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Sample records for contaminant plume delineation

  1. Methane oxidation in a crude oil contaminated aquifer: Delineation of aerobic reactions at the plume fringes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Blowes, D.W.; Kirshtein, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution direct-push profiling over short vertical distances was used to investigate CH4 attenuation in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. The contaminant plume was delineated using dissolved gases, redox sensitive components, major ions, carbon isotope ratios in CH4 and CO2, and the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. Sharp redox gradients were observed near the water table. Shifts in ??13CCH4 from an average of - 57.6??? (?? 1.7???) in the methanogenic zone to - 39.6??? (?? 8.7???) at 105 m downgradient, strongly suggest CH4 attenuation through microbially mediated degradation. In the downgradient zone the aerobic/anaerobic transition is up to 0.5 m below the water table suggesting that transport of O2 across the water table is leading to aerobic degradation of CH4 at this interface. Dissolved N2 concentrations that exceeded those expected for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere indicated bubble entrapment followed by preferential stripping of O2 through aerobic degradation of CH4 or other hydrocarbons. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to distinguish between areas of significant bubble entrapment and areas where other processes such as the infiltration of O 2 rich recharge water were important O2 transport mechanisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Detailed Vertical and Lateral Delineation of Redox Zones in Contaminant Plumes Using Redox-Sensitive Tapes (RST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, P.; Oeste, F. D.; Melzer, R.; Martus, P.

    2006-12-01

    Innovative redox-sensitive tapes (RST) have been developed for a detailed vertical and lateral delineation of redox zones in contaminated aquifers. The RST have the potential to become an integral part of a data acquisition strategy for monitored natural attenuation (MNA). The tape material, consists of a 2 cm wide synthetic textile coated with reactive manganese dioxide minerals. The RST are submerged into existing monitoring wells for approximately one month. This time period is sufficient to allow for a reaction of the mineral coating with groundwater. The RST are aimed at investigating four different redox-zones in contaminated aquifers: Mn(II)-oxidizing, Mn(IV)-reducing, Fe(III)-reducing and sulfate-reducing. Two RST case studies are presented. The RST investigations on a coal tar contaminated site allowed for a precise lateral and vertical delineation of the contaminant plume using the existing monitoring well network. The RST investigations on a BTEX contaminated site yielded a good correlation of RST data with hydrochemical data at the wells sampled. In the majority of plume wells located 50 m downstream of the source area and beyond, Mn(IV)-reducing environment appeared to be prevailing. Comparing the RST data with hydrochemical data indicated evidence for the transport of transformation products with groundwater flow. The repeated application of the RST facilitated an assessment of the plume dynamics. No significant seasonal variation with respect to the redox zone distribution was observed within the contaminant plume. However, the assessment of the changes in redox conditions over a time period of 2.5 years showed that the iron-reducing zone is shrinking and the sulfate-reducing zone disappeared completely indicating that the contaminant plume might decrease in the near future. Thus, the application of the RST facilitated an assessment of the plume dynamics on a centimeter-scale without the necessity of pumping and treating contaminated groundwater.

  3. Waste and cost reduction using dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for contaminant plume delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Smuin, D.R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes the drilling and sampling methods used to delineate a groundwater contaminant plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) during the Groundwater Monitoring IV characterization. The project was unique in that it relied upon dual wall reverse circulation drilling instead of the traditional hollow stem auger method. The Groundwater Monitoring program sought to characterize the boundaries, both vertically and horizontally, of the northeast plume which contains both {sup 99}Tc and trichloroethene. This paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the drilling method used by investigators.

  4. Migration of contaminants in groundwater at a landfill: A case study. 1. Groundwater flow and plume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, D. S.; Cherry, J. A.; Gillham, R. W.; Sudicky, E. A.

    1983-05-01

    A landfill-derived contaminant plume with a maximum width of ˜600 m, a length of ˜700 m and a maximum depth of 20 m in an unconfined sand aquifer was delineated by means of a monitoring network that includes standpipe piezometers, multilevel point-samplers and bundle-piezometers. The extent of detectable contamination caused by the landfill, which began operation in 1940 and which became inactive in 1976, was determined from the distributions of chloride, sulfate and electrical conductance in the sand aquifer, all of which have levels in the leachate that are greatly above those in uncontaminated groundwater. The maximum temperature of groundwater in the zone of contamination beneath the landfill is 12°C, which is 4-5°C above background. The thermal plume in the aquifer extends ˜150 m downgradient from the centre of the landfill. A slight transient water-table mound exists beneath the landfill in the late spring and summer in response to snowmelt and heavy rainfall. Beneath the landfill, the zone of leachate contamination extends to the bottom of the aquifer, apparently because of transient downward components of hydraulic gradient caused by the water-table mound and possibly because of the higher density and lower viscosity of the contaminated water. Values of hydraulic conductivity, which show variations due to local heterogeneity, were obtained from slug tests of piezometers, from pumping tests and from laboratory tests. Because of the inherent uncertainty in the aquifer parameter values, the 38-yr. frontal position of the plume calculated using the Darcy equation with the assumption of plug flow can differ from the observed frontal position by many hundreds of metres, although the use of mean parameter values produces a close agreement. The width of the plume is large relative to the width of the landfill and can be accounted for primarily by variable periods of lateral east- and westward flow caused by changes in water-table configuration due to the

  5. Delineation of discharge areas of two contaminant plumes by use of diffusion samplers, Johns Pond, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoie, Jennifer G.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Blackwood, D.S.; McCobb, T.D.; Rendigs, R. R.; Clifford, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion samplers were installed in the bottom of Johns Pond, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to confirm that volatile organic compounds from the Storm Drain-5 (SD-5) plume emanating from the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) were discharging into the pond. An array of 134 vapor-diffusion samplers was buried by divers about 0.5 feet below the pond bottom in the presumed discharge area of the SD-5 plume and left in place for about 2 weeks to equilibrate. Two areas of high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified. Samples from the first area contained trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene with concentrations in vapor as high as 890 and 667 parts per billion by volume, respectively. This discharge area is about 1,000 feet wide, extends from 100 to 350 feet offshore, and is interpreted to be the discharge area of the SD-5 plume. Samples from the second area were located closer to shore than the discharge area of the SD-5 plume and contained unexpectedly high vapor concentrations of TCE (more than 40,000 parts per billion by volume). Ground-water samples collected with a drive-point sampler near the second area had aqueous TCE concentrations as high as 1,100 micrograms per liter. Subsequently, a more closely spaced array of 110 vapor-diffusion samplers was installed to map the area of elevated TCE concentrations . The discharge area detected with the samplers is about 75 feet wide and extends from about 25 to 200 feet offshore . TCE vapor concentrations in this area were as high as 42,800 parts per billion by volume. TCE concentrations in micrograms per liter in water-diffusion samples from 15 selected sites in the two discharge areas were about 35 times lower than the TCE concentrations in parts per billion by volume in corresponding vapor-diffusion samples. The difference in values is due to the volatile nature of TCE and the different units of measure. TCE was detected in diffusion samplers set in the pond water column above the

  6. Dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for groundwater contaminant plume delineation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Smuin, D.R.; Morti, E.E.; Zutman, J.L.; Pickering, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Dual wall reverse circulation (DWRC) drilling was used to drill 48 borings during a groundwater contaminant investigation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. This method was selected as an alternative to conventional hollow stem auger drilling for a number of reasons, including the expectation of minimizing waste, increasing the drilling rate, and reducing the potential for cross contamination of aquifers. Groundwater samples were collected from several water-bearing zones during drilling of each borehole. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds using a field gas chromatograph. This approach allowed the investigation to be directed using near-real-time data. Use of downhole geophysical logging, in conjunction with lithologic descriptions of borehole cuttings, resulted in excellent correlation of the geology in the vicinity of the contaminant plume. The total volume of cuttings generated using the DWRC drilling method was less than half of what would have been produced by hollow stem augering; however, the cuttings were recovered in slurry form and had to be dewatered prior to disposal. The drilling rate was very rapid, often approaching 10 ft/min; however, frequent breaks to perform groundwater sampling resulted in an average drilling rate of < 1 ft/min. The time required for groundwater sampling could be shortened by changing the sampling methodology. Analytical results indicated that the drilling method successfully isolated the various water bearing zones and no cross contamination resulted from the investigation.

  7. Plume Delineation in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, Dale F.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2004-11-30

    HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc. and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were contracted by Fluor Hanford Group, Inc. to conduct a geophysical investigation in the area of the BC Cribs and Trenches (subject site) at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The BC Cribs and Trenches are located south of the 200 East Area. This document provides the details of the investigation to identify existing infrastructure from legacy disposal activities and to delineate the edges of a groundwater plume that contains radiological and heavy metal constituents beneath the 216-B-26 and 216-B-52 Trenches, and the 216-B-14 through 216-B-19 Cribs.

  8. ModBack - simplified contaminant source zone delineation using backtracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielsch, K.; Herold, M.; Ptak, T.

    2012-12-01

    al. (2005). The contaminant plume length can be estimated using plume length statistics, first order rate degradation equations or calculations based on site specific hydraulic and chemical parameters. Furthermore, an analytical tool is included to identify the distribution of contaminants across a control plane. All relevant output can be graphically displayed and saved as vector data to be later used in GIS software. ModBack has been already used to delimit the zones of source presence or absence at several test sites. With ModBack, a tool is now available which enables environmental consultants, engineers and environmental agencies to delineate possible sources of contamination already at the planning stage of site investigation and remediation measures, helping to significantly reduce costs of contaminated site management. Bayer-Raich, M., Jarsjö, J., Holder, T. and Ptak, T. (2003): "Numerical estimations of contaminant mass flow rate based on concentration measurements in pumping wells", ModelCare 2002: A Few Steps Closer to Reality, IAHS Publication No. 277, 10-16. Jarsjö, J., Bayer-Raich, M., Ptak, T. (2005): "Monitoring groundwater contamination and delineating source zones at industrial sites: Uncertainty analyses using integral pumping tests", Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, 79, 107-134

  9. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation. La biodégradation efficace des polluants souterrains requiert deux éléments: des populations microbiennes possédant les aptitudes nécessaires à la dégradation, et des conditions géochimiques et hydrologiques souterraines favorables. Des contraintes pratiques sur la conception et l'interprétation des expériences à la fois en microbiologie et en hydrogéologie ont conduit à une connaissance limitée des interactions entre les

  10. RAPID REMOVAL OF A GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT PLUME.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L. Jeff; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1985-01-01

    A groundwater management model is used to design an aquifer restoration system that removes a contaminant plume from a hypothetical aquifer in four years. The design model utilizes groundwater flow simulation and mathematical optimization. Optimal pumping and injection strategies achieve rapid restoration for a minimum total pumping cost. Rapid restoration is accomplished by maintaining specified groundwater velocities around the plume perimeter towards a group of pumping wells located near the plume center. The model does not account for hydrodynamic dispersion. Results show that pumping costs are particularly sensitive to injection capacity. An 8 percent decrease in the maximum allowable injection rate may lead to a 29 percent increase in total pumping costs.

  11. Hydrocone groundwater study delineates petroleum contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, K.; Hartness, J.; Christenson, K.

    1994-12-31

    Law Environmental, Inc., (LAW), conducted a groundwater survey at Myrtle Beach Air Force Base, South Carolina, to delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of petroleum contamination at the BX Service station. The survey was performed using the In-Situ Technology Hydrocone in conjunction with a field gas chromatograph. The Hydrocone proved to be a reliable, cost-effective method of extracting multi-depth groundwater samples without incurring the expenses associated with the installation and maintenance of monitoring wells. The process generates virtually no investigation-derived waste. The Hydrocone system consists of an elongated cylindrical steel sampler attached to drill rods on a direct push trailer mounted rig. A gas/electronic cable connects to the sampler, and a computer installed on the rig displays pressure on the tool, sampling time, and groundwater volume collected. A total of 18 groundwater samples were collected from 12 locations around the site at sampling depths of approximately 10, 20, and 30 feet below the ground surface. The Hydrocone/gas chromatograph method produced a large volume of groundwater quality data within a relatively short time interval.

  12. Monitoring Groundwater Contaminant Plumes Using Airborne Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Martin; Oftendinger, Ulrich; Ruffell, Alastair; Cowan, Marie; Cassidy, Rachel; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Wilson, Christopher; Desissa, Mohammednur

    2013-04-01

    Under the European Union Water Framework Directive, Member States are required to assess water quality across both surface water and groundwater bodies. Subsurface pollution plumes, originating from a variety of sources, pose a significant direct risk to water quality. The monitoring and characterisation of groundwater contaminant plumes is generally invasive, time consuming and expensive. In particular, adequately capturing the contaminant plume with monitoring installations, when the extent of the feature is unknown and the presence of contamination is only evident from indirect observations, can be prohibitively expensive. This research aims to identify the extent and nature of subsurface contaminant plumes using airborne geophysical survey data. This data was collected across parts of the island of Ireland within the scope of the original Tellus and subsequent Tellus Border projects. The rapid assessment of the airborne electro-magnetic (AEM) data allowed the identification of several sites containing possible contaminant plumes. These AEM anomalies were assessed through the analysis of existing site data and field site inspections, with areas of interest being examined for metallic structures that could affect the AEM data. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) and ground-based electro-magnetic (EM) surveys were performed to ground-truth existing airborne data and to confirm the extent and nature of the affected area identified using the airborne data. Groundwater and surface water quality were assessed using existing field site information. Initial results collected from a landfill site underlain by basalt have indicated that the AEM data, coupled with ERT and GPR, can successfully be used to locate possible plumes and help delineate their extent. The analysis of a range of case study sites exhibiting different geological and environmental settings will allow for the development of a consistent methodology for examining the

  13. Delineating Reactive Natural Attenuation Zones: Multi-level Sampling in an Ammonium Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüttmann, A.; Wilson, R. D.; Thornton, S. F.; Lerner, D. N.

    2003-12-01

    Current natural attenuation monitoring involves observing concentrations along some transect parallel to flow, often in long--screened observation wells. Vertically integrated geochemical signals essentially compresses 3D-problems into 2D ones and the loss of process resolution does not allow for robust plume transport prediction. On the other hand, a monitoring approach that is based on process quantification will yield field data necessary for current natural attenuation assessment and allow more accurate prediction to plume behaviour. To quantify these spatially discrete processes, the resolution of sampling points must be higher to delineate reactive zones, that account for the bulk of natural attenuation. These reactive zones are dependent on aquifer properties, contaminant type, redox zonation and other factors. In many cases, the plume fringe will be the most active zone, because influx of certain nutrients necessary to support bacteria will be greatest in these zones. Most importantly, consortia of degrading bacteria are dependent on supply of electron--acceptors such as dissolved {O2} and nitrate from background ground water and recharge; electron--acceptors are rapidly consumed at the fringes and concentrations decrease significantly towards the centre of the plume. Thus, if a process--based approach is to be achieved, one has to focus not only on the overall extent and mass of a contaminant plume, but, more importantly, on a sound analysis of the most reactive zones. The site of a former coal processing plant in the UK was chosen as a field site where the afore--mentioned hypothesis is currently being investigated by means of two recently installed multi--level samplers. Previous investigations have located an ammonium plume at the site with outwash from the thick unsaturated zone as ongoing source since the demolition of the actual plant in 1970. The conceptual model drawn from the analysis of these data shows that certain zones exhibit higher rates of

  14. Mapping organic contaminant plumes in groundwater using spontaneous potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Sarah

    Increased water demands have raised awareness of its importance. One of the challenges facing water resource management is dealing with contaminated groundwater; delineating, characterizing and remediating it. In the last decade, spontaneous potentials have been proposed as a method for delineating degrading organic contaminant plumes in groundwater. A hypothesis proposed that the redox potential gradient due to degradation of contaminants generated an electrical potential gradient that could be measured at the ground surface. This research was undertaken to better understand this phenomenon and find under what conditions it occurs. Spontaneous potentials are electrical potentials generated by three sources that act simultaneously: electrokinetic, thermoelectric and electrochemical sources. Over contaminant plumes electrochemical sources are those of interest. Thermoelectric sources are negligible unless in geothermal areas, but we hypothesized that electrokinetic potentials could be impacted by contaminants altering sediment surface properties. We built and calibrated a laboratory apparatus to make measurements that allowed us to calculate streaming current coupling coefficients. We tested sediment from hydrocarbon impacted sites with clean and hydrocarbon polluted groundwater and found a measurable though inconsistent effect. Moreover, numerical modelling was used to demonstrate that the impact of these changes on field measurements was negligible. Spontaneous potential surveys were conducted on two field sites with well characterized degrading hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater. We did not find a correlation between redox conditions and spontaneous potential, even after the electrical measurements were corrected for anthropogenic noise. In order to determine why the expected signal was not seen, we undertook numerical modelling based on coupled fluxes using two hypothesized types of current: redox and diffusion currents. The only scenarios that produced

  15. Monopropellant thruster exhaust plume contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerwald, R. K.; Passamaneck, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The potential spacecraft contaminants in the exhaust plume of a 0.89N monopropellant hydrazine thruster were measured in an ultrahigh quartz crystal microbalances located at angles of approximately 0 deg, + 15 deg and + or - 30 deg with respect to the nozzle centerline. The crystal temperatures were controlled such that the mass adhering to the crystal surface at temperatures of from 106 K to 256 K could be measured. Thruster duty cycles of 25 ms on/5 seconds off, 100 ms on/10 seconds off, and 200 ms on/20 seconds off were investigated. The change in contaminant production with thruster life was assessed by subjecting the thruster to a 100,000 pulse aging sequence and comparing the before and after contaminant deposition rates. The results of these tests are summarized, conclusions drawn, and recommendations given.

  16. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura B.; Winstanley, Henry F.; Mitchell, Sarah L.; Fowler, Andrew C.; Sander, Graham C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front.

  17. Groundwater contaminant plume ranking. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    Containment plumes at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites were ranked to assist in Subpart B (i.e., restoration requirements of 40 CFR Part 192) compliance strategies for each site, to prioritize aquifer restoration, and to budget future requests and allocations. The rankings roughly estimate hazards to the environment and human health, and thus assist in determining for which sites cleanup, if appropriate, will provide the greatest benefits for funds available. The rankings are based on the scores that were obtained using the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Modified Hazard Ranking System (MHRS). The MHRS and HRS consider and score three hazard modes for a site: migration, fire and explosion, and direct contact. The migration hazard mode score reflects the potential for harm to humans or the environment from migration of a hazardous substance off a site by groundwater, surface water, and air; it is a composite of separate scores for each of these routes. For ranking the containment plumes at UMTRA Project sites, it was assumed that each site had been remediated in compliance with the EPA standards and that relict contaminant plumes were present. Therefore, only the groundwater route was scored, and the surface water and air routes were not considered. Section 2.0 of this document describes the assumptions and procedures used to score the groundwater route, and Section 3.0 provides the resulting scores for each site. 40 tabs.

  18. A microbial fuel cell in contaminated ground delineated by electrical self-potential and normalized induced polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, R.; Kulessa, B.; Ferguson, A. S.; Larkin, M. J.; Kulakov, L. A.; Kalin, R. M.

    2010-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of geophysical methods to aid investigation and monitoring of complex biogeochemical environments, for example delineation of contaminants and microbial activity related to land contamination. We combined geophysical monitoring with chemical and microbiological analysis to create a conceptual biogeochemical model of processes around a contaminant plume within a manufactured gas plant site. Self-potential, induced polarization and electrical resistivity techniques were used to monitor the plume. We propose that an exceptionally strong (>800 mV peak to peak) dipolar SP anomaly represents a microbial fuel cell operating in the subsurface. The electromagnetic and electrical geophysical data delineated a shallow aerobic perched water body containing conductive gasworks waste which acts as the abiotic cathode of microbial fuel cell. This is separated from the plume below by a thin clay layer across the site. Microbiological evidence suggests that degradation of organic contaminants in the plume is dominated by the presence of ammonium and its subsequent degradation. We propose that the degradation of contaminants by microbial communities at the edge of the plume provides a source of electrons and acts as the anode of the fuel cell. We hypothesize that ions and electrons are transferred through the clay layer that was punctured during the trial pitting phase of the investigation. This is inferred to act as an electronic conductor connecting the biologically mediated anode to the abiotic cathode. Integrated electrical geophysical techniques appear well suited to act as rapid, low cost sustainable tools to monitor biodegradation.

  19. Associations of free-living bacteria and dissolved organic compounds in a plume of contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Barber, L.B., II

    1992-01-01

    Associations of free-living bacteria (FLB) and dissolved organic contaminants in a 4-km-long plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated. Abundance of FLB in the core of the plume (as delineated by maximum specific conductance) steadily decreased in the direction of flow from a point 0.25 km downgradient from the source to the toe of the plume. At 0.25 km downgradient, FLB comprised up to 31% of the total bacterial population, but constituted < 7% of the population at 2 km downgradient. Abundance of FLB correlated strongly (r = 0.80 n = 23) with total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in contaminated groundwater between 0.64 and 2.1 km downgradient, although distributions of individual contaminants such as di-, tri- and tetrachloroethene were highly variable, and their association with FLB less clear. Numbers of FLB in the downgradient portion of the plume which is contaminated with branched-chain alkylbenzenesulfonate (ABS) surfactants were low (< 5??108/L) in spite of relatively high levels of DOC (up to 4 mg/L). However, abundance of FLB correlated strongly with non-surfactant DOC along vertical transects through the plume. The ratio of FLB to DOC and the ratio of FLB to attached bacteria generally decreased in the direction of flow and, consequently, with the age of the organic contaminants.

  20. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes.

    PubMed

    Cribbin, Laura B; Winstanley, Henry F; Mitchell, Sarah L; Fowler, Andrew C; Sander, Graham C

    2014-12-15

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front. PMID:25461883

  1. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. I. Extension-expansion of the contaminant plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This study concerns the possible use of boundary layer (BL) approach for the analysis and evaluation of contaminant transport in groundwater due to contaminant penetration into the groundwater aquifer through a site of limited size. The contaminant penetration may occur through either the upper (surface) or lower (bedrock) boundary of the aquifer. Two general cases of contaminant penetration mechanisms are considered: (1) the contaminant is transferred through an interface between a contaminating and freshwater fluid phases, and (2) the contaminant arrives at groundwater by leakage and percolation. For the purpose of BL evaluation the contaminant plume is divided into three different sections: (1) the penetration section, (2) the extension-expansion section, and (3) the spearhead section. In each section a different BL method approach yields simple analytical expressions for the description of the contaminant plume migration and contaminant transport. Previous studies of the BL method can be directly applied to the evaluation of contaminant transport at the contaminant penetration section. The present study extends those studies and concerns the contaminant transport in the two other sections, which are located downstream of the penetration section. This study shows that the contaminant concentration profiles in sections 2 and 3 incorporate two BLs: (1) an inner BL adjacent to the aquifer bottom or surface boundary, and (2) an outer BL, which develops above or below the inner one. The method developed in the present study has been applied to practical issues concerning salinity penetration into groundwater in south central Kansas.

  2. Comparison of Eh and H2 measurements for delineating redox processes in a contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Adriaens, Peter; Henry, Mark A.; Bradley, Paul M.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of oxidation−reduction potential (Eh) and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen (H2) were made in a shallow groundwater system contaminated with solvents and jet fuel to delineate the zonation of redox processes. Eh measurements ranged from +69 to −158 mV in a cross section of the contaminated plume and accurately delineated oxic from anoxic groundwater. Plotting measured Eh and pH values on an equilibrium stability diagram indicated that Fe(III) reduction was the predominant redox process in the anoxic zone and did not indicate the presence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. In contrast, measurements of H2concentrations indicated that methanogenesis predominated in heavily contaminated sediments near the water table surface (H2 ∼ 7.0 nM) and that the methanogenic zone was surrounded by distinct sulfate-reducing (H2 ∼ 1−4 nM) and Fe(III)-reducing (H2 ∼ 0.1−0.8 nM) zones. The presence of methanogenesis, sulfate reduction, and Fe(III) reduction was confirmed by the distribution of dissolved oxygen, sulfate, Fe(II), and methane in groundwater. These results show that H2 concentrations were more useful for identifying anoxic redox processes than Ehmeasurements in this groundwater system. However, H2-based redox zone delineations are more reliable when H2 concentrations are interpreted in the context of electron-acceptor (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate) availability and the presence of final products [Fe(II), sulfide, methane] of microbial metabolism.

  3. Comparison of three field screening techniques for delineating petroleum hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater at a site in the southern Carson Desert, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Smuin, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Three types of field screening techniques used in the characterization of potentially contaminated sites at Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada, are compared. The methods and results for each technique are presented. The three techniques include soil-gas surveys, electromagnetic geophysical surveys, and groundwater test hole screening. Initial screening at the first study site included two soil-gas surveys and electromagnetic geophysical studies. These screening methods identified I areas of contamination; however, results were inconclusive. Therefore groundwater test hole screening was performed. Groundwater screening consisted of auger drilling down to the shallow alluvial aquifer. Groundwater samples were collected from the open drill hole with a bailer. On-site head-space analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCS) were performed using a portable gas chromatograph (GC). Five areas of floating petroleum hydrocarbon product were identified along with the overall dissolved contaminant plume boundaries. Well placement was re-evaluated, and well sites were relocated based on the screening information. The most effective technique for identification of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminant plumes was groundwater test hole screening. Groundwater screening was subsequently performed at 19 other sites. A total of 450 test holes were analyzed resulting in the delineation of six plumes.

  4. Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre; Skold, Magnus E; Karaoulis, Marios; Schmutz, Myriam; Hubbard, Susan S; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Watson, David B

    2013-01-01

    At the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contaminants from the former S-3 ponds have infiltrated the shallow saprolite for over 60 years. Two- and three-dimensional DC-resistivity tomography is used to characterize the number and location of the main contaminant plumes, which include high concentration of nitrate. These contaminant plumes have typically an electrical resistivity in the range 2 20 ohm-m while the background saprolite resistivity is in the range 60 120 ohm-m, so the difference of resistivity can be easily mapped using DC-resistivity tomography to locate the contaminant pathways. We develop a relationship to derive the in situ nitrate concentrations from the 3D resistivity tomograms accounting for the effect of surface conductivity. The footprint of the contamination upon the resistivity is found to be much stronger than the local variations associated with changes in the porosity and the clay content. With this method, we identified a total of five main plumes (termed CP1 to CP5). Plume CP2 corresponds to the main plume in terms of nitrate concentration ( 50,000 ). We also used an active time constrained approach to perform time-lapse resistivity tomography over a section crossing the plumes CP1 and CP2. The sequence of tomograms is used to determine the changes in the nitrate concentrations associated with infiltration of fresh (meteoritic) water from a perched aquifer. This study highlights the importance of accounting for surface conductivity when characterizing plume distributions in clay-rich subsurface systems.

  5. Hydrogeology and leachate plume delineation at a closed municipal landfill, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.

    2002-01-01

    The City of Norman operated a solid-waste municipal landfill at two sites on the Canadian River alluvium in Cleveland County, Oklahoma from 1970 to 1985. The sites, referred to as the west and east cells of the landfill, were originally excavations in the unconsolidated alluvial deposits and were not lined. Analysis of ground-water samples indicate that leachate from the west cell is discharging into an adjacent abandoned river channel, referred to as the slough, and is migrating downgradient in ground water toward the Canadian River. The report describes the hydrogeologic features at the landfill, including the topography of the bedrock, water-level changes in the alluvial aquifer, and delineates the leachate plume using specific conductance data. The leading edge of the leachate plume along the 35-80 transect extended over 250 meters downgradient of the west cell. The leading edge of the leachate plume along the 40-SOUTH transect had moved about 60 meters from the west cell in a south-southwesterly direction and had not moved past the slough as of 1997. Specific conductance measurements exceeding 7,000 microsiemens per centimeter at site 40 indicate the most concentrated part of the plume remained in the upper half of the alluvial aquifer adjacent to the west cell. The direction of ground-water flow in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the landfill was generally north-northeast to south-southwest toward the river. However, between the west cell and the slough along the 40-SOUTH transect, head measurements indicate a directional change to the east and southeast toward a channel referred to as the sewage outfall. Near the 35-80 transect, at 0.5 meter below the water table and at the base of the aquifer, the direction of ground-water flow was south-southeast with a gradient of about 30 centimeters per 100 meters. Generally, ground-water levels in the alluvial aquifer were higher during the winter months and lower during summer months, due to a normal decrease in

  6. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. II. Horizontal penetration of the contaminant plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Part I of this study (Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W. Groundwater Contamination Downstream of a Contaminant Penetration Site Part 1: Extension-Expansion of the Contaminant Plume. J. of Environmental Science and Health Part A (in press).) addressed cases, in which a comparatively thin contaminated region represented by boundary layers (BLs) developed within the freshwater aquifer close to contaminant penetration site. However, at some distance downstream from the penetration site, the top of the contaminant plume reaches the top or bottom of the aquifer. This is the location of the "attachment point," which comprises the entrance cross section of the domain evaluated by the present part of the study. It is shown that downstream from the entrance cross section, a set of two BLs develop in the aquifer, termed inner and outer BLs. It is assumed that the evaluated domain, in which the contaminant distribution gradually becomes uniform, can be divided into two sections, designated: (a) the restructuring section, and (b) the establishment section. In the restructuring section, the vertical concentration gradient leads to expansion of the inner BL at the expense of the outer BL, and there is almost no transfer of contaminant mass between the two layers. In the establishment section, each of the BLs occupies half of the aquifer thickness, and the vertical concentration gradient leads to transfer of contaminant mass from the inner to the outer BL. By use of BL approximations, changes of salinity distribution in the aquifer are calculated and evaluated. The establishment section ends at the uniformity point, downstream from which the contaminant concentration profile is practically uniform. The length of the restructuring section, as well as that of the establishment section, is approximately proportional to the aquifer thickness squared, and is inversely proportional to the transverse dispersivity. The study provides a convenient set of definitions and terminology that are

  7. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  8. Contamination control and plume assessment of low-energy thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Potential contamination of a spacecraft cryogenic surface by a xenon (Xe) ion generator was evaluated. The analysis involves the description of the plume exhausted from the generator with its relative component fluxes on the spacecraft surfaces, and verification of the conditions for condensation, adsorption, and sputtering at those locations. The data describing the plume fluxes and their effects on surfaces were obtained from two sources: the tests carried out with the Xe generator in a small vacuum chamber to indicate deposits and sputter on monitor slides; and the extensive tests with a mercury (Hg) ion thruster in a large vacuum chamber. The Hg thruster tests provided data on the neutrals, on low-energy ion fluxes, on high-energy ion fluxes, and on sputtered materials at several locations within the plume.

  9. Superposition of borehole-to-surface voltage residuals for Vadose Zone plume delineation.

    PubMed

    Osiensky, James L; Belknap, Willard J; Donaldson, Paul R

    2006-01-10

    An injected tracer field experiment was conducted at the University of Idaho Ground Water Field Laboratory to evaluate the application of borehole-to-surface voltage measurements for delineation of the tracer distribution in partially saturated, fractured basalt. A tap water tracer was injected into a fracture-dominated, salt-water plume formed during a previous salt-water injection experiment. The tap water tracer was injected into a central injection well under constant hydraulic head for 34 days. The injection well was surrounded by seven test boreholes. Each borehole contained several copper wire electrodes for borehole-to-surface potential measurements between a surface grid of 224 copper sulfate, porous pot electrodes. Eight pole-pole, borehole-to-surface voltage data sets were acquired during each measurement period by energization of a selected electrode in each of the eight boreholes. Predicted voltages for a uniform earth (homogeneous and isotropic) potential model (finite difference) were subtracted from each data set (for its respective current source location), and the voltage residuals superposed to create new data sets with greater measurement sensitivity and coverage, to aid in interpretation. These data sets were collected over four measurement periods during tap water injection and four measurement periods during the subsequent 64-day drainage phase. The data were interpreted with the use of three-dimensional models and by comparisons with other electrical and hydrological observations. Results indicate that superposition of multiple data sets of voltage residuals significantly improved the lateral resolution of subsurface bulk resistivity changes that occurred over time. PMID:16298016

  10. Chaotic Advection, Fluid Spreading, and Groundwater Contaminant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupauer, R. M.; Mays, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    In situ remediation of contaminated groundwater requires degradation reactions at the interface between the contaminant plume and an injected treatment solution containing chemical or biological amendments. Therefore a promising approach to accelerate in situ remediation is to elongate the interface between the contaminant plume and treatment solution through fluid spreading. The literature on chaotic advection describes how to accomplish spreading in laminar flows, which lack the turbulent eddies that provide spreading in streams or engineered reactors. A key result from the literature on chaotic advection is that spreading is inherent in the vicinity of certain periodic points, which are points to which fluid particles return in successive iterations of chaotic flows. Specifically, spreading is enhanced near the stable and unstable manifolds associated with hyperbolic periodic points. We investigate the transient flow created with a four-well system in which wells are operated sequentially as either injection wells or extraction wells. In particular, we identify the periodic points and demonstrate that fluid spreading occurs nearby. For appropriately designed injection and extraction sequences, the periodic points are located near the interface between the contaminant plume and treatment solution, leading to elongation of the interface, with expected benefits of enhanced reaction and accelerated remediation.

