Science.gov

Sample records for constant water content

  1. Dielectric constant of water in the interface.

    PubMed

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ∼5 to 18 Å. PMID:27394114

  2. Dielectric constant of water in the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ˜5 to 18 Å.

  3. CONSTANT VOLUME SAMPLING SYSTEM WATER CONDENSATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion of organic motor vehicle fuels produces carbon dioxide and water (H2O) vapor (and also products of incomplete combustion, e.g. hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide, at lower concentrations). he Constant Volume Sampling (CVS) system, commonly used to condition auto exhaust ...

  4. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  5. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  6. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  7. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  8. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  9. Profiling soil water content sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) sensor system based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) principles was developed to sense soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity in 20-cm (8 inch) deep layers from the soil surface to depths of 3 m (10 ft) (patent No. 13/404,491 pending). A Cooperative R...

  10. Dielectric constant of water at very high temperature and pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Pertinent statistical mechanical theory is combined with the available measurements of the dielectric constant of water at high temperature and pressure to predict that property at still higher temperature. The dielectric constant is needed in connection with studies of electrolytes such as NaCl/H2O at very high temperature. PMID:16593342

  11. Computing the dielectric constant of liquid water at constant dielectric displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Sprik, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    The static dielectric constant of liquid water is computed using classical force field based molecular dynamics simulation at fixed electric displacement D . The method to constrain the electric displacement is the finite-temperature classical variant of the constant D method developed by Stengel, Spaldin, and Vanderbilt [Nat. Phys. 5, 304 (2009), 10.1038/nphys1185]. There is also a modification of this scheme imposing fixed values of the macroscopic field E . The method is applied to the popular SPC/E model of liquid water. We compare four different estimates of the dielectric constant, two obtained from fluctuations of the polarization at D =0 and E =0 and two from the variation of polarization with finite D and E . It is found that all four estimates agree when properly converged. The computational effort to achieve convergence varies, however, with constant D calculations being substantially more efficient. We attribute this difference to the much shorter relaxation time of longitudinal polarization compared to transverse polarization accelerating constant D calculations.

  12. Sugar and water contents of honey with dielectrc property sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dielectric properties of pure yellow locust, jujube and rape flower honey and their water-adulterated products with water content from 18% to 42.6% were measured with open-ended coaxial-line probe technology and a network analyzer from 10 to 4500 MHz at 25oC. Dielectric constants of pure honeys ...

  13. Remote Sensing of Salinity: The Dielectric Constant of Sea Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Tarkocin, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Global monitoring of sea surface salinity from space requires an accurate model for the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature to characterize the emissivity of the surface. Measurements are being made at 1.413 GHz, the center frequency of the Aquarius radiometers, using a resonant cavity and the perturbation method. The cavity is operated in a transmission mode and immersed in a liquid bath to control temperature. Multiple measurements are made at each temperature and salinity. Error budgets indicate a relative accuracy for both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of about 1%.

  14. he Ion-Product Constant of Water to 350°

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, J.R.; Barnes, H.L.

    1972-01-01

    The ion-activity product of water, KW0, has been determined to 350?? along the liquid-vapor curve from conductance measurements made between 100 and 350?? on aqueous solutions in the system acetic acid-ammonium acetate-ammonia. Derivation of KW0 requires data on the limiting equivalent conductivities of acetic acid, ammonia, and ammonium acetate, the ionization constants of acetic acid and ammonia, and of the conductivities of pairs of these solutes at a series of concentrations. The limiting equivalent conductivities were indirectly obtained from literature data on the limiting equivalent conductivities of HCl, NaCl, NaOH, NH4Cl, and NaOAc. The ionization constants of acetic acid were obtained from our conductance measurements combined with literature data; constants for ammonia were obtained from the literature. From our conductivities, values of KW0 were obtained between 100 and 350??; these were combined with well established literature values and the combined set analytically smoothed to provide a consistent set of molal constants from 25 to 350??; respective pK's at 150, 250, and 350?? are: for H2O, 11.64, 11.05, and 11.42; for HOAc, 5.22, 5.95, and 7.68; and for NH4OH, 5.11, 5.91, and 7.30.

  15. Ice Particle Impact on Cloud Water Content Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward F.; Miller, Dean R.; Plaskon, Stephen R.; Strapp, Walter; Lillie, Lyle

    2004-01-01

    Determining the total amount of water contained in an icing cloud necessitates the measurement of both the liquid droplets and ice particles. One commonly accepted method for measuring cloud water content utilizes a hot wire sensing element, which is maintained at a constant temperature. In this approach, the cloud water content is equated with the power required to keep the sense element at a constant temperature. This method inherently assumes that impinging cloud particles remain on the sensing element surface long enough to be evaporated. In the case of ice particles, this assumption requires that the particles do not bounce off the surface after impact. Recent tests aimed at characterizing ice particle impact on a thermally heated wing section, have raised questions about the validity of this assumption. Ice particles were observed to bounce off the heated wing section a very high percentage of the time. This result could have implications for Total Water Content sensors which are designed to capture ice particles, and thus do not account for bouncing or breakup of ice particles. Based on these results, a test was conducted to investigate ice particle impact on the sensing elements of the following hot-wire cloud water content probes: (1) Nevzorov Total Water Content (TWC)/Liquid Water Content (LWC) probe, (2) Science Engineering Associates TWC probe, and (3) Particle Measuring Systems King probe. Close-up video imaging was used to study ice particle impact on the sensing element of each probe. The measured water content from each probe was also determined for each cloud condition. This paper will present results from this investigation and attempt to evaluate the significance of ice particle impact on hot-wire cloud water content measurements.

  16. Estimating canopy water content from spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar water content is a dynamic quantity depending on water losses from transpiration and water uptake from the soil. Absorption of shortwave radiation by water is determined by various frequency overtones of fundamental bending and stretching molecular transitions. Leaf water potential and rela...

  17. Use of Water Content Reflectometers in Bioinfiltration/Bioretention to Measure Water Movement and Estimate Evapotranspiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most bioinfiltration/bioretention models assume runoff is evenly distributed across the surface area and after the engineered fill media is no longer saturated, the volumetric water content (VWC) is constant throughout the media profile and at field capacity. Four to nine water ...

  18. Rainfall estimation from liquid water content and precipitable water content data over land, ocean and plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Adhikari, A.; Maitra, A.

    2016-01-01

    A simplistic approach has been proposed to estimate annual rainfall amount from cloud liquid water content and precipitable water content utilizing the data pertaining to the period of 1997-2006. The study involves seven land locations over India, seven stations over plateau and seven locations over the Indian Ocean. The wavelet analyses exhibit prominent annual peaks in the global spectra of rainfall, cloud liquid water content and precipitable water content. Power-law relationships are found to exist between the global wavelet peaks of precipitation and those of both the parameters, namely, cloud liquid water content and precipitable water content. Again, a linear relationship exists between global wavelet peaks of rainfall amount and total rainfall amount. The rainfall estimations utilizing cloud liquid water content data exhibit better matching with the measured values than those utilizing precipitable water content data.

  19. Characterization of Cloud Water-Content Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2010-01-01

    The development of realistic cloud parameterizations for climate models requires accurate characterizations of subgrid distributions of thermodynamic variables. To this end, a software tool was developed to characterize cloud water-content distributions in climate-model sub-grid scales. This software characterizes distributions of cloud water content with respect to cloud phase, cloud type, precipitation occurrence, and geo-location using CloudSat radar measurements. It uses a statistical method called maximum likelihood estimation to estimate the probability density function of the cloud water content.

  20. Inverse modeling of GPR signal for estimating soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambot, S.; van den Bosch, I.; Slob, E. C.; Stockbroeckx, B.; Scheers, B.; Vanclooster, M.

    2003-04-01

    For a large variety of environmental and agricultural applications, the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) for identifying soil water content is a matter of concern. However, the current state of technology still needs improvements and new developments. Research has focused on the development of an integrated inverse modeling approach including GPR design, GPR signal forward modeling, and GPR signal inversion to estimate simultaneously the depth dependent dielectric constant and electrical conductivity of the shallow subsurface. We propose to use as radar system a stepped frequency continuous wave radar with an ultrawide band dielectric filled TEM horn antenna used in monostatic mode. This configuration is appropriate for real time mapping and allows for a more realistic forward modeling of the radar-antenna-soil system. Forward modeling was based on the exact solution of Maxwell's equations and inversion was formulated by the classical least square problem. Given the inherent complex topography of the objective functions to optimize in electromagnetic inversion problems, we used for the inversion the recently developed global multilevel coordinate search algorithm that we combine sequentially with the local Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. We applied the method in laboratory conditions on tank filled with sand subject to different water content levels considering a homogeneous water profile. The inverse estimation of the soil dielectric constant was remarkably well in accordance with each water content level and the corresponding theoretical values of the dielectric constant for the sand. Comparison of GPR measurements with estimations from time domain reflectometry (TDR) were also well in close agreement.

  1. Method for rapidly determining the swelling-clay content in shales and shaly sandstone formations by high-frequency dielectric constant measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, M.K.; Longo, J.M.; Steiger, R.P.; Leung, P.K.

    1989-10-24

    This patent describes a method for measuring the swelling-clay content of earth formations by dielectric measurements. It comprises: grinding a sample of the earth formation to a size suitable for testing; washing the sample with a fluid having a water activity substantially less than that of water; packing the washed sample into a sample cell suitable for dielectric measurement; measuring the dielectric constant of the washed sample at a preselected frequency; and comparing the measured dielectric constant of the rock sample to a calibration curve, to determine the swelling-clay content of the earth formation.

  2. The mechanism of sulforaphene degradation to different water contents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guifang; Li, Yuan; Cheng, Li; Yuan, Qipeng; Tang, Pingwah; Kuang, Pengqun; Hu, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Sulforaphene extracted from radish seeds was strongly associated with cancer prevention. However, sulforaphene was unstable in aqueous medium and at high temperature. This instability impairs many useful applications of sulforaphene. In this paper, the stability of sulforaphene (purity above 95%) during storage at -20°C, 4°C and 26°C was studied. The degradation product was purified by preparative HPLC and identified by ESI/MS, NMR ((1)H and (13)C NMR) and FTIR spectroscopy. The degradation pathway of sulforaphene was presented. Furthermore, we found that the degradation rate of sulforaphene was closely related to the water content of sulforaphene sample. The higher the water content was, the faster the sulforaphene sample degraded. A mathematical model was developed to predict the degradation constant at various water contents. It provided a guideline for industry to improve the stability of sulforaphene during preparation, application and storage. PMID:26471648

  3. Increased Cerebral Water Content in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana Sofia; Gras, Vincent; Tiffin-Richards, Frances; Mirzazade, Shahram; Holschbach, Bernhard; Frank, Rolf Dario; Vassiliadou, Athina; Krüger, Thilo; Eitner, Frank; Gross, Theresa; Schulz, Jörg Bernhard; Floege, Jürgen; Shah, Nadim Jon

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available on the impact of hemodialysis on cerebral water homeostasis and its distribution in chronic kidney disease. We used a neuropsychological test battery, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a novel technique for quantitative measurement of localized water content using 3T MRI to investigate ten hemodialysis patients (HD) on a dialysis-free day and after hemodialysis (2.4±2.2 hours), and a matched healthy control group with the same time interval. Neuropsychological testing revealed mainly attentional and executive cognitive dysfunction in HD. Voxel-based-morphometry showed only marginal alterations in the right inferior medial temporal lobe white matter in HD compared to controls. Marked increases in global brain water content were found in the white matter, specifically in parietal areas, in HD patients compared to controls. Although the global water content in the gray matter did not differ between the two groups, regional increases of brain water content in particular in parieto-temporal gray matter areas were observed in HD patients. No relevant brain hydration changes were revealed before and after hemodialysis. Whereas longer duration of dialysis vintage was associated with increased water content in parieto-temporal-occipital regions, lower intradialytic weight changes were negatively correlated with brain water content in these areas in HD patients. Worse cognitive performance on an attention task correlated with increased hydration in frontal white matter. In conclusion, long-term HD is associated with altered brain tissue water homeostasis mainly in parietal white matter regions, whereas the attentional domain in the cognitive dysfunction profile in HD could be linked to increased frontal white matter water content. PMID:25826269

  4. Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahser, Matthias; Jouniaux, Laurence; Sailhac, Pascal; Matthey, Pierre-Daniel; Zillmer, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    The expectation behind seismoelectric field measurements is to achieve a combination of the sensitivity of electrical properties to water content and permeability and the high spatial resolution of seismic surveys. A better understanding of the physical processes and a reliable quantification of the conversion between seismic energy and electric energy are necessary, and need to take into account the effect of water content, especially for shallow subsurface investigations. We performed a field survey to quantify the seismoelectric signals as the water content changed. We measured seismoelectric signals induced by seismic wave propagation, by repeating the observations on the same two profiles during several months. The electrical resistivity was monitored to take into account the water content variations. We show that the horizontal component of the seismoelectric field, normalized with respect to the horizontal component of the seismic acceleration is inversely proportional to the electrical resistivity ρ0.42 ± 0.25. Assuming that the observed resistivity changes depend only on the water content, this result implies that the electrokinetic coefficient should increase with increasing water saturation. Taking into account the water saturation and combining our results with the Archie law for the resistivity in non-saturated conditions, the normalized seismoelectric field is a power-law of the effective saturation with the exponent (0.42 ± 0.25)n where n is Archie's saturation exponent.

  5. Detection of Plant Water Content with Needle-Type In-Situ Water Content Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayanagi, Hitoshi; Miki, Norihisa

    A needle-type water content sensor with a polyethersulfone (PES) polymer membrane was developed for the low-invasive, direct in-situ measurement of plant water content (PWC) in prior work. In this paper we demonstrate a measurement of plant water stress that represents the demand for water of the plant and greatly affects its sweetness. We inserted the sensor into a stalk of strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) and soil. The variation in both the plant and the soil water content were successfully detected, which revealed the delay between variation in the plant water stress and soil water content after irrigation. Such delay could only be detected by the proposed sensor that could directly measure the variation of PWC in situ and continuously. The experiments also showed the variation in the signals as a function of detection sites and suggested that the detection sites of plant water stress need to be considered when the sensor is applied to irrigation culture.

  6. Water Relations, Gas Exchange, and Nutrient Response to a Long Term Constant Water Deficit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Wade L.; Goldstein, Guillermo; Dreschel, Thomas W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Sager, John C.; Knott, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) were grown for 43 days in a micro-porous tube nutrient delivery system. Roots were unable to penetrate the microporous tube, but grew on the surface and maintained capillary contact with the nutrient solution on the inside of the tube through the 5-microns pores of the porous tube. Water potential in the system was controlled at -0.4, -0.8, and -3.0 kPa by adjusting the applied pressure (hydrostatic head) to the nutrient solution flowing through the microporous tubes. A relatively small decrease in applied water potential from -0.4 to -3.0 kPa resulted in a 34% reduction of shoot growth but only a moderate reduction in the mid-day leaf water potential from - 1.3 to - 1.7 MPa. Carbon dioxide assimilation decreased and water use efficiency increased with the more negative applied water Potentials, while intercellular C02 concentration remained constant. The physiological responses observed in this study in response to small constant differences in applied water potentials were much greater than expected from either the applied water potential or the observed plant water potential. Even though the micro-porous tube may not represent natural conditions and could possibly introduce morphological and physiological artifacts , it enables a high degree of control of water potential that facilitates the investigation of many aspects of water relations not practical with other experimental systems.

  7. Microwave remote sensing of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing of soils to determine water content was considered. A layered water balance model was developed for determining soil water content in the upper zone (top 30 cm), while soil moisture at greater depths and near the surface during the diurnal cycle was studied using experimental measurements. Soil temperature was investigated by means of a simulation model. Based on both models, moisture and temperature profiles of a hypothetical soil were generated and used to compute microwave soil parameters for a clear summer day. The results suggest that, (1) soil moisture in the upper zone can be predicted on a daily basis for 1 cm depth increments, (2) soil temperature presents no problem if surface temperature can be measured with infrared radiometers, and (3) the microwave response of a bare soil is determined primarily by the moisture at and near the surface. An algorithm is proposed for monitoring large areas which combines the water balance and microwave methods.

  8. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  9. Water content reflectometer calibration, field versus laboratory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For soils with large amounts of high-charge clays, site-specific calibrations for the newer permittivity probes that operate at lower frequencies, often have higher permittivity values than factory calibrations. The purpose of this study was to determine site-specific calibration of water content re...

  10. Critical water contents of hydrophobic soils in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, Magdalena; Holzinger, Ursula; Singh, Ranvir; Klik, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    with respect to the critical water content. Soil hydrophobicity was again tested during 4 wetting and drying cycles on 3 replicates each of disturbed and undisturbed soil samples. The tests confirmed that water repellency does not exist at high water contents. It generally starts to appear at a certain limit, increases rapidly up to a peak value and finally decreases slowly when the water content approaches 0. Critical water contents were very high in the first wetting cycle and stabilized at a rather constant level during the 2nd, 3rd and 4th wetting cycle. This phenomenon may be due to inhomogeneous water distributions within the field moist soil samples in the 1st wetting cycle and it was thus chosen to take the critical moisture content from the 2nd wetting cycle for further purposes. We found relatively broad transition zones where soils were found to be both hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Critical water contents or rather transition zones were found to differ significantly between the various soil orders and showed values between 0.34 (m³/m³) for recent soil and 0.44(m³/m³) for organic soil.

  11. Rapid estimates of relative water content.

    PubMed

    Smart, R E

    1974-02-01

    Relative water content may be accurately estimated using the ratio of tissue fresh weight to tissue turgid weight, termed here relative tissue weight. That relative water content and relative tissue weight are linearly related is demonstrated algebraically. The mean value of r(2) for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) leaf tissue over eight separate sampling occasions was 0.993. Similarly high values were obtained for maize (Zea mays cv. Cornell M-3) (0.998) and apple (Malus sylvestris cv. Northern Spy) (0.997) using a range of leaf ages. The proposal by Downey and Miller (1971. Rapid measurements of relative turgidity in maize (Zea mays L.). New Phytol. 70: 555-560) that relative water content in maize may be estimated from water uptake was also investigated for grapevine leaves; this was found to be a less reliable estimate than that obtained with relative tissue weight. With either method, there is a need for calibration, although this could be achieved for relative tissue weight at least with only a few subsamples. PMID:16658686

  12. Measurement of leaf relative water content by infrared reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Rock, Barrett N.; Nobel, Park S.

    1987-01-01

    From basic considerations and Beer's law, a leaf water content index incorporating reflectances of wavelengths from 0.76 to 0.90 microns and from 1.55 to 1.75 microns was developed that relates leaf reflectance to leaf relative water content. For the leaf succulent, Agave deserti, the leaf water content index was not significantly different from the relative water content for either individual leaves or an entire plant. Also, the relative water contents of intact plants of Encelia farinosa and Hilaria rigida in the field were estimated by the leaf water content index; variations in the proportion of living to dead leaf area could cause large errors in the estimate of relative water content. Thus, the leaf water content index may be able to estimate average relative water content of canopies when TM4 and TM5 are measured at a known relative water content and fraction of dead leaf material.

  13. Benchmark calculations of the shielding constants in the water dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecul, Magdalena; Lewandowski, Józef; Sadlej, Joanna

    2001-01-01

    The NMR shielding constants in (H 2O) 2 have been calculated using GIAO-SCF, MP2, MP4 and CCSD methods and for a range of basis sets. According to the obtained results the 6-311++G ** or aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets are recommended for SCF calculations, and the aug-cc-pVXZ series is suggested for correlated calculations of the interaction-induced changes in the shielding constants. The counterpoise correction improves the results towards the basis set limit and is essential in the case of 17O shielding. Correlation effects are substantial for the changes in 17O shielding, less so for 1H shielding. They are overestimated by the MP2 method.

  14. Water relations, gas exchange, and nutrient response to a long term constant water deficit.

    PubMed

    Berry, W L; Goldstein, G; Dreschel, T W; Wheeler, R M; Sager, J C; Knott, W M

    1992-06-01

    Wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) were grown for 43 days in a micro-porous tube nutrient delivery system. Roots were unable to penetrate the microporous tube, but grew on the surface and maintained capillary contact with the nutrient solution on the inside of the tube through the 5-micron pores of the porous tube. Water potential in the system was controlled at -0.4, -0.8, and -3.0 kPa by adjusting the applied pressure (hydrostatic head) to the nutrient solution flowing through the microporous tubes. A relatively small decrease in applied water potential from -0.4 to -3.0 kPa resulted in a 34% reduction of shoot growth but only a moderate reduction in the midday leaf water potential from -1.3 to -1.7 MPa. Carbon dioxide assimilation decreased and water use efficiency increased with the more negative applied water potentials, while intercellular CO2 concentration remained constant. This was associated with a decrease in stomatal conductance to water vapor from 1.90 to 0.98 mol m-2 s-1 and a decrease in total apparent hydraulic conductance from 47 to 12 micromoles s-1 MPa-1. Although the applied water potentials were in the -0.4 to -3.0 kPa range, the actual water potential perceived by the plant roots appeared to be in the range of -0.26 to -0.38 MPa as estimated by the leaf water potential of bagged plants. The amount of K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Cu, and B accumulated with each unit of transpired water increased as the applied water potential became less negative. The increase in accumulation ranged from 1.4-fold for K to 2.2-fold for B. The physiological responses observed in this study in response to small constant differences in applied water potentials were much greater than expected from either the applied water potential or the observed plant water potential. Even though the micro-porous tube may not represent natural conditions and could possibly introduce morphological and physiological artifacts, it enables a high degree of control of water potential that facilitates

  15. Water Relations, Gas Exchange, and Nutrient Response to a Long Term Constant Water Deficit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Wade L.; Goldstein, Guillermo; Dreschel, Thomas W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Sager, John C.; Knott, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) were grown for 43 days in a micro-porous tube nutrient delivery system. Roots were unable to penetrate the microporous tube, but grew on the surface and maintained capillary contact with the nutrient solution on the inside of the tube through the 5-micron pores of the porous tube. Water potential in the system was controlled at -0.4, -0.8, and -3.0 kPa by adjusting the applied pressure (hydrostatic head) to the nutrient solution flowing through the microporous tubes. A relatively small decrease in applied water potential from -0.4 to -3.0 kPa resulted in a 34% reduction of shoot growth but only a moderate reduction in the midday leaf water potential from -1.3 to -1.7 MPa. Carbon dioxide assimilation decreased and water use efficiency increased with the more negative applied water potentials, while intercellular CO2 concentration remained constant. This was associated with a decrease in stomatal conductance to water vapor from 1.90 to 0.98 mol/(sq m sec) and a decrease in total apparent hydraulic conductance from 47 to 12 (micro)mol/(sec MPa). Although the applied water potentials were in the -0.4 to -3.0 kPa range, the actual water potential perceived by the plant roots appeared to be in the range of -0.26 to -0.38 MPa as estimated by the leaf water potential of bagged plants. The amount of K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Cu, and B accumulated with each unit of transpired water increased as the applied water potential became less negative. The increase in accumulation ranged from 1.4-fold for K to 2.2-fold for B. The physiological responses observed in this study in response to small constant differences in applied water potentials were much greater than expected from either the applied water potential or the observed plant water potential. Even though the micro-porous tube may not represent natural conditions and could possibly introduce morphological and physiological artifacts, it enables a high degree of control of water potential that

  16. Structure of high-density water at constant temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pettitt, B.M.; Calef, D.F.

    1987-03-12

    Calculations of the site-site correlation functions for a model of water were performed as a function of density (or pressure) at fixed temperature. These calculations are discussed and compared to neutron-scattering data. The structure of liquid water at high pressure is consistent with a substantially distorted hydrogen-bonding network. It is found that, unlike MeOH, water cannot easily accommodate structures associated with directional attractive forces in the region of several kilobars of pressure.

  17. Use of Water Content Reflectometers in Bioinfiltration/Bioretention to Measure Water Movement and Estimate Evapotranspiration - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most bioinfiltration/bioretention models assume runoff is evenly distributed across the surface area and after the engineered fill media is no longer saturated, the volumetric water content (VWC) is constant throughout the media profile and at field capacity. Four to nine water ...

  18. Stability of aspartame in water: organic solvent mixtures with different dielectric constants.

    PubMed

    Sanyude, S; Locock, R A; Pagliaro, L A

    1991-07-01

    In order to examine the influence of solvent composition on the stability of aspartame (N-alpha-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester) in solution (5 mg/mL), the degradation of aspartame was carried out in water:methanol, water:ethanol, and water:glycerine mixtures with dielectric constant values of 45, 55, and 65, respectively. The rate of disappearance of aspartame was measured by a sensitive HPLC assay. The degradation rate of aspartame increased as the dielectric constant of the solvent mixture decreased in all three solvents systems. For example, at 60 degrees C, the degradation rate constants were 4.1, 5.9, and 8.4 x 10(-3) h-1 at dielectric constant of 65, 55, and 45, respectively. From these results, it can be concluded that the stability of aspartame in aqueous solutions cannot be enhanced by the replacement of water by solvents of lower dielectric constant. PMID:1941567

  19. Relative water content of Spruce needles determined by the leaf water content index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Wong, Sam K. S.; Rock, Barrett N.

    1987-01-01

    Leaf relative water content (RWC) is defined as the volume of water in a leaf divided by the volume at full turgor. Using reflectance factors of wavelengths 0.83 micron and 1.6 microns, a Leaf Water Content Index (LWCI) was derived from the Lambert-Beer Law such that LWCI should equal RWC; LWCI was equal to RWC for Picea pungens, Picea rubens, Liquidambar styraciflua, and Quercus agrifolia. Algebraic manipulation shows that R(1.6)/R(0.83) termed the Moisture Stress Index (MSI), is near-linearly correlated to RWC and to the Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT). Five species tested so far had the same relationship between MSI and EWT, but EWT is not a measure of plant water status.

