System and Disorders Health Topic: ... Immune Deficiency Conditions University of Kansas Medical Center: Dwarfism/Short Stature GeneReviews (1 link) Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia ...

  20. Contraceptives and dysplasia: higher rate for pill choosers.

    PubMed

    Stern, E; Clark, V A; Coffelt, C F

    1970-07-31

    Among women choosing the pill in preference to other contraceptive methods there is a higher rate of the cancer precursor, dysplasia of the cervix, before any possible effect of the pill. PMID:17739011

  1. A compound heterozygote of novel and recurrent DTDST mutations results in a novel intermediate phenotype of Desbuquois dysplasia, diastrophic dysplasia, and recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Atsushi; Nishimura, Gen; Futami, Toru; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2008-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) is required for synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans in cartilage, and its loss-of-function mutations result in recessively inherited chondrodysplasias. The 40 or so DTDST mutations reported to date cause a group of disorders termed the diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) group. The group ranges from the mildest recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (r-MED) through the most common DTD to perinatally lethal atelosteogenesis type II and achondrogenesis 1B. Furthermore, the relationship between DTDST mutations, their sulfate transport function, and disease phenotypes has been described. Here we report a girl with DTDST mutations: a compound heterozygote of a novel p.T266I mutation and a recurrent p.DeltaV340 mutation commonly found in severe phenotypes of the DTD group. In infancy, the girl presented with skeletal manifestations reminiscent of Desbuquois dysplasia, another recessively inherited chondrodysplasia, the mutations of which have never been identified. Her phenotype evolved with age into an intermediate phenotype between r-MED and DTD. Considering her clinical phenotypes and known phenotypes of p.DeltaV340, p.T266I was predicted to be responsible for mild phenotypes of the DTD group. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum of DTDST mutations, adding Desbuquois dysplasia to the list of differential diagnosis of the DTD group. PMID:18553123

  2. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda with progressive arthropathy associated with subcapsular cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Sanjay Kumar; Ghosh, Sudip; Mondal, Soumya Sarathi; Chatterjee, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda with progressive arthropathy is a form of inherited skeletal dysplasia involving the axial skeleton along with swelling and deformities of the peripheral joints that mimics juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of a 14-year-old school boy who presented with dwarfism, spine deformity, ocular anomaly and peripheral arthropathy with characteristic radiological changes in the vertebrae and multiple other joints. PMID:24862418

  3. Clinical management of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with anodontia: case report.

    PubMed

    Paschos, Ekaterini; Huth, Karin Christine; Hickel, Reinhard

    2002-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. The case of a 5-year-old child with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and complete anodontia is presented. Because of the anodontia and the need for treatment at an early age, the prosthetic management of such a young child can be difficult. Complete dentures were provided to encourage a normal psychological development and to improve the function of the stomatognathic system. PMID:12413164

  4. Risk factors for cervical dysplasia in Kerala, India.

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, C.; Amma, N. S.; Chitrathara, K.; Dhakad, N.; Rani, P.; Malathy, L.; Nair, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    A study in Kerala, India, confirmed the importance of genital hygiene in the fight against infections that have a role in the development of cervical dysplasia and cancer. Many women cannot afford sanitary pads, while adequate facilities for washing after coitus are often unavailable. Health education, satisfactory living standards, and the empowerment of women are prerequisites for reducing the incidence of cervical dysplasia. PMID:10212523

