Science.gov

Sample records for consortium bmc2 percutaneous

  1. Oncofertility Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    ... September 15, 2016 National Physicians Cooperative Brigid Martz Smith July 21, 2016 Postdoctoral Position in Pediatric Fertility ... 2016 Oncofertility Consortium Clinic/Center Map Brigid Martz Smith June 30, 2016 Zika Virus Concerns Grow as ...

  2. Impact of pre-procedural beta blockade on inpatient mortality in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Valle, Javier A; Zhang, Min; Dixon, Simon; Aronow, Herbert D; Share, David; Naoum, Joseph B; Gurm, Hitinder S

    2013-06-15

    Early use of β blockers (BBs) in acute myocardial infarction remains controversial, with some studies demonstrating benefit and others harm. The aim of this study was to assess the association between pre-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) BB use and in-hospital outcomes in patients who underwent primary PCI for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction between 2007 and 2009 at institutions participating in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium (BMC-2). Inverse propensity score weighting was used to account for the nonrandomized use of pre-PCI BBs. The cohort comprised 7,667 patients, with 4,769 (62%) receiving pre-PCI BBs. These patients were older, with higher rates of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and previous myocardial infarction, PCI, or coronary artery bypass grafting. In adjusted models, pre-PCI BB use was associated with lower rates of intraprocedural ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (odds ratio [OR] 0.58, p <0.01) and lower in-hospital mortality (OR 0.65, p = 0.022), with increases in rates of emergent coronary artery bypass grafting (OR 1.56, p <0.01) and repeat PCI (OR 1.93, p <0.01). There were no significant increases in rates of cardiogenic shock and congestive heart failure. In conclusion, pre-PCI BB use in this population was associated with decreased arrhythmia and mortality, without increasing rates of cardiogenic shock and heart failure but with higher rates of repeat PCI and emergent coronary artery bypass grafting, suggesting that there may yet remain a role for early BB use in pre-PCI patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions. PMID:23528025

  3. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  4. TransRadial Education And Therapeutics (TREAT): Shifting the balance of safety and efficacy of antithrombotic agents in percutaneous coronary intervention. A report from the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Connie N.; Rao, Sunil V.; Kong, David F.; Miller, Julie M.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Bertrand, Olivier F.; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Effron, Mark B.; Eloff, Benjamin C.; Fadiran, Emmanuel O.; Farb, Andrew; Gilchrist, Ian C.; Holmes, David R.; Jacobs, Alice K.; Kaul, Prashant; Newby, L. Kristin; Rutledge, David R.; Tavris, Dale R.; Tsai, Thomas T.; White, Roseann M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is an integral part of the treatment of coronary artery disease. The most common complication of PCI, bleeding, typically occurs at the vascular access site and is associated with short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Periprocedural bleeding also represents the primary safety concern of concomitant antithrombotic therapies essential for PCI success. Use of radial access for PCI reduces procedural bleeding and hence may change the risk profile and net clinical benefit of these drugs. This new drug-device safety interaction creates opportunities to advance the safe and effective use of antithrombotic agents during PCI. In June 2010 and March 2011, leaders from government, academia, professional societies, device manufacturing, and pharmaceutical industries convened for 2 think tank meetings. Titled TREAT I and II, these forums examined approaches to improve the overall safety of PCI by optimizing strategies for antithrombotic drug use and radial artery access. This article summarizes the content and proceedings of these sessions. PMID:23453103

  5. Percutaneous connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picha, G. J.; Taylor, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A surface possessing a regular array of micro-pillars was evaluated with regard to its ability to control epithelial downgrowth at the percutaneous interface. A range of pillar sizes were applied to the vertical segment of T shaped Biomer (R) implants. These percutaneous tabs were implanted into the dorsum of cats for a period of 6 weeks using a standardized surgical technique. Comments were made post-operatively and at the time of retrieval. A quantitative scoring system was applied to these observations as well as histological results. As observed, the pillar morphology used displayed the ability to control epithelial downgrowth. Collagen ingrowth into the interpillar spaces and possibly direct interactions of the epithelial cells with the morphology may account for the inhibition. The reproducibility of epithelial inhibition is, however, limited by other factors which are currently not well understood. These factors and potential methods of assessment are discussed.

  6. Radiogenomics Consortium (RGC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiogenomics Consortium's hypothesis is that a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity to radiation therapy is influenced by common genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  7. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  8. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  9. The Idaho Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaird, James H.

    The Idaho Consortium was established by the state board of education to remedy perceived needs involving insufficient certificated teachers, excessive teacher mobility, shortage of teacher candidates, inadequate inservice training, a low level of administrative leadership, and a lack of programs in special education, early childhood education,…

  10. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  11. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbacher, Don

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  12. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLGOY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-23

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for

  13. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for

  14. Percutaneous Nephroscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With the development of techniques for percutaneous access and equipment to disintegrate calculi, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery is currently used by many urologists and is the procedure of choice for the removal of large renal calculi and the management of diverticula, intrarenal strictures, and urothelial cancer. Although it is more invasive than shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde ureteroscopic surgery, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery has been successfully performed with high efficiency and low morbidity in difficult renal anatomies and patient conditions. These advantages of minimal invasiveness were rapidly perceived and applied to the management of ureteropelvic junction obstruction, calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis, and urothelial cancer. The basic principle of endopyelotomy is a full-thickness incision of the narrow segment followed by prolonged stenting and drainage to allow regeneration of an adequate caliber ureter. The preferred technique for a calyceal diverticulum continues to be debated. Excellent long-term success has been reported with percutaneous, ureteroscopic, and laparoscopic techniques. Each approach is based on the location and size of the diverticulum. So far, percutaneous ablation of the calyceal diverticulum is the most established minimally invasive technique. Infundibular stenosis is an acquired condition usually associated with inflammation or stones. Reported series of percutaneously treated infundibular stenosis are few. In contrast with a calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis is a more difficult entity to treat with only a 50-76% success rate by percutaneous techniques. Currently, percutaneous nephroscopic resection of transitional cell carcinoma in the renal calyx can be applied in indicated cases. PMID:20495691

  15. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium's, MISCON, mission is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems: synthesis and processing; and limiting features in transport phenomena. During the past twenty-one projects produced over eighty-seven talks and seventy-two publications. Key achievements this past year expand our understanding of processing phenomena relating to crystallization and texture, metal superconductor composites, and modulated microstructures. Further noteworthy accomplishments include calculations on 2-D superconductor insulator transition, prediction of flux line lattice melting, and an expansion of our understanding and use of microwave phenomena as related to superconductors.

  16. Genomic standards consortium projects.

    PubMed

    Field, Dawn; Sterk, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; De Smet, J Wim; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R; Davies, Neil; Dawyndt, Peter; Garrity, George M; Gilbert, Jack A; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Knight, Rob; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Morrison, Norman; Robbins, Robert; San Gil, Inigo; Sansone, Susanna; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Ussery, Dave; Yilmaz, Pelin; White, Owen; Wooley, John; Caporaso, Gregory

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) is an open-membership community that was founded in 2005 to work towards the development, implementation and harmonization of standards in the field of genomics. Starting with the defined task of establishing a minimal set of descriptions the GSC has evolved into an active standards-setting body that currently has 18 ongoing projects, with additional projects regularly proposed from within and outside the GSC. Here we describe our recently enacted policy for proposing new activities that are intended to be taken on by the GSC, along with the template for proposing such new activities. PMID:25197446

  17. Portrait of a Consortium: ANKOS (Anatolian University Libraries Consortium)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Phyllis; Karasozen, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium (ANKOS) was created in 2001 with only a few members subscribed to nine e-journal collections and bibliographic databases. This Turkish library consortium had developed from one state and three private universities joining together for the purchase of two databases in 1999. Over time, the numbers of…

  18. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing

  19. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with

  20. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  1. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  2. The Genomic Standards Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R.; Dawyndt, Peter; Garrity, George M.; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Knight, Rob; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; San Gil, Inigo; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Schriml, Lynn M.; Sterk, Peter; Tatusova, Tatiana; Ussery, David W.; White, Owen; Wooley, John

    2011-01-01

    A vast and rich body of information has grown up as a result of the world's enthusiasm for 'omics technologies. Finding ways to describe and make available this information that maximise its usefulness has become a major effort across the 'omics world. At the heart of this effort is the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality and quantity of contextual information about our public collections of genomes, metagenomes, and marker gene sequences. PMID:21713030

  3. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  4. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer

  7. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  8. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  9. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  10. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host

  11. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology

  12. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Cancer.gov

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  13. INTEGRATED PETROLEUM ENVIRONMENTAL CONSORTIUM (IPEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: R827015
    Title: Integrated Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC)
    Investigator: Kerry L. Sublette
    Institution: University of Tulsa
    EPA Project Officer: S. Bala Krishnan
    Project Period: October 1, 19...

  14. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  15. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  16. California Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, John; Berger, Wolfgang; Wiskerchen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The organizational and administrative structure of the CaSGC has the Consortium Headquarters Office (Principal Investigator - Dr. John Kosmatka, California Statewide Director - Dr. Michael Wiskerchen) at UC San Diego. Each affiliate member institution has a campus director and an scholarship/fellowship selection committee. Each affiliate campus director also serves on the CaSGC Advisory Council and coordinates CMIS data collection and submission. The CaSGC strives to maintain a balance between expanded affiliate membership and continued high quality in targeted program areas of aerospace research, education, workforce development, and public outreach. Associate members are encouraged to participate on a project-by-project basis that meets the needs of California and the goals and objectives of the CaSGC. Associate members have responsibilities relating only to the CaSGC projects they are directly engaged in. Each year, as part of the CaSGC Improvement Plan, the CaSGC Advisory Council evaluates the performance of the affiliate and associate membership in terms of contributions to the CaSGC Strategic Plan, These CaSGC membership evaluations provide a constructive means for elevating productive members and removing non-performing members. This Program Improvement and Results (PIR) report will document CaSGC program improvement results and impacts that directly respond to the specific needs of California in the area of aerospace-related education and human capital development and the Congressional mandate to "increase the understanding, assessment, development and utilization of space resources by promoting a strong education base, responsive research and training activities, and broad and prompt dissemination of knowledge and technology".

  17. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  18. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  19. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  20. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits. PMID:26097697

  1. Percutaneous absorption from soil.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some natural sites, as a result of contaminants emitted into the air and subsequently deposited in soil or accidental industrial release, have high levels of organic and non-organic chemicals in soil. In occupational and recreation settings, these could be potential sources of percutaneous exposure to humans. When investigating percutaneous absorption from soil - in vitro or vivo - soil load, particle size, layering, soil "age" time, along with the methods of performing the experiment and analyzing the results must be taken into consideration. Skin absorption from soil is generally reduced compared with uptake from water/acetone. However, the absorption of some compounds, e.g., pentachlorophenol, chlorodane and PCB 1254, are similar. Lipophilic compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, benzo[A]pyrene, and metals have the tendency to form reservoirs in skin. Thus, one should take caution in interpreting results directly from in vitro studies for risk assessment; in vivo validations are often required for the most relevant risk assessment. PMID:25205703

  2. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is a minimally invasive procedure to open up blocked coronary arteries, allowing blood to circulate unobstructed to the heart muscle. The procedure ...

  3. Percutaneous transmyocardial revascularization.

    PubMed

    Kim, C B; Oesterle, S N

    1997-12-01

    Transmyocardial revascularization (TMR) is a potential therapy for patients with severe angina pectoris and coronary anatomy deemed unsuitable for traditional revascularization techniques. Investigations of TMR are reviewed with emphasis on studies relevant to the development of a percutaneous, catheter-based transmyocardial revascularization procedure (PMR). The results of the preliminary animal studies and description of the PMR procedure are discussed. The recently initiated human PMR protocol is summarized and possible future investigative directions are outlined. PMID:9641086

  4. Federal Laboratory Consortium Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Laboratory Consortium, Washington, DC.

    Intended to assist both the private and public sectors to locate and utilize technological expertise within the federal laboratories, this directory lists the federal laboratories and centers that are affiliated with the Federal Laboratory Consortium and describes the area of technological expertise they can make available to solve problems. This…

  5. Federal Laboratory Consortium Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Laboratory Consortium, Washington, DC.

    Designed to bridge the communication gap between the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) and public and private sectors of the country, this directory has been prepared as a compilation of scientific and technical research and development activities at federal laboratories, which are directing technology transfer efforts toward increasing the use…

  6. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  7. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  8. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  9. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  10. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  11. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  12. Percutaneous left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Ige, Mobolaji; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Attizzani, Guilherme; Costa, Marco; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2015-04-01

    The ventricular partitioning device known as Parachute is the first and only percutaneously implantable device aimed at restoration of normal left ventricular geometry in humans. Since its conception, this technology has undergone extensive animal and human testing, with proved feasibility and safety, and is currently being studied in a pivotal randomized clinical trial. This article discusses ventricular remodeling and therapies attempted in the past, details the components of the ventricular partitioning device, describes the implanting technique, and reviews the most current experience of this device in humans. PMID:25834974

  13. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  14. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:25807772

  15. Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Mohsen; Alizadeh, Keivan; Ghazaee, Sepideh Parchami; Zavarehee, Abbas; Abdi, Seifollah; Shakerian, Farshad; Salehi, Negar; Firouzi, Ata

    2013-01-01

    Regardless of the diabetic status of patients with coronary artery disease, hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are adversely associated with cardiovascular events. The relationship between glucose levels and increased mortality risk in acute myocardial infarction has been shown through various glucose metrics; however, there is a dearth of multivariate analysis of the relationship between elective coronary angioplasty and preprocedural blood glucose levels. We evaluated the relationship between preprocedural blood glucose levels and myocardial injury in 1,012 consecutive patients who underwent elective percutaneous coronary angioplasty. The patients were classified into 4 glycemic groups on the basis of blood glucose levels measured immediately before the procedure: hypoglycemic, euglycemic, mildly hyperglycemic, and hyperglycemic. Samples for troponin I and creatine kinase–MB fraction were collected before each procedure and at 8, 16, and 24 hours after each procedure. Bivariate analysis revealed that postprocedural troponin I levels were significantly higher in the hyperglycemic group (P=0.027). Although postprocedural levels of creatine kinase–MB fraction rose insignificantly in the hypoglycemic patients, our results showed that these patients were more likely to have postprocedural levels 2 to 5 times the upper limit of normal (P=0.013). We tentatively conclude that abnormally low preprocedural plasma glucose levels—together with a recent history of smoking—are associated with an increased incidence of periprocedural myocardial injury in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:24082370

  16. Percutaneous laser disc decompression.

    PubMed

    Choy, D S

    1995-06-01

    Herniated disc disease has an incidence of 1.7% in the U.S. Heretofore, open operative procedures were the rule for this condition when conservative measures were ineffective. Choy and Ascher introduced this new technique in February 1986 using a Nd:YAG laser introduced into the disc through an optical fiber in a needle. Percutaneous laser disc decompression is based on the principle that in an enclosed hydraulic space, such as an intact disc, a small reduction in volume is associated with a disproportionate fall in pressure. In the disc, this partial vacuum causes the herniated portion to move away from the nerve root back toward the center of the disc. This technique has been taught worldwide and is being performed in most of Europe, Japan, the United States, and Korea. In this special issue devoted to percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD), we will set forth the basic science of PLDD, patient selection, use of the holmium:YAG, and the Nd:YAG lasers, operative technique, and results. PMID:10150634

  17. VAMDC Consortium: A Service to Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L Dubernet, M.; Moreau, N.; Zwoelf, C. M.; Ba, Y. A.

    2015-12-01

    The VAMDC Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates Atomic and Molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and a political organisation. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of spectra and for the modelisation of media of many fields of astrophysics. This paper presents how the VAMDC Consortium is organised in order to provide a ``service'' to the astrophysics community.

  18. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  20. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  1. Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Technique.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, John; Cho, Rosa; Reid, J Spence; Boateng, Henry; Copeland, Carol; Sirlin, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Remembering that preoperative planning, surgical indications, and fracture reduction are paramount for this procedure, presented here is our technique for performing percutaneous sacroiliac screws, both transiliac-transsacral and sacral style. A combination of video, still pictures, and fluoroscopy images will guide the viewer through the process we routinely use highlighting specific details. Patient positioning and intraoperative fluoroscopy imaging are critical to a successful procedure. Although inlet and outlet films remain important, we find the procedure best started on the lateral sacral view to reduce the need for start site, trajectory, and imaging position changes during the case. A cannulated pig sticker (drill guide) used with long drill tip guide wires provide improved manual control to both finding a good start site and directing the trajectory. For patient safety, sacral anatomy and safe zones are discussed as well. Using these technical points will help make this a successful procedure. PMID:27441927

  2. Tri-District Arts Consortium Summer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Charlotte O.

    1990-01-01

    The Tri-District Arts Consortium in South Carolina was formed to serve artistically gifted students in grades six-nine. The consortium developed a summer program offering music, dance, theatre, and visual arts instruction through a curriculum of intense training, performing, and hands-on experiences with faculty members and guest artists. (JDD)

  3. The Salix Consortium in New York

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, T.; Jones, J.

    1998-09-28

    Energy crops for electrical production are being given a boost by the Salix Consortium, an association of 20 corporations and industrial, government, farming, and research organizations. The consortium supports commercial development of willows for generating electricity, which are being grown for utilities across the Northeast region of the U.S. for use in cofiring with coal in existing power plants.

  4. Increasing Sales by Developing Production Consortiums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher A.; Russo, Robert

    Intended to help rehabilitation facility administrators increase organizational income from manufacturing and/or contracted service sources, this document provides a decision-making model for the development of a production consortium. The document consists of five chapters and two appendices. Chapter 1 defines the consortium concept, explains…

  5. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research program is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry- defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. It is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation; it is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. This update reviews the AGTSR triad, which consists of university/industry R&D activities, technology transfer programs, and trial student programs.

  6. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  7. Percutaneous Hindfoot and Midfoot Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Hindfoot and midfoot fusions can be performed with percutaneous techniques. Preliminary results of these procedures are encouraging because they provide similar results than those obtained with open techniques with less morbidity and quick recovery. The best indications are probably fusions for mild-to-moderate reducible hindfoot and midfoot deformities in fragile patients with general or local bad conditions. The main limit is linked to the surgeon's experience in percutaneous foot surgery because a learning curve with the specific tools is necessary before doing these procedures. PMID:27524709

  8. Building a local research consortium.

    PubMed

    Martin, P A

    1994-05-01

    Although state, regional, and national networking often are critical to the nurse researchers, local support that is broader than what is found in any single agency may be the foundation needed by clinicians who want "more" research than that prescribed by their current role. More formal consortiums have successfully implemented a variety of research projects and are another possibility to explore (Beaman & Strader, 1990; Bolton, 1991; Chenitz et al., 1990; Keefe et al., 1988; Thiele, 1989). Another option is some state nurses' associations that have formal research assemblies (eg., Ohio Nurses Association, Assembly of Nurse Researchers). However, forming a local, less formal group with a few expert advisors may supply the energy and momentum necessary for both using and conducting research at a grassroots level. The expert advisors should be research-trained nurses (almost always with a PhD or DNS) who are active group members. Although Fitzpatrick encouraged collaborative research and writing early in the history of Applied Nursing Research (Fitzpatrick, 1989), in 1993 approximately two thirds of the articles in Applied Nursing Research still were single authored. Nurses are not using collaboration to its fullest extent. An informal group in one community has been one way to release the scholarship that was latent in many nurses. PMID:8031105

  9. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  10. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  11. WILLIAMSBURG BROOKLYN ASTHMA AND ENVIRONMENT CONSORTIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Consortium expects to develop a family health promotion model in which organized residents have access to easily understood, scientifically accurate, community-specific information about their health, their environment, and the relationship between the two,...

  12. International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) —

    Cancer.gov

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comprises a group of major mouse genetics research institutions along with national funding organisations formed to address the challenge of developing an encyclopedia of mammalian gene function.

  13. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Syed Johar; Field, Erinn; Kibel, Adam S.; Mottrie, Alex; Weizer, Alon Z.; Wagner, Andrew; Hemal, Ashok K.; Scherr, Douglas S.; Schanne, Francis; Gaboardi, Franco; Wu, Guan; Peabody, James O.; Koauk, Jihad; Redorta, Joan Palou; Pattaras, John G.; Rha, Koon-Ho; Richstone, Lee; Balbay, M. Derya; Menon, Mani; Hayn, Mathew; Stoeckle, Micheal; Wiklund, Peter; Dasgupta, Prokar; Pruthi, Raj; Ghavamian, Reza; Khan, Shamim; Siemer, Stephan; Maatman, Thomas; Wilson, Timothy; Poulakis, Vassilis; Wilding, Greg; Guru, Khurshid A.

    2014-01-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC). Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium. PMID:25097319

  14. The bioleaching potential of a bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Mauricio; Cortés, María Paz; Travisany, Dante; Di Genova, Alex; Budinich, Marko; Reyes-Jara, Angélica; Hödar, Christian; González, Mauricio; Parada, Pilar; Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Cambiazo, Verónica; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the molecular foundation of a consortium of five efficient bacteria strains isolated from copper mines currently used in state of the art industrial-scale biotechnology. The strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans Licanantay, Acidiphilium multivorum Yenapatur, Leptospirillum ferriphilum Pañiwe, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Wenelen and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Cutipay were selected for genome sequencing based on metal tolerance, oxidation activity and bioleaching of copper efficiency. An integrated model of metabolic pathways representing the bioleaching capability of this consortium was generated. Results revealed that greater efficiency in copper recovery may be explained by the higher functional potential of L. ferriphilum Pañiwe and At. thiooxidans Licanantay to oxidize iron and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. The consortium had a greater capacity to resist copper, arsenic and chloride ion compared to previously described biomining strains. Specialization and particular components in these bacteria provided the consortium a greater ability to bioleach copper sulfide ores. PMID:27416516

  15. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM: FINDING SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Interior (DOI) developed the framework for a Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) for the United States Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) through an interag...

  16. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  17. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  18. The value of percutaneous cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Evison, Gordon; McNulty, Myles; Thomson, Colin

    1973-01-01

    Percutaneous cholangiograms performed on fifty patients in a district general hospital have been reviewed, and the advantages and limitations of the examination are described. The investigation is considered to have sufficient diagnostic value to warrant its inclusion in the diagnostic armamentarium of every general radiological department. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4788917

  19. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  20. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic

  1. Percutaneous absorption in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I

    1987-11-01

    The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin absorption in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous absorption at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin absorption in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin absorption, as well as postnatal age and skin absorption. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous absorption in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856

  2. New instrumentation in percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Joseph W.; Canales, Benjamin K.

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is the procedure of choice for removing large, complex, and/or multiple renal calculi. Since its first description in 1976, PCNL techniques and equipment have evolved to maximize procedural efficacy, safety, and reproducibility. We reviewed current literature from January 2004 to November 2009 using Medline search regarding PCNL instrumentation and technology. Additional equipment discovered during the review process without published Medline evidence was summarized from manufacturer brochures and data. Included in this review are summaries of intracorporeal lithotriptors and accessory equipment, stone manipulation devices, PCNL tract sealants, and a digital rigid nephroscope. The evolution of these devices from their predecessors has increased the instrumentation options for the treating urologist and may represent more effective technology for the percutaneous treatment of large renal stones. PMID:21116361

  3. Percutaneous renal cryoablation: current status.

    PubMed

    Mazaris, Evangelos M; Varkarakis, Ioannis M; Solomon, Stephen B

    2008-04-01

    Over the last 13 years, renal cryoablation has emerged as a promising technique for the treatment of solid renal tumors. The improvement in imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography and MRI, as well as the introduction of thinner probes, has led to the spread of the minimally invasive percutaneous approach. We review the historical background of percutaneous renal cryoablation (PRC), present its basic principles, mention the contemporary clinical data and outcomes of this technique and suggest future directions for its wider application in renal tumors. Early results have demonstrated that it may offer an alternative for the treatment of small renal masses with the advantages of minimal complications, spared renal function, decreased overall costs and equivalent oncologic efficacy. Long-term results are required in order to apply this minimally invasive technique to a broader spectrum of patients. PMID:18407738

  4. Percutaneous penetration--methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, Rikke; Benfeldt, Eva; Nielsen, Jesper B

    2014-07-01

    Studies on percutaneous penetration are needed to assess the hazards after unintended occupational skin exposures to industrial products as well as the efficacy after intended consumer exposure to topically applied medicinal or cosmetic products. During recent decades, a number of methods have been developed to replace methods involving experimental animals. The results obtained from these methods are decided not only by the chemical or product tested, but to a significant degree also by the experimental set-up and decisions made by the investigator during the planning phase. The present MiniReview discusses some of the existing and well-known experimental in vitro and in vivo methods for studies of percutaneous penetration together with some more recent and promising methods. After this, some considerations and recommendations about advantages and limitations of the different methods and their relevance for the prediction of percutaneous penetration are given. Which method to prefer will depend on the product to be tested and the question asked. Regulatory guidelines exist for studies on percutaneous penetration, but researchers as well as regulatory bodies need to pay specific attention to the vehicles and solvents used in donor and sampling fluids so that it reflects in-use conditions as closely as possible. Based on available experimental data, mathematical models have been developed to aid predictions of skin penetration. The authors question the general use of the present mathematical models in hazard assessment, as they seem to ignore outliers among chemicals as well as the heterogeneity of skin barrier properties and skin conditions within the exposed populations. PMID:24373389

  5. [Percutaneous therapy of painful arthritis].

    PubMed

    Chlud, K

    1991-01-01

    Pain in osteoarthrosis of the big weight bearing joints is either derived from periarticular ligaments, tendons, fasciae, muscles, bursae--peri-arthropathy as sign of decompensation--or from the reactive synovitis with or without effusion. NSAIDs systemically administered have been so far considered as first choice medication together with physical therapy. New pharmacokinetic data on the topical, percutaneous application of NSAIDs (ibuprofen, diclofenac, indomethacin, some salicylates and to a lesser degree for etofenamate and piroxicam) have demonstrated relevant advantages of the percutaneous route over the systemic one in soft tissue rheumatism. NSAIDs, mentioned above, locally administered as cream, gel or spray, quickly penetrate through the corneal layer of the skin at the site of application, reach high effective concentrations in subcutis, fasciae, tendons, ligaments and muscles, lesser in joint-capsule and -fluid indicating direct penetration. The blood levels of topical NSAIDs are extremely low with no systemic side effects, especially no gastric toxicity; however, local skin irritation is observed (1 to 2%). In contrast to this, systemic (oral) NSAIDs lead primarily via high blood levels to a much lesser concentration--only one tenth--in particular soft tissues with a high incidence of side effects. In conclusion the percutaneous application of certain NSAIDs has become a well established therapeutic regimen in painful osteoarthrosis and in all other inflammatory degenerative and posttraumatic alterations of soft tissue structures. PMID:2011838

  6. [Percutaneous biopsy of the liver].

    PubMed

    Skladaný, L; Jarcuska, P; Oltman, M; Hrusovský, S

    2003-08-01

    Percutaneous liver biopsy represents the most specific examination of the nature and severity of liver diseases. P. Ehrlich was the first physician in history having done the intervention in 1880. The new history begins with the Menghini's publication on s.c. one-second biopsy in 1957. The present paper deals exclusively with diffuse diseases of the liver including the most frequent ones--virus hepatitis, alcohol and non-alcohol steatohepatitis. The contraindications include mainly coagulation disorders and non-cooperative patients. The percutaneous biopsy is mostly executed after ultrasonographic examination or under the control of various image-forming techniques and by means of various types of needles; the authors analyze advantages and disadvantages of individual techniques. If the contraindications are respected, the percutaneous biopsy is a safe method of examination, which may be done on out-patient basis. A large series of complications exists, but their frequency is generally low. Morbidity is referred in 0.2% of patients, the most frequent complications being pain and hypotension from vaso-vagal reactions, extensive intraperitoneal bleeding and hemobilia. Mortality is extremely low, the mean in large studies being 0.001%. PMID:14518095

  7. CFD analysis of pump consortium impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Williams, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, embedded with the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and with appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, is developed to analyze turbulent flows in the turbomachinery devices. The FDNS code was benchmarked with its numerical predictions of the pump consortium inducer, and provides satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD analysis of the pump consortium impeller will be conducted with the application of the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is the new design concept of the advanced rocket engine.

  8. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  9. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. 1991 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium`s, MISCON, mission is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems: synthesis and processing; and limiting features in transport phenomena. During the past twenty-one projects produced over eighty-seven talks and seventy-two publications. Key achievements this past year expand our understanding of processing phenomena relating to crystallization and texture, metal superconductor composites, and modulated microstructures. Further noteworthy accomplishments include calculations on 2-D superconductor insulator transition, prediction of flux line lattice melting, and an expansion of our understanding and use of microwave phenomena as related to superconductors.

  10. News from the opacity consortium OPAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Gilles, D.

    2013-03-01

    The international OPAC consortium (see list below) was formed three years ago. It is composed of astrophysicists, plasma physicists and experimentalists from different laboratories. This consortium examines specific opacity calculations used in stellar physics. They contribute to solve the problems suggested by the astrophysical community in performing new calculations and new experiments with laser installation. We show here the specific example of the iron opacity peak that plays an important role in the envelope of intermediate-mass and massive stars and we present our first conclusions on iron and nickel.

  11. The Teleprasenz Consortium: Structure and intentions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blauert, Jens

    1991-01-01

    The Teleprasenz-Consortium is an open group of currently 37 scientists of different disciplines who devote a major part of their research activities to the foundations of telepresence technology. Telepresence technology is basically understood as a means to bridge spatial and temporal gaps as well as certain kinds of concealment, inaccessibility and danger of exposure. The activities of the consortium are organized into three main branches: virtual environment, surveillance and control systems, and speech and language technology. A brief summary of the main activities in these areas is given.

  12. Contemporary Use of Ticagrelor in Interventional Practice (from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium).

    PubMed

    Karve, Amrita M; Seth, Milan; Sharma, Manoj; LaLonde, Thomas; Dixon, Simon; Wohns, David; Gurm, Hitinder S

    2015-06-01

    Ticagrelor has greater antiplatelet activity than clopidogrel and is approved for use in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). There are limited data on use of ticagrelor in real-world practice. We assessed ticagrelor use in 64,600 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention from January 2012 to March 2014 at 47 Michigan hospitals in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium. Preprocedural risk of major adverse events was estimated with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium risk prediction models. The proportion of patients receiving clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor was 72% (n = 46,864), 20% (n = 12,596), and 8% (n = 5,140), respectively, using ticagrelor increasing over time. Ticagrelor was used at 45 hospitals, ranging from 0.5% to 64.9% of discharges. Patients receiving ticagrelor were older (63.6 vs 59.4), more often women (32.9% vs 26.7%), and were more likely to present with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (24.4% vs 18.8%), cardiogenic shock within 24 hours (1.3% vs 0.9%), and anginal class IV (47.8% vs 43.0%) (p <0.05). Compared with prasugrel, ticagrelor was prescribed in patients with a higher predicted risk of percutaneous coronary intervention complications: contrast nephropathy (2.5% vs 1.6%), transfusion (2.2% vs 1.4%), and death (1.2% vs 0.7%) (p <0.001); >10% of patients were given prasugrel or ticagrelor for a non-ACS indication. Ticagrelor is prescribed to a higher risk population, and 1 in 10 patients prescribed ticagrelor or prasugrel did not have ACS. PMID:25846767

  13. THE FEDERAL INTEGRATED BIOTREATMENT RESEARCH CONSORTIUM (FLASK TO FIELD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Federal Integrated Biotreatment Research Consortium (Flask to Field) represented a 7-year concerted effort by several research laboratories to develop bioremediation technologies for contaminated DoD sites. The consortium structure consisted of a director and four thrust are...

  14. Formation of a Human Services Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehallis, George; And Others

    Background information is provided concerning the efforts of Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC), under the sponsorship of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, to form a national consortium of two-year colleges for the development of Human Resources programs aimed at training chemical substance abuse workers. The report first presents…

  15. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM; PARTNERS FOR PRESERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented at EMAP Symposium 2001: Coastal Monitoring Through Partnerships, 24-27 April 2001, Pensacola Beach, FL.

    The Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) was one recommendation to the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (CRTF), to conserve the coral reef ecosystems of the U...

  16. Northeast Technology Education Consortium: Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, W. Tad, Ed.

    This guide is designed to provide additional resources for technology educators who are attempting to shift their programs from industrial arts to technology education. An introduction describes the original demonstration site project, a consortium of Northeastern U.S. schools, the primary goal of which was the advancement of technological…

  17. Enrollment and Retention: A Private College Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    A consortium program of eight private colleges in Southern California that focuses on student retention efforts is described. Each college has a retention task force consisting of faculty, administrators, student affairs staff, and students. A steering committee with one representative from each college, generally the dean of students, coordinates…

  18. THE PLANT ONTOLOGY CONSORTIUM AND PLANT ONTOLOGIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of the Plant OntologyTM Consortium is to produce structured controlled vocabularies, arranged in ontologies, that can be applied to plant-based database information even as knowledge of the biology of the relevant plant taxa (e.g., development, anatomy, morphology, genomics, proteomics) is ...