  20. The MODIS Vegetation Canopy Water Content product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustin, S. L.; Riano, D.; Trombetti, M.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation water stress drives wildfire behavior and risk, having important implications for biogeochemical cycling in natural ecosystems, agriculture, and forestry. Water stress limits plant transpiration and carbon gain. The regulation of photosynthesis creates close linkages between the carbon, water, and energy cycles and through metabolism to the nitrogen cycle. We generated systematic weekly CWC estimated for the USA from 2000-2006. MODIS measures the sunlit reflectance of the vegetation in the visible, near-infrared, and shortwave infrared. Radiative transfer models, such as PROSPECT-SAILH, determine how sunlight interacts with plant and soil materials. These models can be applied over a range of scales and ecosystem types. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to optimize the inversion of these models to determine vegetation water content. We carried out multi-scale validation of the product using field data, airborne and satellite cross-calibration. An Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) of the product is under evaluation by NASA. The CWC product inputs are 1) The MODIS Terra/Aqua surface reflectance product (MOD09A1/MYD09A1) 2) The MODIS land cover map product (MOD12Q1) reclassified to grassland, shrub-land and forest canopies; 3) An ANN trained with PROSPECT-SAILH; 4) A calibration file for each land cover type. The output is an ENVI file with the CWC values. The code is written in Matlab environment and is being adapted to read not only the 8 day MODIS composites, but also daily surface reflectance data. We plan to incorporate the cloud and snow mask and generate as output a geotiff file. Vegetation water content estimates will help predicting linkages between biogeochemical cycles, which will enable further understanding of feedbacks to atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. It will also serve to estimate primary productivity of the biosphere; monitor/assess natural vegetation health related to drought, pollution or diseases

  1. Simulations of dissociation constants in low pressure supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, S. J.; An, P.; Zhang, S.

    2014-09-01

    This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of the dissociation of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide in water from ambient to supercritical temperatures at a fixed pressure of 250 atm. Corrosion of reaction vessels is known to be a serious problem of supercritical water, and acid/base dissociation can be a significant contributing factor to this. The SPC/e model was used in conjunction with solute models determined from density functional calculations and OPLSAA Lennard-Jones parameters. Radial distribution functions were calculated, and these show a significant increase in solute-solvent ordering upon forming the product ions at all temperatures. For both dissociations, rapidly decreasing entropy of reaction was found to be the controlling thermodynamic factor, and this is thought to arise due to the ions produced from dissociation maintaining a relatively high density and ordered solvation shell compared to the reactants. The change in entropy of reaction reaches a minimum at the critical temperature. The values of pKa and pKb were calculated and both increased with temperature, in qualitative agreement with other work, until a maximum value at 748 K, after which there was a slight decrease.

  2. The Determination of Protonation Constants of Peptidomimetic Cyclophanes in Binary Methanol-Water Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Danuta; Andrijewski, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The protonation constants of new group of peptidomimetic cyclophanes with valine or phenylalanine moieties incorporated into the macrocyclic skeleton as well as their linear analogues were determined by potentiometric measurements in solutions of methanol-water mixtures at 25°C and constant ionic strength. The influence of cavity size, location of protonation sites, and attached substituents of the macrocyclic ligands on the protonation constants were discussed on the basis of potentiometric measurement as well as H1-NMR results. PMID:27516918

  3. The Determination of Protonation Constants of Peptidomimetic Cyclophanes in Binary Methanol-Water Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Piotr; Tomczyk, Danuta; Andrijewski, Grzegorz; Tomal, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The protonation constants of new group of peptidomimetic cyclophanes with valine or phenylalanine moieties incorporated into the macrocyclic skeleton as well as their linear analogues were determined by potentiometric measurements in solutions of methanol-water mixtures at 25°C and constant ionic strength. The influence of cavity size, location of protonation sites, and attached substituents of the macrocyclic ligands on the protonation constants were discussed on the basis of potentiometric measurement as well as H(1)-NMR results. PMID:27516918

  4. Comparison of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from Windsat and Modis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retrieval of soil moisture content from microwave sensors also returns an estimate of vegetation water content. Remotely sensed indices from optical sensors can be used to estimate canopy water content. For corn and soybean in central Iowa, there are allometric relationships between canopy water c...

  5. Dissociation constants of phosphoric acid in dimethylformamide-water mixtures at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, L. P.; Fadeeva, Yu. A.; Pryakhin, A. A.

    2009-10-01

    The dissociation constants of phosphoric acid (p K 1 and p K 2) in water-dimethylformamide (DMFA) mixtures (0-0.65 mole fractions of DMFA) were determined at 298.15 K by potentiometric titration. The extrapolation of these data to pure DMFA and the comparative calculation method were used to estimate the dissociation constants of the acid in DMFA.

  6. An investigation of the relationship between tree water potential and dielectric constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Zimmermann, Reiner; Way, Jobea; Oren, Ram

    1992-01-01

    An experiment that has been performed to verify the relationship between the dielectric constant of several tree species and their respective water potentials is described. The water potential, xylem flow and dielectric properties of five tree species were continuously monitored while simultaneously manipulating canopy transpiration and water status. An analysis of the data recorded during these manipulations is presented. Results of this analysis demonstrate a clear coincidence of change in dielectric constant and water status. The implication of this relationship for the utilization of remotely sensed data to study canopy water relations is explored. Preliminary backscatter modeling results demonstrate that the changes in dielectric constant that occur as a result of changes in water status are significant enough to be observable with microwave radar.

  7. SBUV Trends in PMC Ice Water Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deland, M. T.; Thomas, G. E.; Shettle, E. P.; Olivero, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Overlapping data sets from SBUV and SBUV/2 instruments can be combined to create a long-term record of polar mesospheric cloud (PMC, also known as noctilucent clouds) behavior. We have previously used these data to examine multi-decade trends in PMC occurrence frequency and albedo. In this presentation, we extend our analysis to consider zonally and seasonally averaged PMC ice water content (IWC). We use a set of parameterized relationships between mid-UV PMC albedo and scattering angle derived from WACCM-CARMA simulations to determine IWC from SBUV PMC observations at 252 nm. This procedure incorporates an adjustment for the fact that the SBUV/2 data are sensitive to only a portion of the total IWC. We will show results using SBUV/2 data from 1979 to the most recent Northern Hemisphere PMC season in 2010, and compare our results with previous work (e.g. Stevens et al. [2007], Baumgarten et al. [2008]).

  8. Time-domain reflectometry: Simultaneous measurement of soil water content and electrical conductivity with a single probe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, F.N.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Rawlins, D.S.; Rhoades, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Two parallel metallic rods were used as a wave guide to measure the dielectric constant and electrical conductivity of soils having different electrical conductivities but the same water content. Measurements showed that the two parameters were sufficiently independent to permit simultaneous determinations of water content and bulk electrical conductivity.

  9. Variations in the mercury content of the Katun` River water

    SciTech Connect

    Vizhin, V.V.; Gogolev, A.Z.; Sagdeev, R.Z.; Saprykin, A.V.; Friezen, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    The scale of temporal variations in the mercury content of the Katun` River water is discussed. The correlation between the content of mercury in suspended form and the mineral and granulometric composition of suspended matter is analyzed. The process of transforming the spatial nonhomogeneity of the mercury distribution over the catchment area into the temporal nonhomogeneity of the mercury content in water is discussed.

  10. An empirical model for the complex dielectric permittivity of soils as a function of water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Chmugge, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The recent measurements on the dielectric properties of soils shows that the variation of dielectric constant with moisture content depends on soil types. The observed dielectric constant increases only slowly with moisture content up to a transition point. Beyond the transition it increases rapidly with moisture content. The moisture value of transition region was found to be higher for high clay content soils than for sandy soils. Many mixing formulas were compared with, and were found incompatible with, the measured dielectric variations of soil-water mixtures. A simple empirical model was proposed to describe the dielectric behavior of ths soil-water mixtures. The relationship between transition moisture and wilting point provides a means of estimating soil dielectric properties on the basis of texture information.

  11. Laboratory Characterization of a Commercial Capacitance Sensor for Estimating Permittivity and Inferring Soil Water Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volumetric soil water content ''can be estimated from the bulk soil dielectric constant ' measured using ring-capacitor sensors inserted into a plastic access tube augured into soil. The present laboratory experiments were designed to characterize the sensor response over a full range of environment...

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of vapour-liquid nucleation of water with constant energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duška, Michal; Němec, Tomáš; Hrubý, Jan; Vinš, Václav; Planková, Barbora

    2015-05-01

    The paper describes molecular dynamics study of nucleation of water in NVE ensemble. The numerical simulation was performed with the DL_POLY. The metastable steam consisting of 10976 water molecules with TIP4P/2005 potential was driven on the desired energy level by a simulation at constant temperature, and then the nucleation at constant energy was studied for several tens of nanoseconds, which was sufficient for clusters to evolve at hundred molecules size. The results were compared with the previously published results and the classical nucleation theory predictions.

  13. Monitoring of Water Content in Building Materials Using a Wireless Passive Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Stojanović, Goran; Radovanović, Milan; Malešev, Mirjana; Radonjanin, Vlastimir

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative design of a wireless, passive LC sensor and its application for monitoring of water content in building materials. The sensor was embedded in test material samples so that the internal water content of the samples could be measured with an antenna by tracking the changes in the sensor’s resonant frequency. Since the dielectric constant of water was much higher compared with that of the test samples, the presence of water in the samples increased the capacitance of the LC circuit, thus decreasing the sensor’s resonant frequency. The sensor is made up of a printed circuit board in one metal layer and water content has been determined for clay brick and autoclaved aerated concrete block, both widely used construction materials. Measurements were conducted at room temperature using a HP-4194A Impedance/Gain-Phase Analyzer instrument. PMID:22399880

  14. Monitoring of water content in building materials using a wireless passive sensor.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Goran; Radovanović, Milan; Malešev, Mirjana; Radonjanin, Vlastimir

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative design of a wireless, passive LC sensor and its application for monitoring of water content in building materials. The sensor was embedded in test material samples so that the internal water content of the samples could be measured with an antenna by tracking the changes in the sensor's resonant frequency. Since the dielectric constant of water was much higher compared with that of the test samples, the presence of water in the samples increased the capacitance of the LC circuit, thus decreasing the sensor's resonant frequency. The sensor is made up of a printed circuit board in one metal layer and water content has been determined for clay brick and autoclaved aerated concrete block, both widely used construction materials. Measurements were conducted at room temperature using a HP-4194A Impedance/Gain-Phase Analyzer instrument. PMID:22399880

  15. Determination of water content using mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Hughes, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Mass spectrometer is used to measure small quantities of water present in different materials. System has been applied in measuring water and gases desorbed from microcircuitry insulation, can also be used with foods, polymeric materials, and organic solvents.

  16. Improved Approximation of Water Dielectric Permittivity for Calculation of Hamaker Constants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen

    2000-09-15

    Due to the highly polar nature with a multipeak absorption spectrum of water, the contribution of the relaxation in the microwave and infrared regions to the water dielectric spectrum is significant. The old data obtained by the Cauchy plot analysis of the parameters of the single-relaxation representation of water dielectric spectrum produce the discrepancy in the Hamaker constants computed by the complete continuum theory. New data are obtained by the direct fitting of the single-relaxation model to the complete water dielectric spectrum. The Hamaker constants computed using the improved approximate and the complete spectra for water permittivity are in good agreement. The Hamaker function of quartz-water-quartz and quartz-water-air systems computed using the improved approximation for water and the Cauchy plot approximation for quartz also agrees with that computed using the complete spectrum for both liquid water and crystalline quartz. The new data are to be used, instead of the old Cauchy plot analysis data, in the calculation of the van der Waals interaction across water films based on the available simplified expressions. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10985848

  17. Calcium and bromide contents of natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.J.; Graf, D.L.; Jones, B.F.

    1966-01-01

    The linear relation observed in a log Ca++ versus log Br - plot for subsurface Cl- waters is attributed to ultrafiltration by shale of sea water and fresh water that have passed through sedimentary rocks since their formation. Reactions between these solutions and sedimentary minerals, particularly dolomitization, must have contributed additional Ca+ + to solution.

  18. Nondestructive experimental determination of bimaterial rectangular cantilever spring constants in water

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, David E.; Kim, Dae Jung; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.; Weeks, Brandon L.; Pitchimani, Rajasekar

    2008-08-15

    In order to address the issue of spring constant calibration in viscous fluids such as water, a new method is presented that allows for the experimental calibration of bimaterial cantilever spring constants. This method is based on modeling rectangular cantilever beam bending as a function of changing temperature. The temperature change is accomplished by heating water as it flows around the cantilever beams in an enclosed compartment. The optical static method of detection is used to measure the deflection of cantilever at the free end. Experimentally determined results are compared to Sader's method and to the Thermotune method most commonly used in cantilever calibrations. Results indicate that the new bimaterial thermal expansion method is accurate within 15%-20% of the actual cantilever spring constant, which is comparable to other nondestructive calibration techniques.

  19. Nondestructive experimental determination of bimaterial rectangular cantilever spring constants in water.

    PubMed

    Snow, David E; Weeks, Brandon L; Kim, Dae Jung; Pitchimani, Rajasekar; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J

    2008-08-01

    In order to address the issue of spring constant calibration in viscous fluids such as water, a new method is presented that allows for the experimental calibration of bimaterial cantilever spring constants. This method is based on modeling rectangular cantilever beam bending as a function of changing temperature. The temperature change is accomplished by heating water as it flows around the cantilever beams in an enclosed compartment. The optical static method of detection is used to measure the deflection of cantilever at the free end. Experimentally determined results are compared to Sader's method and to the Thermotune method most commonly used in cantilever calibrations. Results indicate that the new bimaterial thermal expansion method is accurate within 15%-20% of the actual cantilever spring constant, which is comparable to other nondestructive calibration techniques. PMID:19044356

  20. Predicting the Reactivity of Hydride Donors in Water: Thermodynamic Constants for Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, Samantha J.; Wiedner, Eric S.; Appel, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reactivity of hydride complexes can be predicted by comparing bond strengths for homolytic and heterolytic cleavage of bonds to hydrogen. To determine these bond strengths, thermodynamic constants for H+, H•, H–, and H2 are essential and need to be used uniformly to enable the prediction of reactivity and equilibria. One of the largest challenges is quantifying the stability of solvated H– in water, which is discussed. Due to discrepancies in the literature for the constants used in water, we propose the use of a set of self-consistent constants with convenient standard states. The work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  1. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Water Content using Shortwave Infrared Reflectances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. The Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) had an objective of developing and testing algorithms for a vegetation water content data product using shortwav...

  2. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Water Content using Shortwave Infrared Reflectance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. The Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) had an objective of developing and testing algorithms for a vegetation water content (VWC) data product using sh...

  3. Estimating the vegetation water content using a radar vegetation index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter. Here, the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) based on polarimetric backscatter observations was evaluated for estimating vegetation water content. Analysis utilized a data set obtained by a ground-based multi-frequency polarimetric scatterome...

  4. Remote sensing of soil water content at large scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at the near surface is a critical parameter for understanding land surface atmosphere interactions, influencing surface energy balances. Using microwave radiometry, an accurate global map of surface soil water content can be generated on a near daily basis. The accuracy of the p...

  5. Computational IR spectroscopy of water: OH stretch frequencies, transition dipoles, and intermolecular vibrational coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2013-05-01

    The Hessian matrix reconstruction method initially developed to extract the basis mode frequencies, vibrational coupling constants, and transition dipoles of the delocalized amide I, II, and III vibrations of polypeptides and proteins from quantum chemistry calculation results is used to obtain those properties of delocalized O-H stretch modes in liquid water. Considering the water symmetric and asymmetric O-H stretch modes as basis modes, we here develop theoretical models relating vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and coupling constants of basis modes to local water configuration and solvent electric potential. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to generate an ensemble of water configurations that was in turn used to construct vibrational Hamiltonian matrices. Obtaining the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrices and using the time-averaging approximation method, which was developed by the Skinner group, to calculating the vibrational spectra of coupled oscillator systems, we could numerically simulate the O-H stretch IR spectrum of liquid water. The asymmetric line shape and weak shoulder bands were quantitatively reproduced by the present computational procedure based on vibrational exciton model, where the polarization effects on basis mode transition dipoles and inter-mode coupling constants were found to be crucial in quantitatively simulating the vibrational spectra of hydrogen-bond networking liquid water.

  6. The relationship between water content and swelling parameters of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samet Öngen, Ali; Abiddin Ergüler, Zeynal

    2016-04-01

    The level of swelling dependent damages of low-rising engineering structures constructed on and/or in unsaturated zone of soil deposits is generally controlled by mineralogical compositions and water content of soils. It is well known that seasonal or even daily variations in water content causes volumetric changes within unsaturated zone of a soil composed mainly of swelling type clay minerals. In this regard, in addition to mineralogical composition of soils, water content should be considered as another major factor for understanding swelling behavior of soils. It can be concluded from literature review that swelling parameters of soils were determined by performing experimental studies on dry samples or samples having natural water content without incorporating seasonal continuous variations in water content. Thus, the effect of variation in water content on swelling mechanism of soils is not yet sufficiently studied in previous studies. For achieving accurate understanding of swelling behavior at field conditions, a new approach is required to identify swelling parameter at different initial water content. For this purpose, a comprehensive study was performed to investigate the effect of water content on swelling behavior of soils and to find a new parameter for assessing swelling parameters of samples prepared at different initial water content conditions. Based on main objectives of this study, soil samples having wide range in terms of grain size distributions, mineralogical compositions and Atterberg limits were collected from different locations in Turkey. To minimize the effect of dry unit weight on swelling behavior of soils, samples were prepared at the same dry unit weight (14.6 kN/m3) and different initial water contents. It was determined that there is a linear relationship between initial water content and swelling parameters, and swelling parameters decrease with increasing initial water content conditions. By utilizing this relationship, a new

  7. Accuracy of soil water content estimates from gamma radiation monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jie; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is known to be sensitive to soil water content, and could be promising for soil water content determination because of the availability of continental-scale gamma radiation monitoring networks. However, the accuracy of soil water content estimates that can be obtained from this type of data is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of soil water content estimates from measured time series of gamma radiation. For this, four gamma radiation monitoring stations were each equipped with four soil water content sensors at 5 and 15 cm depth to provide reference soil water content measurements. The contributions of terrestrial radiation and secondary cosmic radiation were separated from the total amount of measured gamma radiation by assuming that the long-term contribution of secondary cosmic radiation was constant, and that variations were related to changes in air pressure and incoming neutrons. In addition, precipitation effects related to atmospheric washout of radon progenies to the ground that cause an increase of gamma radiation were considered by excluding time periods with precipitation and time periods less than three hours after precipitation. The estimated terrestrial gamma radiation was related to soil water content using an exponential function with two fit parameters. For daily soil water content estimates, the goodness of fit ranged from R2= 0.21 to 0.48 and the RMSE ranged from 0.048 to 0.117 m3m‑3. The accuracy of the soil water content estimates improved considerably when a weekly resolution was used (RMSE ranged from 0.029 to 0.084 m3m‑3). Overall, these results indicate that gamma radiation monitoring data can be used to obtain useful soil water content information. The remaining differences between measured and estimated soil water content can at least partly be explained by the fact that the terrestrial gamma radiation is strongly determined by the upper few centimeters of the

  8. Comparison of hyperspectral retrievals with vegetation water indices for leaf and canopy water content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf and canopy water contents provide information for leaf area index, vegetation biomass, and wildfire fuel moisture content. Hyperspectral retrievals of leaf and canopy water content are determined from the relationship of spectral reflectance and the specific absorption coefficient of water ove...

  9. DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a...

  10. Relationship between Water Content and Osmotic Potential of Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Young

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand how osmotic potentials in Lentinula edodes tissues are related to water contents and how they change while a mushroom matures. Water content and osmotic potential of L. edodes mushroom tissues from log cultivation and sawdust cultivation were measured and the relationships were analyzed. Osmotic potentials in the tissues were exponentially proportional to their moisture contents and there were strain differences in the potentials. Strain 290 has lower osmotic potential than strain 302, in the tissues at the same water content. As the mushrooms mature, tissue water content maintained ca 94% in head tissues and ca 90% in gills, but significantly decreased from ca 90% to 82% in the stipe tissues. Osmotic potential changes were similar to the tissue water content changes as the mushrooms mature. While osmotic potentials maintained -0.25 to -0.45 MPa in head and gill tissues, the potentials greatly decreased from -0.65 to -1.33MPa in stipe tissues. Our results show that osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues are exponentially proportional to tissue water contents, that strains differ in osmotic potential related to water, and that stipe tissues can still have nutritional value when they mature. PMID:23997603

  11. Metasomatic control of water contents in the Kaapvaal cratonic mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Woodland, A. B.; Bell, D. R.; Lazarov, M.; Lapen, T. J.

    2012-11-01

    Water and trace element contents were measured by FTIR and laser ablation-ICPMS on minerals from peridotite xenoliths in kimberlites of the Kaapvaal craton from Finsch, Kimberley, Jagersfontein (South Africa), Letseng-La-Terae, and Liqhobong (Lesotho) mines. The peridotites record a wide range of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, and metasomatic events. Correlations between water content or OH vibration bands with major, minor and trace elements in pyroxene and garnet precludes disturbance during xenolith entrainment by the host kimberlite magma and indicate preservation of mantle water contents. Clinopyroxene water contents (150-400 ppm H2O, by weight) correlate with those of orthopyroxene (40-250 ppm). Olivines (Peslier et al., 2008, 2010) and garnets have 0-86 and 0-20 ppm H2O, respectively. Relations in individual xenolith suites between the amount of water and that of incompatible elements Ti, Na, Fe3+ and rare earths in minerals suggests that metasomatism by oxidizing melts controls the water content of olivine, pyroxene and garnet. At pressures ⩽5.5 GPa, hydrous, alkaline, siliceous fluids or melts metasomatized Liqhobong and Kimberley peridotites, producing high water contents in their olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. At higher pressures, the percolation of ultramafic melts reacting with peridotite resulted in co-variation of Ca, Ti and water at the edge of garnets at Jagersfontein, and the overall crystallization of garnet with lower water contents than those in the original peridotites. The upward migration of these ultramafic melts through the lithospheric mantle also increased the water content of olivines with decreasing pressure at Finsch Mine. H2O/Ce ratios of melts in equilibrium with Kaapvaal peridotites range from 100 to 20,000 and the larger values may indicate metasomatism in subduction zone settings. Metasomatic events in Kaapvaal peridotites are thought to have occurred from the Archean to the Mesozoic. However, circumstantial evidence

  12. Comparison of hyperspectral retrievals with vegetation water indices for leaf and canopy water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Daughtry, Craig S. T.; Qu, John J.; Wang, Lingli; Hao, Xianjun

    2011-09-01

    Leaf and canopy water contents provide information for leaf area index, vegetation biomass, and wildfire fuel moisture content. Hyperspectral retrievals of leaf and canopy water content are determined from the relationship of spectral reflectance and the specific absorption coefficient of water over the wavelength range of a water absorption feature. Vegetation water indices such as the Normalized Difference Water Index [NDWI = (R850 - R1240)/(R850 + R1240)] and Normalized Difference Infrared Index [NDII = (R850 - R1650)/(R850 + R1650)] may be calculated from multispectral sensors such as Landsat Thematic Mapper, SPOT HRG, or MODIS. Predicted water contents from hyperspectral data were much greater than measured water contents for both leaves and canopies. Furthermore, simulated spectral reflectances from the PROSPECT and SAIL models also had greater retrieved leaf and canopy water contents compared to the inputs. Used simply as an index correlated to leaf and canopy water contents, hyperspectral retrievals had better predictive capability than NDII or NDWI. Atmospheric correction algorithms estimate canopy water content in order to estimate the amount of water vapor. These results indicate that estimated canopy water contents should have a systematic bias, even though this bias does not affect retrieved surface reflectances from hyperspectral data. Field campaigns in a variety of vegetation functional types are needed to calibrate both hyperspectral retrievals and vegetation water indices.

  13. Specific water content in speleothem sections as indicator for paleoprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; Marx, T.; Riechelmann, D. F. C.; Schimpf, D.; Mühlinghaus, C.; Kilian, R.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.

    2009-04-01

    The development of a measurement system for tiny water quantities (submicroliters) enables the precise determination of water contained in fluid inclusions of speleothems. The comparison of the specific water content (water per g calcite) in selected stalagmites with precipitation related proxies such as ^18O and Mg/Ca ratios from stalagmites and pollen abundance in lake sediments revealed a correlation between precipitation and water content in the according growth periods. Investigation of stalagmites from Central Europe (Bunker Cave) and Southern Chile (Marcelo Arévalo Cave) confirm this relation, which is independently constrained by modelled drip rates using a reverse stalagmite model. The obtained data already enable a first interpretation of the speleothem water content records with regard to paleoprecipitation.

  14. Spatially resolved dielectric constant of confined water and its connection to the non-local nature of bulk water.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Christian; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-08-28

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to compute the spatially resolved static dielectric constant of water in cylindrical and spherical nanopores as occurring, e.g., in protein water pockets or carbon nanotubes. For this, we derive a linear-response formalism which correctly takes into account the dielectric boundary conditions in the considered geometries. We find that in cylindrical confinement, the axial component behaves similar as the local density akin to what is known near planar interfaces. The radial dielectric constant shows some oscillatory features when approaching the surface if their radius is larger than about 2 nm. Most importantly, however, the radial component exhibits pronounced oscillations at the center of the cavity. These surprising features are traced back quantitatively to the non-local dielectric nature of bulk water. PMID:27586940

  15. Effects of “natural” water and “added” water on prediction of moisture content and bulk density of shelled corn from microwave dielectric properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of samples of shelled corn of “natural” water content and those prepared by adding water were measured in free space at microwave frequencies and 23 oC. Results of measurements of attenuation, phase shift and dielectric constant and loss factor at 9 GHz show no difference betw...

  16. Computational analysis of asymmetric water entry of wedge and ship section at constant velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Md. Mashiur; Ullah, Al Habib; Afroz, Laboni; Shabnam, Sharmin; Sarkar, M. A. Rashid

    2016-07-01

    Water impact problems receive much attention due to their short duration and large unsteady component of hydrodynamic loads. The effect of water entry has several important applications in various aspects of the naval field. Significant attention has been given to various water entry phenomena such as ship slamming, planning hulls, high-speed hydrodynamics of seaplanes, surface-piercing propellers and the interaction of high-speed liquid drops with structural elements. Asymmetric water entry may be caused by various natural phenomena such as weather conditions or strong winds. Since the determination of hydrodynamic impact load plays a vital role in designing safe and effcient vessels, an accurate and reliable prediction method is necessary to investigate asymmetric water entry problems. In this paper, water entry of a two-dimensional wedge and ship section at constant velocity in asymmetric condition will be analysed numerically and the effects of asymmetric impact on the velocity and pressure distribution will be discussed. The finite volume method is employed to solve the dynamic motion of the wedge in two-phase flow. During the water entry, the air and water interface is described implicitly by the volume of fluid (VOF) scheme. The numerical code and method was first validated for symmetric condition by one of the present author is applied for asymmetric wedge and ship section. The free surface, velocity and pressure distribution for asymmetric water entry are investigated and visualized with contour plots at different time steps.

  17. Effect of moisture content of concrete on water uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker-Gramm, P.; Beddoe, R.E.