  5. Initial respiratory management in preterm infants and bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    López, Ester Sanz; Rodríguez, Elena Maderuelo; Navarro, Cristina Ramos; Sánchez-Luna, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ventilator injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Avoiding invasive ventilation could reduce lung injury, and early respiratory management may affect pulmonary outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of initial respiratory support on survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia at a gestational age of 36 weeks. DESIGN/METHODS: A prospective 3-year observational study. Preterm infants of <32 weeks gestational age were classified into 4 groups according to the support needed during the first 2 hours of life: room air, nasal continuous positive airway pressure, intubation/surfactant/extubation and prolonged mechanical ventilation (defined as needing mechanical ventilation for more than 2 hours). RESULTS: Of the 329 eligible patients, a total of 49% did not need intubation, and 68.4% did not require prolonged mechanical ventilation. At a gestational age of 26 weeks, there was a significant correlation between survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia and initial respiratory support. Preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation showed a higher risk of death and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. After controlling for gestational age, antenatal corticosteroid use, maternal preeclampsia and chorioamnionitis, the survival rate without bronchopulmonary dysplasia remained significantly lower in the mechanically ventilated group. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, the need for more than 2 hours of mechanical ventilation predicted the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants with a gestational age >26 weeks (sensitivity = 89.5% and specificity = 67%). The need for prolonged mechanical ventilation could be an early marker for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. This finding could help identify a target population with a high risk of chronic lung disease. Future research is needed to determine other strategies to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in this high-risk group of patients. PMID

  6. Syntelencephaly associated with connected transhemispheric cleft of focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, S; Togari, H; Banno, T; Wada, Y

    1999-05-01

    The authors report a female with syntelencephaly associated with a connected transhemispheric cleft of focal cortical dysplasia. Syntelencephaly is a rare anomaly characterized by fusion of the hemispheres in the posterior frontal and parietal regions and is considered a new variant of holoprosencephaly. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging of the patient revealed syntelencephaly associated with bilateral fused clefts of focal cortical dysplasia without the pial-ependymal seam, which was regarded as an incomplete type of schizencephaly. The underlying mechanism is discussed. PMID:10371387

  7. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  8. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  9. p63 in skin development and ectodermal dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Maranke I.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 is critically important for skin development and maintenance. Processes that require p63 include epidermal lineage commitment, epidermal differentiation, cell adhesion, and basement membrane formation. Not surprisingly, alterations in the p63 pathway underlie a subset of ectodermal dysplasias, developmental syndromes in which the skin and skin appendages do not develop normally. This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of p63 in normal development and ectodermal dysplasias. PMID:20445549

  10. Congenital Malformations in Perinatal Autopsies – A Study of 100 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Andola, Uma S; AM, Anita; Ahuja, Mukta; Andola, Sainath K

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital malformations remain a common cause of perinatal deaths and even though ultrasonogram can give fairly accurate diagnosis, perinatal autopsy is essential to confirm the diagnosis and look for associated malformations. Objectives To emphasize the importance of perinatal autopsy in diagnosing congenital malformations and to compare the same with the prenatal ultrasound findings. Methods The present study comprises 100 consecutive perinatal autopsies conducted after obtaining the approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee. In cases where prenatal ultrasound findings were available they were compared with the autopsy findings. Results Out of 100 perinatal autopsies, 44 cases were congenital anomalies with M:F = 1:1.5. Majority of the fetuses with congenital malformations (36.36%) were therapeutically terminated, Cental nervous system malformations being the commonest indication. The most common timing of therapeutic termination being 20 -24weeks. Congenital malformations were common between 35-39 weeks gestational age and birth weight range 350- 1000g. The malformations involving the central nervous system were commonest, seen in 15 cases (34.09%) followed by renal anomalies in 9 cases (20.45%) and multiple malformations in 7cases ( 15.91%). Autopsy confirmed the prenatal ultrasound findings in 50% of the cases, added to diagnosis in 29.54%, while it completely changed the primary diagnosis in 9.09% of the cases. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of perinatal autopsy in confirming the diagnosis of congenital anomalies by prenatal ultrasound findings. PMID:23373038

  11. [Renal physiology].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Deray, Gilbert; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    The kidneys are responsible for the urinary excretion of uremic toxins and the regulation of several body systems such as intra and extracellular volume status, acid-base status, calcium and phosphate metabolism or erythropoiesis. They adapt quantitative and qualitative composition of the urine to keep these systems in balance. The flow of plasma is filtered in the range of 120 mL/min, and depends on the systemic and renal hemodynamics which is subject to self-regulation. The original urine will then be modified in successive segments of the nephron. The proximal nephron is to lead the massive reabsorption of water and essential elements such as sodium, bicarbonates, amino-acids and glucose. The distal nephron includes the distal convoluted tubule, the connector tube and the collecting duct. Its role is to adapt the quality composition of urine to the needs of the body. PMID:22157516