  19. Consortium approach for nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    van Soeren, M H; Andrusyszyn, M A; Laschinger, H K; Goldenberg, D; DiCenso, A

    2000-10-01

    In 1995, a 10-university consortium approach to deliver a post-baccalaureate primary care nurse practitioner programme funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health was launched throughout Ontario, Canada. A combination of traditional and distance teaching methods, in English and French, were used. A 5-year research project was initiated to evaluate the entire programme, the effect of nurse practitioners on patient and health-care system outcomes and examine practice patterns. Participants included deans and directors (n = 10), regional co-ordinators (n = 5) and course developers, some of whom were also course professors (n = 8). This article is a report of the evaluation of the consortium programme after the first year from the perspective of groups involved in implementation and delivery. Results of qualitative analyses of participant perceptions from researcher-led focus groups and asynchronous electronic interviews provided the framework for the evaluation, and revealed the rationale for the consortium method, strengths, limitations and recommendations. Sharing ideas, resources and delivery and increased student access in remote areas were perceived as positive outcomes. Limitations included the short time period to develop programme content, identify and plan for distance education resources, and too little communication between universities and students. Researchers concluded that the consortium approach was effective for nurse practitioner education. Key factors identified for programme planning were communication, resources, curriculum and workload. Included among the recommendations was to allow sufficient time for role and course development before beginning a similar programme. PMID:11095220

  20. Retirement Plan Consortium Structures for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevin, John

    2012-01-01

    As school districts continue to seek administrative efficiencies and cost reductions in the wake of severe budget pressures, the resources they devote to creating or expanding retirement plan consortia is increasing. Understanding how to structure a retirement plan consortium is paramount to successfully achieving the many objectives of…

  1. Consortium wins major Brazilian gas contract

    SciTech Connect

    O`Driscoll

    1994-08-16

    An international consortium of BHP of Australia, Tenneco Gas of the U.S. and British Gas was selected Monday by Petroleo Braileiro SA (Petrobras) to Monday by Petroleo Brasileiro SA (Petrobras) to develop a $2 billion natural gas pipeline linking reserves in Bolivia with markets in southern and southeastern Brazil.

  2. Establishing a Consortium for the Study of Rare Diseases: The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Seminara, Jennifer; Tuchman, Mendel; Krivitzky, Lauren; Krischer, Jeffrey; Lee, Hye-Seung; LeMons, Cynthia; Baumgartner, Matthias; Cederbaum, Stephen; Diaz, George A.; Feigenbaum, Annette; Gallagher, Renata C.; Harding, Cary O.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Lanpher, Brendan; Lee, Brendan; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; McCandless, Shawn E.; Merritt, J. Lawrence; Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Seashore, Margretta R.; Stricker, Tamar; Summar, Marshall; Waisbren, Susan; Yudkoff, Marc; Batshaw, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium (UCDC) was created as part of a larger network established by the National Institutes of Health to study rare diseases. This paper reviews the UCDC’s accomplishments over the first six years, including how the Consortium was developed and organized, clinical research studies initiated, and the importance of creating partnerships with patient advocacy groups, philanthropic foundations and biotech and pharmaceutical companies. PMID:20188616

  3. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 603.515 Qualification of a consortium. (a) A consortium...

  4. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 603.515 Qualification of a consortium. (a) A consortium...

  5. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 603.515 Qualification of a consortium. (a) A consortium that is not formally incorporated...

  6. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 603.515 Qualification of a consortium. (a) A consortium...

  7. Consortium on Auditory Learning Materials for the Handicapped: Cumulative Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Instructional Media Center.

    Presented is information generated from a Consortium on Auditory Learning Materials for the Handicapped. A list of consortium members and a glossary of 35 terms related to auditory learning are provided in Sections 1 and 2. Section 3 is a chart of projected goals (such as participating in teacher conferences) of the 12 consortium member units…

  8. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 603.515 Qualification of a consortium. (a) A consortium...

  9. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  10. Percutaneous Cryoablation for Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-Zhi; Li, Jia-Liang; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Based on the primary tumor site, liver cancer can be divided into two categories: (1) primary liver cancer and (2) metastatic cancer to the liver from a distant primary site. Guided cryoablation via many imaging methods induces iceball formation and tumor necrosisand is an attractive option for treating unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic liver cancer. There are several advantages to using cryoablation for the treatment of liver cancer: it can be performed percutaneously, intraoperatively, and laparoscopically; iceball formation can be monitored; it has little impact on nearby large blood vessels; and it induces a cryo-immunological response in situ. Clinically, primary research has shown that percutaneous cryoablation of liver cancer is relatively safe and efficient, and it can be combined with other methods, such as radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunology, to control disease. Although research is preliminary, cryosurgery is fast becoming an alternative treatment method for HCC or liver tumors. Here, we review the mechanisms of liver tumor cryoablation, cryoablation program selection, clinical efficiency, and complications following treatment. PMID:26355719

  11. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  12. Transgluteal CT-Guided Percutaneous Renal Access for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in a Pelvic Horseshoe Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Ryan J.; Dauw, Casey A.; Borofsky, Michael S.; York, Nadya; Patel, Aashish A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract CT-guided percutaneous renal access has been described as a safe and effective access technique in patients with complex anatomy, including ectopic kidney, retrorenal colon, spinal dysraphism, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. In comparison to conventional intraoperative fluoroscopic-guided access, CT imaging allows for delineation of surrounding structures that are at risk for injury during percutaneous access. However, previous reports indicate that pelvic kidneys might be inaccessible percutaneously without laparoscopic assistance. Herein, we present a novel transgluteal route to renal access for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient with a pelvic horseshoe kidney and severe spinal deformity.

  13. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes. PMID:22623907

  14. Reuse at the Software Productivity Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, David M.

    1989-01-01

    The Software Productivity Consortium is sponsored by 14 aerospace companies as a developer of software engineering methods and tools. Software reuse and prototyping are currently the major emphasis areas. The Methodology and Measurement Project in the Software Technology Exploration Division has developed some concepts for reuse which they intend to develop into a synthesis process. They have identified two approaches to software reuse: opportunistic and systematic. The assumptions underlying the systematic approach, phrased as hypotheses, are the following: the redevelopment hypothesis, i.e., software developers solve the same problems repeatedly; the oracle hypothesis, i.e., developers are able to predict variations from one redevelopment to others; and the organizational hypothesis, i.e., software must be organized according to behavior and structure to take advantage of the predictions that the developers make. The conceptual basis for reuse includes: program families, information hiding, abstract interfaces, uses and information hiding hierarchies, and process structure. The primary reusable software characteristics are black-box descriptions, structural descriptions, and composition and decomposition based on program families. Automated support can be provided for systematic reuse, and the Consortium is developing a prototype reuse library and guidebook. The software synthesis process that the Consortium is aiming toward includes modeling, refinement, prototyping, reuse, assessment, and new construction.

  15. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) Report

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda M.; Cowan, Morton J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Kohn, Donald B.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C.; Bleesing, Jack J. H.; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M.; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J.; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M.; Logan, Brent R.; Long-Boyle, Janel R.; Malech, Harry L.; McGhee, Sean A.; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J.; Routes, John M.; Shearer, William T.; Small, Trudy N.; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R.; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome and Chronic Granulomatous Disease through retrospective, prospective and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to: encourage training of junior investigators; establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues; work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness; and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for PID. To date, the PIDTC has funded two pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans; and B cell reconstitution in SCID patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first two PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives. PMID:24139498

  16. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  17. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives. PMID:24139498

  18. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thoracoabdominal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ojalehto, M; Tikkakoski, T; Rissanen, T; Apaja-Sarkkinen, M

    2002-03-01

    This review will discuss the benefits and disadvantages of ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration and cutting needle biopsies. Clinical efficacy, cost-effectiveness, some controversies and safety will be reviewed. PMID:12010294

  19. Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or blood disorder, your doctor may recommend percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling (PUBS), which is performed at ... sample of the fetus' blood directly from the umbilical cord. The sample is then analyzed for genetic ...

  20. [Percutaneous laser disk decompression. Experience since 1989].

    PubMed

    Siebert, W E; Berendsen, B T; Tollgaard, J

    1996-02-01

    Since 1987/1988 percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) has been used clinically for treatment of intervertebral disc prolapses. Credible prospective investigations that have been conducted since 1989 with large patient collectives are now available for analysis of their medium-term results and comparison with other minimally invasive procedures. Our follow-up examination of the first 180 patients treated with PLDD from 1989 to 1993 shows a success rate of 72.8%, similar to that with other percutaneous techniques (automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, percutaneous lumbar discectomy, chemonucleolysis). To guarantee success, the spinal surgeon must have command of the correct technique and also use the appropriate instruments. Good results with the PLDD procedure can be procured when contraindications and indications for patient selection are strictly observed. Overall, our 5 year results seem encouraging. PMID:8622845

  1. CFD Parametric Study of Consortium Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Finite Difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. A second-order central difference scheme plus adaptive dissipation terms was employed in the FDNS code, along with a predictor plus multi-corrector pressure-based solution procedure. The multi-zone, multi-block capability allows the FDNS code to efficiently solve flow fields with complicated geometry. The FDNS code has been benchmarked by analyzing the pump consortium inducer, and it provided satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD parametric study of the pump consortium impeller was conducted using the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is a new design concept of the advanced rocket engines. The parametric study was to analyze the baseline design of the consortium impeller and its modification which utilizes TANDEM blades. In the present study, the TANDEM blade configuration of the consortium impeller considers cut full blades for about one quarter chord length from the leading edge and clocks the leading edge portion with an angle of 7.5 or 22.5 degrees. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect and trend of the TANDEM blade modification and provide the result as a design guideline. A 3-D flow analysis, with a 103 x 23 x 30 mesh grid system and with the inlet flow conditions measured by Rocketdyne, was performed for the baseline consortium impeller. The numerical result shows that the mass flow rate splits through various blade passages are relatively uniform

  2. CFD parametric study of consortium impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-07-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Finite Difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. A second-order central difference scheme plus adaptive dissipation terms was employed in the FDNS code, along with a predictor plus multi-corrector pressure-based solution procedure. The multi-zone, multi-block capability allows the FDNS code to efficiently solve flow fields with complicated geometry. The FDNS code has been benchmarked by analyzing the pump consortium inducer, and it provided satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD parametric study of the pump consortium impeller was conducted using the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is a new design concept of the advanced rocket engines. The parametric study was to analyze the baseline design of the consortium impeller and its modification which utilizes TANDEM blades. In the present study, the TANDEM blade configuration of the consortium impeller considers cut full blades for about one quarter chord length from the leading edge and clocks the leading edge portion with an angle of 7.5 or 22.5 degrees. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect and trend of the TANDEM blade modification and provide the result as a design guideline. A 3-D flow analysis, with a 103 x 23 x 30 mesh grid system and with the inlet flow conditions measured by Rocketdyne, was performed for the baseline consortium impeller. The numerical result shows that the mass flow rate splits through various blade passages are relatively uniform

  3. Percutaneous needle biopsy of the irradiated skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Edeiken, B.; deSantos, L.A.

    1983-03-01

    Percutaneous needle biopsy was performed in 20 patients who had radiologic abnormalities after irradiation of the skeleton. The biopsies were performed to determine the nature of the bone changes and to differentiate radiation necrosis from metastases or local tumor extension. Eleven patients had tumors, two of which were radiation-induced sarcomas; nine patients did not show evidence of tumor. One patient had osteomyelitis rather than the suspected tumor. The value of percutaneous needle biopsy in the postirradiated skeleton is discussed.

  4. Percutaneous transcatheter snare vegetectomy in a child.

    PubMed

    Saltık, I Levent; Atik, Sezen U; Eroglu, Ayşe G

    2016-04-01

    Surgical vegetectomy may be indicated in patients with unresolving sepsis, heart failure, recurrent embolism, or the presence of large vegetations >10 mm in size. Percutaneous vegetectomy using a snare may be a reasonable option instead of open-heart surgery in selected patients. We describe the case of a patient with operated tetralogy of Fallot and infective endocarditis who underwent vegetectomy via a percutaneous approach. PMID:26817598

  5. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  6. Consortium for materials development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The status of the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) is reviewed. Individual CMDS materials projects and flight opportunities on suborbital and orbital carriers are outlined. Projects include: surface coatings and catalyst production; non-linear optical organic materials; physical properties of immiscible polymers; nuclear track detectors; powdered metal sintering; iron-carbon solidification; high-temperature superconductors; physical vapor transport crystal growth; materials preparation and longevity in hyperthermal oxygen; foam formation; measurement of the microgravity environment; and commercial management of space fluids.

  7. External RNA Controls Consortium Beta Version Update

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hangnoh; Pine, P. Scott; McDaniel, Jennifer; Salit, Marc; Oliver, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Spike-in RNAs are valuable controls for a variety of gene expression measurements. The External RNA Controls Consortium developed test sets that were used in a number of published reports. Here we provide an authoritative table that summarizes, updates, and corrects errors in the test version that ultimately resulted in the certified Standard Reference Material 2374. We have noted existence of anti-sense RNA controls in the material, corrected sub-pool memberships, and commented on control RNAs that displayed inconsistent behavior. PMID:27512518

  8. Document delivery by the Jupiter Library Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessels, Robert H. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Jupiter library consortium consists of 4 of the leading libraries in the Netherlands. During 1993 Jupiter received 600,000 requests for copies of journal articles, or 70 percent of all external article requests in the Netherlands. Over 90 percent of the requested documents were delivered from a collection of 40,000 current international journal subscriptions. Jupiter and its affiliate libraries are non-profit organizations belonging to, and serving, the scientific and technical research community. The usage of the current journal collection of the libraries was analyzed to improve the cost/benefit ratio.

  9. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  10. Consortium for materials development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During fiscal 1993, the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) maintained the organizational structure and project orientation established in prior years. The commercial objectives are improved materials, biomedical applications, and infrastructure and support hardware. Projects include nonlinear optical materials; space materials (specifically polymer foam/films, atomic oxygen and high temperature superconductors); alloyed and blended materials: sintered and alloyed materials; polymer and carbonate blends; electrodeposition; organic separation; materials dispersion and biodynamics; space carriers: Consort, COMET support, Spacehab utilization; and flight services: accelerometers, CMIX, USEC, ORSEP, and Space Experiment Facility (SEF).

  11. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  12. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-12-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the Fall SWC Technology Transfer Workshop for the northeastern U.S., in Pittsburgh, PA, on November 9, 2006, and organizing and identifying projects to exhibit during the SWC/Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) joint reception on November 8, 2006; (2) Distributing a paper copy of the Texas Tech 2004 Final Report and a revised, complete compact disc of all 2004 final reports; (3) Invoicing current and potential members for FY2007; (4) Soliciting nominations for the 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; and (5) Communications and outreach.

  13. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, C.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  14. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the tenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: {lg_bullet} 2004 SWC Final Project Reports distribution; {lg_bullet} Exhibit and present at the Midcontinent Oil and Gas Prospect Fair, Great Bend, KS, September 12, 2006; {lg_bullet} Participate and showcase current and past projects at the 2006 Oklahoma Oil and Gas Trade Expo, Oklahoma City, OK, October 26, 2006; {lg_bullet} Finalize agenda and identify exhibitors for the northeastern US, Fall SWC Technical Transfer Workshop, Pittsburghhh, PA, November 9, 2006; {lg_bullet} Continue distribution of the public broadcast documentary, ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''; {lg_bullet} Communications/outreach; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  15. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) update.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Shearer, William T; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Decaluwe, Hélène; Haddad, Elie

    2016-08-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a collaboration of 41 North American centers studying therapy for rare primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs), including severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). An additional 3 European centers have partnered with the PIDTC to study CGD. Natural history protocols of the PIDTC analyze outcomes of treatment for rare PIDs in multicenter longitudinal retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. Since 2009, participating centers have enrolled more than 800 subjects on PIDTC protocols for SCID, and enrollment in the studies on WAS and CGD is underway. Four pilot projects have been funded, and 12 junior investigators have received fellowship awards. Important publications of the consortium describe the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for SCID during 2000-2009, diagnostic criteria for SCID, and the pilot project of newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshops provide an opportunity to strengthen collaborations with junior investigators, patient advocacy groups, and international colleagues. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the PIDTC has recently received renewal for another 5 years. Here we review accomplishments of the group, projects underway, highlights of recent workshops, and challenges for the future. PMID:27262745

  16. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M.; Brooks, Philip J.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Kelley, Christine A.; Kuo, Lillian S.; Labosky, Patricia A.; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A.; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A.; Tucker, Jessica M.; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c) identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d) demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e) developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators. PMID:26320938

  17. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation with Radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Ramkaransingh, Jeffrey R.; Fojo, Tito; Walther, McClellan M.; Libutti, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) is a new minimally invasive treatment for localized cancer. Minimally invasive surgical options require less resources, time, recovery, and cost, and often offer reduced morbidity and mortality, compared with more invasive methods. To be useful, image-guided, minimally invasive, local treatments will have to meet those expectations without sacrificing efficacy. METHODS Image-guided, local cancer treatment relies on the assumption that local disease control may improve survival. Recent developments in ablative techniques are being applied to patients with inoperable, small, or solitary liver tumors, recurrent metachronous hereditary renal cell carcinoma, and neoplasms in the bone, lung, breast, and adrenal gland. RESULTS Recent refinements in ablation technology enable large tumor volumes to be treated with image-guided needle placement, either percutaneously, laparoscopically, or with open surgery. Local disease control potentially could result in improved survival, or enhanced operability. CONCLUSIONS Consensus indications in oncology are ill-defined, despite widespread proliferation of the technology. A brief review is presented of the current status of image-guided tumor ablation therapy. More rigorous scientific review, long-term follow-up, and randomized prospective trials are needed to help define the role of RFA in oncology. PMID:11900230

  18. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy for pediatric urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ganpule, Arvind P.; Mishra, Shashikant; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric urolithiasis is a management dilemma as a number of treatment options are available such as shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). PCNL offers good clearance rates in a single hospital stay. The concerns with PCNL include the use of large instrument in pediatric kidneys, parenchymal damage and the associated effects on renal function, radiation exposure with fluoroscopy, and the risk of major complications including sepsis and bleeding. Evolution of pediatric PCNL technique such as miniaturization of instruments, limitation of tract size and advanced intracorporeal lithotripters have resulted in this technique being widely utilized for achieving stone-free status in appropriate patients. Many of the patients in our country come from remote areas thereby requiring special considerations during treatment. This also necessitates complete clearance in a single shorter hospital stay. PCNL appears to be the optimal option available in this scenario. The literature suggests that even complex and staghorn calculi can be tackled with this approach. The choice of the method to gain access is a matter of experience and personal preference. Ultrasound offers the advantage of visualization of spleen, liver and avoids injury. Miniaturization of instruments, particularly smaller nephroscopes and the potential to use lasers will decrease the morbidity and improve the clearance rates further. In this article, we analyze the management of pediatric urolithiasis with PCNL. We discuss our technique and analyze the results, complications and technique mentioned in the contemporary literature. PMID:21369389

  19. Neurologic Complications in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Kamranmanesh, Mohammadreza; Tabibi, Ali; Mohsen Ziaee, Seyed Amir; Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Poorzamani, Mahtab; Gharaei, Babak; Ozhand, Ardalan; Lashay, Alireza; Ahanian, Ali; Aminsharifi, Alireza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Asl-Zare, Mohammad; Ali Beigi, Faramarz Mohammad; Najjaran, Vahid; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been the preferred procedure for the removal of large renal stones in Iran since 1990. Recently, we encountered a series of devastating neurologic complications during PCNL, including paraplegia and hemiplegia. There are several reports of neurologic complications following PCNL owing to paradoxical air emboli, but there are no reports of paraplegia following PCNL. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone PCNL in 13 different endourologic centers and retrieved data related to neurologic complications after PCNL, including coma, paraplegia, hemiplegia, and quadriplegia. Results The total number of PCNL procedures in these 13 centers was 30,666. Among these procedures, 11 cases were complicated by neurologic events, and four of these cases experienced paraplegia. All events happened with the patient in the prone position with the use of general anesthesia and in the presence of air injection. There were no reports of neurologic complications in PCNL procedures performed with the patient under general anesthesia and in the prone position and with contrast injection. Conclusions It can be assumed that using room air to opacify the collecting system played a major role in the occurrence of these complications. Likewise, the prone position and general anesthesia may predispose to these events in the presence of air injection. PMID:23526482

  20. [Permanent percutaneous electric connection. General principles].

    PubMed

    Sabin, P; Labbé, D; Levillain, D; Cazin, L; Caston, J

    1997-01-01

    The Swedes for more than twenty years, and the Germans for over five years have been able to maintain inert or active prostheses with permanent percutaneous connections, thanks to the dependable and proven material and techniques of extraoral implants. The significant improvement extra-oral implants have brought about is not only in a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of important facial defects or transmission deafness; it is also because for some twenty old years now, the few millimeter wide cylinders of Titanium, the affixed on the implants, have crossed the cutaneous barrier for extended periods without complications. The percutaneous abutment thus creates a permanent communication between the interior and the exterior of the organism. If the abutment, instead of simply carrying a Maxillo-Facial Prosthesis or an auditive prosthesis, is modified by placing an electric conductor inside it, the simple "percutaneous peg" will turn out to be, in a way, a "percutaneous electric plug". By adapting classic "mechanical" abutments and implants, authors have created a Permanent Percutaneous Electric Connection (PPEC) which has been successfully experimented on rabbits to record EEG. Clinical applications on humans would make it possible either to receive "bio-electrical information" coming from within the organism, or to send electrical energy into the organism. This last application opens vast perspectives of improvement both in diagnosis and therapy in many fields. PMID:9687654

  1. 21 CFR 870.1310 - Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization... Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization. (a) Identification. A vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization is a device which is placed over the guide wire to enlarge the opening in the vessel, and which...

  2. The Consortium for Higher Education Tax Reform Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This White Paper presents the work of the Consortium for Higher Education Tax Reform, a partnership funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as part of the second phase of its Reimagining Aid Design and Delivery (RADD) initiative. Consortium partners are the Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success at CLASP, the Education Trust, New…

  3. The Technical Writing Consortium: Two-Year--Four-Year Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Joanna M.

    Membership in a technical writing consortium is advantageous both to the local university and to the neighboring community colleges because the consortium guarantees accreditation of the community college courses while increasing enrollment in the advanced technical writing courses and internship programs of the university. An area-wide consortium…

  4. Policy Report of the Physician Consortium on Substance Abuse Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, David C.; Faggett, Walter L.

    This report contains the recommendations of the Physician Consortium for significantly improving medical education and training to enhance the physician's role in early identification, treatment, and prevention of substance abuse. In addition, the consortium subcommittees report on their examination of substance abuse treatment needs of ethnic and…

  5. A Consortium-based Research Education Program for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Anne Victoria; Pieper, David; Hammel, Ernest

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a consortium-based research education seminar program developed by the OHEP Center for Medical Education that presents a yearly research forum in which the best research projects from consortium members are presented by the resident-researchers, who compete for recognition and prize money. Of the 128 presentations to date 25 percent…

  6. Metabolism of 3-methylindole by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Jidong Gu; Berry, D.F. )

    1992-08-01

    A methanogenic 3-methylindole (3-MI)-degrading consortium, enriched from wetland soil, completely mineralized 3-MI. Degradation proceeded through an initial hydroxylation reaction forming 3-methyloxindole. The consortium was unable to degrade oxindole or isatin, suggesting a new pathway for 3-MI fermentation. 3-Methylindole was identified by mass spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

  7. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  8. The Financing of the Michigan Library Consortium. Paper No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Library Consortium, Detroit.

    Since the formal organization of the Michigan Library Consortium, its financial support has come through membership fees and a grant from the Michigan State Library from Title III funds. The financing of the consortium is already a complex operation and will become even more complex as new programs are undertaken, since funds have been accepted…

  9. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  10. United States Participation in the Pacific Circle Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The goal of the Pacific Circle Project is to improve international and intercultural understanding among the people and nations of the Pacific. Consortium member countries are Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. Within the countries are chosen member institutions. Two major types of activities of the consortium are the exchange…

  11. Percutaneous holmium laser fulguration of calyceal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Alwaal, Amjad; Azhar, Raed A; Andonian, Sero

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Calyceal diverticular stones are uncommon findings that represent a challenge in their treatment, due to the technical difficulty in accessing the diverticulum, and the high risk of their recurrence. Current percutaneous technique for calyceal diverticular stones involves establishing a renal access, clearing the stone, and fulguration of the diverticular lining with a roller-ball cautery electrode using hypotonic irrigation solution such as sterile water or glycine solution which may be associated with the absorption of hypotonic fluids with its inherent electrolyte disturbances. Case Report. In this paper, we present for the first time percutaneous holmium laser fulguration of calyceal diverticula in 2 patients using normal saline. Their immediate postoperative sodium was unchanged and their follow-up imaging showed absence of stones. Both patients remain asymptomatic at 30 months post-operatively. Conclusion. This demonstrates that holmium laser is a safe alternative method to fulgurate the calyceal diverticulum after clearing the stone percutaneously. PMID:22606636

  12. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Newell, Mary S; Mahoney, Mary C

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tissue sampling of the breast has positively altered the management of breast lesions, both benign and malignant, since its inception in the 1980s and subsequent widespread acceptance in the 1990s. Its safety, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness have been validated in several studies. However, percutaneous biopsy serves a patient best when performed by an operator with full awareness of patient׳s salient imaging findings; a knowledge of the benefits, limitations, and technical requirements of breast ultrasound; and a thorough understanding of what constitutes an adequate and concordant pathologic specimen. This article outlines a general approach to ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous breast biopsy and discusses indications, potential complications, and technical aspects of the procedure. PMID:24636328

  13. Percutaneous cholecystostomy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Teplick, S K; Harshfield, D L; Brandon, J C; Broadwater, J R; Cone, J B

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen critically ill patients underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy because of suspected acute cholecystitis. The procedure was technically successful, although 11 of 16 patients died subsequently because of various complications of their underlying primary disorders. We reviewed this series to reassess the value of percutaneous cholecystostomy. Four of 11 patients with definite acute cholecystitis (group 1) were cured by this technique, but three required surgery because of gallbladder wall necrosis. Two of these were among four cases which had demonstrated pericholecystic fluid collections on computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound of the abdomen. There were also five patients (group 2) in whom acute cholecystitis or its relationship to patients' symptoms were not fully determined, and four of them did not improve after percutaneous cholecystostomy. We conclude that this technique has a lower success rate in critically ill patients than reported previously. PMID:2016030

  14. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  15. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  16. Industry/University Consortium for ATS research

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.P.; Golan, L.P.

    1993-11-01

    The Industry/University ATS research program is the result of two planning workshops. Workshop I was held April 8--10, 1991 and had the goal of identifying research needs for advanced gas turbine cycles that would permit rapid commercialization of cycles with significant improvements over the machines currently under development, in terms of the cost of electricity produced and the environmental burdens resulting from their use in power producing. Workshop II was held in January 1992 and continued the identification of the research needs to develop advanced gas turbine systems. The goals established for the ATS systems were: (1) efficiency exceeding 60% for large utility turbine system and 15% improvement in heat rate for industrial systems; (2) busbar energy costs 10% less than current state of the art and (3) fuel flexible designs. In addition Workshop II participants agreed that an industry driven research consortium was an acceptable mechanism to achieve base technology development needs.

  17. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  18. The Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, A.; Baker, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    The United States and Russia discovered a mutual interest in fuel cell development during a series of workshops designed to teach entrepreneurial skills to Russian nuclear weapon scientists and engineers to aid them in converting their skill to peaceful applications. The proposal for a Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium was initiated at the third workshop held in Livermore, CA, in May 1994. Representatives from U.S. fuel cell industries, U.S. research institutes, Russian institutes and ministries, and U.S. national laboratories attended, including those from GAZPROM, the Russian natural gas company. GASPROM needs to provide power for telemetry, cathodic corrosion protection of gas lines, and gas line pumping power in remote areas, and estimates that it needs approximately seventy thousand 1.5 to 15 KW plants to do so. Since the workshop, several direct working relationships have developed between the Russian Nuclear Weapon Institutes and the U.S. fuel cell industry.

  19. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  20. Percutaneous Pediatric Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    PubMed

    Uglow, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    The techniques for performing percutaneous osteotomies in treating deformities of the foot in children are presented along with a detailed description of the operative details. The author's use of minimal-access surgery for tibial, os calcis, and midfoot osteotomies is described using a cooled side-cutting burr that has not previously been described for use in the child's foot. The cancellous nature of the bones in the child are easily cut with the burr and the adjacent soft tissues are not damaged. The early experience of the healing times are not impaired and the complications associated with percutaneous scars seem to be negligible. PMID:27524707

  1. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  2. Renal effects of percutaneous stone removal

    SciTech Connect

    Eshghi, M.; Schiff, R.G.; Smith, A.D.

    1989-02-01

    Preoperative and postoperative renography with 99mTechnetium-diethylene-triamine pentaacetic acid was performed on 33 patients who were free of renal scarring, infection, and obstruction and who underwent percutaneous renal stone removal. Although there was a transient decrease in renal function postoperatively in some patients, statistically significant reductions in renal function occurred only in 1 patient with an arteriovenous malformation that was embolized and in 1 patient who had a postoperative ureteropelvic junction stricture. The creation of more than one nephrostomy tract did not affect the results. In the absence of serious complications, percutaneous nephrostomy does not have a significant effect on renal function.

  3. Update on percutaneous mitral commissurotomy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Nascimento, Bruno Ramos; Lodi-Junqueira, Lucas; Tan, Timothy C; Athayde, Guilherme Rafael Sant'Anna; Hung, Judy

    2016-04-01

    Percutaneous mitral commissurotomy (PMC) is the first-line therapy for managing rheumatic mitral stenosis. Over the past two decades, the indications of the procedure have expanded to include patients with unfavourable valve anatomy as a consequence of epidemiological changes in patient population. The procedure is increasingly being performed in patients with increased age, more deformed valves and associated comorbidities. Echocardiography plays a crucial role in patient selection and to guide a more efficient procedure. The main echocardiographic predictors of immediate results after PMC are mitral valve area, subvalvular thickening and valve calcification, especially at the commissural level. However, procedural success rate is not only dependent on valve anatomy, but a number of other factors including patient characteristics, interventional management strategies and operator expertise. Severe mitral regurgitation continues to be the most common immediate procedural complication with unchanged incidence rates over time. The long-term outcome after PMC is mainly determined by the immediate procedural results. Postprocedural parameters associated with late adverse events include mitral valve area, mitral regurgitation severity, mean gradient and pulmonary artery pressure. Mitral restenosis is an important predictor of event-free survival rates after successful PMC, and repeat procedure can be considered in cases with commissural refusion. PMC can be performed in special situations, which include high-risk patients, during pregnancy and in the presence of left atrial thrombus, especially in centres with specialised expertise. Therefore, procedural decision-making should take into account the several determinant factors of PMC outcomes. This paper provides an overview and update of PMC techniques, complications, immediate and long-term results over time, and assessment of suitability for the procedure. PMID:26743926

  4. Biliary pressure: manometric and perfusion studies at percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and percutaneous biliary drainage

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Neff, C.C.; Mueller, P.R.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.

    1983-07-01

    Manometric pressure recordings were attempted during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) in 203 cases. Successful readings were achieved at PTC in 85% (104/122) of patients. Pressure measurements were also obtained through 56 biliary drainage catheters, and controlled perfusion challenges were performed in 12 patients (on 18 occasions). Documentation of the occasionally poor correlation between the caliber of ducts and the degree of obstruction (i.e., pressure) was shown, and it was suggested that very high pressures may be predictive of a bile leak after PTC. Adequacy of percutaneous drainage and stricture dilatation were further assessed with these manometric techniques. Pressure and perfusion data aided in detecting and determining the significance of the nondilated obstructed duct, the dilated nonobstructed ductal system, and subtle distal ductal strictures. The knowledge obtained from percutaneous pressure recordings may help to determine appropriate therapy.

  5. Percutaneous Cyanoacrylate Glue Injection into the Renal Pseudoaneurysm to Control Intractable Hematuria After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Anupam Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sarkar, Debansu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-07-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who developed intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Angiography detected a pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower polar artery; however, embolization could not be performed because of unfavorable vascular anatomy. A percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance initially controlled the bleeding, but hematuria subsequently recurred as a result of recanalization of the aneurysm. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound- and fluoroscopic-guided direct injection of cyanoacrylate glue into the pseudoaneurysm.

  6. Improvements in Intracorporeal Lithotripters for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ramsay L.

    2007-04-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is an effective minimally invasive surgical approach for the treatment of large renal stone burden. Intracorporeal lithotripters (ICL) are utilized during PNL to fragment calculi, with some devices capable of concurrently removing fragments as well. Much progress has been made in the design of ICL devices, resulting in potentially more efficient treatment of nephrolithiasis.

  7. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... through the skin using a dilator and a sheath (introducer) or guide wire. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. Percutaneous Surgery for Severe Hallux Valgus.

    PubMed

    Vernois, Joel; Redfern, David J

    2016-09-01

    Severe hallux valgus is a challenge to treat. If the basal osteotomy is a well known surgery for severe deformity, the chevron osteotomy is usually used in mild to moderate deformity. With a accurent fixation the chevron can also be used in severe deformity. Both techniques can be performed percutaneously and offer reliable techniques. PMID:27524702

  9. [Ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrostomy].