    2010-01-15

    The penetration of water and non-polar hexane in Portland cement mortar prisms with different initial moisture contents was investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR). The amount of water in gel pores strongly affects the penetration of water in much larger capillary pores. Water penetration is reduced by the self-sealing effect as characterized by non-sq roott dependence of capillary uptake and penetration depth. This is explained by the ongoing redistribution of water from capillaries into gel pores which results in internal swelling and loss of continuity of the capillary pore system; a correlation was observed between the amount of redistributed water and departure from sq roott behaviour. A descriptive model is used to explain the dependence of water uptake and penetration on moisture content. For increasing initial moisture contents up to a critical value equivalent to equilibrium with a relative humidity between 65 and 80%, less penetrating water is able to redistribute. Thus more penetrating water is in larger capillaries with less viscous resistance; uptake and penetration depth increase. Above the critical initial moisture content, uptake and penetration depth decrease towards zero. This is explained by (a) an overall reduction in capillary pressure because transport takes places in fewer and larger pores and (b) an increase in viscous resistance due to the connection of penetrating capillary water with pores already containing water. Less capillary pore space is available for transport. The surface region of concrete placed in contact with water is not instantaneously saturated. Water content increases with time depending on the degree of surface saturation. A new transition coefficient for capillary suction gamma is defined for the calculation of surface flux.

  18. High apparent dielectric constants in the interior of a protein reflect water penetration.

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, J J; Gittis, A G; Karp, D A; Lattman, E E; Spencer, D S; Stites, W E; García-Moreno E, B

    2000-01-01

    A glutamic acid was buried in the hydrophobic core of staphylococcal nuclease by replacement of Val-66. Its pK(a) was measured with equilibrium thermodynamic methods. It was 4.3 units higher than the pK(a) of Glu in water. This increase was comparable to the DeltapK(a) of 4.9 units measured previously for a lysine buried at the same location. According to the Born formalism these DeltapK(a) are energetically equivalent to the transfer of a charged group from water to a medium of dielectric constant of 12. In contrast, the static dielectric constants of dry protein powders range from 2 to 4. In the crystallographic structure of the V66E mutant, a chain of water molecules was seen that hydrates the buried Glu-66 and links it with bulk solvent. The buried water molecules have never previously been detected in >20 structures of nuclease. The structure and the measured energetics constitute compelling and unprecedented experimental evidence that solvent penetration can contribute significantly to the high apparent polarizability inside proteins. To improve structure-based calculations of electrostatic effects with continuum methods, it will be necessary to learn to account quantitatively for the contributions by solvent penetration to dielectric effects in the protein interior. PMID:10969021

  19. Computing the Kirkwood g-Factor by Combining Constant Maxwell Electric Field and Electric Displacement Simulations: Application to the Dielectric Constant of Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Hutter, Jürg; Sprik, Michiel

    2016-07-21

    In his classic 1939 paper, Kirkwood linked the macroscopic dielectric constant of polar liquids to the local orientational order as measured by the g-factor (later named after him) and suggested that the corresponding dielectric constant at short-range is effectively equal to the macroscopic value just after "a distance of molecular magnitude" [ Kirkwood, J. Chem. Phys., 1939, 7, 911 ]. Here, we show a simple approach to extract the short-ranged Kirkwood g-factor from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation by superposing the outcomes of constant electric field E and constant electric displacement D simulations [ Zhang and Sprik, Phys. Rev. B: Condens. Matter Mater. Phys., 2016, 93, 144201 ]. Rather than from the notoriously slow fluctuations of the dipole moment of the full MD cell, the dielectric constant can now be estimated from dipole fluctuations at short-range, accelerating the convergence. Exploiting this feature, we computed the bulk dielectric constant of liquid water modeled in the generalized gradient approximation (PBE) to density functional theory and found it to be at least 40% larger than the experimental value. PMID:27352038

  20. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Nitrogen Content for Spatially Explicit Carbon and Water Cycle Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Miller, J. R.; Chen, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Foliage nitrogen concentration is a determinant of photosynthetic capacity of leaves, thereby an important input to ecological models for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. Recently, spectrally continuous airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery has proven to be useful for retrieving an important related parameter, total chlorophyll content at both leaf and canopy scales. Thus remote sensing of vegetation biochemical parameters has promising potential for improving the prediction of global carbon and water balance patterns. In this research, we explored the feasibility of estimating leaf nitrogen content using hyperspectral remote sensing data for spatially explicit estimation of carbon and water budgets. Multi-year measurements of leaf biochemical contents of seven major boreal forest species were carried out in northeastern Ontario, Canada. The variation of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content in response to various growth conditions, and the relationship between them,were investigated. Despite differences in plant type (deciduous and evergreen), leaf age, stand growth conditions and developmental stages, leaf nitrogen content was strongly correlated with leaf chlorophyll content on a mass basis during the active growing season (r2=0.78). With this general correlation, leaf nitrogen content was estimated from leaf chlorophyll content at an accuracy of RMSE=2.2 mg/g, equivalent to 20.5% of the average measured leaf nitrogen content. Based on this correlation and a hyperspectral remote sensing algorithm for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval, the spatial variation of leaf nitrogen content was inferred from the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery acquired by Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). A process-based ecological model Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) was used for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. In contrast to the scenario with leaf nitrogen content assigned as a constant value without

  1. QSPR prediction of the hydroxyl radical rate constant of water contaminants.

    PubMed

    Borhani, Tohid Nejad Ghaffar; Saniedanesh, Mohammadhossein; Bagheri, Mehdi; Lim, Jeng Shiun

    2016-07-01

    In advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), the aqueous hydroxyl radical (HO) acts as a strong oxidant to react with organic contaminants. The hydroxyl radical rate constant (kHO) is important for evaluating and modelling of the AOPs. In this study, quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) method is applied to model the hydroxyl radical rate constant for a diverse dataset of 457 water contaminants from 27 various chemical classes. The constricted binary particle swarm optimization and multiple-linear regression (BPSO-MLR) are used to obtain the best model with eight theoretical descriptors. An optimized feed forward neural network (FFNN) is developed to investigate the complex performance of the selected molecular parameters with kHO. Although the FFNN prediction results are more accurate than those obtained using BPSO-MLR, the application of the latter is much more convenient. Various internal and external validation techniques indicate that the obtained models could predict the logarithmic hydroxyl radical rate constants of a large number of water contaminants with less than 4% absolute relative error. Finally, the above-mentioned proposed models are compared to those reported earlier and the structural factors contributing to the AOP degradation efficiency are discussed. PMID:27124124

  2. An explicit approach to capture diffusive effects in finite water-content method for solving vadose zone flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianting; Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Chen, Xiangfeng; Talbot, Cary A.

    2016-04-01

    Vadose zone flow problems are usually solved from the Richards equation. Solution to the Richards equation is generally challenging because the hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity in the equation are strongly non-linear functions of water content. The finite water-content method was proposed as an alternative general solution method of the vadose zone flow problem for infiltration, falling slugs, and vadose zone response to water table dynamics based on discretizing the water content domain into numerous bins instead of the traditional spatial discretization. In this study, we develop an improved approach to the original finite water-content method (referred to as TO method hereinafter) that better simulates diffusive effects but retains the robustness of the TO method. The approach treats advection and diffusion separately and considers diffusion on a bin by bin basis. After discretizing into water content bins, we treat the conductivity and diffusivity in individual bins as water content dependent constant evaluated at given water content corresponding to each bin. For each bin, we can solve the flow equations analytically since the hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity can be treated as a constant. We then develop solutions for each bin to determine the diffusive water amounts at each time step. The water amount ahead of the convective front for each bin is redistributed among water content bins to account for diffusive effects. The application of developed solution is straightforward only involving algebraic manipulations at each time step. The method can mainly improve water content profiles, but has no significant difference for the total infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration compared to the TO method. Although the method separately deals with advection and diffusion, it can account for the coupling effects of advection and diffusion reasonably well.

  3. Effect of gypsum content on soil water retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret-Fernández, D.; Herrero, J.

    2015-09-01

    Many gypsiferous soils occur in arid lands, where the water retention capacity of the soil is vital to plant life and crop production. This study investigated the effect of gypsum content on the gravimetric soil water retention curve (WRC). We analyzed calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE), equivalent gypsum content (EG), soil organic carbon content (SOC), and electrical conductivity of 43 samples collected from various horizons in soils in the Ebro Valley, NE Spain. The WRC of the fine earth was determined using the pressure-plate method (pressure heads = 0, -33, -100, -200, -500, and -1500 kPa), and the gravimetric water retention curves were fitted to the unimodal van Genuchten function. Soil gypsum content had a significant effect on water retention. Soils that had high gypsum content made WRC with higher water retention at near saturation conditions, and steeper WRC slopes. The EG threshold at which gypsum content had an effect on WRC was about 40%, and EG was positively and negatively correlated with the α and n parameters of the WRC, respectively.

  4. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor's accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm³ cm(-3)) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R² = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm³ cm(-3)), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm³ cm(-3)). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm³ cm(-3)). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  5. The mineral content of tap water in United States households

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The composition of tap water contributes to dietary intake of minerals. The USDA’s Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) conducted a study of the mineral content of residential tap water, to generate current data for the USDA National Nutrient Database. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, copper...

  6. Assessment of the soil water content temporal variations in an agricultural area of Galicia (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas-Valero, Roger Manuel; Miras-Avalos, Jose Manuel; Paz-González, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    The direct and continuous assessment of the temporal variation on soil water content is of paramount importance for agricultural practices and, in particular, for the management of water resources. Soil water content is affected by many factors such as topography, particle size, clay and organic matter contents, and tillage systems. There are several techniques to measure or estimate soil water content. Among them, Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) stands out. It is based on measuring the dielectrical constant of the soil environment. This technique allows to describe water dynamics in time and space, to determine the main patterns of soil moisture, the water uptake by roots, the evapotranspiration and the drainage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the daily variation of soil water content in the root-influenced zone in plots devoted to maize and grassland as a function of the soil water volumetric content. The studied site is located in an experimental field of the Centre for Agricultural Research (CIAM) in Mabegondo located in the province of A Coruña, Spain (43°14'N, 8°15'W; 91 masl). The study was carried out from June 2008 to September 2009 in a field devoted to maize (Zea mays, L.) and another field devoted to grassland. The soil of these sites is silt-clay textured. Long-term mean annual temperature and rainfall figures are 13.3 °C and 1288 mm, respectively. During the study period, maize crop was subjected to conventional agricultural practices. A weekly evaluation of the phenological stage of the crop was performed. An EnviroSCAN FDR equipment, comprising six capacitance sensors, was installed in the studied sites following the manufacturer's recommendations, thus assuring a proper contact between the probe and the soil. Soil water content in the root-influenced zone (40 cm depth in grassland and 60 cm depth in maize were considered) was hourly monitored in 20 cm ranges (0-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and 40-60 cm) using FDR. Evaluations were

  7. Time lapse imaging of water content with geoelectrical methods: on the interest of working with absolute water content data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Robert, Tanguy; Hermans, Thomas; Garré, Sarah; Nguyen, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography is a suitable method to estimate the water content of a waste material and detect changes in water content. Various ERT profiles, both static data and time-lapse, where acquired on a landfill during the Minerve project. In the literature, the relative change of resistivity (Δρ/ρ) is generally computed. For saline or heat tracer tests in the saturated zone, the Δρ/ρ can be easily translated into pore water conductivity or underground temperature changes (provided that the initial salinity or temperature condition is homogeneous over the ERT panel extension). For water content changes in the vadose zone resulting of an infiltration event or injection experiment, many authors also work with the Δρ/ρ or relative changes of water content Δθ/θ (linked to the change of resistivity through one single parameter: the Archie's law exponent "m"). This parameter is not influenced by the underground temperature and pore fluid conductivity (ρ¬w) condition but is influenced by the initial water content distribution. Therefore, you never know if the loss of Δθ/θ signal is representative of the limit of the infiltration front or more humid initial condition. Another approach for the understanding of the infiltration process is the assessment of the absolute change of water content (Δθ). This requires the direct computation of the water content of the waste from the resistivity data. For that purpose, we used petrophysical laws calibrated with laboratory experiments and our knowledge of the in situ temperature and pore fluid conductivity parameters. Then, we investigated water content changes in the waste material after a rainfall event (Δθ= Δθ/θ* θ). This new observation is really representatives of the quantity of water infiltrated in the waste material. However, the uncertainty in the pore fluid conductivity value may influence the computed water changes (Δθ=k*m√(ρw) ; where "m" is the Archie's law exponent

  8. System Regulates the Water Contents of Fuel-Cell Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Lazaroff, Scott

    2005-01-01

    An assembly of devices provides for both humidification of the reactant gas streams of a fuel cell and removal of the product water (the water generated by operation of the fuel cell). The assembly includes externally-sensing forward-pressure regulators that supply reactant gases (fuel and oxygen) at variable pressures to ejector reactant pumps. The ejector supply pressures depend on the consumption flows. The ejectors develop differential pressures approximately proportional to the consumption flow rates at constant system pressure and with constant flow restriction between the mixer-outlet and suction ports of the ejectors. For removal of product water from the circulating oxygen stream, the assembly includes a water/gas separator that contains hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes. The water separator imposes an approximately constant flow restriction, regardless of the quality of the two-phase flow that enters it from the fuel cell. The gas leaving the water separator is nearly 100 percent humid. This gas is returned to the inlet of the fuel cell along with a quantity of dry incoming oxygen, via the oxygen ejector, thereby providing some humidification.

  9. The water, deuterium, gas and uranium content of tektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1958-01-01

    The water content, deuterium concentration of the water, total gas and uranium contents were determined on tektite samples and other glass samples from Texas, Australia, Philippine Islands, Java, French Indo-China, Czechoslovakia, Libyan Desert, Billiton Island, Thailand, French West Africa, Peru, and New Mexico. The water content ranges from 0.24 per cent for the Peru tektite, to 0.0002 per cent for a moldavite. The majority of the tektites have less than 0.05 per cent water, and average 0.005 per cent H2O by weight. No other gases were detected, the lower detection limit being about 1 p.p.m. by weight. The deuterium content of the water in tektites is in the same range as that in terrestrial waters, and varies from 0.010 mole per cent to 0.0166 mole per cent deuterium. The uranium content is about from 1 to 3 p.p.m. The possible origin of tektites is discussed. The experimental data presented favour their being originally terrestrial, but produced by some catastrophic event. An extra-terrestrial source is not ruled out. ?? 1958.

  10. Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content - a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahser, M. H. P.; Matthey, P.-D.; Jouniaux, L.; Sailhac, P.

    2009-04-01

    In porous saturated media, seismic compressional waves can cause seismoelectric and seismoelectromagnetic signals through electrokinetic coupling. It has been observed that these measureable signals also occur in partially saturated media, but the theory is largely unknown for these circumstances. Seismoelectromagnetic tomography is expected to combine the sensitivity of electrical properties to water-content and permeability, to the high spatial resolution of seismic surveys. A better understanding of the physical processes and a reliable quantification of the conversion between seismic and electric energy are necessary and need to take into account the effect of water-content, especially for shallow subsurface investigations. In order to quantify seismoelectric signals with changing water content, we repeated seismoelectric and seismic measurements on the same profile in the Vosges Mountains during several months. The electrical resistivity was also monitored to take into account the water-content variations. We show that an exponential relation can be established between the seismoelectric amplitudes normalized with the seismic amplitudes and the resistivity which in turn is related to the saturation: Increasing resistivity (decreasing water content) leads to decreasing normalized seismoelectric amplitudes. These results imply that the electrokinetic coefficient should increase with water-saturation, as measured in laboratory, but not predicted by theory. This work was funded by CNRS and Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg.

  11. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Water in Chennai, Tamilnadu

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Karunya; Rajapandian, K.; Gurunathan, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Context The optimum level of fluoride in drinking water is 0.7 to 1.2 ppm. Decreased fluoride concentration leads to increased risk of caries and increased concentration can lead to dental or skeletal fluorosis. One crore liters of water is supplied to Chennai and surrounding areas through pouches and bottles which carters about one third of city population. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the fluoride concentration in top 10 bottled waters in Chennai and to check the accuracy of their labelling. Materials and Methods Top selling bottled waters, 6 multinational and 4 Non- multinational brands were selected for the study. Three different batches of each brand were purchased. The labels of the bottled were removed after collecting the details regarding fluoride content. All the bottles were numbered and sent for fluoride content analysis using SPADNS calorimetric method. Results All the brands and batches which were analysed for the study had less than optimal fluoride content and there is a significant variation in fluoride concentration of each brand and among different batches of same brand bottled waters. The range of fluoride level in tested samples was between 0.27 to 0.59. Only one brand’s label had information regarding the fluoride content. Conclusion Standardization of fluoride levels in bottled waters and labelling of fluoride content should become mandatory. PMID:26557612

  12. The formation constants of ionomycin with divalent cations in 80% methanol/water.

    PubMed

    Stiles, M K; Craig, M E; Gunnell, S L; Pfeiffer, D R; Taylor, R W

    1991-05-01

    The protonation constants and complex formation constants of ionomycin have been determined in 80% methanol/water (w/w) at 25.0 degrees C and mu = 0.050 (tetraethylammonium perchlorate). Potentiometric and spectrometric titration techniques give the following values for the mixed-mode protonation constants of ionomycin: log KH1 = 11.94 +/- 0.02 and log KH2 = 6.80 +/- 0.03. Comparison of these values with those for model compounds indicates that KH1 and KH2 refer to equilibria involving the beta-diketone and carboxylic acid moieties, respectively. Titrations of ionomycin with metal ion at fixed values of pH produced changes in the UV-visual absorbance spectra which were analyzed to give conditional complex formation constants, KMI'. The pH dependence of the values of KMI' indicated that 1:1 divalent metal ion-ionomycin (MI) complexes and protonated MHI+ complexes were formed in the pH range studied. The values of log KMI ranged from 5.30 +/- 0.11 for Sr2+ to 10.25 +/- 0.03 for Ni2+. The selectivity pattern and relative affinities (in parentheses) for the formation of the species MI are as follows: Ni2+ (2000) greater than Zn2+ (600) greater than CO2+ (440) greater than Mn2+ (47) greater than Mg2+ (1.00) greater than Ca2+ (0.21) greater than Sr2+ (0.022). Logarithmic values of KMHI, for the reaction MI + H+ in equilibrium MHI+, ranged from 5.9 (Ni2+) to 8.4 (Sr2+). Calculations using the values of the equilibrium constants determined indicate that an appreciable fraction of the complexed ionophore exists as the protonated complex, MHI+, in the pH range of 6.5-8.5. PMID:1850743

  13. Quantitative effects of antihydrophobic agents on binding constants and solubilities in water.

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, R; Halfon, S

    1992-01-01

    The effects of urea and of guanidinium chloride on binding constants in water for 6-(4-tert-butylanilino)-naphthalene-2-sulfonate and of bis(p-tert-butylphenyl) phosphate binding to beta-cyclodextrin and to N,N'-bis(6-beta-cyclo-dextrinyl)imidazolium ion have been determined. Their effects on the water solubility of p-tert-butylbenzyl alcohol and p-methylbenzyl alcohol have also been examined. Quantitative correlations show that the effects of these additives, which diminish hydrophobic effects, are similar for release of a tert-butylphenyl group from a cyclodextrin cavity into water or for solubilizing such a group from a second phase. The effects of these agents on the binding constants for double-ended substrates binding to the bis(cyclodextrin) host are much larger than for a simple substrate binding to monomeric cyclodextrin, consistent with additivity of free-energy perturbations. Ethanol also decreases binding in these systems, and increases solubilities, but the quantitative correlations are less straightforward. Images PMID:1495980

  14. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Behaviour of Limestone: Role of the Clay Minerals Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, F.; Berthonneau, J.; Bromblet, P.; Huon, V.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical characteristics of various sedimentary stones significantly depend on the water content, where 70 % loss of their mechanical strengths can be observed when saturated by water. Furthermore, the clay fraction has been shown to be a key factor of their hydro-mechanical behaviour since it governs for instance the hydric dilation. This work aims at investigating the correlations between the clay mineral content and the mechanical weakening experienced by limestones when interacting with water. The experimental characterization focuses on five different limestones that exhibit very different micro-structures. For each of them, we present the determination of clay mineral composition, the sorption isotherm curve and the dependences of tensile and compressive strengths on the water content. It emerges from these results that, first, the sorption behaviour is mainly governed by the amount of smectite layers which exhibit the larger specific area and, second, the rate of mechanical strength loss depends linearly on the sorption capacity. Indeed, the clay fraction plays the role of a retardation factor that delays the appearance of capillary bridges as well as the mechanical weakening of stones. However, no correlation was evidenced between the clay content and the amplitude of weakening. Since the mechanisms whereby the strength decreases with water content are not clearly established, these results would help to discriminate between various hypothesis proposed in the literature.

  15. Initial Water Content and Temperature Effects on Electrokinetic Removal of Aluminium in Drinking Water Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherifi, M.; Hazourli, S.; Ziati, M.

    2009-11-01

    Electrokinetics is a developping technology that is intended to separate and extract heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic contaminants from saturated or unsaturated soils, sludges and sediments, and groundwater. The goal of electrokinetic remediation is to effect the migration of subsurface contaminants in an imposed electric field. This technique is known as electrokinetic remediation, electroreclamation, electrochemical decontamination, electrorestoration, electromigration or electrochemical soil processing. Electrokinetics involves the installation of electrodes into the subsurface surrounding the contaminated region. After the electrodes are in place, a low electrical potential is applied across the anode(s) (positively charged electrode) and the cathode(s) (negatively charged electrode). As a result of the electrical gradient, different physico-chemical reactions occur and contaminant transport occurs due to various mechanisms within the soil and groundwater. Generally, for the migration to be significant, the contaminants should be in a soluble form. If they are not soluble, they need to be desorbed, dissolved, and/or solubilized into the pore solution before they can be adequately transported from the soil to an electrode wells/reservoirs. Different types of contaminants have been investigated and research has been conducted to optimize the electrokinetic variables. The present study was undertaken to systematically investigate the effect of initial sludge water content, and heating on the electrokinetic remediation of alumium-contaminated sludge. A total of four laboratory experiments were conducted using drinking water sludge. The first two tests studied the effect of variation of initial sludge water content under an ambient temperature, and the last two tests studied the effect of heating on electrokinetic remediation under conditions of both constant saturation and applied voltage.

  16. Body water content of extremely preterm infants at birth

    PubMed Central

    Hartnoll, G.; Betremieux, P.; Modi, N.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Preterm birth is often associated with impaired growth. Small for gestational age status confers additional risk.
AIM—To determine the body water content of appropriately grown (AGA) and small for gestational age (SGA) preterm infants in order to provide a baseline for longitudinal studies of growth after preterm birth.
METHODS—All infants born at the Hammersmith and Queen Charlotte's Hospitals between 25 and 30 weeks gestational age were eligible for entry into the study. Informed parental consent was obtained as soon after delivery as possible, after which the extracellular fluid content was determined by bromide dilution and total body water by H218O dilution.
RESULTS—Forty two preterm infants were studied. SGA infants had a significantly higher body water content than AGA infants (906 (833-954) and 844 (637-958) ml/kg respectively; median (range); p = 0.019). There were no differences in extracellular and intracellular fluid volumes, nor in the ratio of extracellular to intracellular fluid. Estimates of relative adiposity suggest a body fat content of about 7% in AGA infants, assuming negligible fat content in SGA infants and lean body tissue hydration to be equivalent in the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Novel values for the body water composition of the SGA preterm infant at 25-30 weeks gestation are presented. The data do not support the view that SGA infants have extracellular dehydration, nor is their regulation of body water impaired.

 PMID:10873174

  17. The deuterium content of water in some volcanic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Smith, R.L.

    1958-01-01

    The deuterium-hydrogen composition (relative to Lake Michigan water = 0.0) of water extractsd from coexisting perlite and obsidian from eleven different localities was determined. The water content of the obsidians is generally from 0.09 to 0.29 per cent by weight, though two samples from near Olancha, California, contain about 0.92 per cent. The relative deuterium concentration is from -4.6 to -12.3 per cent. The coexisting perlite contains from 2.0 to 3.8 per cent of water with a relative deuterium concentration of -3.1 to -16.6 per cent. The deuterium concentration in the perlites is not related to that in the enclosed obsidian. The deuterium concentration in the perlite water is related to the deuterium concentration of the modern meteoric water and the perlite water contains approximately 4 per cent less deuterium than does the groundwater of the area in which the perlites occur. The above relations hold true for perlites from northern New Mexico, east slope of the Sierra Nevada. California Coast Range, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and New Zealand. As the water in the obsidian is unrelated to meteoric water, but the enclosing perlite water is related, we believe that this is evidence for the secondary hydration of obsidian to form high water content perlitic glass. ?? 1958.

  18. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  19. Sodium Content of Community Water Supplies in California

    PubMed Central

    Steinkamp, Ruth C.; Young, Clarence L.; Nyhus, Dolores; Greenberg, Arnold E.

    1968-01-01

    The amount of sodium ion in water used for ingestion may be critical in effective use of a low sodium dietary regimen. Waters containing not over 20 mg of sodium per liter are provided for in the sodium restricted diets set forth by the American Heart Association. For diets containing more than 500 mg of sodium a day, waters of greater sodium content may be used if proper dietary adjustments are made. While assessment of the long-term average sodium content of a community water supply is difficult, the determined values for sodium lend to classification within range categories. The larger community water supplies in California are presented within several range categories of sodium content. The more commonly used water softeners add sodium to water. The sodium-restricted patient should be cautioned against their use. Similar consideration should probably be given to water supplies of retirement communities where the potential for disorders requiring sodium restriction is greater than in the general population. PMID:5673988

  20. Remote sensing of vegetation water content using shortwave infrared reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Yilmaz, M. Tugrul

    2007-09-01

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. One of the objectives of the Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) were to develop and test algorithms for a vegetation water content data product using shortwave infrared reflectances. SMEX04 studied native vegetation in Arizona, USA, and Sonora, Mexico, while SMEX05 studied corn and soybean in Iowa, USA. The normalized difference infrared index (NDII) is defined as (R 850 - R 1650)/(R 800 + R 1650), where R 850 is the reflectance in the near infrared and R1650 is the reflectance in the shortwave infrared. Simulations using the Scattering by Arbitrarily Inclined Leaves (SAIL) model indicated that NDII is sensitive to surface moisture content. From Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper and other imagery, NDII is linear with respect to foliar water content with R2 = 0.81. The regression standard error of the y estimate is 0.094 mm, which is equivalent to about a leaf area index of 0.5 m2 m -2. Based on modeling the dynamic water flow through plants, the requirement for detection of water stress is about 0.01 mm, so detection of water stress may not be possible. However, this standard error is accurate for input into the tau-omega model for soil moisture. Therefore, NDII may be a robust backup algorithm for MODIS as a standard data product.