  12. Focal cortical dysplasia, microcephaly and epilepsy in a boy with 1q21.1-q21.3 duplication.

    PubMed

    Milone, Roberta; Valetto, Angelo; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Veronica; Valvo, Giulia; Cioni, Giovanni; Sicca, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The recent advance of new molecular technologies like array - Comparative Genomic Hybridization has fostered the detection of genomic imbalances in subjects with intellectual disability, epilepsy, and/or congenital anomalies. Though some of the rearrangements are relatively frequent, their consequences on phenotypes can be strongly variable. We report on a boy harbouring a de novo 8.3 Mb duplication of chromosome 1q21.1-q21.3 whose complex unusual phenotype deserves attention, due to the presence of focal cortical dysplasia, microcephaly, and epilepsy. Loss-of-function (LOF) effects of genes associated with human disease involved in the rearrangement have been only partially established, and have not been previously associated with brain malformations in several deletion syndromes. Less is known, instead, about the consequences of their duplication on neuronal migration and brain development process. Further advance in neuroimaging and genetic research will help in defining their actual role in neurodevelopment and cerebral cortex malformations. PMID:26975584

  13. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  14. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  15. Renal Lymphangiectasia: A Curious Cause of Pleural Effusion.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Amir Ahmad; Lotfollahi, Legha; Bakhshayeshkaram, Mehrdad; Kiani, Arda; Haghighi, Shirin; Alavi Darazam, Ilad; Rashidfarokhi, Farin

    2015-01-01

    Renal lymphangiectasia is a disorder of the lymphatic system of the kidneys, which can be congenital or acquired. Although the exact etiology remains unknown, an obstructive process resulting from several causes, including infection, inflammation or malignant infiltration, has been suggested to be responsible for the acquired form. This disorder may be associated with several pathologies. We report a case of a 24-year-old man with renal lymphangiectasia presenting with polycythemia, ascites and pleural effusion associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in an intravenous (IV) drug user. Our case is the first in the literature that shows an association between HCV infection and IV drug use. PMID:26858768

  16. [Polyarteritis nodosa with renal agenesis and immunosuppressive treatment].

    PubMed

    Alcocer, J; Fraga, A; Gudiño, J; Lavalle, C

    1976-01-01

    A case of a 44 years old man with the unique combination of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) and the congenital absence of a kidney is presented. The clinical picture consisted of fever, general symptoms, hypertermia, peripheric neuropathy, subcutaneous nodules and renal damage. Laboratory findings included increased WBC, telescoped urinary sediment, renal insufficiency, positive rheumatoid factor, policlonal gammopathy and positive Australia antigen. A review of the pertinent literature and the etiopathogenic role of Australia antigen in PAN is discussed. Efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy was evident in this case. PMID:13359

  17. [Conservative management of renal haemangioma: value of a synergistic combination of flexible ureteroscopy and CT angiography].

    PubMed

    Mallet, Richard; Game, Xavier; Lefi, Mounir; Mouzin, Marc; Malavaud, Bernard; Otal, Philippe; Joffre, Francis; Rischmann, Pascal

    2007-02-01

    Renal haemangioma (RH) is a rare congenital vascular lesion that is frequently responsible for macroscopic haematuria. This lesion is difficult to diagnose preoperatively despite progress in imaging techniques. These diagnostic difficulties account for the high rate of radical treatment (nephrectomy or nephro-ureterectomy) due to a suspicion of renal carcinoma or upper urinary tract tumour. However, conservative diagnostic and therapeutic management can be performed by a combination of CT angiography, flexible ureteroscopy and selective embolization. PMID:17373249