    PubMed

    Martino, P

    2000-12-01

    Percutaneous nephrostomy is a mini-invasive technique that creates an external outlet from the renal excretory tract through a catheter inserted through the flank. Indications for this procedure are of both diagnostic and therapeutic type. The nephrostomic catheter is generally positioned under ultrasound guidance, which has the advantages of showing the localization of the renal cavities and the depth of the kidney, and can be used during pregnancy and in subjects with allergy to contrast medium or with reduced renal function. When possible, it is best to associate US with fluoroscopic guidance, as this association has been found to guarantee a success rate exceeding 98%. Within the kidney, the zone known as Broedel's avascular plane, where the terminal branches of the posterior and anterior arterial systems meet, is the safest place to pass the nephrostomic catheter through, as there is little vascularization in this zone. Access is generally posterior and at the level of the inferior calyx, by means of Seldinger's, the one step or a mixed access technique involving a catheter sheathing a metal cannula. Seldinger's access technique is most commonly used, entailing explorative puncture of the renal cavity with a 22 G needle. We prefer to puncture the kidney direct, under US guidance and using an 18 G needle: a metal wire is passed through the needle and then after withdrawing the needle, the fascia dilators are inserted, of scaled widths increasing up to 2 G wider than the nephrostomic catheter. Care must be taken not to go beyond the curve of the guide wire to avoid trauma to the renal parenchyma. The most critical moment is when the catheter is inserted along the wire at the point of passage through the peri-renal fat: the catheter tends to deflect the point of the guide wire away from the desired direction as the peri-renal fat offers less resistance. The metal wire may be of variable rigidity and length, hydrophilic. The catheter may also be made of various

  10. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  11. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Block, Timothy; Ball, Kia; Fournier, Ashley

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  12. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  13. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  14. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  15. The Bholghati (howardite) consortium: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C. )

    1990-08-01

    The Bholghati (howardite) has had a complex history. The consortium studies indicate that eucrite clasts show evidence of rapid crystallization followed by prolonged subsolidus annealing. Dark clasts are carbonaceous CM2 type. Bholghati bulk composition can be modeled by 55% eucritic, 45% diogenitic, and 3% dark clast components. The eucritic clasts show a LREE depleted pattern relative to HREEs, which is not typical of a normal eucrite. The LREE depletion requires two-stage melting from a chondritic source. The volatile/mobile trace element patterns in dark and eucritic clasts are highly variable, probably due to volatile redistribution. The eucritic clast shows excess fission Xe, which is attributed to in situ decay of Pu-244. The cosmic-ray exposure age is 10-17 Ma. The Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and K-Ar ages of Bholghati bulk and eucritic clasts indicate 4.53 Ga as crystallization age, 2-3 Ga as metamorphic event, and probably a minor thermal event < 1 Ga. The Bholghati evolution scenario is (1) early multiple magmatic events (4.53 Ga ago), producing eucrites and diogenites; (2) a metamorphic event (2-3 Ga ago) and prolonged subsolidus annealing; (3) Fragmentation and low-temperature mixing of eucrites and diogenites; (4) low-velocity impact (<1 Ga. ago) and admixing of carbonaceous material; (5) disruption of regolith and ejection of Bholghati 10-17 Ma ago; and (6) Bholghati fell on the Earth in 1905.

  16. AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Maria E.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Douwes, Jeroen; Hoppin, Jane A.; Kromhout, Hans; Lebailly, Pierre; Nordby, Karl-Christian; Schenker, Marc; Schüz, Joachim; Waring, Stephen C.; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Baldi, Isabelle; Dalvie, Mohamed Aqiel; Ferro, Giles; Fervers, Béatrice; Langseth, Hilde; London, Leslie; Lynch, Charles F.; McLaughlin, John; Merchant, James A.; Pahwa, Punam; Sigsgaard, Torben; Stayner, Leslie; Wesseling, Catharina; Yoo, Keun-Young; Zahm, Shelia H.; Straif, Kurt; Blair, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1), Canada (3), Costa Rica (2), USA (6), Republic of Korea (1), New Zealand (2), Denmark (1), France (3) and Norway (3). The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals) or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases). To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides. PMID:21655123

  17. Consortium for Materials Development in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During FY99 the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) was reorganized around the following guidelines: industry driven, product focus, an industry led advisory council, focus on University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) core competencies, linkage to regional investment firms to assist commercialization and to take advantage of space flights. The organizational structure of the CMDS changed considerably during the year. The decision was made to reduce the organization to a Director and an Administrative Assistant. The various research projects, including the employees, were transferred to the appropriate UAH research center or college. In addition, an advisory council was established to provide direction and guidance to the CMDS to ensure a strong commercial focus. The council will (i) review CMDS commercial development plans and provide feedback, (ii) perform an annual evaluation of the Center's progress and present the results of this review to the UAH Vice President for Research, (iii) serve as an avenue of communication between the CMDS and its commercial partners, and (iv) serve as an ambassador and advocate for the CMDS.

  18. SUNrises on the International Plant Nucleus Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Graumann, Katja; Bass, Hank W.; Parry, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear periphery is a dynamic, structured environment, whose precise functions are essential for global processes—from nuclear, to cellular, to organismal. Its main components—the nuclear envelope (NE) with inner and outer nuclear membranes (INM and ONM), nuclear pore complexes (NPC), associated cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal components as well as chromatin are conserved across eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In metazoans in particular, the structure and functions of nuclear periphery components are intensely researched partly because of their involvement in various human diseases. While far less is known about these in plants, the last few years have seen a significant increase in research activity in this area. Plant biologists are not only catching up with the animal field, but recent findings are pushing our advances in this field globally. In recognition of this developing field, the Annual Society of Experimental Biology Meeting in Salzburg kindly hosted a session co-organized by Katja Graumann and David E. Evans (Oxford Brookes University) highlighting new insights into plant nuclear envelope proteins and their interactions. This session brought together leading researchers with expertise in topics such as epigenetics, meiosis, nuclear pore structure and functions, nucleoskeleton and nuclear envelope composition. An open and friendly exchange of ideas was fundamental to the success of the meeting, which resulted in founding the International Plant Nucleus Consortium. This review highlights new developments in plant nuclear envelope research presented at the conference and their importance for the wider understanding of metazoan, yeast and plant nuclear envelope functions and properties. PMID:23324458

  19. Consortium-Based Genetic Studies of Kawasaki Disease in Korea: Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Mi; Jang, Gi Young; Yun, Sin Weon; Yu, Jeong Jin; Yoon, Kyung Lim; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Kil, Hong-Rang

    2015-01-01

    In order to perform large-scale genetic studies of Kawasaki disease (KD) in Korea, the Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium (KKDGC) was formed in 2008 with 10 hospitals. Since the establishment of KKDGC, there has been a collection of clinical data from a total of 1198 patients, and approximately 5 mL of blood samples per patient (for genomic deoxyribonucleic acid and plasma isolation), using a standard clinical data collection form and a nation-wide networking system for blood sample pick-up. In the clinical risk factor analysis using the collected clinical data of 478 KD patients, it was found that incomplete KD type, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) non-responsiveness, and long febrile days are major risk factors for coronary artery lesions development, whereas low serum albumin concentration is an independent risk factor for IVIG non-responsiveness. In addition, we identified a KD susceptibility locus at 1p31, a coronary artery aneurysm locus (KCNN2 gene), and the causal variant in the C-reactive protein (CRP) promoter region, as determining the increased CRP levels in KD patients, by means of genome-wide association studies. Currently, this consortium is continually collecting more clinical data and genomic samples to identify the clinical and genetic risk factors via a single nucleotide polymorphism chip and exome sequencing, as well as collaborating with several international KD genetics teams. The consortium-based approach for genetic studies of KD in Korea will be a very effective way to understand the unknown etiology and causal mechanism of KD, which may be affected by multiple genes and environmental factors. PMID:26617644

  20. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  1. Regional Development and the European Consortium of Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Saskia Loer; Kokkeler, Ben; van der Sijde, P. C.

    2002-01-01

    The European Consortium of Innovative Universities is a network that shares information not just among universities but with affiliated incubators, research parks, and other regional entities. The learning network contributes to regional development.(JOW)

  2. Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer

    The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

  3. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  4. National Consortium Supports Cities in Evaluating LED Streetlights

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-30

    Fact sheet that introduces Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, a group of municipalities, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations who are interested in making investments in LED street and area lighting.

  5. Consortium--A New Direction for Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Adrienne B.

    1976-01-01

    The shared services and joint planning of the area-wide continuing education program of the Northwest Allegheny Hospitals Corporation (a Consortium of seven acute care and two rehabilitation centers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania) are described. (LH)

  6. Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Cancer.gov

    Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium collaborates with three genomic facilities, epidemiologists, population geneticists, and biostatisticians from multiple institutions to study hormone-related gene variants and environmental factors in breast and prostate cancers.

  7. ICONE: An International Consortium of Neuro Endovascular Centres

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; White, P.; Kallmes, D.F.; Spears, J.; Marotta, T.; Roy, D.; Guilbert, F.; Weill, A.; Nguyen, T.; Molyneux, A.J.; Cloft, H.; Cekirge, S.; Saatci, I.; Bracard, S.; Meder, J.-F.; Moret, J.; Cognard, C.; Qureshi, A.I.; Turk, A.S.; Berenstein, A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The proliferation of new endovascular devices and therapeutic strategies calls for a prudent and rational evaluation of their clinical benefit. This evaluation must be done in an effective manner and in collaboration with industry. Such research initiative requires organisational and methodological support to survive and thrive in a competitive environment. We propose the formation of an international consortium, an academic alliance committed to the pursuit of effective neurovascular therapies. Such a consortium would be dedicated to the design and execution of basic science, device development and clinical trials. The Consortium is owned and operated by its members. Members are international leaders in neurointerventional research and clinical practice. The Consortium brings competency, knowledge, and expertise to industry as well as to its membership across a spectrum of research initiatives such as: expedited review of clinical trials, protocol development, surveys and systematic reviews; laboratory expertise and support for research design and grant applications to public agencies. Once objectives and protocols are approved, the Consortium provides a stable network of centers capable of timely realization of clinical trials or preclinical investigations in an optimal environment. The Consortium is a non-profit organization. The potential revenue generated from client-sponsored financial agreements will be re-directed to the academic and research objectives of the organization. The Consortium wishes to work in concert with industry, to support emerging trends in neurovascular therapeutic development. The Consortium is a realistic endeavour optimally structured to promote excellence through scientific appraisal of our treatments, and to accelerate technical progress while maximizing patients’ safety and welfare. PMID:20557763

  8. Establishment of a multi-state experiential pharmacy program consortium.

    PubMed

    Duke, Lori J; Unterwagner, Whitney L; Byrd, Debbie C

    2008-06-15

    In 2002, a regional consortium was created for schools and colleges of pharmacy in Georgia and Alabama to assist experiential education faculty and staff members in streamlining administrative processes, providing required preceptor development, establishing a professional network, and conducting scholarly endeavors. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy with many shared experiential practice sites formed a consortium to help experiential faculty and staff members identify, discuss, and solve common experience program issues and challenges. During its 5 years in existence, the Southeastern Pharmacy Experiential Education Consortium has coordinated experiential schedules, developed and implemented uniform evaluation tools, coordinated site and preceptor development activities, established a work group for educational research and scholarship, and provided opportunities for networking and professional development. Several consortium members have received national recognition for their individual experiential education accomplishments. Through the activities of a regional consortium, members have successfully developed programs and initiatives that have streamlined administrative processes and have the potential to improve overall quality of experiential education programs. Professionally, consortium activities have resulted in 5 national presentations. PMID:18698386

  9. Complications of Percutaneous Nephrostomy, Percutaneous Insertion of Ureteral Endoprosthesis, and Replacement Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskarelis, Ioannis S.; Papadaki, Marina G.; Malliaraki, Niki E.; Robotis, Epaminondas D.; Malagari, Katerina S.; Piperopoulos, Ploutarchos N.

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to record and identify the frequency of complications following percutaneous nephrostomy, replacement of nephrostomy drains and percutaneous insertion of ureteral endoprostheses.Methods: During a 10-year period 341 patients were referred to our department with indications for percutaneous nephrostomy and/or percutaneous insertion of a ureteral endoprosthesis, and a total of 1036 interventional procedures were performed (nephrostomy, catheter change, stenting).Results: There were three major complications (0.29%): two patients died during the first 30 days after the procedure, due to aggravation of their condition caused by the procedure, and one patient had retroperitoneal bleeding requiring surgery. There were 76 complications of intermediate severity (7.33%): catheter or stent displacement (n = 37, 3.57%) catheter occlusion (n = 18, 1.73%), hematuria (n = 12, 1.16%), and urinary tract infection (n = 9, 0.87%). The 55 minor complications (5.3%) comprised inflammation of the skin at the site of insertion of the percutaneous catheter.Conclusion: The small number of complications observed during acts of interventional uroradiology prove transcutaneous manipulations to be safe medical procedures.

  10. Modified Retroperitoneal Access for Percutaneous Intervention after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Lawrence H H

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous access to the surgical bed after pancreaticoduodenectomy can be a challenge, due to the post-operative anatomy alteration. However, immediate complications, such as surgical bed abscess or suspected tumor recurrence, are often best accessed percutaneously, as open surgical or endoscopic approaches are often difficult, if not impossible. We, hereby, describe a safe approach that is highly replicable, in accessing the surgical bed for percutaneous intervention, following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:23690711

  11. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  12. Introduction to ALFA and the GALFA Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.

    2004-12-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of the ALFA instrument, a 7 element focal plane array on the Arecibo 305m telescope, which covers the frequency range 1225 to 1525 MHz. Each pixel observes two orthogonal linear polarizations. There are several spectrometers for different types of observations. For Galactic astronomy, a FFT spectrometer has been developed by D. Werthimer and colleagues, which has 8192 channels covering 7 MHz ( 1500 km/s at 0.2 km/s resolution) along with 256 channels covering 100 MHz intended for measuring and removing spectral baselines. ALFA test observations have been underway since August 2004, and astronomical observations should be ramping up through Fall 2004 and be in full swing by early 2005. The GALFA consortium is comprised of individuals interested in using the ALFA system for galactic astronomy. It is divided by interest into subconsortia, focusing on a number of the outstanding problems which can be addressed by ALFA on the Arecibo telescope, with 8-10 K/Jy gain, 3.5' beamwidth, and 30-35 K system temperature. One subconsortium is planning to carry out a survey of 21cm continuum radiation from the Milky Way, focusing on mapping the polarized emission in order to perform Faraday tomography of the magnetic field distribution. Radio recombination lines are the focus of another subconsortium; the ALFA system will be able to observe multiple RRLs that fall within its bandpass. HI emission and absorption will be utilized by a number of consortia, but applied to different problems, including the Galactic plane, high latitude clouds, high velocity clouds, turbulence, and the relationship of the atomic and molecular components of the ISM. Each subconsortium is making plans, starting with relatively small-scale projects, and working towards large-scale projects. Commensal (GALFA together with extragalactic or pulsar observations) are anticipated, using multiple signal processing systems simultaneously.

  13. Brachiocephalic artery haemorrhage during percutaneous tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S D; Kumar, G; Hill, C S; Kaddour, H

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous tracheostomy was performed on a 69-year-old woman to facilitate weaning. Insertion of the size 7 tracheostomy tube resulted in profuse bleeding around the tracheostomy site. On inflation of the tracheostomy balloon, the bleeding stopped. Urgent computed tomography demonstrated the brachiocephalic artery was abnormally high and lying in an oblique fashion over the trachea, and the tracheostomy tube was displacing the trachea posteriorly. Surgical repair of the defect in the brachiocephalic artery was undertaken and a surgical tracheostomy was performed in theatre. This case raises important issues about the potential dangers of percutaneous tracheostomy in cases of abnormal anatomy. It also emphasises the importance of direct visualisation of the seeker needle using the endoscope. In cases where there is a suspicion of abnormal anatomy, it is safer to obtain preprocedural imaging or perform a surgical tracheostomy. PMID:25723674

  14. Embolic protection devices in percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Meneguz Moreno, Rafael A; Costa, José R; Costa, Ricardo A; Abizaid, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Clinical benefit of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) depends on both angiographic success at lesion site as well as the restoration of adequate macro and microvascular perfusion. The pathophysiology of embolization from coronary lesions during PCI is multifactorial, being more frequently observed in patients with acute coronary syndrome and in those with lesions at saphenous vein graft (SVG). In this population, despite successful epicardial intervention, distal tissue perfusion may still be absent in up to a quarter of all PCI. Multiple devices and pharmacologic regimens have been developed and refined in an attempt to protect the microvascular circulation during PCI. Among them, embolic protection devices have raised as an attractive adjunctive toll due to their ability to retain debris and potentially prevent distal embolization, reducing major adverse cardiac events. Currently, their use has been validated for the treatment of SVG lesions but failed to show effectiveness in the percutaneous approach of acute coronary syndrome patients, including those with ST elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:27007782

  15. Percutaneous closure of the patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Surmely, J-F; Meier, B

    2007-10-01

    A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common finding present in 25% of the population. A relationship between PFO and several clinical conditions such as stroke, migraine, platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome, neurological decompression illness in divers, high altitude pulmonary edema, sleep apnea, and economy class syndrome have been documented. Observational non-randomized studies have shown percutaneous PFO closure more effective than medical treatment for stroke prevention, in particular in patients with complete closure as well as in patients with more than one cerebrovascular event at baseline. In the case of migraine, PFO closure has been shown to result in a marked reduction in migraine burden or migraine days. PFO anatomy, epidemiological data on associated clinical conditions, comparison between percutaneous closure and medical treatment, as well as the technical aspect of the procedure are described in this review. PMID:17912171

  16. Percutaneous Large Arterial Access Closure Techniques.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Charles J; Gandhi, Ripal T; Vatakencherry, Geogy; Baumann, Frederic; Benenati, James F

    2015-06-01

    Endovascular repair has replaced open surgical repair as the standard of care for treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in appropriately selected patients owing to its decreased morbidity and length of stay and excellent clinical outcomes. Similarly, there is a progressive trend toward total percutaneous repair of the femoral artery using percutaneous suture-mediated closure devices over open surgical repair due to decreased complications and procedure time. This article describes the techniques of closure for large-bore vascular access most commonly used in endovascular treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms, but could similarly be applied to any procedure requiring large-bore arterial access, such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. PMID:26070624

  17. Bilothorax as a complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Sano, Atsushi; Yotsumoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of bilothorax that occurred as a complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. In an 86-year-old woman who had undergone percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice, bilothorax occurred after accidental removal of the tube. She recovered with chest drainage only. An 83-year-old man who had undergone percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for cholecystitis developed bilothorax with infection. He recovered with thoracoscopic curettage. Although bilothorax is a rare complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, appropriate diagnosis and prompt treatment is important, especially when bilothorax is accompanied by infection. PMID:26294694

  18. Microcatheter use for difficult percutaneous biliary procedures.

    PubMed

    Brountzos, Elias N; Kelekis, Alexis D; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Kotsioumba, Ioanna; Misiakos, Evangelos; Perros, George; Gouliamos, Athanasios D

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous biliary drainage procedures in patients with nondilated ducts are demanding, resulting in lower success rates than in patients with bile duct dilatation. Pertinent clinical settings include patients with iatrogenic bile leaks, diffuse cholangiocarcinomas, and sclerosing cholangitis. We describe a method to facilitate these procedures with the combined use of a 2.7-Fr microcatheter and a 0.018-in. hydrophilic wire. PMID:18320271

  19. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage Complicated by Bilothorax.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stephanie H; Zangan, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is a well-established and safe technique for the management of biliary obstructions and leaks. While approach is variable based on operator preference, patient anatomy, and indications; PTBD is commonly performed via a right-sided intercostal route. With a right-sided approach, pleural complications may be encountered. The authors describe a case of a right PTBD complicated by a leak into the pleural space, with the subsequent development of bilothorax. PMID:27053829

  20. Percutaneous absorption in diseased skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Audris; Tudela, Emilie; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-08-01

    The stratum corneum's (SC) functions include protection from external hazardous environments, prevention of water loss and regulation of body temperature. While intact skin absorption studies are abundant, studies on compromised skin permeability are less common, although products are often used to treat affected skin. We reviewed literature on percutaneous absorption through abnormal skin models. Tape stripping is used to disrupt water barrier function. Studies demonstrated that physicochemical properties influence the stripping effect: water-soluble drugs are more affected. Abrasion did not affect absorption as much. Freezing is commonly used to preserve skin. It does not seem to modify water absorption, but still increases the penetration of compounds. Comparatively, heating the skin consistently increased percutaneous absorption. Removing SC lipids may increase percutaneous absorption of drugs. Many organic solvents are employed to delipidize. Delipidization with chloroform-methanol increased hydrophilic compound permeability, but not lipophilic. Acetone pre-treatment enhanced hydrophilic compound penetration. More data is needed to determine influence on highly lipophilic compound penetration. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) induces irritant dermatitis and is frequently used as a model. Studies revealed that SLS increases hydrophilic compound absorption, but not lipophilic. However, skin irritation with other chemicals increases lipophilic penetration as much as hydrophilic. Animal studies show that UV exposure increases percutaneous absorption whereas human studies do not. Human studies show increased penetration in psoriatic and atopic dermatitis skin. The data summarized here begin to characterize flux alteration associated with damaged skin. Understanding the degree of alteration requires interpretation of involved conditions and the enlarging of our database to a more complete physicochemical spectrum. PMID:22912973

  1. Percutaneous Vertebral Body Augmentation: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    There are many medical conditions like osteoporosis, tumor, or osteonecrosis that weaken the structural strength of the vertebral body and prone it to fracture. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation that is usually applied by polymethylmethacrylate is a relatively safe, effective, and long lasting procedure commonly performed in these situations. In this paper, we updated a review of biomechanics, indications, contraindications, surgical techniques, complications, and overall prognosis of these minimally invasive spinal procedures. PMID:25379561

  2. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy after percutaneous mitral annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Swampillai, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous approaches to reduce mitral regurgitation in ischemic cardiomyopathy have stirred interest recently. Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and functional mitral regurgitation often meet criteria for cardiac resynchronisation therapy to improve left ventricular function as well as mitral regurgitation, and alleviate symptoms. This case shows that implantation of a pacing lead in the coronary sinus to restore synchronous left and right ventricular contraction is feasible, despite the presence of a remodeling device in the coronary sinus. PMID:27182527

  3. Management of hemorrhage after percutaneous renal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, M; Fortunato, P; Schettini, M; Vincenzoni, A

    1998-12-01

    Percutaneous renal surgery is routine therapy for a number of renal pathologies. It is a technique not without complications, often serious ones, of which the worst is bleeding. We reviewed our experience of the incidence, etiology, and management of this serious complication to determine a protocol of treatment that will minimize the consequences. Between 1984 and 1996, we carried out 976 percutaneous operations for reno-calix stones, pyeloureteral junction stenosis, neoplasia of the renal pelvis, diagnosis, and ureteral prostheses. In all cases, the percutaneous access was achieved through a lower calix in the posterior axillary line with the patient in a prone position. The lithotripsy was performed with ultrasound and balistic energy lithotripters. Antegrade endopyelotomy was performed according to our technique. At the end of the procedure, a nephrostomy tube was positioned, 24F for lithotripsy and 16F for endopyelotomy. The nephrostomy tube was removed after 24 to 48 hours. In this series, 146 patients (15%) presented significant perioperative bleeding. In 97 cases (10%), this complication was resolved with the repositioning of the nephrostomy tube, bedrest in a supine position, and observation, whereas in 49 cases (5%), clamping of the nephrostomy tube for 24 hours was necessary. In 56 patients (5.7%), two blood transfusions were necessary, and three patients (0.3%) had bleeding 10, 12, and 20 days after the operation, which was resolved by embolization of the lacerated vessel. PMID:9895253

  4. [Activity of NTDs Drug-discovery Research Consortium].

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an extremely important issue facing global health care. To improve "access to health" where people are unable to access adequate medical care due to poverty and weak healthcare systems, we have established two consortiums: the NTD drug discovery research consortium, and the pediatric praziquantel consortium. The NTD drug discovery research consortium, which involves six institutions from industry, government, and academia, as well as an international non-profit organization, is committed to developing anti-protozoan active compounds for three NTDs (Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and African sleeping sickness). Each participating institute will contribute their efforts to accomplish the following: selection of drug targets based on information technology, and drug discovery by three different approaches (in silico drug discovery, "fragment evolution" which is a unique drug designing method of Astellas Pharma, and phenotypic screening with Astellas' compound library). The consortium has established a brand new database (Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease Database; iNTRODB), and has selected target proteins for the in silico and fragment evolution drug discovery approaches. Thus far, we have identified a number of promising compounds that inhibit the target protein, and we are currently trying to improve the anti-protozoan activity of these compounds. The pediatric praziquantel consortium was founded in July 2012 to develop and register a new praziquantel pediatric formulation for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Astellas Pharma has been a core member in this consortium since its establishment, and has provided expertise and technology in the area of pediatric formulation development and clinical development. PMID:26831798

  5. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  6. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.; Jiang, X.; Tao, D.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1996-10-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities were focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies were conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing and a spiral model was developed by West Virginia University. For the University of Kentucky the advisory board approved a project entitled: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Project management and administration will be provided by Virginia Tech., for the first year. Progress reports for coal dewatering and destabilization of flotation froth studies are presented in this report.

  7. ACTS Operations Extended Through a University-Based Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert A.; Krawczyk, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program was slated for decommissioning in October 2000. With plans in place to move the spacecraft to an orbital graveyard and then shut the system down, NASA was challenged to consider the feasibility of extending operations for education and research purposes provided that an academic organization would be willing to cover operations costs. This was determined to be viable, and in the fall of 2000, NASA announced that it would consider extending operations. On March 19, 2001, NASA, the Ohio Board of Regents, and the Ohio University signed a Space Act Agreement to continue ACTS operations for 2 more years with options to extend operations up to a total of 4 years. To accomplish this, the Ohio University has formed a university-based consortium, the Ohio Consortium for Advanced Communications Technology (OCACT), and acts as the managing member. The Ohio University is responsible for the full reimbursement of NASA's operations costs, and does this through consortium membership. NASA retains the operating license of the spacecraft and has two contractors supporting spacecraft and master control station operations. This flexible arrangement between NASA and academia allows the education community to access a large communications satellite for learning about spacecraft operations and to use the system's transponders for communications applications. It also allows other organizations, such as commercial companies, to become consortium members and use the ACTS wideband Ka-band (30/20 GHz) payload. From the consortium members, six areas of interest have been identified.

  8. Acute endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Karthik V; Olivieri, Laura; Jonas, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis of percutaneously placed pulmonary valve is increasingly being recognized and reported as a potentially life-threatening complication. In this report, we discuss a 17-year-old male who presented with septic shock secondary to staphylococcal endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve. PMID:26556969

  9. Percutaneous feeding tube method for use in children.

    PubMed

    Long, B; Rafert, J; Cory, D

    1991-01-01

    Surgical gastrostomy has been a widely accepted method for introducing a percutaneous feeding tube for many years. However, complications are frequent, and many children who need them are not good surgical candidates. This study examines imaging guided percutaneous placement of feeding gastrostomy catheters as a safe and effective alternative to surgery. PMID:1902957

  10. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of radiation-induced arterial stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Guthaner, D.F.; Schmitz, L.

    1982-07-01

    A case of atherosclerosis resulting from previous irradiation was successfully treated using percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for recanalization of the vessel. Irradiation may result in extensive perivascular fibrosis around an area of arterial narrowing; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty appears to be the method of choice for treatment of such lesions.

  11. Percutaneous Sclerotherapy With OK-432 of a Cervicomediastinal Lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Golinelli, Gloria; Toso, Andrea; Borello, Giovanni; Aluffi, Paolo; Pia, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The present study reports a case of percutaneous sclerotherapy of a giant cystic cervicomediastinal lymphangioma using OK-432. To the best of our knowledge, percutaneous sclerotherapy of a mediastinal lymphangioma using OK 432 has not previously been reported in the English literature. PMID:26522530

  12. The ISPRS Student Consortium: From launch to tenth anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjir, U.; Detchev, I.; Reyes, S. R.; Akkartal Aktas, A.; Lo, C. Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    2014-04-01

    The ISPRS Student Consortium is an international organization for students and young professionals in the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, and the geospatial information sciences. Since its start ten years ago, the number of members of the Student Consortium has been steadily growing, now reaching close to 1000. Its increased popularity, especially in recent years, is mainly due to the organization's worldwide involvement in student matters. The Student Consortium has helped organize numerous summer schools, youth forums, and student technical sessions at ISPRS sponsored conferences. In addition, the organization publishes a newsletter, and hosts several social media outlets in order to keep its global membership up-to-date on a regular basis. This paper will describe the structure of the organization, and it will give some example of its past student related activities.

  13. A consortium for purchase of blood products directed by physicians.

    PubMed

    Aledort, L M; Lipton, R A; Hilgartner, M

    1988-05-01

    Clotting-factor therapy is a costly part of comprehensive hemophilia treatment. Physicians treating patients with hemophilia in New York formed a consortium for the purchasing and regional distribution of clotting-factor concentrates. Concentrates are centrally purchased based on a bidding formula aimed at obtaining the lowest price for quality product while guaranteeing all suppliers continued involvement in a large market area. The consortium has successfully maintained, and, in instances, lowered prices each year. Estimated regional savings this year are more than $750,000 for an anticipated purchase of approximately 60,00,000 units of clotting-factors VIII and IX. Central distribution has additionally lowered costs to participating hospitals. The consortium is able to provide patients and third-party payers with some of the lowest prices for clotting-factor concentrates in the United States. A physician-directed regional approach to purchasing costly medical products might be applied to other areas of clinical medicine. PMID:3358574

  14. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C.; Constable, C.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A.; Banerjee, S.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.

    2003-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is a multi-user facility to establish and maintain a state-of-the-art relational database and digital archive for rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to make such data generally available and to provide an information technology infrastructure for these and other research-oriented databases run by the international community. As its name implies, MagIC will not be restricted to paleomagnetic or rock magnetic data only, although MagIC will focus on these kinds of information during its setup phase. MagIC will be hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ where two "integrated" web portals will be developed, one for paleomagnetism (currently functional as a prototype that can be explored via the http://earthref.org/databases/PMAG/ link) and one for rock magnetism. The MagIC database will store all measurements and their derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and their intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). Ultimately, this database will allow researchers to study "on the internet" and to download important data sets that display paleo-secular variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field over geological time, or that display magnetic data in typical Zijderveld, hysteresis/FORC and various magnetization/remanence diagrams. The MagIC database is completely integrated in the EarthRef.org relational database structure and thus benefits significantly from already-existing common database components, such as the EarthRef Reference Database (ERR) and Address Book (ERAB). The ERR allows researchers to find complete sets of literature resources as used in GERM (Geochemical Earth Reference Model), REM (Reference Earth Model) and MagIC. The ERAB contains addresses for all contributors to the EarthRef.org databases, and also for those who participated in data collection, archiving and

  15. Molecular Basis of a Bacterial Consortium: Interspecies Catabolism of Atrazine

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Mervyn L.; Newcombe, David; Alvey, Sam; Crowley, David E.; Hay, Anthony; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP contains the genes, atzA, -B, and -C, that encode three enzymes which metabolize atrazine to cyanuric acid. Atrazine-catabolizing pure cultures isolated from around the world contain genes homologous to atzA, -B, and -C. The present study was conducted to determine whether the same genes are present in an atrazine-catabolizing bacterial consortium and how the genes and metabolism are subdivided among member species. The consortium contained four or more bacterial species, but two members, Clavibacter michiganese ATZ1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, collectively mineralized atrazine. C. michiganese ATZ1 released chloride from atrazine, produced hydroxyatrazine, and contained a homolog to the atzA gene that encoded atrazine chlorohydrolase. C. michiganese ATZ1 stoichiometrically metabolized hydroxyatrazine to N-ethylammelide and contained genes homologous to atzB and atzC, suggesting that either a functional AtzB or -C catalyzed N-isopropylamine release from hydroxyatrazine. C. michiganese ATZ1 grew on isopropylamine as its sole carbon and nitrogen source, explaining the ability of the consortium to use atrazine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. A second consortium member, Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, metabolized the N-ethylammelide produced by C. michiganese ATZ1 to transiently form cyanuric acid, a reaction catalyzed by AtzC. A gene homologous to the atzC gene of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was present, as demonstrated by Southern hybridization and PCR. Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, but not C. michiganese, metabolized cyanuric acid. The consortium metabolized atrazine faster than did C. michiganese individually. Additionally, the consortium metabolized a much broader set of triazine ring compounds than did previously described pure cultures in which the atzABC genes had been identified. These data begin to elucidate the genetic and metabolic bases of catabolism by multimember consortia. PMID:16349478

  16. Percutaneous Balloon Compression vs Percutaneous Retrogasserian Glycerol Rhizotomy for the Primary Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric; Bergenheim, A. Tommy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite >30 years of clinical use, the literature is still sparse when it comes to comparisons between percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) and percutaneous retrogasserian glycerol rhizolysis (PRGR) as treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. OBJECTIVE: To perform a retrospective cohort comparison between PBC and PRGR with regard to therapeutic effect, side effects, and complications. METHODS: Medical records and follow-up data from 124 primary PRGRs performed from 1986 to 2000 and 82 primary PBCs performed from 2000 to 2013 were reviewed. All patients had undergone clinical sensory testing and assessment of sensory thresholds. Analyses were performed to compare duration of pain relief, frequency of sensory disturbances, and side effects. RESULTS: Median duration of pain relief was 21 months after PRGR and 20 months after PBC. Both methods carried a high risk of hypesthesia/hypalgesia (P < .001) that was partly reversed with time. Decreased corneal sensibility was common after PRGR (P < .001) but not after PBC. Dysesthesia was more common after PRGR (23%) compared after PBC (4%; P < .001). Other side effects were noted but uncommon. CONCLUSION: PBC and PRGR are both effective as primary surgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Both carry a risk of postoperative hypesthesia, but in this series, the side effect profile favored PBC. Furthermore, PBC is technically less challenging, whereas PRGR requires fewer resources. Between these 2 techniques, we propose PBC as the primary surgical technique for percutaneous treatment of trigeminal neuralgia on the basis of its lower incidence of dysesthesia, corneal hypesthesia, and technical failures. ABBREVIATIONS: MS, multiple sclerosis PBC, percutaneous balloon compression PRGR, percutaneous retrogasserian glycerol rhizotomy TN, trigeminal neuralgia PMID:26465639

  17. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided biliary drainage: Summary of consortium meeting, May 7th, 2011, Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Kahaleh, Michel; Artifon, Everson LA; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Gupta, Kapil; Itoi, Takao; Binmoeller, Kenneth F; Giovannini, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the preferred procedure for biliary or pancreatic drainage in various pancreatico-biliary disorders. With a success rate of more than 90%, ERCP may not achieve biliary or pancreatic drainage in cases with altered anatomy or with tumors obstructing access to the duodenum. In the past those failures were typically managed exclusively by percutaneous approaches by interventional radiologists or surgical intervention. The morbidity associated was significant especially in those patients with advanced malignancy, seeking minimally invasive interventions and improved quality of life. With the advent of biliary drainage via endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance, EUS guided biliary drainage has been used more frequently within the last decade in different countries. As with any novel advanced endoscopic procedure that encompasses various approaches, advanced endoscopists all over the world have innovated and adopted diverse EUS guided biliary and pancreatic drainage techniques. This diversity has resulted in variations and improvements in EUS Guided biliary and pancreatic drainage; and over the years has led to an extensive nomenclature. The diversity of techniques, nomenclature and recent progress in our intrumentation has led to a dedicated meeting on May 7th, 2011 during Digestive Disease Week 2011. More than 40 advanced endoscopists from United States, Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia, Italy, France, Austria, Germany, Spain, Japan, China, South Korea and India attended this pivotal meeting. The meeting covered improved EUS guided biliary access and drainage procedures, terminology, nomenclature, training and credentialing; as well as emerging devices for EUS guided biliary drainage. This paper summarizes the meeting’s agenda and the conclusions generated by the creation of this consortium group. PMID:23538784

  18. NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 1995-1999 Self Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Schaffart, Mary M.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium receives funds from NASA to allow Nebraska colleges and universities to implement balanced programs of research, education and public service related to aeronautics, space science and technology. Nebraska is a capability enhancement state which directs efforts and resources toward developing research infrastructure and enhancing the quality of aerospace research and education for all Nebraskans. Furthermore, the Nebraska Space Grant strives to provide national leadership in applied aspects of aeronautics. Nebraska has met, meets and will continue to meet all requirements set forth by NASA. Nebraska is a top-tier consortium and will continue to be a model program.