  11. Hall Effect Thruster Plume Contamination and Erosion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the Hall effect thruster plume contamination and erosion study was to evaluate the impact of a xenon ion plume on various samples placed in the vicinity of a Hall effect thruster for a continuous 100 hour exposure. NASA Glenn Research Center was responsible for the pre- and post-test evaluation of three sample types placed around the thruster: solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton(R). Mass and profilometer), were used to identify the degree of deposition and/or erosion on the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton@ samples. Transmittance, reflectance, solar absorptance, and room temperature emittance were used to identify the degree of performance degradation of the solar cell cover glass samples alone. Auger spectroscopy was used to identify the chemical constituents found on the surface of the exposed solar cell cover glass samples. Chemical analysis indicated some boron nitride contamination on the samples, from boron nitride insulators used in the body of the thruster. However, erosion outweighted contamination. All samples exhibited some degree of erosion. with the most erosion occurring near the centerline of the plume and the least occurring at the +/- 90 deg positions. For the solar cell cover glass samples, erosion progressed through the antireflective coating and into the microsheet glass itself. Erosion occurred in the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone and Kapton(R) at different rates. All optical properties changed with the degree of erosion, with solar absorptance and room temperature emittance increasing with erosion. The transmittance of some samples decreased while the reflectance of some samples increased and others decreased. All results are consistent with an energetic plume of xenon ions serving as a source for erosion.

  12. Delineating Landfill Leachate Discharge To An Arsenic Contaminated Waterway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discharge of contaminated ground water may serve as a primary and on-going source of contamination to surface water. A field investigation was conducted at a Superfund site in Massachusetts, USA to define the locus of contaminant flux and support source identification for arseni...

  13. Shuttle PRCS plume contamination analysis for Astro-2 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Francis C.; Greene, Cindy

    1993-01-01

    The Astro-2 mission scheduled for Jan. 1995 flight is co-manifested with the Spartan experiment. The Astro instrument array consists of several telescopes operating in the UV spectrum. To obtain the desired 300 observations with the telescope array in a shorter time than the Astro-1 mission, it will be necessary to use the primary reaction control system (PRCS) rather than just the Vernier reaction control system. The high mass flow rate of the PRCS engines cause considerable concern about contamination due to PRCS plume return flux. Performance of these instruments depends heavily on the environment they encounter. The ability of the optical system to detect a remote signal depends not only on the intensity of the incoming signal, but also on the ensuing transmission loss through the optical train of the instrument. Performance of these instruments is thus dependent on the properties of the optical surface and the medium through which it propagates. The on-orbit contamination environment will have a strong influence on the performance of these instruments. The finding of a two-month study of the molecular contamination environment of the Astro-2 instruments due to PRCS thruster plumes during the planned Astro-2 mission are summarized.

  14. Simple indicator kriging for estimating the probability of incorrectly delineating hazardous areas in a contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, K.W.; Lee, D.Y.

    1998-09-01

    The probability of incorrectly delineating hazardous areas in a contaminated site is very important for decision-makers because it indicates the magnitude of confidence that decision-makers have in determining areas in need of remediation. In this study, simple indicator kriging (SIK) was used to estimate the probability of incorrectly delineating hazardous areas in a heavy metal-contaminated site, which is located at Taoyuan, Taiwan, and is about 10 ha in area. In the procedure, the values 0 and 1 were assigned to be the stationary means of the indicator codes in the SIK model to represent two hypotheses, hazardous and safe, respectively. The spatial distribution of the conditional probability of heavy metal concentrations lower than a threshold, given each hypothesis, was estimated using SIK. Then, the probabilities of false positives ({alpha}) (i.e., the probability of declaring a location hazardous when it is not) and false negatives ({beta}) (i.e., the probability of declaring a location safe when it is not) in delineating hazardous areas for the heavy metal-contaminated site could be obtained. The spatial distribution of the probabilities of false positives and false negatives could help in delineating hazardous areas based on a tolerable probability level of incorrect delineation. In addition, delineation complicated by the cost of remediation, hazards in the environment, and hazards to human health could be made based on the minimum values of {alpha} and {beta}. The results suggest that the proposed SIK procedure is useful for decision-makers who need to delineate hazardous areas in a heavy metal-contaminated site.

  15. IDENTIFYING AND PREDICTING DIVING PLUME BEHAVIOR AT GROUNDWATER SITES CONTAMINATED WITH MTBE: PART 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    As contaminant ground water flows downgradient from a release point, its movement is dictated by site geological conditions and hydraulics that may result in significant perpendicular contamination migration. This vertical migration pattern has been termed 'plume diving'. Under ...

  16. Groundwater redox conditions and conductivity in a contaminant plume from geoelectrical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naudet, V.; Revil, A.; Rizzo, E.; Bottero, J.-Y.; Bégassat, P.

    Accurate mapping of the electrical conductivity and of the redox potential of the groundwater is important in delineating the shape of a contaminant plume. A map of redox potential in an aquifer is indicative of biodegradation of organic matter and of concentrations of redox-active components; a map of electrical conductivity provides information on the mineralisation of the groundwater. Both maps can be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation. The self-potential method (SP) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) have been applied to the contaminant plume associated with the Entressen landfill in south-east France. The self-potential depends on groundwater flow (electrokinetic contribution) and redox conditions ("electro-redox" contribution). Using the variation of the piezometric head in the aquifer, the electrokinetic contribution is removed from the SP signals. A good linear correlation (R2=0.85) is obtained between the residual SP data and the redox potential values measured in monitoring wells. This relationship is used to draw a redox potential map of the overall contaminated site. The electrical conductivity of the subsoil is obtained from 3D-ERT analysis. A good linear correlation (R2=0.91) is observed between the electrical conductivity of the aquifer determined from the 3D-ERT image and the conductivity of the groundwater measured in boreholes. This indicates that the formation factor is nearly homogeneous in the shallow aquifer at the scale of the ERT. From this correlation, a map of the pore water conductivity of the aquifer is obtained.

  17. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  18. INORGANIC PLUME DELINEATION USING SURFACE HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AT THE BC CRIBS & TRENCHES SITE HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2007-05-29

    A surface resistivity survey was conducted on the Hanford Site over a waste disposal trench that received a large volume of liquid inorganic waste. The objective of the survey was to map the extent of the plume that resulted from the disposal activities approximately 50 years earlier. The survey included six resistivity transects of at least 200m, where each transect provided two-dimensional profile information of subsurface electrical properties. The results of the survey indicated that a low resistivity plume resides at a depth of approximately 25-44 m below ground surface. The target depth was calibrated with borehole data of pore-water electrical conductivity. Due to the high correlation of the pore-water electrical conductivity to nitrate concentration and the high correlation of measured apparent resistivity to pore-water electrical conductivity, inferences were made that proposed the spatial distribution of the apparent resistivity was due to the distribution of nitrate. Therefore, apparent resistivities were related to nitrate, which was subsequently rendered in three dimensions to show that the nitrate likely did not reach the water table and the bounds of the highest concentrations are directly beneath the collection of waste sites.

  19. Persistence of a Groundwater Contaminant Plume after Hydraulic Source Containment at a Chlorinated-Solvent Contaminated Site

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, D.E.; Brusseau, M.L.; Guo, Z.; Plaschke, M.; Carroll, K.C.; Brinker, F.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the behavior of a groundwater contaminant (trichloroethene) plume after implementation of a source-containment operation at a site in Arizona. The plume resides in a quasi three-layer system comprising a sand/gravel unit bounded on the top and bottom by relatively thick silty clayey layers. The system was monitored for 60 months beginning at start-up in 2007 to measure the change in contaminant concentrations within the plume, the change in plume area, the mass of contaminant removed, and the integrated contaminant mass discharge. Concentrations of trichloroethene in groundwater pumped from the plume extraction wells have declined significantly over the course of operation, as have concentrations for groundwater sampled from 40 monitoring wells located within the plume. The total contaminant mass discharge associated with operation of the plume extraction wells peaked at 0.23 kg/d, decreased significantly within one year, and thereafter began an asymptotic decline to a current value of approximately 0.03 kg/d. Despite an 87% reduction in contaminant mass and a comparable 87% reduction in contaminant mass discharge for the plume, the spatial area encompassed by the plume has decreased by only approximately 50%. This is much less than would be anticipated based on ideal flushing and mass-removal behavior. Simulations produced with a simplified 3-D numerical model matched reasonably well to the measured data. The results of the study suggest that permeability heterogeneity, back diffusion, hydraulic factors associated with the specific well field system, and residual discharge from the source zone are all contributing to the observed persistence of the plume, as well as the asymptotic behavior currently observed for mass removal and for the reduction in contaminant mass discharge. PMID:26069436

  20. In situ sequential treatment of a mixed contaminant plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morkin, M.; Devlin, J. F.; Barker, J. F.; Butler, B. J.

    2000-10-01

    Groundwater plumes often contain a mixture of contaminants that cannot easily be remediated in situ using a single technology. The purpose of this research was to evaluate an in situ treatment sequence for the control of a mixed organic plume (chlorinated ethenes and petroleum hydrocarbons) within a Funnel-and-Gate. A shallow plume located in the unconfined aquifer at Alameda Point, CA, was found to contain up to 218,000 μg/l of cis-1,2 dichloroethene (cDCE), 16,000 μg/l of vinyl chloride (VC) and <1000 μg/l of 1,1 dichloroethene (1,1 DCE), trans-1,2 dichloroethene ( trans-1,2 DCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). Total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) concentrations were <10,000 μg/l. Contaminated groundwater was funneled into a gate, 3.0 m wide, 4.5 m long and 6.0 m deep (keyed into the underlying aquitard) where treatment occurred. The initial gate segment consisted of granular iron, for the reductive dechlorination of the higher chlorinated ethenes. The second segment, the biosparge zone, promoted aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons and any remaining lesser-chlorinated compounds, stimulated by dissolved oxygen (DO) and carbon dioxide (CO 2) additions via an in situ sparge system (CO 2 was used to neutralize the high pH produced from reactions in the iron wall). Groundwater was drawn through the gate by pumping two wells located at the sealed, downgradient, end. Over a 4-month period an estimated 1350 g of cDCE flowed into the treatment gate and the iron wall removed 1230 g, or 91% of the mass. The influent mass of VC was 572 g and the iron wall removed 535 g, corresponding to 94% mass removal. The other chlorinated ethenes had significantly lower influent masses (3 to 108 g) and the iron wall removed the majority of the mass resulting in >96% mass removal for any of the compounds. In spite of these high removal percentages, laboratory column tests indicated that at these levels of chlorinated contaminants, surface saturation of the

  1. Delineation of brine contamination in and near the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana, 2004-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamke, Joanna N.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    The extent of brine contamination in the shallow aquifers in and near the East Poplar oil field is as much as 17.9 square miles and appears to be present throughout the entire saturated zone in contaminated areas. The brine contamination affects 15–37 billion gallons of groundwater. Brine contamination in the shallow aquifers east of the Poplar River generally moves to the southwest toward the river and then southward in the Poplar River valley. The likely source of brine contamination in the shallow aquifers is brine that is produced with crude oil in the East Poplar oil field study area. Brine contamination has not only affected the water quality from privately owned wells in and near the East Poplar oil field, but also the city of Poplar’s public water-supply wells. Three water-quality types characterize water in the shallow aquifers; a fourth water-quality type in the study area characterizes the brine. Type 1 is uncontaminated water that is suitable for most domestic purposes and typically contains sodium bicarbonate and sodium/magnesium sulfate as the dominant ions. Type 2 is moderately contaminated water that is suitable for some domestic purposes, but not used for drinking water, and typically contains sodium and chloride as the dominant ions. Type 3 is considerably contaminated water that is unsuitable for any domestic purpose and always contains sodium and chloride as the dominant ions. Type 3 quality of water in the shallow aquifers is similar to Type 4, which is the brine that is produced with crude oil. Electromagnetic apparent conductivity data were collected in the 106 square-mile area and used to determine extent of brine contamination. These data were collected and interpreted in conjunction with water-quality data collected through 2009 to delineate brine plumes in the shallow aquifers. Monitoring wells subsequently were drilled in some areas without existing water wells to confirm most of the delineated brine plumes; however, several possible

  2. Leachate plume delineation and lithologic profiling using surface resistivity in an open municipal solid waste dumpsite, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wijesekara, Hasintha Rangana; De Silva, Sunethra Nalin; Wijesundara, Dharani Thanuja De Silva; Basnayake, Bendict Francis Antony; Vithanage, Meththika Suharshini

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the use of direct current resistivity techniques (DCRT) for investigation and characterization of leachate-contaminated subsurface environment of an open solid waste dumpsite at Kandy, Sri Lanka. The particular dumpsite has no liner and hence the leachate flows directly to the nearby river via subsurface and surface channels. For the identification of possible subsurface flow paths and the direction of the leachate, DCRT (two-dimensional, three-dimensional and vertical electrical sounding) have been applied. In addition, the physico-chemical parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity (EC), alkalinity, hardness, chloride, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) of leachate collected from different points of the solid waste dumping area and leachate drainage channel were analysed. Resistivity data confirmed that the leachate flow is confined to the near surface and no separate plume is observed in the downstream area, which may be due to the contamination distribution in the shallow overburden thickness. The stratigraphy with leachate pockets and leachate plume movements was well demarcated inside the dumpsite via low resistivity zones (1-3 Ωm). The recorded EC, alkalinity, hardness and chloride contents in leachate were averaged as 14.13 mS cm⁻¹, 3236, 2241 and 320 mg L⁻¹, respectively, which confirmed the possible causes for low resistivity values. This study confirms that DCRT can be effectively utilized to assess the subsurface characteristics of the open dumpsites to decide on corridor placement and depth of permeable reactive barriers to reduce the groundwater contamination. PMID:25209886

  3. The Plume Impingement Contamination II Experiment: Motivation, Design, and Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, Forrest E., III; Albyn, Keith C.; Farrell, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will have a long service life during which it must be able to serve as a capable platform for a wide variety of scientific investigations. In order to provide this capability, the ISS has, at the system level, a design requirement of no more than 100 Angstroms of contaminant deposition per year from "non-quiescent" sources. Non-quiescent sources include the plumes resulting from the firing of reaction control system (ReS) engines on space vehicles visiting the ISS as well as the engines on the ISS itself. Unfortunately, good general plume contamination models do not yet exist. This is due both to the complexity of the problem, making the analytic approach difficult, and to the difficulty in obtaining empirical measurements of contaminant depositions. To address this lack of flight data, NASA Johnson Space Center is planning to fly an experiment, Plume Impingement Contamination-II, to measure the contamination deposition from the Shuttle Orbiter's primary RCS engines as a function angle from plume centerline. This represents the first direct on-orbit measurement of plume impingement contamination away from the nozzle centerline ever performed, and as such is extremely important in validating mathematical models which will be used to quantify the cumulative plume impingement contamination to the ISS over its lifetime. The paper will elaborate further upon the motivation behind making these measurements as well as present the design and implementation plan of this planned experiment.

  4. Modelling reaction front formation and oscillatory behaviour in a contaminant plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura; Fowler, Andrew; Mitchell, Sarah; Winstanley, Henry

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater contamination is a concern in all industrialised countries that suffer countless spills and leaks of various contaminants. Often, the contaminated groundwater forms a plume that, under the influences of regional groundwater flow, could eventually migrate to streams or wells. This can have catastrophic consequences for human health and local wildlife. The process known as bioremediation removes pollutants in the contaminated groundwater through bacterial reactions. Microorganisms can transform the contaminant into less harmful metabolic products. It is important to be able to predict whether such bioremediation will be sufficient for the safe clean-up of a plume before it reaches wells or lakes. Borehole data from a contaminant plume which resulted from spillage at a coal carbonisation plant in Mansfield, England is the motivation behind modelling the properties of a contaminant plume. In the upper part of the plume, oxygen is consumed and a nitrate spike forms. Deep inside the plume, nitrate is depleted and oscillations of organic carbon and ammonium concentration profiles are observed. While there are various numerical models that predict the evolution of a contaminant plume, we aim to create a simplified model that captures the fundamental characteristics of the plume while being comparable in accuracy to the detailed numerical models that currently exist. To model the transport of a contaminant, we consider the redox reactions that occur in groundwater systems. These reactions deplete the contaminant while creating zones of dominant terminal electron accepting processes throughout the plume. The contaminant is depleted by a series of terminal electron acceptors, the order of which is typically oxygen, nitrate, manganese, iron, sulphate and carbon dioxide. We describe a reaction front, characteristic of a redox zone, by means of rapid reaction and slow diffusion. This aids in describing the depletion of oxygen in the upper part of the plume. To

  5. Combining high resolution vertical gradients and sequence stratigraphy to delineate hydrogeologic units for a contaminated sedimentary rock aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jessica R.; Parker, Beth L.; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Runkel, Anthony C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogeologic units (HGUs), representing subsurface contrasts in hydraulic conductivity, form the basis for all conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow. However, conventionally, delineation of these units relies heavily on data sets indirect with respect to hydraulic properties. Here, we use the spatial and temporal characteristics of the vertical component of hydraulic gradient (i.e., vertical gradient) as the primary line of evidence for delineating HGUs for Cambrian-Ordovician sedimentary rocks at a site in Dane County, Wisconsin. The site includes a 16 km2 area encompassing a 3 km long mixed organic contaminants plume. The vertical gradients are derived from hydraulic head profiles obtained using high resolution Westbay multilevel systems installed at 7 locations along two, orthogonal 4 km long cross-sections and monitoring to depths between 90 and 146 m with an average of 3-4 monitoring zones per 10 m. These vertical gradient cross-sections reveal 11 laterally extensive HGUs with contrasting vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv). The position and thickness of the Kv contrasts are consistently associated with sequence stratigraphic features (maximum flooding intervals and sequence boundaries) distinguished at the site using cores and borehole geophysical logs. The same sequence stratigraphic features are also traceable across much of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system of the Midwest US. The vertical gradients and sequence stratigraphy were arrived at independently and when combined provide a hydraulically calibrated sequence stratigraphic framework for the site. This framework provides increased confidence in the precise delineation and description of the nature of HGU contacts in each borehole, reduced uncertainty in interpolation of the HGUs between boreholes, and some capability to predict HGU boundaries and thickness in offsite areas where high resolution hydraulic data sets are not available. Consequently, this HGU conceptual model will

  6. Comparison of three nonparametric kriging methods for delineating heavy-metal contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, K.W.; Lee, D.Y

    2000-02-01

    The probability of pollutant concentrations greater than a cutoff value is useful for delineating hazardous areas in contaminated soils. It is essential for risk assessment and reclamation. In this study, three nonparametric kriging methods [indicator kriging, probability kriging, and kriging with the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of order statistics (CDF kriging)] were used to estimate the probability of heavy-metal concentrations lower than a cutoff value. In terms of methodology, the probability kriging estimator and CDF kriging estimator take into account the information of the order relation, which is not considered in indicator kriging. Since probability kriging has been shown to be better than indicator kriging for delineating contaminated soils, the performance of CDF kriging, which the authors propose, was compared with that of probability kriging in this study. A data set of soil Cd and Pb concentrations obtained from a 10-ha heavy-metal contaminated site in Taoyuan, Taiwan, was used. The results demonstrated that the probability kriging and CDF kriging estimations were more accurate than the indicator kriging estimation. On the other hand, because the probability kriging was based on the cokriging estimator, some unreliable estimates occurred in the probability kriging estimation. This indicated that probability kriging was not as robust as CDF kriging. Therefore, CDF kriging is more suitable than probability kriging for estimating the probability of heavy-metal concentrations lower than a cutoff value.

  7. Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, James; Foy, Bernard R.; Fraser, Andrew M.

    2006-05-01

    When a matched filter is used for detecting a weak target in a cluttered background (such as a gaseous plume in a hyperspectral image), it is important that the background clutter be well-characterized. A statistical characterization can be obtained from the off-plume pixels of a hyperspectral image, but if on-plume pixels are inadvertently included, then that background characterization will be contaminated. In broad area search scenarios, where detection is the central aim, it is by definition unknown which pixels in the scene are off-plume, so some contamination is inevitable. In general, the contaminated background degrades the ability of the matched-filter to detect that signal. This could be a practical problem in plume detection. A linear analysis suggests that the effect is limited, and actually vanishes in some cases. In this study, we take into account the Beer's Law nonlinearity of plume absorption, and we investigate the effect of that nonlinearity on the signal contamination.

  8. Delineation of Hydrocarbon Contamination of Soils and Sediments With Environmental Magnetic Methods: Laboratory and Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijal, M. L.; Appel, E.; Porsch, K.; Kappler, A.; Blaha, U.; Petrovsky, E.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of soils and sediments is a worldwide environmental problem. The present research focuses on the study of magnetic properties of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and sediments using environmental magnetic methods both on field sites as well as in laboratory batch experiments. The main objectives of this research are i) to determine a possible application of magnetic proxies for the delineation of organic contamination in soils and sediments and ii) to examine the role of bacteria in changing soil magnetic properties after hydrocarbon contamination. A former oil field and a former military site which are heavily contaminated with hydrocarbons were studied. Additionally, three different types of natural clean soils were investigated in laboratory experiments by simulating hydrocarbon contamination in sterile and microbial active setups. Magnetic properties, soil properties, iron bioavailability, iron redox state and hydrocarbon content of samples were measured. Additionally, magnetic susceptibility (MS) was monitored weekly in laboratory batch set-ups during several months. Results from the field sites showed that there is an increase of MS and a good correlation between MS and hydrocarbon content. A weekly monitored MS result from the laboratory study clearly indicated~~10% change (increase as well as decrease) of initial MS of respective soils only in microbial active set-ups with saturation after a few weeks of experimental period. This depicts that there is a change of MS caused by microbial iron mineral transformation in presence of hydrocarbon contamination in soils. The results from the field study demonstrate that magnetic proxies can be used to localize hydrocarbon contamination. However, more field sites with hydrocarbon contaminated soils and sediments need to be investigated by using environmental magnetic methods for better understanding the factors driving such changes in magnetic properties.

  9. Fate of organic contaminants in the redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1992-09-01

    Samples from 75 sample locations in a landfill leachate pollution plume reveal a significant disappearance of specific organic compounds (SOC's) within the first 100 m of the plume. Only the herbicide Mecoprop® (MCPP) migrates further. Since sorption and dilution cannot account for the decreasing concentrations, degradation is considered to be the governing process. Non-volatile organic carbon shows a corresponding fate probably acting as a substrate for the microbial processes. The first 20 m of the plume are methanogenic/sulfidogenic, judged on the chemistry of the groundwater, followed by a significant ferrogenic zone exhibiting a substantial capacity to degrade the SOC's. The presence of intermediary products (here an oxidized camphor compound) supports the concept of degradation within the ferrogenic zone. This investigation draws the attention to the significant natural attenuation of organic contaminants and to the so far neglected ferrogenic zone in controlling the fate of organic contaminants in leachate plumes.

  10. Kriging with cumulative distribution function of order statistics for delineation of heavy-metal contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, K.W.; Lee, D.Y.; Hsiao, C.K.

    1998-10-01

    Accurate delineation of contaminated soils is essential for risk assessment and remediation. The probability of pollutant concentrations lower than a cutoff value is more important than the best estimate of pollutant concentrations for unsampled locations in delineating contaminated soils. In this study, a new method, kriging with the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of order statistics (CDF kriging), is introduced and compared with indicator kriging. It is used to predict the probability that extractable concentrations of Zn will be less than a cut-off value for soils to be declared hazardous. The 0.1 M HCl-extractable Zn concentrations of topsoil of a paddy field having an area of about 2000 ha located in Taiwan are used. A comparison of the CDF of order statistics and indicator function transformation shows that the variance and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the CDF of order statistics transformed data are smaller than those of the indicator function transformed data. This suggests that the CDF of order statistics transformation possesses less variability than does the indicator function transformation. In addition, based on cross-validation, CDF kriging is found to reduce the mean squared errors of estimations by about 30% and to reduce the mean kriging variances by about 26% compared with indicator kriging.

  11. Air-Seawater Exchange of Organochlorine Pesticides along the Sediment Plume of a Large Contaminated River.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tian; Guo, Zhigang; Li, Yuanyuan; Nizzetto, Luca; Ma, Chuanliang; Chen, Yingjun

    2015-05-01

    Gaseous exchange fluxes of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) across the air-water interface of the coastal East China Sea were determined in order to assess whether the contaminated plume of the Yangtze River could be an important regional source of OCPs to the atmosphere. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) were the most frequently detected OCPs in air and water. Air-water exchange was mainly characterized by net volatilization for all measured OCPs. The net gaseous exchange flux ranged 10-240 ng/(m2·day) for γ-HCH, 60-370 ng/(m2·day) for trans-CHL, 97-410 ng/(m2·day) for cis-CHL, and ∼0 (e.g., equilibrium) to 490 ng/(m2·day) for p,p'-DDE. We found that the plume of the large contaminated river can serve as a significant regional secondary atmospheric source of legacy contaminants released in the catchment. In particular, the sediment plume represented the relevant source of DDT compounds (especially p,p'-DDE) sustaining net degassing when clean air masses from the open ocean reached the plume area. In contrast, a mass balance showed that, for HCHs, contaminated river discharge (water and sediment) plumes were capable of sustaining volatilization throughout the year. These results demonstrate the inconsistencies in the fate of HCHs and DDTs in this large estuarine system with declining primary sources. PMID:25827140

  12. Isotopic Systematics (U, nitrate and Sr) of the F-Area Acidic Contamination Plume at the Savannah River Site: Clues to Contaminant History and Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J. N.; Conrad, M. E.; Bill, M.; Denham, M.; Wan, J.; Rakshit, S.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Spycher, N.

    2010-12-01

    Seepage basins in the F-Area of the Savannah River Site were used from 1955 to 1989 for the disposal of low-level radioactive acidic (ave. pH ˜2.9) waste solutions from site operations involving irradiated uranium billets and other materials used in the production of radionuclides. These disposal activities resulted in a persistent acidic groundwater plume (pH as low as 3.2) beneath the F-Area including contaminants such as tritium, nitrate, 90Sr, 129I and uranium and that has impinged on surface water (Four Mile Branch) about 600 m from the basins. After cessation of disposal in 1989, the basins were capped in 1991. Since that time, remediation has consisted of a pump-and-treat system that has recently been replaced with in situ treatment using a funnel-and-gate system with injection of alkaline solutions in the gates to neutralize pH. In order to delineate the history of contamination and the current mobility and fate of contaminants in F-Area groundwater, we have undertaken a study of variations in the isotopic compositions of U (234U/238U, 235U/238U, 236U/238U), Sr (87Sr/86Sr) and nitrate (δ15N, δ18O) within the contaminant plume. This data can be used to trace U transport within the plume, evaluate chemical changes of nitrate, and potentially track plume/sediment chemical interaction and trace the migration of 90Sr. We have analyzed a suite of groundwater samples from monitoring wells, as well as pore-water samples extracted from aquifer sediment cores to map out the isotopic variation within the plume. The isotopic compositions of U from well samples and porewater samples are all consistent with the variable burn-up of depleted U. The variation in U isotopic composition requires at least three different endmembers, without any significant influence of background natural U. The δ15N and δ18O of nitrate from F-Area plume groundwater are distinct both from natural and unaltered synthetic nitrate, and likely represents fractionation due to waste volume

  13. An application of geoelectrical methods for contamination plume recognition in Urbanowice waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mycka, Mateusz; Mendecki, Maciej Jan

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to detect groundwater pollution and to identify the conditions of soil and groundwater near the Urbanowice landfill site using geoelectrical measurements. Presented measurements are preliminary results from tested site and are beginning of continuous monitoring. Contamination outflows detected by resistivity and IP technique show a good correlation with available hydrological data. Contamination plume were found in Eastern part of survey profil.

  14. Hydrogeological factors affecting the multiple plumes of chlorinated contaminants in an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Kaown, D.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.

    2010-12-01

    Apparent plume attenuations of multiple chlorinated contaminants such as TCE, carbon tetrachloride, and its daughter products at an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea were examined through various hydraulic tests and six rounds of groundwater quality analyses. Aquifer media properties and hydrogeologic factors affecting the distribution and attenuation of multiple contaminants were investigated and key attributes were evaluated. The study area has vertically heterogeneous properties from top alluvial layer to crystalline rocks while the weathered fractured layer above intact Jurassic biotite granite acts as the main layer for groundwater flow and aqueous phase multiple contaminants migration. Aerial heterogeneity in surface conditions plays an important role for groundwater recharge because the industrial complex is mostly paved by asphalt and concrete. Due to limited recharge area and concentrated precipitation in summer season, seasonal effects of contaminant plume distribution diminish as the distance increase from the area of recharge. This study analyzed how differently the solute and contaminant concentrations response to the seasonal recharge. For the analyses, the study site was divided into three zones and four transects were established. Groundwater and solute mass balances were estimated by computing groundwater and solute mass flux through transects. The effects of groundwater pumping, groundwater flow and contaminant degradation were examined to simulate the solutes and contaminant concentrations. General tendency of the water quality and contaminant concentration were reproducible with the effects of major components such as groundwater recharge, pumping and estimated degradation rate.

  15. The Relationship Between Partial Contaminant Source Zone Remediation and Groundwater Plume Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falta, R. W.

    2004-05-01

    Analytical solutions are developed that relate changes in the contaminant mass in a source area to the behavior of biologically reactive dissolved contaminant groundwater plumes. Based on data from field experiments, laboratory experiments, numerical streamtube models, and numerical multiphase flow models, the chemical discharge from a source region is assumed to be a nonlinear power function of the fraction of contaminant mass removed from the source zone. This function can approximately represent source zone mass discharge behavior over a wide range of site conditions ranging from simple homogeneous systems, to complex heterogeneous systems. A mass balance on the source zone with advective transport and first order decay leads to a nonlinear differential equation that is solved analytically to provide a prediction of the time-dependent contaminant mass discharge leaving the source zone. The solution for source zone mass discharge is coupled semi-analytically with a modified version of the Domenico (1987) analytical solution for three-dimensional reactive advective and dispersive transport in groundwater. The semi-analytical model then employs the BIOCHLOR (Aziz et al., 2000; Sun et al., 1999) transformations to model sequential first order parent-daughter biological decay reactions of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in the groundwater plume. The resulting semi-analytic model thus allows for transient simulation of complex source zone behavior that is fully coupled to a dissolved contaminant plume undergoing sequential biological reactions. Analyses of several realistic scenarios show that substantial changes in the ground water plume can result from the partial removal of contaminant mass from the source zone. These results, however, are sensitive to the nature of the source mass reduction-source discharge reduction curve, and to the rates of degradation of the primary contaminant and its daughter products in the ground water plume. Aziz, C.E., C.J. Newell, J

  16. Analysis of the remediation systems on the contaminant plume at the Plainville landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, R.L.