  1. Background electrolytes in 50% methanol/water for the determination of acidity constants of basic drugs by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    de Nogales, Vasco; Ruiz, Rebeca; Rosés, Martí; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2006-08-01

    The acidic dissociation constants of several hydrophobic drugs, amiodarone and a series of antidepressants that show a secondary or tertiary amino group, were determined in a 50% methanol/water mixture by capillary zone electrophoresis. The electrophoretic behavior of buffers prepared from sodium acetate, tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane hydrochloride, sodium hydrogenphosphate, ammonium chloride, ethanolamine, butilammonium chloride, and sodium borate in the hydroalcoholic solution was tested. Thus, all of them follow the Ohm's law until about 25 kV and, therefore, they can be used without significant Joule heat dissipation at 20 kV. For the studied drugs, buffers prepared with phosphate or borate give effective mobility measurements lower than those from other buffers. The wide pKa range of the studied drugs provides a wide pH range where the protonated forms of the amino compounds coexist with hydrogenphosphate ions and where the neutral amines coexist with boric acid. The decrease of the experimental effective mobilities in these instances can be explained through the interactions between coexisting species. Therefore, phosphate and borate buffers should be avoided to determine the mobility of amines with aqueous pKa higher than 8, at least in solutions with high methanol content. Independent measurements of acidic dissociation constants of drugs validate this statement. PMID:16723130

  2. Review of photochemical reaction constants of organic micropollutants required for UV advanced oxidation processes in water.

    PubMed

    Wols, B A; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2012-06-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceutical compounds, personal care products, pesticides, hormones, surfactants, fire retardants, fuel additives etc.) are increasingly found in water sources and therefore need to be controlled by water treatment technology. UV advanced oxidation technologies are often used as an effective barrier against organic contaminants. The combined operation of direct photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals ensures good results for a wide range of contaminants. In this review, an overview is provided of the photochemical reaction parameters (quantum yield, molar absorption, OH radical reaction rate constant) of more than 100 organic micropollutants. These parameters allow for a prediction of organic contaminant removal by UV advanced oxidation systems. An example of contaminant degradation is elaborated for a simplified UV/H(2)O(2) system. PMID:22483836

  3. Communication: Tolman length and rigidity constants of water and their role in nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Bedeaux, Dick; Reguera, David

    2015-05-01

    A proper understanding of nucleation is crucial in several natural and industrial processes. However, accurate quantitative predictions of this phenomenon have not been possible. The most popular tool for calculating nucleation rates, classical nucleation theory (CNT), deviates by orders of magnitude from experiments for most substances. We investigate whether part of this discrepancy can be accounted for by the curvature-dependence of the surface tension. To that end, we evaluate the leading order corrections for water, the Tolman length and the rigidity constants, using square gradient theory coupled with the accurate cubic plus association equation of state. The Helfrich expansion is then used to incorporate them into the CNT-framework. For water condensation, the modified framework successfully corrects the erroneous temperature dependence of the nucleation rates given by the classical theory and reproduces experimental nucleation rates.

  4. Ozonation of pharmaceutical compounds: Rate constants and elimination in various water matrices.

    PubMed

    Javier Benitez, F; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldán, Gloria

    2009-09-01

    The ozonation of four pharmaceuticals (metoprolol, naproxen, amoxicillin, and phenacetin) in ultra-pure (UP) water was studied in the pH range between 2.5 and 9. The experiments allowed the determination of the apparent rate constants for the reactions between ozone and the selected compounds. The values obtained varied depending on the pH, and ranged between 239 and 1.27x10(4)M(-1) s(-1) for metoprolol; 2.62x10(4) and 2.97x10(5)M(-1)s(-1) for naproxen; 2.31x10(3) and 1.21x10(7)M(-1)s(-1) for amoxicillin; and 215 and 1.57x10(3)M(-1)s(-1) for phenacetin. Due to the acidic nature of these substances, the degree of dissociation of each pharmaceutical was determined at every pH of work, and the specific rate constants of the neutral and ionic species formed were evaluated. Additionally, the simultaneous ozonation of the pharmaceuticals in different water matrices was carried out by considering a groundwater, a surface water from a public reservoir, and three secondary effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants. The influence of the operating conditions (initial ozone dose, nature of pharmaceuticals and type of water) on the pharmaceuticals elimination efficiency was established, and a kinetic model was proposed for the evaluation of the partial contribution to the global oxidation of both, the direct ozonation reaction and the radical pathway. PMID:19545885

  5. Cloud Water Content Sensor for Sounding Balloons and Small UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bognar, John A.

    2009-01-01

    A lightweight, battery-powered sensor was developed for measuring cloud water content, which is the amount of liquid or solid water present in a cloud, generally expressed as grams of water per cubic meter. This sensor has near-zero power consumption and can be flown on standard sounding balloons and small, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The amount of solid or liquid water is important to the study of atmospheric processes and behavior. Previous sensing techniques relied on strongly heating the incoming air, which requires a major energy input that cannot be achieved on sounding balloons or small UAVs.

  6. Data assimilation with soil water content sensors and pedotransfer functions in soil water flow modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water flow models are based on a set of simplified assumptions about the mechanisms, processes, and parameters of water retention and flow. That causes errors in soil water flow model predictions. Soil water content monitoring data can be used to reduce the errors in models. Data assimilation (...

  7. Remote Sensing of Leaf Equivalent Water Thickness and Vegetation Water Content using Shortwave Infrared Reflectances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. The Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) had an objective of developing and testing algorithms for a vegetation water content data product using shortwav...

  8. Remote sensing of vegetation water content from equivalent water thickness using satellite imagery.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is one of the most important parameters for the successful retrieval of soil moisture content from passive and active microwave data. Normalized Difference Infrared Index (NDII) is a widely-used index to remotely sense Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT) of leaves and can...

  9. Temporal stability of soil water content and soil water flux patterns across agricultural fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When an agricultural field is repeatedly surveyed for soil water content, sites often can be spotted where soil is consistently wetter or consistently dryer than average across the study area. Temporal stability presents significant interest for upscaling observed soil water content, improving soil ...

  10. Relationship between the lattice constant of {Upsilon} phase and the content of {delta} phase, {gamma}{double_prime} and {gamma}{prime} phases in Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.C.; Xiao, F.R.; Yao, M.; Chen, Z.L.; Jiang, Z.Q.; Wang, S.G.

    1997-07-01

    Inconel 718, a Nb-modified nickel-base superalloy has been widely used in gas turbine and related applications due to its good mechanical properties and structural stability at elevated temperatures ({approximately}650 C). The mechanical properties of Inconel 718 depended on the austenite grain size and the size, morphology and content of {delta} phase, {gamma}{double_prime} and {gamma}{prime} phases. In a previous study, the {delta} phase content in Inconel 718 was measured by X-ray diffraction techniques. However, it was difficult to measure the content of {gamma}{double_prime} and {gamma}{prime} phases. M.G. Burke and M.K. Miller determined the composition of the {Upsilon} matrix by using analytical electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. Their results indicated that the composition of the {Upsilon} matrix changed due to the formation of the various precipitates. The variation in the composition of the {Upsilon} matrix affected the lattice constant of {Upsilon} phase, then the content of {delta} phase, {gamma}{double_prime} and {gamma}{prime} phases was thought to be associated with the lattice constant of {Upsilon} phase. In this paper, the lattice constant of {Upsilon} phase and the content of {delta} phase in Inconel 718 aged at 910 C for different times after cold rolling are measured by X-ray diffraction techniques. The lattice constant of {Upsilon} phase as a function of the content of {delta} phase, {gamma}{double_prime} and {gamma}{prime} phases is derived.

  11. [Preparation of water in oil type cream with high content of water containing Kochia scoparia fruit and Cnidium monnieri fruit].

    PubMed

    Kohri, Naonori; Yamashita, Miki; Kanazawa, Tsutomu; Kodera, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Kikisui is a herbal lotion containing Kochia scoparia Fruit and Cnidium monnieri Fruit that is clinically used as an antipruritic for itchy dry skin. However, this formulation is unsuitable for inducing a prolonged effect. Here, we attempted to change the formulation from a lotion to a cream. The cream we chose was a water-in-oil (W/O) type emulsion for enhancing skin compatibility. In addition, the high water content imparts a sensation of coolness. However, it is difficult to prepare a stable W/O type cream with high water content using a mechanical mixing method. Instead, we prepared the W/O type emulsion using liquid crystals. Water containing cocamidopropyl betaine was added to a dispersed phase comprising an oil phase of oleic acid and liquid paraffin that was constantly stirred. Addition of an aqueous solution containing Kochia scoparia Fruit and Cnidium monnieri Fruit decreased the stability of the cream. However, addition of glycerin as a humectant, and ethyl p-hydroxybenzoate/n-butyl p-hydroxybenzoate as preservatives enhanced the stability of the cream. The stability of the emulsion was correlated with the apparent viscosity of the cream. The final W/O type cream had a water content of 83% and was stable for more than 6 months at 4°C. Furthermore, ostol, which is one of the main biologically active herbal compounds, was also stable for more than 6 months. PMID:22129882

  12. Assessment of a calibration procedure to estimate soil water content with Sentek Diviner 2000 capacitance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, G.; Giordano, G.; Provenzano, G.

    2012-04-01

    In irrigated systems, soil water content is a major factor determining plant growth. Irrigation scheduling criteria are often related to measurements of soil water content or matric potential. Strategies to manage irrigation can be used to optimize irrigation water use or to maximize crop yield and/or quality, in order to increase the net return for the farmer. Of course, whatever criterion is adopted to schedule irrigation and in particular when crop water stress conditions are considered, the accurate monitoring of the water content in the soil profile, could allow to verify the exact irrigation timing, defined according to the crop response to water stress. Currently many methods are available for determining soil water content on a volume basis (m3m-3) or a tension basis (MPa), as described by Robinson (2008). Recently, distributed fiber optic temperature measurement, has been assessed as a new technique for indirect and precise estimation of soil water contents. Over the past decade Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) probes, allowing to measure the apparent dielectric constant of the soil (K), indirectly related to the volumetric water content (θv), have been improved, due to the good potentiality of capacitance based sensors to in situ measurements of soil water content. However, due to the high variability of K with soil minerals and dry plants tissues, it necessary to proceed to a specific calibration of the sensor for each soil (Baumhardt et al., 2000), even to take into account the effect of soil temperature, bulk density and water salinity (Al Ain et al., 2009). . According to Paltineanu and Starr (1997), the precision of the calibration equation, obtained with in situ measurements, mainly depends on the errors related to the sampling of the soil volume investigated by the sensor, that must be done accurately. For swelling/shrinking soils, the changes of soil bulk volume with water content cause modifications in the geometry of some if not all the

  13. Effect of hydration on the water content of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Levin, R L; Cravalho, E G; Huggins, C E

    1976-12-01

    An ideal, hydrated, nondilute pseudobinary salt-protein-water solution model of the RBC intracellular solution has been developed to describe the osmotic behavior of human erythrocytes during freezing and thawing. Because of the hydration of intracellular solutes (mostly cell proteins), our analytical results predict that at least 16.65% of the isotonic cell water content will be retained within RBCs placed in hypertonic solutions. These findings are consistent not only with the experimental measurements of the amount of isotonic cell water retained within RBCs subjected to nonisotonic extracellular solutions (20-32%) but also with the experimental evidence that all of the water within RBCs is solvent water. By modeling the RBC intracellular solution as a hydrated salt-protein-water solution, no anomalous osmotic behavior is apparent. PMID:990394

  14. Electrokinetics dependence on water-content in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, V.; Lehmann, F.; Jouniaux, L.; Sailhac, P.; Matthey, P.

    2009-12-01

    The electrokinetic potential results from the coupling between the water flow and the electrical current because of the presence of ions within water. This coupling is well described in fluid-saturated media, however its behavior under unsaturated flow conditions is still discussed. We propose here an experimental approach which can clearly describe streaming potential variations in unsaturated conditions. Several drainage experiments have been performed within a column filled with a clean sand. Streaming potential measurements are combined to capillary pressure and to water content measurements each 10 centimeter along the column. In order to model hydrodymanics during each experiment, we solve Richards equation in an inverse way which allows us to establish the relation between hydraulic conductivity and water content, and retention relation. The electrokinetic coefficient C shows a more complex behavior than it was previously reported and can not be fitted by the existing models. We show that the normalized electrokinetic coefficient increases first when water saturation decreases from 100% to about 80% - 95%, and then decreases as the water saturation decreases, whereas all previous works described a unifrom decrease of the normalized electrokinetic coefficient as water saturation decreases. We delimited two water saturation domains, and deduced two different empirical laws describing the evolution of the electrokinetic coefficient in unsaturated conditions. Finally, electrical potentials data from four different drainage experiments and hydrodynamics were jointly inversed, including electrical conductivity measurements in order to find a robust description of the electrokinetic coefficient behavior in unsaturated conditions.

  15. Review of Suction Water Content Relationship of Bentonite-Sand Mixtures Considering Temperature Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Abhishek; Zhi Lang, Lin; Baille, Wiebke

    2015-04-01

    Bentonite-sand mixture is one of the candidate sealing/ buffer material for landfills, hazardous and high level radioactive waste repository. The long term satisfactory performance of bentonite sand mixture in terms of load bearing function, sealing function and buffer function is governed by hydro-mechanical response of material under elevated temperature conditions. The suction-water content relationship is one of the key parameter, which govern the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of compacted bentonite-sand mixture. This paper presents brief review of suction water content relationships of bentonite-sand mixture considering temperature effects. Numerous parametric models or equations have been developed for representing the soil water characteristics curve i.e. SWCC for isothermal conditions. The most frequently used equations for representing the SWCC are the van Genuchten (1980) and Fredlund and Xing (1994) SWCC equations. Various researchers (Romero et al. 2000; Villar and Lloret, 2004; Tang and Cui, 2005; Agus, 2005; Arifin, 2008) have reported the temperature effect on the water retention behavior of compacted bentonite-sand mixtures. The testing program, results and major conclusions made by above mentioned researchers were discussed in this paper. The changes in hydro-mechanical behavior due to elevated temperature are also discussed based on the suction components of soil which are influenced by temperature. As a general conclusion, total suction of the bentonite-sand mixtures is a function of mixture water content and mixture bentonite content or collectively a function of bentonite water content both at room temperature and at elevated temperature. At a constant temperature, different techniques for measuring suction results in different values of suction depending on accuracy of the sensor and calibration technique used as founded earlier by Agus (2005). The change in total suction due to change in temperature lower than 100 degree C is reversible

  16. WATER CONTENT-TEMPERATURE INTERACTIONS REGULATE SEED AGING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water content and temperature are important factors that influence the duration of seed survival in storage. The interacting effect of these two factors and the consequences on seed longevity is rarely recognized. An experiment to quantify the interaction was begun in 1994, using lettuce (Lactuca s...

  17. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  18. Optical sensing of vegetation water content: A synthesis study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation Water Content (VWC) plays an important role in parameterizing the vegetation influence on microwave soil moisture retrieval. During the past decade, researchers have developed relationships between VWC and vegetation indices available from satellite optical sensors in order to create larg...

  19. SAPWOOD WATER CONTENT IS INSENSITIVE TO CHANGES IN SOIL MOISTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in sapwood water content of large Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) trees were measured throughout the year at two sites: a low elevation (600-m) site where precipitation occurs primarily as rain, and a high elevation (1200-m) site that receives significant snowfall. B...

  20. Split-replicates correlation of water content in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The range of water content in a set of cottons equilibrated to moisture equilibrium at standard textile testing conditions is < 0.8 %. This presents a challenge in obtaining accurate test data to calibrate fast sensors. A dozen raw cottons, nine American and three international, were analyzed for ...

  1. Vegetation Water Content Retrievals for NAFE06 and CLASIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is a valuable input to many microwave based soil moisture retrieval algorithms. Previous research, both theoretical and experimental, has established that VWC can be estimated using multispectral remote sensing. There are limits on the reliability of these methods that...

  2. Mapping soil water content on golf course greens with GPR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be an effective and efficient method for high-resolution mapping of volumetric water content in the sand layer directly beneath the ground surface at a golf course green. This information could potentially be very useful to golf course superintendents for determi...

  3. A review on temporal stability of soil water contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) has been observed across a wide range of soil types, landscapes, climates and scales. A better understanding of TS SWC controls and their interactions needs to be developed. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive inventory of publis...

  4. Structural implications of water dissolution in haplogranitic glasses from NMR spectroscopy: influence of total water content and mixed alkali effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. C.; Riemer, T.; Kohn, S. C.; Holtz, F.; Dupree, R.

    2001-09-01

    To study the effects of total water content and alkali substitution on the structure of aluminosilicate glasses, two series of glasses belonging to the ternary system Quartz (Qz)-Albite (Ab)-Orthoclase (Or) were synthesized and investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Series I consisted of seven glasses with normative composition Ab 39Or 32Qz 29 (AOQ) and water contents ranging from 0 to 6 wt%. Series II consisted of dry and hydrous glasses (˜2.0 wt% H 2O) with five compositions along the join Qz 37Ab 63-Qz 34Or 66 (AQ-OQ) varying the alkali content (Na/K) at constant Si/Al ratio. All glasses were investigated with 1H, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. 29Si MAS spectra of AOQ glasses showed no change upon hydration, suggesting little variation of the Si environments although the large linewidth of the 29Si signal may hide the presence of some Si Q 3-OH. The isotropic chemical shift (δ iso) of 27Al showed no change upon hydration, regardless of the amount of dissolved water. The 27Al mean quadrupolar coupling constant (C q) decreased with increasing water content, indicating a general increase of symmetry of the charge distribution around Al, which suggests the absence of significant amounts of Al Q 3-OH. Nonetheless, the evolution of C q upon hydration suggests a correlation with OH concentration in the quenched glass. The evolution of 23Na isotropic chemical shifts upon hydration appears to be correlated with total water content or with the concentration of dissolved H 2O molecules. In general, the NMR data are consistent with the water solubility model of Kohn et al. (1989), involving the exchange of charge balancing cations by protons. However, in addition to the presence of molecular water, 1H-NMR results showed at least two types of OH groups of which one may be related to Al-OH. Although the small intensity of this signal indicates that only a minor fraction of OH groups is present in this species, it demonstrates

  5. Density fluctuations and dielectric constant of water in low and high density liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik; Zhang, Cui; Galli, Giulia A.; Franzese, Giancarlo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-02-01

    The hypothesis of a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) in the phase diagram of water, though first published many years ago, still remains the subject of a heated debate. According to this hypothesis there exists a critical point near T 244 K, and P 215 MPa, located at the end of a coexistence line between a high density liquid (HDL) and a low density liquid state (LDL). The LLCP lies below the homogenous nucleation temperature of water and it has so far remained inaccessible to experiments. We study a model of water exhibiting a liquid-liquid phase transition (that is a liquid interacting through the ST2 potential) and investigate the properties of dipolar fluctuations as a function of density, in the HDL and LDL. We find an interesting correlation between the macroscopic dielectric constants and the densities of the two liquids in the vicinity of the critical point, and we discuss possible implications for measurements close to the region where the LLCP may be located.

  6. Experimental Solubility Approach to Determine PDMS-Water Partition Constants and PDMS Activity Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Grant, Sharon; Schacht, Veronika J; Escher, Beate I; Hawker, Darryl W; Gaus, Caroline

    2016-03-15

    Freely dissolved aqueous concentration and chemical activity are important determinants of contaminant transport, fate, and toxic potential. Both parameters are commonly quantified using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) based on a sorptive polymer such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This method requires the PDMS-water partition constants, KPDMSw, or activity coefficient to be known. For superhydrophobic contaminants (log KOW >6), application of existing methods to measure these parameters is challenging, and independent measures to validate KPDMSw values would be beneficial. We developed a simple, rapid method to directly measure PDMS solubilities of solid contaminants, SPDMS(S), which together with literature thermodynamic properties was then used to estimate KPDMSw and activity coefficients in PDMS. PDMS solubility for the test compounds (log KOW 7.2-8.3) ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (4.1-5700 μM), and was dependent on compound class. For polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), solubility-derived KPDMSw increased linearly with hydrophobicity, consistent with trends previously reported for less chlorinated congeners. In contrast, subcooled liquid PDMS solubilities, SPDMS(L), were approximately constant within a compound class. SPDMS(S) and KPDMSw can therefore be predicted for a compound class with reasonable robustness based solely on the class-specific SPDMS(L) and a particular congener's entropy of fusion, melting point, and aqueous solubility. PMID:26881312

  7. Bioaccessibility of metal cations in soil is linearly related to its water exchange rate constant.

    PubMed

    Laird, Brian D; Peak, Derek; Siciliano, Steven D

    2011-05-01

    Site-specific risk assessments often incorporate the concepts of bioaccessibility (i.e., contaminant fraction released into gastrointestinal fluids) or bioavailability (i.e., contaminant fraction absorbed into systemic circulation) into the calculation of ingestion exposure. We evaluated total and bioaccessible metal concentrations for 19 soil samples under simulated stomach and duodenal conditions using an in vitro gastrointestinal model. We demonstrated that the median bioaccessibility of 23 metals ranged between <1 and 41% under simulated stomach conditions and < 1 and 63% under simulated duodenal conditions. Notably, these large differences in metal bioaccessibility were independent of equilibrium solubility and stability constants. Instead, the relationship (stomach phase R = 0.927; duodenum phase R = 0.891) between bioaccessibility and water exchange rates of metal cations (k(H₂O)) indicated that desorption kinetics may influence if not control metal bioaccessibility. PMID:21466150

  8. Total Water Content Measurements with an Isokinetic Sampling Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Miller, Dean R.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a Total Water Content (TWC) Isokinetic Sampling Probe. Since it is not sensitive to cloud water particle phase nor size, it is particularly attractive to support super-cooled large droplet and high ice water content aircraft icing studies. The instrument is comprised of the Sampling Probe, Sample Flow Control, and Water Vapor Measurement subsystems. Analysis and testing have been conducted on the subsystems to ensure their proper function and accuracy. End-to-end bench testing has also been conducted to ensure the reliability of the entire instrument system. A Stokes Number based collection efficiency correction was developed to correct for probe thickness effects. The authors further discuss the need to ensure that no condensation occurs within the instrument plumbing. Instrument measurements compared to facility calibrations from testing in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel are presented and discussed. There appears to be liquid water content and droplet size effects in the differences between the two measurement techniques.

  9. [Estimating canopy water content in wheat based on new vegetation water index].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-juan; Yang, Gui-jun; Xu, Xin-gang; Chen, Tian-en; Li, Zhen-hai; Feng, Hai-kuan; Wang, Dong

    2014-12-01

    Moisture content is an important indicator for crop water stress condition, timely and effective monitoring crop water content is of great significance for evaluate crop water deficit balance and guide agriculture irrigation. In order to improve the saturated problems of different forms of typical NDWI (Normalized Different Water Index), we tried to introduce EVI (Enhanced Vegetation Index) to build new vegetation water indices (NDWI#) to estimate crop water content. Firstly, PROSAIL model was used to study the saturation sensitivity of NDWI, and NDWI# to canopy water content and LAI (Leaf Area Index). Then, the estimated model and verified model were estimated using the spectral data and moisture data in the field. The result showed that the new indices have significant relationships with canopy water content. In particular, by implementing modified standardized for NDWI1450, NDWI1940, NDWI2500. The result indicated that newly developed indices with visible-infrared and shortwave infrared spectral feature may have greater advantage for estimation winter canopy water content. PMID:25881445

  10. Assessment of change in soil water content properties irrigated with industrial sugar beet wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Sayyed Hassan; Najafi, Payam; Amini, Hussein

    2007-05-15

    In this research the effect of industrial sugar beet wastewater has been assessed on the soil water content properties in summer 2005. The evaluated parameters were the soil water content points such as Saturation Percent (SP), Field Capacity (FC), Permanent Wilting Point (PWP), gravitational water and Total Available Water (TAW). The pilot design was fully randomized with three replications and three treatments. The three treatments were: 1-normal water, 2-industrial sugar beet wastewater (50%) and normal water (50%) and 3-sugar beet wastewater (100%). The experiments have been carried out in the field, in 21 columns with the diameter 110 mm and the height of 400 mm. The soil was irrigated using surface irrigation method for 12 events with a constant volume and period. Based on the result, the SP, FC and PWP initial value were 46.5, 35 and 15%, respectively for all the treatments. At the end of the period, the values changed to 47, 36.6 and 17.5% for T2. They are also increased significantly to 48.5, 37 and 18.7% for T3 at the end of the period. The increasing of soil Organic Matter (OM) during the period is expected to be the main factor for this change. The result shows that although the FC and PWP parameters are increased during the period but TAW decreased significantly from the 20 to 18.5%. The other effects of wastewater on soil and leached water quality should be evaluated too. PMID:19086512

  11. Response of a sloping aquifer to constant replenishment and to stream varying water level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zissis, T. S.; Teloglou, I. S.; Terzidis, G. A.

    2001-03-01

    The problem of seepage from a stream into an adjacent unconfined aquifer of semi-infinite extent, underlain by an impermeable sloping bed was considered in this study as a problem of one-dimensional unsteady-state groundwater flow. It was assumed that the water level in the stream gradually rises to a certain height, according to a known exponential function of time, while the aquifer was assumed to be replenished at a constant rate from ground surface. Applying the Laplace transformation method derived an analytical solution to an extended and linearized form of the nonhomogeneous Boussinesq equation used to describe the phreatic surface in sloping aquifers. The comparison of the analytical solution with a numerical solution obtained by applying the finite difference Mac Cormack explicit computational scheme to the nonlinear Boussinesq equation illustrates the validity of the new analytical solution and the effectiveness of the linearization. Some nondimensional diagrams are also presented to show the variation of the water table height and the seepage rate as well as their sensitivity to various sets of parameter values.

  12. Effect of the soil water content on Jatropha seedlings in a tropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Vázquez, A.; Hernández-Salinas, G.; Ávila-Reséndiz, C.; Valdés-Rodríguez, O. A.; Gallardo-López, F.; García-Pérez, E.; Ruiz-Rosado, O.

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate growth, chlorophyll content, and photosynthesis in Jatropha at different levels of soil moisture. Plants were cultivated in containers and the treatments of the soil water content evaluated were: 0% (without watering), 20, 40, 60, and 80% soil water content. Plant height was statistically similar for all treatments, but the number of leaves differed significantly. Total dry matter and chlorophyll at 40, 60, and 80% soil water content were statistically similar, but different from 0 and 20% soil water content. Leaf area at 40, 60, and 80% soil water content was statistically different from 0 and 20% soil water content. The photosynthetic rate, transpiration and stomatal conductance at 60 and 80% soil water content were statistically similar but different from 0 and 20% soil water content. Water stress affected growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, transpiration, and stomatal conductance.