  19. Terragenome: International Soil Metagenome Sequencing Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Jansson, Janet [LBNL

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Janet Jansson of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discusses the Terragenome Initiative at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  20. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting. PMID:26843697

  1. The IPTi Consortium: research for policy and action.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, David; Cisse, Badara; Menendez, Clara

    2006-07-01

    The results of a randomized controlled trial in Tanzania suggest that intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi), delivered through the Expanded Program on Immunization, might be a useful approach to controlling malaria in countries where it is endemic. An international consortium of research collaborations, involving the World Health Organization and United Nation's Children's Fund, is now evaluating IPTi in a range of different settings to generate robust and compelling evidence to guide policy. This review summarizes the available information on IPTi and presents the consortium's approach to determining whether IPTi might be a valuable additional strategy in programs to control malaria. PMID:16713739

  2. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  3. Research plan for pilot studies of the biodiversity research consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kiester, A.R.; White, D.; Preston, E.M.; Master, L.L.; Loveland, T.R.

    1993-06-03

    This report presents a research plan for an assessment of risks to biodiversity. The plan describes the theoretical basis of the research approach and the data and methods to be used in the assessment. Initial research activities are formulated as a set of pilot studies that will examine nine research questions concerning the assumptions, data, and methods of the approach. A collection of government, academic, and nongovernmental organizations, called the Biodiversity Research Consortium, has developed this research approach and prepared the plan. Authors of the plan represent current members of the Consortium.

  4. Percutaneous Mitral Annuloplasty for Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Schofer, Joachim; Siminiak, Tomasz; Haude, Michael; Herrman, Jean P.; Vainer, Jindra; Wu, Justina C.; Levy, Wayne C.; Mauri, Laura; Feldman, Ted; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Kaye, David M.; Duffy, Stephen J.; Tübler, Thilo; Degen, Hubertus; Brandt, Mathias C.; Van Bibber, Rich; Goldberg, Steve; Reuter, David G.; Hoppe, Uta C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR), a well-recognized component of left ventricular remodeling, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure patients. Percutaneous mitral annuloplasty has the potential to serve as a therapeutic adjunct to standard medical care. Methods and Results Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, moderate to severe FMR, an ejection fraction <40%, and a 6-minute walk distance between 150 and 450 m were enrolled in the CARILLON Mitral Annuloplasty Device European Union Study (AMADEUS). Percutaneous mitral annuloplasty was achieved through the coronary sinus with the CARILLON Mitral Contour System. Echocardiographic FMR grade, exercise tolerance, New York Heart Association class, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and 1 and 6 months. Of the 48 patients enrolled in the trial, 30 received the CARILLON device. Eighteen patients did not receive a device because of access issues, insufficient acute FMR reduction, or coronary artery compromise. The major adverse event rate was 13% at 30 days. At 6 months, the degree of FMR reduction among 5 different quantitative echocardiographic measures ranged from 22% to 32%. Six-minute walk distance improved from 307±87 m at baseline to 403±137 m at 6 months (P<0.001). Quality of life, measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire, improved from 47±16 points at baseline to 69±15 points at 6 months (P<0.001). Conclusions Percutaneous reduction in FMR with a novel coronary sinus–based mitral annuloplasty device is feasible in patients with heart failure, is associated with a low rate of major adverse events, and is associated with improvement in quality of life and exercise tolerance. PMID:19597051

  5. Orthopedic surgical analyzer for percutaneous vertebroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Lim, Do H.; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-05-01

    Since the spine is one of the most complex joint structures in the human body, its surgical treatment requires careful planning and high degree of precision to avoid any unwanted neurological compromises. In addition, comprehensive biomechanical analysis can be very helpful because the spine is subject to a variety of load. In case for the osteoporotic spine in which the structural integrity has been compromised, it brings out the double challenges for a surgeon both clinically and biomechanically. Thus, we have been developing an integrated medical image system that is capable of doing the both. This system is called orthopedic surgical analyzer and it combines the clinical results from image-guided examination and the biomechanical data from finite element analysis. In order to demonstrate its feasibility, this system was applied to percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that has been recently introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae. It involves puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to excessive PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. Since the degree of the osteoporosis can influence the porosity of the cancellous bone in the vertebral body, the injection volume can be different from patient to patient. In this study, the optimal volume of PMMA injection for vertebroplasty was predicted based on the image analysis of a given patient. In addition, biomechanical effects due to the changes in PMMA volume and bone mineral density (BMD) level were investigated by constructing clinically

  6. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy in children: evolutions.

    PubMed

    Long, Christopher J; Srinivasan, Arun K

    2015-02-01

    The increasing incidence of pediatric stone disease has coincided with significant advances in technology and equipment, resulting in drastic improvements in management. Miniaturization of both ureteroscopes and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) equipment has facilitated access to the entirety of the urinary tract and has made ureteroscopy a first-line therapy option along with shock-wave lithotripsy for kidney and ureteral stones. Advances in PCNL have decreased patient morbidity while preserving stone clearance rates. In this review, the advances in operative approach for ureteroscopy and PCNL in children and its applicability to current surgical management of pediatric stone disease are discussed. PMID:25455168

  7. Percutaneous Cryoablation and Vertebroplasty: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Roselli, Mario; Manenti, Guglielmo; Mammucari, Matteo; Bartolucci, Dario Alberto Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-05-15

    A 70-year-old man with a painful vertebral metastasis was treated with combined percutaneous cryoablation and vertebroplasty therapy (CVT) in one session. The patient was suffering from diffuse visceral metastasized cholangiocarcinoma. After several weeks of back pain, magnetic resonance imaging documented a single L2 bone metastasis. In consultation with the oncologists, palliative combined CVT was administered with the aim of obtaining pain relief and bone stabilization. In our experience this combined treatment is safe and effective for immediate pain relief in painful bone metastases when other standard palliative treatments have failed.

  8. PET-Based Percutaneous Needle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Ghassan

    2016-07-01

    PET can be used to guide percutaneous needle biopsy to the most metabolic lesion, improving diagnostic yield. PET biopsy guidance can be performed using visual or software coregistration, electromagnetic needle tracking, cone-beam computed tomography (CT), and intraprocedural PET/CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsies allow the sampling of lesions that may not be clearly visible on anatomic imaging, or of lesions that are morphologically normal. PET can identify suspicious locations within complex tumors that are most likely to contain important diagnostic and prognostic information. PMID:27321036

  9. Percutaneous cryoablation and vertebroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Masala, Salvatore; Roselli, Mario; Manenti, Guglielmo; Mammucari, Matteo; Bartolucci, Dario Alberto; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    A 70-year-old man with a painful vertebral metastasis was treated with combined percutaneous cryoablation and vertebroplasty therapy (CVT) in one session. The patient was suffering from diffuse visceral metastasized cholangiocarcinoma. After several weeks of back pain, magnetic resonance imaging documented a single L2 bone metastasis. In consultation with the oncologists, palliative combined CVT was administered with the aim of obtaining pain relief and bone stabilization. In our experience this combined treatment is safe and effective for immediate pain relief in painful bone metastases when other standard palliative treatments have failed. PMID:18459032

  10. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  11. Radiological considerations: percutaneous laser disc decompression.

    PubMed

    Botsford, J A

    1993-10-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an integral part of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). All physicians involved in PLDD patient selection and treatment must be familiar with the imaging techniques unique to this procedure to ensure a successful outcome. The following review is based on the cumulative experience gained in performing over 150 PLDD procedures. It discusses the function of diagnostic radiology in all facets of PLDD including patient selection, intraoperative imaging, postoperative evaluation, and analysis of complications. Fundamental radiologic concepts that apply to PLDD are explained and protocols suggested to optimize results and avoid complications. PMID:10146513

  12. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, Stan

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  13. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  14. Percutaneous tracheostomy in patients on anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Pasin, Laura; Frati, Elena; Cabrini, Luca; Giovanni, Landoni; Nardelli, Pasquale; Bove, Tiziana; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Scandroglio, Anna Mara; Pappalardo, Federico; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine if percutaneous tracheostomy is safe in critically ill patients treated with anticoagulant therapies. Settings and Design: Single-center retrospective study including all the patients who underwent percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) placement over a 1-year period in a 14-bed, cardiothoracic and vascular Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Materials and Methods: Patients demographics and characteristics, anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies, coagulation profile, performed technique and use of bronchoscopic guidance were retrieved. Results: Thirty-six patients (2.7% of the overall ICU population) underwent PDT over the study period. Twenty-six (72%) patients were on anticoagulation therapy, 1 patient was on antiplatelet therapy and 2 further patients received prophylactic doses of low molecular weight heparin. Only 4 patients had normal coagulation profile and were not receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapies. Overall, bleeding of any severity complicated 19% of PDT. No procedure-related deaths occurred. Conclusions: PDT was proved to be safe even in critically ill-patients treated with anticoagulant therapies. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26139737

  15. Laparoscopic-Assisted Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Adarsh M; Sedarat, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    There are a variety of techniques for gastrostomy tube placement. Endoscopic and radiologic approaches have almost entirely superseded surgical placement. However, an aging population and significant advancements in modern healthcare have resulted in patients with increasingly complex medical issues or postsurgical anatomy. The rising prevalence of obesity has also created technical challenges for proceduralists of many specialties. When patients with these comorbidities develop the need for long-term enteral nutrition and feeding tube placement, standard approaches such as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) by endoscopists and percutaneous image-guided gastrostomy (PIG) by interventional radiologists may be technically difficult or impossible. For these challenging situations, laparoscopic-assisted PEG (LAPEG) is an alternative option. LAPEG combines the advantages of PEG with direct intraperitoneal visualization, helping ensure a safe tube placement tract free of intervening organs or structures. In this review, we highlight some of the important factors of first-line gastrostomy techniques, with an emphasis on the utility and procedural technique of LAPEG when they are not feasible. PMID:27422123

  16. [Percutaneous tracheostomy in the ventilated patient].

    PubMed

    Añón, J M; Araujo, J B; Escuela, M P; González-Higueras, E

    2014-04-01

    The medical indications of tracheostomy comprise the alleviation of upper airway obstruction; the prevention of laryngeal and upper airway damage due to prolonged translaryngeal intubation in patients subjected to prolonged mechanical ventilation; and the facilitation of airway access for the removal of secretions. Since 1985, percutaneous tracheostomy (PT) has gained widespread acceptance as a method for creating a surgical airway in patients requiring long-term mechanical ventilation. Since then, several comparative trials of PT and surgical tracheostomy have been conducted, and new techniques for PT have been developed. The use of percutaneous dilatation techniques under bronchoscopic control are now increasingly popular throughout the world. Tracheostomy should be performed as soon as the need for prolonged intubation is identified. However a validated model for the prediction of prolonged mechanical ventilation is not available, and the timing of tracheostomy should be individualized. The present review analyzes the state of the art of PT in mechanically ventilated patients--this being regarded by many as the technique of choice in performing tracheostomy in critically ill patients. PMID:23347906

  17. Implementing Teleconference Educational Programming in a Community College Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Jan Flohr

    1983-01-01

    Lists seven requisites for the implementation of community college teleconferencing. Describes the development of a consortium comprised of 15 Iowa community colleges and Iowa State University designed to increase educational program offerings using the community college telenet system. Analyzes results and problems and offers recommendations.…

  18. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.

    1996-07-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities are focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies will be conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing. A spiral model is developed by West Virginia University. The research to be performed by the University of Kentucky has recently been determined to be: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Acoomplishments to date are reported.

  19. Reflections on the MEC Consortium: Classroom Teacher as Teacher Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Edward W.

    The role of teachers serving as policy board members of the Metrolina Educational Consortium (MEC) in North Carolina is discussed. The MEC is concerned with teacher education programs and is composed of classroom teachers, college representatives, local education agency staff, and state education department staff. The board members are mandated to…

  20. The Research Consortium, 1977-2010: Contributions, Milestones, and Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Claman, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    Research and innovation are a cornerstone of any progressive organization. The Research Consortium (RC) has served as the principal organization fulfilling this function on behalf of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) throughout much of its history. The RC is an organization of approximately 5,000…

  1. Places to Go: OpenCourseWare Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In his Places to Go column, Stephen Downes visits the OpenCourseWare Consortium, a Web site that consolidates access to multiple university-based open courseware initiatives and materials. Downes finds, however, that the site's layout and restricted access hinders the development of the very community it proposes to be supporting. Downes'…

  2. University Library Cooperation in Israel: The MALMAD Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Elhanan

    1999-01-01

    Describes the MALMAD (Israel Center for Digital Information Services) consortium that was set up by the eight universities of Israel to serve as a common framework for the procurement and licensing of digital information. Discusses the organizational framework, budget, services, and future plans. (Author/LRW)

  3. AACJC International/Intercultural Consortium Summer Study Programs Overseas, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Becky

    Responses are presented to a questionnaire on overseas summer programs that was sent in January 1979 to members of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC) International/Intercultural Consortium (IIC). Program descriptions are listed alphabetically by world region and country. Program information includes: name of program,…

  4. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  5. Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of…

  6. It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Judy

    2009-01-01

    If the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) has its way, expensive textbooks may go the way of typewriters and carbon paper. Ideally, Internet access for all students would allow educators to replace commercially printed textbooks with interactive digital textbooks and personal learning environments. However, until…

  7. Porcine Reproductive And Respiratory Syndrome (Prrs) Host Genetics Consortium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A PRRS Host Genetics Consortium has been formed in the US; its objectives are to use genotyping and phenotyping tools to determine if there are host genes controlling resistance/susceptibility to PRRSV infection. The general plan is to use the nursery pig model of primary response to infection, i.e....

  8. The Appalachian Model Teaching Consortium: Preparing Teachers for Rural Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proffit, Alvin C.; Sale, R. Paul; Alexander, Ann E.; Andrews, Ruth S.

    2004-01-01

    The Appalachian Model Teacher Consortium is a partnership involving Radford University, Wytheville Community College, and the Grayson County (Virginia) School System. Its purpose is to prepare highly qualified teachers for rural southwest Virginia. The model was developed in response to the growing teacher shortage facing school districts in rural…

  9. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  10. Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System (Vps)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marz, Bryan E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the launch and post-launch activities of Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System, V(ps). It is a comprehensive overview covering launch activities, post-launch activities, experimental results, and future flight recommendations.

  11. Organizing a Basic Skills Consortium: The Results of a Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenstein, Ronnie B.

    A one-day meeting of leaders of basic skills organizations was held in order to create a consortium to promote the sharing of ideas and information, assist in the transfer of effective programs and materials, and encourage the joint development of new programs and products to train adults and youth in need. After familiarizing themselves with the…

  12. The Non-Territorial Imperative in a CBTE Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseberry, Kent B.

    The problems associated with development of a field based teacher education program in the public schools are examined. Conflict between the college education department and the cooperating schools for control of time and curriculum frequently appears in such programs. A model is proposed for the structure and development of a consortium that…

  13. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  14. Alabama Linkage: An Innovative Higher Education Consortium Maximizing Statewide Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Charles L.; And Others

    In the late 1960's and early 1970's, attracting physicians to areas of rural Alabama was virtually impossible because of the lack of professional health care workers available to become part of the necessary health care team. To address this problem, the University of Alabama (UA) adopted a plan to create a consortium of higher education…

  15. The LearnShare Consortium: A Model for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corry, Rick

    LearnShare is a consortium of non-competing companies that share training expertise and innovative practices. Evolving the concept of a collaborative approach to training, LearnShare combines the best training practices and programs of the partners with leading-edge distance learning technology. The result provides LearnShare members electronic…

  16. Health Science Careers: Tech Prep Consortium for New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; D'Anna, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    A high school health sciences program consists of an interdisciplinary core curriculum, clinical job shadowing, and potential to earn college credit. Interactive television and CD-ROMs enhance teaching. A consortium of high schools offers the tech prep program in collaboration with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. (SK)

  17. Appeal Resource and Training Consortium (ARTC) 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    APPEAL (Asia Pacific Programme of Education for All) Resource and Training Consortium (ARTC) was initiated in May 1997 at the Technical Working Group Meeting organized by APPEAL in cooperation with the Indian Institute of Education (IIE) to provide technical support and assistance to the work of APPEAL among the Member States. This booklet is a…

  18. Western Pennsylvania Schools Without Failure Consortium: First Year Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, James R.

    The consortium was formed in the summer of 1971 as a means of implementing William Glasser's philosophy and methods. The program was implemented in two parochial elementary schools and in nine public elementary schools located in eight school districts. The evaluation discussed in this report included questionnaires to measure pupil self concepts…

  19. Improving safety of aircraft engines: a consortium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1996-11-01

    With over seven million departures per year, air transportation has become not a luxury, but a standard mode of transportation for the United States. A critical aspect of modern air transport is the jet engine, a complex engineered component that has enabled the rapid travel to which we have all become accustomed. One of the enabling technologies for safe air travel is nondestructive evaluation, or NDE, which includes various inspection techniques used to assess the health or integrity of a structure, component, or material. The Engine Titanium Consortium (ETC) was established in 1993 to respond to recommendations made by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Titanium Rotating Components Review Team (TRCRT) for improvements in inspection of engine titanium. Several recent accomplishments of the ETC are detailed in this paper. The objective of the Engine Titanium Consortium is to provide the FAAand the manufacturers with reliable and costeffective new methods and/or improvements in mature methods for detecting cracks, inclusions, and imperfections in titanium. The consortium consists of a team of researchers from academia and industry-namely, Iowa State University, Allied Signal Propulsion Engines, General Electric Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Engines-who work together to develop program priorities, organize a program plan, conduct the research, and implement the solutions. The true advantage of the consortium approach is that it brings together the research talents of academia and the engineering talents of industry to tackle a technology-base problem. In bringing industrial competitors together, the consortium ensures that the research results, which have safety implications and result from FAA funds, are shared and become part of the public domain.

  20. Percutaneous Relief of Tension Pneumomediastinum in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, Helen Hoi-lun; Kwok, Philip Chong-hei; Lai, Albert Kwok-hung; Fan, Tsz Wo; Chan, Susan Chi-hum; Miu, Ting Yat; Chan, Grace Lai-har

    2003-11-15

    The purpose of this article was to describe the experience of relieving tension pneumomediastinum by a fluoroscopic-guided percutaneous method. We inserted a percutaneous drainage catheter with a Heimlich valve under fluoroscopic guidance to relieve the tension pneumomediastinum in a 2-year-old girl who suffered from dermatomyositis with lung involvement. This allowed immediate relief without the need for surgery. The procedure was repeated for relapsed tension pneumomediastinum. Good immediate results were achieved in each attempt. We conclude that percutaneous relief of pneumomediastinum under fluoroscopic guidance can be performed safely and rapidly in patients not fit for surgery.

  1. Percutaneous embolization of varicocele: technique, indications, relative contraindications, and complications

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Joshua; Mittal, Sameer; Pereira, Keith; Bhatia, Shivank; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    There are several options for the treatment of varicocele, including surgical repair either by open or microsurgical approach, laparoscopy, or through percutaneous embolization of the internal spermatic vein. The ultimate goal of varicocele treatment relies on the occlusion of the dilated veins that drain the testis. Percutaneous embolization offers a rapid recovery and can be successfully accomplished in approximately 90% of attempts. However, the technique demands interventional radiologic expertise and has potential serious complications, including vascular perforation, coil migration, and thrombosis of pampiniform plexus. This review discusses the common indications, relative contraindications, technical details, and risks associated with percutaneous embolization of varicocele. PMID:26658060

  2. Percutaneous Procedures for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bender, Matthew T; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2016-07-01

    Three major percutaneous procedures are currently used to treat trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Percutaneous balloon compression, glycerol rhizotomy, and radiofrequency thermocoagulation interrupt afferent pain fibers by injury to the trigeminal nerve root or ganglion. Each is capable of offering immediate and durable pain relief. Each is associated with relatively low, but variable rates of complications. Patient heterogeneity, technical variation, and nonstandard outcomes plague the existing outcomes literature and limit comparisons of treatments. Rendering treatment selection a function of individual physician preference and practice patterns. Randomized, prospective trials are needed; in the meantime, percutaneous rhizotomy remains an excellent treatment for selected patients. PMID:27324995

  3. The inferior vena cava clip. The percutaneous approach.

    PubMed

    Bildsoe, M C; Yedlicka, J W; Hunter, D W; Castañeda-Zúñiga, W R; Amplatz, K

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary embolism in high-risk patients may be minimized by surgical inferior vena cava (IVC) clipping or by the insertion of caval filters. A percutaneous clipping technique was developed that narrows the cava while allowing caval patency. The caval clip is inserted through a percutaneous translumbar approach under fluoroscopic control. Nine dogs underwent percutaneous translumbar caval clip placement without complications. Three of four dogs, followed-up for 5 to 19 weeks by angiography and caval pressure measurements, showed caval patency. This technique eliminates the risks of surgical IVC clip placement and risks from the insertion of intravascular foreign bodies such as filters. PMID:2394568

  4. Percutaneous embolization of varicocele: technique, indications, relative contraindications, and complications.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Joshua; Mittal, Sameer; Pereira, Keith; Bhatia, Shivank; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    There are several options for the treatment of varicocele, including surgical repair either by open or microsurgical approach, laparoscopy, or through percutaneous embolization of the internal spermatic vein. The ultimate goal of varicocele treatment relies on the occlusion of the dilated veins that drain the testis. Percutaneous embolization offers a rapid recovery and can be successfully accomplished in approximately 90% of attempts. However, the technique demands interventional radiologic expertise and has potential serious complications, including vascular perforation, coil migration, and thrombosis of pampiniform plexus. This review discusses the common indications, relative contraindications, technical details, and risks associated with percutaneous embolization of varicocele. PMID:26658060

  5. Percutaneous transhepatic thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis of mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Choi, Lorraine; Lin, Peter H; Dardik, Alan; Eraso, Andrea; Lumsden, Alan B

    2007-01-01

    Mesenteric venous occlusion is a rare yet highly morbid condition that is traditionally treated with anticoagulation while surgery serves as the last resort. Percutaneous intervention provides an effective option with relatively low mortality and morbidity. We herein describe use of transhepatic percutaneous thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis in treating two cases of symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. These cases underscore the fact that transhepatic thrombectomy and thrombolysis are a highly effective strategy for treating acute symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. Several percutaneous techniques are also reviewed. PMID:17382054

  6. 25 CFR 1000.425 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Appeals § 1000.425 How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference? The Tribe/Consortium shall file its request for an informal conference with the...

  7. 47 CFR 54.636 - Eligible participant-constructed and owned network facilities for consortium applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... network facilities for consortium applicants. 54.636 Section 54.636 Telecommunication FEDERAL... owned network facilities for consortium applicants. (a) Subject to the funding limitations under §§ 54.675 and 54.638 and the following restrictions, consortium applicants may receive support for...

  8. 47 CFR 54.636 - Eligible participant-constructed and owned network facilities for consortium applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... network facilities for consortium applicants. 54.636 Section 54.636 Telecommunication FEDERAL... owned network facilities for consortium applicants. (a) Subject to the funding limitations under §§ 54.675 and 54.638 and the following restrictions, consortium applicants may receive support for...

  9. 77 FR 43237 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Work Plan Review Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Work Plan Review Workshop... stakeholders about the draft consortium work plan, broadly solicit consortium membership from interested stakeholders, and invite members to participate in work plan implementation. DATES: The Genome in a...

  10. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating...

  11. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating...

  12. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating...

  13. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating...

  14. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating...

  15. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11–12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11–12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11–12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  16. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Ko; Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11-12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11-12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11-12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  17. Percutaneous Biopsy of Osteoid Osteomas Prior to Percutaneous Treatment Using Two Different Biopsy Needles

    SciTech Connect

    Laredo, Jean-Denis Hamze, Bassam; Jeribi, Riadh

    2009-09-15

    Biopsy is usually performed as the first step in percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteomas prior to laser photocoagulation. At our institution, 117 patients with a presumed diagnosis of osteoid osteoma had a trephine biopsy before a percutaneous laser photocoagulation. Biopsies were made using two different types of needles. A Bonopty biopsy needle (14-gauge cannula, 16-gauge trephine needle; Radi Medical Systems, Uppsala, Sweden) was used in 65 patients, and a Laurane biopsy needle (11-gauge cannula, 12.5-gauge trephine needle; Laurane Medical, Saint-Arnoult, France) in 43 patients. Overall biopsy results were positive for osteoid osteoma in 83 (70.9%) of the 117 cases. The Laurane needle provided a significantly higher positive rate (81.4%) than the Bonopty needle (66.1%; p < 0.05). This difference was not due to the size of the nidus, which was similar in the two groups (p < 0.05) and may be an effect of differences in needle caliber (12.5 vs. 14 gauge) as well as differences in needle design. The rate of positive biopsy results obtained in the present series with the Laurane biopsy needle is, to our knowledge, the highest rate reported in series dealing with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and laser photocoagulation of osteoid osteomas.

  18. Age-related percutaneous penetration part 1: skin factors.

    PubMed

    Konda, S; Meier-Davis, S R; Cayme, B; Shudo, J; Maibach, H I

    2012-05-01

    Changes in the skin that occur in the elderly may put them at increased risk for altered percutaneous penetration from pharmacotherapy along with potential adverse effects. Skin factors that may have a role in age-related percutaneous penetration include blood flow, pH, skin thickness, hair and pore density, and the content and structure of proteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), water, and lipids. Each factor is examined as a function of increasing age along with its potential impact on percutaneous penetration. Additionally, topical drugs that successfully overcome the barrier function of the skin can still fall victim to cutaneous metabolism, thereby producing metabolites that may have increased or decreased activity. This overview discusses the current data and highlights the importance of further studies to evaluate the impact of skin factors in age-related percutaneous penetration. PMID:22622279

  19. Embolic protection devices in saphenous percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Morís, Cesar; Lozano, Iñigo; Martín, María; Rondán, Juán; Avanzas, Pablo

    2009-05-01

    Saphenous veins remain a source of conduit for use in surgical coronary bypass graft revascularisation procedures. Saphenous vein grafts have a progressive closure rate estimated to be 12% to 20% at the end of the first year, and approximately 50% by 10 years. Regarding secondary revascularisation in these cases, reoperation carries substantially increased morbidity and mortality rates, making saphenous coronary intervention, in particular stent implantation, a more attractive means of revascularisation. However, this procedure carries a significant risk of major adverse clinical events, predominantly myocardial infarction or reduced antegrade flow (non-reflow phenomenon), mainly due to distal embolisation of atherothrombotic debris and distal microvascular occlusion. Embolic protection devices are used to reduce the risk of distal embolisation. There are two different designs: filter and occlusion-aspiration devices. In this article we present the different systems of embolic protection devices in saphenous percutaneous intervention and the previously published information is reviewed. PMID:19736070

  20. Delayed Nephropleural Fistula After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kaler, Kamaljot S; Cwikla, Daniel; Clayman, Ralph V

    2016-01-01

    Pleural effusions due to pleural injury following supracostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) occur in upwards of 15% of patients; however, these effusions are invariably diagnosed immediately postoperative or during the hospital stay. Herein, we report our initial experience with a delayed nephropleural fistula. A 52-year-old female underwent an uneventful supracostal right PCNL staghorn stone procedure and was discharged on postoperative day 1. She presented to the emergency department 8 days after her original procedure and one day after ureteral stent removal in the office, with right pleural effusion, concomitant contralateral renal colic secondary to migration of a left pelvic stone into her left proximal ureter, and acute renal failure/oliguria. She was treated with right chest tube drainage, bilateral nephrostomy tube placement, and subsequent left holmium laser ureterolithotripsy. PMID:27579431

  1. Magnetic electrical connectors for biomedical percutaneous implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A biomedical percutaneous connector is described which includes a socket having an enlarged disk shaped base portion for being implanted below the patient's skin and cylindrical portion which is integral with the base portion and extends outwardly of the skin. A conical recess in an upper end of the cylindrical portion has a magnet located in the base. Inclined conductive strips are carried on an upper end of the cylindrical portion to which electrical conductors are attached and extend into the patient's body. A complementary shaped plug which also has electrical contacts provided thereon is adapted to fit within the conical recess of the socket. The plug is held in the socket by magnetic force.

  2. Percutaneous absorption and disposition of Tinopal EMS.

    PubMed

    Black, J G; Moule, R C; Philp, J

    1977-08-01

    A cotton-substantive, anionic, fluorescent whitening agent manufactured by several suppliers under various trade names e.g. Tinopal EMS, has been synthesized in radioactive form. Intubation of detergent or aqueous solution into rats resulted in little absorption from the intestinal tract as evidenced by low radioactivity in the urine and tissues. Most of the dose was excreted rapidly in the faeces. After parenteral administration to rats, the radioactivity was rapidly excreted in the faeces with small amounts remaining in tissues and organs. There was slight evidence of retention of radioactivity in the kidneys. Very small amounts of Tinopal EMS in detergent were absorbed through rat skin, but only when concentrations greater than those normally used by the consumer, together with occlusion of the skin were employed. Small amounts were absorbed throught skin when applied in ethanol. It is concluded that the possibility of systemic toxic effects in man as a result of percutaneous absorption is remote. PMID:929616

  3. Percutaneous foam sclerotherapy for venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bush, R; Bush, P

    2013-10-01

    The technique of foam sclerotherapy directed at the distal most vessels, draining the ulcer bed was first described in 2010, with excellent penetration into the underlying venous network possible with this technique. Thirty-five patients have now been treated with this technique as the initial treatment at Midwest Vein Laser, USA. There have been no complications with this technique and rapid healing occurred within 4-8 weeks after the initial treatment in 90% of the patients, and all ulcers were healed at 4 months. Here we present the representative case of a 67-year-old man treated with a modified technique that used a percutaneous approach via reticular or spider veins at the margin of the ulcer bed. PMID:24142137

  4. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Right Atrioventricular Embolus

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Roger Philip; Harding, James; Hassam, Rhonda

    1998-09-15

    Percutaneous retrieval of a 12-cm-long serpiginous clot lodged in the right atrium and ventricle is reported. Following bilateral common femoral vein puncture, a Bird's Nest cava filter was first positioned ready to deploy immediately below the renal veins via the right femoral vein. From the left femoral vein, a Cook intravascular retrieval basket was advanced to the right atrium. Under transthoracic echocardiographic visualization, the basket was used to engage, trap, and gently withdraw the clot in a single long strand below the prepositioned inferior vena cava filter. The filter was immediately deployed, leaving the clot trapped inferior to the renal veins, in the cava and left iliac vein. The patient remained well and asymptomatic at discharge.

  5. Percutaneous Placement and Management of Peritoneovenous Shunts

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Louis G.