  18. Sclerosing bone dysplasias: genetic, clinical and radiology update of hereditary and non-hereditary disorders.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Cedric; Madani, Hardi; Lenchik, Leon; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Amalnath, Deepak S; de Mey, Johan; De Maeseneer, Michel

    2016-06-01

    There is a wide variety of hereditary and non-hereditary bone dysplasias, many with unique radiographic findings. Hereditary bony dysplasias include osteopoikilosis, osteopathia striata, osteopetrosis, progressive diaphyseal dysplasia, hereditary multiple diaphyseal sclerosis and pyknodysostosis. Non-hereditary dysplasias include melorheostosis, intramedullary osteosclerosis and overlap syndromes. Although many of these dysplasias are uncommon, radiologists should be familiar with their genetic, clinical and imaging findings to allow for differentiation from acquired causes of bony sclerosis. We present an overview of hereditary and non-hereditary bony dysplasias with focus on the pathogenesis, clinical and radiographic findings of each disorder. PMID:26898950

  19. Mitochondrial Factors and VACTERL Association-Related Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, S.; Solomon, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    VACTERL/VATER association is a group of congenital malformations characterized by at least 3 of the following findings: vertebral defects, anal atresia, cardiac defects, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal anomalies, and limb abnormalities. To date, no unifying etiology for VACTERL/VATER association has been established, and there is strong evidence for causal heterogeneity. VACTERL/VATER association has many overlapping characteristics with other congenital disorders that involve multiple malformations. In addition to these other conditions, some of which have known molecular causes, certain aspects of VACTERL/VATER association have similarities with the manifestations of disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction can result from a number of distinct causes and can clinically manifest in diverse presentations; accurate diagnosis can be challenging. Case reports of individuals with VACTERL association and confirmed mitochondrial dysfunction allude to the possibility of mitochondrial involvement in the pathogenesis of VACTERL/VATER association. Further, there is biological plausibility involving mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible etiology related to a diverse group of congenital malformations, including those seen in at least a subset of individuals with VACTERL association. PMID:23653577

  20. Congenital anatomic variants of the kidney and ureter: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M R; Adarsh, K M; Jeeson, Riya; Ashwini, C; Nagaraj, B R

    2016-03-01

    Congenital renal parenchymal and pelvicalyceal abnormalities have a wide spectrum. Most of them are asymptomatic, like that of ectopia, cross fused kidney, horseshoe kidney, etc., while a few of them become complicated, leading to renal failure and death. It is very important for the radiologist to identify these anatomic variants and guide the clinicians for surgical and therapeutic procedures. Cross-sectional imaging with a volume rendered technique/maximum intensity projection has overcome ultrasonography and IVU for identification and interpretation of some of these variants. PMID:26747433

  1. [Congenital lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Crespo, J M; Teixidor de Otto, J L

    1998-07-01

    Hernias in the lumbar region are abdominal wall defects that appear in two possible locations: the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft and the inferior lumbar triangle of Petit. There are 40 cases reported in the pediatric literature, and only 16 are considered congenital, associated with the lumbocostovertebral syndrome and/or meningomyelocele. A new case is presented. A premature newborn with a mass in the left flank that increases when the patient cries and reduces easily. The complementary studies confirm the diagnosis of lumbar hernia and reveal the presence of lumbocostovertebral syndrome associated. At the time of operation a well defined fascial defect at the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft is primarily closed. The diagnosis of lumbar hernia is not difficult to establish but it is necessary the screening of the lumbocostovertebral syndrome. We recommend the surgical treatment before 12 months of age; the objective is to close the defect primarily or to use prosthetic material if necessary. PMID:12602034