  13. Water Content of Basalt Erupted on the ocean floor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1970-01-01

    Deep sea pillow basalts dredged from the ocean floor show that vesicularity changes with composition as well as with depth. Alkalic basalts are more vesicular than tholeiitic basalts erupted at the same depth. The vesicularity data, when related to experimentally determined solubility of water in basalt, indicate that K-poor oceanic tholeiites originally contained about 0.25 percent water, Hawaiian tholeiites of intermediate K-content, about 0.5 percent water, and alkali-rich basalts, about 0.9 percent water. Analyses of fresh basalt pillows show a systematic increase of H2O+ as the rocks become more alkalic. K-poor oceanic tholeiites contain 0.06-0.42 percent H2O+, Hawaiian tholeiites, 0.31-0.60 percent H2O+, and alkali rich basalts 0.49-0.98 percent H2O+. The contents of K2O, P2O5, F, and Cl increase directly with an increase in H2O+ content such that at 1.0 weight percent H2O+, K2O is 1.58 percent, P2O5 is 0.55 percent, F is 0.07 percent, and Cl is 0.1 percent. The measured weight percent of deuterium on the rim of one Hawaiian pillow is -6.0 (relative to SMOW); this value, which is similar to other indications of magmatic water, suggests that no appreciable sea water was absorbed by the pillow during or subsequent to eruption on the ocean floor. Concentrations of volatile constituents in the alkali basalt melts relative to tholeiitic melts can be explained by varying degrees of partial melting of mantle material or by fractional crystallization of a magma batch. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Monitoring soil water content by vertical temperature variations.

    PubMed

    Bechkit, Mohamed Amine; Flageul, Sébastien; Guerin, Roger; Tabbagh, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The availability of high sensitivity temperature sensors (0.001 K sensitivity platinum resistors), which can be positioned at intervals of a few centimeters along a vertical profile in the unsaturated zone, allows short-term in situ determinations-one day or even less-of the thermal diffusivity. The development of high data storage capabilities also makes this possible over long periods and the relative variations in thermal diffusivity allow the monitoring of the variations in water content. The processing of temperature measurements recorded at different depths is achieved by solving the heat equation, using the finite elements method, with both conductive and convective heat transfers. A first set of measurements has allowed this approach to be validated. Water content variations derived from thermal diffusivity values are in excellent agreement with TDR measurements carried out on the experimental site at Boissy-le-Châtel (Seine et Marne, France). PMID:23834312

  15. Monitoring of soil water content and quality inside and outside the water curtain cultivation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, K.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of green house. Artificial groundwater recharge application to the water curtain cultivation facilities was adopted and tested to use groundwater sustainably in a rural region of Korea. The groundwater level in the test site shows natural trend corresponding rainfall pattern except during mid-November to early April when groundwater levels decline sharply due to groundwater abstraction for water curtain cultivation. Groundwater levels are also affected by surface water such as stream, small dams in the stream and agricultural ditches. Infiltration data were collected from lysimeter installation and monitoring inside and outside water cultivation facility and compared with each other. The infiltration data were well correlated with rainfall outside the facility, but the data in the facility showed very different from the other. The missing infiltration data were attributed to groundwater level rise and level sensor location below water table. Soil water contents in the unsaturated zone indicated rainfall infiltration propagation at depth and with time outside the facility. According to rainfall amount and water condition at the initial stage of a rainfall event, the variation of soil water content was shown differently. Soil water contents and electrical conductivities were closely correlated with each other, and they reflected rainfall infiltration through the soil and water quality changes. The monitoring results are useful to reveal the hydrological processes from the infiltration to groundwater recharge, and water management planning in the water cultivation areas.

  16. Constants and thermodynamics of the acid-base equilibria of triglycine in water-ethanol solutions containing sodium perchlorate at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Tkhi, L.; Usacheva, T. R.; Tukumova, N. V.; Koryshev, N. E.; Khrenova, T. M.; Sharnin, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    The acid-base equilibrium constants for glycyl-glycyl-glycine (triglycine) in water-ethanol solvents containing 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mole fractions of ethanol are determined by potentiometric titration at 298.15 K and an ionic strength of 0.1, maintained with sodium perchlorate. It is established that an increase in the ethanol content in the solvent reduces the dissociation constant of the carboxyl group of triglycine (increases p K 1) and increases the dissociation constant of the amino group of triglycine (decreases p K 2). It is noted that the weakening of the acidic properties of a triglycinium ion upon an increase of the ethanol content in the solvent is due to the attenuation of the solvation shell of the zwitterionic form of triglycine, and to the increased solvation of triglycinium ions. It is concluded that the acid strength of triglycine increases along with a rise in the EtOH content in the solvent, due to the desolvation of the tripeptide zwitterion and the enhanced solvation of protons.

  17. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  18. Plant Response to Differential Soil Water Content and Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A. B.; Dara, A.; Kamai, T.; Ngo, A.; Walker, R.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Root-zone soil water content is extremely dynamic, governed by complex and coupled processes such as root uptake, irrigation, evaporation, and leaching. Root uptake of water and nutrients is influenced by these conditions and the processes involved. Plant roots are living and functioning in a dynamic environment that is subjected to extreme changes over relatively short time and small distances. In order to better manage our agricultural resources and cope with increasing constraints of water limitation, environmental concerns and climate change, it is vital to understand plants responses to these changes in their environment. We grew chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants, in boxes of 30 x 25 x 1 cm dimensions filled with fine sand. Layers of coarse sand (1.5 cm thick) were embedded in the fine-sand media to divide the root growth environment into sections that were hydraulically disconnected from each other. This way, each section could be independently treated with differential levels of water and salinity. The root growth and distribution in the soil was monitored on daily bases using neutron radiography. Daily water uptake was measured by weighing the containers. Changes of soil water content in each section of the containers were calculated from the neutron radiographs. Plants that part of their root system was stressed with drought or salinity showed no change in their daily water uptake rate. The roots in the stressed sections stayed turgid during the stress period and looked healthy in the neutron images. However the uptake rate was severely affected when the soil in the non-stressed section started to dry. The plants were then fully irrigated with water and the water uptake rate recovered to its initial rate shortly after irrigation. The neutron radiographs clearly illustrated the shrinkage and recovery of the roots under stress and the subsequent relief. This cycle was repeated a few times and the same trend could be reproduced. Our results show that plants

  19. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  20. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-05-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB.

  1. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>10(5) km(3)) within short time span (<1-3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  2. Product distributions and rate constants for ion-molecule reactions in water, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Pinizzotto, R. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal energy, bimolecular ion-molecule reactions occurring in gaseous water, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and methane have been identified and their rate constants determined using ion cyclotron resonance methods. Absolute rate constants were determined for the disappearance of the primary ions by using the trapped ion method, and product distributions were determined for these reactions by using the cyclotron ejection method. Previous measurements are reviewed and compared with the results using the present methods. The relative rate constants for hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer, and charge transfer are also determined for reactions of the parent ions.

  3. Intra-Abdominal Pressure Correlates with Extracellular Water Content

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowski, Wojciech; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Jaroszynski, Andrzej; Zadora, Przemyslaw; Pilat, Jacek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Zaluska, Wojciech; Schneditz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume. Material and Methods Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI) and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW), extracellular water content (ECW) and volume excess (VE) were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients. Results One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP. Conclusion IAP strongly correlates with ECW. PMID:25849102

  4. Water Calibration Measurements for Neutron Radiography: Application to Water Content Quantification in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Misun; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-lin; Perfect, Edmund; Horita, Juske; Warren, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scattering effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 2 mm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector / scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.

  5. Water calibration measurements for neutron radiography: Application to water content quantification in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C. L.; Perfect, E.; Horita, J.; Warren, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scattering effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 0.2 cm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector/scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.

  6. Estimating plant available water content from remotely sensed evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; Warren, G.; Doody, T.

    2012-04-01

    Plant available water content (PAWC) is an emergent soil property that is a critical variable in hydrological modelling. PAWC determines the active soil water storage and, in water-limited environments, is the main cause of different ecohydrological behaviour between (deep-rooted) perennial vegetation and (shallow-rooted) seasonal vegetation. Conventionally, PAWC is estimated for a combination of soil and vegetation from three variables: maximum rooting depth and the volumetric water content at field capacity and permanent wilting point, respectively. Without elaborate local field observation, large uncertainties in PAWC occur due to the assumptions associated with each of the three variables. We developed an alternative, observation-based method to estimate PAWC from precipitation observations and CSIRO MODIS Reflectance-based Evapotranspiration (CMRSET) estimates. Processing steps include (1) removing residual systematic bias in the CMRSET estimates, (2) making spatially appropriate assumptions about local water inputs and surface runoff losses, (3) using mean seasonal patterns in precipitation and CMRSET to estimate the seasonal pattern in soil water storage changes, (4) from these, calculating the mean seasonal storage range, which can be treated as an estimate of PAWC. We evaluate the resulting PAWC estimates against those determined in field experiments for 180 sites across Australia. We show that the method produces better estimates of PAWC than conventional techniques. In addition, the method provides detailed information with full continental coverage at moderate resolution (250 m) scale. The resulting maps can be used to identify likely groundwater dependent ecosystems and to derive PAWC distributions for each combination of soil and vegetation type.

  7. Magmatic Water Contents in Mariana and Izu Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S.; Grove, T.; Plank, T.

    2002-05-01

    We estimate the magmatic water content of magmas from the Mariana-Izu arc system using experimental phase equilibria. Our goal is to produce primary H2O estimates for Mariana-Izu magmas to compare with along-arc variations in the trace element and isotopic compositions of the magmas. Such correlations can be used to quantify the chemical inputs into the sub-arc mantle wedge from the subducting Pacific plate. The experiments are performed in externally heated, gas-pressure vessels. H2O-saturatation is maintained throughout the experiment, as well as an fO2 at the Ni-NiO buffer. The experimental melts contain between 5.5 and 6.2 wt.% H2O. The observed LLD for Pagan island in the Mariana arc falls midway between the hydrous 200 MPa LLD and an anhydrous LLD modeled using the MELTS program [Ghiorso and Sack, 1995], suggesting an initial H2O content of ~3 wt.%. This in good agreement with the H2O content (2.7 wt.%, Plank, unpub. data) of an olivine-hosted melt inclusion contained in the Pagan samples. Experiments at lower H2O contents are being conducted to verify this estimate. The LLD for Hachijo-jima in the Izu arc follows the 200 MPa, H2O saturated LLD fairly well, though there is significant scatter in the natural sample compositions, likely due to plagioclase accumulation. Thus our preliminary results indicate higher H2O contents in the Hachijo-jima magmas (5-7 wt.%) relative to the Pagan magmas. The compositions of minerals in the mafic Pagan sample (PAF3b; Woodhead, 1989) indicate a history of mixing. Relative to the hydrous experiments, olivine (ol) phenocrysts in the sample have higher Mg#s (0.867 vs. 0.809), while plag phenocrysts have lower anorthite (An) contents (0.889 vs. 0.946). The lower An contents are consistent with the lower estimated H2O contents in the Pagan magmas relative to the experiments, while the higher ol Mg# indicates that even the most mafic Pagan sample is fractionated or a mixed magma. Glomerocrysts in the sample contain ol with lower

  8. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the

  9. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  10. Both water intoxication and osmotic BBB disruption increase brain water content in rats.

    PubMed

    Kozler, P; Riljak, V; Pokorný, J

    2013-01-01

    Our previous experiments revealed that water intoxication and osmotic BBB disruption in the rat allow penetration of high-molecular substances into the brain and that resulting changes in the internal environment of the CNS lead to pathological development, such as the loss of integrity of myelin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the previously described phenomena are associated with increased water content in the brain. To answer the question following methods were used: a) water intoxication: intraperitoneal administration of distilled water, b) osmotic BBB disruption: application of mannitol (20 %) selectively into the internal carotid artery, c) brain wet weight was measured after decapitation, and subsequently (after six days in thermostat set at 86 °C) the dry weight were estimated d) in animals with 20 % and 30 % hyperhydration the degree of myelin deterioration was estimated e) animal locomotor activity was tested by continuous behavior tracking and analysis. Brain water content after water intoxication and following the administration of mannitol was higher than in the control group. Different degrees of hyperhydration led to different levels of brain water content and to different degrees of myelin impairment. Hyperhydration corresponding to 20 % of the body weight brought about lower locomotor activity. Increased water content in the brain after the BBB osmotic disruption is surprising because this method is frequently used in the clinical practice. PMID:24329706

  11. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Properties of an Argillaceous Swelling Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Maximiliano R.; Triantafyllidis, Theodoros

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental investigation aimed to study the effect of water on the mechanical properties of a partially saturated argillaceous swelling rock. The mineralogical composition of the rock, in particular the portion of swelling clays, was determined with X-ray diffraction. The water retention curve was estimated using a dew-point potential meter and the swelling behavior of the studied rock was examined by unconfined and oedometric swelling tests. The influence of water on the rock mechanical properties was assessed by means of triaxial tests. The experimental results indicate a strong decrease of strength and stiffness with increasing saturation or decreasing suction. This occurs only within a certain range of saturation. Degradation of the rock properties can be expected for small increments in the water content within this range. At low suction and close to the air-entry value, the stiffness remained constant. As the rock desaturates, the strength and stiffness increase approaching constant values. For suction greater than about 76 MPa, low increase of strength and stiffness was observed. The specimens in the swelling tests reached a saturation degree of 70 % which corresponds to a decrease of strength and stiffness of approximately 80 %. Rock swelling occurring simultaneously with reduction of strength and stiffness, increases deformations and it is an important issue for the stability of excavations.

  12. Hygienic importance of increased barium content in some fresh waters.

    PubMed

    Havlík, B; Hanusová, J; Rálková, J

    1980-01-01

    In surface waters of the mining and processing areas of uranium ore there is an increased content of free and bound barium ions due to the use of barium salts for the treatment of waste and mine waters containing radium. In model experiments with the algae Ankistrodesmus falcatus, Chlorella kessleri and Scenedesmus obliquus, we studied the effect of Ba2+ on the accumulation of 226Ra. It was found that the accumulation of radium by algae is negatively influenced with barium concentrations higher than 1 mg.l-1. The accumulation of barium of organisms of primary production was studied using 133BaCl2. At a barium content in the medium of 4.0, 0.46 and 0.04 mu. l-1, the algae accumulated 30-60% of the added amount of barium during an exposure of 15 days. Biochemical analyses showed that barium is bound to the cellular membrane and to other components of the algal cell that cannot be extracted with water or alcohol. PMID:7462608

  13. Estimation of canopy water content with MODIS spectral index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zuoning; Li, Lin; Ustin, Susan L.

    2009-08-01

    Canopy water content is an important variable for forestry and agriculture management. This study was aimed at building calibration models to estimate vegetation canopy (VC) equivalent water thickness (EWT) from high temporal resolution and large areal coverage MODIS images. The models were developed for a semi-arid area in Arizona (SMEX04) and the best one was applied to MODIS images covering a forest area in Southern Indiana. EWT derived from hyperspectral data in the process of atmospheric correction was used for calibrating MODIS spectral indices. Tested in this study were four vegetation indices: Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Shortwave Infrared Water Stress Index (SIWSI), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), which were designed based on either water (NDWI and SIWSI) or chlorophyll absorptions (NDVI and EVI). Validating these indices on field measured EWT for the SMEX04 site resulted in R2 correlations of 0.7547, 0.7509, 0.7299 and 0.7547, respectively. According to regression equations, however, EWT estimated using NDWI and SIWSI shows a slope more close to 1 than those using NDVI and EVI when validated with ground measured EWT, thus showing a better prediction ability than the two chlorophyll indices. The SIWSI-EWT model was chosen to apply to a time series of MODIS images covering the Southern Indiana areas and the relationship of EWT derived from these images to precipitation was examined.

  14. Stalagmite water content as a proxy for drip water supply in tropical and subtropical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Scheidegger, Y.; Brennwald, M. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Figura, S.; Wieler, R.; Kipfer, R.

    2012-07-01

    In this pilot study water was extracted from samples of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island, Yemen, and one Eemian stalagmite from southern continental Yemen. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of stalagmite rock, termed "water yield" hereafter, serves as a measure for its total water content. The stalagmites' water yield records vary systematically with the corresponding oxygen isotopic compositions of the calcite (δ18Ocalcite). Low δ18Ocalcite values are thereby accompanied by low water yields and vice versa. Based on the paleoclimatic interpretation of the δ18Ocalcite records, water yields can be linked to drip water supply. High drip water supply caused by high precipitation rates supports homogeneous deposition of calcite with low porosity and therefore a small fraction of water-filled inclusions, resulting in low water yields of the respective samples. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular growth of calcite with higher porosity, leading to an increase of the fraction of water-filled inclusions and thus higher water yields. The results are consistent with the literature on stalagmite growth and supported by optical inspection of thin sections of our samples. We propose that for a stalagmite from a tropical or subtropical area, its water yield record represents a novel paleoclimate proxy recording changes in drip water supply, which can in turn be interpreted in terms of associated precipitation rates.

  15. On the Variation of Water Diffusion Coefficient in Stratum Corneum With Water Content.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Johnson, Robert; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    Water permeability and transient water sorption data in human and porcine stratum corneum (SC) are analyzed in conjunction with equilibrium water sorption data and a dynamic skin swelling model to develop a quantitative model for water diffusivity in the SC as a function of its water content. The recommended function (model 1) is phenomenological and treats the SC as a uniform, swellable slab. This approach yields satisfactory agreement with experimental data over a wide range of RH and associated equilibrium SC water content, Cw. It is supported by two alternative approaches. Model 2 considers the SC to be a multilaminate membrane consisting of alternating lipid and protein layers. Diffusivity in the protein phase is estimated from water diffusivity in other keratinized tissues, whereas diffusivity in the lipid phase is assumed to be linearly related to the swelling strain on intercellular lipids. Model 3 uses an analysis previously suggested by Stockdale to rationalize transepidermal water loss data in humans over a wide range of relative humidity. All models yield similar results for 0.20 ≤ Cw ≤ 0.78 g/cm(3), the usual range of SC water content in vivo. PMID:26886319

  16. Dielectric constant and low-frequency infrared spectra for liquid water and ice Ih within the E3B model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, L.; Ni, Y.; Drews, S. E. P.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-08-28

    Two intrinsic difficulties in modeling condensed-phase water with conventional rigid non-polarizable water models are: reproducing the static dielectric constants for liquid water and ice Ih, and generating the peak at about 200 cm{sup −1} in the low-frequency infrared spectrum for liquid water. The primary physical reason for these failures is believed to be the missing polarization effect in these models, and consequently various sophisticated polarizable water models have been developed. However, in this work we pursue a different strategy and propose a simple empirical scheme to include the polarization effect only on the dipole surface (without modifying a model's intermolecular interaction potential). We implement this strategy for our explicit three-body (E3B) model. Our calculated static dielectric constants and low-frequency infrared spectra are in good agreement with experiment for both liquid water and ice Ih over wide temperature ranges, albeit with one fitting parameter for each phase. The success of our modeling also suggests that thermal fluctuations about local minima and the energy differences between different proton-disordered configurations play minor roles in the static dielectric constant of ice Ih. Our analysis shows that the polarization effect is important in resolving the two difficulties mentioned above and sheds some light on the origin of several features in the low-frequency infrared spectra for liquid water and ice Ih.

  17. REMOTE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-TRITIUM-CONTENT WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; Raymond Sigg, R; Leah Arrigo, L; Donald Pak, D

    2007-08-07

    Systems to safely analyze for tritium in moisture collected from glovebox atmospheres are being developed for use at Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities. Analysis results will guide whether the material contains sufficient tritium for economical recovery, or whether it should be stabilized for disposal as waste. In order to minimize potential radiation exposures that could occur in handling and diluting high-tritium-content water, SRS sought alternatives to the process laboratory's routine analysis by liquid-scintillation counting. The newer systems determine tritium concentrations by measuring bremsstrahlung radiation induced by low-energy beta interactions. One of the systems determines tritium activity in liquid streams, the other determines tritium activity in water vapor. Topics discussed include counting results obtained by modeling and laboratory testing and corrections that are made for low-energy photon attenuation.

  18. Disparate effects of constant and annually-cycling daylength and water temperature on reproductive maturation of striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.W.; Henderson-Arzapalo, A.; Sullivan, C.V.

    2005-01-01

    Adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) were exposed to various combinations of constant or anually-cycling daylength and water temperature. Constant conditions (15 h days, 18??C) were those normally experienced at spawning and cycling conditions simulated natural changes at Chesapeake Bay latitude. Females exposed to constant long (15 h) days and cycling water temperature (TEMPERATURE group) had blood plasma levels of sex steroids (testosterone [T] and estradiol-17?? [E2]) and vitellogenin (Vg), and profiles of oocyte growth, that were nearly identical to those of females held under a natural photothermal cycle (CONTROL group). Several fish from these two groups were induced to spawn fertile eggs. Females constantly exposed to warm water (18??C), with or without a natural photoperiod cycle (PHOTOPERIOD and STATIC groups, respectively), had diminished circulating levels of gonadal steroid hormones and Vg, impaired deposition of yolk granules in their ooplasm, and decreased oocyte growth, and they underwent premature ovarian atresia. Males exposed to cycling water temperature (CONTROL and TEMPERATURE groups) spermiated synchronously during the natural breeding season, at which time they also had had high plasma androgen (T and 11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]) levels. The timing of spermiation was highly asynchronous among males in groups of fish held constantly at 18??C (STATIC and PHOTOPERIOD groups) and this asynchrony was associated with diminished plasma androgen levels. Termination of spermiation by males exposed to cycling water temperature coincided with a sharp decline in levels of plasma androgens about a month after water temperature rose above 18??C. In contrast, most males held constantly at 18??C sustained intermediate levels of plasma androgens and spermiated until the end of the study in late July. The annual cycle of water temperature clearly plays a prominent role in the initiation, maintenance, and termination of the striped bass reproductive cycle. In

  19. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  20. Effect of water content on the water repellency for hydrophobized sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Kuroda, T.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Alternative earthen covers such as capillary barriers (CBs) and evapotranspirative covers are recognized as useful technical and low-cost solutions for limiting water infiltration and controlling seepage flow at solid waste landfills in semi-arid and arid regions. However, their application to the landfills at wet regions seems to be matter of concern due to loss of their impending capability under high precipitation. One of the possible techniques to enhance the impermeable properties of CBs is to alter soil grain surfaces to be water-repellent by mixing/coating hydrophobic agents (HAs). In order to examine a potential use of model sands hydrophobized with locally available and environmental-friendly HAs such as oleic acid (OA) and stearic acid (SA) for hydrophobic CBs. In the present study, we first characterized the effect of water content on the degree of water repellency (WR) for hydrophobized sands and volcanic ash soil at different depth. Secondly, the time dependency of the contact angle in hydrophobized sands and volcanic ash soils at different water content was evaluated. Further, the effects of hydrophobic organic matter contents on the WR of hydrophobized sands were investigated by horizontal infiltration test. We investigated the degree of WR as functions of volumetric water content (θ) of a volcanic ash soil samples from different depth and water adjusted hydrophobized sand samples with different ratio of HAs by using sessile drop method (SDM). The initial contact angle (αi) measured from SDM decreased gradually with increasing water content in OA and SA coated samples. Measured αi values for volcanic ash soils increased with increasing water content and reached a peak values of 111.7o at θ= 0.325 cm3 cm-3, where-after αi gradually decreased. Each test sample exhibited sharp decrease in contact angle with time at higher water content. Sorptivity values for oleic acid coated samples decreased with increasing HA content and reached the minimum

  1. Compilation of Henry's law constants (version 4.0) for water as solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.

    2015-04-01

    Many atmospheric chemicals occur in the gas phase as well as in liquid cloud droplets and aerosol particles. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the distribution between the phases. According to Henry's law, the equilibrium ratio between the abundances in the gas phase and in the aqueous phase is constant for a dilute solution. Henry's law constants of trace gases of potential importance in environmental chemistry have been collected and converted into a uniform format. The compilation contains 17 350 values of Henry's law constants for 4632 species, collected from 689 references. It is also available at http://www.henrys-law.org.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  3. Mechanical impedance of soil crusts and water content in loamy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josa March, Ramon; Verdú, Antoni M. C.; Mas, Maria Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Soil crust development affects soil water dynamics and soil aeration. Soil crusts act as mechanical barriers to fluid flow and, as their mechanical impedance increases with drying, they also become obstacles to seedling emergence. As a consequence, the emergence of seedling cohorts (sensitive seeds) might be reduced. However, this may be of interest to be used as an effective system of weed control. Soil crusting is determined by several factors: soil texture, rain intensity, sedimentation processes, etc. There are different ways to characterize the crusts. One of them is to measure their mechanical impedance (MI), which is linked to their moisture level. In this study, we measured the evolution of the mechanical impedance of crusts formed by three loamy soil types (clay loam, loam and sandy clay loam, USDA) with different soil water contents. The aim of this communication was to establish a mathematical relationship between the crust water content and its MI. A saturated soil paste was prepared and placed in PVC cylinders (50 mm diameter and 10 mm height) arranged on a plastic tray. Previously the plastic tray was sprayed with a hydrophobic liquid to prevent the adherence of samples. The samples on the plastic tray were left to air-dry under laboratory conditions until their IM was measured. To measure IM, a food texture analyzer was used. The equipment incorporates a mobile arm, a load cell to apply force and a probe. The arm moves down vertically at a constant rate and the cylindrical steel probe (4 mm diameter) penetrates the soil sample vertically at a constant rate. The equipment is provided with software to store data (time, vertical distance and force values) at a rate of up to 500 points per second. Water content in crust soil samples was determined as the loss of weight after oven-drying (105°C). From the results, an exponential regression between MI and the water content was obtained (determination coefficient very close to 1). This methodology allows

  4. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  5. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  6. Relationship between optical extinction and liquid water content in fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Dabas, A.

    2014-05-01

    Studies carried out in the late 1970s suggest that a simple linear relationship exists in practice between the optical extinction in the thermal IR and the liquid water content (LWC) in fogs. Such a relationship opens the possibility to monitor the vertical profile of the LWC in fogs with a rather simple backscatter lidar. Little is known on how the LWC varies as a function of height and during the fog life cycle, so the new measurement technique would help understand fog physics and provide valuable data for improving the quality of fog forecasts. In this paper, the validity of the linear relationship is revisited in the light of recent observations of fog droplet size distributions measured with a combination of sensors covering a large range of droplet radii. In particular, large droplets (radius above 15 μm) are now detected, which was not the case in the late 1970s. The results confirm that the linear relationship still holds, at least for the mostly radiative fogs observed during the campaign. The impact of the precise value of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index on the coefficient of the linear relationship is also studied. The usual practice considers that droplets are made of pure water. This assumption is probably valid for big drops, but it may be questioned for small ones since droplets are formed from condensation nuclei of highly variable chemical composition. The study suggests that the precise nature of condensation nuclei will primarily affect rather light fogs with small droplets and light liquid water contents.