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneovenous shunts are used in the treatment of recurrent ascites or recurrent pleural effusions. Generally speaking, the shunts allow passage of ascites or pleural effusions (by either passive or active means) back into the central venous system. The most recent development in peritoneovenous shunts, known as the Denver Shunt, is a modification of a shunt developed for the treatment of hydrocephalus. In recent years, the Denver shunt has been placed by interventional radiologists. It is used to treat both cirrhotic and malignant effusions in the peritoneal and pleural cavities. Reported complications of the shunt are shunt occlusion, infection, post-shunt coagulopathy, deep vein thrombosis, catheter breakage, and leaks. This article discusses the technical aspects related to the percutaneous placement and maintenance of the Denver Shunt. PMID:23729983

  6. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Painful Schmorl Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore Pipitone, Vincenzo; Tomassini, Marco; Massari, Francesco; Romagnoli, Andrea; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2006-02-15

    The Schmorl node represents displacement of intervertebral disc tissue into the vertebral body. Both Schmorl nodes and degenerative disc disease are common in the human spine. We performed a retrospective study, for the period from January 2003 to February 2005, evaluating 23 patients affected by painful Schmorl nodes, who underwent in our department percutaneous transpedicular injection of polymethylmethacrylate (vertebroplasty) in order to solve their back pain not responsive to medical and physical management. Eighteen patients reported improvement of the back pain and no one reported a worsening of symptoms. Improvement was swift and persistent in reducing symptoms. Painful Schmorl nodes, refractory to medical or physical therapy, should be considered as a new indication within those vertebral lesions adequately treatable utilizing Vertebroplasty procedure.

  7. Delayed Nephropleural Fistula After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Kamaljot S.; Cwikla, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pleural effusions due to pleural injury following supracostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) occur in upwards of 15% of patients; however, these effusions are invariably diagnosed immediately postoperative or during the hospital stay. Herein, we report our initial experience with a delayed nephropleural fistula. A 52-year-old female underwent an uneventful supracostal right PCNL staghorn stone procedure and was discharged on postoperative day 1. She presented to the emergency department 8 days after her original procedure and one day after ureteral stent removal in the office, with right pleural effusion, concomitant contralateral renal colic secondary to migration of a left pelvic stone into her left proximal ureter, and acute renal failure/oliguria. She was treated with right chest tube drainage, bilateral nephrostomy tube placement, and subsequent left holmium laser ureterolithotripsy. PMID:27579431

  8. Bioresorbable scaffolds for percutaneous coronary interventions

    PubMed Central

    Gogas, Bill D.

    2014-01-01

    Innovations in drug-eluting stents (DES) have substantially reduced rates of in-segment restenosis and early stent thrombosis, improving clinical outcomes following percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). However a fixed metallic implant in a vessel wall with restored patency and residual disease remains a precipitating factor for sustained local inflammation, in-stent neo-atherosclerosis and impaired vasomotor function increasing the risk for late complications attributed to late or very late stent thrombosis and late target lesion revascularization (TLR) (late catch-up). The quest for optimal coronary stenting continues by further innovations in stent design and by using biocompatible materials other than cobalt chromium, platinum chromium or stainless steel for engineering coronary implants. Bioresorbable scaffolds made of biodegradable polymers or biocorrodible metals with properties of transient vessel scaffolding, local drug-elution and future restoration of vessel anatomy, physiology and local hemodynamics have been recently developed. These devices have been utilized in selected clinical applications so far providing preliminary evidence of safety showing comparable performance with current generation drug-eluting stents (DES). Herein we provide a comprehensive overview of the current status of these technologies, we elaborate on the potential benefits of transient coronary scaffolds over permanent stents in the context of vascular reparation therapy, and we further focus on the evolving challenges these devices have to overcome to compete with current generation DES. Condensed Abstract:: The quest for optimizing percutaneous coronary interventions continues by iterative innovations in device materials beyond cobalt chromium, platinum chromium or stainless steel for engineering coronary implants. Bioresorbable scaffolds made of biodegradable polymers or biocorrodible metals with properties of transient vessel scaffolding; local drug-elution and future

  9. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy: is gall stone recurrence inevitable?

    PubMed Central

    Donald, J J; Cheslyn-Curtis, S; Gillams, A R; Russell, R C; Lees, W R

    1994-01-01

    Using radiological interventional techniques the gall bladder can be cleared of stones with a high success rate. As with any treatment option that leaves the gall bladder in situ there is an accompanying risk of stone recurrence, which is currently unknown for the radiological method. One hundred patients were studied prospectively to determine the recurrence rate of stones and clinical outcome after successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy. Follow up included both clinical assessment and ultrasound examination at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annual intervals thereafter. The overall stone recurrence rate was 31% at a mean follow up of 26 months (range, 3-50 months). By actuarial life table analysis, the cumulative proportion of gall stone recurrence was 7, 19, 28, 35, and 44% at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months respectively. Of the 31 patients with recurrent stones; 17 remain asymptomatic, seven have experienced biliary colic, two abdominal pain, three non-specific upper gastrointestinal symptoms, and two jaundice secondary to common duct stones. Thirteen of the stone free patients have remained symptomatic; six with abdominal pain and seven with nonspecific upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Eight patients have subsequently had a cholecystectomy. No significant difference was found between the sex of the patient or the number of stones before treatment and the stone recurrence rates. The cumulative stone recurrence rate was significantly less in the 56 patients who received adjuvant chemolitholysis (p < 0.05). These data show that stone recurrence after successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy occurs in the minority, and is usually asymptomatic. It is concluded that the technique remains justified in the management of selected patients with gall stones. PMID:8200568

  10. Percutaneous Surgery for Metatarsalgia and the Lesser Toes.

    PubMed

    Redfern, David J; Vernois, Joel

    2016-09-01

    The traditional open surgical options for the treatment of metatarsalgia and lesser toe deformities are limited and often result in unintentional stiffness. The use of percutaneous techniques for the treatment of metatarsalgia and lesser toe deformities allows a more versatile and tailor-made approach to the individual deformities. As with all percutaneous techniques, it is vital the surgeon engage in cadaveric training from surgeons experienced in these techniques before introducing them into his/her clinical practice. PMID:27524704

  11. Intraperitoneal seeding from hepatocellular carcinoma following percutaneous ethanol ablation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kurl, S; Farin, P; Rytkonen, H; Soimakallio, S

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of intraperitoneal seeding in a 36-year-old woman with a large primary hepatocellular carcinoma located superfically in the left lobe of the otherwise normal liver. The patient was treated with percutaneous ethanol ablation therapy. Eight months after the treatment computed tomography and ultrasonography (US) revealed an intraperitoneal seeding that was confirmed with US-guided percutaneous biopsy. PMID:9107646

  12. Percutaneous ablation therapies of inoperable pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Marco, De Chiara; Bracchi, Elena; Cocozza, Eugenio; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Floridi, Chiara; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Development of techniques with high quality imaging used as guidance improve outcomes reducing complications. Moreover, only few experiences of percutaneous pancreatic ablations are reported. They are performed by very skilled operators in highly specialized centers. This review presents the current status of percutaneous local ablative therapies in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26424487

  13. Chest Wall Dissemination of Nocardiosis after Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Kamiya, Mika; Miyazaki, Masaya; Arai, Yasuaki; Horio, Yoshitsugu

    2007-07-15

    We described a case of chest wall dissemination after percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. A 65-year-old man had a lung nodule which was suspected to be lung carcinoma. He underwent percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy using an 18G semiautomated biopsy needle and pathologic diagnosis showed organizing pneumonia. Two months after the biopsy, chest wall dissemination occurred. Implantation of carcinoma along the biopsy route was suspected, but the mass was actually due to pulmonary nocardiosis.

  14. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage: direct approach under fluoroscopic control.

    PubMed

    Takada, T; Hanyu, F; Kobayashi, S; Uchida, Y

    1976-01-01

    We devised a direct percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage under fluoroscopic control. The principle is as follows. After percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, the three dimensional structure of intrahepatic bile ducts is projected to a two dimensional plane under fluoroscopy; the needle can then be introduced into the selected bile duct with accuracy. The technique can be used as a preoperative management of operations of patients with jaundice and also as a palliative management of advanced cancer without much complication. PMID:1249944

  15. Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism Treated with Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Bunc, Matjaz

    2011-02-15

    A case of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism treated with percutaneous thrombus aspiration is described. A 63-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to the hospital with progressive abdominal pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed an occlusion of the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was effectively treated using transaxillary percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using a 6F Aspirex thrombectomy catheter.

  16. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  17. Percutaneous pulmonary and tricuspid valve implantations: An update

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Robert; Daehnert, Ingo; Lurz, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The field of percutaneous valvular interventions is one of the most exciting and rapidly developing within interventional cardiology. Percutaneous procedures focusing on aortic and mitral valve replacement or interventional treatment as well as techniques of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation have already reached worldwide clinical acceptance and routine interventional procedure status. Although techniques of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation have been described just a decade ago, two stent-mounted complementary devices were successfully introduced and more than 3000 of these procedures have been performed worldwide. In contrast, percutaneous treatment of tricuspid valve dysfunction is still evolving on a much earlier level and has so far not reached routine interventional procedure status. Taking into account that an “interdisciplinary challenging”, heterogeneous population of patients previously treated by corrective, semi-corrective or palliative surgical procedures is growing inexorably, there is a rapidly increasing need of treatment options besides redo-surgery. Therefore, the review intends to reflect on clinical expansion of percutaneous pulmonary and tricuspid valve procedures, to update on current devices, to discuss indications and patient selection criteria, to report on clinical results and finally to consider future directions. PMID:25914786

  18. Percutaneous nephrostomy with extensions of the technique: step by step.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Raymond B; Regan, John D; Kavanagh, Peter V; Khatod, Elaine G; Chen, Michael Y; Zagoria, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapy in the urinary tract begins with renal access by means of percutaneous nephrostomy. Indications for percutaneous nephrostomy include urinary diversion, treatment of nephrolithiasis and complex urinary tract infections, ureteral intervention, and nephroscopy and ureteroscopy. Bleeding complications can be minimized by entering the kidney in a relatively avascular zone created by branching of the renal artery. The specific site of renal entry is dictated by the indication for access with consideration of the anatomic constraints. Successful percutaneous nephrostomy requires visualization of the collecting system for selection of an appropriate entry site. The definitive entry site is then selected; ideally, the entry site should be subcostal and lateral to the paraspinous musculature. Small-bore nephrostomy tracks can be created over a guide wire coiled in the renal pelvis. A large-diameter track may be necessary for percutaneous stone therapy, nephroscopy, or antegrade ureteroscopy. The most common extension of percutaneous nephrostomy is placement of a ureteral stent for treatment of obstruction. Transient hematuria occurs in virtually every patient after percutaneous nephrostomy, but severe bleeding that requires transfusion or intervention is uncommon. In patients with an obstructed urinary tract complicated by infection, extensive manipulations pose a risk of septic complications. PMID:12006684

  19. Ilio-psoas abscesses: percutaneous drainage under image guidance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Suri, S; Gulati, M; Singh, P

    1997-09-01

    Over a 5-year period, 56 psoas abscesses occurring in 51 patients were managed by image-guided percutaneous drainage, either by needle aspiration (n = 10) or by catheter drainage (n = 46) in conjunction with medical therapy. Twenty-seven patients had tuberculous abscesses (bilateral in five) while 24 patients had pyogenic abscesses. Percutaneous treatment was successful in 16 of the 24 patients (66.7%) with pyogenic abscesses. The reasons for failure were co-existent bowel lesions, phlegmonous involvement of muscle without liquefaction, multiloculated abscess cavity and thick tenacious pus not amenable to percutaneous drainage. Surgery was required in seven patients, either for failed percutaneous drainage or for the management of co-existent disease. Percutaneous drainage was initially successful in all 27 patients of tuberculous psoas abscesses. However, eight patients presented with recurrence requiring repeat intervention. The average duration of catheter drainage was longer in patients with tuberculous abscess (11 days) than in patients with pyogenic abscess (6 days). Percutaneous drainage under image guidance provides an effective and safe alternative to more invasive surgical drainage in most patients with psoas abscesses. PMID:9313737

  20. A Consortium of Universities Partnering with Tribal Colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seielstad, G. A.; Rattling Leaf, J.

    2003-12-01

    Institutions participating in the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC) are the Universities of North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming; North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana State Universities; the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; and Sinte Gleska University. UMAC?s purpose is to build learning communities integrating researchers with stakeholders, with the intent of leading a regional transition toward sustainability. No single culture has a monopoly on ideas for a sustainable future; in fact, the more diverse the input, the better the emergent ideas will be. The region spanned by the Consortium includes 20 Indian reservations and 18 tribal colleges/universities. The input from these institutions is an essential part of any integrated program to change lifestyles for the benefit of present and future generations. Success stories in education and in resource management, including management of cultural and sacred resources by tribal officials and educators, will be described.

  1. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 8

    PubMed Central

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn; Sterk, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Garrity, George M.; Cochrane, Guy; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 8th meeting of the Genomic Standards Consortium held at the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, CA, USA on September 9-11, 2009. This three-day workshop marked the maturing of Genomic Standards Consortium from an informal gathering of researchers interested in developing standards in the field of genomic and metagenomics to an established community with a defined governance mechanism, its own open access journal, and a family of established standards for describing genomes, metagenomes and marker studies (i.e. ribosomal RNA gene surveys). There will be increased efforts within the GSC to reach out to the wider scientific community via a range of new projects. Further information about the GSC and its activities can be found at http://gensc.org/. PMID:21304696

  2. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    SciTech Connect

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  3. Transformation of phenol into phenylalanine by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, F.; Milot, S.; Beaudet, R.; Villemur, R.

    1996-03-01

    Phenol is a widely used chemical found in many wastewaters of industrial origin. The degradation of phenol by methanogenic bacterial consortia has been reported by many investigators. To better characterise the metabolism of this consortium, a new metabolic pathway of benzoic acid, an intermediary in the degradation of phenol, is reported. This study describes the transformations of benzoic acid into 3-phenylpropionic acid and phenylalanine. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  4. FLYSUB-Consortium Tracking and RICH Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aria; Azumoun, Bob; Blatnik, Marie; Pak, Robert; Purschke, Martin; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Woody, Craig; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Twigger, Jessie; Zhang, Aiwu; Dehmelt, Klaus; Deshpande, Abhay; Feege, Nils; Hemmick, Thomas; Bai, Xinzhang; Gnanvo, Kondo; Gu, Chao; Liyanage, Nilanga; Majka, Richard; Smirnov, Nikolai

    2013-09-23

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experiments of FLYSUB-Consortium who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The ultimate goal of this test-beam effort is to test and verify the performance of the individual components according to their expectation.

  5. The Cometa Consortium and the PI2S2 project .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.

    The new grid e-Infrastructure in Sicily is offering new perspectives and important resources and starts to give new great opportunity for research using the HPC resources. We will show the infrastructure of the Cometa Consortium, the main activities of the PI2S2 project and the new challenges, mainly in the HPC area, that the project is carrying out. A simple but useful procedure for running HPC is also described.

  6. Biodegradation of hexachlorobenzene by a constructed microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Yan, Da-Zhong; Mao, Ling-Qi; Li, Cun-Zhi; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    A consortium comprised of an engineered Escherichia coli DH5α and a natural pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrader, Sphingobium chlorophenolicum ATCC 39723, was assembled for degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a persistent organic pollutant. The engineered E. coli strain, harbouring a gene cassette (camA (+) camB (+) camC) that encodes the F87W/Y96F/L244A/V247L mutant of cytochrome P-450cam (CYP101), oxidised HCB to PCP. The resulting PCP was then further completely degraded by ATCC 39723. The results showed that almost 40 % of 4 μM HCB was degraded by the consortium at a rate of 0.033 nmol/mg (dry weight)/h over 24 h, accompanied by transient accumulation and immediate consumption of the intermediate PCP, detected by gas chromatography. In contrast, in the consortium comprised of Pseudomonas putida PaW340 harbouring camA (+) camB (+) camC and ATCC 39723, PCP accumulated in PaW340 cells but could not be further degraded, which may be due to a permeability barrier of Pseudomonas PaW340 for PCP transportation. The strategy of bacterial co-culture may provide an alternative approach for the bioremediation of HCB contamination. PMID:25532745

  7. 25 CFR 1000.281 - Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance AFA? 1000... who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance... services out of which the claim arose were performed in carrying out the self-governance AFA....

  8. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  9. Removal of a Trapped Endoscopic Catheter from the Gallbladder via Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholecystostomy: Technical Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Stay, Rourke M.; Sonnenberg, Eric van Goodacre, Brian W.; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Wittich, Gerhard R.

    2006-12-15

    Background. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is used for a variety of clinical problems. Methods. Percutaneous cholecystostomy was utilized in a novel setting to resolve a problematic endoscopic situation. Observations. Percutaneous cholecystostomy permitted successful removal of a broken and trapped endoscopic biliary catheter, in addition to helping treat cholecystitis. Conclusion. Another valuable use of percutaneous cholecystostomy is demonstrated, as well as emphasizing the importance of the interplay between endoscopists and interventional radiologists.

  10. [Local anesthesia after percutaneous administration. I].

    PubMed

    Ziegenmeyer, J; Meyer, F

    1976-11-01

    Local anesthesia of the intact skin is difficult because of the skin barrier to epicutaneous penetration. Using solutions of local anesthetics in organic agents, which have the ability of penetrating the skin without causing irreversible damage and enhancing the percutaneous absorption of all materials dissolved therein, topical anesthesia seems to be attainable. A satisfactory method for determining pain threshold in uninjured skin of animals has been set up. Measurments of the pricking pain threshold have been made by exposing the skin of guinea-pigs to defined mechanical and electrical stimuli. A nociceptive muscle reflex (twitch) has been taken as the index of pain sensation. The suppression of this twitch has been used as an indicator of anesthetic potency. Two methods have been applied with varying parameters: stimulation at a fixed intensity until the pain threshold was reached (duration of anesthetic effect) and stimulation with increasing stimulus strenght until the cutaneous reflex was elicited (intensity or "depth" of anesthesia). The local anesthetic effects of lidocaine, fomocaine and procaine bases were studied, after dissolving them in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a wellknown carrier for transmembranal application. The duration of local anesthesia measured by electrical stimuli was longer than that obtained with mechanical ones. Differences are discussed. All results indicate that fomocaine (5%) has a greater local anesthetic potency than procaine (5%) but both are less active than lidocaine (5%). No effect could be seen after application of DMSO alone. PMID:1037079

  11. Minimizing radiation exposure during percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, T T; Preminger, G M; Lipkin, M E

    2015-12-01

    Given the recent trends in growing per capita radiation dose from medical sources, there have been increasing concerns over patient radiation exposure. Patients with kidney stones undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) are at particular risk for high radiation exposure. There exist several risk factors for increased radiation exposure during PNL which include high Body Mass Index, multiple access tracts, and increased stone burden. We herein review recent trends in radiation exposure, radiation exposure during PNL to both patients and urologists, and various approaches to reduce radiation exposure. We discuss incorporating the principles of As Low As reasonably Achievable (ALARA) into clinical practice and review imaging techniques such as ultrasound and air contrast to guide PNL access. Alternative surgical techniques and approaches to reducing radiation exposure, including retrograde intra-renal surgery, retrograde nephrostomy, endoscopic-guided PNL, and minimally invasive PNL, are also highlighted. It is important for urologists to be aware of these concepts and techniques when treating stone patients with PNL. The discussions outlined will assist urologists in providing patient counseling and high quality of care. PMID:26354615

  12. Early experience with percutaneous lateral discectomy.

    PubMed

    Stern, M B

    1989-01-01

    Seventeen patients were treated by percutaneous lumbar discectomy for a herniated disc and sciatica. The criteria for inclusion in this series included: (1) a protruding disc in the lumbar area causing neural compression; (2) persistent sciatica; (3) failure of conservative treatment; (4) magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomographic, or myelographic confirmation of the protrusion; and (5) chronic low-back pain with definite evidence of a protruding disc at the appropriate level. The only contraindication to the procedure is the presence of an extruded fragment. There were ten male and seven female patients, with an average age of 40 years. The operation was performed under local anesthesia and by the method of Hijikata. Six cases were at L5-S1, nine at L4-L5, four at L3-L4, and one at L2-L3. Fourteen of 16 patients were relieved of their symptoms. One operation was aborted due to the inability to pass the cannula beneath arthritic facet joints. One complication occurred early while using general anesthetic. An L5 nerve root was injured, causing a permanent drop foot. Major possible complications include infection, nerve root injury, and vascular injury. The success rate with an average follow-up period of six and one-half months was 87.5%. PMID:2910618

  13. Percutaneous endovascular stents: an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wright, K C; Wallace, S; Charnsangavej, C; Carrasco, C H; Gianturco, C

    1985-07-01

    Percutaneous, expanding, endovascular stents were constructed of stainless steel wire formed in a zig-zag pattern. Stents were placed for varying periods of time in the jugular vein, vena cava, and abdominal aorta in each of five adult dogs. The dilating force of the stents could be controlled by different wire size, number and angle of wire bends, and stent length. In addition, multiple stents could be placed one inside the other or one after the other, depending on the circumstance. The stents distended the vessels and increased their diameter. No flow defects, luminal narrowing, or occlusion were noted in any of the stented vessels, even after 6 months. Side branches bridged by the stents remained patent and showed no indication of narrowing. Stent wires became encased by a proliferation of the tunica intima where they contacted the vessel wall. Encasement was slower and less extensive in the abdominal aorta. No vascular erosion or clot formation was found to be associated with any of the stents. PMID:4001423

  14. Percutaneous coronary intervention in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Kully; Nadar, Sunil K

    2015-11-15

    Our population dynamics are changing. The number of octogenarians and older people in the general population is increasing and therefore the number of older patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome or stable angina is increasing. This group has a larger burden of coronary disease and also a greater number of concomitant comorbidities when compared to younger patients. Many of the studies assessing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to date have actively excluded octogenarians. However, a number of studies, both retrospective and prospective, are now being undertaken to reflect the, "real" population. Despite being a higher risk group for both elective and emergency PCIs, octogenarians have the greatest to gain in terms of prognosis, symptomatic relief, and arguably more importantly, quality of life. Important future development will include assessment of patient frailty, encouraging early presentation, addressing gender differences on treatment strategies, identification of culprit lesion(s) and vascular access to minimise vascular complications. We are now appreciating that the new frontier is perhaps recognising and risk stratifying those elderly patients who have the most to gain from PCI. This review article summarises the most relevant trials and studies. PMID:26241641

  15. Percutaneous Local Ablative Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W. Y.; Leung, Thomas W. T.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Ho, Stephen K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review and compare treatment result for percutaneous local ablative therapy (PLAT) with surgical resection in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Summary Background Data PLAT is indicated for small unresectable HCC localized to the liver. From the use of ethanol to the latest technology of radiofrequency ablation, ablative techniques have been refined and their role in the management of HCC established. This review aims to give an overview of various ablative methods, including their efficacy, indications, and limitations, and also tries to look into the future of clinical trials in PLAT. Methods The authors reviewed recent papers in the English medical literature about the use of local ablative therapy for HCC. Focus was given to the results of treatment in terms of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival, and to compare treatment results with those of surgery. Results PLAT for small HCC (<5 cm) with thermal ablation (radiofrequency ablation or microwave coagulation) can achieve effective local control of disease and is superior to ethanol injection. Progressive disease in untreated areas is a common reason for failure. Overall progression-free survival is similar to that of surgical resection. Conclusions Thermal ablation gives good local control of small HCC, is superior to ethanol, and may be comparable to surgical resection in long-term outcome. PMID:12560774

  16. Incidence of retrorenal colon during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdülkadir; Poyraz, Necdet; Unal, Yunus; Ozturk, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate retrorenal colon incidence in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) interventions made in our clinic. Materials and Methods Clinical data of 804 PNL patients, accumulated over a 7 year period (2006-2012), was surveyed. The patient files were reviewed retrospectively, and only those who had abdominal computed tomography (CT) images before PNL intervention were included in the study. In the CT images, the position of both the ascending and descending colon in relation to the right and left kidneys were evaluated. Results According to our hospital reports, 394 patients with CT images were included in the present study 27 patients (6.9%) had retrorenal colon, of which 18 (4.6%) were on the left side, 4 (1.0%) on the right side and 5 (1.3%) had bilateral retrorenal colons. Colonic perforation complication was seen only in two patients and the colonic perforation rate was 0.3%. These two cases had no CT images. Conclusions PNL, in the process of becoming the standard treatment modality, is a safe and reliable technique for renal stone treatment. Colonic injury should be taken into consideration during PNL interventions of the lower pole of the kidney (especially on the left side) due to the location of retrorenal colon. PMID:26005968

  17. Treatment of Colonic Injury During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Colonic injury during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) persists despite the advances in technical equipment and interventional radiology techniques. According to the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications, colonic injury is regarded as a stage IVa complication. Currently, the rate of colonic injury ranges between 0.3% and 0.5%, with an unremarkable difference in incidence between supine and prone PCNL procedures. Colon injury is the most significant complication of PCNL. Colonic injury can result in more complicated open exploration of the abdomen, involving colostomy construction. The necessity of a second operation for the closure of the colostomy causes financial and emotional burden on the patients, patients’ relatives, and surgeons. Currently, the majority of colonic injuries occurring during PCNL are retroperitoneal. The primary treatment option is a conservative approach. It must be kept in mind that the time of diagnosis is as important as the diagnosis itself in colonic injury. Surgeons performing PCNL are advised to be conservative when considering exploratory laparotomy and colostomy construction during treatment of colonic injury. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who underwent left prone PCNL that resulted in retroperitoneal colonic injury, along with a review of the current literature. PMID:26543436

  18. Computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation: concepts and evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erin J; Ellis, Randy E; Pichora, David R

    2013-11-01

    Background The treatment for undisplaced scaphoid waist fractures has evolved from conventional cast immobilization to percutaneous screw insertion. Percutaneous fixation reduces some of the risks of open surgery, but can be technically demanding and carries the risk of radiation exposure. Recently, computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation (CAPSF) has been gaining interest. Materials and Methods Conventional percutaneous scaphoid fixation is performed under fluoroscopic guidance and involves insertion of a guide wire along the length of the scaphoid to facilitate placement of a cannulated screw. Adapting computer-assisted techniques for scaphoid fixation poses several unique challenges including patient tracking and registration. Results To date, five groups have successfully implemented systems for CAPSF. These systems have implemented wrist immobilization strategies to resolve the issue of patient tracking and have developed unique guidance techniques incorporating 2D fluoroscope, cone-beam CT, and ultrasound, to circumvent patient-based registration. Conclusions Computer-aided percutaneous pinning of scaphoid waist fractures can significantly reduce radiation exposure and has the potential to improve the accuracy of this procedure. This article reviews the rationale for, and the evolution of, CAPSF and describes the key principles of computer-assisted technology. PMID:24436833

  19. Septic thrombophlebitis: percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy and thrombolytic therapies.

    PubMed

    Kar, Subrata; Webel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Suppurative thrombophlebitis (Lemierre's syndrome) of the internal jugular vein is a rare and sometimes fatal complication. It commonly occurs from oropharyngeal infections, peripheral lines, complications from dental procedures, gingivitis, or central venous catheterizations. Empiric antibiotics are the initial treatment of choice followed by thrombolytics or surgical thrombectomy in refractory cases. We present a case of septic thrombophlebitis of the right internal jugular vein from a peripherally inserted central venous catheter. We also review the current percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy and thrombolytics therapies for such a rare disorder. Mechanical thrombectomy includes rotational thrombectomy or rheolytic therapies. Devices include the Amplatz thrombectomy device (Microvena), the Arrow-Trerotola Percutaneous thrombolytic device (Arrow), and the Cragg-Casteneda thrombolytic brush (Microtherapeutics). Rheolytic therapies include Angiojet, the Hydrolyzer, and the Oasis Thrombectomy System. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy techniques include rotational fragmentation, aspiration or suction thrombectomy, and hydrodynamic thrombectomy. AngioJet catheters may be used for percutaneous embolectomy in conjunction with pulse spray techniques, which instill thrombolytics locally. Thrombolytics include streptokinase, urokinase, and recombinant-tissue plasminogen activator. Mechanical thrombectomy combined with thrombolytics provide optimal treatment results secondary to their complementary effects. Therefore, patients who are refractory to standard medical therapy and considered poor surgical candidates may benefit from combined percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy with thrombolytics to achieve superior results if no contraindications exist for thrombolytics. PMID:22198069

  20. Computer-Assisted Percutaneous Scaphoid Fixation: Concepts and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erin J.; Ellis, Randy E.; Pichora, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The treatment for undisplaced scaphoid waist fractures has evolved from conventional cast immobilization to percutaneous screw insertion. Percutaneous fixation reduces some of the risks of open surgery, but can be technically demanding and carries the risk of radiation exposure. Recently, computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation (CAPSF) has been gaining interest. Materials and Methods Conventional percutaneous scaphoid fixation is performed under fluoroscopic guidance and involves insertion of a guide wire along the length of the scaphoid to facilitate placement of a cannulated screw. Adapting computer-assisted techniques for scaphoid fixation poses several unique challenges including patient tracking and registration. Results To date, five groups have successfully implemented systems for CAPSF. These systems have implemented wrist immobilization strategies to resolve the issue of patient tracking and have developed unique guidance techniques incorporating 2D fluoroscope, cone-beam CT, and ultrasound, to circumvent patient-based registration. Conclusions Computer-aided percutaneous pinning of scaphoid waist fractures can significantly reduce radiation exposure and has the potential to improve the accuracy of this procedure. This article reviews the rationale for, and the evolution of, CAPSF and describes the key principles of computer-assisted technology. PMID:24436833

  1. Current status of percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty--a review.

    PubMed

    Yimin, Yang; Zhiwei, Ren; Wei, Ma; Jha, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) and kyphoplasty (PK) are the 2vertebral augmentation procedures that have emerged as minimally invasive surgical options to treat painful vertebral compression fractures (VCF) during the last 2 decades. VCF may either be osteoporotic or tumor-associated. Two hundred million women are affected by osteoporosis globally. Vertebral fracture may result in acute pain around the fracture site, loss of vertebral height due to vertebral collapse, spinal instability, and kyphotic deformity. The main goal of the PV and PK procedures is to give immediate pain relief to patients and restore the vertebral height lost due to fracture. In percutaneous vertebroplasty, bone cement is injected through a minimal incision into the fractured site. Kyphoplasty involves insertion of a balloon into the fractured site, followed by inflation-deflation to create a cavity into which the filler material is injected, and the balloon is taken out prior to cement injection. This literature review presents a qualitative overview on the current status of vertebral augmentation procedures,especially PV and PK, and compares the efficacy and safety of these 2 procedures. The review consists of a brief history of the development of these 2 techniques, a discussion on the current research on the bone cement, clinical outcome of the 2 procedures, and it also sheds light on ongoing and future research to maximize the efficacy and safety of vertebral augmentation procedures. PMID:24097261

  2. Current status of percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty – a review

    PubMed Central

    Yimin, Yang; Zhiwei, Ren; Wei, Ma; Jha, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) and kyphoplasty (PK) are the 2 vertebral augmentation procedures that have emerged as minimally invasive surgical options to treat painful vertebral compression fractures (VCF) during the last 2 decades. VCF may either be osteoporotic or tumor-associated. Two hundred million women are affected by osteoporosis globally. Vertebral fracture may result in acute pain around the fracture site, loss of vertebral height due to vertebral collapse, spinal instability, and kyphotic deformity. The main goal of the PV and PK procedures is to give immediate pain relief to patients and restore the vertebral height lost due to fracture. In percutaneous vertebroplasty, bone cement is injected through a minimal incision into the fractured site. Kyphoplasty involves insertion of a balloon into the fractured site, followed by inflation-deflation to create a cavity into which the filler material is injected, and the balloon is taken out prior to cement injection. This literature review presents a qualitative overview on the current status of vertebral augmentation procedures, especially PV and PK, and compares the efficacy and safety of these 2 procedures. The review consists of a brief history of the development of these 2 techniques, a discussion on the current research on the bone cement, clinical outcome of the 2 procedures, and it also sheds light on ongoing and future research to maximize the efficacy and safety of vertebral augmentation procedures. PMID:24097261

  3. Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy for the Treatment of Arterial Thromboembolic Occlusions Following Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schleder, Stephan; Diekmann, Matthias; Manke, Christoph; Heiss, Peter

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the technical success and the early clinical outcome of patients undergoing percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) for the treatment of arterial thromboembolism following percutaneous infrainguinal transluminal angioplasty (PTA).MethodsIn this single-center study, during a period of 7 years retrospectively, 47 patients (22 male, 47 %) with a mean age of 73 (range 53–96) years were identified in whom PAT was performed for the treatment of thromboembolic complications of infrainguinal PTA. Primary technical success was defined as residual stenosis of <50 % in diameter after sole PAT, whereas secondary technical success was defined as residual stenosis of <50 % in diameter after PAT and additional PTA and/or stenting. Clinical outcome parameters (e.g., need for further intervention, minor/major amputation) were evaluated for the 30-day postinterventional period.ResultsPrimary technical success was achieved in 64 % of patients (30/47); secondary technical success was obtained in 96 % of patients (45/47). Clinical outcome data were available in 38 patients. In 87 % of patients (33/38), there was no need for further intervention within the 30-day postinterventional period. In three patients, minor amputations were conducted due to preexisting ulcerations (Rutherford Category 5 respectively).ConclusionsPAT enables endovascular treatment of iatrogenic thromboembolic complications after PTA with good technical and early clinical results and minimal morbidity.

  4. 21 CFR 880.5970 - Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular... and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5970 Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter. (a) Identification. A percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter is a device...