  2. Congenital parotid fistula.

    PubMed

    Natasha, Shiggaon

    2014-01-01

    Parotid fistula is a cause of great distress and embarrassment to the patient. Parotid fistula is most commonly a post-traumatic situation. Congenital parotid salivary fistulas are unusual entities that can arise from accessory parotid glands or even more infrequently, from normal parotid glands through an aberrant Stensen's duct. The treatment of fistulous tract is usually surgical and can be successfully excised after making a skin incision along the skin tension line around the fistula opening. This report describes a case of right accessory parotid gland fistula of a 4-year-old boy with discharge of pus from right cheek. Computed tomography (CT) fistulography and CT sialography demonstrated fistulous tract arising from accessory parotid gland. Both CT fistulography and CT sialography are very helpful in the diagnosis and surgical planning. In this case, superficial parotidectomy is the treatment of choice. A detailed history, clinical and functional examination, proper salivary gland investigations facilitates in correct diagnosis followed by immediate surgical intervention helps us to restore physical, psychological health of the child patient. PMID:25231049

  3. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  4. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Juan A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  5. Congenital Triangular Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Yin Li, Vincent Chum; Yesudian, Paul Devakar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital triangular alopecia (CTA) also known as temporal triangular alopecia is a benign noncicatricial pattern of hair loss. It typically affects the frontotemporal region and rarely involves the temporoparietal or occipital scalp. It is a nonprogressive disorder that presents as a triangular, oval or lancet-shaped patch of alopecia. CTA can manifest at birth or develop later in life. The exact etiology of this condition remains unknown. Rarely, it may be associated with other disorders such as Down's syndrome and phakomatosis pigmentovascularis. The diagnosis is based on its distinct clinical appearance. Histologically, hair follicles are miniaturized and replaced by sparse vellus hair follicles. Tricoscopy using a polarized light handheld dermatoscope can be a useful diagnostic tool. CTA is often asymptomatic and remains unchanged throughout the life. No treatment is required. Surgical intervention with follicular unit hair transplantation can provide a satisfactory cosmetic result. In this paper, we have identified 126 cases of CTA in the published literature cited on PubMed between 1905 and 2015. From the available evidence, 79% of patients with CTA presented with unilateral hair loss, 18.5% with bilateral involvement and rarely, with occipital alopecia (2.5%). There was no gender predilection. These figures are entirely consistent with previously published data. Physicians should remember to consider CTA as a potential diagnosis in any patient presenting with a nonscarring alopecia in order to avoid unnecessary investigations and treatments. PMID:26180448

  6. Congenital Rhabdomyosarcoma of Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghnejad-Tabari, Ahmad; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Nariman, Shahin; Hassas-Yeganeh, Shaghayegh; Gharib, Atoosa; Khaleghnejad-Tabari, Nasibeh

    2012-01-01

    A 16-day-old female was referred with congenital swelling on her right shoulder. On examination, there was a hard, round, ecchymotic, nontender, slightly movable, warm and shiny 10x15 cm mass on the right axillary pits which was extended to the right side of neck and chest wall. The mass separated the shoulder from the chest wall causing paralysis of right hand. Chest X-ray, ultrasound and MRI with contrast demonstrated a soft tissue mass suspected to be a hemangioma. The mass rapidly increased in size despite aggressive steroid therapy with rupture and bleeding. On the 45th post natal day the baby was taken to operating room to control the bleeding and if possible total excision of the mass. The mass was separated easily from the surrounding tissue and was excised along with right upper extremity. At the end of surgery the baby had cardiac arrest, and apparently died of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC). The final pathology report was Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). PMID:25628836

  7. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  8. Singing in congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Dalla Bella, Simone; Giguère, Jean-François; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-07-01

    Congenital amusia is a musical disorder characterized by impaired pitch perception. To examine to what extent this perceptual pitch deficit may compromise singing, 11 amusic individuals and 11 matched controls were asked to sing a familiar tune with lyrics and on the syllable /la/. Acoustical analysis of sung renditions yielded measures of pitch accuracy (e.g., number of pitch errors) and time accuracy (e.g., number of time errors). The results revealed that 9 out of 11 amusics were poor singers, mostly on the pitch dimension. Poor singers made an anomalously high number of pitch interval and contour errors, produced pitch intervals largely deviating from the score, and lacked pitch stability; however, more than half of the amusics sang in-time. Amusics' variability in singing proficiency was related to their residual pitch perceptual ability. Thus, their singing deficiency might be a consequence of their perceptual deficit. Nevertheless, there were notable exceptions. Two amusic individuals, despite their impoverished perception, sang proficiently. The latter findings are consistent with the existence of separate neural pathways for auditory perception and action. PMID:19603898