    1999-06-01

    The Plainville landfill, located in Plainville, Massachusetts, has been the subject of study by several groups in recent years. A contaminant plume, exiting from the southwest corner of the landfill, is contaminating the groundwater downgradient and may affect drinking water wells located there. A two-phase remediation scheme, consisting of an interim overburden air sparging system and a final proposed pump and treat and air sparging system, has been proposed to mitigate the groundwater contaminant plume. This thesis assesses these remediation systems to determine their ability to remediate the contaminants in the groundwater plume. The interim and final proposed air sparging systems were analyzed using existing quarterly reports and a literature review. A MODFLOW groundwater flow model was used to analyze the pump and treat system. These analyses were then compared to the model utilized to design the remediation scheme. Several discrepancies in the design of the remediation scheme were noted as a result of this analysis. First, the presence of till lenses throughout the remediation zone was not addressed. Also, the extraction of water from the competent bedrock layer appears counterproductive. In addition, the air sparging system was not field tested to ascertain the flow pattern in the subsurface. Finally, the installation of the bedrock air sparging wells appears redundant. These discrepancies, however, will only decrease the projected efficiency of the proposed remediation schemes and increase clean up time. Consequently, the results of this study seem to indicate that the proposed remediation scheme is adequately designed.

  17. Testing of stack-unit/aquifer sensitivity analysis using contaminant plume distribution in the subsurface of Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rine, J.M.; Shafer, J.M.; Covington, E.; Berg, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Published information on the correlation and field-testing of the technique of stack-unit/aquifer sensitivity mapping with documented subsurface contaminant plumes is rare. The inherent characteristic of stack-unit mapping, which makes it a superior technique to other analyses that amalgamate data, is the ability to deconstruct the sensitivity analysis on a unit-by-unit basis. An aquifer sensitivity map, delineating the relative sensitivity of the Crouch Branch aquifer of the Administrative/Manufacturing Area (A/M) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA, incorporates six hydrostratigraphic units, surface soil units, and relevant hydrologic data. When this sensitivity map is compared with the distribution of the contaminant tetrachloroethylene (PCE), PCE is present within the Crouch Branch aquifer within an area classified as highly sensitive, even though the PCE was primarily released on the ground surface within areas classified with low aquifer sensitivity. This phenomenon is explained through analysis of the aquifer sensitivity map, the groundwater potentiometric surface maps, and the plume distributions within the area on a unit-by- unit basis. The results of this correlation show how the paths of the PCE plume are influenced by both the geology and the groundwater flow. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  18. Improving Modeling of Iodine-129 Groundwater Contamination Plumes Using the System Assessment Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkes, J.; Nichols, W.E.; Wurstner, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    Years of production of radioactive materials at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has resulted in contamination of surface, subsurface, and surface water environments. Cleanup of the site has been aided by various tools, including computer software used to predict contaminant migration in the future and estimate subsequent impacts. The System Assessment Capability (SAC) is a total systems tool designed to simulate the movement of contaminants from all waste sites at Hanford through the vadose zone, the unconfined aquifer, and the Columbia River. Except for iodine-129, most of the contaminants modeled by SAC have acceptably matched field measurements. The two most likely reasons for the inconsistency between the measured field data and SAC modeled predictions are an underestimated inventory and an overestimated sorption value (Kd). Field data tend to be point measurements taken from near the surface of the unconfined aquifer. Thus, the depth of the iodine-129 contamination plume on the site is not well characterized. Geostatistical analyses of the measured data were conducted to determine the mass of iodine-129 for four assumed plume depths within the unconfined aquifer. Several simulations for two different Kd’s using the initial SAC inventory were run to determine the effect of an overestimated sorption value on SAC modeled predictions. The initial SAC inventory was then increased for the two different Kd’s to determine the influence of an underestimated inventory on SAC modeled predictions. It was found that evidence for both an underestimated inventory and for an overestimated sorption value for iodine-129 exist. These results suggest that the Kd for iodine-129 should be reevaluated and that a more complete inventory must be generated in order to more accurately model iodine-129 groundwater contamination plumes that match available field data.

  19. Surface and borehole electromagnetic imaging of conducting contaminant plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component magnetic field detectors are deployed in other boreholes or on the surface. Sources and receivers are typically deployed in a configuration surrounding the region of interest. The goal of this procedure is to image electrical conductivity variations in the earth, much as x-ray tomography is used to image density variations through cross-sections of the body. Although such EM field techniques have been developed and applied, the algorithms for inverting the magnetic field data to produce the desired images of electrical conductivity have not kept pace. One of the main reasons for the lag in the algorithm development has been the fact that the magnetic induction problem is inherently three dimensional; other imaging methods such as x-ray and seismic can make use of two-dimensional approximations that are not too far from reality, but we do not have this luxury in EM induction tomography. In addition, previous field experiments were conducted at controlled test sites that typically do not have much external noise or extensive surface clutter problems often associated with environmental sites. To use the same field techniques in environments more typical of cleanup sites requires a new set of data processing tools to remove the effects of both noise and clutter. The goal of this project is to join theory and experiment to produce enhanced images of electrically conducting fluids underground, allowing better localization of contaminants and improved planning strategies for the subsequent remediation efforts. After explaining the physical context in more detail, this report will summarize the progress made in the first 18 months of this project: (1) on code development and (2) on field tests of

  20. Emplacement of zero-valent metal for remediation of deep contaminant plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Hubble, D.W.; Gillham, R.W.; Cherry, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    Some groundwater plumes containing chlorinated solvent contaminants are found to be so deep that current in situ remediation technologies cannot be economically applied. Also, source zones are often found to be too deep for removal or inaccessible due to surface features. Plumes emanating from these sources require containment or treatment. Containment technologies are available for shallow sites (< 15 m) and are being developed for greater depths. However, it is important to advance the science of reactive treatment - both for cut off of plumes and to contain and treat source zones. Zero-valent metal technology has been used for remediation of solvent plumes at sites in Canada, the UK and at several industrial and military sites in the USA. To date, all of the plumes treated with zero-valent metal (granular iron) have been at depths less than 15 m. This paper gives preliminary results of research into methods to emplace granular iron at depths in the range of 15 to 60 m. The study included review of available and emerging methods of installing barrier or reactive material and the selection, preliminary design and costing of several methods. The design of a treatment system for a 122 m wide PCE plume that, immediately down gradient from its source, extends from a depth of 24 to 37 m below the ground surface is used as a demonstration site. Both Permeable Reactive Wall and Funnel-and-Gate{trademark} systems were considered. The emplacement methods selected for preliminary design and costing were slurry wall, driven/vibrated beam, deep soil mixing and hydrofracturing injection. For each of these methods, the iron must be slurried for ease of pumping and placement using biodegradable polymer viscosifiers that leave the iron reactive.

  1. Tracking the origin and dispersion of contaminated sediments transported by rivers draining the Fukushima radioactive contaminant plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, H.; Evrard, O.; Onda, Y.; Chartin, C.; Lefevre, I.; Sophie, A.; Bonte, P.

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted in several catchments draining the main Fukushima Dai-ichi Power Plant contaminant plume in Fukushima prefecture, Japan. We collected soils and sediment drape deposits (n = 128) and investigated the variation in 137Cs enrichment during five sampling campaigns, conducted every six months, which typically occurred after intense erosive events such as typhoons and snowmelt. We show that upstream contaminated soils are eroded during summer typhoons (June-October) before being exported during the spring snowmelt (March-April). However, this seasonal cycle of sediment dispersion is further complicated by the occurrence of dam releases that may discharge large amounts of contaminants to the coastal plains during the coming years.

  2. Source-term development for a contaminant plume for use by multimedia risk assessment models

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Gene ); McDonald, John P. ); Taira, Randal Y. ); Gnanapragasam, Emmanuel K.; Yu, Charley; Lew, Christine S.; Mills, William B.

    1999-12-01

    Multimedia modelers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are collaborating to conduct a comprehensive and quantitative benchmarking analysis of four intermedia models: DOE's Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS), EPA's MMSOILS, EPA's PRESTO, and DOE's RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD). These models represent typical analytically, semi-analytically, and empirically based tools that are utilized in human risk and endangerment assessments for use at installations containing radioactive and/or hazardous contaminants. Although the benchmarking exercise traditionally emphasizes the application and comparison of these models, the establishment of a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) should be viewed with equal importance. This paper reviews an approach for developing a CSM of an existing, real-world, Sr-90 plume at DOE's Hanford installation in Richland, Washington, for use in a multimedia-based benchmarking exercise bet ween MEPAS, MMSOILS, PRESTO, and RESRAD. In an unconventional move for analytically based modeling, the benchmarking exercise will begin with the plume as the source of contamination. The source and release mechanism are developed and described within the context of performing a preliminary risk assessment utilizing these analytical models. By beginning with the plume as the source term, this paper reviews a typical process and procedure an analyst would follow in developing a CSM for use in a preliminary assessment using this class of analytical tool.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Ion Thruster Plume Backflow for Spacecraft Contamination Assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta Roy, Robie I.

    1995-01-01

    A study is presented of the induced environment produced by an ion thruster, and its interactions with spacecraft. Axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional physical and numerical models of an ion thruster plume are developed and utilized to understand the physical processes involved, as well as to make useful predictions of spacecraft contamination. Components included in the model are primary beam ions, neutral propellant efflux, slow propellant ions created mainly by charge-exchange (CEX) collisions, non-propellant efflux (NPE) such as sputtered molybdenum grid metal, and neutralizing electrons. Primary focus is on the creation and transport of both the CEX propellant ions created from the beam ions and neutral propellant, and charged NPE from the thruster plume into the backflow region. The numerical model utilizes the hybrid plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) method, and the fully three-dimensional implementation is designed for multi -computer environments. Computational results of the CEX ion density and flow angles show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental data. It is shown that the CEX ions created in the beam accelerate outwards and form two distinct energy populations, one with a significant backstreaming component. The effect of the background tank pressure in ground experiments, and the accelerator grid impingement current is examined. The backflow contamination from NASA's current 30 cm xenon ion thruster is investigated over the operating envelope of the thruster, and predictions for space operation are made. Scaling relationships for the backflow previously identified are confirmed. Issues regarding the electron temperature in the plume are explored, and it is shown that backflow contamination increases with electron temperature. Fully three-dimensional results with up to 17.5 million particles are presented. It is shown that the spacecraft geometry plays a strong role in the expansion of the CEX plasma. The contamination from the

  4. Exhaust plume and contamination characteristics of a bipropellant (MMH/N2O4) RCS thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented for three recent tests in a series of thruster contamination experiments made in liquid helium-cooled environmental facility. The contaminating effects encountered on various materials, surfaces, and components, due to the exhaust products from a 5-pound thrust, bipropellant (MMH/N2O4) thruster are investigated. The angular distribution of plume effects around the periphery of the thruster established by transmittance changes of quartz samples over the wavelength range from 0.2 to 2.0 micrometer is studied, along with mass deposition rates at a specific location measured with a quartz crystal microbalance for three different experiments. Quadrupole mass spectrometer measurements of the exhaust products over the mass number range from 12 to 75; infrared transmittance measurements of contaminated samples for the wavelength range from 2.5 to 15 microns; and infrared transmittance measurements of residue from the thruster nozzle are also considered.

  5. The effect of rocket plume contamination on the optical properties of transmitting and reflecting materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.; Spisz, E. W.; Cassidy, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The preliminary results of plume contamination from a 5-pound thrust single-doublet, bipropellant rocket engine on the transmittance of quartz and the reflectance of a silicon monoxide overcoated aluminum mirror are presented. Changes in quartz transmittance were found to be significant and were due to both absorption and scattering effects. Contaminant absorption effects were predominant at the short wavelengths and scattering effects were greatest in the visible wavelengths. Measured changes in mirror reflectance were due primarily to contaminant absorption. Scattering effects were found to be as much as 9 percent of the total reflected energy from the mirror. There were no noticeable chemical or erosion effects on either the quartz or the front surface mirror.

  6. Cost-effective sampling network design for contaminant plume monitoring under general hydrogeological conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianfeng; Zheng, Chunmiao; Chien, Calvin C

    2005-03-01

    A new simulation-optimization methodology is developed for cost-effective sampling network design associated with long-term monitoring of large-scale contaminant plumes. The new methodology is similar in concept to the one presented by Reed et al. (Reed, P.M., Minsker, B.S., Valocchi, A.J., 2000a. Cost-effective long-term groundwater monitoring design using a genetic algorithm and global mass interpolation. Water Resour. Res. 36 (12), 3731-3741) in that an optimization model based on a genetic algorithm is coupled with a flow and transport simulator and a global mass estimator to search for optimal sampling strategies. However, this study introduces the first and second moments of a three-dimensional contaminant plume as new constraints in the optimization formulation, and demonstrates the proposed methodology through a real-world application. The new moment constraints significantly increase the accuracy of the plume interpolated from the sampled data relative to the plume simulated by the transport model. The plume interpolation approaches employed in this study are ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The proposed methodology is applied to the monitoring of plume evolution during a pump-and-treat operation at a large field site. It is shown that potential cost savings up to 65.6% may be achieved without any significant loss of accuracy in mass and moment estimations. The IDW-based interpolation method is computationally more efficient than the OK-based method and results in more potential cost savings. However, the OK-based method leads to more accurate mass and moment estimations. A comparison of the sampling designs obtained with and without the moment constraints points to their importance in ensuring a robust long-term monitoring design that is both cost-effective and accurate in mass and moment estimations. Additional analysis demonstrates the sensitivity of the optimal sampling design to the various coefficients included in the

  7. Cross-shore transport pathways between coastal aquifers and coastal seas: Archetype of a nearshore variable-density contaminant plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Bakhtyar, R.; Brovelli, A.; Li, L.; Robinson, C. E.; Xin, P.

    2012-12-01

    On permeable beaches, tides and waves lead to an upper saline plume underneath the beach face in addition to the saltwater wedge. The transport and fate of land-derived chemicals depend on process dynamics at the land-sea interface, which can be examined using a nearshore variable-density contaminant plume. Such a plume can be taken as an archetype, since it includes tracer transport as a special case, or can become unstable if a suitable density contrast is imposed. Using this archetype, we consider three features of coastal aquifers: (i) Dense plumes interact with groundwater to produce features that resemble instabilities but are, instead, distinct features that depend on the flow regime and aquifer geometry. While evident in the laboratory, such features are unlikely to occur in the field. (ii) In oceanic settings, coastal aquifers respond and interact with tides and waves. Simulations confirm that beach morphology and in/exfiltration across the beach face are both linked to wave breaking on short time scales, i.e., linkages between beach morphology and in/exfiltration both reflect their relationship with coastal waves. On longer time scales, tide and wave effects are roughly additive, with tides usually being more important. (iii) The density of inland contaminant plume and the coastal aquifer depth both impact on the distribution of travel times from the contaminant site to the beachface. Tracer plume breakthrough curves resemble a Gaussian distribution, with increasing skewness as the plume density increases.

  8. Assessing Redox Potential and Fluid Conductivity of a Contaminant Plume from Geoelectric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naudet, V.; Revil, A.; Rizzo, E.; Bottero, J.; Begassat, P.

    2003-12-01

    The redox potential and the fluid conductivity of a contaminant plume are two key-parameter to evaluate the plume development and to propose appropriate remediation technologies. we applied geo-electrical methods (self-potential, SP, and electrical resistivity tomography, ERT) to the Entressen landfill site (South-eastern France). From the knowledge of the piezometric head variation of the groundwater, the electrokinetic source is removed from the SP signals measured on the field. Then, a correlation (Rý=0.85) is obtained between the residual SP due to redox effect and the redox potential values measured in monitoring wells. The first-order linear relationship derived from this correlation is finally used to obtain a redox potential map of the overall contaminated site. A correlation (Rý=0.70) is observed between the electrical conductivities determined from the 3D ERT image and the conductivity of the groundwater measured in boreholes. From this correlation a map of the fluid conductivity is obtained. The maps of the redox potential and conductivity of the groundwater are both indicative of the presence of contaminants. The first one is more sensitive to the presence of organic matter and biodegradation. The second one gives information on the mineralization of the groundwater. Both maps can therefore be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation.

  9. Pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants within a leachate plume downgradient of a municipal landfill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Kimberlee K.; Christenson, Scott C.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Focazio, Michael J.; Furlong, Edward T.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Meyer, Michael T.; Barber, Larry B.

    2004-01-01

    Ground water samples collected from the Norman Landfill research site in central Oklahoma were analyzed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Toxic Substances Hydrology Program's national reconnaissance of pharmaceuticals and other organic waste water contaminants (OWCs) in ground water. Five sites, four of which are located downgradient of the landfill, were sampled in 2000 and analyzed for 76 OWCs using four research methods developed by the USGS. OWCs were detected in water samples from all of the sites sampled, with 22 of the 76 OWCs being detected at least once. Cholesterol (a plant and animal steroid), was detected at all five sites and was the only compound detected in a well upgradient of the landfill. N,Ndiethyltoluamide (DEET used in insect repellent) and tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (fire-retardant) were detected in water samples from all four sites located within the landfill-derived leachate plume. The sites closest to the landfill had more detections and greater concentrations of each of the detected compounds than sites located farther away. Detection of multiple OWCs occurred in the four sites located within the leachate plume, with a minimum of four and a maximum of 17 OWCs detected. Because the landfill was established in the 1920s and closed in 1985, many compounds detected in the leachate plume were likely disposed of decades ago. These results indicate the potential for long-term persistence and transport of some OWCs in ground water.

  10. Integration of Predicted Atmospheric Contaminant Plumes into ArcView GIS

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, Larry D.

    2005-10-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) plays a key role in emergency response scenarios in which there may be a release of atmospheric chemical or radiological contamination at the DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). Meteorologists at SRNL use a variety of tools to predict the path of the plume and levels of contamination along the path. These predictions are used to guide field teams that take sample measurements for verification. Integration of these predicted plumes as well as field measurements into existing Geographic Information System (GIS) interactive maps provides key additional information for decision makers during an emergency. In addition, having this information in GIS format facilitates sharing the information with other agencies that use GIS. In order to be useful during an emergency, an application for converting predictions or measurements into GIS format must be automated and simple to use. Thus, a key design goal in developing such applications is ease of use. Simple menu selections and intuitive forms with graphical user interfaces are used to accomplish this goal. Applications have been written to convert two different predictive code results into ArcView GIS. Meteorologists at SRNL use the Puff/Plume code, which is tied to real-time wind data, to predict the direction and spread of the atmospheric plume for early assessment. The calculated circular puffs are converted into an ArcView polygon shapefile with attributes for predicted time, dose, and radius of the puff. The meteorologists use the more sophisticated Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) to predict particle dispersion and deposition. The calculational grid is brought into ArcView as a point shapefile and then interpolated to ARC GRID format using Spatial Analyst. This GRID can then be contoured into a line shapefile, which is easily shared with other agencies. The deposition grid is also automatically contoured for values that correspond to FDA Derived Intervention Levels

  11. Delineating the discharge zone and potential natural attenuation of a chlorinated solvent plume to a gaining lowland river: A multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherill, J. J.; Krause, S.; Voyce, K. J.

    2012-04-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), such as trichloroethene (TCE), are often recalcitrant groundwater pollutants which can form extensive dissolved plumes with the potential to impact on the quality of baseflow to rivers. There is a growing need to evaluate the risk to surface water posed by migrating plumes and the intrinsic potential for natural attenuation along contaminant flow paths through the groundwater/surface water interface (GSI). This study investigates the potential discharge of a poorly defined CAH plume to an accreting section of the River Tern (Shropshire, UK). Groundwater sampling in the area has revealed the presence of TCE (with minor chloroform and carbon tetrachloride) with maximum concentrations discovered at depths of up to 80 m in a number of deep boreholes in an unconfined sandstone aquifer hydraulically connected to the river. We aim to develop a conceptual understanding of spatial patterns of plume discharge at sub-catchment to sediment-scale and assess the potential significance of biogeochemical transformation in the river bed and riparian sediments of a baseflow-dominated lowland river. Concentrations of dissolved CAHs (including the anaerobic metabolites of TCE) were monitored in a reach-scale longitudinal channel network of liquid-liquid passive diffusion samplers, placed in direct contact with the top 10 cm of river bed sediment. Samplers comprised distilled water-filled glass vials capped by a thin (50 μm) film of commercially available LDPE tubing. A long integration time (33 days) was selected for sampler equilibration with in-situ pore water concentrations. Results provided a plan-view reconnaissance survey of TCE distribution in the river bed and indicated tentative core and fringe zones. Spatial connectivity between ground and surface water was mapped by means of an in-situ fibre-optic distributed temperature sensor system deployed in the uppermost 10 cm of sediment spanning the investigated reach. To determine changes

  12. The plume fringe concept - Biodegradation of organic contaminants in subsurface ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckenstock, R. U.; Griebler, C.; Anneser, B.; Winderl, C.; Bauer, R.; Lüders, T.; Kellermann, C.; Selesi, D.

    2005-12-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in groundwater systems may be limited by the depletion of essential nutrients or the low number of degraders. However, the main problem seems to be the insufficient mixing of e-donors and e-acceptors. Main degradation activities in contaminant plumes are therefore located at their fringes. In order to investigate the ecology of pollutant-degrading microbes, experiments are carried out (1) in 2D-aquifer model systems and (2) sediment cores were drilled at a former gasworks site and a novel high-resolution multilevel sampling well was installed. (1) To assess the importance of individual abiotic (e.g. mixing, toxicity, nutrients) and biotic (e.g. cell distribution and activity, redox tolerance) parameters for biodegradation under well controlled lab conditions, contaminant plumes are generated in 2D-model systems and subsequently inoculated with aerobic and/or anaerobic bacterial strains to investigate biodegradation in a spatially resolved manner. (2) To recognize limitations of biodegradation in a PAH-contaminated aquifer, sediment cores were taken and, at the same site, a high-resolution multilevel well was installed for frequent groundwater sampling with varying spatial resolution (from cm to m range). In both systems, degradation of contaminants is followed by vertically resolved concentration measurements, compound-specific stable isotope (D/H, 13C/12C) analysis and the identification of signature metabolites. Physical-chemical gradients are resolved by means of microsensors and geochemical sediment and water analysis. The spatial distribution of microbial biomass, individual groups of microbes and the presence of functional genes coding for potential degradation activities are investigated using molecular tools. First results of the work, which is embedded in two current projects, will be discussed.

  13. Detection of contaminant plumes in ground water of Long Island, New York, by electromagnetic terrain-conductivity surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mack, Thomas J.; Maus, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic terrain conductivity surveys were conducted at four landfills in Suffolk county and at an artificial recharge site in Nassau County to assess the feasibility of this technique for detecting contaminant plumes. The technique was successful at three of the landfills; results compared closely with those indicated by specific conductance of water from observation wells on the sites. Data from the three sites for which the technique was successful--the Horseblock Road landfill , the Manorville scavenger waste disposal facility, and the Riverhead landfill--revealed pronounced terrain conductivity anomalies that reflect known contaminant plumes. Plumes at the other two sites--Blydenburgh landfill and the East Meadow artificial recharge site--could not be detected because cultural interferences were too great and, at the Blydenburgh site, depth to water was too great. The interferences included pipelines, utility cables, and traffic. Given favorable conditions, such as high plume conductivity, lack of cultural interferences, and a depth of less than 100 ft to the plume, electromagnetic surveying can provide a rapid means of locating contaminant plumes. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Free-product plume distribution and recovery modeling prediction in a diesel-contaminated volcanic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Espriú, Antonio; Martínez-Santos, Pedro; Sánchez-León, Emilio; Marín, Luis E.

    Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL) represent one of the most serious problems in aquifers contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons liquids. To design an appropriate remediation strategy it is essential to understand the behavior of the plume. The aim of this paper is threefold: (1) to characterize the fluid distribution of an LNAPL plume detected in a volcanic low-conductivity aquifer (∼0.4 m/day from slug tests interpretation), (2) to simulate the recovery processes of the free-product contamination and (3) to evaluate the primary recovery efficiency of the following alternatives: skimming, dual-phase extraction, Bioslurping and multi-phase extraction wells. The API/Charbeneau analytical model was used to investigate the recovery feasibility based on the geological properties and hydrogeological conditions with a multi-phase (water, air, LNAPL) transport approach in the vadose zone. The modeling performed in this research, in terms of LNAPL distribution in the subsurface, show that oil saturation is 7% in the air-oil interface, with a maximum value of 70% in the capillary fringe. Equilibrium between water and LNAPL phases is reached at a depth of 1.80 m from the air-oil interface. On the other hand, the LNAPL recovery model results suggest a remarkable enhancement of the free-product recovery when simultaneous extra-phase extraction was simulated from wells, in addition to the LNAPL lens. Recovery efficiencies were 27%, 65%, 66% and 67% for skimming, dual-phase extraction, Bioslurping and multi-phase extraction, respectively. During a 3-year simulation, skimmer wells and multi-phase extraction showed the lowest and highest LNAPL recovery rates, with expected values from 207 to 163 and 2305 to 707 l-LNAPL/day, respectively. At a field level we are proposing a well distribution arrangement that alternates pairs of dual-phase well-Bioslurping well. This not only improves the recovery of the free-product plume, but also pumps the dissolve plume and enhances in

  15. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical contaminant distribution are necessary in order to adequately characterize waste sites and determine remedial strategies to be employed. However, it is important to consider the sampling objectives, sampling methods, and sampl...

  16. Simulation of the effect of remediation on EDB and 1,2-DCA plumes at sites contaminated by leaded gasoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, James K.; Falta, Ronald W.; Freedman, David L.

    2009-08-01

    An analytical model is used to simulate the effects of partial source removal and plume remediation on ethylene dibromide (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) plumes at contaminated underground storage tank (UST) sites. The risk posed by EDB, 1,2-DCA, and commingled gasoline hydrocarbons varies throughout the plume over time. Dissolution from the light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) determines the concentration of each contaminant near the source, but biological decay in the plume has a greater influence as distance downgradient from the source increases. For this reason, compounds that exceed regulatory standards near the source may not in downgradient plume zones. At UST sites, partial removal of a residual LNAPL source mass may serve as a stand alone remedial technique if dissolved concentrations in the source zone are within several orders of magnitude of the applicable government or remedial standards. This may be the case with 1,2-DCA; however, EDB is likely to be found at concentrations that are orders of magnitude higher than its low Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 0.05 μg/L (micrograms per liter). For sites with significant EDB contamination, even when plume remediation is combined with source depletion, significant timeframes may be required to mitigate the impact of this compound. Benzene and MTBE are commonly the focus of remedial efforts at UST sites, but simulations presented here suggest that EDB, and to a lesser extent 1,2-DCA, could be the critical contaminants to consider in the remediation design process at many sites.

  17. Plume mass flow and optical damage distributions for an MMH/N2O4 RCS thruster. [exhaust plume contamination of spacecraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The data obtained from two recent experiments conducted in a continuing series of experiments at the Lewis Research Center into the contamination characteristics of a 5-pound thrust MMH/N2O4 engine are presented. The primary objectives of these experiments were to establish the angular distribution of condensible exhaust products within the plume and the corresponding optical damage angular distribution of transmitting optical elements attributable to this contaminant. The plume mass flow distribution was measured by five quartz crystal microbalances (QCM's) located at the engine axis evaluation. The fifth QCM was located above the engine and 15 deg behind the nozzle exit plane. The optical damage was determined by ex-situ transmittance measurements for the wavelength range from 0.2 to 0.6 microns on 2.54 cm diameter fused silica discs also located at engine centerline elevation. Both the mass deposition and optical damage angular distributions followed the expected trend of decreasing deposition and damage as the angle between sensor or sample and the nozzle axis increased. A simple plume gas flow equation predicted the deposition distribution reasonably well for angles of up to 55 degrees. The optical damage measurements also indicated significant effects at large angles.

  18. Phytoforensics, dendrochemistry, and phytoscreening: new green tools for delineating contaminants from past and present.

    PubMed

    Burken, Joel G; Vroblesky, Don A; Balouet, Jean Christophe

    2011-08-01

    As plants evolved to be extremely proficient in mass transfer with their surroundings and survive as earth's dominant biomass, they also accumulate and store some contaminants from surroundings, acting as passive samplers. Novel applications and analytical methods have been utilized to gain information about a wide range of contaminants in the biosphere soil, water, and air, with information available on both past (dendrochemistry) and present (phytoscreening). Collectively these sampling approaches provide rapid, cheap, ecologically friendly, and overall "green" tools termed "Phytoforensics". PMID:21749088

  19. Resistivity and self-potential tomography applied to groundwater remediation and contaminant plumes: Sandbox and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Revil, A.; Hort, R. D.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Kulessa, B.

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical methods can be used to remotely characterize contaminated sites and monitor in situ enhanced remediation processes. We have conducted one sandbox experiment and one contaminated field investigation to show the robustness of electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential (SP) tomography for these applications. In the sandbox experiment, we injected permanganate in a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated environment under a constant hydraulic gradient. Inverted resistivity tomograms are able to track the evolution of the permanganate plume in agreement with visual observations made on the side of the tank. Self-potential measurements were also performed at the surface of the sandbox using non-polarizing Ag-AgCl electrodes. These data were inverted to obtain the source density distribution with and without the resistivity information. A compact horizontal dipole source located at the front of the plume was obtained from the inversion of these self-potential data. This current dipole may be related to the redox reaction occurring between TCE and permanganate and the strong concentration gradient at the front of the plume. We demonstrate that time-lapse self-potential signals can be used to track the kinetics of an advecting oxidizer plume with acceptable accuracy and, if needed, in real time, but are unable to completely resolve the shape of the plume. In the field investigation, a 3D resistivity tomography is used to characterize an organic contaminant plume (resistive domain) and an overlying zone of solid waste materials (conductive domain). After removing the influence of the streaming potential, the identified source current density had a magnitude of 0.5 A m-2. The strong source current density may be attributed to charge movement between the neighboring zones that encourage abiotic and microbially enhanced reduction and oxidation reactions. In both cases, the self-potential source current density is located in the area of strong resistivity

  20. COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT IN CONTAMINANT PLUMES: FIELD EXPERIMENTS, LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, AND MODELING (EPA/600/S-99/001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbatio...

  1. Movement and fate of solutes in a plume of sewage-contaminated ground water, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, D. R., (Edited By)

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has begun a nationwide program to study the fate of toxic wastes in groundwater. Several sites where groundwater is known to be contaminated are being studied by interdisciplinary teams of geohydrologists, chemists, and microbiologists. The objective of these studies is to obtain a thorough quantitative understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes of contaminant generation, migration, and attenuation in aquifers. One of the sites being studied by the USGS under this program is a plume of sewage contaminated groundwater on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The plume was formed by land disposal of treated sewage to a glacial outwash aquifer since 1936. This report summarizes results obtained during the first year of research at the Cape Cod s under the USGS Toxic-Waste Ground-Water Contamination Program. The seven papers included in this volume were presented at the Toxic Waste Technical Meeting, Tucson, Arizona, in March 1984. They provide an integrated view of the subsurface distribution of contaminants based on the first year of research and discuss hypotheses concerning the transport processes that affect the movement of contaminants in the plume. (See W89-09053 thru W89-09059) (Lantz-PTT)

  2. Phytoforensics, dendrochemistry, and phytoscreening: New green tools for delineating contaminants from past and present

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burken, J.G.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Balouet, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    As plants evolved to be extremely proficient in mass transfer with their surroundings and survive as earth's dominant biomass, they also accumulate and store some contaminants from surroundings, acting as passive samplers. Novel applications and analytical methods have been utilized to gain information about a wide range of contaminants in the biosphere soil, water, and air, with information available on both past (dendrochemistry) and present (phytoscreening). Collectively these sampling approaches provide rapid, cheap, ecologically friendly, and overall "green" tools termed "Phytoforensics". ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. DELINEATION OF SUBSURFACE HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION USING A DIRECT PUSH RESISTIVITY METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct push resistivity method was evaluated as a complementary screening tool to provide rapid in-situ contaminant detection to aid in better defining locations for drilling, sampling, and monitoring well installation at hazardous waste sites. Nine continuous direct push resi...