  7. Sensing the water content of honey from temperature-dependent electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to predict water content in honey, electrical conductivity was measured on blossom honey types of milk-vetch, jujube and yellow-locust with water content of 18%-37% between 5-40ºC. Regression models of electrical conductivity were developed as functions of water content and temperature. The...

  8. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  9. Long-term behavior of water content and density in an earthen liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, T.E.; Krapac, I.G.; Stark, T.D.; Strack, G.D.

    2005-01-01

    An extensively instrumented compacted earthen liner was constructed at the Illinois State Geological Survey facility in Champaign, III. in 1987. A pond of water 0.31 m deep was maintained on top of the 7.3 m ?? 14.6 m ?? 0.9 m thick liner for 14 years. One of the goals of the project was to evaluate the long-term performance of a compacted earthen liner by monitoring the long-term changes in water content and density. The water content of the earthen liner showed no trend with depth or time. The liner density remained essentially constant from construction through excavation in 2002. The liner did not become fully saturated. Upon excavation of the liner, the degree of saturation was 80.0??6.3% after 14 years of ponding under a hydraulic head of 0.31 m. The results imply that properly designed and constructed earthen liners may reduce the possibility of pollutants leaching from municipal solid waste containment facilities by remaining partially saturated for years and maintaining the placement density. Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering ?? ASCE.

  10. Instrumental correction of the uneven PMT aging effect on the calibration constant of a water vapor Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Valentin; Fastig, Shlomo; Haefele, Alexander; Martucci, Giovanni; Calpini, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    The water vapor profile derived from Raman lidar measurements is obtained from the ratio of water vapor to nitrogen Raman-shifted returns. The proportionality factor converting the signal ratio to water vapor/air mixing ratio is referred to as lidar calibration constant. The calibration constant is a function of the water vapor and nitrogen Raman cross sections and the efficiencies of the respective Raman channels including the photomultiplier tubes (PMT) efficiencies. Unequal, gradual changes in the water vapor and nitrogen channels PMT efficiencies due to aging effects lead to steady alteration of the calibration constant. This effect has been observed during the seven- year continuous operation of the RAman Lidar for Meteorological Observations (RALMO)1. A more detailed research2, has shown that the calibration constant change is more pronounced during summer time, which is explained by the higher daylight exposure of the PMTs during this period. Periodical recalibration of the lidar with radiosonde measurements is used to correct the calibration constant. This approach, however, induces additional systematic errors due to the nature of the calibration procedure and because of sonde-to-sonde accuracy variations. The systematic errors could induce artefacts leading to an incorrect interpretation of certain data points in the framework of climatological studies. To resolve this problem we developed a new, instrumental method for automated correction of the lidar calibration constant. By this method, the change in the water vapor and the nitrogen PMTs efficiencies are estimated from the PMTs responses measured when they are illuminated simultaneously by a single stabilized LED light source. A correction factor is deduced from the ratio of the signals of the two photomultipliers. The correction measurements are taken automatically once daily before midnight. The correction is applied when the correction factor exceeds a predefined threshold for several days. The

  11. Stalagmite water content as a proxy for drip water supply in tropical and subtropical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Scheidegger, Y.; Brennwald, M. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Figura, S.; Wieler, R.; Kipfer, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this pilot study water was extracted from samples of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island, Yemen, and one Eemian stalagmite from southern continental Yemen. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of stalagmite rock, termed "water yield" hereafter, serves as a measure of its total water content. Based on direct correlation plots of water yields and δ18Ocalcite and on regime shift analyses, we demonstrate that for the studied stalagmites the water yield records vary systematically with the corresponding oxygen isotopic compositions of the calcite (δ18Ocalcite). Within each stalagmite lower δ18Ocalcite values are accompanied by lower water yields and vice versa. The δ18Ocalcite records of the studied stalagmites have previously been interpreted to predominantly reflect the amount of rainfall in the area; thus, water yields can be linked to drip water supply. Higher, and therefore more continuous drip water supply caused by higher rainfall rates, supports homogeneous deposition of calcite with low porosity and therefore a small fraction of water-filled inclusions, resulting in low water yields of the respective samples. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular growth of calcite with higher porosity, leading to an increase of the fraction of water-filled inclusions and thus higher water yields. The results are consistent with the literature on stalagmite growth and supported by optical inspection of thin sections of our samples. We propose that for a stalagmite from a dry tropical or subtropical area, its water yield record represents a novel paleo-climate proxy recording changes in drip water supply, which can in turn be interpreted in terms of associated rainfall rates.

  12. The stability constants of copper(II) complexes with some alpha-amino acids in dioxan-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Doğan, A; Köseoğlu, F; Kiliç, E

    2001-08-15

    In this study, the overall stability constants of copper(II) complexes with some alpha-amino acids (glycine, dl-alanine, dl-valine, l-leucine, l-asparagine, l-glutamine) were determined by potentiometric titration in water, 25% dioxan-75% water, 35% dioxan-65% water, 50% dioxan-50% water, and 60% dioxan-40% water. The titrations were performed at 25 degrees C, under nitrogen atmosphere, and the ionic strength of the medium was maintained at 0.10 M by using sodium perchlorate. The formation curves of their complexes (n-p[L]) were obtained by means of the titration data. Then the stability constants were determined in relation to these curves. The mol ratio of copper(II) to alpha-amino acid was also determined and it was found that the complexes were CuL(2) type. Another important result obtained was that the tendency of amino acids to form complexes with copper(II) was greater in dioxan-water mixtures compared to water. PMID:11488627

  13. Water movement in stony soils: The influence of stoniness on soil water content profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Viliam; Knava, Karol

    2010-05-01

    WATER MOVEMENT IN STONY SOILS: THE INFLUENCE OF STONINESS ON SOIL WATER CONTENT PROFILES Viliam Novák, Karol Kňava Institute of Hydrology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 831 02 Bratislava 3, Slovakia, e-mail: novak@uh.savba.sk Soils containing rock fragments are widespread over the world, on Europe such soil account for 30%, 60% in Mediterranean region. In comparison to fine earth soils (soil particles are less then 2 mm) stony soils contain rock fragments characterized by the low retention capacity and hydraulic conductivity. So, for stony soils -in comparison to the fine-earth soils - is typical lower hydraulic conductivity and retention capacity, which lead to the decrease decrease of infiltration rate and low water retention. So, water movement and its modeling in stony soil would differ from fine earth (usually agricultural) soil. The aim of this contribution is to demonstrate the differences in water movement in homogeneous soil (fine earth) and stony soil. The influence of different stoniness on soil water content and soil water dynamics was studied too. Windthrow at High Tatra mountains in Slovakia (November 2004) cleared nearly 12 000 ha of 80 year conifers and this event initiated complex research of windthrow impact on the ecosystem. The important part of this study was water movement in impacted area. Specific feature of the soil in this area was moraine soil consisting of fine earth, characterized as silty sand, with the relative stone content up to 0.49, increasing with depth. Associated phenomenon to the forest clearing is the decrease of rain interception and higher undercanopy precipitation. Conifers interception capacity can be three times higher than low canopy interception, and can reach up to 40% of annual precipitation in Central Europe. Stones in the soil are decreasing infiltration rate, but paradoxically increased understorey precipitation and followingly the increased cumulative infiltration led to the increase of the soil

  14. Collimated neutron probe for soil water content measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klenke, J.M.; Flint, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    A collimated neutron probe was designed to enable mesurements in specific directions from the access tube. To determine the size and shape of soil volume affecting the neutron counts, experiments were conducted to evaluate: 1) the vertical distance of soil above and below the probe that influences neutron counts; 2) the horizontal distance away from the probe into the soil that influences neutron counts; 3) the angle of soil viewed by the probe from the collimator; and 4) the three-dimensional thermal-neutron density field. The vertical distance was ~0.5m, the horizontal distance was ~0.2m, and the angle of soil viewed by the probe from the collimator was ~120??. Thermal neutrons detected from distances or angles larger than these values influence the determination of relative water content by 5% or less. -from Authors

  15. Effect of cadmium sulfide nanorod content on Freedericksz threshold voltage, splay and bend elastic constants in liquid-crystal nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayek, Prasenjit; Karan, Santanu; Kundu, Sudarshan; Lee, Seung Hee; Das Gupta, Sudeshna; Roy, Soumen Kumar; Roy, Subir Kumar

    2012-06-01

    This report describes how doping liquid crystals (LC) with rod-like hexagonal semiconductor nanoprisms alters the dielectric and elastic properties of the composites as compared with a pristine nematic liquid crystal (NLC). Cadmium sulfide nanorods were synthesized via the solvothermal process and blended with a NLC. Nanorods were highly miscible with NLC and produced a topological defect-free texture up to a certain limit. A good dark state was achieved during the homeotropic configuration of the cell within that limit. Appreciable changes in splay and bend elastic constants of the LCs were observed after blending with nanorods. Long-range order was established in the hybrid system, and consequently the anisotropy was increased. The threshold voltage decreased dramatically by ˜31%. Dielectric study revealed a high-frequency mode, which might be due to anchoring of the LC with nanorods.

  16. Effects of water and polymer content on covalent amide-linked adduct formation in peptide-containing amorphous lyophiles.

    PubMed

    DeHart, Michael P; Anderson, Bradley D

    2012-09-01

    Deamidation of asparagine-containing proteins and peptides results in the formation of hydrolysis products via a reactive succinimide intermediate. In amorphous lyophile formulations at low water content, nucleophilic amine groups in neighboring molecules can effectively compete with water for reaction with the succinimide intermediate resulting in the formation of a variety of covalent amide-linked adducts. This study examines the effects of changes in percentage of a polymeric excipient [hypromellose (HPMC)] and water content on the degradants formed from a model asparaginyl peptide (Gly-Phe-L-Asn-Gly) in amorphous solids also containing an excess of Gly-Val and carbonate buffer and stored at 40°C. Degradation of Gly-Phe-L-Asn-Gly and formation of succinimide intermediates, aspartyl peptides, and covalent amide-linked adducts were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography. In all formulations and storage conditions, the formation kinetics of aspartyl hydrolysis products and covalent adducts could be described by a mechanism-based model that assigned a central role to the succinimide intermediate. Increasing the percentage of HPMC (i.e., reactant dilution) favored the formation of hydrolysis products over covalent amide-linked adducts, consistent with the bimolecular nature of covalent adduct formation. Increases in water content as relative humidity (RH) was varied from 33% to 75% produced orders-of-magnitude increases in the rate constants for succinimide formation and hydrolysis with both becoming nearly constant at high water contents. A bell-shaped profile for the dependence of the rate of covalent adduct formation on water content was observed, a result that may be indicative of phase separation at higher RHs. PMID:22437444

  17. An index for plant water deficit based on root-weighted soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianchu; Li, Sen; Zuo, Qiang; Ben-Gal, Alon

    2015-03-01

    Governed by atmospheric demand, soil water conditions and plant characteristics, plant water status is dynamic, complex, and fundamental to efficient agricultural water management. To explore a centralized signal for the evaluation of plant water status based on soil water status, two greenhouse experiments investigating the effect of the relative distribution between soil water and roots on wheat and rice were conducted. Due to the significant offset between the distributions of soil water and roots, wheat receiving subsurface irrigation suffered more from drought than wheat under surface irrigation, even when the arithmetic averaged soil water content (SWC) in the root zone was higher. A significant relationship was found between the plant water deficit index (PWDI) and the root-weighted (rather than the arithmetic) average SWC over root zone. The traditional soil-based approach for the estimation of PWDI was improved by replacing the arithmetic averaged SWC with the root-weighted SWC to take the effect of the relative distribution between soil water and roots into consideration. These results should be beneficial for scheduling irrigation, as well as for evaluating plant water consumption and root density profile.

  18. Effect of water content on strontium retardation factor and distribution coefficient in Chinese loess.

    PubMed

    Huo, Lijuan; Qian, Tianwei; Hao, Junting; Liu, Hongfang; Zhao, Dongye

    2013-12-01

    results illustrated that water content must be taken into account in determining radionuclide Rd values in Chinese loess, while Kd values can be derived from the unsaturated column experiments and can be considered constant at various levels of θ. PMID:24047556

  19. Radiocarbon Content of Intermediate Waters off West Sumatra During the Last 45,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pol-Holz, R.; Mohtadi, M.; Southon, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon content of intermediate waters originating from the Southern Ocean is held as a likely smoking gun of the events that triggered the atmospheric CO2 rise and its radiocarbon decline during the last glacial-interglacial transition. Late Glacial depleted radiocarbon water masses have been found at intermediate depths off the coast of Baja California, the Galapagos, the Arabian Sea, but not unequivocally elsewhere. Knowing the route of the old water is therefore central for the required mechanistic linkage of Southern Ocean processes and the atmospheric response. A common approach to search for the old water reservoir is the radiocarbon difference between planktonic and benthic foraminifera or 'apparent ventilation age'. Caveats of this approach are due to the fact that it relies strongly on the knowledge of the surface water reservoir age. In this study, we present a high-resolution radiocarbon difference between surface and intermediate depth waters off west Sumatra in the attempt to elucidate a possible route of the old water from its hypothetical source in the high latitudes near Antarctica on its way to the lower latitude sites where it has been observed. Samples come from core SO189-39KL (0°47'S, 99°55'E, 517 m), a 1350 cm hemipelagic sedimentary sequence that spans the last 45,000 years. Radiocarbon determinations were made at centennial time resolution on both planktonic and benthic species. Calibration of the planktonic radiocarbon as age control points allowed us to infer the Δ14C of the intermediate waters. Our results show that throughout the LGM and the entire deglaciation, radiocarbon content of intermediate depths in the area remained with an almost constant age difference with the contemporaneous atmosphere. Unless we have grossly underestimated the local planktonic reservoir age, our results discard this area as a probable route for the spreading of the old water along its way to northern latitudes. In light of recent evidence from the

  20. Soil water content and water supply of plants in the southern Crimea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudnitsyn, I. I.

    2008-01-01

    In cinnamonic soils of the Nikitsky Botanical Garden (Crimea), the average productive water reserves (WR) under different plants in 1981-1990 exhibited close correlation with the field water capacity (FC) and the productive moisture range, which is equal to the difference between the FC and the permanent wilting point (WP). The soil water content (SWC) regularly increased with the depth. An 8-year-long variation cycle of the meteorological conditions and the WR was revealed. A correlation between the WR and the precipitation was noted. The relationship of the occurrence frequencies of the FC and WR with their values was analogous to the Maxwell distribution close to the normal (Gaussian) distribution.

  1. Understanding the bias between moisture content by oven drying and water content by Karl Fischer titration at moisture equilibrium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple causes of the difference between equilibrium moisture and water content have been found. The errors or biases were traced to the oven drying procedure to determine moisture content. The present paper explains the nature of the biases in oven drying and how it is possible to suppress one ...

  2. Multiscale Bayesian neural networks for soil water content estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Raghavendra B.; Mohanty, Binayak P.; Springer, Everett P.

    2008-08-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN) have been used for some time now to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from other available or more easily measurable soil properties. However, most such uses of ANNs as pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been at matching spatial scales (1:1) of inputs and outputs. This approach assumes that the outputs are only required at the same scale as the input data. Unfortunately, this is rarely true. Different hydrologic, hydroclimatic, and contaminant transport models require soil hydraulic parameter data at different spatial scales, depending upon their grid sizes. While conventional (deterministic) ANNs have been traditionally used in these studies, the use of Bayesian training of ANNs is a more recent development. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian framework to derive soil water retention function including its uncertainty at the point or local scale using PTFs trained with coarser-scale Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO)-based soil data. The approach includes an ANN trained with Bayesian techniques as a PTF tool with training and validation data collected across spatial extents (scales) in two different regions in the United States. The two study areas include the Las Cruces Trench site in the Rio Grande basin of New Mexico, and the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) hydrology experimental region in Oklahoma. Each region-specific Bayesian ANN is trained using soil texture and bulk density data from the SSURGO database (scale 1:24,000), and predictions of the soil water contents at different pressure heads with point scale data (1:1) inputs are made. The resulting outputs are corrected for bias using both linear and nonlinear correction techniques. The results show good agreement between the soil water content values measured at the point scale and those predicted by the Bayesian ANN-based PTFs for both the study sites. Overall, Bayesian ANNs coupled with nonlinear bias correction are found to be very suitable tools for deriving soil

  3. Correlation among Cirrus Ice Content, Water Vapor and Temperature in the TTL as Observed by CALIPSO and Aura-MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flury, T.; Wu, D. L.; Read, W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) has a local radiative cooling effect. As a source for ice in cirrus clouds, however, it can also indirectly produce infrared heating. Using NASA A-Train satellite measurements of CALIPSO and Aura/MLS we calculated the correlation of water vapor, ice water content and temperature in the TTL. We find that temperature strongly controls water vapor (correlation r =0.94) and cirrus clouds at 100 hPa (r = -0.91). Moreover we observe that the cirrus seasonal cycle is highly (r =-0.9) anticorrelated with the water vapor variation in the TTL, showing higher cloud occurrence during December-January-February. We further investigate the anticorrelation on a regional scale and find that the strong anticorrelation occurs generally in the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone). The seasonal cycle of the cirrus ice water content is also highly anticorrelated to water vapor (r = -0.91) and our results support the hypothesis that the total water at 100 hPa is roughly constant. Temperature acts as a main regulator for balancing the partition between water vapor and cirrus clouds. Thus, to a large extent, the depleting water vapor in the TTL during DJF is a manifestation of cirrus formation.

  4. A global sensitivity analysis of crop virtual water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamea, S.; Tuninetti, M.; D'Odorico, P.; Laio, F.; Ridolfi, L.

    2015-12-01

    The concepts of virtual water and water footprint are becoming widely used in the scientific literature and they are proving their usefulness in a number of multidisciplinary contexts. With such growing interest a measure of data reliability (and uncertainty) is becoming pressing but, as of today, assessments of data sensitivity to model parameters, performed at the global scale, are not known. This contribution aims at filling this gap. Starting point of this study is the evaluation of the green and blue virtual water content (VWC) of four staple crops (i.e. wheat, rice, maize, and soybean) at a global high resolution scale. In each grid cell, the crop VWC is given by the ratio between the total crop evapotranspiration over the growing season and the crop actual yield, where evapotranspiration is determined with a detailed daily soil water balance and actual yield is estimated using country-based data, adjusted to account for spatial variability. The model provides estimates of the VWC at a 5x5 arc minutes and it improves on previous works by using the newest available data and including multi-cropping practices in the evaluation. The model is then used as the basis for a sensitivity analysis, in order to evaluate the role of model parameters in affecting the VWC and to understand how uncertainties in input data propagate and impact the VWC accounting. In each cell, small changes are exerted to one parameter at a time, and a sensitivity index is determined as the ratio between the relative change of VWC and the relative change of the input parameter with respect to its reference value. At the global scale, VWC is found to be most sensitive to the planting date, with a positive (direct) or negative (inverse) sensitivity index depending on the typical season of crop planting date. VWC is also markedly dependent on the length of the growing period, with an increase in length always producing an increase of VWC, but with higher spatial variability for rice than for

  5. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-01

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  6. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  7. Phase equilibria and distribution constants of metal ions in diantipyryl alkane-organic acid-hydrochloric acid-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtev, M. I.; Popova, O. N.; Yuminova, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of antipyrine and its derivatives (diantipyryl alkanes) to form separating systems in the presence of salicylic (sulfosalicylic) acid and hydrochloric acid and water is studied. The optimum volume of the organic phase, the composition of complexes, and the mechanism for the distribution of metal ions are determined, depending on the concentrations of the main components and the salting-out agent. The complex distribution and extraction constants are calculated.

  8. Electrostatic field-exposed water in nanotube at constant axial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuchi; Sun, Gang; Koga, Kenichiro; Xu, Limei

    2014-10-01

    Water confined within nanoscale geometries under external field has many interesting properties which is very important for its application in biological processes and engineering. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of external fields on polarization and structure as well as phase transformations of water confined within carbon nanotubes. We find that dipoles of water molecules tend to align along external field in nanoscale cylindrical confinement. Such alignment directly leads to the longitudinal electrostriction and cross-sectional dilation of water in nanotube. It also influences the stability of ice structures. As the electrostatic field strengthens, the confined water undergoes phase transitions from a prism structure to a helical one to a single chain as the electrostatic field strengthens. These results imply a rich phase diagram of the confined water due to the presence of external electriostatic field, which can be of importance for the industrial applications in nanopores.

  9. Electrostatic field-exposed water in nanotube at constant axial pressure

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuchi; Sun, Gang; Koga, Kenichiro; Xu, Limei

    2014-01-01

    Water confined within nanoscale geometries under external field has many interesting properties which is very important for its application in biological processes and engineering. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of external fields on polarization and structure as well as phase transformations of water confined within carbon nanotubes. We find that dipoles of water molecules tend to align along external field in nanoscale cylindrical confinement. Such alignment directly leads to the longitudinal electrostriction and cross-sectional dilation of water in nanotube. It also influences the stability of ice structures. As the electrostatic field strengthens, the confined water undergoes phase transitions from a prism structure to a helical one to a single chain as the electrostatic field strengthens. These results imply a rich phase diagram of the confined water due to the presence of external electriostatic field, which can be of importance for the industrial applications in nanopores. PMID:25318649

  10. Improved SPC force field of water based on the dielectric constant: SPC/ ε

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Azcatl, Raúl; Mendoza, Noé; Alejandre, José

    2015-02-01

    In a recent work, Fuentes and Alejandre (2014) found that for TIP4P models there is a dipole moment of minimum density at 240 K and that the Lennard-Jones parameters can be adjusted to match the experimental dielectric constant at 300 K and the temperature of maximum density, respectively. The same procedure is used in this work to re-parameterize the simple point charge (SPC) model keeping the original geometry. The new model fails to reproduce the experimental self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity but improves the results at different temperatures and pressures of dielectric constant, isothermal compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient, surface tension, coexisting densities at the liquid-vapor interface, equation of state of ice Ih and equation of state of liquids at high pressures. A second model that reproduces the dielectric constant, self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity is proposed but the temperature of maximum density is 250 K, compared with the experimental value of 277 K. Both models improve the SPC/E results for almost all properties. The TIP3P model was also analyzed but the liquid density at 240 K always increases and a minimum in the dipole moment was not found. It is not possible to adjust for that model the charge distribution and short range interaction parameters to reproduce at the same time the target properties.

  11. Estimation of soil water content for engineering and agricultural applications using ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, Katherine Rose

    2003-10-01

    Near-surface water content is important for a variety of applications in engineering, agriculture, ecology, and environmental monitoring and is an essential input parameter for hydrological and atmospheric models. Water content is both spatially and temporally variable and is difficult to characterize using conventional measurement techniques, which are invasive, time-consuming to collect, and provide only a limited number of point measurements. The purpose of this study is to investigate ground penetrating radar (GPR) techniques for improved estimation of water content. GPR techniques have potential for providing accurate, high-resolution estimates of water content quickly and non-invasively, but the efficacy of these techniques for field-scale applications has not been previously determined. This study begins with a literature review of the application of GPR techniques for water content estimation, followed by a description of the principles employed in GPR surveying and the general methodology for converting electromagnetic GPR measurements to water content estimates. Next, a pilot experiment using GPR techniques for water content estimation is described; this experiment was performed under very controlled conditions and used common-offset GPR reflections to estimate the water content in sandy test pits. This experiment showed that GPR techniques can estimate water content very accurately (within 0.017 cm3/cm3 of the volumetric water content estimates obtained gravimetrically) and provided motivation for the second, less-controlled experiment. The second study used common-offset GPR reflections to estimate water content in a transportation engineering application, where the GPR data were used to monitor the water content in sub-asphalt aggregate layers and to estimate deformation under dynamic loading. This experiment showed that GPR data could be used to accurately monitor changes in the horizontal and vertical distributions of sub-asphalt water content with

  12. Test of prototype liquid-water-content meter for aircraft use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Hermann E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the effort undertaken to meet the objectives of National Science Foundation Grant ATM-9207345 titled 'Test of Prototype Liquid-Water-Content Meter for Aircraft Use.' Three activities were proposed for testing the new aircraft instrument, PVM-100A: (1) Calibrate the PVM-100A in a facility where the liquid-water-content (LWC) channel, and the integrated surface area channel (PSA) could be compared to standard means for LWC and PSA measurements. Scaling constant for the channels were to be determined in this facility. The fog/wind tunnel at ECN, Petten, The Netherlands was judged the most suitable facility for this effort. (2) Expose the PVM-100A to high wind speeds similar to those expected on research aircraft, and test the anti-icing heaters on the PVM-100A under typical icing conditions expected in atmospheric clouds. The high-speed icing tunnel at NRC, Ottawa, Canada was to be utilized. (3) Operate the PVM-100A on an aircraft during cloud penetrations to determine its stability and practicality for such measurements. The C-131A aircraft of the University of Washington was the aircraft of opportunity for these-tests, which were to be conducted during the 4-week Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June of 1992.

  13. Complex dielectric constant well logging means and method for determining the water saturation and the water resistivity of an earth formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.C.; Cox, P.T.; Simpson, R.S.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes a well logging system for determining the water saturation of an earth formation and the resistivity of the water comprising: means for transmitting electromagnetic energy at a frequency lying within a range of frequencies from 10 MHz to 200 MHz into the earth formation from a borehole traversing the earth formation, means for receiving electromagnetic energies at two locations in the borehole from the earth formation, means for deriving a complex dielectric constant from the received electromagnetic energies, and means for deriving the water resistivity and the water saturation of the earth formation in accordance with a predetermined porosity of the earth formation and with the real and imaginary parts of the derived complex dielectric constant.

  14. 17O nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of water bound to a metal ion: A gadolinium(III) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazyev, Oleg V.; Helm, Lothar

    2006-08-01

    Rotational correlation times of metal ion aqua complexes can be determined from O17 NMR relaxation rates if the quadrupole coupling constant of the bound water oxygen-17 nucleus is known. The rotational correlation time is an important parameter for the efficiency of Gd3+ complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. Using a combination of density functional theory with classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations we performed a computational study of the O17 quadrupole coupling constants in model aqua ions and the [Gd(DOTA)(H2O)]- complex used in clinical diagnostics. For the inner sphere water molecule in the [Gd(DOTA)(H2O)]- complex the determined quadrupole coupling parameter χ√1+η2/3 of 8.7MHz is very similar to that of the liquid water (9.0MHz ). Very close values were also predicted for the the homoleptic aqua ions of Gd3+ and Ca2+. We conclude that the O17 quadrupole coupling parameters of water molecules coordinated to closed shell and lanthanide metal ions are similar to water molecules in the liquid state.