  9. Heterotopic nephrogenic rests in the colon and multiple congenital anomalies: possibly related association.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dhanpat; Martel, Maritza; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel; Parkash, Vinita

    2002-01-01

    Heterotopic renal tissue (HRT) in the wall of the colon is a very rare occurrence, with only five cases published. Our patient is only the second patient reported to have this abnormality in the absence of sirenomelia. We describe colonic HRT in a child, associated with multiple congenital anomalies. The congenital abnormalities were of the VACTERL type, accompanied by valvular cardiac anomalies that were clinically diagnosed as Shone syndrome. The HRT was not apparent clinically or grossly. Microscopically, multifocal islands of renal tissue consisting of glomeruli, cystically dilated tubules, and blastema were seen in all layers of the bowel, and simulated "cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma." Our case provides further support to the belief that VACTERL association and sirenomelia represent related entities. PMID:12375130

  10. Renal 123I-MIBG Scintigraphy Before and After Kidney Autotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Linn C; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, Daan W; Idu, Mirza M; van den Born, Bert-Jan H; Verberne, Hein J

    2015-10-01

    A 25-year-old man underwent an autotransplantation of his right kidney because of fibromuscular dysplasia-induced renal artery stenosis and subsequent hypertension. Since transplantation results in complete kidney denervation, it enabled assessment of renal sympathetic nerve activity changes using renal I-MIBG scintigraphy. Before and 2 weeks after transplantation I-MIBG, scintigraphy was performed. Uptake of I-MIBG in the left (control) kidney increased after transplantation with 4% at 15 minutes and 5% at 4 hours postinjection images, whereas I-MIBG uptake in the right transplanted kidney decreased with 21% at 15 minutes and with 29% at 4 hours, demonstrating renal I-MIBG changes after denervation. PMID:26222531

  11. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:26202137

  12. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Audiologic Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Karen B.

    2013-01-01

    The association between congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was first described almost 50 years ago. Studies over the intervening decades have further described the relationship between congenital CMV infection and SNHL in children. However, congenital CMV infection remains a leading cause of SNHL in children in the United States and the world today. As more CMV infections are identified, it is important to recognize that infants who are born to seroimmune mothers are not completely protected from SNHL, although their hearing loss is often milder than that seen in CMV-infected infants following primary maternal infections. Late-onset and progressive hearing losses occur following congenital CMV infection, and CMV-infected infants should be evaluated regularly to provide for early detection of hearing loss and appropriate intervention. Fluctuating hearing loss that is not explained by concurrent middle ear infections is another characteristic of CMV-related hearing loss in children. Challenges still remain in predicting which children with congenital CMV infection will develop hearing loss and, among those who do develop loss, whether or not the loss will continue to deteriorate. PMID:24257423

  13. Congenital Scoliosis (Mini-review).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Moramarco, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis is a lateral deformity of the spine with a disturbance of the sagittal profile caused by malformations of vertebra and ribs. Typically, early surgical intervention is the suggested treatment (before three-years-old) for young patients with congenital scoliosis. While a previous study was conducted in 2011 to investigate long-term studies supporting the necessity for this recommendation and no evidence was found, this current review, is an updated search for evidence published from 2011 through March 2015. This also failed to find any prospective or randomized controlled studies to support the hypothesis that spinal fusion surgery in patients with congenital scoliosis should be considered as evidence-based treatment. Contradictory results exist on the safety of hemivertebra resection and segmental fusion using pedicle screw fixation. When using the VEPTR (vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib) device, studies show a high rate of complications exist. It is difficult to predict the final outcome for patients with congenital scoliosis. However, it is possible that many patients with congenital scoliosis may be able to avoid spinal surgery with the application of advanced bracing technology. Therefore, it is only prudent to advocate for conservative management first before spinal surgery is considered. PMID:26769614