  4. Biodegradation Processes in a Laboratory-Scale Groundwater Contaminant Plume Assessed by Fluorescence Imaging and Microbial Analysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Helen C.; Oswald, Sascha E.; Banwart, Steven A.; Pickup, Roger W.; Lerner, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Flow reactors containing quartz sand colonized with biofilm were set up as physical model aquifers to allow degrading plumes of acetate or phenol to be formed from a point source. A noninvasive fluorescent tracer technique was combined with chemical and biological sampling in order to quantify transport and biodegradation processes. Chemical analysis of samples showed a substantial decrease in carbon concentration between the injection and outflow resulting primarily from dilution but also from biodegradation. Two-dimensional imaging of the aqueous oxygen [O2(aq)] concentration field quantified the depletion of O2(aq) within the contaminant plume and provided evidence for microbial respiration associated with biodegradation of the carbon source. Combined microbiological, chemical, and O2(aq) imaging data indicated that biodegradation was greatest at the plume fringe. DNA profiles of bacterial communities were assessed by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, which revealed that diversity was limited and that community changes observed depended on the carbon source used. Spatial variation in activity within the plume could be quantitatively accounted for by the changes observed in active cell numbers rather than differences in community structure, the total biomass present, or the increased enzyme activity of individual cells. Numerical simulations and comparisons with the experimental data were used to test conceptual models of plume processes. Results demonstrated that plume behavior was best described by growth and decay of active biomass as a single functional group of organisms represented by active cell counts. PMID:17468279

  5. Plume-Scale Testing of a Simplified Method for Detecting Tritium Contamination in Plants and Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraski, B. J.; Halford, K. J.; Johnson, M. J.; Michel, R. L.; Radyk, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Research at the Amargosa Desert Research Site near Beatty, Nevada indicates that tritium movement from a closed low-level radioactive waste facility occurs primarily in the gas phase with preferential transport through coarse-textured sediment layers. However, models for movement of tritiated water vapor at the site fail to predict the extent of transport indicated by field measurements. In order to develop a better understanding of the spatial distribution of tritium contamination in the near-surface environment adjacent to the waste facility, a recently published tritium contamination-detection method was tested for collection and analysis of plume-scale data. The method entails solar distillation of plant water from foliage, followed by filtration and adsorption of scintillation-interfering constituents on a graphite-based solid-phase-extraction column prior to direct-scintillation counting. Samples were collected from 103 plants (creosote bush; Larrea tridentata) within a 72-ha area adjacent to the waste facility. Plant data showed elevated tritium concentrations up to 300 m from the waste facility. For a small ( ˜ 8 ha) area where high-density soil-water vapor data were already available, plant-based and soil-based concentration contours compared favorably. Plant data for previously unmeasured areas identified "hot spots" that were later verified by direct soil measurements. Regression analysis of tritium concentrations from collocated plant- and soil-sampling sites showed that empirical relations could be developed to predict soil concentrations (y) from the more simply determined plant concentrations (x): e.g., the equation for root-zone soil concentrations (Bq/L) was y = 1.156 x + 55.17 (r2 = 0.9521; SEE = 250). Results of this work have improved knowledge of the extent of tritium contamination in the near-surface environment. The pattern of the tritium concentrations indicated that the observed contamination originates from two sources--the waste

  6. Long-term electrical resistivity monitoring of recharge-induced contaminant plume behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hubbard, Susan S.; Watson, David B.; Baker, Gregory S.; Peterson, John E.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Smith, Meagan; Brooks, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Geophysical measurements, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data in particular, are sensitive to properties that are related (directly or indirectly) to hydrological processes. The challenge is in extracting information from geophysical data at a relevant scale that can be used to gain insight about subsurface behavior and to parameterize or validate flow and transport models. Here, we consider the use of ERT data for examining the impact of recharge on subsurface contamination at the S-3 ponds of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Tennessee. A large dataset of time-lapse cross-well and surface ERT data, collected at the site over a period of 12 months, is used to study time variations in resistivity due to changes in total dissolved solids (primarily nitrate). The electrical resistivity distributions recovered from cross-well and surface ERT data agrees well, and both of these datasets can be used to interpret spatiotemporal variations in subsurface nitrate concentrations due to rainfall, although the sensitivity of the electrical resistivity response to dilution varies with nitrate concentration. Using the time-lapse surface ERT data interpreted in terms of nitrate concentrations, we find that the subsurface nitrate concentration at this site varies as a function of spatial position, episodic heavy rainstorms (versus seasonal and annual fluctuations), and antecedent rainfall history. These results suggest that the surface ERT monitoring approach is potentially useful for examining subsurface plume responses to recharge over field-relevant scales.

  7. Delineating Fecal Contaminant Sources and Travel Times in a Karst Groundwater Basin, Inner Bluegrass Region, Kentucky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. W.; Reed, T. M.; Fryar, A. E.; Brion, G. M.

    2006-12-01

    Because of preferential flowpaths via features such as sinkholes and conduits, karst aquifers are susceptible to non-point-source pollution from agricultural and urban drainage. With many karst aquifers being drinking- water sources, pathogens are contaminants of public health concern. Monitoring of microbial parameters (total coliforms [TC], atypical colonies [AC] and fecal coliform bacteria [FC]) transpired biweekly from December 2002 March 2004 and weekly from February October 2005 at Blue Hole Spring, which drains outlying farm lands and the town of Versailles in the Inner Bluegrass Region of Kentucky. Physicochemical parameters (discharge, temperature, specific conductance, and pH) were measured continuously during the entire period. The AC/TC ratio, which had been employed only in surface water-quality studies, was used with FC counts, precipitation and discharge data to determine sources of fecal loading to ground water as result of land-use practices. An AC/TC ratio < 10 demonstrates fresh input of fecal matter, while a larger ratio can represent a variety of occurrences, including aged fecal material input and/or lack of nutrient input into the system. AC/TC ratio data in the 2002 04 dataset behaved similarly to surface waters, with ratios > 10 during dry periods and < 10 during wet periods, while the 2005 data demonstrated a very irregular pattern. The difference in these two data sets indicated a compositional change within the groundwater basin between the two sampling periods, perhaps as a result of construction at a sewage treatment plant adjoining the spring. Solute (rhodamine WT fluorescent dye and bromide) and particle (1-μm diameter fluorescent latex microspheres) tracer tests were conducted during summer 2006 to examine contaminant mobility within the system under base-flow and storm-flow conditions. Rainfall was limited prior to the base-flow trace, totaling 0.025 cm within 2 weeks prior to the slug injection. Base-flow discharge averaged 400 m

  8. In search of plumes: a GPR odyssey in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrych, T.J.; Lima, O.A.L. de; Sampaio, E.E.S.

    1994-12-31

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) and geoelectrical surveys have been combined to outline underground contaminant plumes of industrial origin within a petrochemical center in Bahia, Brazil. Such plumes are invading the upper phreatic layers of a regional aquifer system which is being exploited for supplying cities and villages in the region, for industrial activities and even for the population of Salvador, the third largest city in Brazil. Three case studies are presented: two are related to conductive plumes localized beneath a metallurgical plant and an effluent treatment plant and another, a DNAPL plume below a dirt petrochemical unit. Resistivity soundings and transverse profiling were useful for a gross delineation of the aquifer structure and the extent of the contamination. GPR processed sections were employed for refining the subsurface stratigraphy and petrophysics as well as for a more precise mapping of the plume boundaries.

  9. Insights into biodegradation through depth-resolved microbial community functional and structural profiling of a crude-oil contaminant plume.

    PubMed

    Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Bailey, Zach; Pruden, Amy

    2014-10-01

    Small-scale geochemical gradients are a key feature of aquifer contaminant plumes, highlighting the need for functional and structural profiling of corresponding microbial communities on a similar scale. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial functional and structural diversity with depth across representative redox zones of a hydrocarbon plume and an adjacent wetland, at the Bemidji Oil Spill site. A combination of quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and pyrosequencing were applied to vertically sampled sediment cores. Levels of the methanogenic marker gene, methyl coenzyme-M reductase A (mcrA), increased with depth near the oil body center, but were variable with depth further downgradient. Benzoate degradation N (bzdN) hydrocarbon-degradation gene, common to facultatively anaerobic Azoarcus spp., was found at all locations, but was highest near the oil body center. Microbial community structural differences were observed across sediment cores, and bacterial classes containing known hydrocarbon degraders were found to be low in relative abundance. Depth-resolved functional and structural profiling revealed the strongest gradients in the iron-reducing zone, displaying the greatest variability with depth. This study provides important insight into biogeochemical characteristics in different regions of contaminant plumes, which will aid in improving models of contaminant fate and natural attenuation rates. PMID:24760171

  10. Insights into biodegradation through depth-resolved microbial community functional and structural profiling of a crude-oil contaminant plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bailey, Zach; Pruden, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale geochemical gradients are a key feature of aquifer contaminant plumes, highlighting the need for functional and structural profiling of corresponding microbial communities on a similar scale. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial functional and structural diversity with depth across representative redox zones of a hydrocarbon plume and an adjacent wetland, at the Bemidji Oil Spill site. A combination of quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and pyrosequencing were applied to vertically sampled sediment cores. Levels of the methanogenic marker gene, methyl coenzyme-M reductase A (mcrA), increased with depth near the oil body center, but were variable with depth further downgradient. Benzoate degradation N (bzdN) hydrocarbon-degradation gene, common to facultatively anaerobic Azoarcus spp., was found at all locations, but was highest near the oil body center. Microbial community structural differences were observed across sediment cores, and bacterial classes containing known hydrocarbon degraders were found to be low in relative abundance. Depth-resolved functional and structural profiling revealed the strongest gradients in the iron-reducing zone, displaying the greatest variability with depth. This study provides important insight into biogeochemical characteristics in different regions of contaminant plumes, which will aid in improving models of contaminant fate and natural attenuation rates.

  11. Indian MORB-source mantle: not just a case of plume contamination or sediment recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, P. D.; Pearce, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) from the Indian Ocean have long been known for their distinctive Pb and Sr isotope compositions relative to other MORBs. Most models for their origin involve contamination of a "normal" depleted mantle by a distinctly enriched material, the most favoured being (1) recycled oceanic crust plus pelagic sediments, (2) mantle plumes and/or (3) delaminated sub-continental lithosphere. Based on quantitative mixing models, Rehkämper and Hofmann (1997) showed that recycling of an old, compositionally heterogeneous component could explain the range of Sr, Nd and Pb isotope compositions for Indian MORBs. Their model predicts that the predominant recycled component is ancient (1.5Ga) altered ocean crust, with pelagic sediment comprising less than 10% of the contaminant. However, Hf-Nd isotope systematics are difficult to explain in this way because Indian MORBs have higher eHf values (i.e. greater time-integrated depletion of Lu relative to Hf) for a given eNd than nearly all other MORBs - and considerably higher than any of the enriched materials suggested as contaminants. Essentially, Indian and Pacific MORBs form separate and parallel arrays in Nd-Hf isotope space. What is required is a mechanism that involves not only enrichment of some elements, but also relative depletion of others. Based on new Nd-Hf isotope data for Indian and Pacific MORBs from the Australian-Antarctic Discordance, we propose that the distinctive Indian MORB source composition can be explained by recycling of subduction-modified mantle. This mantle could have been generated within the convergent margin that existed off the east coast of Gondwana throughout most of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic Eras. It was subsequently recycled into the upper mantle beneath Gondwana and became the source of Indian MORBs following the break-up of the Gondwanan supercontinent. Rehkämper, M., and A. W. Hofmann, Recycled ocean crust and sediment in Indian Ocean MORB, Earth and Planetary

  12. Investigation of contamination of thin-film aluminum filters by MMH-NTO plumes exposed to UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vaibhav; Wieman, Seth; Didkovsky, Leonid; Haiges, Ralf; Yao, Yuhan; Wu, Wei; Gruntman, Mike; Erwin, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Thin-film aluminum filters degrade in space with significant reduction of their Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) transmission. This degradation was observed on the EUV Spectrophotometer (ESP) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory's EUV Variability Experiment and the Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. One of the possible causes for deterioration of such filters over time is contamination of their surfaces from plumes coming from periodic firing of their satellite's Monomethylhydrazine (MMH) - Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) thrusters. When adsorbed by the filters, the contaminant molecules are exposed to solar irradiance and could lead to two possible compositions. First, they could get polymerized leading to a permanent hydrocarbon layer buildup on the filter's surface. Second, they could accelerate and increase the depth of oxidation into filter's bulk aluminum material. To study the phenomena we experimentally replicate contamination of such filters in a simulated environment by MMH-NTO plumes. We apply, Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy to characterize the physical and the chemical changes on these contaminated sample filter surfaces. In addition, we present our first analysis of the effects of additional protective layer coatings based on self-assembled carbon monolayers for aluminum filters. This coverage is expected to significantly decrease their susceptibility to contamination and reduce the overall degradation of filter-based EUV instruments over their mission life.

  13. A stable isotope approach for source apportionment of chlorinated ethene plumes at a complex multi-contamination events urban site.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Schmidt, Marie; Pellegatti, Eleonora; Paramatti, Enrico; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Gargini, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of chlorinated aliphatic compounds such as chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethenes was examined as an intrinsic fingerprint for apportionment of sources. A complex field site located in Ferrara (Italy), with more than 50years history of use of chlorinated aliphatic compounds, was investigated in order to assess contamination sources. Several contamination plumes were found in a complex alluvial sandy multi-aquifer system close to the river Po; sources are represented by uncontained former industrial and municipal dump sites as well as by spills at industrial areas. The carbon stable isotope signature allowed distinguishing 2 major sources of contaminants. One source of chlorinated aliphatic contaminants was strongly depleted in ¹³C (<-60‰) suggesting production lines which have used depleted methane for synthesis. The other source had typical carbon isotope compositions of >-40‰ which is commonly observed in recent production of chlorinated solvents. The degradation processes in the plumes could be traced interpreting the isotope enrichment and depletion of parent and daughter compounds, respectively. We demonstrate that, under specific production conditions, namely when highly chlorinated ethenes are produced as by-product during chloromethanes production, ¹³C depleted fingerprinting of contaminants can be obtained and this can be used to track sources and address the responsible party of the pollution in urban areas. PMID:24077332

  14. Assessing the Impact of Source-Zone Remediation Efforts at the Contaminant-Plume Scale Through Analysis of Contaminant Mass Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, M. L.; Hatton, J.; DiGuiseppi, W.

    2011-01-01

    The long-term impact of source-zone remediation efforts was assessed for a large site contaminated by trichloroethene. The impact of the remediation efforts (soil vapor extraction and in-situ chemical oxidation) was assessed through analysis of plume-scale contaminant mass discharge, which was measured using a high-resolution data set obtained from 23 years of operation of a large pump-and-treat system. The initial contaminant mass discharge peaked at approximately 7 kg/d, and then declined to approximately 2 kg/d. This latter value was sustained for several years prior to the initiation of source-zone remediation efforts. The contaminant mass discharge in 2010, measured several years after completion of the two source-zone remediation actions, was approximately 0.2 kg/d, which is ten times lower than the value prior to source-zone remediation. The time-continuous contaminant mass discharge data can be used to evaluate the impact of the source-zone remediation efforts on reducing the time required to operate the pump-and-treat system, and to estimate the cost savings associated with the decreased operational period. While significant reductions have been achieved, it is evident that the remediation efforts have not completely eliminated contaminant mass discharge and associated risk. Remaining contaminant mass contributing to the current mass discharge is hypothesized to comprise poorly-accessible mass in the source zones, as well as aqueous (and sorbed) mass present in the extensive lower-permeability units located within and adjacent to the contaminant plume. The fate of these sources is an issue of critical import to the remediation of chlorinated-solvent contaminated sites, and development of methods to address these sources will be required to achieve successful long-term management of such sites and to ultimately transition them to closure. PMID:22115080

  15. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Kent S. Jr.

    2003-06-01

    Natural attenuation of TCE under aerobic conditions at the INEEL Test Area North site was demonstrated largely on the basis of preferential loss of TCE relative to conservative solutes (PCE and H-3) along groundwater flow paths. First order degradation half-lives were calculated from the rate of preferential TCE loss. We are utilizing the same approach at other DOE sites that have aerobic TCE plumes to determine if aerobic natural attenuation of TCE is rapid enough at these sites to be environmentally significant, i.e. if natural attenuation can reduce concentrations to acceptable levels before groundwater reaches potential receptors. The first step in this process was to identify TCE plumes at DOE sites that have the appropriate site conditions and data needed to perform this analysis. The site conditions include the presence of TCE in groundwater at appreciable concentrations in an aerobic aquifer, a co-mingled contaminant that can be used as a conservative tracer (e.g. PCE, H-3, Tc-99), a flow path that represents at least a decade of travel time, and several monitoring wells located along this flow path. Candidate sites were identified through interviews with knowledgeable individuals in the DOE system and by screening the U.S. Dept. of Energy Groundwater Database using the keywords ''TCE'' and ''groundwater''. The initial screening yielded 25 plumes for consideration. These sites had anywhere from one to 37 individual plumes containing TCE. Of the 25 sites, 13 sites were further evaluated because they met the screening criteria or were promising. After contacting DOE personnel from the respective sites, they were divided into three groups: (1) sites that meet all the project criteria, (2) sites that could potentially be used for the project, and (3) DOE sites that did not meet the criteria. The five sites with plumes that met the criteria were: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Rocky Flats

  16. Changes in concentrations of a TCE plume in near- stream zones of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    A field investigation of a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume originating at an industrial complex and its discharges to a stream nearby showed that apparent plume attenuation occurred in the near-stream zone of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream prior to discharging to the stream. The concentrations of TCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in groundwater, hyporheic water, stream water and streambed, and hydrogeology were characterized using mini-piezometers, monitoring wells, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys, and soil coring. In the near stream zones temporal and spatial TCE plume concentration changes and mass fluxes were investigated along the flowpath of groundwater discharging to the stream. It is evident that observed concentrations of contaminants (TCE and cis-DCE) were reduced in the near-stream zone, resulting that TCE and cis-DCE were not detected in the streambed and stream water. Ground GPR surveys done in the near stream zone found that wire and water treatment pipe conduits were buried under the ground next to the stream, which could lead groundwater flow field distortion in this zone. At streambed, the GPR survey and soil coring indicated the presence of low permeable zones consisting of rotten material deposits at the top of 0.3 m ~ 0.8 m underlain by silty sands. These hydrogeological features can also attribute to no detection of contaminants in the streambed and stream water because low permeable zone is an obstacle to effective interactions between groundwater and stream water. More investigations will be carried out for comprehensive understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical processes associated with TCE plume attenuation in near stream zones and streambed in the site.

  17. Chromium isotope variation along a contaminated groundwater plume: a coupled Cr(VI)- reduction, advective mixing perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, T.; Izbicki, J.

    2007-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a common contaminant in groundwater, used in electroplating, leather tanning, wood preservation, and as an anti-corrosion agent. Cr occurs in two oxidation states in groundwater: Cr(VI) is highly soluble and mobile, and is a carcinogen; Cr(III) is generally insoluble, immobile and less toxic than Cr(VI). Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is thus a central issue in approaches to Cr(VI) contaminant remediation in aquifers. Aqueous Cr(VI) occurs mainly as the chromate (CrO22-) and bichromate (HCrO2-) oxyanions, while Cr(III) is mainly "hexaquo" Cr(H2O)63+. Cr has four naturally-occurring stable isotopes: 50Cr, 52Cr, 53Cr and 54Cr. When Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), the strong Cr-O bond must be broken, resulting in isotopic selection. Ellis et al. (2002) demonstrated that for reduction of Cr(VI) on magnetite and in natural sediment slurries, the change of isotopic composition of the remnant Cr(VI) pool was described by a Rayleigh fractionation model having fractionation factor ɛCr(VI)-Cr(III) = 3.4‰. We attempted to use Cr isotopes as a monitor of Cr(VI) reduction at a field site in Hinkley, California (USA) where groundwater contaminated with Cr(VI) has been under assessment for remediation. Groundwater containing up to 5 ppm Cr(VI) has migrated down-gradient from the contamination source through the fluvial to alluvial sediments to form a well-defined plume. Uncontaminated groundwater in the aquifer immediately adjacent to the plume has naturally-occurring Cr(VI) of 4 ppb or less (CH2M-Hill). In early 2006, colleagues from CH2M-Hill collected 17 samples of groundwater from within and adjacent to the plume. On a plot of δ53Cr vs. log Cr(VI), the data array is strikingly linear and differs markedly from the trend predicted for reduction of Cr(VI) in the contaminated water. There appear to be two groups of data: four samples with δ53Cr >+2‰ and Cr(VI) <4 ppb, and 13 samples with δ53Cr <+2‰ and Cr(VI) >15 ppb. Simple mixing lines between the

  18. Migration of a groundwater contaminant plume by stratabound flow in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The discovery of radiologically contaminated groundwater in core hole CH-8 in the western portion of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prompted a detailed investigation to identify the contaminant plume. Utilizing a working hypothesis of stratabound groundwater flow and contaminant transport, investigators analyzed existing subsurface geologic data to predict the contaminant plume discharge location in first Creek and locations of contaminated groundwater seepage into storm drains. The hypothesis states that differential lithologic/fracture conditions lead to the development of preferred flow and transport pathways, of discrete vertical extent, which may not be coincident with the hydraulic gradient. Leakage out of the stratabound pathway is a minor component of the overall plume configuration.

  19. Migration of a groundwater contaminant plume by stratabound flow in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The discovery of radiologically contaminated groundwater in core hole CH-8 in the western portion of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prompted a detailed investigation to identify the contaminant plume. Utilizing a working hypothesis of stratabound groundwater flow and contaminant transport, investigators analyzed existing subsurface geologic data to predict the contaminant plume discharge location in first Creek and locations of contaminated groundwater seepage into storm drains. The hypothesis states that differential lithologic/fracture conditions lead to the development of preferred flow and transport pathways, of discrete vertical extent, which may not be coincident with the hydraulic gradient. Leakage out of the stratabound pathway is a minor component of the overall plume configuration.

  20. Hydrazine engine plume contamination mapping. [measuring instruments for rocket exhaust from liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirivella, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Instrumentation for the measurement of plume exhaust specie deposition rates were developed and demonstrated. The instruments, two sets of quartz crystal microbalances, were designed for low temperature operation in the back flow and variable temperature operation in the core flow regions of an exhaust plume. These quartz crystal microbalances performed nominally, and measurements of exhaust specie deposition rates for 8400 number of pulses for a 0.1-lb monopropellant thruster are reported.

  1. Distributional patterns of arsenic concentrations in contaminant plumes offer clues to the source of arsenic in groundwater at landfills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2015-01-01

    The distributional pattern of dissolved arsenic concentrations from landfill plumes can provide clues to the source of arsenic contamination. Under simple idealized conditions, arsenic concentrations along flow paths in aquifers proximal to a landfill will decrease under anthropogenic sources but potentially increase under in situ sources. This paper presents several conceptual distributional patterns of arsenic in groundwater based on the arsenic source under idealized conditions. An example of advanced subsurface mapping of dissolved arsenic with geophysical surveys, chemical monitoring, and redox fingerprinting is presented for a landfill site in New Hampshire with a complex flow pattern. Tools to assist in the mapping of arsenic in groundwater ultimately provide information on the source of contamination. Once an understanding of the arsenic contamination is achieved, appropriate remedial strategies can then be formulated.

  2. Tracing the dispersion of sediment contaminated with fallout radionuclides along the main rivers draining the contaminated plume in Fukushima Prefecture (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, O.; Patin, J.; Lefèvre, I.; Chartin, C.; Ayrault, S.; Bonté, Ph.; Onda, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident led to the release of important quantities of radionuclides into the environment. Several of those substances (e.g., Cs-134; Cs-137) strongly sorb onto soil particles. Resulting radiations lead to an external exposure threat associated with the spatial distribution of radionuclides. This threat, associated with the possibility of transfer of contamination to plants and direct ingestion of contaminated particles, will affect human activities such as agriculture, forest exploitation and fishing for long periods of time, depending on the half life of the radionuclides (e.g., 2 yrs for Cs-134; 30 yrs for Cs-137). Furthermore, sediment can be a preferential vector of contaminants in rivers, and its transfer can lead to the dispersion of radioactive contamination across larger areas over time. We present here preliminary results obtained during a field campaign conducted in November 2011 in a part of Fukushima Prefecture located in the main contamination plume and covering an area of about 5000 km2. We had the unique opportunity to measure and "trace" the dispersion of sediment contaminated with radionuclides shortly after the catastrophe. In total, 125 soil and sediment samples were collected along the main rivers of the area (i.e., Abukuma, Nitta, Mano, Kutchibuto and Hirose Rivers). This hydrological network drains the contamination plume located 20 to 80 km northwest of Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant. Furthermore, radiation dose rates were measured all throughout the field survey. Preliminary results show that, 8 months after the accident, radiation dose rates constitute a good proxy to trace contamination dispersion in the region, especially along rivers. Radiation dose rates varied between 0.5 µSv/h and 200 µSv/h in the field. Transfer of contaminated sediment has already started in rivers, and it was accelerated by the occurrence of violent typhoons in the region between July and October, 2011. Main gamma

  3. Assessing the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in aquifers using plume-scale electron and carbon balances: model development with analysis of uncertainty and parameter sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Steven F.; Lerner, David N.; Banwart, Steven A.

    2001-12-01

    A quantitative methodology is described for the field-scale performance assessment of natural attenuation using plume-scale electron and carbon balances. This provides a practical framework for the calculation of global mass balances for contaminant plumes, using mass inputs from the plume source, background groundwater and plume residuals in a simplified box model. Biodegradation processes and reactions included in the analysis are identified from electron acceptors, electron donors and degradation products present in these inputs. Parameter values used in the model are obtained from data acquired during typical site investigation and groundwater monitoring studies for natural attenuation schemes. The approach is evaluated for a UK Permo-Triassic Sandstone aquifer contaminated with a plume of phenolic compounds. Uncertainty in the model predictions and sensitivity to parameter values was assessed by probabilistic modelling using Monte Carlo methods. Sensitivity analyses were compared for different input parameter probability distributions and a base case using fixed parameter values, using an identical conceptual model and data set. Results show that consumption of oxidants by biodegradation is approximately balanced by the production of CH 4 and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) which is conserved in the plume. Under this condition, either the plume electron or carbon balance can be used to determine contaminant mass loss, which is equivalent to only 4% of the estimated source term. This corresponds to a first order, plume-averaged, half-life of >800 years. The electron balance is particularly sensitive to uncertainty in the source term and dispersive inputs. Reliable historical information on contaminant spillages and detailed site investigation are necessary to accurately characterise the source term. The dispersive influx is sensitive to variability in the plume mixing zone width. Consumption of aqueous oxidants greatly exceeds that of mineral oxidants

  4. Assessing the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in aquifers using plume-scale electron and carbon balances: model development with analysis of uncertainty and parameter sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Thornton, S F; Lerner, D N; Banwart, S A

    2001-12-15

    A quantitative methodology is described for the field-scale performance assessment of natural attenuation using plume-scale electron and carbon balances. This provides a practical framework for the calculation of global mass balances for contaminant plumes, using mass inputs from the plume source, background groundwater and plume residuals in a simplified box model. Biodegradation processes and reactions included in the analysis are identified from electron acceptors, electron donors and degradation products present in these inputs. Parameter values used in the model are obtained from data acquired during typical site investigation and groundwater monitoring studies for natural attenuation schemes. The approach is evaluated for a UK Permo-Triassic Sandstone aquifer contaminated with a plume of phenolic compounds. Uncertainty in the model predictions and sensitivity to parameter values was assessed by probabilistic modelling using Monte Carlo methods. Sensitivity analyses were compared for different input parameter probability distributions and a base case using fixed parameter values, using an identical conceptual model and data set. Results show that consumption of oxidants by biodegradation is approximately balanced by the production of CH4 and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) which is conserved in the plume. Under this condition, either the plume electron or carbon balance can be used to determine contaminant mass loss, which is equivalent to only 4% of the estimated source term. This corresponds to a first order, plume-averaged, half-life of > 800 years. The electron balance is particularly sensitive to uncertainty in the source term and dispersive inputs. Reliable historical information on contaminant spillages and detailed site investigation are necessary to accurately characterise the source term. The dispersive influx is sensitive to variability in the plume mixing zone width. Consumption of aqueous oxidants greatly exceeds that of mineral oxidants

  5. On the significance of contaminant plume-scale and dose-response models in defining hydrogeological characterization needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, F.; Rubin, Y.; Maxwell, R.; Bai, H.

    2007-12-01

    Defining rational and effective hydrogeological data acquisition strategies is of crucial importance since financial resources available for such efforts are always limited. Usually such strategies are developed with the goal of reducing uncertainty, but less often they are developed in the context of the impacts of uncertainty. This paper presents an approach for determining site characterization needs based on human health risk factors. The main challenge is in striking a balance between improved definition of hydrogeological, behavioral and physiological parameters. Striking this balance can provide clear guidance on setting priorities for data acquisition and for better estimating adverse health effects in humans. This paper addresses this challenge through theoretical developments and numerical testing. We will report on a wide range of factors that affect the site characterization needs including contaminant plume's dimensions, travel distances and other length scales that characterize the transport problem, as well as health risk models. We introduce a new graphical tool that allows one to investigate the relative impact of hydrogeological and physiological parameters in risk. Results show that the impact of uncertainty reduction in the risk-related parameters decreases with increasing distances from the contaminant source. Also, results indicate that human health risk becomes less sensitive to hydrogeological measurements when dealing with ergodic plumes. This indicates that under ergodic conditions, uncertainty reduction in human health risk may benefit from better understanding of the physiological component as opposed to a detailed hydrogeological characterization

  6. Application of satellite infrared data for mapping of thermal plume contamination in coastal ecosystem of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Lee, Jae-Hak; Kang, Yong Q

    2006-03-01

    The 5900 MW Younggwang nuclear power station on the west coast of Korea discharges warm water affecting coastal ecology [KORDI report (2003). Wide area observation of the impact of the operation of Younggwang nuclear power plant 5 and 6, No. BSPI 319-00-1426-3, KORDI, Seoul, Korea]. Here the spatial and temporal characteristics of the thermal plume signature of warm water are reported from a time series (1985-2003) of space-borne, thermal infrared data from Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Sea surface temperature (SST) were characterized using advanced very high resolution radiometer data from the NOAA satellites. These data demonstrated the general pattern and extension of the thermal plume signature in the Younggwang coastal areas. In contrast, the analysis of SST from thematic mapper data using the Landsat-5 and 7 satellites provided enhanced information about the plume shape, dimension and direction of dispersion in these waters. The thermal plume signature was detected from 70 to 100 km to the south of the discharge during the summer monsoon and 50 to 70 km to the northwest during the winter monsoon. The mean detected plume temperature was 28 degrees C in summer and 12 degrees C in winter. The DeltaT varied from 2 to 4 degrees C in winter and 2 degrees C in summer. These values are lower than the re-circulating water temperature (6-9 degrees C). In addition the temperature difference between tidal flats and offshore (SSTtidal flats - SSToffsore) was found to vary from 5.4 to 8.5 degrees C during the flood tides and 3.5 degrees C during the ebb tide. The data also suggest that water heated by direct solar radiation on the tidal flats during the flood tides might have been transported offshore during the ebb tide. Based on these results we suggest that there is an urgent need to protect the health of Younggwang coastal marine ecosystem from the severe thermal impact by the large quantity of warm water discharged from

  7. Huntington beach shoreline contamination investigation, phase III: coastal circulation and transport patterns : the likelihood of OCSD's plume impacting Huntington beach shoreline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, Marlene; Xu, Jingping; Rosenfeld, Leslie; Largier, John; Hamilton, Peter; Jones, Burt; Robertson, George

    2003-01-01

    A consortium of agencies have conducted an extensive investigation of the coastal ocean circulation and transport pathways off Huntington Beach, with the aim of identifying any causal links that may exist between the offshore discharge of wastewater by OCSD and the significant bacterial contamination observed along the Huntington Beach shoreline. This is the third study supported by OCSD to determine possible land-based and coa Although the study identifies several possible coastal ocean pathways by which diluted wastewater may be transported to the beach, including internal tide, sea-breeze and subtidal flow features, there were no direct observations of either the high bacteria concentrations seen in the OCSD plume at the shelf break reaching the shoreline in significant levels or of an association between the existence of a coastal ocean process and beach contamination at or above AB411 levels. It is concluded that the OCSD plume is not a major cause of beach contamination; no causal links could be demonstrated. This conclusion is based on the absence of direct observation of plume-beach links, on analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of shoreline contamination and coastal ocean processes, and on the observation of higher levels of contamination at the beach than in the plume.