  5. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  6. Geodesy and the UNAVCO Consortium: Three Decades of Innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, L. R.; Miller, M. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO, a non-profit, university consortium that supports geoscience research using geodesy, began with the ingenious recognition that the nascent Global Positioning System constellation (GPS) could be used to investigate earth processes. The consortium purchased one of the first commercially available GPS receivers, Texas Instrument's TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator, in 1984 to measure plate deformation. This early work was highlighted in a technology magazine, GPSWorld, in 1990. Over a 30-year period, UNAVCO and the community have helped advance instrument design for mobility, flexibility, efficiency and interoperability, so research could proceed with higher precision and under ever challenging conditions. Other innovations have been made in data collection, processing, analysis, management and archiving. These innovations in tools, methods and data have had broader impacts as they have found greater utility beyond research for timing, precise positioning, safety, communication, navigation, surveying, engineering and recreation. Innovations in research have expanded the utility of geodetic tools beyond the solid earth science through creative analysis of the data and the methods. For example, GPS sounding of the atmosphere is now used for atmospheric and space sciences. GPS reflectrometry, another critical advance, supports soil science, snow science and ecological research. Some research advances have had broader impacts for society by driving innovations in hazards risk reduction, hazards response, resource management, land use planning, surveying, engineering and other uses. Furthermore, the geodetic data is vital for the design of space missions, testing and advancing communications, and testing and dealing with interference and GPS jamming. We will discuss three decades (and counting) of advances by the National Science Foundation's premiere geodetic facility, consortium and some of the many geoscience principal investigators that have driven innovations in

  7. Effect of temperature on perchloroethylene dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the kinetics of growth, substrate metabolism, and perchloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium is reported. In all cases, a simple kinetic model accurately reflected experimental data. Values for the substrate and methane yield coefficients, and the maximum specific growth rate are fairly consistent at each temperature. Also, the substrate and methane yield coefficients show little temperature sensitivity. In contrast, both the maximum specific growth rate and the PCE dechlorination yield coefficient (Y{sub PCE}) are temperature dependent.

  8. Exploring the genetic basis of stroke. Spanish stroke genetics consortium.

    PubMed

    Giralt-Steinhauer, E; Jiménez-Conde, J; Soriano Tárraga, C; Mola, M; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Ois, A; Fernández-Cádenas, I; Carrera, C; Montaner, J; Díaz Navarro, R M; Vives-Bauzá, C; Roquer, J

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of stroke genetics studies ranging from the candidate gene approach to more recent studies by the genome wide association. It highlights the complexity of stroke owing to its different aetiopathogenic mechanisms, the difficulties in studying its genetic component, and the solutions provided to date. The study emphasises the importance of cooperation between the different centres, whether this takes places occasionally or through the creation of lasting consortiums. This strategy is currently essential to the completion of high-quality scientific studies that allow researchers to gain a better knowledge of the genetic component of stroke as it relates to aetiology, treatment, and prevention. PMID:23831412

  9. Accessible mixotrophic growth of denitrifying sulfide removal consortium.

    PubMed

    Juang, Ruey-Shin; Wong, Biing-Teo; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-06-01

    Nitrate, sulfide and organic matters in wastewaters can be removed simultaneously by denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process. Complicated interactions between different microbial groups in the DSR medium render the process design and control difficult to implement. A consortium with DSR activity was grown mixotrophically at varying concentrations of nitrate, acetate or ammonium. The kinetic diagram previously proposed was adopted to quantitatively represent DSR performance with accessible regimes of the diagram being identified. Example on the use of the so-yielded accessible regime was provided. PMID:25795451

  10. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants. PMID:20407917

  11. Prevention and Management of Infectious Complications of Percutaneous Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Philip, Asher; Richter, Michael D.; Gupta, Sanjay; Lessne, Mark L.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications following interventional radiology (IR) procedures can cause significant patient morbidity and, potentially, mortality. As the number and breadth of IR procedures grow, it becomes increasingly evident that interventional radiologists must possess a thorough understanding of these potential infectious complications. Furthermore, given the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, emphasis on cost containment, and attention to quality of care, it is critical to have infection control strategies to maximize patient safety. This article reviews infectious complications associated with percutaneous ablation of liver tumors, transarterial embolization of liver tumors, uterine fibroid embolization, percutaneous nephrostomy, percutaneous biliary interventions, central venous catheters, and intravascular stents. Emphasis is placed on incidence, risk factors, prevention, and management. With the use of these strategies, IR procedures can be performed with reduced risk of infectious complications. PMID:26038616

  12. Benign Biliary Strictures: Diagnostic Evaluation and Approaches to Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted to help identify and treat biliary strictures that can result from a variety of benign etiologies. Mainstays of noninvasive imaging for benign biliary strictures include ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and computed tomography cholangiography. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the invasive diagnostic procedure of choice, allowing both localization of a stricture and treatment. Percutaneous biliary interventions are reserved for patients who are not candidates for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (eg, history of distal gastrectomy and biliary-enteric anastomosis to a jejunal roux limb). This review discusses the roles of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage in the diagnosis of benign biliary strictures. The methodology for crossing benign biliary strictures, approaches to balloon dilation, management of recalcitrant strictures (ie, large-bore biliary catheters and retrievable covered stents), and the expected outcomes and complications of percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures are also addressed. PMID:26615161

  13. Current readings: Percutaneous ablation for pulmonary metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Matthew T; Pomykala, Kelsey L; Suh, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation is a technique for maintaining local control of metastatic lung lesions that may, in selected patients, confer a survival benefit over no treatment or systemic therapy alone. Although the currently accepted treatment for oligometastatic pulmonary disease is surgical resection, the existing body of literature, including the recent investigations reviewed within this article, supports a role for percutaneous ablation as an important and relatively safe therapeutic option for nonsurgical and in carefully selected surgical patients, conferring survival benefits competitive with surgical metastasectomy. Continued clinical investigations are needed to further understand the nuances of thermal technologies and applications to treat lung primary and secondary pulmonary malignancy, directly compare available therapeutic options and further define the role of percutaneous image-guided ablation in the treatment of pulmonary metastatic disease. PMID:25527018

  14. Perivascular Inflammatory Reaction After Percutaneous Placement of Covered Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Johann; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Brossmann, Joachim; Steffens, Johann C.; Heller, Martin

    1996-09-15

    A 52-year-old woman with an extensive superficial femoral artery occlusion was treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Because of extensive dissections, two covered stents were placed percutaneously. The intervention was successful with respect to vessel patency, but local pain and fever developed 5 hr after the intervention. Swelling of the thigh occurred, but deep venous thrombosis was excluded. MRI revealed pronounced soft-tissue edema in the adductor canal that persisted for 4 weeks. The fever responded to antiinflammatory medication, but the pain remained for 4 weeks. The vessel was patent at the last follow-up, 8 weeks after graft placement. Soft-tissue edema after percutaneous placement of covered stents has been reported previously. The cause of the inflammatory reaction is unclear.

  15. CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the chest: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Lazguet, Younes; Maarouf, Rachid; Karrou, Marouan; Skiker, Imane; Alloubi, Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to report our first experience of CT guided percutaneous thoracic biopsy and to demonstrate the accuracy and safety of this procedure. This was a retrospective study of 28 CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsies of the Chest performed on 24 patients between November 2014 and April 2015. Diagnosis was achieved in 18 patients (75%), negative results were found in 3 patients (12,5%). Biopsy was repeated in these cases with two positive results. Complications were seen in 7 patients (29%), Hemoptysis in 5 patients (20%), Pneumothorax in 1 patient (4,1%) and vaso-vagal shock in 1 patient (4,1%). CT Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsy of the Chest is a safe, minimally invasive procedure with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosis of lung lesions.

  16. Paravalvular Regurgitation: Clinical Outcomes in Surgical and Percutaneous Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Carlos Passos; Rezek, Daniele; Costa, Eduardo Paiva; de Carvalho, Edvagner Sergio Leite; Moscoso, Freddy Antonio Brito; Taborga, Percy Richard Chavez; Jeronimo, Andreia Dias; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Ramos, Auristela Isabel de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Paravalvular regurgitation (paravalvular leak) is a serious and rare complication associated with valve replacement surgery. Studies have shown a 3% to 6% incidence of paravalvular regurgitation with hemodynamic repercussion. Few studies have compared surgical and percutaneous approaches for repair. Objectives To compare the surgical and percutaneous approaches for paravalvular regurgitation repair regarding clinical outcomes during hospitalization and one year after the procedure. Methods This is a retrospective, descriptive and observational study that included 35 patients with paravalvular leak, requiring repair, and followed up at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology between January 2011 and December 2013. Patients were divided into groups according to the established treatment and followed up for 1 year after the procedure. Results The group submitted to percutaneous treatment was considered to be at higher risk for complications because of the older age of patients, higher prevalence of diabetes, greater number of previous valve surgeries and lower mean creatinine clearance value. During hospitalization, both groups had a large number of complications (74.3% of cases), with no statistical difference in the analyzed outcomes. After 1 year, the percutaneous group had a greater number of re-interventions (8.7% vs 20%, p = 0.57) and a higher mortality rate (0% vs. 20%, p = 0.08). A high incidence of residual mitral leak was observed after the percutaneous procedure (8.7% vs. 50%, p = 0.08). Conclusion Surgery is the treatment of choice for paravalvular regurgitation. The percutaneous approach can be an alternative for patients at high surgical risk. PMID:27305109

  17. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jihion; Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Joonho; Kwon, Koo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Seo, Hyungseok; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Park, Hyung Keun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous nephrolithotomy is minimally invasive, it is associated with several complications, including extravasation of fluid and urine, the need for a blood transfusion, and septicemia. However, little is known about pulmonary complications after this procedure. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors for and outcomes of pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. All consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2001 and 2014 were identified and divided into group A (no clinically significant pulmonary complications) and group B (clinically significant pulmonary complications). Preoperative and intraoperative variables and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Independent risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The study included 560 patients: 378 (67.5%) in group A and 182 (32.5%) in group B. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index (odds ratio = 1.062, P = 0.026), intraoperative red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio = 2.984, P = 0.012), and an intercostal surgical approach (odds ratio = 3.046, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the duration of hospital stay was significantly longer (8.4 ± 4.3 days vs 7.6 ± 3.4 days, P = 0.010) and the intensive care unit admission rate was significantly higher [13 (7.1%) vs 1 (0.3%), P < 0.001] in group B than in group A. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index, intraoperative red blood cell transfusion, and an intercostal surgical approach. Postoperative pulmonary complications were associated with poor outcomes. These results may provide useful information for the perioperative management of pulmonary complications after

  18. A case of micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy with macro complication.

    PubMed

    Dede, Onur; Utangaç, Mazhar; Dağguli, Mansur; Hatipoğlu, Namık Kemal; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Bodakçı, Mehmet Nuri

    2015-06-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is accepted as the standard management approach for kidney stones that are either refractory to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy or are >2 cm in diameter. The recently developed micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (microperc) technique provides intrarenal access under full vision using an optic instrument with a smaller calibration. A lesser amount of bleeding has been reported with the use of this method. Here we present a case of a bleeding complication on postoperative day 15 after a microperc procedure used to treat a left kidney stone. The complication led to retention of bloody urine in the bladder and required transfusion of 5 units of whole blood. PMID:26328211

  19. Angioscopy by a new percutaneous transluminal coronary angioscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurada, Masami; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Miyamoto, Akira; Arakawa, Koh; Satomura, Kimio; Shibuya, Toshio; Yanagida, Shigeki; Okamoto, Yasuyuki; Kurita, Akira; Nakamura, Haruo; Arai, Tsunenori; Suda, Akira; Kikuchi, Makoto; Utsumi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Akai, Yoshiro

    1990-07-01

    We developed a new percutaneous transluminal coronary angioscopic catheter for visualization of coronary artery.This angioscopic catheter has an inflatable balloon at the distal tip and one - directional angulation mechanism.We performed percutaneous transluminal coronary angioscopy during cardiac catheterization cosecutively in 155 patients. With this angioscope , we could get good'-'fair visualization in 81%(131 of 162 lesions)without major complications.We could investigate the endothelial macropathology of ischemic heart disease such as unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

  20. Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices: New Deus Ex Machina?

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Diego; Cook, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    The development of ventricular assist devices has broadened the means with which one can treat acute heart failure. Percutaneous ventricular assist devices (pVAD) have risen from recent technological advances. They are smaller, easier, and faster to implant, all important qualities in the setting of acute heart failure. The present paper briefly describes the functioning and assets of the most common devices used today. It gives an overview of the current evidence and indications for left ventricular assist device use in cardiogenic shock and high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention. Finally, extracorporeal life support devices are dealt with in the setting of hemodynamic support. PMID:22091361

  1. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy.

    PubMed

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  2. Atlantoaxial Joint Synovial Cyst: Diagnosis and Percutaneous Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Velan, Osvaldo; Rabadan, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-11-15

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  3. Image-Guided Percutaneous Splenic Biopsy and Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Sammon, Jennifer; Twomey, Maria; Crush, Lee; Maher, Michael M.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous splenic biopsy and drainage are relatively safe and accurate procedures. The risk of major complication (1.3%) following percutaneous splenic biopsy does not exceed that of other solid intra-abdominal organ biopsies, and it has less morbidity and mortality than splenectomy. Both computed tomography and ultrasound can be used to provide image guidance for biopsy and drainage. The safety profile of fine-needle aspiration cytology is better than core needle biopsy, but core biopsy has superior diagnostic accuracy. PMID:24293803

  4. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy for acute neonatal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Helin, Radley; Bhat, Rama; Rao, Bhaskara

    2007-01-01

    Use of a percutaneously-inserted cholecystostomy drainage tube is an effective therapeutic option for acute hyperbilirubinemia in severely-ill adult patients, but to our knowledge has not been previously reported in infants. We describe an infant who developed acute extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction with marked conjugated (direct) hyperbilirubinemia, and who was determined to be an unsuitable surgical candidate. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed and resulted in prompt, significant, and sustained decline in serum bilirubin levels. Potential risks and benefits, as well as suggested indications for the procedure are discussed. PMID:17568158

  5. Managing Complications of Percutaneous Surgery of the First Metatarsal.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Yuan; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Yong-Tao

    2016-09-01

    The percutaneous osteotomy based on a Hohmanntype first metatarsal subcapital linear osteotomy was introduced into Mainland China in the late 1980s. No internal fixation is used for stabilization of the osteotomy, leading unfortunately to unpredictable results. Despite its high acceptance by patients and enthusiasm by surgeons at present, the clinical outcomes of percutaneous surgery have not been promising. The authors have no experience of performing this osteotomy and report only on their management of the complications of this technique and their recommended treatment algorithm. PMID:27524703

  6. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  7. Double-orifice mitral valve treated by percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Thomas George; Revankar, Vinod Raghunath; Papanna, Monica; Srinivasan, Harshini

    2016-07-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve is an rare anomaly characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus and 2 orifices that open into the left ventricle. It is often associated with other congenital anomalies, most commonly atrioventricular canal defects, and rarely associated with a stenotic or regurgitant mitral valve. A patient who was diagnosed with congenital double-orifice mitral valve with severe mitral stenosis was treated successfully by percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy rather than the conventional open surgical approach, demonstrating the utility of percutaneous correction of this anomaly. PMID:26045488

  8. Contemporary anticoagulation therapy in patients undergoing percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Bhatty, Shaun; Ali, Asghar; Shetty, Ranjith; Sumption, Kevin F; Topaz, On; Jovin, Ion S

    2014-04-01

    The proper use of anticoagulants is crucial for ensuring optimal patient outcomes post percutaneous interventions in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Anticoagulant agents such as unfractionated heparin, a thrombin inhibitor; low-molecular weight heparins, predominantly Factor Xa inhibitors; fondaparinux, a Factor Xa inhibitor and bivalirudin, a direct thrombin inhibitor have been developed to target various steps in the coagulation cascade to prevent formation of thrombin. Optimal anticoagulation achieves the correct balance between thrombosis and bleeding and is related to optimal outcomes with minimal complications. This review will discuss the mechanisms and appropriate use of current and emerging anticoagulant therapies used during percutaneous interventions. PMID:24506409

  9. Extensive subcutaneous emphysema complicating a percutaneous Mumford procedure.

    PubMed

    Saseendar, Shanmugasundaram; Tan, Si Heng Sharon; Vijayan, Sandeep; Pawaskar, Aditya; Kumar, Veerasingam Prem

    2016-06-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema may be a part of a life-threatening pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax and usually does not occur alone. A case of a 75-year-old lady who underwent a percutaneous Mumford procedure for acromioclavicular osteoarthrosis has been reported. She developed extensive subcutaneous emphysema of the neck, chest, bilateral shoulders, and upper arms, in the absence of pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax, during the procedure. Isolated subcutaneous emphysema as a complication of a percutaneous Mumford procedure has not been reported so far in the English literature. The possible mechanism of this complication is discussed. Understanding the mechanism is essential in avoiding this preventable complication. PMID:25059337

  10. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  11. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  12. Supracostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Maneesh; Krishnappa, Pramod; Subudhi, Santosh Kumar; Krishnamoorthy, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A widely prevalent fear of thoracic complications with the supracostal approach has led to its underutilization in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We frequently use the supracostal approach and compared the efficacy and thoracic complications of infracostal, supra 12th, and supra 11th punctures. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study of patients who underwent PCNL between January 2005 and December 2012. The patients were divided into three groups based on the access: infracostal, supra 12th (between the 11th and 12th ribs) and supra 11th (between the 10th and 11th ribs). Clearance rates, fall in hemoglobin levels, transfusion rates, perioperative analgesic requirements, hospital stay and thoracic complications were compared. Results: Seven hundred patients were included for analysis. There were 179 (25.5%) patients in the supra 11th group, 187 (26.7%) patients in the supra 12th group and 334 (47.8%) patients in the infracostal group. The overall clearance rate was 78% with no difference in the three groups. The postoperative analgesic requirements were significantly higher in the supracostal groups and showed a graded increase from infracostal to supra 12th to supra 11th. During the study period, only 2 patients required angioembolization (0.3%) and none required open exploration. The number of patients requiring intercostal chest drain insertion was extremely low, at 1.6% and 2.2% in the supra 12th and supra 11th groups, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of the supracostal approach including punctures above the 11th rib, albeit at the cost of an increase in thoracic complications. Staying in the line of the calyx has helped us to minimize the most dreaded complication of bleeding requiring angioembolization. PMID:26941494

  13. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anuj; Tarsin, Rajab; Elhabbash, Basma; Zagan, Nuri; Markus, Rabia; Drebeka, Sawsen; Abdelmola, Khaled; Shawish, Taib; Shebani, Abdulhafidh; Abdelmola, Tamer; Elusta, Ahmad; Ehtuish, Ehtuish Faraj

    2011-07-01

    This study was done to assess the safety and efficacy of real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and to determine the optimal period of observation required as well as to ascertain the risk factors for any ensuing complications. Between 1 st February 2006 and 31 st January 2008, a total of 86 PRBs were performed by the radiologist using an automated biopsy gun with 16-gauge needle at the National Organ Transplant Centre, Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya. Prior to the procedure coagulation profile was done in all the patients. All patients were kept on strict bed rest for 6-hours post-procedure. Of the 86 renal biopsies performed, 78 patients were referred from Rheumatology Department and 8 were post-kidney transplant recipients. There were 23 males with age ranging from 15 to 56 years and 63 females with age ranging from 16 to 66 years. A mean of 17.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. A glomerular yield of less than five glomeruli was seen in only four biopsies. Class I lupus nephritis (LN) was seen in one patient, class II LN in seven patients, class III LN in 13 patients and class IV LN in 29 patients. All the eight renal allografts were diagnosed as either acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial rejection. The overall complication rate was 5.8% and these complications were observed within 6 hours of biopsy. No late complications were seen. PRB under real-time ultra-sound guidance is a safe and efficacious procedure to establish the histological diagnosis of the renal disease and may be done as an out-patient procedure. A post-biopsy observation time of 6 hours appears to be optimal. PMID:21743221

  14. The consortium approach to producing Earth Science courseware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerbutts, W. T. C.

    1999-05-01

    A unique project to develop a suite of computer-aided learning modules for use in Earth Science teaching and learning has been underway in the UK since 1992. The consortium approach has been used to develop 21 stand-alone courseware modules for use in degree-level courses throughout the UK and beyond. Authoring software and multimedia techniques have been employed to present text, graphics and movies into structured sequences of teaching material that can be used by both teachers and students of geology. Interactions are used extensively in order to retain student interest and provide feedback on progress. Students are encouraged to work through material at their own pace and repeat sequences they do not fully understand. The courseware has been produced mostly by academics involved in teaching and was testing rigorously before courseware was released for general use. The consortium approach to producing courseware is suited to large projects and situations where CAL software is aimed at a wide range of users.

  15. Extending ACTS Operations Through a University-Based Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert; Krawcyzk, Richard; Irwin, Dennis; Kruse, Hans

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program was slated for decommissioning in October 2000 as was announced at the 6th Ka-band Utilization Conference in May 2000. Quite a celebration was had at that event too centering on the decommissioning of this very successful technology program. With plans in place to move the spacecraft to an orbital graveyard and then shut the system down, NASA was challenged to consider the feasibility of extending operations for education and research purposes provided that an academic organization would be willing to cover operations costs. Continuing operations of the system was determined viable and in the fall of 2000, an announcement was made by NASA to consider extending operations. Plans are now in place to continue the operations of ACTS through a university-based consortium led by Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Initial plans are for two more years of operations, with options to extend up to a total of four years. This paper will present the change in plans to continue operations of ACTS. A description of the multi-month transition of the spacecraft to its new and final orbital location is provided. With the spacecraft at this new location, an update on its performance is presented as well as estimates of long-term performance. The consortium development will be presented along with its organization, membership, and operations plans for using ACTS.

  16. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  17. The Latin American Consortium of Studies in Obesity (LASO)

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, L. E.; Casas, J. P.; Herrera, V. M.; Miranda, J. J.; Perel, P.; Pichardo, R.; González, A.; Sanchez, J. R.; Ferreccio, C.; Aguilera, X.; Silva, E.; Oróstegui, M.; Gómez, L. F.; Chirinos, J. A.; Medina-Lezama, J.; Pérez, C. M.; Suárez, E.; Ortiz, A. P.; Rosero, L.; Schapochnik, N.; Ortiz, Z.; Ferrante, D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Current, high-quality data are needed to evaluate the health impact of the epidemic of obesity in Latin America. The Latin American Consortium of Studies of Obesity (LASO) has been established, with the objectives of (i) Accurately estimating the prevalence of obesity and its distribution by sociodemographic characteristics; (ii) Identifying ethnic, socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of obesity; (iii) Estimating the association between various anthropometric indicators or obesity and major cardiovascular risk factors and (iv) Quantifying the validity of standard definitions of the various indexes of obesity in Latin American population. To achieve these objectives, LASO makes use of individual data from existing studies. To date, the LASO consortium includes data from 11 studies from eight countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela), including a total of 32 462 subjects. This article describes the overall organization of LASO, the individual studies involved and the overall strategy for data analysis. LASO will foster the development of collaborative obesity research among Latin American investigators. More important, results from LASO will be instrumental to inform health policies aiming to curtail the epidemic of obesity in the region. PMID:19438980

  18. Electron donor preference of a reductive dechlorinating consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium was developed by the USGS and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for use in bioaugmentation applications. The consortium had the capacity to completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1.1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. A suite of electron donors with characteristics useful for bioaugmentation applications was tested. The electron donors included lactate (the donor used during WBC-2 development), ethanol, chitin (Chitorem???), hydrogen releasing compound (HRC???), emulsified vegetable oil (Newman Zone???), and hydrogen gas. Ethanol, lactate, and chitin were particularly effective with respect to stimulating, supporting, and sustaining reductive dechlorination of the broad suite of chemicals that WBC-2 biodegraded. Chitorem??? was the most effective "slow release" electron donor tested. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  19. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  20. Comparison Between Percutaneous Transhepatic Rigid Cholangioscopic Lithotripsy and Conventional Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholangioscopic Surgery for Hepatolithiasis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Beiwang; Huang, Binyuan; Xie, Jiafen; Liu, Yanmin; Zhu, Canhua; Ye, Chen; Zhou, Zixuan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) is one option for treating hepatolithiasis without surgical resection. This approach can use conventional biliary drainage methods over a long period, but a shorter procedure needs to be evolved. Objective: To evaluate the short-term and the long-term therapeutic outcomes of percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotripsy (PTCSL) in comparison with conventional PTCS. Methods: In this retrospective study, 118 patients with hepatolithiasis were enrolled who underwent treatment in our hospital between March 2007 and July 2014. About 67 of them received PTCSL and the remaining 51 patients received conventional PTCS. Preoperative data, surgical operation-related records, the postoperative therapeutic effect, and the long-term hepatolithiasis recurrence rate were collected for comparison between the 2 groups. Results: The age, sex, and surgical history were similar between the 2 groups, but there was a significant difference in the Child-Pugh score, with more grade 3 patients in the PTCS group (P=0.002). However, the operation time, intraoperative blood infusion, and the blood loss were similar between the 2 groups. The final clearance ratio of calculus in the PTCSL group was significantly better than in the PTCS group after multivariate analysis (P=0.021; OR=0.201; 95% CI, 0.051-0.785). Calculus recurrence was 9% (PTCSL) and 22% (PTCS). The postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the PTCSL group (P=0.001; OR=1.337; 95% CI, 1.132-1.58). Conclusions: PTCSL was a satisfactory therapeutic option for hepatolithiasis treatment, with less operation time and a superior long-term therapeutic effect compared with conventional PTCS. PMID:26679679

  1. Ultra-mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A minimally-invasive option for percutaneous stone removal

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Madhu Sudan; Agarwal, Ketan; Jindal, Tarun; Sharma, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has witnessed rapid advancements, the latest being ultra-mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (UMP), which makes the use of 11–13F sheaths as compared to 24–30F sizes used in conventional PCNL. This miniaturization aims to reduce morbidity and improve patient outcomes. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of UMP and report our ourtcomes. Patients and Methods: A total of 120 patients underwent UMP from July 2012 to March 2014. These patients had a single unilateral renal stone measuring between 8 and 20 mm. All patients underwent UMP using a 3F nephroscope, 7.5F inner sheath, and 11F or 13F outer metallic cannula, which served as the Amplatz sheath. Stone fragmentation and clearance were achieved with holmium laser. No nephrostomy or stent was used routinely. Results: Complete stone fragmentation was achieved in 114 out of 120 patients (95%) using UMP; whereas the remaining 6 were converted into mini-PCNL using a 12.5F nephroscope and 15F Amplatz sheath. The mean operative time was 39.7 ± 15.4 min, and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 22.3 ± 2.2 h. Postoperatively, 6 (5%) patients had residual fragments measuring ≤4 mm. At the 2 weeks follow-up, the stone-free status was >99% (119/120). There were no significant postoperative complications. Conclusion: This study shows UMP to be an effective and safe procedure for managing stones up to 20 mm. This procedure offers an attractive alternative to shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde intrarenal surgery for managing small stones. PMID:27127356

  2. The Detroit Consortium. A Model for City/University Collaboration on Urban Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Otto; Musial, John J.

    Results are reported of a NSF grant awarded to Wayne State University in 1976 for support of the project entitled "University-Community Consortium." The project included (1) identification of 16 problem areas by the city for which they wanted policy option papers from the consortium; (2) a three-part survey of city-related academic efforts as seen…

  3. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  4. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Trkov, A.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  5. Third Progress and Information Report of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Connie W.; And Others

    This description of major activities and accomplishments of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of the States (V-TECS) since the second progress report of May, 1975, is designed to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the processes and procedures used by the consortium in achieving its major goal: The production of catalogs…

  6. The West Virginia Consortium for Faculty and Course Development in International Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sophia; Maxwell, John

    The West Virginia Consortium for Faculty and Course Development in International Studies (FACDIS) is described in this report. FACDIS, a consortium of 21 West Virginia institutions of higher education, assists in international studies course development, revision, and enrichment. It also helps faculty remain current in their fields and in new…

  7. 42 CFR 93.306 - Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of Institutions Compliance and Assurances § 93.306 Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings. (a) An... qualified by practice and experience to conduct research misconduct proceedings. (b) A consortium may be...

  8. 42 CFR 93.306 - Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of Institutions Compliance and Assurances § 93.306 Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings. (a) An... qualified by practice and experience to conduct research misconduct proceedings. (b) A consortium may be...

  9. 42 CFR 93.306 - Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of Institutions Compliance and Assurances § 93.306 Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings. (a) An... qualified by practice and experience to conduct research misconduct proceedings. (b) A consortium may be...

  10. Wisconsin Area Planning and Development. Consortium Project, Title I, Higher Education Act 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Univ. Extension.

    The Consortium for Area Planning and Development was established in 1967 to implement the basic purposes of Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965. The Consortium's first seminar was held in May 1968 and was attended by 25 project leaders, local and state government officials, technical consultants, and representatives of various institutions…

  11. 77 FR 8252 - The International Consortium of Energy Managers; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ..., using the eComment system at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/ecomment.asp . You must include your name... Energy Regulatory Commission The International Consortium of Energy Managers; Notice of Preliminary... Applications On January 6, 2012, The International Consortium of Energy Managers filed an application,...

  12. The PRRS Host Genomic Consortium (PHGC) Database: Management of large data sets.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In any consortium project where large amounts of phenotypic and genotypic data are collected across several research labs, issues arise with maintenance and analysis of datasets. The PRRS Host Genomic Consortium (PHGC) Database was developed to meet this need for the PRRS research community. The sch...

  13. Final Report: Appalachian Consortium. Evaluation of a Dissemination and Diffusion Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsbery Systems Analysis, Ltd., Flushing, NY.

    The Appalachian Consortium was evaluated as an organization for the dissemination of educational information regarding programs for the early identification of preschool handicapped children. Chapter I provides a historical overview and discusses the Consortium's independence from the Appalachian Educational Laboratory. The chapter also indicates…

  14. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  15. 15 CFR 918.6 - Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duration of Sea Grant Regional... REGULATIONS SEA GRANTS § 918.6 Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation. Designation will be made... consistent with the goals of the Act. Continuation of the Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation...

  16. Degradation of dicamba by an anaerobic consortium enriched from wetland soil.

    PubMed Central

    Taraban, R H; Berry, D F; Berry, D A; Walker, H L

    1993-01-01

    The biodegradability of dicamba was investigated under anaerobic conditions with a consortium enriched from wetland soil. Degradation proceeded through an initial demethylation reaction, forming 3,6-dichlorosalicylic acid, followed by reductive dechlorination, forming 6-chlorosalicylic acid. The consortium, consisting of a sulfate reducer, three methanogens, and a fermenter, was unable to mineralize the aromatic ring. PMID:8357265

  17. Metabolic ability and individual characteristics of an atrazine-degrading consortium DNC5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Cao, Bo; Jiang, Zhao; Dong, Xiaonan; Hu, Miao; Wang, Zhigang

    2012-10-30

    A stable four-member bacterial consortium, DNC5 that was capable of metabolizing atrazine was isolated from corn-planted soil. The main objective of this paper is to characterize the individual metabolic characteristics and the mutualism of the cultivable members in the consortium DNC5. Substrates utilizing character of each community member indicate that the primary organism in this consortium is Arthrobacter sp. DNS10, which was the only strain capable of mineralizing atrazine to cyanuric acid. Two secondary strains (Bacillus subtilis DNS4 and Variovorax sp. DNS12) utilized cyanuric acid during the atrazine degradation process. Meanwhile, we found that a metabolite (isopropylamine) inhibited the atrazine degrading species Arthrobacter sp. DNS10. The last strain (Arthrobacter sp. DNS9) of this consortium played a role in reducing this inhibition by utilizing isopropylamine for its growth. Altogether this is a new combination of isolates in an atrazine degrading consortium. The growth and the degradation rate of consortium DNC5 were faster than that of the single strain DNS10. The high degradation ability of the consortium showed good potential for atrazine biodegradation. This study will contribute toward a better understanding about metabolic activities of atrazine degrading consortium, which are generally considered to be responsible for atrazine mineralization in the natural environment. PMID:22981745

  18. The Launch of the Philadelphia Education Research Consortium: Lessons Learned from the First Year of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Philadelphia Education Research Consortium (PERC) was launched in July 2014 as an innovative place-based consortium of educational research partners from multiple sectors. Its primary objective is to provide research and analyses on some of the city's most pressing education issues. As such, PERC's research agenda is driven by both traditional…

  19. Evaluation Report for the Massachusetts Workplace Literacy Consortium. National Workplace Literacy Program Wave 6, Year 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperazi, Laura; DePascale, Charles A.

    The Massachusetts Workplace Literacy Consortium sought to upgrade work-related literacy skills at 22 partner sites in the state. Members included manufacturers, health care organizations, educational institutions, and labor unions. In its third year, the consortium served 1,179 workers with classes in English for speakers of other languages, adult…

  20. Report of a Study of the Pacific Circle Consortium. [Final Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmis, Stephen

    A five-part cumulative report details the activities of the Pacific Circle Consortium. Section 1, on the origins of the Pacific Circle, describes the consortium on three levels: participating organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, participating institutions, and development teams. In section 2, the involvement of…

  1. Pacific Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Regional Consortium Final Performance Report, October 1, 1995-February 28, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI.