  14. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  15. Treatment of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Rall, Katharina; Campo, Rudi; Oppelt, Peter; Isaacson, Keith

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of müllerian malformations is 1 in 200, or 0.5%. A third of the anomalies are septate, a third bicornuate uteri, 10% arcuate uterus, 10% didelphis and unicornuate uterus, and < 5% uterine and vaginal aplasia. Correct diagnosis of the malformation is most important but often very difficult. Correct treatment can only be performed if the malformation is clear. Longitudinal vaginal septums have to be removed due to potential obstetric problems. Transverse vaginal septums can cause hematocolpos and pain and have to be incised crosswise and excised so as not to shorten the vagina at the same time. Congenital vaginal agenesis occurs in Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome patients and in androgen insensitivity syndrome. The first choice for surgical treatment should be the new laparoscopic-assisted creation of a neovagina. Septate uterus has to be distinguished from a bicornuate uterus. Even if it is not proven to be a cause for infertility, the chance of miscarriage can be diminished by performing hysteroscopic metroplasty. Repair of a uterine septum in infertility patients often improves pregnancy rates. In contrast, surgical repair of a bicornuate uterus requires an abdominal metroplasty. This should only be performed if the patient has recurrent fetal loss due to the uterine structural defect. In a unicornuate uterus it is most important to determine if there is a second uterine horn that can cause cyclic pain if it has functioning endometrium. The only surgical option in these cases is to remove the rudimentary uterus with endometrium and hematometra, respectively. PMID:21437824

  16. Multi-modality imaging review of congenital abnormalities of kidney and upper urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Khanna, Maneesh; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Sheikh, Adnan; Virmani, Vivek; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2016-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include a wide range of abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic ectopic kidneys to life threatening renal agenesis (bilateral). Many of them are detected in the antenatal or immediate postnatal with a significant proportion identified in the adult population with varying degree of severity. CAKUT can be classified on embryological basis in to abnormalities in the renal parenchymal development, aberrant embryonic migration and abnormalities of the collecting system. Renal parenchymal abnormalities include multi cystic dysplastic kidneys, renal hypoplasia, number (agenesis or supernumerary), shape and cystic renal diseases. Aberrant embryonic migration encompasses abnormal location and fusion anomalies. Collecting system abnormalities include duplex kidneys and Pelvi ureteric junction obstruction. Ultrasonography (US) is typically the first imaging performed as it is easily available, non-invasive and radiation free used both antenatally and postnatally. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to confirm the ultrasound detected abnormality, detection of complex malformations, demonstration of collecting system and vascular anatomy and more importantly for early detection of complications like renal calculi, infection and malignancies. As CAKUT are one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease, it is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the varying imaging appearances of CAKUT on US, CT and MRI, thereby helping in prompt diagnosis and optimal management. PMID:26981222

  17. Multi-modality imaging review of congenital abnormalities of kidney and upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Khanna, Maneesh; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Sheikh, Adnan; Virmani, Vivek; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2016-02-28

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include a wide range of abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic ectopic kidneys to life threatening renal agenesis (bilateral). Many of them are detected in the antenatal or immediate postnatal with a significant proportion identified in the adult population with varying degree of severity. CAKUT can be classified on embryological basis in to abnormalities in the renal parenchymal development, aberrant embryonic migration and abnormalities of the collecting system. Renal parenchymal abnormalities include multi cystic dysplastic kidneys, renal hypoplasia, number (agenesis or supernumerary), shape and cystic renal diseases. Aberrant embryonic migration encompasses abnormal location and fusion anomalies. Collecting system abnormalities include duplex kidneys and Pelvi ureteric junction obstruction. Ultrasonography (US) is typically the first imaging performed as it is easily available, non-invasive and radiation free used both antenatally and postnatally. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to confirm the ultrasound detected abnormality, detection of complex malformations, demonstration of collecting system and vascular anatomy and more importantly for early detection of complications like renal calculi, infection and malignancies. As CAKUT are one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease, it is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the varying imaging appearances of CAKUT on US, CT and MRI, thereby helping in prompt diagnosis and optimal management. PMID:26981222