  8. Mercury speciation and mobilization in a wastewater-contaminated groundwater plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamborg, Carl H.; Kent, Doug B.; Swarr, Gretchen J.; Munson, Kathleen M.; Kading, Tristan; O'Connor, Alison E.; Fairchild, Gillian M.; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Wiatrowski, Heather A.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the concentration and speciation of mercury (Hg) in groundwater down-gradient from the site of wastewater infiltration beds operated by the Massachusetts Military Reservation, western Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Total mercury concentrations in oxic, mildly acidic, uncontaminated groundwater are 0.5–1 pM, and aquifer sediments have 0.5–1 ppb mercury. The plume of impacted groundwater created by the wastewater disposal is still evident, although inputs ceased in 1995, as indicated by anoxia extending at least 3 km down-gradient from the disposal site. Solutes indicative of a progression of anaerobic metabolisms are observed vertically and horizontally within the plume, with elevated nitrate concentrations and nitrate reduction surrounding a region with elevated iron concentrations indicating iron reduction. Mercury concentrations up to 800 pM were observed in shallow groundwater directly under the former infiltration beds, but concentrations decreased with depth and with distance down-gradient. Mercury speciation showed significant connections to the redox and metabolic state of the groundwater, with relatively little methylated Hg within the iron reducing sector of the plume, and dominance of this form within the higher nitrate/ammonium zone. Furthermore, substantial reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0 within the core of the anoxic zone was observed when iron reduction was evident. These trends not only provide insight into the biogeochemical factors controlling the interplay of Hg species in natural waters, but also support hypotheses that anoxia and eutrophication in groundwater facilitate the mobilization of natural and anthropogenic Hg from watersheds/aquifers, which can be transported down-gradient to freshwaters and the coastal zone.

  9. Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue. PMID:24165695

  10. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-09-01

    Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a preferred treatment technology saves significant site restoration costs for DOE. However, in order to be accepted MNA requires direct evidence of which processes are responsible for the contaminant loss and also the rates of the contaminant loss. Our proposal aims to: 1) provide evidence for one example of MNA, namely the disappearance of the dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Test Area North (TAN) site, 2) determine the rates at which aquifer microbes can co-metabolize TCE, and 3) determine whether there are other examples of natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents occurring at DOE sites. To this end, our research has several objectives. First, we have conducted studies to characterize the microbial processes that are likely responsible for the co-metabolic destruction of TCE in the aquifer at TAN (University of Idaho and INL). Second, we are investigating realistic rates of TCE co-metabolism at the low catabolic activities typical of microorganisms existing under aquifer conditions (INL). Using the co-metabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained in the aquifer at TAN and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Coupled with the research on low catabolic activities of co-metabolic microbes we are determining the patterns of functional gene expression by these cells, patterns that may be used to diagnose the co-metabolic activity in the SRPA or other aquifers. Third, we have systematically considered the aquifer contaminants at different locations in plumes at other DOE sites in order to determine whether MNA is a broadly applicable remediation strategy for chlorinated hydrocarbons (North Wind Inc.). Realistic terms for co-metabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE’s ability to predict and

  11. Speciation of iodine isotopes inside and outside of a contaminant plume at the Savannah River Site.

    PubMed

    Schwehr, Kathleen A; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Merchel, Silke; Kaplan, Daniel I; Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang; Yeager, Chris M; Santschi, Peter H

    2014-11-01

    A primary obstacle in understanding the fate and transport of the toxic radionuclide (129)I (a thyroid seeker) is an accurate method to distinguish it from the stable isotope, (127)I, and to quantify the various species at environmentally relevant concentrations (~10(-8) M). A pH-dependent solvent extraction and combustion method was paired with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to measure ambient levels of (129)I/(127)I isotope ratios and iodine speciation (iodide (I(-)), iodate (IO3(-)), and organo-I (OI)) in aquatic systems. The method exhibited an overall uncertainty of 10% or less for I(-) and IO3(-), and less than 30% for OI species concentrations and enabled (129)I measurements as low as 0.001 Bq/L (1 Bq/L=10(-13) M). The method was used to analyze groundwater from the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, USA, along a pH, redox potential (Eh), and organic carbon gradient (8-60 μM DOC). The data confirmed that the (129)I/(127)I ratios and species distribution were strongly pH dependent and varied in a systematic manner from the strongly acidic source. While (129)I speciation in plume samples containing total I concentrations >1.7 Bq/L was similar whether measured by AMS or GC-MS ([I(-)]≫[IO3(-)]=[OI]), AMS enabled (129)I speciation measurements at much lower concentrations than what was possible with GC-MS. AMS analyses demonstrated that groundwater samples minimally impacted by the plume were still orders of magnitude higher than ambient (129)I concentrations typically found elsewhere in the USA groundwaters and rivers. This is likely due to past atmospheric releases of volatile (129)I species by SRS nuclear reprocessing facilities near the study site. Furthermore, the results confirmed the existence of (129)I not only as I(-), but also as OI and IO3(-) species. PMID:25173764

  12. Analytical solutions to dissolved contaminant plume evolution with source depletion during carbon dioxide storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Liu, Yongzhong; Yu, Bo; Ding, Tian

    2016-06-01

    Volatile contaminants may migrate with carbon dioxide (CO2) injection or leakage in subsurface formations, which leads to the risk of the CO2 storage and the ecological environment. This study aims to develop an analytical model that could predict the contaminant migration process induced by CO2 storage. The analytical model with two moving boundaries is obtained through the simplification of the fully coupled model for the CO2-aqueous phase -stagnant phase displacement system. The analytical solutions are confirmed and assessed through the comparison with the numerical simulations of the fully coupled model. Then, some key variables in the analytical solutions, including the critical time, the locations of the dual moving boundaries and the advance velocity, are discussed to present the characteristics of contaminant migration in the multi-phase displacement system. The results show that these key variables are determined by four dimensionless numbers, Pe, RD, Sh and RF, which represent the effects of the convection, the dispersion, the interphase mass transfer and the retention factor of contaminant, respectively. The proposed analytical solutions could be used for tracking the migration of the injected CO2 and the contaminants in subsurface formations, and also provide an analytical tool for other solute transport in multi-phase displacement system.

  13. Analytical solutions to dissolved contaminant plume evolution with source depletion during carbon dioxide storage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Liu, Yongzhong; Yu, Bo; Ding, Tian

    2016-06-01

    Volatile contaminants may migrate with carbon dioxide (CO2) injection or leakage in subsurface formations, which leads to the risk of the CO2 storage and the ecological environment. This study aims to develop an analytical model that could predict the contaminant migration process induced by CO2 storage. The analytical model with two moving boundaries is obtained through the simplification of the fully coupled model for the CO2-aqueous phase -stagnant phase displacement system. The analytical solutions are confirmed and assessed through the comparison with the numerical simulations of the fully coupled model. Then, some key variables in the analytical solutions, including the critical time, the locations of the dual moving boundaries and the advance velocity, are discussed to present the characteristics of contaminant migration in the multi-phase displacement system. The results show that these key variables are determined by four dimensionless numbers, Pe, RD, Sh and RF, which represent the effects of the convection, the dispersion, the interphase mass transfer and the retention factor of contaminant, respectively. The proposed analytical solutions could be used for tracking the migration of the injected CO2 and the contaminants in subsurface formations, and also provide an analytical tool for other solute transport in multi-phase displacement system. PMID:27045163

  14. Using Airborne and Ground Electromagnetic Surveys and DC Resistivity Surveys to Delineate a Plume of Conductive Water at an In-Channel Coalbed Methane Produced Water Impoundment Near the Powder River, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, B. A.; Harbert, W.; Hammack, R.; Sams, J.; Veloski, G.; Smith, B. D.

    2004-12-01

    compared to geological and geochemical data collected from on-site monitoring wells. The geophysical methods accurately delineated the CBM water plume. Differences in the inversion results were observed and are discussed. The AEM data may also prove useful in identifying potential problem areas for locating future in-channel storage impoundments.

  15. Techniques of contributing-area delineation for analysis of nonpoint-source contamination of Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misut, P.

    1995-01-01

    Ninety shallow monitoring wells on Long Island, N.Y., were used to test the hypothesis that the correlation between the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) at a well and explanatory variables representing land use, population density, and hydrogeologic conditions around the well is affected by the size and shape of the area defined as the contributing area. Explanatory variables are quantified through overlay of various specified contributing areas on 1:24 000-scale landuse and population-density geographic information system (GIS) coverages. Four methods of contributing-area delineation were used: (a) centering a circle of selected radius on the well site, (b) orienting a triangular area along the direction of horizontal ground-water flow to the well, (c) generating a shaped based on direction and magnitude of horizontal flow to the well, and (d) generating a shape based on three-dimensional particle pathlines backtracked from the well screen to the water table. The strongest correlations with VOC detections were obtained from circles of 400- to 1 000-meter radius. Improvement in correlation through delineations based on ground-water flow would require geographic overlay on more highly detailed GIS coverages than those used in the study.

  16. A sequential checklist for the assessment of natural attenuation of dissolved petroleum contaminant plumes from leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    De Rose, N.

    1995-12-31

    Estimates of the number of leaking underground storage tanks (UST) are measured in the hundreds of thousands in the United States alone. The discussion in this article largely pertains to the lighter motor fuels which contain aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons. These include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). The occurrence of dissolved BTEX groundwater contaminant plumes is most commonly associated with leaking gasoline USTs. However, their association with other petroleum products is not uncommon. this article and checklist provide guidance for completing UST assessments, which can support the decision-making process presented in the ASTM Emergency Standard Guide. Following the checklist will measure that the initial site assessment results in an accurate and functional characterization of the details and subtleties of the UST Source Impact Zone. This includes evaluating the UST area to identify release pathways for residual contamination in soil and groundwater. Based on the results obtained from the Source Impact Zone Evaluation, natural attenuation can be assessed for its applicability and performance.

  17. Innovative Use of Cr(VI) Plume Depictions and Pump-and-Treat Capture Analysis to Estimate Risks of Contaminant Discharge to Surface Water at Hanford Reactor Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Chuck W.; Hanson, James P.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Hanford Site nuclear reactor operations required large quantities of high-quality cooling water, which was treated with chemicals including sodium dichromate dihydrate for corrosion control. Cooling water leakage, as well as intentional discharge of cooling water to ground during upset conditions, produced extensive groundwater recharge mounds consisting largely of contaminated cooling water and resulted in wide distribution of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) contamination in the unconfined aquifer. The 2013 Cr(VI) groundwater plumes in the 100 Areas cover approximately 6 km2 (1500 acres), primarily in the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units (OUs). The Columbia River is a groundwater discharge boundary; where the plumes are adjacent to the Columbia River there remains a potential to discharge Cr(VI) to the river at concentrations above water quality criteria. The pump-and-treat systems along the River Corridor are operating with two main goals: 1) protection of the Columbia River, and 2) recovery of contaminant mass. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat systems was needed to determine if the Columbia River was protected from contamination, and also to determine where additional system modifications may be needed. In response to this need, a technique for assessing the river protection was developed which takes into consideration seasonal migration of the plume and hydraulic performance of the operating well fields. Groundwater contaminant plume maps are generated across the Hanford Site on an annual basis. The assessment technique overlays the annual plume and the capture efficiency maps for the various pump and treat systems. The river protection analysis technique was prepared for use at the Hanford site and is described in detail in M.J. Tonkin, 2013. Interpolated capture frequency maps, based on mapping dynamic water level observed in observation wells and derived water levels in the vicinity of extraction and injection wells

  18. 3-D SPECTRAL IP IMAGING: NON-INVASIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONTAMINANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to develop a noninvasive tomographic imaging technique,based on the spectral induced-polarization method, to characterize the in-situ distribution of organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants. Recent advances in tomographic imaging, applied to ...

  19. Mapping of contaminant plumes with geoelectrical methods. A case study in urban context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudelet, P.; Schmutz, M.; Pessel, M.; Franceschi, M.; Guérin, R.; Atteia, O.; Blondel, A.; Ngomseu, C.; Galaup, S.; Rejiba, F.; Bégassat, P.

    2011-12-01

    During the past two decades, the diagnosis and monitoring of polluted sites have become more important. Urban sites are particularly difficult to study, because they are contaminated with various pollutants, and there is a large physical and chemical heterogeneity. The heterogeneity comes from the landfilling of various solid wastes and remolded soil (endogenous or exogenous) from which they were constituted over time. Traditional techniques such as wells monitoring, are often insufficient to evaluate the extension of soil contamination. This is why we proposed a geoelectrical methodology from the fastest to the most information rich technique, showing all carry out and acquisition times: electromagnetic low frequency conductivity mapping, electrical resistivity profiles, chargeability profiles and spectral induced polarization (SIP) soundings. This strategy has been successfully applied to an urban site located in the Paris Basin (France). A conductivity map in relation with geochemical and lithological informations should provide us information to implement electrical resistivity and chargeability profiles. The latter allowed us to differentiate 3 main anomaly zones that have been determined. As interpretation of chargeability profiles is difficult, because it integrates polarization mechanisms with different relaxation times, we add spectral induced polarization soundings that provide us information concerning the contaminant nature. We determined the extension of an organic phase, and of 2 highly mineralized zones that could be linked to biodegraded and/or with pyrite areas. That theory is consistent with groundwater analysis and SIP data. The conclusion is that the suggested methodology is well suited to the study of urban contaminated sites including several different pollutants.

  20. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-06-01

    Dissolved dense nonaqueous-phase liquid plumes are persistent, widespread problems in the DOE complex. At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) is disappearing from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) by natural attenuation, a finding that saves significant site restoration costs. Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation as a preferred treatment technology requires direct evidence of the processes and rates of the degradation. Our proposal aims to provide that evidence for one such site by testing two hypotheses. First, we believe that realistic values for in situ rates of TCE cometabolism can be obtained by sustaining the putative microorganisms at the low catabolic activities consistent with aquifer conditions. Second, the patterns of functional gene expression evident in these communities under starvation conditions while carrying out TCE cometabolism can be used to diagnose the cometabolic activity in the aquifer itself. Using the cometabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained at this location and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Realistic terms for cometabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE's ability to predict and monitor natural attenuation of chlorinated organics at other sites, increase the acceptability of this solution, and provide significant economic and health benefits through this noninvasive remediation strategy. Finally, this project aims to derive valuable genomic information about the functional attributes of subsurface microbial communities upon which DOE must depend to resolve some of its most difficult contamination issues.

  1. Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of a contaminant plume in Kingsford, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, R.L.; Silva, S.R.; Bemis, B.; Godsy, E.M.; Warren, E.

    2001-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis was used to study a contaminated site near Kingsford, Michigan, USA. Organic compounds at three of the sites studied had similar ??13C values indicating that the contaminant source is the same for all sites. At a fourth site, chemical and ??13C values had evolved due to microbial degradation of organics, with the ??13C being much heavier than the starting materials. A microcosm experiment was run to observe isotopic changes with time in the methane evolved and in compounds remaining in the water during degradation. The ??13C values of the methane became heavier during the initial period of the run when volatile fatty acids were being consumed. There was an abrupt decrease in the ??13C values when fatty acids had been consumed and phenols began to be utilized. The ??13C value of the propionate remaining in solution also increased, similar to the results found in the field.

  2. Site characterization and petroleum hydrocarbon plume mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a case study of site characterization and hydrocarbon contamination plume mapping/delineation in a gas processing plant in southern Mexico. The paper describes innovative and cost-effective use of passive (non-intrusive) and active (intrusive) techniques, including the use of compound-specific analytical methods for site characterization. The techniques used, on a demonstrative basis, include geophysical, geochemical, and borehole drilling. Geochemical techniques used to delineate the horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the site include soil gas surveys. The borehole drilling technique used to assess the vertical extent of contamination and confirm geophysical and geochemical data combines conventional hollow-stem auguring with direct push-probe using Geoprobe. Compound-specific analytical methods, such as hydrocarbon fingerprinting and a modified method for gasoline range organics, demonstrate the inherent merit and need for such analyses to properly characterize a site, while revealing the limitations of noncompound-specific total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. The results indicate that the techniques used in tandem can properly delineate the nature and extent of contamination at a site; often supplement or complement data, while reducing the risk of errors and omissions during the assessment phase; and provide data constructively to focus site-specific remediation efforts. 7 figs.

  3. Using ASCEM Modeling and Visualization to Inform Stakeholders of Contaminant Plume Evolution and Remediation Efficacy at F-Basin Savannah River, SC – 15156

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.; Wainwright, H.; Molins, S.; Davis, J.; Arora, B.; Faybishenko, B.; Krishnan, H.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Moulton, D.; Lipnikov, K.; Gable, C.; Miller, T.; Freshley, M.

    2015-01-28

    Communication with stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and the public is an essential part of implementing different remediation and monitoring activities, and developing site closure strategies at contaminated sites. Modeling of contaminant plume evolution plays a critical role in estimating the benefit, cost, and risk of particular options. At the same time, effective visualization of monitoring data and modeling results are particularly important for conveying the significance of the results and observations. In this paper, we present the results of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project, including the discussion of the capabilities of newly developed ASCEM software package, along with its application to the F-Area Seepage Basins located in the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). ASCEM software includes state-of-the-art numerical methods for simulating complex flow and reactive transport, as well as various toolsets such as a graphical user interface (GUI), visualization, data management, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation. Using this software, we have developed an advanced visualization of tritium plume migration coupled with a data management system, and simulated a three-dimensional model of flow and plume evolution on a high-performance computing platform. We evaluated the effect of engineered flow barriers on a nonreactive tritium plume, through advanced plume visualization and modeling of tritium plume migration. In addition, we developed a geochemical reaction network to describe complex geochemical processes at the site, and evaluated the impact of coupled hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These results are expected to support SRS’s monitoring activities and operational decisions.

  4. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    David Watson

    2005-04-18

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the

  5. Assessing chlorinated ethene degradation in a large scale contaminant plume by dual carbon-chlorine isotope analysis and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Hunkeler, Daniel; Abe, Yumiko; Broholm, Mette M; Jeannottat, Simon; Westergaard, Claus; Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr; Aravena, Ramon; Bjerg, Poul L

    2011-01-25

    The fate of chlorinated ethenes in a large contaminant plume originating from a tetrachloroethene (PCE) source in a sandy aquifer in Denmark was investigated using novel methods including compound-specific carbon and chlorine isotope analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods targeting Dehaloccocoides sp. and vcrA genes. Redox conditions were characterized as well based on concentrations of dissolved redox sensitive compounds and sulfur isotopes in SO(4)(2-). In the first 400 m downgradient of the source, the plume was confined to the upper 20 m of the aquifer. Further downgradient it widened in vertical direction due to diverging groundwater flow reaching a depth of up to 50 m. As the plume dipped downward and moved away from the source, O(2) and NO(3)(-) decreased to below detection levels, while dissolved Fe(2+) and SO(4)(2-) increased above detectable concentrations, likely due to pyrite oxidation as confirmed by the depleted sulfur isotope signature of SO(4)(2-). In the same zone, PCE and trichloroethene (TCE) disappeared and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) became the dominant chlorinated ethene. PCE and TCE were likely transformed by reductive dechlorination rather than abiotic reduction by pyrite as indicated by the formation of cDCE and stable carbon isotope data. TCE and cDCE showed carbon isotope trends typical for reductive dechlorination with an initial depletion of (13)C in the daughter products followed by an enrichment of (13)C as degradation proceeded. At 1000 m downgradient of the source, cDCE was the dominant chlorinated ethene and had reached the source δ(13)C value confirming that cDCE was not affected by abiotic or biotic degradation. Further downgradient (up to 1900 m), cDCE became enriched in (13)C by up to 8 ‰ demonstrating its further transformation while vinylchloride (VC) concentrations remained low (<1 μg/L) and ethene was not observed. The correlated shift of carbon and chlorine isotope ratios of c

  6. Permeable sorptive walls for treatment of hydrophobic organic contaminant plumes in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Grathwohl, P.; Peschik, G.

    1997-12-31

    Highly hydrophobic contaminants are easily adsorbed from aqueous solutions. Since for many of these compounds sorption increases with increasing organic carbon content natural materials such as bituminous shales and coals may be used in permeable sorptive walls. This, however, only applies if sorption is at equilibrium, which may not always be the case in groundwater treatment using a funnel-and-gate system. In contrast to the natural solids, granular activated carbons (GACs) have very high sorption capacities and reasonably fast sorption kinetics. The laboratory results show that application of GACs (e.g. F100) is economically feasible for in situ removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site (MGP). For less sorbing compounds (such as benzene, toluene, xylenes) a combination of adsorption and biodegradation is necessary (i.e. sorptive + reactive treatment).

  7. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F.S.; Crawford, R.L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-09-01

    Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a preferred treatment technology saves significant site restoration costs for DOE. However, in order to be accepted MNA requires direct evidence of which processes are responsible for the contaminant loss and also the rates of the contaminant loss. Our proposal aims to: 1) provide evidence for one example of MNA, namely the disappearance of the dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Test Area North (TAN) site, 2) determine the rates at which aquifer microbes can co-metabolize TCE, and 3) determine whether there are other examples of natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents occurring at DOE sites. To this end, our research has several objectives. First, we have conducted studies to characterize the microbial processes that are likely responsible for the co-metabolic destruction of TCE in the aquifer at TAN (University of Idaho and INL). Second, we are investigating realistic rates of TCE co-metabolism at the low catabolic activities typical of microorganisms existing under aquifer conditions (INL). Using the co-metabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained in the aquifer at TAN and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Coupled with the research on low catabolic activities of co-metabolic microbes we are determining the patterns of functional gene expression by these cells, patterns that may be used to diagnose the co-metabolic activity in the SRPA or other aquifers.

  8. Detection of fresh ground water and a contaminant plume beneath Red Brook Harbor, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCobb, Timothy D.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2002-01-01

    Trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene were detected in ground water in a vertical interval from about 68 to 176 feet below sea level beneath the shoreline where the contaminant plume emanating from a capped landfill on the Massachusetts Military Reservation intersects Red Brook Harbor. The highest concentrations at the shoreline, about 15 micrograms per liter of trichloroethene and 1 microgram per liter of tetrachloroethene, were measured in samples from one well at about 176 feet below sea level. The concentrations of nutrients, such as nitrate and ammonium, and trace metals, such as iron and manganese, in these same samples are typical of uncontaminated ground water on Cape Cod. Fresh ground water (bulk electrical conductance less than 100 millisiemens per meter) is present beneath the harbor at 40 of 48 locations investigated within about 250 feet of the shoreline. Fresh ground water also was detected at one location approximately 450 feet from shore. The harbor bottom consists of soft sediments that range in thickness from 0 to greater than 20 feet and overlie sandy aquifer materials. Trichloroethene was detected at several locations in fresh ground water from the sandy aquifer materials beneath the harbor. The highest trichloroethene concentration, about 4.5 micrograms per liter, was measured about 450 feet from shore.

  9. Assessing Contaminant-Removal Conditions and Plume Persistence through Analysis of Data from Long-term Pump-and-Treat Operations

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Guo, Zhilin

    2014-01-01

    Historical groundwater-withdrawal and contaminant-concentration data collected from long-term pump-and-treat operations were analyzed and used to examine contaminant mass discharge (CMD) and mass-removal behavior for multiple sites. Differences in behavior were observed, and these differences were consistent with the nature of contaminant distributions and subsurface properties of the sites. For example, while CMD exhibited a relatively rapid decline during the initial stage of operation for all three sites, the rate of decline varied. The greatest rate was observed for the PGN site, whereas the lowest rate was observed for the MOT site. In addition, the MOT site exhibited the lowest relative reduction in CMD. These results are consistent with the actuality that the MOT site likely contains the greatest proportion of poorly accessible contaminant mass, given that it comprises a combined alluvium and fractured-bedrock system in which solvent and dissolved mass are present directly in the bedrock. The relative contributions of the source zones versus the plumes to total CMD were determined. Constrained contaminant mass removal was observed to influence the plumes for all three sites, and was attributed to a combination of uncontrolled (or imperfectly controlled) sources, back diffusion, and well-field hydraulics. The results presented herein illustrate that detailed analysis of operational pump-and-treat data can be a cost-effective method for providing value-added characterization of contaminated sites. PMID:24914523

  10. Source Inversion for contaminant plume dispersion in urban environments using building-resolving simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, F K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2005-11-04

    Flow in urban environments is complicated by the presence of buildings, which divert the flow into often unexpected directions. Contaminants released at ground level are easily lofted above tall ({approx} 100 m) buildings and channeled through urban canyons that are perpendicular to the wind direction (see e.g., IOP 9 in Chan, 2005). The path of wind and scalars in urban environments is difficult to predict even with building-resolving computational fluid dynamics codes, due to the uncertainty in the synoptic wind and boundary conditions and other errors in the models. Given the difficulties due to the complexity of urban flows, solving an inverse problem becomes quite challenging. That is, given measurements of concentration at sensors scattered throughout a city, is it possible to detect the source of the contaminant? The ability to locate a source and determine its characteristics in a complex environment is necessary for emergency response for accidental or intentional releases of contaminants in densely-populated urban areas. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a robust statistical inversion procedure that performs well even under the complex flow conditions and uncertainty present in urban environments. Much work has previously focused on direct inversion procedures, where an inverse solution is obtained using an adjoint advection-diffusion equation. The exact direct inversion approaches are strictly limited to processes governed by linear equations. In addition, they assume the system is steady-state and that the equations are linear (Enting, 2002). In addition to adjoint models, optimization techniques are also employed to obtain solutions to inverse problems. These techniques often give only a single best answer, or assume a Gaussian distribution to account for uncertainties. General dispersion related inverse problems, however, often include non-linear processes (e.g., dispersion of chemically reacting substances) or are characterized by non

  11. Surface and borehole electromagnetic imaging of conducting contaminant plumes. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    'Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component magnetic field detectors are deployed in other boreholes or on the surface. Sources and receivers are typically deployed in a configuration surrounding the region of interest. The goal of this procedure is to image electrical conductivity variations in the earth, much as x-ray tomography is used to image density variations through cross-sections of the body. Although such EM field techniques have been developed and applied, the algorithms for inverting the magnetic data to produce the desired images of electrical conductivity have not kept pace. One of the main reasons for the lag in the algorithm development has been the fact that the magnetic induction problem is inherently three dimensional: other imaging methods such as x-ray and seismic can make use of two-dimensional approximations that are not too far from reality, but the author does not have this luxury in EM induction tomography. In addition, previous field experiments were conducted at controlled test sites that typically do not have much external noise or extensive surface clutter problems often associated with environmental sites. To use the same field techniques in environments more typical of cleanup sites requires a new set of data processing tools to remove the effects of both noise and clutter. The goal of this project is to join theory and experiment to produce enhanced images of electrically conducting fluids underground, allowing better localization of contaminants and improved planning strategies for the subsequent remediation efforts. After explaining the physical context in more detail, this report will summarize the progress made in the first year of this project: (1) on code development and (2) on field tests of

  12. Application of environmental tracers to delineate recharge patterns and nitrate contamination in shallow groundwater around a river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaown, Dugin; Koh, Eunhee; Park, Byeong-Hak; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogeochemical data, stable isotopes, chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs) and 3H-3He in groundwater were applied to characterize residence time, recharge patterns and nitrate contamination of groundwater in a small agricultural area, Yangpyung, Korea. The study area is located around a river and the measured groundwater table ranges from 1.5 to 2.65 m during the year. Most residents in the study area practice agriculture and potato, strawberry, and cabbage are the typical vegetables grown. Vegetable fields are mostly located in the upgradient area of the study area while forest and residence areas are located in the downgradient area. A lot of chemical and organic fertilizers are applied in the upgradient area. The concentration of NO3-N in groundwater showed 9.8-83.7 mg/L in the upgradient area and 0.1-22.6 mg/L in the downgradient area in 2014. It is necessary to monitor groundwater recharge patterns and transport processes of nitrate to protect surface water around the study area. The values of δ18O and δD showed that groundwater is recharged mainly from summer precipitation. The apparent groundwater ages using 3H-3He and CFCs ranged from 13 to 27 years in the upgradient area and from 25 to 35 years in the downgradient area. The NO3-N in more recently recharged groundwater showed higher concentrations while the NO3-N in older groundwater showed low concentrations. Some shallow wells in the downgradient area showed similar apparent groundwater age with that of the river water indicating groundwater-surface water interactions. A conceptual model of groundwater-surface water interactions using stable isotopes, apparent 3H-3He and CFCs age in groundwater will be useful to understand the hydrological processes and nitrate contamination of the study area.

  13. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment - Task 4: Modeling - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Starr

    2005-10-31

    Trichloroethene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, can be degraded under certain conditions by microorganisms that occur naturally in the subsurface. TCE can be degraded under anaerobic conditions to less chlorinated compounds and ultimately into the non-chlorinated, non-hazardous end product, ethene, via anaerobic reductive dechlorination (ARD). ARD is widely recognized as a TCE degradation mechanism, and occurs in active groundwater remediation and can occur during monitored natural attenuation (MNA). MNA relies on natural processes, such as dispersion and degradation, to reduce contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels without active human intervention other than monitoring. TCE can also be biodegraded under aerobic conditions via cometabolism, in which microbial enzymes produced for other purposes fortuitously also react with TCE. In cometabolism, TCE is oxidized directly to non-hazardous products. Cometabolism as a TCE-degrading process under aerobic conditions is less well known than ARD. Natural attenuation is often discounted as a TCE remedial alternative in aerobic conditions based on the paradigm that TCE is biodegradable only under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to this paradigm, TCE was shown to degrade relative to conservative co-contaminants at an environmentally significant rate in a large (approximately 3 km long) TCE plume in aerobic groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the degradation mechanism was shown to be cometabolism. MNA was selected as the remedy for most of this plume, resulting in a considerable cost savings relative to conventional remedial methods. To determine if cometabolism might be a viable remedy at other sites with TCE-contaminated aerobic groundwater, TCE plumes at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were screened to evaluate whether TCE commonly degrades in aerobic groundwater, and if degradation rates are fast enough that natural attenuation could be a viable remedy. One hundred and twenty

  14. Determination of Premining Geochemical Background and Delineation of Extent of Sediment Contamination in Blue Creek Downstream from Midnite Mine, Stevens County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Stanley E.; Kirschner, Frederick E.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Budahn, James R.; Brown, Zoe Ann

    2008-01-01

    geochemical background determined upstream of the mine site. Postmining metal concentrations in sediment are lower than during the mining period, but remain elevated relative to premining geochemical background. Furthermore, the sediment composition of surface sediment in the Blue Creek delta is contaminated. Base-metal contamination by arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc in sediment in the delta in Blue Creek cove is dominated by suspended sediment from the Coeur d?Alene mining district. Uranium contamination in surface sediment in the delta of Blue Creek cove extends at least 500 meters downstream from the mouth of Blue Creek as defined by the 1,290-ft elevation boundary between lands administered by the National Park Service and the Spokane Indian Tribe. Comparisons of the premining geochemical background to sediment sampled during the period the mine was in operation, and to the sediment data from the postmining period, are used to delineate the extent of contaminated sediment in Blue Creek cove along the thalweg of Blue Creek into Lake Roosevelt. The extent of contamination out into Lake Roosevelt by mining remains open.

  15. 3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, K.M.; Lesmes, D.P.; Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W.; Shi, W.; Sturrock, J.

    1997-12-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. The first-year accomplishments are (1) laboratory experiments on fluid-saturated sandstones quantifying the dependence of spectral IP responses on solution chemistry and rock micro-geometry; (2) library research on the current understanding of electromagnetic coupling effects on IP data acquired in the field: and (3) development of prototype forward modeling and inversion algorithms for interpreting IP data in terms of 3-D models of complex resistivity.'

  16. Long-Term Distribution and Transport of Nitrate and Ammonium Within a Groundwater Sewage Plume, Cape Cod, MA, After Removal of the Contaminant Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repert, D. A.; Smith, R. L.