    The Pacific Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Regional Consortium was established at Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL) in October, 1992 and completed its second funding cycle in February 2001. The Consortium is a collaboration among PREL, the Curriculum Research and Development Group (CRDG) at the University of Hawaii, and the…

  2. The Chicago Thoracic Oncology Database Consortium: A Multisite Database Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Carey, George B; Tan, Yi-Hung Carol; Bokhary, Ujala; Itkonen, Michelle; Szeto, Kyle; Wallace, James; Campbell, Nicholas; Hensing, Thomas; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An increasing amount of clinical data is available to biomedical researchers, but specifically designed database and informatics infrastructures are needed to handle this data effectively. Multiple research groups should be able to pool and share this data in an efficient manner. The Chicago Thoracic Oncology Database Consortium (CTODC) was created to standardize data collection and facilitate the pooling and sharing of data at institutions throughout Chicago and across the world. We assessed the CTODC by conducting a proof of principle investigation on lung cancer patients who took erlotinib. This study does not look into epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but rather it discusses the development and utilization of the database involved. Methods:  We have implemented the Thoracic Oncology Program Database Project (TOPDP) Microsoft Access, the Thoracic Oncology Research Program (TORP) Velos, and the TORP REDCap databases for translational research efforts. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) were created to document the construction and proper utilization of these databases. These SOPs have been made available freely to other institutions that have implemented their own databases patterned on these SOPs. Results: A cohort of 373 lung cancer patients who took erlotinib was identified. The EGFR mutation statuses of patients were analyzed. Out of the 70 patients that were tested, 55 had mutations while 15 did not. In terms of overall survival and duration of treatment, the cohort demonstrated that EGFR-mutated patients had a longer duration of erlotinib treatment and longer overall survival compared to their EGFR wild-type counterparts who received erlotinib. Discussion: The investigation successfully yielded data from all institutions of the CTODC. While the investigation identified challenges, such as the difficulty of data transfer and potential duplication of patient data, these issues can be resolved

  3. Experience of the Paris Research Consortium Climate-Environment-Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joussaume, Sylvie; Pacteau, Chantal; Vanderlinden, Jean Paul

    2016-04-01

    It is now widely recognized that the complexity of climate change issues translates itself into a need for interdisciplinary approaches to science. This allows to first achieve a more comprehensive vision of climate change and, second, to better inform the decision-making processes. However, it seems that willingness alone is rarely enough to implement interdisciplinarity. The purpose of this presentation is to mobilize reflexivity to revisit and analyze the experience of the Paris Consortium for Climate-Environment-Society. The French Consortium Climate-Environment-Society aims to develop, fund and coordinate interdisciplinary research into climate change and its impacts on society and environment. Launched in 2007, the consortium relies on the research expertise of 17 laboratories and federation in the Paris area working mainly in the fields of climatology, hydrology, ecology, health sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. As examples, economists and climatologists have studied greenhouse gas emission scenarios compatible with climate stabilization goals. Historical records have provided both knowledge about past climate change and vulnerability of societies. Some regions, as the Mediterranean and the Sahel, are particularly vulnerable and already have to cope with water availability, agricultural production and even health issues. A project showed that millet production in West Africa is expected to decline due to warming in a higher proportion than observed in recent decades. Climate change also raises many questions concerning health: combined effects of warming and air quality, impacts on the production of pollens and allergies, impacts on infectious diseases. All these issues lead to a need for approaches integrating different disciplines. Furthermore, climate change impacts many ecosystems which, in turn, affect its evolution. Our experience shows that interdisciplinarity supposes, in order to take shape, the conjunction between programming

  4. CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of head and neck masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gatenby, R.A.; Mulhern, C.B. Jr.; Strawitz, J.

    1983-03-01

    Six patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous pharyngeal or laryngeal biopsies. A retromandibular approach was used in five of these patients. Accurate cytologic information was obtained in all six cases, and no complications were encountered. This technique can be helpful in certain clinical settings.

  5. Percutaneous and Endovascular Embolization of Ruptured Hepatic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Andrew F.; Lee, Wai Kit

    2002-06-15

    A 72-year-old woman presented with an intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured intrahepatic arteryaneurysm, with an associated pseudoaneurysm developing a high-flow arteriovenous fistula. Persistent coagulopathy and a median arcuate ligament stenosis of the celiac axis further complicated endovascular management. Aneurysm thrombosis required percutaneous embolization with coils, a removable core guidewire and polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  6. Systematic review comparing endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Dhir, Vinay; Jin, Zhen-Dong; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Seo, Dong Wan; Ho, Khek Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review comparing the outcomes of endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage. METHODS: Comparative studies published between January 1980 and May 2014 were identified on PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane controlled trials register and assessed for suitability of inclusion. The primary outcome was the treatment success rate. Secondary outcomes included were the recurrence rates, re-interventions, length of hospital stay, adverse events and mortalities. RESULTS: Ten comparative studies were identified and 3 were randomized controlled trials. Four studies reported on the outcomes of percutaneous and surgical drainage. Based on a large-scale national study, surgical drainage appeared to reduce mortality and adverse events rate as compared to the percutaneous approach. Three studies reported on the outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and surgical drainage. Clinical success and adverse events rates appeared to be comparable but the EUS approach reduced hospital stay, cost and improved quality of life. Three other studies compared EUS and esophagogastroduodenoscopy-guided drainage. Both approaches were feasible for pseudocyst drainage but the success rate of the EUS approach was better for non-bulging cyst and the approach conferred additional safety benefits. CONCLUSION: In patients with unfavorable anatomy, surgical cystojejunostomy or percutaneous drainage could be considered. Large randomized studies with current definitions of pseudocysts and longer-term follow-up are needed to assess the efficacy of the various modalities. PMID:27014427

  7. Buried bumper syndrome: a rare complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Krzysztof; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka

    2015-09-01

    Feeding via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred form of alimentation when oral feeding is impossible. Although it is a relatively safe method, some complications may occur. One uncommon PEG complication is buried bumper syndrome. In this paper we report a case of buried bumper syndrome, successfully managed with PEG tube repositioning. PMID:26649105

  8. Lateral rectus palsy following coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Luke; Jones, Ruth; Hughes, David S

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of unilateral lateral rectus palsy following an elective coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention in a 78-year-oldwoman. Ophthalmoplegia following coronary angiography is extremely rare and this is the first case of a unilateral lateral rectus palsy following the procedure. PMID:24536054

  9. Successful management of dislodged stents during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Farman, Muhammad Tariq; Sial, Jawaid Akbar; Saghir, Tahir; Rizvi, Syed Nadeem Hasan; Rasool, Syed Ishtiaq; Jamal, Syed Zahid

    2010-02-01

    Stent dislodgement is a very rare but recognized and potentially serious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This case series describe the incidence and etiology of such cases at National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Karachi during the year 2008 and the method of treatment of this complication. PMID:20209706

  10. Intrapleural migration of a percutaneous transhepatic hemodialysis catheter.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Sharon W; Kerlan, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic catheters are a form of nonconventional access for patients requiring hemodialysis. We report a complication of these catheters which has not been previously described in the literature. The mechanism for intrapleural migration and a way to avoid this potential complication are discussed. PMID:21786242

  11. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    ten Berg, Jurriën M; Plokker, HW Thijs; Verheugt, Freek WA

    2001-01-01

    Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used. PMID:11806786

  12. Percutaneous Drainage of Suppurative Pylephlebitis Complicating Acute Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Nouira, Kais Bedioui, Haykel; Azaiez, Olfa; Belhiba, Hend; Messaoud, Monia Ben; Ksantini, Rachid; Jouini, Mohamed; Menif, Emna

    2007-11-15

    Suppurative pylephlebitis is a rare condition with a significant mortality rate, ranging from 50% to 80%. We report a case of suppurative pylephlebitis complicating acute pancreatitis treated by percutaneous drainage in a 40-year-old woman. The patient had an uneventful recovery.

  13. Robotic-Assisted Removal of Intracardiac Cement After Percutaneous Vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Thomas; Kos, Allison; Piwowarski, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is an increasingly common intervention, and complications resulting from embolization are increasingly observed. We report a case of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) embolization resulting in cardiac complications in a frail patient, which was managed with endoscopic robotic-assisted removal of the embolized material. PMID:27106432

  14. Percutaneous and off-pump treatments for functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2008-01-01

    A new era in the treatment of functional mitral regurgitation is emerging with new devices that can be placed percutaneously or minimally invasively without cardiopulmonary bypass. These devices are categorized into three groups: annuloplasty, edge-to-edge repair, and ventricular reshaping. Percutaneous annuloplasty devices, implanted via the coronary sinus, mimic surgical annuloplasty by reducing the mitral annular anterior-posterior (or septal-lateral) dimension. Several devices, such as the PTMA, CARILLON, Monarch, and PS3 systems, are in clinical trials. Percutaneous edge-to-edge repair devices mimic the surgical Alfieri edge-to-edge repair technique, creating a double-orifice mitral valve; of these, MitraClip is in clinical trials. Ventricular reshaping devices treat both mitral annular dilatation and papillary muscle displacement (and thus leaflet tethering). The surgical Coapsys device is currently in clinical trials, and its percutaneous "interventional" version, iCoapsys, is being prepared for a clinical trial. Numerous issues need to be addressed before these devices can become standard therapies for functional mitral regurgitation. Device safety and efficacy must be demonstrated in carefully designed clinical trials with the goal of achieving outcomes equal to or better than those of surgical repair. PMID:18414987

  15. Percutaneous pediculoplasty: polymethylmethacrylate injection into lytic vertebral pedicle lesions.

    PubMed

    Gailloud, Philippe; Beauchamp, Norman J; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Murphy, Kieran J

    2002-05-01

    Two patients with painful lytic lesions of the vertebral pedicle were treated with percutaneous pediculoplasty. This technique, similar to vertebroplasty but with increased procedural risks because of the immediate vicinity of neural structures, was performed under high-quality biplane fluoroscopic guidance. For lesions involving both the pedicle and the vertebral body, a double-needle unipedicular technique is advocated. PMID:11997361

  16. Percutaneous multiple electrode connector, design parameters and fabrication (biomedical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    A percutaneous multielectrode connector was designed which utilizes an ultrapure carbon collar to provide an infection free biocompatible passage through the skin. The device provides reliable electrical continuity, mates and demates readily with the implant, and is fabricated with processes and materials oriented to commercial production.

  17. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung Suk Lee, Hae Giu Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6-20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6-38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5-14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10-58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites.

  18. Successful Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gartenschlaeger, Soeren Bender, Siegfried; Maeurer, Juergen; Schroeder, Ralf J.

    2008-03-15

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening emergency. The complications are high by the time of diagnosis in most cases and therefore only few data on primary percutaneous intervention with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting in AMI are available. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman who presented to our emergency department complaining of an acute worsening of pre-existing abdominal periumbilical pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. She had previously undergone percutaneous transluminal embolectomy for an acute occlusion of the left common femoral artery. Due to suspicion of intestinal infarction, conventional angiography of the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was performed and confirmed a proximal occlusion of the SMA. Percutaneous SMA recanalization with balloon dilation and subsequent stent implantation was carried out successfully. The abdominal symptoms subsided after this procedure. In AMI that is diagnosed early, endovascular stenting should be considered as an alternative treatment to the surgical approach that avoids the need for surgical bowel resection.

  19. Percutaneous laser disc decompression with the holmium: YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Casper, G D; Hartman, V L; Mullins, L L

    1995-06-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) method using a holmium:YAG laser. Advantages of using this wavelength and several techniques for its use in PLDD are reviewed. The article also discusses the current devices and delivery systems available for this application. PMID:10150646

  20. Percutaneous iliac screws for minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael Y

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females). Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs. PMID:22900162

  1. Percutaneous techniques for cervical pain of discal origin.

    PubMed

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Buy, Xavier; Cabral, Jose Facundo; Garnon, Julien

    2011-04-01

    Cervical discogenic pain is an important cause of suffering and disability in the adult population. Pain management in cervical disc herniation relies initially on conservative care (rest, physiotherapy, and oral medications). Once conservative treatment has failed, different percutaneous minimally invasive radiological procedures can be applied to relief pain. This article offers a systematic review on the percutaneous minimally invasive techniques that can be advocated for the treatment of cervical pain of discal origin. Periradicular steroid injection under image guidance (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) is the first technique to be considered. The steroid injection aims at reducing the periradicular inflammation and thus relieves the radicular pain. The steroid injections present satisfying short-term results, but pain can recur in the long term. Whenever the steroid injections fail to relieve pain from a contained cervical disc herniation, the more invasive percutaneous disc decompression techniques should be proposed. Percutaneous radiofrequency nucleoplasty is the most often applied technique on the cervical level with a low risk of thermal damage. When the indications and instructions are respected, radiofrequency nucleoplasty presents accepted safety and efficacy levels. PMID:21500138

  2. Percutaneous Cystgastrostomy as a Single-Step Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, L. Sookur, P.; Low, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Fotheringham, T.

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of percutaneous transgastric cystgastrostomy as a single-step procedure. We performed a retrospective analysis of single-step percutaneous transgastric cystgastrostomy carried out in 12 patients (8 male, 4 female; mean age 44 years; range 21-70 years), between 2002 and 2007, with large symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts for whom up to 1-year follow-up data (mean 10 months) were available. All pseudocysts were drained by single-step percutaneous cystgastrostomy with the placement of either one or two stents. The procedure was completed successfully in all 12 patients. The pseudocysts showed complete resolution on further imaging in 7 of 12 patients with either enteric passage of the stent or stent removal by endoscopy. In 2 of 12 patients, the pseudocysts showed complete resolution on imaging, with the stents still noted in situ. In 2 of 12 patients, the pseudocysts became infected after 1 month and required surgical intervention. In 1 of 12 patients, the pseudocyst showed partial resolution on imaging, but subsequently reaccumulated and later required external drainage. In our experience, percutaneous cystgastrostomy as a single-step procedure has a high success rate and good short-term outcomes over 1-year follow-up and should be considered in the treatment of large symptomatic cysts.

  3. Rehabilitation training improves exercise tolerance after percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fang; Ren, Yusheng; Jin, Heng; Cui, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate the effects of training on exercise tolerance of patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention. Fifty-seven cases of coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention were divided randomly into the rehabilitation training group (26 cases) and control group (31 cases). Patients in the rehabilitation training group received rehabilitation training at different stages and exercise intensities 3 d after percutaneous coronary intervention for 3 months. The heart rate, blood pressure, ECG changes in treadmill exercise test, and the frequency of anginal episodes were observed. The results showed that NST and ΣST of ECG and the frequency of anginal episodes were significantly reduced in the rehabilitation training group. In addition, exercise tolerance was improved and the total exercise time was lengthened in these patients. Moreover, ST segment depression time and emergence time of angina with exercise were also lengthened compared with controls (P < 0.05, or 0.01). However, the heart rate and blood pressure before and after exercise of the two groups were similar. The study indicated that rehabilitation training could significantly relieve angina, amend ischemic features of ECG, and improve exercise tolerance of coronary heart disease patients after percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:23554756

  4. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  5. Precipitation of iron minerals by a natural microbial consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.A.; Sherriff, B.L.; Sparling, R.; Sawicki, J.A.

    1999-08-01

    A microbial biofilm consortium enriched from Shield surface water is able to mediate geochemical cycling of iron within a biofilm. Iron can be leached from Fe(II) containing minerals such as magnetite, biotite and ilmenite to generate a colloidal Fe(III) suspension. The Fe(III) can then be reduced back to Fe(II) by iron-reducing bacteria that utilize it as an electron acceptor. On precipitation, different iron compounds are formed depending on the ratio of iron to carbon in the media and upon the local environment. Moessbauer and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy show these compounds to include ferrous hydroxide, vivianite, ferrihydrite and hematite. These minerals may then become incorporated into stratifer iron deposits such as Banded Iron Formations.

  6. Computational Astrophysics Consortium, University of Minnesota, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, Alexander

    2015-03-26

    During its six year duration the Computational Astrophysics consortium helped to train the next generation of scientists in computational and nuclear astrophysics. A total of five graduate students were supported by the grant at UMN. The major advances at UMN were in the use, testing, and contribution to development of the CASTRO that efficiently scales on over 100,000 CPUs. At UMN it was used for modeling of thermonuclear supernovae (pair instability and supermassive stars) and core-collapse supernovae as well as the final phases of their progenitors, as well as for x-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars. Important secondary advances in the field of nuclear astrophysics included a better understanding of the evolution of massive stars and the origin of the elements. The research resulted in more than 50 publications.

  7. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  8. SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY. Emergent genetic oscillations in a synthetic microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Hirning, Andrew J; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R

    2015-08-28

    A challenge of synthetic biology is the creation of cooperative microbial systems that exhibit population-level behaviors. Such systems use cellular signaling mechanisms to regulate gene expression across multiple cell types. We describe the construction of a synthetic microbial consortium consisting of two distinct cell types—an "activator" strain and a "repressor" strain. These strains produced two orthogonal cell-signaling molecules that regulate gene expression within a synthetic circuit spanning both strains. The two strains generated emergent, population-level oscillations only when cultured together. Certain network topologies of the two-strain circuit were better at maintaining robust oscillations than others. The ability to program population-level dynamics through the genetic engineering of multiple cooperative strains points the way toward engineering complex synthetic tissues and organs with multiple cell types. PMID:26315440

  9. Participation in the Cluster Magnetometer Consortium for the Cluster Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, Margaret

    1997-01-01

    Prof. M. G. Kivelson (UCLA) and Dr. R. C. Elphic (LANL) are Co-investigators on the Cluster Magnetometer Consortium (CMC) that provided the fluxgate magnetometers and associated mission support for the Cluster Mission. The CMC designated UCLA as the site with primary responsibility for the inter-calibration of data from the four spacecraft and the production of fully corrected data critical to achieving the mission objectives. UCLA was also charged with distributing magnetometer data to the U.S. Co-investigators. UCLA also supported the Technical Management Team, which was responsible for the detailed design of the instrument and its interface. In this final progress report we detail the progress made by the UCLA team in achieving the mission objectives.

  10. Creating Future Stem Leaders: The National Astronomy Consortium:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Benjamin, Robert A.; Brisbin, Drew; Giles, Faye; National Astronomy Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and Associated Universities Inc., (AUI) in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP), and a number of minority and majority universities to increase the numbers of students from underrepresented groups and those otherwise overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM or STEM-related careers. The seed for the NAC was a partnership between NRAO and Howard University which began with an exchange of a few summer students five years ago. Since then the NAC has grown tremendously. Today the NAC aims to host between 4 to 5 cohorts nationally in an innovative model in which the students are mentored throughout the year with multiple mentors and peer mentoring, continued engagement in research and professional development / career training throughout the academic year and throughout their careers. We will summarize the results from this innovative and highly succesful program and provide lessons learned.

  11. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 9

    PubMed Central

    Davidsen, Tanja; Madupu, Ramana; Sterk, Peter; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 9th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), held at the J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. It was the first GSC workshop to have open registration and attracted over 90 participants. This workshop featured sessions that provided overviews of the full range of ongoing GSC projects. It included sessions on Standards in Genomic Sciences, the open access journal of the GSC, building standards for genome annotation, the M5 platform for next-generation collaborative computational infrastructures, building ties with the biodiversity research community and two discussion panels with government and industry participants. Progress was made on all fronts, and major outcomes included the completion of the MIENS specification for publication and the formation of the Biodiversity working group. PMID:21304722

  12. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I.; Gerken, S.C.; Leppert, M.; Shiang, R.; Jabs, E.W.; Warren, A.C.; Antonarakis, S.; Retief, A.E.; Vergnaud, G.

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alphaRI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM. 76 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. The SNP Consortium website: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Thorisson, Gudmundur A; Stein, Lincoln D

    2003-01-01

    The SNP Consortium website (http://snp.cshl.org) has undergone many changes since its initial conception three years ago. The database back end has been changed from the venerable ACeDB to the more scalable MySQL engine. Users can access the data via gene or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) keyword searches and browse or dump SNP data to textfiles. A graphical genome browsing interface shows SNPs mapped onto the genome assembly in the context of externally available gene predictions and other features. SNP allele frequency and genotype data are available via FTP-download and on individual SNP report web pages. SNP linkage maps are available for download and for browsing in a comparative map viewer. All software components of the data coordinating center (DCC) website (http://snp.cshl.org) are open source. PMID:12519964

  14. 34 CFR 614.4 - Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agent? (a) For purposes of 34 CFR 75.127, the lead applicant for the consortium must be a nonprofit member of the consortium. (b) The lead applicant must serve as the fiscal agent. (Authority: 20...

  15. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  16. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  17. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  18. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  19. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.277 - To what extent shall the Tribe/Consortium cooperate with the Federal government in connection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... employees that relates to performance of a self-governance AFA or subcontract. (c) The Tribe/Consortium..., discovery, and trial. (e) If requested by the Secretary, the Tribe/Consortium shall make an assignment...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.277 - To what extent shall the Tribe/Consortium cooperate with the Federal government in connection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... employees that relates to performance of a self-governance AFA or subcontract. (c) The Tribe/Consortium..., discovery, and trial. (e) If requested by the Secretary, the Tribe/Consortium shall make an assignment...

  2. The New Traditions Consortium: Shifting from a Faculty-Centered Paradigm To a Student-Centered Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Clark R.; Peace, G. Earl, Jr.; Scharberg, Maureen A.; Branz, Steve; Spencer, James N.; Ricci, Robert W.; Zumdahl, Susan Arena; Shaw, David

    1998-01-01

    Describes the role of the New Traditions Consortium, a consortium that identifies mechanisms of pedagogical and instructional change, implements them at different types of institutions, and evaluates their effects on student learning. (DDR)

  3. 34 CFR 614.4 - Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... TEACHERS TO USE TECHNOLOGY § 614.4 Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent? (a) For purposes of 34 CFR 75.127, the lead applicant for the consortium must be a...

  4. 34 CFR 614.4 - Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... TEACHERS TO USE TECHNOLOGY § 614.4 Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent? (a) For purposes of 34 CFR 75.127, the lead applicant for the consortium must be a...

  5. 34 CFR 614.4 - Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... TEACHERS TO USE TECHNOLOGY § 614.4 Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent? (a) For purposes of 34 CFR 75.127, the lead applicant for the consortium must be a...

  6. Rhodanobacter sp. Strain BPC1 in a Benzo[a]pyrene-Mineralizing Bacterial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, Robert A.; Harayama, Shigeaki; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2002-01-01

    A bacterial consortium which rapidly mineralizes benzo[a]pyrene when it is grown on a high-boiling-point diesel fuel distillate (HBD) was recovered from soil and maintained for approximately 3 years. Previous studies have shown that mobilization of benzo[a]pyrene into the supernatant liquid precedes mineralization of this compound (R. Kanaly, R. Bartha, K. Watanabe, and S. Harayama, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:4205-4211, 2000). In the present study, we found that sterilized supernatant liquid filtrate (SSLF) obtained from the growing consortium stimulated mineralization of benzo[a]pyrene when it was readministered to a consortium inoculum without HBD. Following this observation, eight bacterial strains were isolated from the consortium, and SSLF of each of them was assayed for the ability to stimulate benzo[a]pyrene mineralization by the original consortium. The SSLF obtained from one strain, designated BPC1, most vigorously stimulated benzo[a]pyrene mineralization by the original consortium; its effect was more than twofold greater than the effect of the SSLF obtained from the original consortium. A 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and biochemical tests identified strain BPC1 as a member of the genus Rhodanobacter, whose type strain, Rhodanobacter lindaniclasticus RP5557, which was isolated for its ability to grow on the pesticide lindane, is not extant. Strain BPC1 could not grow on lindane, benzo[a]pyrene, simple hydrocarbons, and HBD in pure culture. In contrast, a competitive PCR assay indicated that strain BPC1 grew in the consortium fed only HBD and benzo[a]pyrene. This growth of BPC1 was concomitant with growth of the total bacterial consortium and preceded the initiation of benzo[a]pyrene mineralization. These results suggest that strain BPC1 has a specialized niche in the benzo[a]pyrene-mineralizing consortium; namely, it grows on metabolites produced by fellow members and contributes to benzo[a]pyrene mineralization by increasing the bioavailability of

  7. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-10-24

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

  8. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-02-27

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

  9. On the Need to Establish an International Soil Modeling Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, H.; Vanderborght, J.; Schnepf, A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil is one of the most critical life-supporting compartments of the Biosphere. Soil provides numerous ecosystem services such as a habitat for biodiversity, water and nutrients, as well as producing food, feed, fiber and energy. To feed the rapidly growing world population in 2050, agricultural food production must be doubled using the same land resources footprint. At the same time, soil resources are threatened due to improper management and climate change. Despite the many important functions of soil, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain, regarding the role of soil biota and biodiversity on ecosystem services, the structure and dynamics of soil communities, the interplay between hydrologic and biotic processes, the quantification of soil biogeochemical processes and soil structural processes, the resilience and recovery of soils from stress, as well as the prediction of soil development and the evolution of soils in the landscape, to name a few. Soil models have long played an important role in quantifying and predicting soil processes and related ecosystem services. However, a new generation of soil models based on a whole systems approach comprising all physical, mechanical, chemical and biological processes is now required to address these critical knowledge gaps and thus contribute to the preservation of ecosystem services, improve our understanding of climate-change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society. To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key

  10. 76 FR 66040 - Announcement of Meeting To Explore Feasibility of Establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... Establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on ``Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)'' AGENCY: National... consortium focused on ``Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)''. The goal of such a consortium could... consolidation of concrete. This goal would be achieved by developing test methods and models to measure...

  11. 77 FR 25406 - Consortium on “Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)”: Membership Fee Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Consortium on ``Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME... NIST/Industry Consortium on Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)''. The notice stated that... consortium is to predict the pumpability of a grout/mortar or a concrete from the rheological properties...

  12. 76 FR 77251 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Consortium for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ...--Consortium for Command, Control, Communications and Computer Technologies Notice is hereby given that, on..., 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Consortium for Command, Control, Communications and Computer... are: Consortium for Command, Control, Communications and Computer Technologies, Washington, DC;...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.248 - What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? 1000.248 Section 1000.248 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN.../Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? The Tribe/Consortium has the following...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.248 - What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? 1000.248 Section 1000.248 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN.../Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? The Tribe/Consortium has the following...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.394 - What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? 1000.394 Section 1000.394 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? The Tribe/Consortium must provide to the...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.394 - What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? 1000.394 Section 1000.394 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? The Tribe/Consortium must provide to the...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.394 - What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? 1000.394 Section 1000.394 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? The Tribe/Consortium must provide to the...

  6. 25 CFR 1000.394 - What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? 1000.394 Section 1000.394 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? The Tribe/Consortium must provide to the...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.394 - What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What audit requirements must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? 1000.394 Section 1000.394 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... must a self-governance Tribe/Consortium follow? The Tribe/Consortium must provide to the...

  8. Characterization of 4-nonylphenol-degrading bacterial consortium obtained from a textile wastewater pretreatment plant.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Diana; Salvadori, Laura; Zanaroli, Giulio; Coppini, Ester; Fava, Fabio; Barberio, Claudia

    2008-12-01

    4-Nonylphenol (4-NP) isomers are toxic and recalcitrant compounds often resulting, together with short-chain ethoxylated nonylphenol (NPnEO, where n is the number of ethylene oxide units), from NPnEO biodegradation in conventional activated sludge plants. In this work, a microbial consortium, defined as Consortium A, capable of removing 100 mg/L of 4-NP with no accumulation of metabolites with aromatic moiety was isolated from textile wastewaters after enrichment with 4-NP. The consortium showed remarkable degradation activities toward several short-chain NPnEO congeners. Culture-dependent techniques were used to isolate from the consortium twenty-six strains assigned to seven different amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis groups. Two- and three-member cocultures were prepared with the strains showing highest 4-NP-degrading capabilities, but neither the single strains nor the cocultures were as efficient in 4-NP degradation as Consortium A. FISH was used to characterize the microbial composition of Consortium A: it evidenced a strong occurrence of Proteobacteria and, in particular, of Gammaproteobacteria along with a relevant stability of the culture. Therefore, the isolated consortium has the potential of being used in the development of a biotechnological process for the tertiary treatment of effluents of activated sludge plants fed with NPnEO-contaminated wastewaters. PMID:18830582

  9. Percutaneous Dorsal Instrumentation of Vertebral Burst Fractures: Value of Additional Percutaneous Intravertebral Reposition—Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Antonio; Schmuck, Maya; Noriega, David C.; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Baroud, Gamal; Oberkircher, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The treatment of vertebral burst fractures is still controversial. The aim of the study is to evaluate the purpose of additional percutaneous intravertebral reduction when combined with dorsal instrumentation. Methods. In this biomechanical cadaver study twenty-eight spine segments (T11-L3) were used (male donors, mean age 64.9 ± 6.5 years). Burst fractures of L1 were generated using a standardised protocol. After fracture all spines were allocated to four similar groups and randomised according to surgical techniques (posterior instrumentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device without cement; and intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation). After treatment, 100000 cycles (100–600 N, 3 Hz) were applied using a servohydraulic loading frame. Results. Overall anatomical restoration was better in all groups where the intravertebral reduction device was used (p < 0.05). In particular, it was possible to restore central endplates (p > 0.05). All techniques decreased narrowing of the spinal canal. After loading, clearance could be maintained in all groups fitted with the intravertebral reduction device. Narrowing increased in the group treated with dorsal instrumentation. Conclusions. For height and anatomical restoration, the combination of an intravertebral reduction device with dorsal instrumentation showed significantly better results than sole dorsal instrumentation. PMID:26137481

  10. Degradation of 2,4 dichlorobiphenyl via meta-cleavage pathway by Pseudomonas spp. consortium.

    PubMed

    Jayanna, Shobha K; Gayathri, Devaraja

    2015-06-01

    Two bacterial isolates (Pseudomonas sp. GSa and Pseudomonas sp. GSb) were in close association able to assimilate 2,4 dichlorobiphenyl (2,4 CB), a PCB congener. GC-MS analysis of spent culture medium of the consortium with 2,4 CB as substrate showed 90 % degradation (according to Electron capture detection values) with catechol as one of the important intermediate compounds through meta-cleavage pathway. Further, ability of the consortium to utilise PCB congeners, Methoxychlor, Aroclor 1016, Chlorobenzoic acids and Monoaromatic compounds indicated that the consortium of GSa and GSb would be an ideal candidate for in situ bioremediation of PCB. PMID:25800378

  11. CDEP Consortium on Ocean Data Assimilation for Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction (ODASI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rienecker, Michele; Zebiak, Stephen; Kinter, James; Behringer, David; Rosati, Antonio; Kaplan, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    The ODASI consortium is focused activity of the NOAA/OGP/Climate Diagnostics and Experimental Prediction Program with the goal of improving ocean data assimilation methods and their implementations in support of seasonal forecasts with coupled general circulation models. The consortium is undertaking coordinated assimilation experiments, with common forcing data sets and common input data streams. With different assimilation systems and different models, we aim to understand what approach works best in improving forecast skill in the equatorial Pacific. The presentation will provide an overview of the consortium goals and plans and recent results focused towards evaluating data impacts.

  12. Cohort Profile: The International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort (i3C) Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Terence; Sun, Cong; Magnussen, Costan G; Raitakari, Olli T; Schork, Nicholas J; Venn, Alison; Burns, Trudy L; Juonala, Markus; Steinberger, Julia; Sinaiko, Alan R; Prineas, Ronald J; Davis, Patricia H; Woo, Jessica G; Morrison, John A; Daniels, Stephen R; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Viikari, Jorma SA; Berenson, Gerald S

    2013-01-01

    This is a consortium of large children's cohorts that contain measurements of major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in childhood and had the ability to follow those cohorts into adulthood. The purpose of this consortium is to enable the pooling of data to increase power, most importantly for the follow-up of CVD events in adulthood. Within the consortium, we hope to be able to obtain data on the independent effects of childhood and early adult levels of CVD risk factors on subsequent CVD occurrence. PMID:22434861

  13. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force applied research units and projects, 1992 program. Summary and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    This report contains brief descriptions of projects involved in the urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF). The Consortium is a special network which helps to define urban problems, and commercialize technologies which could help solve those problems. Research and Development priorities within the program are transportation, energy, environment, and economic development and energy efficient facilities. The Consortium has established partnerships with US DOE on energy utilities, alternative vehicle fuels, waste management, and electricity management. A technology transfer committee was established to build a marketing program.

  14. Isprs Student Consortium: the Network of Youth in Geoinformation Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivilcim, C. O.; Sterenczak, K.; Kanjir, U.; Sengul, A.; Stavbar, G.; Pakdil, M. E.; Lobo, E.; Oo, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    The ISPRS Student Consortium (SC) initiative started at the 20th ISPRS Congress in Istanbul, 2004.After four years of volunteer activity, an official structure for volunteers was needed. With the implementation of the SC Statutes in the ISPRS Beijing Congress in 2008, the first ISPRS Student Consortium Board Members were elected. Since this day, SC volunteers and supporters have continued to contribute through numerous activities in order to promote the Society and connect young people with a similar interest in the profession. So far, promotional activities have taken place in various places in Europe, North and Central America, Asia and Australia. SC members have not only participated in the events, but also organized activities, taken responsibilities and represented youth in ISPRS midterm symposiums and ISPRS Centenary Celebrations as well as other related events. Summer schools, as the main SC event, are organized with the help of ISPRS TC VI/5 and are focused on the needs and interests of scientific communities around the world. The SC community has been constantly growing with almost 750 members over 85 countries at present, registered through our self-developed website. The organization also publishes its own Newsletter four times per year, with the intention to transmit the messages and news from ISPRS and the SC. The Newsletter is a perfect platform for presenting useful technical, educational and informational material prepared by members and distributed freely among the supporters. Throughout time, the SC has received guiding, motivational and administrative support from WG VI/5 as well as TC VI and the ISPRS Council. Activities have been financially supported by foundations, commercial enterprises and academic organizations and many SC members have received grants to present their work in different scientific events. In addition, the SC has started and established permanent connections and signed agreements for better networking with the youth

  15. High-density percutaneous chronic connector for neural prosthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Kedar G.; Bennett, William J.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.

    2015-09-22

    A high density percutaneous chronic connector, having first and second connector structures each having an array of magnets surrounding a mounting cavity. A first electrical feedthrough array is seated in the mounting cavity of the first connector structure and a second electrical feedthrough array is seated in the mounting cavity of the second connector structure, with a feedthrough interconnect matrix positioned between a top side of the first electrical feedthrough array and a bottom side of the second electrical feedthrough array to electrically connect the first electrical feedthrough array to the second electrical feedthrough array. The two arrays of magnets are arranged to attract in a first angular position which connects the first and second connector structures together and electrically connects the percutaneously connected device to the external electronics, and to repel in a second angular position to facilitate removal of the second connector structure from the first connector structure.