  15. Field calibration accuracy and utility for four down-hole water content sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water balance studies aimed at determining crop water use, spatial variability of water use, profile water content, and changes in stored water demand accurate soil water determinations that are representative across at least field sized areas. Several capacitance and other electromagnetic (EM)...

  16. Oblique wave-free potentials for water waves in constant finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Rajdeep; Basu, Uma; Mandal, B. N.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method to construct oblique wave-free potentials in the linearised theory of water waves for water with uniform finite depth is presented in a systematic manner. The water has either a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a thin elastic plate. For the case of free surface, the effect of surface tension may be neglected or taken into account. Here, the wave-free potentials are singular solutions of the modified Helmholtz equation, having singularity at a point in the fluid region and they satisfy the conditions at the upper surface and the bottom of water region and decay rapidly away from the point of singularity. These are useful in obtaining solutions to oblique water wave problems involving bodies with circular cross-sections such as long horizontal cylinders submerged or half-immersed in water of uniform finite depth with a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a floating elastic plate. Finally, the forms of the upper surface related to the wave-free potentials constructed here are depicted graphically in a number of figures to visualize the wave motion. The results for non-oblique wave-free potentials and the upper surface wave-free potentials are obtained. The wave-free potentials constructed here will be useful in the mathematical study of water wave problems involving infinitely long horizontal cylinders, either half-immersed or completely immersed in water.

  17. Modeling soil water content for vegetation modeling improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, Carmen; Buri, Aline; Zingg, Barbara; Vittoz, Pascal; Verrecchia, Eric; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is known to be important for plants as it affects the physiological processes regulating plant growth. Therefore, SWC controls plant distribution over the Earth surface, ranging from deserts and grassland to rain forests. Unfortunately, only a few data on SWC are available as its measurement is very time consuming and costly and needs specific laboratory tools. The scarcity of SWC measurements in geographic space makes it difficult to model and spatially project SWC over larger areas. In particular, it prevents its inclusion in plant species distribution model (SDMs) as predictor. The aims of this study were, first, to test a new methodology allowing problems of the scarcity of SWC measurements to be overpassed and second, to model and spatially project SWC in order to improve plant SDMs with the inclusion of SWC parameter. The study was developed in four steps. First, SWC was modeled by measuring it at 10 different pressures (expressed in pF and ranging from pF=0 to pF=4.2). The different pF represent different degrees of soil water availability for plants. An ensemble of bivariate models was built to overpass the problem of having only a few SWC measurements (n = 24) but several predictors to include in the model. Soil texture (clay, silt, sand), organic matter (OM), topographic variables (elevation, aspect, convexity), climatic variables (precipitation) and hydrological variables (river distance, NDWI) were used as predictors. Weighted ensemble models were built using only bivariate models with adjusted-R2 > 0.5 for each SWC at different pF. The second step consisted in running plant SDMs including modeled SWC jointly with the conventional topo-climatic variable used for plant SDMs. Third, SDMs were only run using the conventional topo-climatic variables. Finally, comparing the models obtained in the second and third steps allowed assessing the additional predictive power of SWC in plant SDMs. SWC ensemble models remained very good, with

  18. Modeling of total water content in cotton before and after cleaning with the shirley analyzer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Shirley analyzer is used worldwide to measure nonlint content in cotton. The aim of this study was to build and test a model of the difference in total water content in cotton before cleaning (i.e., raw cotton) and after cleaning with the Shirley analyzer. First, the total water content in cot...

  19. [Comparison of conductivity-water content curve and visual methods for ascertaintation of the critical water content of O/W microemulsions formation].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Da-wei; Tang, Tian-tian; Peng, Jin-fei; Li, Lan-lin; Sun, Xiao-bo; Xiang, Da-xiong

    2010-08-01

    This study is to screen 23 blank O/W type microemulsion (ME) samples, that is 15 samples from our laboratory, and 8 samples from literature; compare the conductivity-water content curve (CWCC) method and visual method in determining the critical water content during O/W type MEs' formation, to analyze the deficiency and the feasibility of visual method and to exploxe scientific meanings of CWCC method in judging the critical water content of O/W type MEs during formation. The results show that there is a significant difference between the theoretical feasible CWCC method and visual method in determining the critical water content (P<0.001), and the results judged by conductivity is higher than that by eye-based water content. Therefore, this article firmly confirmed the shortcomings of visual method and suggested that the eye-base "critical water content" may falls into continuous ME stage during O/W MEs' formation. Further more, the CWCC method has theoretical feasibility and scientific meanings in determining the critical water content of O/W type MEs during formation. PMID:21351595

  20. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter of maize during water stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Judge, Jasmeet; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Microwave emission and backscatter of vegetated surfaces are influenced by vegetation water content (VWC), which varies in response to availability of soil moisture in the root zone. Understanding the influence of diurnal VWC dynamics on radar backscatter will improve soil moisture retrievals using microwave remote sensing, and will provide insight into the potential use for radar to directly monitor vegetation water status. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of diurnal variation in VWC of an agricultural canopy on backscatter for different radar configurations. Water stress was induced in a corn (Zea mays) canopy near Citra, Florida, between September 1 and October 20, 2013. Diurnal destructive samples from the canopy were collected to determine leaf, stalk and total VWC. Water stress was quantified by calculating the evaporation deficit and measuring the soil water tension. The water-cloud model was used to model the influence of VWC and soil moisture variations on backscatter for a range of frequencies, polarizations and incidence angles. Furthermore, radar backscatter time series was simulated to show the effect of water stress on the diurnal variation in backscatter due to VWC. Results of this study show the very significant effects that VWC dynamics have on radar backscatter. We also highlight the potential for vegetation and soil water status monitoring using microwave remote sensing.

  1. Cloud Liquid Water Content Variability over the Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandalgaonkar, S. S.; Padma Kumari, B.; Kulkarni, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the aircraft measurements of liquid water content (LWC) which are taken during three different missions organized by Institutes ongoing CAIPEEX project. The three missions are Pathankot (32.2250N, 75.6340E); Hyderabad (17.4480N,78.3810E,) and Bangalore (13.1350N, 77.6150E) respectively. The LWC data is collected for fifteen flight days at the above locations. Each second LWC values are analyzed to study their vertical and frequency distribution. The preliminary results of this study show that the nature of LWC profile at above three locations is same showing the average LWC as 0.28, 0.33 and .036 gm m-3 respectively. The range of LWC varies at all three locations. It is minimum at Pathankot and maximum at Bangalore. The LWC values are compared with the adiabatic values at the same temperature, pressure and humidity conditions. The analysis shows consistent small adiabatic fraction in all the cases. The horizontal and vertical distributions of LWC have been studied. In the horizontal a large spread has been observed. The maximum LWC has been found to increase steeply over Pathankot and gently over Bangalore.

  2. Disinfection associated spoilage of high water content ionic matrix hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sack, R A; Harvey, H; Nunes, I

    1989-01-01

    Chemical analysis was carried out on clinically obtained hazy white hydrogel lenses that had been exposed to hydrogen peroxide disinfection. Analysis revealed that hazing was a surface phenomenon limited to high water content ionic matrix hydrogels (type IV), the type associated with the deposition of large amounts of lysozyme. We subjected unworn lenses to cycling studies involving doping in a variable artificial tear solution followed by exposure to disinfectant; this allowed us to duplicate the clinical situation and to derive a mechanism for this phenomenon. Hazing proved independent of the presence of hydrogen peroxide but dependent on the interaction of lens-bound lysozyme and stannate anion, the latter derived from sodium stannate present in the disinfectant as a stabilizing agent. Hazing is restricted to the type IV hydrogels because only these polymers have a sufficient number of anionic binding sites and are of sufficient porosity to allow the penetration and binding of a thick layer of lysozyme. Lysozyme is essential to hazing. No other tear protein is small enough to penetrate the hydrogel matrix or basic enough to have a marked affinity for the lens and to provide binding sites for stannate anion. These findings highlight the unique vulnerability of the type IV hydrogel to interaction with trace or transient ionic constituents in tears and lens care solutions. PMID:2720948

  3. Estimating Canopy Water Content of Chaparral Shrubs Using Optical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, Susan L.; Scheer, George; Castaneda, Claudia M.; Jacquemoud, Stephane; Roberts, Dar; Green, Robert O.

    1996-01-01

    California chaparral ecosystems are exceptionally fire adapted and typically are subject to wildfire at decadal to century frequencies. The hot dry Mediterranean climate summers and the chaparral communities of the Santa Monica Mountains make wildfire one of the most serious economic and life-threatening natural disasters faced by the region. Additionally, the steep fire-burned hillsides are subject to erosion, slumpage, and mud slides during the winter rains. The Santa Monica Mountain Zone (SMMZ) is a 104,000 ha eastwest trending range with 607 m of vertical relief and located in the center of the greater Los Angeles region. A series of fires in the fall of 1993 burned from Simi Valley to Santa Monica within a few hours. Developing techniques to monitor fire hazard and predict the spread of fire is of major concern to the region. One key factor in the susceptibility to fire is the water content of the vegetation canopy. The development of imaging spectrometry and remote sensing techniques may constitute a tool to provide this information.

  4. Water content and its effect on ultrasound propagation in concrete--the possibility of NDE

    PubMed

    Ohdaira; Masuzawa

    2000-03-01

    It is known that water content or moisture affects the strength of concrete. The purpose of this study is to examine the possibility of the NDE of concrete from a knowledge of the relationship between water content and ultrasonic propagation in concrete. The results of measurements made on the ultrasound velocity and the frequency component on ultrasonic propagation as a function of the water content in concrete are reported. Test pieces of concrete made from common materials were made for the fundamental studies. The test piece dimensions were 10 cm in diameter and 20 cm in length. Test pieces were immersed in water for about 50 days to saturate them. To measure the effect of different water contents, test pieces were put in a drying chamber to change the amount of water between measurements. This procedure was repeated until the concrete was completely dried and the weight no longer changed. Water contents were defined as weight percentage to full dried state. Thus water content could be changed from 8% to 0%. Using the pulse transmission method, ultrasonic propagation in the frequency range 20 to 100 kHz was measured as a function of water content. The sound velocity varied gradually from 3000 m/s to 4500 m/s according to the water content. The frequency of maximum transmission also depended on the water content in this frequency range. It is considered that the ultrasonic NDE of concrete strength is feasible. PMID:10829724

  5. Irrigation scheduling as affected by field capacity and wilting point water content from different data sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at field capacity and wilting point water content is critical information for irrigation scheduling, regardless of soil water sensor-based method (SM) or evapotranspiration (ET)-based method. Both methods require knowledge on site-specific and soil-specific Management Allowable De...

  6. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  7. Remote Sensing of Canopy Water Content: Scaling from Leaf Data to MODIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water in green vegetation is detectable using reflectances in the near infrared and shortwave infrared. Canopy water content is estimated from the product of leaf water content and leaf area index (LAI). The Normalized Difference Infrared Index [NDII = (R0.8 – R1.6)/(R0.8 + R1.6)] was found to ...

  8. Mantle Melting as a Function of Water Content in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, K. A.; Plank, T.; Newman, S.; Stolper, E.; Grove, T. L.; Parman, S.; Hauri, E.

    2003-12-01

    Subduction zone magmas are characterized by high concentrations of dissolved H2O, presumably derived from the subducted plate and ultimately responsible for melt generation in this tectonic setting. Almost ten years ago, Stolper and Newman (EPSL, 1994) illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of water (H2Oo) and the fraction of melting (F) in the mantle beneath the Mariana back-arc. Here we report new major element and volatile data for olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the Mariana Islands to test this relationship for melting beneath an arc. Basaltic melt inclusions from the Mariana arc have water contents (2.3-6.1 wt% H2O) significantly higher than all basaltic glasses or melt inclusions from the Mariana back-arc (0.2-2.2 wt% H2O). We use TiO2 as a proxy for F, after correcting for crystal fractionation, and evaluate the Ti source composition with a model based on Ti/Y variations in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). Each calculated F thus represents the amount of mantle melting for a single melting episode. Even after accounting for mantle depletion, the TiO2 concentrations in Mariana arc magmas record higher extents of mantle melting (F = 10-30%) than recorded in back-arc magmas (F = 5-24%). As a whole, the Mariana arc broadly extends the linear H2Oo-F array defined by the back-arc, although in detail the islands show important differences. Two islands from the Mariana arc (Guguan and Pagan) define a H2Oo-F slope similar to the Mariana back-arc, suggesting similar mantle potential temperature beneath the arc and back-arc ( ˜1360 +/- 20° C). Melts from Agrigan island, however, indicate a steeper slope suggestive both of cooler mantle beneath Agrigan and of along-strike thermal variations beneath the Mariana Islands. Both the arc and back-arc arrays project to finite F at zero water in the mantle, providing evidence for decompression melting in both settings. These relationships may be extended globally to other back-arc and arc systems

  9. GIAO-DFT isotropic magnetic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling of tartaric acid in water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fideles, Bruna; Oliveira, Leonardo B. A.; Colherinhas, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear isotropic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling for oxygen and carbons atoms of isomers of tartaric acid in gas phase and in water solutions by Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanics calculations using the GIAO-B3LYP approach. Solute polarization effects are included iteratively and play an important role in the quantitative determination of shielding constants. Our MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ results show substantial increases of the dipole moment in solution as compared with the gas phase results (61-221%). The solvent effects on the σ(13O) values are in general small. More appreciable solvent effects can be seen on the σ(17O) and J(Csbnd O).

  10. Determining the Influence of Soil Water Content Variability on GPR Measurements with Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Jens S.; Wollschläger, Ute; Schneider, Stefan; Roth, Kurt

    2010-05-01

    Soil water content in the vadose zone is a key quantity in the hydrological cycle. Atmospheric forcing and soil textural heterogeneity may lead to a high temporal and spatial variability of the soil water content. Due to the large difference between the dielectric permittivity of water and the further soil constituents soil matrix and air, soil water content can be observed using electromagnetic methods. GPR has become a widely used non-invasive method to investigate soil water content dynamics at scales ranging between a few meters and a few kilometers. In this study, the influence of soil water content variability on the GPR wave field is investigated quantitatively. We consider a two-dimensional model of a measurement site. Transient water content dynamics are simulated by numerical solutions of Richard's equation using rainfall measurements as atmospheric forcing. The resulting water content profiles are transformed into dielectric permittivity profiles by invoking the CRIM formula. For representative states of the permittivity distributions, GPR measurements are simulated numerically by solving Maxwell's equations. We show the effects on the GPR measurements for these states and for specific features of the water content distribution, for instance sharp infiltration fronts. In addition, we discuss the impact of the often made simplified assumption of a homogeneous permittivity distribution and the necessity to account for spatial soil water content variability in GPR evaluations.

  11. Remote sensing of leaf, canopy and vegetation water contents for satellite climate data records

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar water content is a dynamic quantity depending on water losses from transpiration and water uptake from the soil. Absorption of shortwave radiation by water is determined by various frequency overtones of fundamental bending and stretching molecular transitions. Leaf water potential and rela...

  12. Nanoconfined water under electric field at constant chemical potential undergoes electrostriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, Davide; Bratko, D.; Luzar, Alenka

    2014-02-01

    Electric control of nanopore permeation by water and solutions enables gating in membrane ion channels and can be exploited for transient surface tuning of rugged substrates, to regulate capillary permeability in nanofluidics, and to facilitate energy absorption in porous hydrophobic media. Studies of capillary effects, enhanced by miniaturization, present experimental challenges in the nanoscale regime thus making molecular simulations an important complement to direct measurement. In a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, exchange of water between the pores and environment requires modeling of coexisting confined and bulk phases, with confined water under the field maintaining equilibrium with the unperturbed environment. In the present article, we discuss viable methodologies for MD sampling in the above class of systems, subject to size-constraints and uncertainties of the barostat function under confinement and nonuniform-field effects. Smooth electric field variation is shown to avoid the inconsistencies of MD integration under abruptly varied field and related ambiguities of conventional barostatting in a strongly nonuniform interfacial system. When using a proper representation of the field at the border region of the confined water, we demonstrate a consistent increase in electrostriction as a function of the field strength inside the pore open to a field-free aqueous environment.

  13. APPROXIMATION OF BIODEGRADATION RATE CONSTANTS FOR MONOAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (BTEX) IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two methods were used to approximate site-specific biodegradation rates of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes [BTEX]) dissolved in ground water. Both use data from monitoring wells and the hydrologic properties of the quifer to estimate a biode...

  14. Water dimer equilibrium constant calculation: A quantum formulation including metastable states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leforestier, Claude

    2014-02-01

    We present a full quantum evaluation of the water second virial coefficient B(T) based on the Takahashi-Imada second order approximation. As the associated trace Tr[e^{-β {H}_{AB}}-e^{-β {H}_{AB}^o}] is performed in the coordinate representation, it does also include contribution from the whole continuum, i.e., resonances and collision pairs of monomers. This approach is compared to a Path Integral Monte Carlo evaluation of this coefficient by Schenter [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 6573 (2002)] for the TIP4P potential and shown to give extremely close results in the low temperature range (250-450 K) reported. Using a recent ab initio flexible potential for the water dimer, this new formulation leads to very good agreement with experimental values over the whole range of temperatures available. The virial coefficient is then used in the well known relation Kp(T) = -(B(T) - bM)/RT where the excluded volume bM is assimilated to the second virial coefficient of pure water monomer vapor and approximated from the inner repulsive part of the interaction potential. This definition, which renders bM temperature dependent, allows us to retrieve the 38 cm3 mol-1 value commonly used, at room temperature. The resulting values for Kp(T) are in agreement with available experimental data obtained from infrared absorption spectra of water vapor.

  15. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  16. Near surface water content estimation using GPR data: investigations within California vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S.; Grote, K.; Lunt, I.; Rubin, Y.

    2003-04-01

    Detailed estimates of water content are necessary for variety of hydrogeological investigations. In viticulture applications, this information is particularly useful for assisting the design of both vineyard layout and efficient irrigation/agrochemical application. However, it is difficult to obtain sufficient information about the spatial variation of water content within the root zone using conventional point or wellbore measurements. We have investigated the applicability of ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods to estimate near surface water content within two California vineyard study sites: the Robert Mondavi Vineyard in Napa County and the Dehlinger Vineyard within Sonoma County. Our research at the winery study sites involves assessing the feasibility of obtaining accurate, non-invasive and dense estimates of water content and the changes in water content over space and time using both groundwave and reflected GPR events. We will present the spatial and temporal estimates of water content obtained from the GPR data at both sites. We will compare our estimates with conventional measurements of water content (obtained using gravimetric, TDR, and neutron probe techniques) as well as with soil texture and plant vigor measurements. Through these comparisons, we will illustrate the potential of GPR for providing reliable and spatially dense water content estimates and the linkages between water content, soil properties and ecosystem responses at the two study sites.

  17. Sensing the water content of honey from temperature-dependent electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenchuan; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Xinhua; Zhuang, Hong

    2011-08-01

    In order to predict the water content in honey, electrical conductivity was measured on blossom honey types milk-vetch, jujube and yellow-locust with the water content of 18-37% between 5 and 40 °C. The regression models of electrical conductivity were developed as functions of water content and temperature. The results showed that increases in either water content or temperature resulted in an increase in the electrical conductivity of honey with greater changes at higher water content and/or higher temperature. The linear terms of water content and temperature, a quadratic term of water content, and the interaction effect of water content and temperature had significant influence on the electrical conductivity of honey (p < 0.0001). Regardless of blossom honey type, the linear coefficient of the determination of measured and calculated electrical conductivities was 0.998 and the range error ratio was larger than 100. These results suggest that the electrical conductivity of honey might be used to develop a detector for rapidly predicting the water content in blossom honey.

  18. Effect of pressure on the dissociation constant of boric acid in water and seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.; Ward, Gary K.; Surdo, Antonio Lo; Huang, Fen

    2012-01-01

    The sound speeds of boric acid and sodium borate in water and 0.725 m NaCl have been measured from 0 to 50 °C and to near 1 molal. These results have been used to determine the partial molal adiabatic compressibilities of B(OH) 3 and NaB(OH) 4. The partial molal volumes, v¯(i), and compressibilities, κ¯(i), have been used to estimate the changes in the volume (Δ V) and compressibility (Δ κ) for the dissociation of boric acid in water and average seawater (0.725 m NaCl, SA ˜ 35 g/kg) B(OH)3+H2O=H++B(OH)4- where

  19. Predicting the reaction rate constants of micropollutants with hydroxyl radicals in water using QSPR modeling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models which predict hydroxyl radical rate constants (kOH) for a wide range of emerging micropollutants are a cost effective approach to assess the susceptibility of these contaminants to advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). A QSPR model for the prediction of kOH of emerging micropollutants from their physico-chemical properties was developed with special attention to model validation, applicability domain and mechanistic interpretation. In this study, 118 emerging micropollutants including those experimentally determined by the author and data collected from the literature, were randomly divided into the training set (n=89) and validation set (n=29). 951 DRAGON molecular descriptors were calculated for model development. The QSPR model was calibrated by applying forward multiple linear regression to the training set. As a result, 7 DRAGON descriptors were found to be important in predicting the kOH values which related to the electronegativity, polarizability, and double bonds, etc. of the compounds. With outliers identified and removed, the final model fits the training set very well and shows good robustness and internal predictivity. The model was then externally validated with the validation set showing good predictive power. The applicability domain of the model was also assessed using the Williams plot approach. Overall, the developed QSPR model provides a valuable tool for an initial assessment of the susceptibility of micropollutants to AOPs. PMID:26005810

  20. Rate Constant and Reaction Coordinate of Trp-Cage Folding in Explicit Water

    PubMed Central

    Juraszek, Jarek; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    We report rate constant calculations and a reaction coordinate analysis of the rate-limiting folding and unfolding process of the Trp-cage mini-protein in explicit solvent using transition interface sampling. Previous transition path sampling simulations revealed that in this (un)folding process the protein maintains its compact configuration, while a (de)increase of secondary structure is observed. The calculated folding rate agrees reasonably with experiment, while the unfolding rate is 10 times higher. We discuss possible origins for this mismatch. We recomputed the rates with the forward flux sampling method, and found a discrepancy of four orders of magnitude, probably caused by the method's higher sensitivity to the choice of order parameter with respect to transition interface sampling. Finally, we used the previously computed transition path-sampling ensemble to screen combinations of many order parameters for the best model of the reaction coordinate by employing likelihood maximization. We found that a combination of the root mean-square deviation of the helix and of the entire protein was, of the set of tried order parameters, the one that best describes the reaction coordination. PMID:18676648

  1. Water dimer equilibrium constant calculation: A quantum formulation including metastable states

    SciTech Connect

    Leforestier, Claude

    2014-02-21

    We present a full quantum evaluation of the water second virial coefficient B(T) based on the Takahashi-Imada second order approximation. As the associated trace Tr[e{sup −βH{sub A}{sub B}}−e{sup −βH{sub A}{sub B}{sup o}}] is performed in the coordinate representation, it does also include contribution from the whole continuum, i.e., resonances and collision pairs of monomers. This approach is compared to a Path Integral Monte Carlo evaluation of this coefficient by Schenter [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 6573 (2002)] for the TIP4P potential and shown to give extremely close results in the low temperature range (250–450 K) reported. Using a recent ab initio flexible potential for the water dimer, this new formulation leads to very good agreement with experimental values over the whole range of temperatures available. The virial coefficient is then used in the well known relation K{sub p}(T) = −(B(T) − b{sub M})/RT where the excluded volume b{sub M} is assimilated to the second virial coefficient of pure water monomer vapor and approximated from the inner repulsive part of the interaction potential. This definition, which renders b{sub M} temperature dependent, allows us to retrieve the 38 cm{sup 3} mol{sup −1} value commonly used, at room temperature. The resulting values for K{sub p}(T) are in agreement with available experimental data obtained from infrared absorption spectra of water vapor.

  2. Effect of water content on partial ternary phase diagram water-in-diesel microemulsion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukayat, Hastinatun; Badri, Khairiah Haji; Raman, Ismail Ab.; Ramli, Suria

    2014-09-01

    Introduction of water in the fuel gave a significant effect to the reduction of pollutant such as NOx emission. In this work, water/diesel microemulsion fuels were prepared using compositional method by mixing water and diesel in the presence of non-ionic surfactant and co-surfactant. The effects of water composition on the partial ternary phase diagram were studied at 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% (w/w). The physical stability of the microemulsion was investigated at 45°C over a period of one month. The optimum formulae obtained were diesel/T80/1-penthanol/water 60:20:15:5 wt% (System 1), 55:20:15:10 wt% (System 2), 50:20:15:15 wt% (System 3) and 45:20:15:20 wt% (System 4). Physicochemical characterizations of optimum formulae were studied. The results showed that water content has a significant effect to the formation of microemulsion, its stability, droplet size and viscosity.

  3. The NOAA Water Instrument: A Two-Channel, Tunable Diode Laser-Based Hygrometer for Measurement of Water Vapor and Cirrus Cloud Ice Water Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed-phase) from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. Combining the measurements from the two channels allows the determination of cloud ice water content (IWC), an important metric for evaluating the radiative properties of cirrus clouds. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An on-board calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cirrus IWC sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on board the Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1 σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol/mol), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33-48 for ice particles larger than 8 µm in diameter, depending primarily

  4. Derivation of Volumetric Liquid Water Content from the RADARSAT-1 SAR Images over a Permafrost Region in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewuyi, A. A.; Zhou, X.

    2014-12-01

    The empirical adopted integral equation model (EA-IEM) is implemented as a promising algorithm for liquid water content from the microwave data over a bare soil and sparsely vegetated conditions. The EA-IEM provides simplified mathematical expressions to calculate the soil dielectric constant. The Newton-Rhapson iteration is used to generate the calibrated rms height and calibrated correlation length by using the absolute difference between the calculated liquid water content (LWC) and the measured liquid water content. The absolute difference is less than the threshold value set to 1e-8. The calibrated rms height shows a constant value of 0.02 m while the calibrated correlation length varies for different sample points. A simple exponential regression model is established between the calibrated correlation length values and the backscattering coefficient observations. In addition, the regression model is incorporated into the EA-IEM as a robust way in determining the roughness parameters for retrieval of LWC over a large area. Liquid water content is then calculated directly from radar backscattering coefficient without iteration. Seven strategies were adopted to calibrate and validate the two NCRS-SCAN sites: Nenana and Ward Farm. A comparison between the predicted LWC and the measurements is performed for each strategy, and the root-mean-square (rms) error is found to be 3.60%, suggesting that the strategy one performs well compared to other strategies. All these strategies indicate that the EA-IEM can be used to retrieve soil moisture under the tested range of model parameters: incidence angles between 10o and 60o, surface rms height from 10 to 25 mm, and correlation length from 30 to 100 mm.