    2002-12-01

    Disposal of treated sewage for 60 yrs. onto infiltration beds at a site on Cape Cod, MA produced a groundwater contaminant plume >6 km long. The plume was characterized by an anoxic ammonium-containing core, surrounded by an oxic-suboxic outer zone within the sand and gravel aquifer. In Dec. 1995 the sewage treatment facility ceased operation. A long-term study to characterize the distribution of sewage plume constituents was conducted along a 500 m-long transect (source to 3 yrs. groundwater travel distance). Prior to sewage-disposal cessation, total inorganic N within 30 m vertical profiles decreased from 6.6 moles N/m2 (92% NO3-, 8% NH4+) at the point of discharge to 3.3 moles N/m2 (77% NO3-, 23% NH4+) at the furthest point along the transect. Post-cessation nitrate concentrations increased within the first 6 mo. and then gradually decreased. The nitrate decrease was accompanied by an initial nitrite increase, an indication that denitrification was reducing nitrate after the oxygenated sewage discharge was discontinued. There was also an apparent increase in ammonium concentration in the first 6 mo. after cessation. Previous laboratory experiments on pre-cessation cores showed that nitrification was important in converting sorbed ammonium to nitrate under the sewage beds. However, with the removal of the oxygenated sewage source, nitrification ceased, allowing ammonium to initially increase. This increase was correlated with dissolved organic carbon concentrations within the groundwater. Ammonium concentrations decreased dramatically after a year, but subsequently increased in the core of the plume to pre-cessation levels through mineralization of organic N. Recent laboratory core experiments and extractions show that there is a large pool of sorbed organic carbon, although dissolved organic carbon concentrations have been consistently less than 3 mg/L for 6 yrs. Seven yrs. after cessation of the sewage disposal, there is still a significant amount (0.6 moles N

  17. The Impact of In-situ Chemical Oxidation on Contaminant Mass Discharge: Linking Source-Zone and Plume-Scale Characterizations of Remediation Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, K. C.; Baker, J. B.; Allen, T.; DiGuiseppi, W.; Hatton, J.; Morrison, C.; Russo, A. E.; Berkompas, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    A large-scale permanganate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) effort has been conducted over the past ten years at a federal Superfund site in Tucson, AZ, for which trichloroethene (TCE) is the primary contaminant of concern. Remediation performance was assessed by examining the impact of treatment on contaminant mass discharge, an approach that has been used for only a very few prior ISCO projects. Contaminant mass discharge tests were conducted before and after permanganate injection to measure the impact at the source-zone scale. The results indicate that ISCO caused a significant reduction in mass discharge (approximately 75%). The standard approach of characterizing discharge at the source-zone scale was supplemented with additional characterization at the plume scale, which was evaluated by examining the change in contaminant mass discharge associated with the pump-and-treat system. The integrated contaminant mass discharge decreased by approximately 70%, consistent with the source-zone-scale measurements. The integrated mass discharge rebounded from 0.1 to 0.2 Kg/d within one year after cessation of permanganate injections, after which it has been stable for several years. Collection of the integrated contaminant mass discharge data throughout the ISCO treatment period provided a high-resolution, real-time analysis of the site-wide impact of ISCO, thereby linking source-zone remediation to impacts on overall risk. The results indicate that ISCO was successful in reducing contaminant mass discharge at this site, which comprises a highly heterogeneous subsurface environment. Analysis of TCE sediment concentration data for core material collected before and after ISCO supports the hypothesis that the remaining mass discharge is associated in part with poorly-accessible contaminant mass residing within lower-permeability zones.

  18. Impact of In Situ Chemical Oxidation on Contaminant Mass Discharge: Linking Source-Zone and Plume-Scale Characterizations of Remediation Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Allen, Tim J.; Baker, Joseph R.; DiGuiseppi, W.; Hatton, J.; Morrison, C.; Russo, A.; Berkompas, J.

    2011-05-26

    A large-scale permanganate-based in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) effort has been conducted over the past ten years at a federal Superfund site in Tucson, AZ, for which trichloroethene (TCE) is the primary contaminant of concern. Remediation performance was assessed by examining the impact of treatment on contaminant mass discharge, an approach that has been used for only a very few prior ISCO projects. Contaminant mass discharge tests were conducted before and after permanganate injection to measure the impact at the source-zone scale. The results indicate that ISCO caused a significant reduction in mass discharge (approximately 75%). The standard approach of characterizing discharge at the source-zone scale was supplemented with additional characterization at the plume scale, which was evaluated by examining the change in contaminant mass discharge associated with the pump-and-treat system. The integrated contaminant mass discharge decreased by approximately 70%, consistent with the source-zone-scale measurements. The integrated mass discharge rebounded from 0.1 to 0.2 kg/d within one year after cessation of permanganate injections, after which it has been stable for several years. Collection of the integrated contaminant mass discharge data throughout the ISCO treatment period provided a high-resolution, real-time analysis of the site-wide impact of ISCO, thereby linking source-zone remediation to impacts on overall risk. The results indicate that ISCO was successful in reducing contaminant mass discharge at this site, which comprises a highly heterogeneous subsurface environment. Analysis of TCE sediment concentration data for core material collected before and after ISCO supports the hypothesis that the remaining mass discharge is associated in part with poorly accessible contaminant mass residing within lower permeability zones.

  19. The Impact of In-situ Chemical Oxidation on Contaminant Mass Discharge: Linking Source-Zone and Plume-Scale Characterizations of Remediation Performance

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, M.L.; Carroll, K.C.; Allen, T.; Baker, J.; DiGuiseppi, W.; Hatton, J.; Morrison, C.; Russo, A.; Berkompas, J.

    2011-01-01

    A large-scale permanganate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) effort has been conducted over the past ten years at a federal Superfund site in Tucson, AZ, for which trichloroethene (TCE) is the primary contaminant of concern. Remediation performance was assessed by examining the impact of treatment on contaminant mass discharge, an approach that has been used for only a very few prior ISCO projects. Contaminant mass discharge tests were conducted before and after permanganate injection to measure the impact at the source-zone scale. The results indicate that ISCO caused a significant reduction in mass discharge (approximately 75%). The standard approach of characterizing discharge at the source-zone scale was supplemented with additional characterization at the plume scale, which was evaluated by examining the change in contaminant mass discharge associated with the pump-and-treat system. The integrated contaminant mass discharge decreased by approximately 70%, consistent with the source-zone-scale measurements. The integrated mass discharge rebounded from 0.1 to 0.2 Kg/d within one year after cessation of permanganate injections, after which it has been stable for several years. Collection of the integrated contaminant mass discharge data throughout the ISCO treatment period provided a high-resolution, real-time analysis of the site-wide impact of ISCO, thereby linking source-zone remediation to impacts on overall risk. The results indicate that ISCO was successful in reducing contaminant mass discharge at this site, which comprises a highly heterogeneous subsurface environment. Analysis of TCE sediment concentration data for core material collected before and after ISCO supports the hypothesis that the remaining mass discharge is associated in part with poorly-accessible contaminant mass residing within lower-permeability zones. PMID:21615133

  20. Experimental characterization of a plume of passive contaminant above a thermal source: capture efficiency of a fume extraction hood.

    PubMed

    Devienne, René; Fontaine, Jean Raymond; Kicka, Jérémie; Bonthoux, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Industrial ventilation problems can be linked to the formation of thermal plumes that develop due to natural convection above various heat sources. These plumes, independent of the energy losses and thermal constraints caused, can also be the carrier of polluting products. This article describes an experimental study of the dynamic, thermal, and mass fields that develop from a hot rectangular (0.5 x 1.25 m) horizontal source. The metrology available allows the measurement of not only the local temperatures and velocities but also the concentration of a tracer gas (helium). Mathematical models have been developed enabling representation of the fields concerned; their characterization by isothermal, iso-velocity, or iso-concentration curves; calculation of the flow rate carried by the plume at a given height; calculation of the enthalpy transport; and so on. Moreover, a pollutant capture device has been introduced, and the measurement technique used allows the determination of various efficiencies of practical interest. The ratio of capture flow to free plume flow at a particular height appears to correlate well with the mean efficiencies obtained for distinct source temperatures. PMID:19666957

  1. Investigation of the Strontium-90 Contaminant Plume along the Shoreline of the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Patton, Gregory W.; Hartman, Mary J.; Spane, Frank A.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts are underway to remediate strontium-laden groundwater to the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site. Past practices of the 100-N reactor liquid waste disposal sites has left strontium-90 sorbed onto sediments which is a continuing source of contaminant discharge to the river. The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology Project assessed the interaction of groundwater and river water at the hyporheic zone. Limited data have been obtained at this interface of contaminant concentrations, geology, groundwater chemistry, affects of river stage and other variables that may affect strontium-90 release. Efforts were also undertaken to determine the extent, both laterally and horizontally, of the strontium-90 plume along the shoreline and to potentially find an alternative constituent to monitor strontium-90 that would be more cost effective and could possibly be done under real time conditions. A baseline of strontium-90 concentrations along the shoreline was developed to help assess remediation technologies.

  2. Dynamics of an Oligotrophic Bacterial Aquifer Community during Contact with a Groundwater Plume Contaminated with Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes: an In Situ Mesocosm Study†

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Barbara; Dejonghe, Winnie; Boënne, Wesley; Brennerova, Maria; Cernik, Miroslav; Lederer, Tomas; Bucheli-Witschel, Margarete; Bastiaens, Leen; Verstraete, Willy; Top, Eva M.; Diels, Ludo; Springael, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    An in situ mesocosm system was designed to monitor the in situ dynamics of the microbial community in polluted aquifers. The mesocosm system consists of a permeable membrane pocket filled with aquifer material and placed within a polypropylene holder, which is inserted below groundwater level in a monitoring well. After a specific time period, the microcosm is recovered from the well and its bacterial community is analyzed. Using this system, we examined the effect of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) contamination on the response of an aquifer bacterial community by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes and PCR detection of BTEX degradation genes. Mesocosms were filled with nonsterile or sterile aquifer material derived from an uncontaminated area and positioned in a well located in either the uncontaminated area or a nearby contaminated area. In the contaminated area, the bacterial community in the microcosms rapidly evolved into a stable community identical to that in the adjacent aquifer but different from that in the uncontaminated area. At the contaminated location, bacteria with tmoA- and xylM/xylE1-like BTEX catabolic genotypes colonized the aquifer, while at the uncontaminated location only tmoA-like genotypes were detected. The communities in the mesocosms and in the aquifer adjacent to the wells in the contaminated area consisted mainly of Proteobacteria. At the uncontaminated location, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were found. Our results indicate that communities with long-term stability in their structures follow the contamination plume and rapidly colonize downstream areas upon contamination. PMID:16000793

  3. Dynamics of an oligotrophic bacterial aquifer community during contact with a groundwater plume contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes: an in situ mesocosm study.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Barbara; Dejonghe, Winnie; Boënne, Wesley; Brennerova, Maria; Cernik, Miroslav; Lederer, Tomas; Bucheli-Witschel, Margarete; Bastiaens, Leen; Verstraete, Willy; Top, Eva M; Diels, Ludo; Springael, Dirk

    2005-07-01

    An in situ mesocosm system was designed to monitor the in situ dynamics of the microbial community in polluted aquifers. The mesocosm system consists of a permeable membrane pocket filled with aquifer material and placed within a polypropylene holder, which is inserted below groundwater level in a monitoring well. After a specific time period, the microcosm is recovered from the well and its bacterial community is analyzed. Using this system, we examined the effect of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) contamination on the response of an aquifer bacterial community by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes and PCR detection of BTEX degradation genes. Mesocosms were filled with nonsterile or sterile aquifer material derived from an uncontaminated area and positioned in a well located in either the uncontaminated area or a nearby contaminated area. In the contaminated area, the bacterial community in the microcosms rapidly evolved into a stable community identical to that in the adjacent aquifer but different from that in the uncontaminated area. At the contaminated location, bacteria with tmoA- and xylM/xylE1-like BTEX catabolic genotypes colonized the aquifer, while at the uncontaminated location only tmoA-like genotypes were detected. The communities in the mesocosms and in the aquifer adjacent to the wells in the contaminated area consisted mainly of Proteobacteria. At the uncontaminated location, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were found. Our results indicate that communities with long-term stability in their structures follow the contamination plume and rapidly colonize downstream areas upon contamination. PMID:16000793

  4. Three-dimensional analysis of future groundwater flow conditions and contaminant plume transport in the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1996 and 1997 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, C.R.; Wurstner, S.K.; Williams, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.; Bergeron, M.P.

    1997-12-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow and transport, based on the Coupled Fluid Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code, was developed for the Hanford Site to support the Hanford Groundwater Project (HGWP), managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The model was developed to increase the understanding and better forecast the migration of several contaminant plumes being monitored by the HGWP, and to support the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200-Area Plateau. Recent modeling efforts have focused on continued refinement of an initial version of the three-dimensional model developed in 1995 and its application to simulate future transport of selected contaminant plumes in the aquifer system. This version of the model was updated using a more current version of the CFEST code called CFEST96. Prior to conducting simulations of contaminant transport with the three-dimensional model, a previous steady-state, two-dimensional model of the unconfined aquifer system was recalibrated to 1979 water-table conditions with a statistical inverse method implemented in the CFEST-INV computer code. The results of the recalibration were used to refine the three-dimensional conceptual model and to calibrate it with a conceptualization that preserves the two-dimensional hydraulic properties and knowledge of the aquifer`s three-dimensional properties for the same 1979 water-table conditions. The transient behavior of the three-dimensional flow model was also calibrated by adjusting model storage properties (specific yield) until transient water-table predictions approximated observed water-table elevations between 1979 and 1996.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter oleivorans PF1, a Diesel-Degrading and Plant-Growth-Promoting Endophytic Strain Isolated from Poplar Trees Growing on a Diesel-Contaminated Plume

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Rineau, Francois; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Daghio, Matteo; Thijs, Sofie; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report the 3.7-Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter oleivorans strain PF1, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-negative bacterium in the class Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from poplar trees growing on a diesel-contaminated plume at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain PF1 is a potent plant-growth promoter, useful for diesel fuel phytoremediation applications. PMID:25657268

  6. Geochemical Characteristics of the Contaminant Waste Plume in the F-Area of the Savannah River Site: From Kilometer to Micrometer Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Wan, J.; Denham, M.; Seaman, J. C.; Rakshit, S.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) was a major DOE facility for plutonium production during the Cold War. Low-level radioactivity acidic waste solutions were discharged to a series of unlined seepage basins in the F-Area of the SRS from 1955-1989. Although the site has gone through many years of active remediation, the groundwater remains acidic with pH values as low as 3.2, and the concentrations of U and other radionuclides are still up to ten times higher than their maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). In order to understand the current and predict the future contaminant behavior, a comprehensive investigation is being conducted, funded jointly by the DOE’s offices of Biological and Environmental Resources (BER) and Environmental Management (EM). Five boreholes were drilled outside and within the plume along the groundwater flow path. Samples were collected from varied depths of each borehole, sediment pore-waters were extracted by ultracentrifugation, and the solid phase and pore-water were characterized. We identified the sediment mineralogy as being composed predominantly fine quartz sand with 2 to 12% clay. Kaolinite and goethite are the major minerals of the clay-sized fraction, residing primarily as coatings of varied thicknesses on quartz sand grains, providing reactive surfaces for contaminant adsorption. The measured U “field” distribution coefficients (Kd) and U concentrations in the pore waters are strongly pH dependent. These results are consistent with laboratory equilibrium adsorption studies, where U adsorption onto SRS sediments increases sharply from pH 3 to 5, and reaches ≈100% at pH 6-7. The variability in U adsorption capacity in these sediments is mainly caused by differences in goethite/clay content and effective reactive specific surface area. Measured “field” Kd values are smaller than those obtained from laboratory equilibrium adsorption studies with the same contaminated sediments. The equilibrium pH-dependent U adsorption

  7. Investigation of the potential source area, contamination pathway, and probable release history of chlorinated-solvent-contaminated groundwater at the Capital City Plume Site, Montgomery, Alabama, 2008-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Miller, Scott; Campbell, Bruce G.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Gill, Amy C.; Clark, Athena P.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of the organic solvent perchloroethylene (PCE) in a shallow public-supply well in 1991 and exposure of workers in 1993 to solvent vapors during excavation activities to depths near the water table provided evidence that the shallow aquifer beneath the capital city of Montgomery, Alabama, was contaminated. Investigations conducted from 1993 to 1999 by State and Federal agencies confirmed the detection of PCE in the shallow aquifer, as well as the detection of the organic solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and various inorganic compounds, but the source of the groundwater contamination was not determined. In May 2000 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed that the site, called the Capital City Plume (CCP) Site, be a candidate for the National Priorities List. Between 2000 and 2007, numerous site-investigation activities also did not determine the source of the groundwater contamination. In 2008, additional assessments were conducted at the CCP Site to investigate the potential source area, contamination pathway, and the probable release history of the chlorinated-solvent-contaminated groundwater. The assessments included the collection of (1) pore water in 2008 from the hyporheic zone of a creek using passive-diffusion bag samplers; (2) tissue samples in 2008 and 2009 from trees growing in areas of downtown Montgomery characterized by groundwater contamination and from trees growing in riparian zones along the Alabama River and Cypress Creek; and (3) groundwater samples in 2009 and 2010. The data collected were used to investigate the potential source area of contaminants detected in groundwater, the pathway of groundwater contamination, and constraints on the probable contaminant-release history. The data collected between 2008 and 2010 indicate that the PCE and TCE contamination of the shallow aquifer beneath the CCP Site most likely resulted from the past use and disposal of industrial wastewater from printing operations containing chlorinated

  8. Groundwater ecosystem resilience to organic contaminations: microbial and geochemical dynamics throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Nossa, Carlos W; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-09-01

    The capacity of groundwater ecosystem to recover from contamination by organic chemicals is a vital concern for environmental scientists. A pilot-scale aquifer system was used to investigate the long-term dynamics of contaminants, groundwater geochemistry, and microbial community structure (by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR) throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume (10% ethanol + 50 mg/L benzene + 50 mg/L toluene). Two-year continuous ethanol-blended release significantly changed the groundwater geochemistry (resulted in anaerobic, low pH, and organotrophic conditions) and increased bacterial and archaeal populations by 82- and 314-fold respectively. Various anaerobic heterotrophs (fermenters, acetogens, methanogens, and hydrocarbon degraders) were enriched. Two years after the release was shut off, all contaminants and their degradation byproducts disappeared and groundwater geochemistry completely restored to the pre-release states (aerobic, neutral pH, and oligotrophic). Bacterial and archaeal populations declined by 18- and 45-fold respectively (relative to the time of shut off). Microbial community structure reverted towards the pre-release states and alpha diversity indices rebounded, suggesting the resilience of microbial community to ethanol blend releases. We also found shifts from O2-sensitive methanogens (e.g., Methanobacterium) to methanogens that are not so sensitive to O2 (e.g., Methanosarcina and Methanocella), which is likely to contribute to the persistence of methanogens and methane generation following the source removal. Overall, the rapid disappearance of contaminants and their metabolites, rebound of geochemical footprints, and resilience of microbial community unequivocally document the natural capacity of groundwater ecosystem to attenuate and recover from a large volume of catastrophic spill of ethanol-based biofuel. PMID:25996759

  9. Evaluation of Visible Plumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Thomas

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline discusses plumes with contaminants that are visible to the naked eye. Information covers: (1) history of air pollution control regulations, (2) need for methods of evaluating…

  10. Assessment of diesel contamination in groundwater using electromagnetic induction geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, S.; Fallgren, P.; Cooper, J.; Morris, J; . Urynowicz, M.

    2008-07-01

    Determining hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater is typically accomplished through the installation of extensive monitoring wells. Issues of scale and site heterogeneities tend to introduce errors in delineating the extent of contamination and environmental impact. In this study, electromagnetic induction survey was investigated as an alternative technique for mapping petroleum contaminants in the subsurface. The surveys were conducted at a coal mining site near Gillette, Wyoming, using the EM34-XL ground conductivity meter. Data from this survey were validated with known concentrations of diesel compounds detected in groundwater from the study site. Groundwater data correlated well with the electromagnetic survey data, which was used to generate a site model to identify subsurface diesel plumes. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to use electromagnetic survey techniques for mapping hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater. Results from this study indicate that this geophysical technique can be an effective tool for assessing subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon sources and plumes at contaminated sites.

  11. Automated Crater Delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, J. S.; Pina, P.

    2015-05-01

    An algorithm to delineate impact craters based on Edge Maps and Dynamic Programming is presented. The global performance obtained on 1045 craters from Mars (5 m to about 200 km in diameter), achieved 96% of correct contour delineations.

  12. Plume radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  13. A comparison of contaminant plume statistics from a Gaussian puff and urban CFD model for two large cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Julie; Boris, Jay P.; Young, Theodore; Patnaik, Gopal; Iselin, John

    This paper quantitatively assesses the spatial extent of modeled contaminated regions resulting from hypothetical airborne agent releases in major urban areas. We compare statistics from a release at several different sites in Washington DC and Chicago using a Gaussian puff model (SCIPUFF, version 1.3, with urban parameter settings) and a building-resolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model (FAST3D-CT). For a neutrally buoyant gas source term with urban meteorology, we compare near-surface dosage values within several kilometers of the release during the first half hour, before the gas is dispersed beyond the critical lethal level. In particular, using "fine-grain" point-wise statistics such as fractional bias, spatial correlations and the percentage of points lying within a factor of two, we find that dosage distributions from the Gaussian puff and CFD model share few features in common. Yet the "coarse-grain" statistic that compares areas contained within a given contour level reveals that the differences between the models are less pronounced. Most significant among these distinctions is the rapid lofting, leading to enhanced vertical mixing, and projection downwind of the contaminant by the interaction of the winds with the urban landscape in the CFD model. This model-to-model discrepancy is partially ameliorated by supplying the puff model with more detailed information about the urban boundary layer that evolves on the CFD grid. While improving the correspondence of the models when using the "coarse-grain" statistic, the additional information does not lead to quite as substantial an overall agreement between the models when the "fine-grain" statistics are compared. The taller, denser and more variable building landscape of Chicago created increased sensitivity to release site and led to greater divergence in FAST3D-CT and SCIPUFF results relative to the flatter, sparser and more uniform urban morphology of Washington DC.

  14. USE OF AROMATIC ACIDS AND PHOSPHOLIPID-ESTER-LINKED FATTY ACIDS FOR DELINEATION OF PROCESSES AFFECTING AN AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH JP-4 FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A glacio-fluvial aquifer located at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, has been contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons released by the crash of a tanker aircraft in October of 1988. A comprehensive analysis of the inorganic and organic geochemical constituents and geomicrobio...

  15. Delineating contamination of basaltic magma by mafic crust VIA U/Th disequilibrium determined by TIMS, Pisgah Craters, Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, F.C.; Reid, M.R. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Compositional changes in basaltic lavas at Pisgah Craters, CA, are hypothesized to reflect contamination by variable amounts of mafic crust (Glazner et al, 1991). Data determined by Glazner and coworker indicate that the lavas range in isotopic composition from [sup 143]Nd/[sup 144]Nd = 0.51293--0.51276 and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr = 0.7038--0.7050, and have decreasing concentrations of incompatible elements with decreasing MgO. The lavas are postulated to range from nearly pure primitive mantle-derived magmas (>8 wt % MgO) early in the eruptive history to nearly pure melts of mafic crust (<4.5 wt % MgO) late in the eruptive history. Preliminary U-series isotopic results obtained by thermal ionization mass spectrometry suggest that the crustal contaminant contains minor concentrations of Th and U. Th and U concentrations in the lavas correlate positively with MgO contents, with ([sup 238]U)/([sup 232]Th) increasing by almost 30% over a variation from 8 to 4.5 wt % MgO. In contrast, [sup 232]Th/[sup 230]Th varies little with MgO concentration and averages 1.8 [times] 10[sup 5] (([sup 230]Th)/([sup 232]Th) [approximately]1.03; 5 samples). The [sup 232]Th/[sup 230]Th ratios of the Pisgah lavas are those expected for mantle-derived magmas based on their Sr and Nd isotopic compositions. The lack of Th isotopic variation coupled with decreasing Th concentrations suggests that the contaminant contained very little Th, consistent with a mafic and/or deep crustal source. U/Th disequilibrium in these lavas indicates that contamination and eruption occurred within the past 50,000 years from the present.

  16. Interpolating and Extrapolating Contaminant Concentrations from Monitor Wells to Model Grids for Fate-and-Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D. B.; Clement, P.; Bostick, K.

    2002-02-26

    Geostatistical interpolation of groundwater characterization data to visualize contaminant distributions in three dimensions is often hindered by the sparse distribution of samples relative to the size of the plume and scale of heterogeneities. Typically, placement of expensive monitoring wells is guided by the conceptualized plume rather than geostatistical considerations, focusing on contaminated areas rather than thoroughly gridding the plume boundary. The resulting data sets require careful analysis in order to produce plausible plume shells. A purely geostatistical approach is usually impractical; kriging parameters based on the observed data structure can extrapolate contamination far beyond the demonstrated extent of the plume. When more appropriate kriging parameters are selected, holes often occur in the interpolated distribution because realistic kriging ranges may not bridge large gaps between data points. Such artifacts obscure the probable location of the plume boundary and distort the contaminant distribution, obstructing quantitative modeling of remedial strategies. Two methods of constraining kriging can successfully eliminate these geostatistical artifacts. Laterally, the plume boundary may be controlled using a manually constructed mask that delineates the plan-view extent of the plume. After kriging, the mask is used to set all grid cells outside of the plume to a concentration of zero. Use of non-zero control points is a more refined but laborious approach that also bridges data gaps within the body of a plume and permits use of tighter kriging parameters. These can be obtained by manual linear interpolation between measured samples, or derived from historical data migrated along flow paths while accounting for all attenuative processes. Masking and use of non-zero control points result in a plume shell that reflects the intuition and professional judgment of the hydrologist, and can be interpolated automatically to any desired grid, providing

  17. Delineation of a wellhead protection zone and determination of flowpaths from potential groundwater contaminant source areas at Camp Ripley, Little Falls, Minnesota.

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-12-22

    Groundwater at Camp Ripley, Minnesota, is recharged both on post and off site and discharged to rivers, wetlands, and pumping wells. The subsurface geologic materials have a wide range of permeabilities and are arranged in a complex fashion as a result of the region's multiple glacial advances. Correlation of individual glacial geologic units is difficult, even between nearby boreholes, because of the heterogeneities in the subsurface. This report documents the creation of a numerical model of groundwater flow for Camp Ripley and hydrologically related areas to the west and southwest. The model relies on a hydrogeological conceptual model built on the findings of a University of Minnesota-Duluth drilling and sampling program conducted in 2001. Because of the site's stratigraphic complexity, a geostatistical approach was taken to handle the uncertainty of the subsurface correlation. The U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW code was used to create the steady-state model, which includes input data from a variety of sources and is calibrated to water levels in monitoring wells across much of the site. This model was used for several applications. Wellhead protection zones were delineated for on-site production wells H, L, and N. The zones were determined on the basis of a probabilistic assessment of the groundwater captured by these wells; the assessment, in turn, had been based on multiple realizations of the study area's stratigraphy and groundwater flowfield. An additional application of the model was for estimating flowpaths and times of travel for groundwater at Camp Ripley's range areas and waste management facilities.

  18. Effect of bipropellant plume exhaust effluents on spaceborne optical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maag, C. R.; Jeffery, J. A.; Millard, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical tools together with a good data base are necessary to predict the transport of plume contaminants and their effects on spacecraft surfaces. The present paper describes an assessment of bipropellant thrusters, the production and transport of plume contaminants from these thrusters, and the use of the JPL contamination analysis program to assess the effects of plume contamination on the Galileo spacecraft. It is shown that, in the case of the Galileo mission, contamination from the liquid engines has been effectively reduced to nothing by the use of predictive tools. Plume shields together with precise scan platform stowage have been designed to protect the optical instruments.

  19. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

  20. Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Aleisa C

    2015-01-01

    ). It originated from at least four separate source areas that comingled in the subsurface to form the large plume. The major contaminants of concern (COCs) are tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA), which were historically used for degreasing operations in the maintenance of aircraft and support vehicles. Relatively small areas of elevated PCE, TCE, and 1,1,1-TCA were delineated in the shallow portion of the water table aquifer by direct-push groundwater sampling. Focused direct-push AAB treatment occurred in March 2006 at these source areas (Figure 1). Downgradient of the these areas and deeper in the aquifer, AAB treatment was implemented using rows of extraction/injection wells oriented perpendicular to groundwater flow to create multiple reductive zones across the plume cores, defined as areas where more than 1,000 micrograms per liter (ug/L) total solvent concentrations were present. Initial indications of successful degradation were observed within 6 months of starting injections. FIGURE 1. Dover AFB Area 6 plume. This paper describes the AAB implementation and progress of remediation after 8 years of treatment and periodic groundwater monitoring. SITE LITHOLOGY Contamination at the site is limited to the surficial aquifer, which consists of 35 to 50 feet (ft) (11 to 15 meters [m]) of unconsolidated Pleistocene deposits of the Columbia Formation. The Columbia Formation consists of fine to coarse sand with silt and clay lenses and less common gravel lenses. Silts and silty sands are generally encountered to a depth of 10 to 12 ft (3.05 to 3.65 m) below ground surface (bgs) and grade to medium- and coarse-grained sands to a depth of 35 to 50 ft (11 to 15 m) bgs. There is a clay and silt unit (part of the Calvert Formation) below the surficial aquifer that acts as an aquitard to the downward migration of contaminants. The depth to the water table varies across the site but usually ranges from 8 to 15 ft (2.4 to 4.5 m

  1. Phytoscreening for chlorinated solvents using rapid in vitro SPME sampling: application to urban plume in Verl, Germany.

    PubMed

    Limmer, Matt A; Balouet, Jean-Christophe; Karg, Frank; Vroblesky, Don A; Burken, Joel G

    2011-10-01

    Rapid detection and delineation of contaminants in urban settings is critically important in protecting human health. Cores from trees growing above a plume of contaminated groundwater in Verl, Germany, were collected in 1 day, with subsequent analysis and plume mapping completed over several days. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) analysis was applied to detect tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to below nanogram/liter levels in the transpiration stream of the trees. The tree core concentrations showed a clear areal correlation to the distribution of PCE and TCE in the groundwater. Concentrations in tree cores were lower than the underlying groundwater, as anticipated; however, the tree core water retained the PCE:TCE signature of the underlying groundwater in the urban, populated area. The PCE:TCE ratio can indicate areas of differing degradation activity. Therefore, the phytoscreening analysis was capable not only of mapping the spatial distribution of groundwater contamination but also of delineating zones of potentially differing contaminant sources and degradation. The simplicity of tree coring and the ability to collect a large number of samples in a day with minimal disruption or property damage in the urban setting demonstrates that phytoscreening can be a powerful tool for gaining reconnaissance-level information on groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. The use of SPME decreases the detection level considerably and increases the sensitivity of phytoscreening as an assessment, monitoring, and phytoforensic tool. With rapid, inexpensive, and noninvasive methods of detecting and delineating contaminants underlying homes, as in this case, human health can be better protected through screening of broader areas and with far faster response times. PMID:21848303

  2. Phytoscreening for chlorinated solvents using rapid in vitro SPME sampling: Application to urban plume in Verl, Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Limmer, M.A.; Balouet, J.-C.; Karg, F.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Burken, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid detection and delineation of contaminants in urban settings is critically important in protecting human health. Cores from trees growing above a plume of contaminated groundwater in Verl, Germany, were collected in 1 day, with subsequent analysis and plume mapping completed over several days. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) analysis was applied to detect tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to below nanogram/liter levels in the transpiration stream of the trees. The tree core concentrations showed a clear areal correlation to the distribution of PCE and TCE in the groundwater. Concentrations in tree cores were lower than the underlying groundwater, as anticipated; however, the tree core water retained the PCE:TCE signature of the underlying groundwater in the urban, populated area. The PCE:TCE ratio can indicate areas of differing degradation activity. Therefore, the phytoscreening analysis was capable not only of mapping the spatial distribution of groundwater contamination but also of delineating zones of potentially differing contaminant sources and degradation. The simplicity of tree coring and the ability to collect a large number of samples in a day with minimal disruption or property damage in the urban setting demonstrates that phytoscreening can be a powerful tool for gaining reconnaissance-level information on groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. The use of SPME decreases the detection level considerably and increases the sensitivity of phytoscreening as an assessment, monitoring, and phytoforensic tool. With rapid, inexpensive, and noninvasive methods of detecting and delineating contaminants underlying homes, as in this case, human health can be better protected through screening of broader areas and with far faster response times. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Dynamics of the Chesapeake Bay outflow plume: Realistic plume simulation and its seasonal and interannual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Long; Xia, Meng

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) was implemented for Chesapeake Bay and its adjacent coastal ocean to delineate the realistic Chesapeake Bay outflow plume (CBOP) as well as its seasonal and interannual variability. Applying the appropriate horizontal and vertical resolution, the model exhibited relatively high skill in matching the observational water level, temperature, and salinity from 2003 to 2012. The simulated surface plume structure was verified by comparing output to the HF radar current measurements, earlier field observations, and the MODIS and AVHRR satellite imagery. According to the orientation, shape, and size of the CBOP from both model snapshots and satellite images, five types of real-time plume behavior were detected, which implied strong regulation by wind and river discharge. In addition to the episodic plume modulation, horizontal and vertical structure of the CBOP exhibited variations on seasonal and interannual temporal scales. Seasonally, river discharge with a 1 month lag was primarily responsible for the surface plume area variation, while the plume thickness was mainly correlated to wind magnitude. On the interannual scale, river discharge was the predominant source of variability in both surface plume area and depth; however, the southerly winds also influenced the offshore plume depth. In addition, large-scale climate variability, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, could potentially affect the plume signature in the long term by altering wind and upwelling dynamics, underlining the need to understand the impacts of climate change on buoyant plumes, such as the CBOP.