  18. PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS OF FOCAL CORTICAL DYSPLASIA

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Guerrini, Renzo; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) constitute a prevalent cause of intractable epilepsy in children, and one of the leading conditions requiring epilepsy surgery. Despite the recent advances on the cellular and molecular biology of these conditions, the pathogenetic mechanisms of FCDs remain largely unknown. The purpose if this work is to review the molecular underpinnings of FCDs and to highlight potential therapeutic targets. Methods A systematic review of the literature regarding the histological, molecular, and electrophysiological aspects of FCDs was conducted. Results Disruption of the mTOR signaling comprises a common pathway underlying the structural and electrical disturbances of some FCDs. Other mechanisms such as viral infections, prematurity, head trauma, and brain tumors are also posited. mTOR inhibitors (i.e., rapamycin) have shown positive results on seizure management in animal models and in a small cohort of patients with FCD. Significance Encouraging progresses have been achieved on the molecular and electrophysiological basis of constitutive cells in the dysplastic tissue. Despite the promising results of mTOR inhibitors, large-scale randomized trials are in need to evaluate their efficacy and side effects, along with additional mechanistic studies for the development of novel, molecular-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:24861491

  19. Dental Anomalies Associated with Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-P; Tadinada, A; Dutra, E H; Utreja, A; Uribe, F; Reichenberger, E J

    2014-06-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare genetic disorder encompassing hyperostosis of craniofacial bones and metaphyseal widening of tubular bones. Dental abnormalities are features of CMD that have been little discussed in the literature. We performed dentofacial examination of patients with CMD and evaluated consequences of orthodontic movement in a mouse model carrying a CMD knock-in (KI) mutation (Phe377del) in the Ank gene. All patients have a history of delayed eruption of permanent teeth. Analysis of data obtained by cone-beam computed tomography showed significant bucco-lingual expansion of jawbones, more pronounced in mandibles than in maxillae. There was no measurable increase in bone density compared with that in unaffected individuals. Orthodontic cephalometric analysis showed that patients with CMD tend to have a short anterior cranial base, short upper facial height, and short maxillary length. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis in homozygous Ank (KI/KI) mice, a model for CMD, showed that molars can be moved by orthodontic force without ankylosis, however, at a slower rate compared with those in wild-type Ank (+/+) mice (p < .05). Histological analysis of molars in Ank (KI/KI) mice revealed decreased numbers of TRAP(+) osteoclasts on the bone surface of pressure sides. Based on these findings, recommendations for the dental treatment of patients with CMD are provided. PMID:24663682

  20. Morphologic studies in the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Sillence, D. O.; Horton, W. A.; Rimoin, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the delineation of the genetic skeletal dysplasias, a heterogeneous group of disorders, that consist of over 80 distinct conditions. Morphologic studies have added a further dimension to the delineation of these conditions, their diagnosis, and the investigation of their pathogenetic mechanisms. In certain diseases, the morphologic alterations are characteristic and pathognomonic. In others only nonspecific alterations are observed, whereas in still other disorders growth-plate structure is essentially normal. Histologic, histochemical, and electronmicroscopic studies of growth-plate cartilage have provided new insights into the complexity of morphogenetic events in normal growth through the demonstration of morphologic defects in the genetic disorders of skeletal growth. As yet, very little is known of the biochemical abnormalities underlying the morphologic abnormalities. However, the great variety of morphologic findings points to a number of different pathogenetic defects in the synthesis, release, and assembly of connective tissue macromolecules and in the cells involved in growth-plate metabolism. Images Figure 4 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 10 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2 PMID:474720