  5. Determination of rate constants and half-lives for the simultaneous biodegradation of several cyanobacterial metabolites in Australian source waters.

    PubMed

    Ho, Lionel; Tang, Tim; Hoefel, Daniel; Vigneswaran, Bala

    2012-11-01

    The fate of five cyanobacterial metabolites was assessed in water sourced from Lake Burragorang (Warragamba Dam) in New South Wales, Australia. All of the studied metabolites were shown to be biodegradable in this water source. For some metabolites, biodegradation was influenced by factors, including temperature, location (within the water body) and seasonal variations. The biodegradation of the metabolites was shown to follow pseudo-first-order kinetics with rate constants ranging from 8.0 × 10(-4) to 1.3 × 10(-2) h(-1). Half-lives of the metabolites were also estimated and ranged from 2.2 to 36.1 d. The order of ease of biodegradability in this water source followed the trend: microcystin-LR ≥ cylindrospermopsin > saxitoxins > geosmin ≥ 2-methylisoborneol. The lack of detection of the mlrA gene during microcystin biodegradation suggests that these toxins may be degraded via a different pathway. While no metabolite-degrading organisms were isolated in this study, the inoculation of previously isolated geosmin- and microcystin-degrading bacteria into Lake Burragorang water resulted in efficient biodegradation of the respective metabolites. For example, microcystin-degrading isolate TT25 was able to degrade three microcystin variants to concentrations below analytical detection within 24 h, suggesting that inoculation of such bacteria has the potential to enhance biodegradation in Lake Burragorang. PMID:22921397

  6. Visualization by light transmission of oil and water contents in transient two-phase flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, Christophe J. G.; Throop, James A.; DiCarlo, David A.; Rimmer, Alon; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Parlange, J.-Yves

    1998-06-01

    The difficulty of determining transient fluid contents in a soil-oil-water system is hampering an understanding of the system's flow characteristics. In this paper, we describe a light transmission method (LTM) which can rapidly obtain oil and water contents throughout a large two-dimensional flow field of silica sand. By appropriately coloring the water with 0.005% FD&C blue #1, the hue of the transmitted light is found to be directly related to the water content within the porous media. The hue provides a high resolution measurement of the water and oil contents in transient flow fields (such as unstable flow). Evaluation of the reliability of LTM was assessed by checking the mass balance for a known water injection and its utility in visualizing a whole flow field was exemplified for unstable fingered flow by comparing fluid contents to those obtained with synchrotron X-ray radiation.

  7. Aqueous solubility, Henry's law constants and air/water partition coefficients of n-octane and two halogenated octanes.

    PubMed

    Sarraute, S; Delepine, H; Costa Gomes, M F; Majer, V

    2004-12-01

    New data on the aqueous solubility of n-octane, 1-chlorooctane and 1-bromooctane are reported between 1 degree C and 45 degrees C. Henry's law constants, K(H), and air/water partition coefficients, K(AW), were calculated by associating the measured solubility values to vapor pressures taken from literature. The mole fraction aqueous solubility varies between (1.13-1.60)x10(-7) for n-octane with a minimum at approximately 23 degrees C, (3.99-5.07)x10(-7) for 1-chlorooctane increasing monotonically with temperature and (1.60-3.44)x10(-7) for 1-bromooctane with a minimum near 18 degrees C. The calculated air-water partition coefficients increase with temperature and are two orders of magnitude lower for the halogenated derivatives compared to octane. The precision of the results, taken as the average absolute deviations of the aqueous solubility, the Henry's law constants, or the air/water partition coefficients, from appropriate smoothing equations as a function of temperature is of 3% for n-octane and of 2% and 4% for 1-chlorooctane and 1-bromooctane, respectively. A new apparatus based on the dynamic saturation column method was used for the solubility measurements. Test measurements with n-octane indicated the capability of measuring solubilities between 10(-6) and 10(-10) in mole fraction, with an estimated accuracy better than +/-10%. A thorough thermodynamic analysis of converting measured data to air/water partition coefficients is presented. PMID:15519399

  8. Three-dimensional spatial and temporal monitoring of soil water content using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi You; Shimada, Jun; Sato, Akira

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a noninvasive method for monitoring three-dimensional (3-D) spatial and temporal variations of soil water content in the field, soil moisture tomography. The basic idea of the method originates from Archie's relationship between soil resistivity and water content. Initially, 88 electrodes were densely buried within a 3.5 m×3.5 m square area, and potentials at the electrodes were measured by pole-pole and Wenner array methods at given time intervals. An inversion calculation of the 3-D soil resistivity was then conducted based on these potential data. Next, 46 soil samples were taken at representative positions in the square, and the parameters in the Archie's relationship were measured in the laboratory. Then, the 3-D distributions of the parameters were obtained by a distance weight interpolation method. Finally, based on Archie's relationship and the 3-D distribution of the soil resistivity and the related parameters, 3-D distributions of soil water content were calculated. To evaluate the obtained water content, the calculated water contents were compared with those measured by heat-probe-type soil moisture sensors, and a comparison between the spatial distribution patterns of calculated water content and soil bulk dry density was conducted. The 3-D variations of the calculated water content during a rainfall event were also analyzed. The results show that there are ±0.10 cm3/cm3 errors in the calculated water content, but between the calculated and the measured water content there exists a good linear relationship. It is possible to use the calculated water content to analyze the very general 3-D distribution characteristics of the soil moisture and investigate the 3-D rainfall infiltration process, the redistribution of soil water after rain, and other hydrological processes in the field. The proposed method is preferred for porous media where the water resistivity is relatively stable.

  9. Mapping soil water content under sparse vegetation and changeable sky conditions: comparison of two thermal inertia approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo

    2013-01-01

    A critical analysis of a thermal inertia approach to map surface soil water content on bare and sparsely vegetated soils by means of remotely sensed data is reported. The study area is an experimental field located in Barrax, Spain. In situ data were acquired within the Barrax 2011 research project. An advanced hyperspectral scanner airborne imager provides images in the visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bands. Images were acquired both in day and night times by the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial between 12th and 13th of June 2011. The scene covers a corn irrigation pivot surrounded by bare soil, where a set of in situ data have been collected both previously and simultaneously to overpasses. To validate remotely sensed estimations, an ad hoc dataset has been produced by measuring spectra, radiometric temperatures, surface soil water content, and soil thermal properties. These data were collected on two transects covering bare and sparsely vegetated soils. This ground dataset was used (1) to verify if a thermal inertia method can be applied to map the water content on soil covered by sparse vegetation and (2) to quantify a correction factor accounting for solar radiation reduction due to sky cloudiness. The experiment intended to test a spatially constant and a spatially distributed approach to estimate the phase difference. Both methods were then applied to the airborne images collected during the following days to obtain the spatial distribution of surface soil water content. Results confirm that the thermal inertia method can be applied to sparsely vegetated soil characterized by low fractional cover if the solar radiation reaching the ground is accurately estimated. A spatially constant value of the phase difference allows a good assessment of thermal inertia, whereas the comparison with the three-temperature approach did not give conclusive responses. Results also show that clear sky, only at the time of the acquisition, does not provide

  10. Plasma osmolality, urine composition and tissue water content of the toad Bufo viridis Laur. in nature and under controlled laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Katz, U; Pagi, D; Hayat, S; Degani, G

    1986-01-01

    The compositions of plasma and urine were studied in toads (Bufo viridis) which were collected from three locations in Israel, and compared with toads which were kept under constant laboratory conditions for nearly 2 years. Plasma osmolality was rather constant (over 310 mOsm kg-1 H2O) during the whole year in the active toads. Urea was the most variable osmolyte in the plasma, and accounted for the higher osmolality in southern population. Urine osmolality fluctuated in a circannual fashion both in freshly captured and in the toads under constant laboratory conditions. Water content of the tissues was constant throughout the year, independent of the plasma osmolality. It is concluded that high plasma urea concentration and the excretory system (kidneys and the urinary bladder) are important in sustaining constant plasma osmolality in active toads. Both mechanisms change annually and form the basis for the high terrestriality of this species. PMID:2879673

  11. Electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene: Implications for the water content of the asthenosphere

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lidong; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of minerals is sensitive to water content and hence can be used to infer the water content in the mantle. However, previous studies to infer the water content in the upper mantle were based on pure olivine model of the upper mantle. Influence of other minerals particularly that of orthopyroxene needs to be included to obtain a better estimate of water content in view of the high water solubility in this mineral. Here we report new results of electrical conductivity measurements on orthopyroxene, and apply these results to estimate the water content of the upper mantle of Earth. We found that the electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene is enhanced by the addition of water in a similar way as other minerals such as olivine and pyrope garnet. Using these new results, we calculate the electrical conductivity of pyrolite mantle as a function of water content and temperature incorporating the temperature and water fugacity-dependent hydrogen partitioning. Reported values of asthenosphere conductivity of 4 × 10−2−10−1 S/m corresponds to the water content of 0.01–0.04 wt%, a result in good agreement with the petrological model of the upper mantle. PMID:20009379

  12. Electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene: implications for the water content of the asthenosphere.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lidong; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of minerals is sensitive to water content and hence can be used to infer the water content in the mantle. However, previous studies to infer the water content in the upper mantle were based on pure olivine model of the upper mantle. Influence of other minerals particularly that of orthopyroxene needs to be included to obtain a better estimate of water content in view of the high water solubility in this mineral. Here we report new results of electrical conductivity measurements on orthopyroxene, and apply these results to estimate the water content of the upper mantle of Earth. We found that the electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene is enhanced by the addition of water in a similar way as other minerals such as olivine and pyrope garnet. Using these new results, we calculate the electrical conductivity of pyrolite mantle as a function of water content and temperature incorporating the temperature and water fugacity-dependent hydrogen partitioning. Reported values of asthenosphere conductivity of 4x10(-2)-10(-1) S/m corresponds to the water content of 0.01-0.04 wt%, a result in good agreement with the petrological model of the upper mantle. PMID:20009379

  13. Influence of Water Content on the β-Sheet Formation, Thermal Stability, Water Removal, and Mechanical Properties of Silk Materials.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Kenjiro; Ishida, Kana; Masunaga, Hiroyasu; Hikima, Takaaki; Numata, Keiji

    2016-03-14

    Silk, which has excellent mechanical toughness and is lightweight, is used as a structural material in nature, for example, in silkworm cocoons and spider draglines. However, the industrial use of silk as a structural material has garnered little attention. For silk to be used as a structural material, its thermal processability and associated properties must be well understood. Although water molecules influence the glass transition of silk, the effects of water content on the other thermal properties of silks are not well understood. In this study, we prepared Bombyx mori cocoon raw fibers, degummed fibers, and films with different water contents and then investigated the effects of water content on crystallization, degradation, and water removal during thermal processing. Thermal gravimetric analyses of the silk materials showed that water content did not affect the thermal degradation temperature but did influence the water removal behavior. By increasing the water content of silk, the water molecules were removed at lower temperatures, indicating that the amount of free water in silk materials increased; additionally, the glass transition temperature decreased with increasing water plasticization. Differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray scattering of the silk films also suggested that the water molecules in the amorphous regions of the silk films acted as a plasticizer and induced β-sheet crystallization. The plasticizing effect of water was not detected in silk fibers, owing to their lower amorphous content and mobility. The structural and mechanical characterizations of the silk films demonstrated the silk film prepared at RH 97% realized both crystallinity and ductility simultaneously. Thus, the thermal stability, mechanical, and other properties of silk materials are regulated by their water content and crystallinity. PMID:26835719

  14. Prediction of water content at different potentials from soil property data in Jazan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alturki, Ali; Ibrahim, Hesham

    2016-04-01

    In dry regions effective irrigation management is crucial to maintain crop production and sustain limited water resources. Effective irrigation requires good knowledge of soil water content in the root zone. However, measurement of soil water in the root zone over time is extremely expensive and time consuming. On the other hand, weather and basic soil property data are more available, either from existing databases or by direct measurement in the field. Simulation models can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate soil water content and subsequent irrigation requirements based on the available weather and soil data. In this study we investigated three hierarchical approaches to predict water content at variable potentials (0, 10, 33, 60, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 kPa) using the Rosetta model: soil texture class (STC); percent of sand, silt, and clay (SSC); bulk density, percent of sand, silt, and clay, and water content measurements at 33 and 1500 kPa (SSC+WC). Estimation of soil water content at 43 locations in Jazan region using the three hierarchical approaches was compared with gravimetric water content. Results showed that the three approaches failed to describe water content accurately at saturation conditions (<10kPa). At water potentials lower than 10 kPa, good agreement was obtained, in general, between measured and simulated soil water content indicating that soil property data can be used to provide adequate estimates of the average soil water content in the root zone. The third approach gave the best results as indicated by an average NSCE value of 0.75 as compared to 0.16 and 0.18 for the first and second approaches, respectively. The ability to predict the amount of available water in the soil profile will facilitate the accurate estimate of irrigation requirements and achieve effective irrigation scheduling especially in locations where only limited weather and soil date are available.

  15. Structure Evolution of Ordered Mesoporous Carbons Induced by Water Content of Mixed Solvents Water/Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Liang, Shujun; Li, Zhenzhong; Zhai, Yan; Song, Yan

    2016-12-01

    In this work, mesostructure evolution of ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) from the 2-D hexagonal (space group p6mm) to the discontinuous cubic [Formula: see text], then towards the face-centered cubic lattice [Formula: see text], and finally, to the simple cubic Pm3n is achieved by simply adjusting the cosolvent water content of the mixed solvents water/ethanol in the presence of a reverse nonionic triblock copolymer and low molecular resin by evaporation-induced self-assembly method. Experimental results demonstrate that both the cosolvent and the reverse triblock copolymer play a key role in the mesophase transitions of OMCs. Furthermore, the OMCs with Pm3n symmetry are reported for the first time. Finally, the mechanism of mesostructure transition was discussed and proposed. PMID:27518232

  16. A polishing hybrid AER/UF membrane process for the treatment of a high DOC content surface water.

    PubMed

    Humbert, H; Gallard, H; Croué, J-P

    2012-03-15

    The efficacy of a combined AER/UF (Anion Exchange Resin/Ultrafiltration) process for the polishing treatment of a high DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon) content (>8 mgC/L) surface water was investigated at lab-scale using a strong base AER. Both resin dose and bead size had a significant impact on the kinetic removal of DOC for short contact times (i.e. <15 min). For resin doses higher than 700 mg/L and median bead sizes below 250 μm DOC removal remained constant after 30 min of contact time with very high removal rates (80%). Optimum AER treatment conditions were applied in combination with UF membrane filtration on water previously treated by coagulation-flocculation (i.e. 3 mgC/L). A more severe fouling was observed for each filtration run in the presence of AER. This fouling was shown to be mainly reversible and caused by the progressive attrition of the AER through the centrifugal pump leading to the production of resin particles below 50 μm in diameter. More important, the presence of AER significantly lowered the irreversible fouling (loss of permeability recorded after backwash) and reduced the DOC content of the clarified water to l.8 mgC/L (40% removal rate), concentration that remained almost constant throughout the experiment. PMID:22200260

  17. EVALUATION OF A TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY SLED FOR MAPPING SOIL WATER CONTENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid method for mapping soil water content would be valuable for agricultural and scientific applications such as precision irrigation. A sled type measurement device with a time domain reflectometer and global positioning system was evaluated for measuring soil water content following tillage. T...

  18. Field tests of a down-hole TDR profiling water content measurement system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate soil profile water content monitoring at multiple depths has previously been possible only using the neutron probe (NP), but with great effort and at unsatisfactory intervals. Despite the existence of several capacitance systems for profile water content measurements, accuracy and spatial r...

  19. Preliminary assestment of lint cotton water content in gin-drying temperature studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior studies to measure total water (free and bound) in lint cotton by Karl Fischer Titration showed the method is more accurate and precise than moisture content by standard oven drying. The objective of the current study was to compare the moisture and total water contents from five cultivars de...

  20. Upper Washita River experimental watersheds: Multiyear stability of soil water content profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scaling in situ soil water content time series data to a large spatial domain is a key element of watershed environmental monitoring and modeling. The primary method of estimating and monitoring large-scale soil water content distributions is via in situ networks. It is critical to establish the s...

  1. Antecedent Water Content Effects on Runoff and Sediment Yields From Two Coastal Plain Utisols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly-weathered, low-carbon, intensively cropped, drought-prone Coastal Plain soils of Georgia are susceptible to runoff and soil loss, especially at certain times of the year when soil water contents are elevated. Our objective was to quantify the effects of antecedent water content (AWC) on r...

  2. Comparison of Vegetation Water Content Estimates From WindSat and MODIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of soil moisture content by microwave remote sensing is important for quantifying the global energy, water and biogeochemical cycles. Vegetation water content (VWC, kg m-2) is one of the important parameters for retrieval of soil moisture using passive microwave radiometers. Liquid w...

  3. New parametric implementation of metamorphic reactions limited by water content, impact on exhumation along detachment faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezri, L.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Wolf, S.; Burov, E.

    2015-11-01

    Metamorphic phase changes have a strong impact on the physical and mechanical properties of rocks including buoyancy (body forces) and rheology (interface forces). As such, they exert important dynamic control on tectonic processes. It is generally assumed that phase changes are mainly controlled by pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions. Yet, in reality, whatever the PT conditions are, phase changes cannot take place without an adequate amount of the main reactant - water. In present day geodynamic models, the influence of water content is neglected. It is generally assumed that water is always available in quantities sufficient for thermodynamic reactions to take place at minimal Gibbs energy for given P and T conditions and a constant chemical composition. If this assumption was correct, no high-grade metamorphic rocks could to be found on the Earth's surface, since they would be retro-morphed to low-grade state during their exhumation. Indeed, petrologic studies point out that water, as a limiting reactant, is responsible for the lack of retrograde metamorphic reactions observed in the rocks exhumed in typical MCC contexts. In order to study the impact of fluid content on the structure of metamorphic core complexes, we have coupled a geodynamic thermo-mechanical code Flamar with a fluid-transport and water-limited thermodynamic phase transition algorithm. We have introduced a new parameterization of Darcy flow that is able to capture source/sink and transport aspects of fluid transport at the scale of the whole crust with a minimum of complexity. Within this model, phase transitions are controlled by pressure temperature and the local amount of free fluid that comes from both external (meteoric) and local (dehydration) sources. The numerical experiments suggest a strong positive feedback between the asymmetry of the tectonic structures and the depth of penetration of meteoric fluids. In particular, bending-stress distribution in asymmetric detachment zones

  4. Quantification of chemical states, dissociation constants and contents of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of biochars produced at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zaiming; Xiao, Xin; Chen, Baoliang; Zhu, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Surface functional groups such as carboxyl play a vital role in the environmental applications of biochar as a soil amendment. However, the quantification of oxygen-containing groups on a biochar surface still lacks systematical investigation. In this paper, we report an integrated method combining chemical and spectroscopic techniques that were established to quantitatively identify the chemical states, dissociation constants (pK(a)), and contents of oxygen-containing groups on dairy manure-derived biochars prepared at 100-700 °C. Unexpectedly, the dissociation pH of carboxyl groups on the biochar surface covered a wide range of pH values (pH 2-11), due to the varied structural microenvironments and chemical states. For low temperature biochars (≤ 350 °C), carboxyl existed not only as hydrogen-bonded carboxyl and unbonded carboxyl groups but also formed esters at the surface of biochars. The esters consumed OH(-) via saponification in the alkaline pH region and enhanced the dissolution of organic matter from biochars. For high temperature biochars (≥ 500 °C), esters came from carboxyl were almost eliminated via carbonization (ester pyrolysis), while lactones were developed. The surface density of carboxyl groups on biochars decreased sharply with the increase of the biochar-producing temperature, but the total contents of the surface carboxyls for different biochars were comparable (with a difference <3-fold) as a result of the expanded surface area at high pyrolytic temperatures. Understanding the wide pKa ranges and the abundant contents of carboxyl groups on biochars is a prerequisite to recognition of the multifunctional applications and biogeochemical cycling of biochars. PMID:25453912

  5. Determining the in situ water content of the Geysers Graywacke of Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, A.

    1994-12-01

    The water content, porosity and permeability measurements of the Northern California Geysers rocks are used to predict the lifetime of the geothermal resource, which provides 10% of Northern California`s electricity. The Geysers rock was drilled from defunct well SB-15-D, and some cores wee sealed in aluminum tubes to preserve the in situ water content. These cores were sent to the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to measure the water content. Humidity measurements were taken of the air around a one and a half foot encased core, recovered from a depth of 918.9 feet. Over a seven day period, the humidity reached almost 100% indicating that the air around the core was saturated in water vapor. We believe the sealing method is effective, preserving the in-situ water content. To measure water content, I will use Archimede`s principle to determine the density of the core before and after drying in an oven. Ultrasonic measurements will be taken of the core upon removal from aluminum tube to determine the change of p-wave velocity with change in water content. Water in the pores increases the effective compressibility of the rock therefore increasing the p-velocity. The measured p-wave velocities can then be used in the field to determine in-situ water content. Three dimensional x-ray images will be used to determine the deviations from average density within individual cores. Since the density depends on water content as well as mineralogy, images can show the location of pore fluid and drilling mud. Archimede`s principle, humidity detection, ultrasonics and x-ray scanning are viable methods to measure the in-situ water content and pore water distribution in the graywacke.

  6. Hyperfine coupling constants on inner-sphere water molecules of Gd(III)-based MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Gómez, David; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Helm, Lothar; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2012-11-12

    Herein we present a theoretical investigation of the hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) on the inner-sphere water molecules of [Gd(H(2)O)(8)](3+) and different Gd(III)-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents such as [Gd(DOTA)(H(2)O)](-), [Gd(DTPA)(H(2)O)](2-), [Gd(DTPA-BMA)(H(2)O)] and [Gd(HP-DO3A)(H(2)O)]. DFT calculations performed on the [Gd(H(2)O)(8)](3+) model system show that both hybrid-GGA functionals (BH&HLYP, B3PW91 and PBE1PBE) and the hybrid meta-GGA functional TPSSh provide (17)O HFCCs in close agreement with the experimental data. The use of all-electron relativistic approaches based on the DKH2 approximation and the use of relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) provide results of essentially the same quality. The accurate calculation of HFCCs on the [Gd(DOTA)(H(2)O)](-), [Gd(DTPA)(H(2)O)](2-), [Gd(DTPA-BMA)(H(2)O)] and [Gd(HP-DO3A)(H(2)O)] complexes requires an adequate description of solvent effects. This was achieved by using a mixed cluster/continuum approach that includes explicitly two second-sphere water molecules. The calculated isotropic (17)O HFCCs (A(iso)) fall within the range 0.40-0.56 MHz, and show deviations from the corresponding experimental values typically lower than 0.05 MHz. The A(iso) values are significantly affected by the distance between the oxygen atom of the coordinated water molecule and the Gd(III) ion, as well as by the orientation of the water molecule plane with respect to the Gd-O vector. (1)H HFCCs of coordinated water molecules and (17)O HFCCs of second-sphere water molecules take values close to zero. PMID:22927182

  7. Nitrate contents of well, raw, treated and pipe borne water in Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Gbodi, T.A.; Atawodi, S.E.

    1987-04-01

    Nitrate content of water available to man and animals in a rural community in Plateau State, Nigeria was determined. Water samples were obtained from artesian wells, raw untreated surface water, treated raw water, and pipe borne water. The examination of the samples was over a period of 3 mo at weekly intervals. Sixty percent of the artesian wells sampled had nitrate concentration above 5-50 ppm in June and August, while samples from other sources had less than 1 ppm. The proximity of pit latrines to some of the wells may have been responsible for high nitrate content of the well water.

  8. Nitrate contents of well, raw, treated and pipe borne water in Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Gbodi, T A; Atawodi, S E

    1987-04-01

    Nitrate content of water available to man and animals in a rural community in Plateau State, Nigeria was determined. Water samples were obtained from artesian wells, raw untreated surface water, treated raw water, and pipe borne water. The examination of the samples was over a period of 3 mo at weekly intervals. Sixty percent of the artesian wells sampled had nitrate concentration above 5-50 ppm in June and August, while samples from other sources had less than 1 ppm. The proximity of pit latrines to some of the wells may have been responsible for high nitrate content of the well water. PMID:3576949

  9. Lipase-catalyzed acidolysis of menhaden oil with conjugated linoleic acid: effect of water content.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos F; Hill, Charles G

    2002-06-01

    The effect of the water content on the lipase-catalyzed (Candida rugosa) interesterification (acidolysis) of menhaden oil with conjugated linoleic acid was studied for amounts of added water ranging from 0-4% (w/w). The rate of the acidolysis reaction increased with increasing water content, but the corresponding percentage of n-3 fatty acids liberated also increased. The implications of water content for minimization of the release of n-3 fatty acid residues while maximizing incorporation of CLA are discussed. PMID:12115120

  10. Validation of finite water-content vadose zone dynamics method using column experiments with a moving water table and applied surface flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Steinke, Robert C.; Zhu, Jianting

    2015-05-01

    Data from laboratory experiments on a 143 cm tall and 14.5 cm diameter column, packed with Wedron sand with varied constant upper boundary fluxes and water table velocities for both falling and rising water tables are used to validate a finite water-content vadose zone simulation methodology. The one-dimensional finite water-content Talbot and Ogden (2008) (T-O) infiltration and redistribution method was improved to simulate groundwater table dynamic effects and compared against the numerical solution of the Richards equation using Hydrus-1D. Both numerical solutions agreed satisfactorily with time series measurements of water content. Results showed similar performance for both methods, with the T-O method on average having higher Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies and smaller absolute biases. Hydrus-1D was more accurate in predicting deponding times in the case of a falling water table, while Hydrus-1D and the T-O method had similar errors in predicted ponding times in the case of a rising water table in six of nine tests. The improved T-O method was able to predict general features of vadose zone moisture dynamics with moving water table and surface infiltration using an explicit, mass-conservative formulation. The advantage of an explicit formulation is that it is numerically simple, using forward Euler solution methodology, and is guaranteed to converge and to conserve mass. These properties make the improved T-O method presented in this paper a robust and computationally efficient alternative to the numerical solution of the Richards equation in hydrological modeling applications involving groundwater table dynamic effects on vadose zone soil moistures.