  4. Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-02-01

    A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentrations of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {sup 4-} is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), while Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} and CaUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} are also significant in the plume front vicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole porewaters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that high geochemical stability of UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-} in the original carbonate and sodium rich waste solution permits its continues migration and the field observed increases of U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater.

  5. Challenge in Flow Path Delineation and Modification: SECUREarth Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodvarsson, G. S.; Majer, E. L.; Wang, J. S.; Colwell, F.; Redden, G.

    2005-12-01

    After decades of studies, our knowledge about subsurface flow paths has large uncertainty and our capability to enhance or reduce formation permeability is inefficient and rudimentary. This is the case for fossil energy production, in environment remediation, in greenhouse gas sequestration, in nuclear waste disposal, in geothermal heat extraction, and in groundwater management. Fluid imaging, in addition to rock structure imaging, is needed to enhance petroleum extraction, to isolate contaminant plumes, and to prevent leakage from storage reservoirs. Flow focusing from surface to depth must be quantified to determine the flow path magnitude and spacing in order to determine the degrees of dissolution and transport of emplaced wastes. These diverse problems have common goals: either to isolate or to enhance subsurface fluid movement. It is crucial to identify the common features from different problems and refocus our efforts to delineate and then to manipulate flow paths. Geochemical engineering and geomicrobiological engineering need to combine laboratory studies, field experiments, and modeling approaches to verify and validate our understanding and to design solutions. An initiative SECUREarth is being developed to rally the scientists and engineers from national laboratories, universities, and industry to address key critical bottlenecks that prevent significant progress in solving common subsurface issues. SECUREarth is aimed to develop cross-cutting, multi-disciplinary approaches for solving urgent energy and environment problems in the earth, in order to achieve quantum leaps and breakthroughs in earth science and technology.

  6. Proactive screening approach for detecting groundwater contaminants along urban streams at the reach-scale.

    PubMed

    Roy, James W; Bickerton, Greg

    2010-08-15

    Here we outline and demonstrate a screening approach for the detection of groundwater contaminants along urban streams within unconsolidated beds. It involves the rapid acquisition of groundwater samples along urban stream reaches at a spacing of about 10 m and from depths of about 25-75 cm below the streambed, with analyses for a suite of potential contaminants. This screening approach may serve two functions: a) providing information for assessing and mitigating the toxicity and eutrophication risks to aquatic ecosystems posed by groundwater contaminants and b) detecting and identifying groundwater contamination in urban settings more rapidly and inexpensively compared to land-based well installations. The screening approach was tested at three urban streams, each affected by a known chlorinated-solvent plume. All three known groundwater plumes were detected and roughly delineated. Multiple, previously unknown, areas or types of groundwater contamination were also identified at each stream. The newly identified contaminants and plumes included petroleum hydrocarbons (BTEX, naphthalene, MTBE), 1,4-dioxane, nitrate and phosphate, road salt, and various metals (including arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead) at elevated concentrations compared to background values and relevant Canadian water quality guidelines. These findings suggest that this screening approach may be a useful tool for both ecologists performing ecological assessments and stream restorations and for hydrogeologists undertaking groundwater protection activities. Given the numerous contaminants detected, it may be appropriate to apply this technique proactively to better determine the pervasiveness of urban groundwater contaminants, especially along urban streams. PMID:20617839

  7. Optimized Field Sampling and Monitoring of Airborne Hazardous Transport Plumes; A Geostatistical Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, DI-WEN

    2001-11-21

    Airborne hazardous plumes inadvertently released during nuclear/chemical/biological incidents are mostly of unknown composition and concentration until measurements are taken of post-accident ground concentrations from plume-ground deposition of constituents. Unfortunately, measurements often are days post-incident and rely on hazardous manned air-vehicle measurements. Before this happens, computational plume migration models are the only source of information on the plume characteristics, constituents, concentrations, directions of travel, ground deposition, etc. A mobile ''lighter than air'' (LTA) system is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will be part of the first response in emergency conditions. These interactive and remote unmanned air vehicles will carry light-weight detectors and weather instrumentation to measure the conditions during and after plume release. This requires a cooperative computationally organized, GPS-controlled set of LTA's that self-coordinate around the objectives in an emergency situation in restricted time frames. A critical step before an optimum and cost-effective field sampling and monitoring program proceeds is the collection of data that provides statistically significant information, collected in a reliable and expeditious manner. Efficient aerial arrangements of the detectors taking the data (for active airborne release conditions) are necessary for plume identification, computational 3-dimensional reconstruction, and source distribution functions. This report describes the application of stochastic or geostatistical simulations to delineate the plume for guiding subsequent sampling and monitoring designs. A case study is presented of building digital plume images, based on existing ''hard'' experimental data and ''soft'' preliminary transport modeling results of Prairie Grass Trials Site. Markov Bayes Simulation, a coupled Bayesian/geostatistical methodology, quantitatively combines soft information

  8. Delineation of ecosystem regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Robert G.

    1983-07-01

    As a means of developing reliable estimates of ecosystem productivity, ecosystem classification needs to be placed within a geographical framework of regions or zones. This paper explains the basis for the regions delineated on the 1976 map Ecoregions of the United States. Four ecological levels are discussed—domain, division, province, and section—based on climatic and vegetational criteria. Statistical tests are needed to verify and refine map units.

  9. Dust Plumes off Libya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Two-toned dust plumes blew northward off the coast of Libya on October 26, 2007, as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite took this picture. While plumes in the west are beige, reminiscent of the Sahara's sands, the plumes in the east are distinctly darker. The differences in color can be traced to the plumes's varied origins.

  10. Application of dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.; Stanley, R.; MacMahan, K.

    1996-11-01

    Dig-face characterization is a concept for improving the safety and efficiency of hazardous waste retrieval. A dig-face characterization system consists of onsite hardware for collecting detailed information on the changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface during the entire course of a hazardous site excavation. The dig-face characterization concept originated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and has been under development there since 1992. During August 1995, a prototype dig-face system was taken to Mound Laboratory, Ohio, for a first attempt at monitoring a hazardous excavation. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and assorted debris. The dig-face characterization system was used to monitor a 20-ft x 20-ft x 5-ft-deep excavation aimed at removing {sup 227}Ac contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were scanned across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed in 1-ft to 2-ft lifts. The geophysical and topographic sensors located metallic debris and mapped the dig-face topography in great detail as the excavation advanced. The radiation sensors produced high-fidelity images showing the location of radioactive contaminants and clearly identified and delineated separate {sup 232}Th and {sup 227}Ac plumes. By combining the radiation data from all four levels, a three-dimensional image of the contamination plumes was developed. The radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

  11. Sewage plume in a sand and gravel aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Secondarily treated domestic sewage has been disposed of to a sand and gravel aquifer by infiltration through sand beds at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts, since 1936. The disposal has formed a plume of contaminated ground water that is more than 11 ,000 feet long, is 2,500 to 3,500 feet wide and 75 feet thick, and is overlain by 20 to 50 feet of uncontaminated ground water derived from precipitation. The distributions of specific conductance, temperature, boron chloride, sodium, phosphorus, nitrogen, ammonia, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, and detergents are used to delineate the plume. The center of the plume contains up to 2.6 milligrams per liter detergents as MBAS (methylene blue active substances), 0.4 milligram per liter boron, 20 milligrams per liter ammonia-nitrogen, and specific conductance as high as 405 micromhos per centimeter. Corresponding levels in uncontaminated ground water are less than 0.1 milligram per liter detergents, less than 0.1 ammonia-nitrogen, less than 0.05 milligram per liter boron, and less than 80 micromhos per centimeter specific conductance. Chloride, sodium, and boron concentrations seem to be affected only by hydrodynamic dispersion. Phosphorus movement is greatly retarded by sorption. Detergent concentrations exceed 0.5 milligram per liter from 3 ,000 to 10,000 feet from the sand beds and reflect the use of nonbiodegradable detergents from 1946 through 1964. The center of the plume as far as 5,000 feet from the sand beds contains nitrogen as ammonia, no nitrate, and no dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is oxidized to nitrate gradually with distance from the center of the plume. (USGS)

  12. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30

    Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation

  13. Assessment of ground-water contamination at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, 1982-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummings, T.R.; Twenter, F.R.

    1986-01-01

    Study of ground-water contamination at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, defined the movement and distribution of volatile organic compounds in the glacial sand and gravel aquifer at known sites of contamination, and has defined new plumes at two other sites. The Arrow Street purge system, installed in 1982 to remove contaminants from the Building 43 plume, has lowered concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater in the central part of the most contaminated area from a range of 1,000 to 2,000 microg/L to about 200 microg/L. TCE is not escaping off-Base from this area. In the southern part of the Base a plume containing principally TCE and dichloroethylene (DCE) has been delineated along Mission Drive. Maximum concentrations observed were 3,290 microg/L of TCE and 1,480 microg/L of DCE. Hydrologically suitable sites for purge wells were identified in the southern part of the plume using a new ground-water flow model of the Base. A benzene plume near the bulk-fuel storage area has shifted to a more northerly direction under influence of the Arrow Street purge system. Sites initially identified for purging the benzene plume have been repositioned because of the change in contaminant movement. JP-4 fuel was found to be accumulating in wells near the bulk-fuel storage area, largely in response to seasonal fluctuations in the water-table. It is thought to originate from a spill that occurred several years ago. In general, concentrations found in water do not differ greatly from those observed in 1981. Since 1981, concentrations of TCE have decreased significantly in the Alert Apron plume. Near the origin of the plume, the concentration of TCE has decreased from 1,000 microg/L in 1980 to 50 microg/L in 1984. Water from Van Etten Lake near the termination of the plume had only a trace of TCE at one site. Benzene detected in water from well AF2 seems to originate near the former site of buried fuel tanks west of the operational apron. During periods of normal

  14. Geochemical and microbiological methods for evaluating anaerobic processes in an aquifer contaminated by landfill leachate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Suflita, J.M.; Ulrich, G.A.; Harris, S.H.; Scholl, M.A.; Schlottmann, J.L.; Christenson, S.

    2000-01-01

    A combined geochemical and microbiological approach was needed to delineate the biogeochemical processes occurring in an aquifer contaminated by landfill leachate in Norman, OK, where the important microbially mediated reactions in an anoxic plume were iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. The highest rates of sulfate reduction (13.2 ??M/day) were detected near the water table where sulfate levels were maximal (up to 4.6 mM). The enrichment of 34S in the sulfate pools (??34S of SO42- was 67-69%0), and dissolved hydrogen measurements provided additional support for the importance of sulfate reduction near the water table. Methane was detected in the center of the plume where sulfate was depleted. Microbial incubations demonstrated concomitant sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in the anoxic portion of the plume. Although high concentrations of soluble reduced iron were detected throughout the aquifer and H2 levels were indicative of iron reduction under steady-state conditions, microbiological experiments showed that iron reduction was active only at the edges of the sulfate-depleted portion of the plume. This study demonstrates the benefits of using a combined geochemical and microbiological approach to elucidate the spatial distribution of biogeochemical processes in contaminated aquifers.A combined geochemical and microbiological approach was needed to delineate the biogeochemical processes occurring in an aquifer contaminated by landfill leachate in Norman, OK, where the important microbially mediated reactions in an anoxic plume were iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. The highest rates of sulfate reduction (13.2 ??M/day) were detected near the water table where sulfate levels were maximal (up to 4.6 mM). The enrichment of 34S in the sulfate pools (??34S of SO42- was 67-69 per mil), and dissolved hydrogen measurements provided additional support for the importance of sulfate reduction near the water table. Methane was

  15. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  16. Model based evaluation of a contaminant plume development under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in 2D bench-scale tank experiments.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Beyer, C; Bauer, R D; Griebler, C; Bauer, S

    2014-06-01

    The influence of transverse mixing on competitive aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume was investigated using a two-dimensional, bench-scale flow-through laboratory tank experiment. In the first part of the experiment aerobic degradation of increasing toluene concentrations was carried out by the aerobic strain Pseudomonas putida F1. Successively, ethylbenzene (injected as a mixture of unlabeled and fully deuterium-labeled isotopologues) substituted toluene; nitrate was added as additional electron acceptor and the anaerobic denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1 was inoculated to study competitive degradation under aerobic /anaerobic conditions. The spatial distribution of anaerobic degradation was resolved by measurements of compound-specific stable isotope fractionation induced by the anaerobic strain as well as compound concentrations. A fully transient numerical reactive transport model was employed and calibrated using measurements of electron donors, acceptors and isotope fractionation. The aerobic phases of the experiment were successfully reproduced using a double Monod kinetic growth model and assuming an initial homogeneous distribution of P. putida F1. Investigation of the competitive degradation phase shows that the observed isotopic pattern cannot be explained by transverse mixing driven biodegradation only, but also depends on the inoculation process of the anaerobic strain. Transient concentrations of electron acceptors and donors are well reproduced by the model, showing its ability to simulate transient competitive biodegradation. PMID:24122285

  17. Turbulent Plumes in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    This review describes a range of natural processes leading to the formation of turbulent buoyant plumes, largely relating to volcanic processes, in which there are localized, intense releases of energy. Phenomena include volcanic eruption columns, bubble plumes in lakes, hydrothermal plumes, and plumes beneath the ice in polar oceans. We assess how the dynamics is affected by heat transfer, particle fallout and recycling, and Earth's rotation, as well as explore some of the mixing of the ambient fluid produced by plumes in a confined geometry.

  18. Dust Plume off Mauritania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A thick plume of dust blew off the coast of Mauritania in western Africa on October 2, 2007. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite observed the dust plume as it headed toward the southwest over the Atlantic Ocean. In this image, the dust varies in color from nearly white to medium tan. The dust plume is easier to see over the dark background of the ocean, but the plume stretches across the land surface to the east, as well. The dust plume's structure is clearest along the coastline, where relatively clear air pockets separate distinct puffs of dust. West of that, individual pillows of dust push together to form a more homogeneous plume. Near its southwest tip, the plume takes on yet another shape, with stripes of pale dust fanning out toward the northwest. Occasional tiny white clouds dot the sky overhead, but skies are otherwise clear.

  19. Modeling Europa's dust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B. S.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Jupiter's moon Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we simulate possible Europa plume configurations, analyze particle number density and surface deposition results, and estimate the expected flux of ice grains on a spacecraft. Due to Europa's high escape speed, observing an active plume will require low-altitude flybys, preferably at altitudes of 5-100 km. At higher altitudes a plume may escape detection. Our simulations provide an extensive library documenting the possible structure of Europa dust plumes, which can be quickly refined as more data on Europa dust plumes are collected.

  20. Plume development in Long Island Sound observed by remote sensing (ERTS-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggles, F. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    As the Connecticut River flows into Long Island Sound, large plumes are developed during the mixing of ocean and estuarine waters. Plumes were delineated for July 28, October 8, October 27, and December 2, 1972, by analyzing ERTS-1 imagery with the SRI electronic satellite image analysis console (ESIAC). Insertion of MSS band 5 into the ESIAC produced the best result in this analysis. The four plumes that have been delineated provide the first input to a time-lapse analysis of circulation patterns at the eastern end of Long Island Sound.

  1. SH-Wave Imaging of Potential Near-Surface Geologic Controls on Contaminant Plume Migration: Fluorspar Area Fault Complex, Western Kentucky USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almayahi, A.; Woolery, E.; Hampson, S.

    2011-12-01

    Subbottom lake stratification is of interest to hydrology and core site selection, and in delta formation, sediment focusing and periglacial dynamics. Mirror Lake, New Hampshire, within the Hubbard Brook research area, has long been studied, but its subbottom stratification has only been estimated from coring that revealed up to 13 m of gyttja above about 1 m of Late Wisconsin glacial silt. However, the very low water conductivity of 0.002-0.003 S/m allows exceptional penetration of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals. Here we discuss several GPR profiles recorded at pulse center frequencies of 60 and 120 MHz along 300-600 m transects that crossed the entire lake in many directions. With care not to misinterpret multiple reflection horizons, the profiles clearly delineate gyttja, till, bedrock horizons, boulder horizons near shore and deltaic deposition. Hyperbolic backscatter in the well-stratified gyttja may be responses from buried logs because they often occur in nests of close, deepening diffractions and much logging historically occurred. Strong local horizons within the gyttja suggest sediment retransport and focusing, as suggested by Davis and Ford in their1982 interpretation of cores. The generally deeper and underlying till is characterized by sections of dense diffractions. In some profile sections internal till horizons appear draped over the bedrock horizons. In others parallel and deep horizons may be responses to bedrock fractures. Using estimated minimal wave speeds based on maximum possible dielectric permittivities calculated from assumed saturated conditions, and partly verified by diffraction interpretation after statics removal, our 60 MHz profiles show gyttja (permittivity no greater than 53) thicknesses of at least 11 m, till (permittivity no greater than 33) thicknesses of at least 25 m and depths to bedrock (Littleton schist) up to 28 m. This till thickness far exceeds the average 4-5 m on the surrounding slopes of the Hubbard Brook

  2. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-07-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

  3. Modeling Europa's Dust Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring the properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we adjust the ejection model by Schmidt et al. [2008] to the conditions at Europa. In this way, we estimate properties of a possible, yet unobserved dust component of the Europa plume. For a size-dependent speed distribution of emerging ice particles we use the model from Kempf et al. [2010] for grain dynamics, modified to run simulations of plumes on Europa. Specifically, we model emission from the two plume locations determined from observations by Roth et al. [2014] and also from other locations chosen at the closest approach of low-altitude flybys investigated in the Europa Clipper study. This allows us to estimate expected fluxes of ice grains on the spacecraft. We then explore the parameter space of Europa dust plumes with regard to particle speed distribution parameters, plume location, and spacecraft flyby elevation. Each parameter set results in a 3-dimensional particle density structure through which we simulate flybys, and a map of particle fallback ('snowfall') on the surface of Europa. Due to the moon's high escape speed, a Europa plume will eject few to no particles that can escape its gravity, which has several further consequences: (i) For given ejection velocity a Europa plume will have a smaller scale height, with a higher particle number densities than the plume on Enceladus, (ii) plume particles will not feed the diffuse Galilean dust ring, (iii) the snowfall pattern on the surface will be more localized about the plume location, and will not induce a global m = 2 pattern as seen on Enceladus, and (iv) safely observing an active plume will require low altitude flybys, preferably at 50

  4. Hydrogeological modeling constraints provided by geophysical and geochemical mapping of a chlorinated ethenes plume in northern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razafindratsima, Stephen; Guérin, Roger; Bendjoudi, Hocine; de Marsily, Ghislain

    2014-09-01

    A methodological approach is described which combines geophysical and geochemical data to delineate the extent of a chlorinated ethenes plume in northern France; the methodology was used to calibrate a hydrogeological model of the contaminants' migration and degradation. The existence of strong reducing conditions in some parts of the aquifer is first determined by measuring in situ the redox potential and dissolved oxygen, dissolved ferrous iron and chloride concentrations. Electrical resistivity imaging and electromagnetic mapping, using the Slingram method, are then used to determine the shape of the pollutant plume. A decreasing empirical exponential relation between measured chloride concentrations in the water and aquifer electrical resistivity is observed; the resistivity formation factor calculated at a few points also shows a major contribution of chloride concentration in the resistivity of the saturated porous medium. MODFLOW software and MT3D99 first-order parent-daughter chain reaction and the RT3D aerobic-anaerobic model for tetrachloroethene (PCE)/trichloroethene (TCE) dechlorination are finally used for a first attempt at modeling the degradation of the chlorinated ethenes. After calibration, the distribution of the chlorinated ethenes and their degradation products simulated with the model approximately reflects the mean measured values in the observation wells, confirming the data-derived image of the plume.

  5. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  6. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  7. Sewage plume in a sand and gravel aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, Denis R.

    1984-01-01

    Secondarily treated domestic sewage has been disposed of on surface sand beds at the sewage treatment facility at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts, since 1936. Infiltration of the sewage through the sand beds into the underlying unconfined sand and gravel aquifer has resulted in a plume of sewage-contaminated ground water that is 2,500 to 3,500 feet wide, 75 feet thick, and more than 11,000 feet long. The plume extends south and southwest of the sand beds in the same direction as the regional flow of ground water, and is overlain by 20 to 50 feet of ground water derived from precipitation that recharges the aquifer. The bottom of the plume generally coincides with the contact between the permeable sand and gravel and underlying finer grained sediments. The distributions in the aquifer of specific conductance, temperature, boron, chloride, sodium, phosphorus, nitrogen (total of all species), ammonia, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, and detergents are used to delineate the plume. In ground water outside the plume, the detergent concentration is less than 0.1 milligrams per liter as MBAS (methylene blue active substances), the ammonia-nitrogen concentration is less than 0.1 milligrams per liter, the boron concentration is less than 50 micrograms per liter, and specific conductance is less than 80 mircromhos per centimeter. In the center of the plume, detergent concentrations as high as 2.6 milligrams per liter as MBAS, ammonia-nitrogen concentrations as high as 20 milligrams per liter, boron concentrations as high as 400 micrograms per liter, and specific conductance as high as 405 micromhos per centimeter were measured. Chloride, sodium, and boron are transported by the southward-flowing ground water without significant retardation, and seem to be diluted only by hydrodynamic dispersion. The movement of phosphorus is greatly restricted by sorption. Phosphorus concentrations do not exceed 0.05 milligrams per liter farther than 2,500 feet from the sand beds. Detergent

  8. Improving the delineation of hydrocarbon-impacted soils and water through induced polarization (IP) tomographies: a field study at an industrial waste land.

    PubMed

    Deceuster, John; Kaufmann, Olivier

    2012-08-01

    Without a good estimation of samples representativeness, the delineation of the contaminated plume extent and the evaluation of volumes of hydrocarbon-impacted soils may remain difficult. To contribute to this question, a time domain induced polarization (IP) field experiment was conducted on an industrial waste land. Boreholes were drilled to specify the local geological context. Cross-hole seismic tomographies were performed to extend borehole logs and to draw an interpreted geological cross-section. Soil samples taken during drillings were analysed in laboratory. A preliminary survey was conducted to locate the IP profile. The polarization signatures linked to the presence of clayey sediments were filtered out from the data set. Chargeability and resistivity depth soundings were computed and compared to mean concentrations of total organic products to overcome the data support issue between the geophysical models and the spot samples of soils. A logarithmic relation between chargeabilities and smoothed hydrocarbon concentrations in soils was found. Taking into account contaminant's concentration thresholds defined in local codes and regulations allows defining chargeability classes to delineate hotspots on this site. This showed that IP tomography can be an accurate screening methodology. A statistical methodology is proposed to assess the efficiency of the investigation strategy. PMID:22659399

  9. COOLING TOWER PLUME MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of recently reported cooling tower plume models yields none that is universally accepted. The entrainment and drag mechanisms and the effect of moisture on the plume trajectory are phenomena which are treated differently by various investigators. In order to better under...

  10. Stealth Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Blaney, Diana L.; Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley

    1995-01-01

    We suggest that Io's eruptive activity may include a class of previously undetected SO2 geysers. The thermodynamic models for the eruptive plumes discovered by Voyager 'involve low to moderate entropy SO2 eruptions. The resulting plumes are a mixture of solid and gas which emerge from the vent and follow essentially ballistic trajectories. We show that intrusion of silicate magma into buried SO2 deposits can create the required conditions for high entropy eruptions which proceed entirely in the vapor phase. These purely gaseous plumes would have been invisible to Voyager's instruments. Hence, we call them "stealth" plumes. Such eruptions could explain the "patchy" SO2 atmosphere inferred from recent UV and micro-wave spectral observations. The magma intrusion rate required to support the required gas production for these plumes is a negligible fraction of estimated global magma intrusion rates.

  11. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  12. 30 CFR 282.22 - Delineation Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delineation Plan. 282.22 Section 282.22 Mineral... § 282.22 Delineation Plan. All exploration activities shall be conducted in accordance with a Delineation Plan submitted by the lessee and approved by the Director. The Delineation Plan shall describe...

  13. Evidence for Little Shallow Entrainment in Starting Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, F. C.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Hort, M.

    2005-12-01

    Basalts from intraplate or hotspot ocean islands show distinct geochemical signatures. Their diversity in composition is generally believed to result from the upwelling plume entraining shallow mantle material during ascent, while potentially also entraining other deep regions of the mantle. Here we present results from analogue laboratory experiments and numerical modelling that there is evidence for little shallow entrainment into ascending mantle plumes, i.e. most of the plume signature is inherited from the source. We conducted laboratory experiments using glucose syrup contaminated with glass beads to visualize fluid flow and origin. The plume is initiated by heating from below or by injecting hot, uncontaminated syrup. Particle movement is captured by a CCD camera. In our numerical experiments we solve the Stokes equations for a viscous fluid at infinite Prandtl number with passive tracer particles being used to track fluid flow and entrainment rates, simulating laboratory as well as mantle conditions. In both analogue experiments and numerical models we observe the classical plume structure being embedded in a `sheath' of material from the plume source region that retains little of the original temperature anomaly of the plume source. Yet, this sheath ascends in the `slipstream' of the plume at speeds close to the ascent speed of the plume head, and effectively prevents the entrainment of surrounding material into the plume head or plume tail. We find that the source region is most effectively sampled by an ascending plume and that compositional variations in the source region are preserved during plume ascent. The plume center and plume sheath combined are composed of up to 85% source material. However, there is also evidence of significant entrainment of up to 30% of surrounding material into the outer layers of the plume sheath. Entrainment rates are found to be influenced by mantle composition and structure, with the radial viscosity profile of the

  14. Distribution of microbial physiologic types in an aquifer contaminated by crude oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Godsy, E.M.; Warren, E.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a plume-scale study of the microbial ecology in the anaerobic portion of an aquifer contaminated by crude-oil compounds. The data provide insight into the patterns of ecological succession, microbial nutrient demands, and the relative importance of free-living versus attached microbial populations. The most probable number (MPN) method was used to characterize the spatial distribution of six physiologic types: aerobes, denitrifiers, iron-reducers, heterotrophic fermenters, sulfate-reducers, and methanogens. Both free-living and attached numbers were determined over a broad cross-section of the aquifer extending horizontally from the source of the plume at a nonaqueous oil body to 66 m downgradient, and vertically from above the water table to the base of the plume below the water table. Point samples from widely spaced locations were combined with three closely spaced vertical profiles to create a map of physiologic zones for a cross-section of the plume. Although some estimates suggest that less than 1% of the subsurface microbial population can be grown in laboratory cultures, the MPN results presented here provide a comprehensive qualitative picture of the microbial ecology at the plume scale. Areas in the plume that are evolving from iron-reducing to methanogenic conditions are clearly delineated and generally occupy 25-50% of the plume thickness. Lower microbial numbers below the water table compared to the unsaturated zone suggest that nutrient limitations may be important in limiting growth in the saturated zone. Finally, the data indicate that an average of 15% of the total population is suspended.

  15. REFERENCE SITE WATERSHED DELINEATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of geographic information systems for the delineation of watersheds and analysis of land use / land cover associated with 250 reference sites on wadeable streams as identified by the Central Plains Bioassessment workgroup and located in the States of Kansas, Iowa, Missour...

  16. Prometheus: Io's wandering plume.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, S W; Lopes-Gautier, R; McEwen, A; Smythe, W; Keszthelyi, L; Carlson, R

    2000-05-19

    Unlike any volcanic behavior ever observed on Earth, the plume from Prometheus on Io has wandered 75 to 95 kilometers west over the last 20 years since it was first discovered by Voyager and more recently observed by Galileo. Despite the source motion, the geometric and optical properties of the plume have remained constant. We propose that this can be explained by vaporization of a sulfur dioxide and/or sulfur "snowfield" over which a lava flow is moving. Eruption of a boundary-layer slurry through a rootless conduit with sonic conditions at the intake of the melted snow can account for the constancy of plume properties. PMID:10817989

  17. Colloid Formation at Waste Plume Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T.; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A.

    2004-05-22

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington State). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass%, and their particle-sizes ranged from tens of nm to a few {micro}m. Colloid chemical composition and mineralogy depended on temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high Na{sup +} waste solution, rapid and completed Na{sup +} replacement of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+}-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction at the plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions, and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies.

  18. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  19. Methane Plumes on Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Spectrometer instruments attached to several telescopes detect plumes of methane emitted from Mars during its summer and spring seasons. High levels of methane are indicated by warmer colors. The m...

  20. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. Electrification of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.

    2006-07-01

    Volcanic lightning, perhaps the most spectacular consequence of the electrification of volcanic plumes, has been implicated in the origin of life on Earth, and may also exist in other planetary atmospheres. Recent years have seen volcanic lightning detection used as part of a portfolio of developing techniques to monitor volcanic eruptions. Remote sensing measurement techniques have been used to monitor volcanic lightning, but surface observations of the atmospheric electric Potential Gradient (PG) and the charge carried on volcanic ash also show that many volcanic plumes, whilst not sufficiently electrified to produce lightning, have detectable electrification exceeding that of their surrounding environment. Electrification has only been observed associated with ash-rich explosive plumes, but there is little evidence that the composition of the ash is critical to its occurrence. Different conceptual theories for charge generation and separation in volcanic plumes have been developed to explain the disparate observations obtained, but the ash fragmentation mechanism appears to be a key parameter. It is unclear which mechanisms or combinations of electrification mechanisms dominate in different circumstances. Electrostatic forces play an important role in modulating the dry fall-out of ash from a volcanic plume. Beyond the local electrification of plumes, the higher stratospheric particle concentrations following a large explosive eruption may affect the global atmospheric electrical circuit. It is possible that this might present another, if minor, way by which large volcanic eruptions affect global climate. The direct hazard of volcanic lightning to communities is generally low compared to other aspects of volcanic activity.

  2. Estuarine and coastal water dynamics controlling sediment movement and plume development in Long Island Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggles, F. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. As the Connecticut River flows into Long Island Sound, large plumes develop during the mixing of ocean and estuarine waters. Plumes were delineated for July 28, October 8, October 27, and December 2, 1972, by analyzing ERTS-1 imagery with the SRI Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console (ESIAC). Because the chemical and physical composition of the plume and ocean water were not too different, the ESIAC was utilized to expand the scenes and subject the transparencies to varying combinations of viewing techniques to identify and delineate the plumes. Best results were obtained when band 5 transparencies were used. Indications are, when the scene being analyzed is predominantly in the first two steps of the gray scale, it is best to use the negative transparencies. When the analysis is being done above the first two steps of the gray scale, it is best to use the positive transparencies.