  16. Design and Testing of a Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Gerald E.; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Kaihui; Nicholson, Adriana; Peck, Raymond A.; Krishnan, Anjana; Silka, Michael; Pruetz, Jay; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape that permits percutaneous implantation into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which can otherwise be fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. Acute tests in adult rabbits demonstrated the range of electrical parameters required for successful pacing and the feasibility of successfully implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance. The lithium cell can be recharged inductively as needed, as indicated by a small decline in the pulsing rate. PMID:22855119

  17. Functional Status and Search for Meaning After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Skaggs, Brenda G; Yates, Bernice C

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in the search for meaning and functional status (psychological and physical) between persons who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention and have recurrent angina symptoms and those who do not have recurrent symptoms. Participants (224; 147 male, 77 female) who underwent PCI completed the following study materials: Meaning in Heart Disease instrument, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and SF36v2™. Persons with recurrent angina symptoms (40% of the sample) were more likely to have higher disrupted meaning, greater anxiety, greater depression, lower physical functioning, and greater use of meaning-based coping (searching for answers and refocusing global meaning) compared with individuals without recurrent symptoms. Interventions are needed to identify the risk of recurrent symptoms after percutaneous coronary intervention and provide coping and cognitive behavioral interventions focused on managing the psychological and physical disruptions. PMID:25512267

  18. [Results following percutaneous intramedullary pin fixation in distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Kirchner, R; Hüttl, T; Krüger-Franke, M; Rosemeyer, B

    1994-01-01

    42 distal radius fractures have been submitted to further examination after percutaneous intramedullary pin fixation. The outcome were 95.3% of very good to good anatomic results and 90.5% of satisfying functional results. This showed the close link between the radiological-anatomical and functional results. The success of the treatment was very acceptable, although the Morbus Sudeck as the major complication--with 7.2%--was still relatively frequently observed. It could be seen that particularly fractures at the risk of dislocation with smash zone constituted an indication for the percutaneous intramedullary pin fixation, that is to say all fractures for which a retention is primarily difficult. It constitutes a supplement, as well as an extension to the therapy of the distal radius fractures. PMID:7516105

  19. Radiation dose to personnel during percutaneous renal calculus removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, W.H.; Jones, D.; Brannen, G.E.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation dose to the radiologist and other personnel was measured during 102 procedures for percutaneous removal of renal calculi from the upper collecting system. A mobile C-arm image intensifier was used to guide entrance to the kidney and stone removal. Average fluoroscopy time was 25 min. Exposure to personnel was monitored by quartz-fiber dosimeters at the collar level above the lead apron. Average radiation dose to the radiologist was 10 mrem (0.10 mSv) per case; to the surgical nurse, 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) per case; to the radiologic technologist, 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) per case; and to the anesthesiologist, 3 mrem (0.03 mSv) per case. Radiation dose to the uroradiologic team during percutaneous nephrostolithotomy is similar to that from other interventional fluoroscopic procedures and is within acceptable limits for both physicians and assisting personnel.

  20. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation: minimally invasive therapy for renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Kamran; Wallace, Michael J; Matin, Surena F

    2006-12-01

    Currently, up to 60% of renal tumors are detected incidentally by abdominal imaging. Most of these tumors are small and localized to the kidney. Owing to the shift to lower stage at diagnosis, radical nephrectomy has fallen out of favor and has been replaced by nephron-sparing surgery. Currently, partial nephrectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with small renal tumors. As the trend towards less invasive therapy continues, laparoscopic and percutaneous ablation techniques have gained popularity for the treatment of renal tumors in patients who are high-risk surgical candidates, or have a solitary kidney, limited renal function or multifocal disease. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation is a safe, minimally invasive treatment option for those patients. PMID:17181487

  1. [Treatment of malignant biliary obstructions via the percutaneous approach].

    PubMed

    Radeleff, B A; López-Benítez, R; Hallscheidt, P; Grenacher, L; Libicher, M; Richter, G M; Kauffmann, G W

    2005-11-01

    This paper gives an overview of experience and success of percutaneous transhepatic interventions in malignant biliary obstruction. Even after exhaustion of surgical and endoscopic therapy options, the percutaneously inserted stents provide effective palliation. The palliative treatment of malignant jaundice using a stent is an established procedure in clinical practice, particularly whenever the endoscopic, transpapillary approach is not possible due to high obstructions or previous surgery. The technical success rate is very high (about 95-100%), and the complication rate is about 10-30%. Since the patency rate of stents is higher than that of plastic endoprostheses, their primary use is justified despite higher costs, provided the patients are adequately selected. PMID:16240139

  2. Device entrapment: a rare complication of percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Abdul; Rehman, Abdur; Khan, Javaid Arif; Sial, Javaid A; Baloch, Zafar Haleem

    2011-10-01

    Device entrapment is a rare complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. It has hazardous potentials for the patient. Emergent cardiac surgery is the only option after failure of retrieval devices. We have described here a case of a 55 years old male. During percutaneous coronary intervention, the balloon inflated only partially at its ends and entrapped in the lesion along with the stent. Multiple attempts at inflation failed and the patient developed severe chest pain for few minutes. Surgery was contemplated but final attempt at inflation was successful and the patient stabilized. It was an emergent situation and could have led to fatal outcome, although this patient escaped narrowly from any fatal outcome. PMID:22015124

  3. Congenital Splenic Cyst Treated with Percutaneous Sclerosis Using Alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Anon, Ramon Guijarro, Jorge; Amoros, Cirilo; Gil, Joaquin; Bosca, Marta M.; Palmero, Julio; Benages, Adolfo

    2006-08-15

    We report a case of successful percutaneous treatment of a congenital splenic cyst using alcohol as the sclerosing agent. A 14-year-old female adolescent presented with a nonsymptomatic cystic mass located in the spleen that was believed to be congenital. After ultrasonography, a drainage catheter was placed in the cavity. About 250 ml of serous liquid was extracted and sent for microbiologic and pathologic studies to rule out an infectious or malignant origin. Immediately afterwards, complete drainage and local sclerotherapy with alcohol was performed. This therapy was repeated 8 days later, after having observed 60 ml of fluid in the drainage bag. One year after treatment the cyst has practically disappeared. We believe that treatment of splenic cyst with percutaneous puncture, ethanolization, and drainage is a valid option and it does not rule out surgery if the conservative treatment fails.

  4. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M.; Niemeyer, Matthew M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  5. Evaluation of percutaneous absorption of esculetin: effect of chemical enhancers.

    PubMed

    del Rio Sancho, Sergio; Serna Jiménez, César Eulogio; Calatayud Pascual, María Aracely; Balaguer Fernández, Cristina; Femenía Font, Andrés; Castillo García, Encarna; Merino, Virginia; López Castellano, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous transdermal absorption of esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin), an oxidative damage inhibitor, was evaluated by means of in vitro permeation studies in which vertical Franz-type diffusion cells and pig ear skin were employed. To determine the absorption of esculetin, we validated a simple, accurate, precise, and rapid HPLC-UV method. Additionally, the effects of several percutaneous enhancers were studied. Pretreatment of porcine skin was performed with ethanol (control vehicle), decenoic acid, oleic acid, R-(+)-limonene, and laurocapram (Azone®) (5% in ethanol, w/w, respectively). Pretreatment of skin with oleic acid or laurocapram led to statistically significant differences in the transdermal flux of esculetin with respect to controls. Of the two enhancers, laurocapram showed the greatest capacity to enhance the flux of esculetin across pig skin. PMID:23250808

  6. Recent advancement or less invasive treatment of percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Soo

    2015-09-01

    Since its initial introduction in 1976, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been widely performed for the management of large renal stones and currently is recommended for staghorn calculi, kidney stones larger than 2 cm, and shock wave lithotripsy-resistant lower pole stones greater than 1 cm. However, except for open and laparoscopic surgery, PCNL is the most invasive of the minimally invasive stone surgery techniques. Over the years, technical and instrumental advances have been made in PCNL to reduce morbidity and improve effectiveness. A thorough review of the recent literature identified five major areas of progress for the advancement of PCNL: patient positioning, method of percutaneous access, development of lithotriptors, miniaturized access tracts, and postoperative nephrostomy tube management. This review provides an overview of recent advancements in PCNL and the outcomes of each area of progress and notes how much we achieve with less invasive PCNL. This information may allow us to consider the future role and future developments of PCNL. PMID:26366273

  7. [Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors: radiofrequency ablation or cryoablation?].

    PubMed

    Buy, X; Lang, H; Garnon, J; Gangi, A

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation, are increasingly being used for small tumors as an alternative to surgery for poor surgical candidates. Compared to radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation has several advantages: improved volume control and preservation of adjacent structures due to the excellent depiction of the ice ball on CT and MRI; better protection of the collecting system for central tumor with reduced risk of postprocedural urinary fistula. The main pitfall of cryoablation is the higher cost. Therefore, cryoablation should be reserved for the treatment of complex tumors. In this article, we will review the different steps of percutaneous renal tumor ablation procedures including patient selection, technical considerations, and follow-up imaging. PMID:21944236

  8. Radiographically guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Merriam, M A; Cronan, J J; Dorfman, G S; Lambiase, R E; Haas, R A

    1988-12-01

    We reviewed the outcome of guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections in 18 patients over a 5-year period. Catheter positioning was guided by fluoroscopy in 10 (56%) cases, CT in seven (39%), and sonography in one (6%). Included were 16 patients with empyemas and one each with a sterile hematoma and transudate. In nine of the patients, previous surgical chest tube drainage had been unsuccessful. The majority of collections were treated with a 12- or 14-French catheter and closed underwater seal drainage. Twelve (80%) of the 15 patients who had an adequate trial of guided drainage were cured. Propyliodone oil suspension contrast sinography after catheter placement showed two clinically unsuspected bronchopleural fistulas. Although an extensive multilocular pleural collection was a contraindication to percutaneous catheter drainage, the thick fibrous peel of a chronic empyema was not. Drainage of pleural fluid collections with radiographic guidance ensures proper catheter placement and is successful in a high percentage of cases. PMID:3055887

  9. Percutaneously Inject able Fetal Pacemaker: Electrodes, Mechanical Design and Implantation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Peck, Raymond A.; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a self-contained cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape (~3×20mm) that permits it to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. The feasibility of implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance was demonstrated in acute adult rabbit experiments. PMID:23367442

  10. Percutaneous screw fixation of acetabular fractures: applicability of hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Chouhan, Devendra Kumar; Oh, Kwang-Jun

    2010-11-01

    Percutaneous screw fixation of the anterior column of the acetabulum has been a challenging task because of its unique anatomy and a risk of intra-articular penetration. Evidence is lacking for any tools to provide visual scrutiny of fracture reduction and intra-articular screw penetration. We report 2 cases of fracture of the acetabulum that developed in young female athletes, in which the anterior column was fixed with a percutaneous screw by use of hip arthroscopy as an assisting tool for intra-articular observation. In our experience this method was found to be promising in terms of anatomic reduction of the fracture site, avoiding articular penetration during screw insertion, with additional advantages of joint debridement, lavage, and reduction in radiation exposure. PMID:20888169

  11. Monitoring radiation exposure to medical personnel during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, F.C.; Auster, M.; Beck, T.J.; Chang, R.; Marshall, F.F.

    1986-09-01

    To ascertain radiation exposure to medical personnel during percutaneous nephrolithotomy, lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were utilized for the radiographic monitoring of 7 consecutive patients. Average fluoroscopy time per procedure was 27.8 minutes of which 15.1 minutes were for nephrostomy tube insertion and 12.7 minutes were for calculi extraction. The 2 radiologists received 4.5 and 5.1 mrad per procedure, while the 2 urologists received 2.5 and 3.7 mrad. All other ancillary personnel received less than 2.1 mrad per procedure except the anesthesiologists whose mean exposure was 4.7 mrad. By taking appropriate precautions and using the proper equipment, percutaneous nephrolithotomy can be performed with a low level of radiation exposure for all involved physicians and personnel.

  12. Hemostatic Plug: Novel Technique for Closure of Percutaneous Nephrostomy Tract

    PubMed Central

    Cicic, Arman; Jump, Roger W.; Davalos, Julio G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is a standard treatment for patients with large or complex kidney stones. The procedure has traditionally included postoperative placement of a nephrostomy tube to allow for drainage and possible reentry. This practice was first implemented after complications incurred after tubeless PCNL in a small patient population. Recently, tubeless PCNL has reemerged as a viable option for selected patients, resulting in decreased pain and analgesic use, shorter hospitalization, quicker return to normal activity, and decreased urine extravasation. Gelatin matrix sealants are occasionally used in nephrostomy tract closure. Techniques for delivery of these agents have been ill described, and placement may be performed with varying results. We present a literature review comparing tubeless PCNL to its traditional variant with indications for use of each, as well as a comparison of agents used in closure. Finally, we outline a novel, reproducible technique for closure of the dilated percutaneous renal access tract. PMID:25157538

  13. Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy using working channel endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy has evolved as an efficient, minimally invasive spine surgery for cervical disc herniation or radiculopathy. The development of the working channel endoscope makes definitive decompression surgery through a percutaneous approach feasible. There are two methods of approach to target the pathology: anterior and posterior approach. The approach can be determined according to the zone of pathology or the surgeon's preference. The most significant benefits of this endoscopic surgical technique are minimal access tissue trauma and early recovery from the intervention. However, this technique is still evolving and have a steep learning curve. Extensive development of surgical technique and working channel endoscopes will enable us to treat cervical disc herniation more practically. The objective of this review is to describe the cutting-edge techniques of endoscopic surgery in the cervical spine and to discuss the pros and cons of these minimally invasive surgical techniques. PMID:27086505

  14. Role of Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Hion; Arzamendi, Dabit; Carreras, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent valvular heart disease in the United States and the second most prevalent in Europe. Patients with severe mitral regurgitation have a poor prognosis with medical therapy once they become symptomatic or develop signs of significant cardiac dysfunction. However, as many as half of these patients are inoperable because of advanced age, ventricular dysfunction, or other comorbidities. Studies have shown that surgery increases survival in patients with organic mitral regurgitation due to valve prolapse but has no clinical benefit in those with functional mitral regurgitation. In this scenario, percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation in native valves provides alternative management of valvular heart disease in patients at high surgical risk. Percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation is a growing field that relies heavily on imaging techniques to diagnose functional anatomy and guide repair procedures. PMID:26926991

  15. Percutaneous ventricular assist devices and extracorporeal life support: current applications.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, Johannes; de Waha, Suzanne; Thiele, Holger

    2016-05-17

    Percutaneous mechanical circulatory support devices, such as intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP), active left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) or extracorporeal life support (ECLS), are treatment options for selected patients in cardiogenic shock, undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting. Potential benefits include the maintenance of organ function and the reduction of intracardiac pressures, volumes, and oxygen consumption. On the other hand, they are invasive, resource intensive, and can be associated with serious complications. Thus, their potential benefits must be weighed against the inherent risks. Despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence, the use of mechanical circulatory support devices has risen considerably in recent years. This educational article covers practical issues of IABP, LVAD, and ECLS with respect to patient and device selection, implantation technique, potential complications, and future perspectives. PMID:27174115

  16. Recent advancement or less invasive treatment of percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Since its initial introduction in 1976, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been widely performed for the management of large renal stones and currently is recommended for staghorn calculi, kidney stones larger than 2 cm, and shock wave lithotripsy-resistant lower pole stones greater than 1 cm. However, except for open and laparoscopic surgery, PCNL is the most invasive of the minimally invasive stone surgery techniques. Over the years, technical and instrumental advances have been made in PCNL to reduce morbidity and improve effectiveness. A thorough review of the recent literature identified five major areas of progress for the advancement of PCNL: patient positioning, method of percutaneous access, development of lithotriptors, miniaturized access tracts, and postoperative nephrostomy tube management. This review provides an overview of recent advancements in PCNL and the outcomes of each area of progress and notes how much we achieve with less invasive PCNL. This information may allow us to consider the future role and future developments of PCNL. PMID:26366273

  17. Arthroscopy Assisted Percutaneous Fixation of Ideberg Type Iii Glenoid Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Prashant; Arora, Bakul; Pinto, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Intra-articular glenoid fractures are extremely rare and may be associated with other injuries. Traditionally open reduction and internal fixation has been recommended in displaced intra-articular glenoid fractures. However open reduction is difficult and it may not be possible to address the associated intra-articular soft tissue injuries. A few reports of arthroscopic assisted fixation of these fractures have been recently published. We are reporting a case of Ideberg type 3 glenoid fracture and its treatment. Case Report: We are presenting our case where a 52 year old man presented with Type 3 intra-articular glenoid fracture. The fracture was fixed percutaneously under simultaneous arthroscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. Conclusion: Intra-articular glenoid fractures are uncommon and difficult to treat. Arthroscopy assisted percutaneous fixation technique can be a valuable adjunct for the surgeon in dealing with not only the fracture but also the associated soft-tissue injuries. PMID:27299041

  18. Simultaneous percutaneous nephrolithotomy and early endoscopic ureteric realignment for iatrogenic ureteropelvic junction avulsion during ureteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tayeb, Marawan El; Mellon, Matthew J.; Lingeman, James E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of successful management of ureteropelvice junction avulsion during ureteroscopy successfully managed with simultaneous percutaneous nephrolithotomy and early endoscopic ureteral realignment. PMID:26834898

  19. Percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Han, Yoon Hee

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of afferent loop syndrome, jejunostomy or Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy have tended to represent the preferred procedures. In patients who are not good candidates for surgery, palliative treatment-i.e., percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or percutaneous direct transperitoneal jejunostomy techniques-have been applied. Transhepatic biliary drainage confers a risk of ascending cholangitis. Direct percutaneous transperitoneal drainage may be impractical when overlying bowel loops prevent access to deeply located afferent loops. In the present case, percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma was performed successfully for palliation of afferent loop syndrome. PMID:25433418

  20. Feasibility of percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Seoyeoun; Jung, Sunyoung; Kim, Boeun; Jung, Joohyun; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Mincheol

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating hepatocellular disease versus biliary obstruction can be challenging in dogs presented for icterus. The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the feasibility of percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography in dogs. Ten normal dogs weighing 7.6-13.0 kg (median 9.8 kg) were recruited. All dogs were considered normal based on complete blood count, serum chemistry profile, ultrasound examination, and percutaneous radiographic cholecystography. Percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography was performed using 0.5 ml of commercially available contrast agent and two conventional ultrasound machines for simultaneous scanning at two different locations. Two observers independently evaluated the time to initial detection of contrast in the proximal duodenum and duration of contrast enhancement via visual monitoring. Dynamic contrast enhancement was calculated using time-intensity curves. Mean (± SD) and median (range) of time to initial detection were 8.60 s (± 3.35) and 8.0 s (2.0-11.0), respectively, and mean and median duration were 50.45 s (± 23.24) and 53.0 s (20.0 - 70.0), respectively. Mean, median, and range of peak intensity were 114.1 mean pixel value (MPV) (SD ± 30.7), 109.2 MPV, and 79.7-166.7, respectively, and mean, median, and range of time to peak intensity were 26.1 s (SD ± 7.1 s), 24.0 s, and 19.0-41.0 s, respectively. Findings indicated that percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography is a feasible technique for detecting and quantifying patency of the bile duct in normal dogs. Future studies are needed to assess the diagnostic utility of this technique for dogs with biliary obstruction. PMID:25403172

  1. Percutaneous transluminal alcohol septal myocardial ablation after aortic valve replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitges, M.; Kapadia, S.; Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.; Tuzcu, M. E.; Lever, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    When left ventricular outflow tract obstruction develops after aortic valve replacement, few treatment choices have been available until now. We present a patient with prior aortic valve replacement who developed left ventricle outflow tract obstruction that was successfully treated with a percutaneous transcoronary myocardial septal alcohol ablation. This technique is a useful tool for the treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, especially in those patients with prior heart surgery. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Image-guided percutaneous internal fixation of sacral fracture.

    PubMed

    Kinon, Merritt D; Desai, Rupen; Loriaux, Daniel; Houten, John K

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous iliosacral screw placement is a technically challenging procedure with a significant complication profile for misplaced screws. The use of stereotactic image guidance has been shown to provide superior accuracy in the placement of spinal instrumentation. Here, the authors describe a novel application of O-arm technology (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) to help safely place iliosacral screws for the treatment of a traumatic sacral fracture. PMID:26433323

  3. Percutaneous Renal Cyst Ablation and Review of the Current Literature.

    PubMed

    Desai, Devang; Modi, Sunny; Pavicic, Matthew; Thompson, Melissa; Pisko, John

    2016-01-01

    Renal cysts are common and most often are discovered incidentally, but may require intervention if associated with pain, hypertension, or hematuria. Minimally invasive treatment options are preferred with numerous modalities available, including renal cyst ablation. This case report of a 61-year-old female describes the effective percutaneous drainage and endoscopic ablation of a simple parapelvic renal cyst for management of symptomatic renal calculus. Current literature regarding this surgical intervention and alternative methods is discussed. PMID:27579403

  4. Percutaneous Permeation of Topical Phtalocyanine Studied by Photoacoustic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, E. P. O.; Beltrame, M.; Cardoso, L. E.; Barja, P. R.

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the percutaneous permeation of topical hydroxy-(29 H,31 H-phthalocyaninato)aluminum (PcAlOH) on pig ear skin employing photoacoustic (PA) measurements. The PcAlOH was incorporated in an emulsion with assessed stability parameters of pH and short- and long-term stability tests. Pig skin was prepared through a heat separation technique, and the outer skin of the cartilage was removed with a scalpel. Skin samples were then cut and treated with sodium bromide 2 mol . L-1 for 6 h at 37 °C. The epidermis layer was washed with purified water, dried, and stored under reduced pressure until use. The skin permeation kinetics were determined by PA measurements as a function of time, performed with an open PA cell developed at Universidade do Vale do Paraíba. Short- and long-term stability tests showed no phase separation. A significant difference was found between the typical times for percutaneous permeation of the emulsion base and the emulsion + PcAlOH. The study showed two absorption transients due to the physical diffusion of molecules in the skin sample. The first is attributed to the penetration of molecules that promptly passed through the lipid barrier, while the second is related to the molecules that had greater difficulty of passing through. This slower component in the absorption curves is attributed to the penetration of PcAlOH, a planar molecule whose percutaneous penetration is more difficult. The study indicates that the formulations containing PcAlOH have stable characteristics and show promising results in absorption into the skin. The presence of the photosensitive agent in the formulation contributed significantly to the larger time constant observed. PA measurements allowed the evaluation of the penetration kinetics of PcAlOH in pig ear skin; the methodology employed may be used in the determination of the percutaneous permeation of phthalocyanines in further studies.

  5. Percutaneous Renal Cyst Ablation and Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Devang; Pavicic, Matthew; Thompson, Melissa; Pisko, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Renal cysts are common and most often are discovered incidentally, but may require intervention if associated with pain, hypertension, or hematuria. Minimally invasive treatment options are preferred with numerous modalities available, including renal cyst ablation. This case report of a 61-year-old female describes the effective percutaneous drainage and endoscopic ablation of a simple parapelvic renal cyst for management of symptomatic renal calculus. Current literature regarding this surgical intervention and alternative methods is discussed.

  6. Percutaneous antegrade fiberoptic ureterorenoscopic treatment of ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Berkhoff, W B; Meijer, F

    1990-09-01

    Treatment of upper ureteral calculi can be accomplished by various endourological techniques and/or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Percutaneous fiberoptic treatment of upper ureteral stones provides an alternative especially suited as second line treatment in cases when extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy failed. Usually, these patients will present with impacted ureteral stones. Our first experiences with 8 stones in 7 patients to date proved this technique to be safe and reliable, with no complications encountered on excretory urography 3 months postoperatively. PMID:2388317

  7. Testing Percutaneous Arterial Closure Devices: An Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Ruifang; Kranokpiraksa, Pawanrat; Pavcnik, Dusan Kakizawa, Hideaki; Uchida, Barry T.; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2009-03-15

    The ovine superficial femoral artery was used for testing the efficacy of percutaneous arterial closure devices (PACDs) in their developmental stage. Two topical devices containing chitostan, one staple-mediated PACD and a porcine small intestinal submucosa plug, were tested by follow-up angiography in 37 sheep. Absence or presence of bleeding and time to bleeding cessation were the main criteria for evaluation of PAVD efficacy. The results of these tests directed modification of individual PACDs and improved their efficacy.

  8. Percutaneous aspiration of fluid for management of peritonitis in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Nicolaou, S.; Campbell, M. R.; Sargsyan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Melton, S.; Beck, G.; Dawson, D. L.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a medical emergency that can affect even well-screened, healthy individuals, peritonitis developing during a long-duration space exploration mission may dictate deviation from traditional clinical practice due to the absence of otherwise indicated surgical capabilities. Medical management can treat many intra-abdominal processes, but treatment failures are inevitable. In these circumstances, percutaneous aspiration under sonographic guidance could provide a "rescue" strategy. Hypothesis: Sonographically guided percutaneous aspiration of intra-peritoneal fluid can be performed in microgravity. METHODS: Investigations were conducted in the microgravity environment of NASA's KC-135 research aircraft (0 G). The subjects were anesthetized female Yorkshire pigs weighing 50 kg. The procedures were rehearsed in a terrestrial animal lab (1 G). Colored saline (500 mL) was introduced through an intra-peritoneal catheter during flight. A high-definition ultrasound system (HDI-5000, ATL, Bothell, WA) was used to guide a 16-gauge needle into the peritoneal cavity to aspirate fluid. RESULTS: Intra-peritoneal fluid collections were easily identified, distinct from surrounding viscera, and on occasion became more obvious during weightless conditions. Subjectively, with adequate restraint of the subject and operators, the procedure was no more demanding than during the 1-G rehearsals. CONCLUSIONS: Sonographically guided percutaneous aspiration of intra-peritoneal fluid collections is feasible in weightlessness. Treatment of intra-abdominal inflammatory conditions in spaceflight might rely on pharmacological options, backed by sonographically guided percutaneous aspiration for the "rescue" of treatment failures. While this risk mitigation strategy cannot guarantee success, it may be the most practical option given severe resource limitations.

  9. Percutaneous Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Lori K.; Argenziano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The burgeoning field of catheter-based, percutaneous valve intervention takes an interdisciplinary approach to mitral valve regurgitation with the goal of maximizing clinical outcomes and minimizing procedure-associated morbidity. This exciting field continues to push the boundaries of technological innovation as it expands the armamentarium available to treat valvular disease. Around the world teams are working to create a catheter-based approach that is practical and durable. Several technologies are in various stages of development and clinical application. PMID:22443644

  10. CT-Guided Percutaneous Biopsy of Intrathoracic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Hira; Nath, Alok; Borah, Samudra

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous CT-guided needle biopsy of mediastinal and pulmonary lesions is a minimally invasive approach for obtaining tissue for histopathological examination. Although it is a widely accepted procedure with relatively few complications, precise planning and detailed knowledge of various aspects of the biopsy procedure is mandatory to avert complications. In this pictorial review, we reviewed important anatomical approaches, technical aspects of the procedure, and its associated complications. PMID:22438689

  11. Iatrogenic Percutaneous Vascular Injuries: Clinical Presentation, Imaging, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Benjamin H.; Copelan, Alexander; Scola, Dominic; Watts, Micah M.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular interventional radiology procedures are relatively safe compared with analogous surgical procedures, with overall major complication rates of less than 1%. However, major vascular injuries resulting from these procedures may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. This review will discuss the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of vascular complications related to percutaneous vascular interventions. Early recognition of these complications and familiarity with treatment options are essential skills for the interventional radiologist. PMID:26038619

  12. Pain Palliation by Percutaneous Acetabular Osteoplasty for Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hokotate, Hirofumi; Baba, Yasutaka; Churei, Hisahiko; Nakajo, Masayuki; Ohkubo, Kouichi; Hamada, Kenji

    2001-09-15

    A 68-year-old man with hepatocellular carcinoma and known skeletal metastasis developed right hip pain and gait disturbance due to an osteolytic metastasis in the right acetabulum. This was treated initially with chemoembolization and radiation therapy. When these procedures proved unsuccessful percutaneous injection of acrylic bone cement into the acetabulum was undertaken. Immediately after this procedure, he obtained sufficient pain relief and improved walking ability, which continued for 3 months until he died of hepatic insufficiency.

  13. An unusual presentation of colon perforation following percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chubak, Barbara; Stern, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Colon perforation is a rare but serious complication of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), meriting particular attention to its signs and symptoms for prompt diagnosis and treatment. We report an unusual presentation of colon perforation following tubeless PCNL, characterized by sore throat, pneumomediastinum, and neck and shoulder crepitus. In addition to the details of this case, we review the current literature on bowel injury during PCNL and its management. PMID:25485017

  14. Phosphorus mobilizing consortium Mammoth P(™) enhances plant growth.

    PubMed

    Baas, Peter; Bell, Colin; Mancini, Lauren M; Lee, Melanie N; Conant, Richard T; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a critical nutrient used to maximize plant growth and yield. Current agriculture management practices commonly experience low plant P use efficiency due to natural chemical sorption and transformations when P fertilizer is applied to soils. A perplexing challenge facing agriculture production is finding sustainable solutions to deliver P more efficiently to plants. Using prescribed applications of specific soil microbial assemblages to mobilize soil bound-P to improve crop nutrient uptake and productivity has rarely been employed. We investigated whether inoculation of soils with a bacterial consortium developed to mobilize soil P, named Mammoth P(TM), could increase plant productivity. In turf, herbs, and fruits, the combination of conventional inorganic fertilizer combined with Mammoth P(TM) increased productivity up to twofold compared to the fertilizer treatments without the Mammoth P(TM) inoculant. Jalapeño plants were found to bloom more rapidly when treated with either Mammoth P. In wheat trials, we found that Mammoth P(TM) by itself was able to deliver yields equivalent to those achieved with conventional inorganic fertilizer applications and improved productivity more than another biostimulant product. Results from this study indicate the substantial potential of Mammoth P(TM) to enhance plant growth and crop productivity. PMID:27326379

  15. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  16. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Kort, E.

    1995-05-01

    The CEPH consortium framework map of chromosome 11 is presented. The map was generated from CEPH family DNAs with 181 probe/enzyme combinations contributed by 20 laboratories. Seventy-seven of the loci are defined by microsatellite polymorphisms that can be typed by the PCR. A total of 42 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The female, male, and sex-average maps extend for 179.6, 110.8, and 145.3 cM, respectively. The largest interval on the sex-average map is less than 11 cM, and the average distance between uniquely placed loci is 4 cM. The genotypic data obtained for map construction have been used to identify the positions of crossovers on the chromosomes of CEPH family children, allowing the localization of new markers without computationally intensive likelihood models and providing a basis for efficient extension of the linkage map to higher resolution. 36 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C.; Keith, T.P.

    1995-01-01

    A Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-averaged map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM, and the female map length is 197 cM. The map covers virtually the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map. 39 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Sutherland, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    A Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-average map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM and the female map length is 197 cM. The map virtually covers the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 Kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map.

  19. The Climate Change Consortium of Wales (C3W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, K. R.; Reis, J.; Hall, I. R.

    2011-12-01

    In response to the complexity and multidisciplinary nature of climate change research, the Climate Change Consortium of Wales (C3W) was formed in 2009 by the Welsh universities of Aberystwyth, Bangor, Cardiff and Swansea. Initially funded by Welsh Government, through the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales, the Countryside Council for Wales and the universities, C3W aims to bring together climate change researchers from a wide range of disciplines to explore scientific and sociological drivers, impacts and implications at local, national and international scale. The specific aims are to i) improve our fundamental understanding of the causes, nature, timing and consequences of climate change on Planet Earth's environment and on humanity, and ii) to reconfigure climate research in Wales as a recognisable centre of excellence on the world stage. In addition to improving the infrastructure for climate change research, we aim to improve communication, networking, collaborative research, and multidisciplinary data assimilation within and between the Welsh universities, and other UK and international institutions. Furthermore, C3W aims to apply its research by actively contributing towards national policy development, business development and formal and informal education activities within and beyond Wales.

  20. The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium: Identification of ocular mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Monica M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Lu, Lu; Miller, Darla R; Rinchik, Eugene M; Williams, Robert; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2005-06-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) is in its fifth year of a ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-based mutagenesis screen to detect recessive mutations that affect the eye and brain. Each pedigree is tested by various phenotyping domains including the eye, neurohistology, behavior, aging, ethanol, drug, social behavior, auditory, and epilepsy domains. The utilization of a highly efficient breeding protocol and coordination of various universities across Tennessee makes it possible for mice with ENU-induced mutations to be evaluated by nine distinct phenotyping domains within this large-scale project known as the TMGC. Our goal is to create mutant lines that model human diseases and disease syndromes and to make the mutant mice available to the scientific research community. Within the eye domain, mice are screened for anterior and posterior segment abnormalities using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, eye weight, histology, and immunohistochemistry. As of January 2005, we have screened 958 pedigrees and 4800 mice, excluding those used in mapping studies. We have thus far identified seven pedigrees with primary ocular abnormalities. Six of the mutant pedigrees have retinal or subretinal aberrations, while the remaining pedigree presents with an abnormal eye size. Continued characterization of these mutant mice should in most cases lead to the identification of the mutated gene, as well as provide insight into the function of each gene. Mice from each of these pedigrees of mutant mice are available for distribution to researchers for independent study.