  3. Large eddy simulation of plume dispersion in a convective boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Fosberry, L.P.; Tsang, T.T.H.

    1996-12-31

    Plume dispersion in a convective boundary layer is dependent on release height. When a neutrally buoyant contaminant is released from an elevated point in the convective boundary layer at z {approximately} 0.5h, where h is the height of the boundary layer, the plume descends and a concentration maximum is observed at ground level. Alternately, when the contaminant is released from a surface source at z < {approximately} 0.2h, the plume lifts off and a maximum concentration is observed near the inversion layer. Neutrally buoyant plume dispersion in the convective atmospheric boundary layer were simulated by a mixed pseudospectral finite difference Large Eddy Simulation (LES).

  4. Electrification of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.

    We present a review of our current understanding of the electrification of volcanic plumes on Earth and discuss the possible implications both in terms of the volcanic monitoring, early Earth evolution and planetary exploration. Volcanic lightning is perhaps the most spectacular consequence of the electrification of volcanic plumes. Recent years have seen volcanic lightning detection used as part of a portfolio of developing techniques to monitor volcanic eruptions. Remote sensing measurement techniques have been used to monitor volcanic lightning, but surface observations of the atmospheric electric Potential Gradient (PG) and the charge carried on volcanic ash also show that many volcanic plumes, whilst not sufficiently electrified to produce lightning, have detectable electrification exceeding that of their surrounding environment. Electrification has only been observed associated with ash-rich explosive plumes, but there is little evidence that the composition of the ash is critical to its occurrence. Different conceptual theories for charge generation and separation in volcanic plumes have been developed to explain the disparate observations obtained, but the ash fragmentation mechanism appears to be a key parameter. It is unclear which mechanisms or combinations of electrification mechanisms dominate in different circumstances. Electrostatic forces play an important role in modulating the dry fall-out of ash from a volcanic plume. Beyond the local electrification of plumes, the higher stratospheric particle concentrations following a large explosive eruption may affect the global atmospheric electrical circuit. It is possible that this might present another, if minor, way by which large volcanic eruptions affect global climate. Volcanic lightning has been implicated in a number of ways in the origin of life on Earth, and may also exist in other planetary atmospheres where measurements of its occurrence might give clues about the nature of volcanism on other

  5. River plume patterns and dynamics within the Southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, J. A.; DiGiacomo, P. M.; Weisberg, S. B.; Nezlin, N. P.; Mengel, M.; Jones, B. H.; Ohlmann, J. C.; Washburn, L.; Terrill, E. J.; Farnsworth, K. L.

    2007-11-01

    Stormwater river plumes are important vectors of marine contaminants and pathogens in the Southern California Bight. Here we report the results of a multi-institution investigation of the river plumes across eight major river systems of southern California. We use in situ water samples from multi-day cruises in combination with MODIS satellite remote sensing, buoy meteorological observations, drifters, and HF radar current measurements to evaluate the dispersal patterns and dynamics of the freshwater plumes. River discharge was exceptionally episodic, and the majority of storm discharge occurred in a few hours. The combined plume observing techniques revealed that plumes commonly detach from the coast and turn to the left, which is the opposite direction of Coriolis influence. Although initial offshore velocity of the buoyant plumes was ˜50 cm/s and was influenced by river discharge inertia (i.e., the direct momentum of the river flux) and buoyancy, subsequent advection of the plumes was largely observed in an alongshore direction and dominated by local winds. Due to the multiple day upwelling wind conditions that commonly follow discharge events, plumes were observed to flow from their respective river mouths to down-coast waters at rates of 20-40 km/d. Lastly, we note that suspended-sediment concentration and beam-attenuation were poorly correlated with plume salinity across and within the sampled plumes (mean r2=0.12 and 0.25, respectively), while colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence was well correlated (mean r2=0.56), suggesting that CDOM may serve as a good tracer of the discharged freshwater in subsequent remote sensing and monitoring efforts of plumes.

  6. A Brilliant Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons captured another dramatic picture of Jupiter's moon Io and its volcanic plumes, 19 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter on Feb. 28, 2007. LORRI took this 75 millisecond exposure at 0035 Universal Time on March 1, 2007, when Io was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

    The shadow of Io, cast by the Sun, slices across the plume. The plume is quite asymmetrical and has a complicated wispy texture, for reasons that are still mysterious. At the heart of the eruption incandescent lava, seen here as a brilliant point of light, is reminding scientists of the fire fountains spotted by the Galileo Jupiter orbiter at Tvashtar in 1999.

    The sunlit plume faintly illuminates the surface underneath. 'New Horizons and Io continue to astonish us with these unprecedented views of the solar system's most geologically active body' says John Spencer, deputy leader of the New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Science Team and an Io expert from Southwest Research Institute.

    Because this image shows the side of Io that faces away from Jupiter, the large planet does not illuminate the moon's night side except for an extremely thin crescent outlining the edge of the disk at lower right. Another plume, likely from the volcano Masubi, is illuminated by Jupiter just above this lower right edge. A third and much fainter plume, barely visible at the 2 o'clock position, could be the first plume seen from the volcano Zal Patera.

    As in other New Horizons images of Io, mountains catch the setting Sun just beyond the terminator (the line dividing day and night

  7. Review of quantitative surveys of the length and stability of MTBE, TBA, and benzene plumes in groundwater at UST sites.

    PubMed

    Connor, John A; Kamath, Roopa; Walker, Kenneth L; McHugh, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the length and stability condition of groundwater plumes of benzene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has been compiled from thousands of underground storage tank (UST) sites in the United States where gasoline fuel releases have occurred. This paper presents a review and summary of 13 published scientific surveys, of which 10 address benzene and/or MTBE plumes only, and 3 address benzene, MTBE, and TBA plumes. These data show the observed lengths of benzene and MTBE plumes to be relatively consistent among various regions and hydrogeologic settings, with median lengths at a delineation limit of 10 µg/L falling into relatively narrow ranges from 101 to 185 feet for benzene and 110 to 178 feet for MTBE. The observed statistical distributions of MTBE and benzene plumes show the two plume types to be of comparable lengths, with 90th percentile MTBE plume lengths moderately exceeding benzene plume lengths by 16% at a 10-µg/L delineation limit (400 feet vs. 345 feet) and 25% at a 5-µg/L delineation limit (530 feet vs. 425 feet). Stability analyses for benzene and MTBE plumes found 94 and 93% of these plumes, respectively, to be in a nonexpanding condition, and over 91% of individual monitoring wells to exhibit nonincreasing concentration trends. Three published studies addressing TBA found TBA plumes to be of comparable length to MTBE and benzene plumes, with 86% of wells in one study showing nonincreasing concentration trends. PMID:25040137

  8. Stochastic analytical modeling of the biodegradation of steady plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarlenga, A.; Fiori, A.

    2014-02-01

    We present a stochastic analytical framework to assess the contaminant concentration of a steady plume undergoing biodegradation. The method is focused on heterogeneous formations, and it embeds both fringe and core degradation. The Lagrangian concentration approach of Fiori (2001) was employed, which is suited for describing the interplay between the large scale advection caused by heterogeneity and the local dispersion processes. The principal scope of the model is to provide a relatively simple tool for a quick assessment of the contamination level in aquifers, as function of a few relevant, physically based dimensionless parameters. The solution of the analytical model is relatively simple and generalizes previous approaches developed for homogeneous formations. It is found that heterogeneity generally enhances mixing and degradation; in fact, the plume shear and distortion operated by the complex, heterogeneous velocity field facilitates local dispersion in diluting the contaminant and mixing it with the electron acceptor. The decay of the electron donor concentration, and so the plume length, is proportional to the transverse pore-scale dispersivity, which is indeed the parameter ruling mixing and hence degradation. While the theoretical plume length is controlled by the fringe processes, the core degradation may determine a significant decay of concentration along the mean flow direction, thus affecting the length of the plume. The method is applied to the crude oil contamination event at the Bemijdi site, Minnesota (USA).

  9. Nested monitoring approaches to delineate groundwater trichloroethene discharge to a UK lowland stream at multiple spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherill, John; Krause, Stefan; Voyce, Kevin; Drijfhout, Falko; Levy, Amir; Cassidy, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Integrated approaches for the identification of pollutant linkages between aquifers and streams are of crucial importance for evaluating the environmental risks posed by industrial contaminants like trichloroethene (TCE). This study presents a systematic, multi-scale approach to characterising groundwater TCE discharge to a 'gaining' UK lowland stream receiving baseflow from a major Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifer. Beginning with a limited number of initial monitoring points, we aim to provide a 'first pass' mechanistic understanding of the plume's fate at the aquifer/stream interface using a novel combination of streambed diffusion samplers, riparian monitoring wells and drive-point mini-piezometers in a spatially nested sampling configuration. Our results indicate the potential discharge zone of the plume to extend along a stream reach of 120 m in length, delineated by a network of 60 in-situ diffusion samplers. Within this section, a 40 m long sub-reach of higher concentration (> 10 μg L- 1) was identified; centred on a meander bend in the floodplain. 25 multi-level mini-piezometers installed to target this down-scaled reach revealed even higher TCE concentrations (20-40 μg L- 1), significantly above alluvial groundwater samples (< 6 μg L- 1) from 15 riparian monitoring wells. Significant lateral and vertical spatial heterogeneity in TCE concentrations within the top 1 m of the streambed was observed with the decimetre-scale vertical resolution provided by multi-level mini-piezometers. It appears that the distribution of fine-grained material in the Holocene deposits of the riparian floodplain and below the channel is exerting significant local-scale geological controls on the location and magnitude of the TCE discharge. Large-scale in-situ biodegradation of the plume was not evident during the monitoring campaigns. However, detections of cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride in discrete sections of the sediment profile indicate that shallow (e.g., < 20

  10. Nested monitoring approaches to delineate groundwater trichloroethene discharge to a UK lowland stream at multiple spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Weatherill, John; Krause, Stefan; Voyce, Kevin; Drijfhout, Falko; Levy, Amir; Cassidy, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Integrated approaches for the identification of pollutant linkages between aquifers and streams are of crucial importance for evaluating the environmental risks posed by industrial contaminants like trichloroethene (TCE). This study presents a systematic, multi-scale approach to characterising groundwater TCE discharge to a 'gaining' UK lowland stream receiving baseflow from a major Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifer. Beginning with a limited number of initial monitoring points, we aim to provide a 'first pass' mechanistic understanding of the plume's fate at the aquifer/stream interface using a novel combination of streambed diffusion samplers, riparian monitoring wells and drive-point mini-piezometers in a spatially nested sampling configuration. Our results indicate the potential discharge zone of the plume to extend along a stream reach of 120 m in length, delineated by a network of 60 in-situ diffusion samplers. Within this section, a 40 m long sub-reach of higher concentration (>10 μg L(-1)) was identified; centred on a meander bend in the floodplain. 25 multi-level mini-piezometers installed to target this down-scaled reach revealed even higher TCE concentrations (20-40 μg L(-1)), significantly above alluvial groundwater samples (<6 μg L(-1)) from 15 riparian monitoring wells. Significant lateral and vertical spatial heterogeneity in TCE concentrations within the top 1m of the streambed was observed with the decimetre-scale vertical resolution provided by multi-level mini-piezometers. It appears that the distribution of fine-grained material in the Holocene deposits of the riparian floodplain and below the channel is exerting significant local-scale geological controls on the location and magnitude of the TCE discharge. Large-scale in-situ biodegradation of the plume was not evident during the monitoring campaigns. However, detections of cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride in discrete sections of the sediment profile indicate that shallow (e.g., <20

  11. Collapse in Thermal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M. I.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Dobson, D. P.; Davies, R.

    2013-12-01

    Collapsing thermal plumes have been investigated through experimental and numerical simulations. Collapsing plumes are an uncommon fluid dynamical phenomenon, usually seen when the buoyancy source is turned off. A series of fluid dynamical experiments were conducted on thermal plumes at a variety of temperature and viscosity contrasts, in a 26.5 cm^3 cubic tank heated by a constant temperature heater 2 cm in diameter and no-slip bottom and top surfaces. Working fluids included Lyle's Golden Syrup and ADM's Liquidose 436 syrup, which have strongly-temperature dependent viscosity and high Pr number (10^3-10^7 at experimental conditions). Visualisation included white light shadowgraphs and PIV of the central plane. Temperature contrasts ranged from 3-60°C, and two differing forms of collapse were identified. At very low temperature differences 'no rise' collapse was discovered, where the plumes stagnate in the lower third of the tank before collapsing. At temperature differences between 10-23°C normal evolution occurred until 'lens shape' collapse developed between midway and two-thirds of the distance from the base. The lens shape originated in the top of the conduit and was present throughout collapse. At temperatures above ΔT=23°C the plumes follow the expected growth and shape and flatten out at the top of the tank. Thermal collapse remains difficult to explain given experimental conditions (continuous heating). Instead it is possible that small density differences arising from crystallization at ambient temperatures changes plume buoyancy-inducing collapse. We show results on the evolution of the refractive index of the syrup through time to ascertain this possibility. Preliminary numerical results using Fluidity will be presented to explore a greater parameter range of viscosity contrasts and tank aspect ratios.

  12. Io Pele plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Voyager 1 took this narrow-angle camera image on 5 March 1979 from a distance of 450,000 kilometers. At this geometry, the camera looks straight down through a volcanic plume at one of Io's most active volcanos, Pele. The large heart-shaped feature is the region where Pele's plume falls to the surface. At the center of the 'heart' is the small dark fissure that is the source of the eruption. The Voyager Project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  13. Evidence for mantle plumes?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Don L; Natland, James H

    2007-11-22

    Geophysical hotspots have been attributed to partially molten asthenosphere, fertile blobs, small-scale convection and upwellings driven by core heat. Most are short-lived or too close together to be deeply seated, and do not have anomalous heat flow or temperature; many are related to tectonic features. Bourdon et al. investigate the dynamics of mantle plumes from uranium-series geochemistry and interpret their results as evidence for thermal plumes. Here we show why alternative mechanisms of upwelling and melting should be considered. PMID:18033248

  14. In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

    1989-05-23

    A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 figs.

  15. In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C.; Looney, Brian B.; Kaback, Dawn S.

    1989-01-01

    A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like.

  16. Biodegradation at Dynamic Plume Fringes: Mixing Versus Reaction Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Eckert, D.; Griebler, C.; Haberer, C.; Kürzinger, P.; Bauer, R.; Mellage, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biodegradation of continuously emitted plumes is known to be most pronounced at the plume fringe, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. Under steady-state conditions, physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion was shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation, with plume lengths scaling inversely with the bulk transverse dispersivity in quasi two-dimensional settings. Under these conditions, the presence of suitable microbes is essential but the biokinetic parameters do not play an important role. When the location of the plume shifts (caused, e.g., by a fluctuating groundwater table), however, the bacteria are no more situated at the plume fringe and biomass growth, decay, activation and deactivation determine the time lag until the fringe-controlled steady state is approached again. During this time lag, degradation is incomplete. The objective of the presented study was to analyze to which extent flow and transport dynamics diminish effectiveness of fringe-controlled biodegradation and which microbial processes and related biokinetic parameters determine the system response in overall degradation to hydraulic fluctuations. We performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth and maintenance (often subsumed as "biomass decay") microbial dormancy (that is, change into a metabolically inactive state) and

  17. Final report : results of the 2006-2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The 2006-2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Barnes, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The overall goal of the investigation was to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The investigation objectives were to (1) determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, (2) delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and (3) design and implement an expanded monitoring network at Barnes (Argonne 2006a).

  18. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Cozzarelli, I M; Böhlke, J K; Masoner, J; Breit, G N; Lorah, M M; Tuttle, M L W; Jaeschke, J B

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework. PMID:21314684

  19. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Masoner, Jason R.; Breit, George N.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework.

  20. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  1. LAMP Observes the LCROSS Plume

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows LAMP’s view of the LCROSS plume. The first half of the animation shows the LAMP viewport scanning across the horizon, passing through the plume, and moving on. The second half of...

  2. Information Content of Turbulent Chemical Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; Roberts, P. J. W.; Rahman, S.; Dasi, L. P.

    1999-11-01

    The rapid decrease in concentration contaminants released into the natural environment due to turbulent diffusion has traditionally been modeled based on time-averaged quantities. In contrast to the time-averaged concentration characteristics, the instantaneous characteristics and information content are poorly understood. Instantaneous peak levels are important in many contexts, including the impact of contaminants on organisms and the local ecosystem. The current work is motivated by the need to understand how aquatic organisms, such as blue crabs, search for and locate turbulent chemical odor plume sources. A fundamental question is what information is available to an animal or observer indicating its relative position to the plume source. In this study, the chemical plume is released iso-kinetically into a fully-developed, uniform open channel flow at 50 mm/s. Instantaneous concentration and velocity fields are simultaneously measured using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and digital particle tracking velocimetry (DPTV), respectively. In addition to the mean and variance, quantities of interest include intermittency, the temporal rise slope of chemical concentration and spatial correlations.

  3. COLD WEATHER PLUME STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While many studies of power plant plume transport and transformation have been performed during the summer, few studies of these processes during the winter have been carried out. Accordingly, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Electric Power Research Institute join...

  4. Improving operational plume forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-04-01

    Forecasting how plumes of particles, such as radioactive particles from a nuclear disaster, will be transported and dispersed in the atmosphere is an important but computationally challenging task. During the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan, operational plume forecasts were produced each day, but as the emissions continued, previous emissions were not included in the simulations used for forecasts because it became impractical to rerun the simulations each day from the beginning of the accident. Draxler and Rolph examine whether it is possible to improve plume simulation speed and flexibility as conditions and input data change. The authors use a method known as a transfer coefficient matrix approach that allows them to simulate many radionuclides using only a few generic species for the computation. Their simulations work faster by dividing the computation into separate independent segments in such a way that the most computationally time consuming pieces of the calculation need to be done only once. This makes it possible to provide real-time operational plume forecasts by continuously updating the previous simulations as new data become available. They tested their method using data from the Fukushima incident to show that it performed well. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2011JD017205, 2012)

  5. PLUME and research sotware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Veronique; Gomez-Diaz, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    The PLUME open platform (https://www.projet-plume.org) has as first goal to share competences and to value the knowledge of software experts within the French higher education and research communities. The project proposes in its platform the access to more than 380 index cards describing useful and economic software for this community, with open access to everybody. The second goal of PLUME focuses on to improve the visibility of software produced by research laboratories within the higher education and research communities. The "development-ESR" index cards briefly describe the main features of the software, including references to research publications associated to it. The platform counts more than 300 cards describing research software, where 89 cards have an English version. In this talk we describe the theme classification and the taxonomy of the index cards and the evolution with new themes added to the project. We will also focus on the organisation of PLUME as an open project and its interests in the promotion of free/open source software from and for research, contributing to the creation of a community of shared knowledge.

  6. Enceladus' Water Vapour Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Esposito, L.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A.; Matson, Dennis; Parkinson, C.; Pryor, W.; Shemansky, D.; Stewart, I.; Tew, J.; Yung, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the discovery of Enceladus water vapor plumes is shown. Conservative modeling of this water vapor is also presented and also shows that Enceladus is the source of most of the water required to supply the neutrals in Saturn's system and resupply the E-ring against losses.

  7. Buoyant plume calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures.

  8. Stormwater plume detection by MODIS imagery in the southern California coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezlin, Nikolay P.; DiGiacomo, Paul M.; Diehl, Dario W.; Jones, Burton H.; Johnson, Scott C.; Mengel, Michael J.; Reifel, Kristen M.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Wang, Menghua

    2008-10-01

    Stormwater plumes in the southern California coastal ocean were detected by MODIS-Aqua satellite imagery and compared to ship-based data on surface salinity and fecal indicator bacterial (FIB) counts collected during the Bight'03 Regional Water Quality Program surveys in February-March of 2004 and 2005. MODIS imagery was processed using a combined near-infrared/shortwave-infrared (NIR-SWIR) atmospheric correction method, which substantially improved normalized water-leaving radiation (nLw) optical spectra in coastal waters with high turbidity. Plumes were detected using a minimum-distance supervised classification method based on nLw spectra averaged within the training areas, defined as circular zones of 1.5-5.0-km radii around field stations with a surface salinity of S < 32.0 ("plume") and S > 33.0 ("ocean"). The plume optical signatures (i.e., the nLw differences between "plume" and "ocean") were most evident during the first 2 days after the rainstorms. To assess the accuracy of plume detection, stations were classified into "plume" and "ocean" using two criteria: (1) "plume" included the stations with salinity below a certain threshold estimated from the maximum accuracy of plume detection; and (2) FIB counts in "plume" exceeded the California State Water Board standards. The salinity threshold between "plume" and "ocean" was estimated as 32.2. The total accuracy of plume detection in terms of surface salinity was not high (68% on average), seemingly because of imperfect correlation between plume salinity and ocean color. The accuracy of plume detection in terms of FIB exceedances was even lower (64% on average), resulting from low correlation between ocean color and bacterial contamination. Nevertheless, satellite imagery was shown to be a useful tool for the estimation of the extent of potentially polluted plumes, which was hardly achievable by direct sampling methods (in particular, because the grids of ship-based stations covered only small parts of the

  9. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima

  10. Species separation in rocket exhaust plumes and analytic plume flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenwallner, G.

    2001-08-01

    Species separation in the exhaust plume of control thrusters of satellites is of main importance for the contamination analysis. Contamination concerns mainly scientific instruments or sensitive surfaces.. In continuum fluid dynamics a multi- component gas mixture can be treated as mixture with mean properties and with a flow field independent composition. This basic feature of continuum flow ceases to be valid in the rarefied flow regimes. In this regime there are two main mechanism which cause a separation of species in the flow field. a. Strong velocity gradients or streamline curvature. Strong stream line curvatures with large centrifugal forces exist close to the nozzle throat of sonic free jets [Sherman] or at the nozzle lip. Heavy gas constituents will not be able to follow these strong stream line curvatures. b. Different thermal velocity or thermal diffusivity of heavy and light gas constituents The transition from continuum to free molecular plume expansion can approximately be described by the sudden freeze model of Bird. At the freezing point molecular collisions suddenly cease and the further expansion is given by the velocity vector of the individual molecules at this freezing point. As light molecules have a larger thermal speed c than the heavy ones their spreading potential is also higher. This mechanism will also produce an enrichment of the plume boundary with light molecules. The approaches to model species separation in exhaust plumes as result of the above mechanism will be reviewed. To gain more insight into the separation the following cases are analyzed in detail: [B ]The free molecular supersonic expansion from a freezing plane. □ The various analytic plume flow models and their capability to predict the lateral spreading at the plume boundary (e.g. Simmons, Boynton, Brook, DLR) □ DSMC test case calculations of single and two-species plumes with mass separation. (M. Ivanov, ITAM) Based on this analysis a new 3 region model for species

  11. Stormwater plume detection by MODIS imagery in the southern California coastal ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nezlin, N.P.; DiGiacomo, P.M.; Diehl, D.W.; Jones, B.H.; Johnson, S.C.; Mengel, M.J.; Reifel, K.M.; Warrick, J.A.; Wang, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stormwater plumes in the southern California coastal ocean were detected by MODIS-Aqua satellite imagery and compared to ship-based data on surface salinity and fecal indicator bacterial (FIB) counts collected during the Bight'03 Regional Water Quality Program surveys in February-March of 2004 and 2005. MODIS imagery was processed using a combined near-infrared/shortwave-infrared (NIR-SWIR) atmospheric correction method, which substantially improved normalized water-leaving radiation (nLw) optical spectra in coastal waters with high turbidity. Plumes were detected using a minimum-distance supervised classification method based on nLw spectra averaged within the training areas, defined as circular zones of 1.5-5.0-km radii around field stations with a surface salinity of S 33.0 ('ocean'). The plume optical signatures (i.e., the nLw differences between 'plume' and 'ocean') were most evident during the first 2 days after the rainstorms. To assess the accuracy of plume detection, stations were classified into 'plume' and 'ocean' using two criteria: (1) 'plume' included the stations with salinity below a certain threshold estimated from the maximum accuracy of plume detection; and (2) FIB counts in 'plume' exceeded the California State Water Board standards. The salinity threshold between 'plume' and 'ocean' was estimated as 32.2. The total accuracy of plume detection in terms of surface salinity was not high (68% on average), seemingly because of imperfect correlation between plume salinity and ocean color. The accuracy of plume detection in terms of FIB exceedances was even lower (64% on average), resulting from low correlation between ocean color and bacterial contamination. Nevertheless, satellite imagery was shown to be a useful tool for the estimation of the extent of potentially polluted plumes, which was hardly achievable by direct sampling methods (in particular, because the grids of ship-based stations covered only small parts of the plumes detected via

  12. Ocean-outfall mixing zone delineation using Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, D.A.; Ding, L.; Huang, H.

    1997-12-01

    A methodology has been developed to use data collected by ocean surface current radar (OSCR) systems to predict the fate and transport of pollutants released from ocean outfalls. The proposed OSCR-based transport model was validated at the Miami Central-District (MCD) outfall using data collected during the Southeast Florida Outfall Experiment 2 (SEFLOE 2). A comparison between the measured dye concentration versus distance from the outfall and the predictions of the OSCR-based transport model showed good agreement. A second validation test of the OSCR-based transport model compared the growth of variance versus time and diffusion coefficients versus length scale with the conventional Okubo diagrams for instantaneous tracer releases. This comparison indicated that the mixing characteristics simulated explicitly by the OSCR-based transport model are in good agreement with field measurements in the coastal ocean. Mixing zones based on worst-case and probabilistic criteria were delineated using the OSCR-based model. The results indicate that an OSCR-based transport model is a significant improvement over conventional models that are used to delineate mixing zones surrounding ocean outfalls with surfacing plumes. This claim is strongly supported by the field data collected during the SEFLOE 2 study in south Florida.

  13. Geophysical detection of on-site wastewater plumes in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew

    Nonpoint source pollution (NPS) continues to be the leading cause of water quality degradation in the United States. On-site wastewater systems (OWS) contribute to NPS; however, due to the range of system designs and complexity of the subsurface, OWS contributions to groundwater pollution are not well understood. As the population of coastal North Carolina continues to increase, better methods to locate and characterize wastewater impacted groundwater are needed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of non-intrusive geophysical methods to provide high resolution information on various contaminants in different geologic settings. The goals of this study were to evaluate the utility of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and capacitively coupled resistivity (CCR) for detecting OWS components, delineating associated wastewater plumes, and monitoring temporal variations in groundwater quality. Cross-sectional and three dimensional (3D) geophysical surveys were conducted periodically over a one year period (February 2011--January 2012) at two schools utilizing OWS in the lower Neuse River Basin (NRB) in the North Carolina Coastal Plain (NCCP). Cores were collected at both study sites; as well as monthly groundwater depth, temperature, and specific conductivity measurements to better constrain the geophysical interpretations. Additionally, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and Cl concentrations were monitored bi-monthly to assess nutrient transport at the sites. The 3D GPR surveys effectively located the wastewater drainage trenches at both sites, in close agreement with locations described in as-built OWS blueprints. Regression analysis of resistivity versus groundwater specific conductivity revealed an inverse relationship, suggesting resistivity ≤ 250 ohm.m was indicative of wastewater impacted groundwater at both sites. The 3D resistivity models identified regions of low resistivity beneath the drainfields relative to background values. Regression analysis of

  14. Chemical plume source localization.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shuo; Farrell, Jay A

    2006-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the dispersion of the chemical is dominated by turbulence, resulting in an intermittent chemical signal. The vehicle is capable of detecting above-threshold chemical concentration and sensing the fluid flow velocity at the vehicle location. This paper reviews instances of biological plume tracing and reviews previous strategies for a vehicle-based plume tracing. The main contribution is a new source-likelihood mapping approach based on Bayesian inference methods. Using this Bayesian methodology, the source-likelihood map is propagated through time and updated in response to both detection and nondetection events. Examples are included that use data from in-water testing to compare the mapping approach derived herein with the map derived using a previously existing technique. PMID:17036813

  15. Simulation of two- and three-dimensional dense solute plume behavior with the the METROPOL-3 code

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, M.; Roberson, K.R.; Leijnse, A.

    1994-07-01

    Contaminant plumes emanating from waste disposal facilities are often denser than the ambient groundwater. These so-called dense plumes sink deeper into phreatic aquifers and may, under certain conditions, become unstable. The behavior of variable density, aqueous-phase contaminant plumes in saturated, homogeneous 2-D and 3-D intermediate-scale aquifer models was investigated with the finite element code METROPOL-3. The numerical results compare, in a quantitative sense, to previously reported laboratory-scale transport experiments. The simulations show that dense plumes are more likely to penetrate deeper into aquifers and eventually become unstable with increasing density differences between the leachate solution and the ambient groundwater, and other important parameters as the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the porous medium, leakage-rate of the contaminant solution, and source width. The significance of unstable behavior decreases with increasing dispersivity values. It was observed that 3-D flow patterns have a stable effect on sense contaminant plume behavior.

  16. Low altitude plume impingement handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    Plume Impingement modeling is required whenever an object immersed in a rocket exhaust plume must survive or remain undamaged within specified limits, due to thermal and pressure environments induced by the plume. At high altitudes inviscid plume models, Monte Carlo techniques along with the Plume Impingement Program can be used to predict reasonably accurate environments since there are usually no strong flowfield/body interactions or atmospheric effects. However, at low altitudes there is plume-atmospheric mixing and potential large flowfield perturbations due to plume-structure interaction. If the impinged surface is large relative to the flowfield and the flowfield is supersonic, the shock near the surface can stand off the surface several exit radii. This results in an effective total pressure that is higher than that which exists in the free plume at the surface. Additionally, in two phase plumes, there can be strong particle-gas interaction in the flowfield immediately ahead of the surface. To date there have been three levels of sophistication that have been used for low altitude plume induced environment predictions. Level 1 calculations rely on empirical characterizations of the flowfield and relatively simple impingement modeling. An example of this technique is described by Piesik. A Level 2 approach consists of characterizing the viscous plume using the SPF/2 code or RAMP2/LAMP and using the Plume Impingement Program to predict the environments. A Level 3 analysis would consist of using a Navier-Stokes code such as the FDNS code to model the flowfield and structure during a single calculation. To date, Level 1 and Level 2 type analyses have been primarily used to perform environment calculations. The recent advances in CFD modeling and computer resources allow Level 2 type analysis to be used for final design studies. Following some background on low altitude impingement, Level 1, 2, and 3 type analysis will be described.

  17. Seismic Imaging of Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, Henri-Claude

    The mantle plume hypothesis was proposed thirty years ago by Jason Morgan to explain hotspot volcanoes such as Hawaii. A thermal diapir (or plume) rises from the thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and produces a chain of volcanoes as a plate moves on top of it. The idea is very attractive, but direct evidence for actual plumes is weak, and many questions remain unanswered. With the great improvement of seismic imagery in the past ten years, new prospects have arisen. Mantle plumes are expected to be rather narrow, and their detection by seismic techniques requires specific developments as well as dedicated field experiments. Regional travel-time tomography has provided good evidence for plumes in the upper mantle beneath a few hotspots (Yellowstone, Massif Central, Iceland). Beneath Hawaii and Iceland, the plume can be detected in the transition zone because it deflects the seismic discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depths. In the lower mantle, plumes are very difficult to detect, so specific methods have been worked out for this purpose. There are hints of a plume beneath the weak Bowie hotspot, as well as intriguing observations for Hawaii. Beneath Iceland, high-resolution tomography has just revealed a wide and meandering plume-like structure extending from the core-mantle boundary up to the surface. Among the many phenomena that seem to take place in the lowermost mantle (or D''), there are also signs there of the presence of plumes. In this article I review the main results obtained so far from these studies and discuss their implications for plume dynamics. Seismic imaging of mantle plumes is still in its infancy but should soon become a turbulent teenager.

  18. Areal extent of a plume of mineralized water from a flowing artesian well in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1982-01-01

    A flowing artesian well that taps the Floridan aquifer at Chekika Hammock State Park is contaminating the overlying Biscayne aquifer with saline water. The plume of mineralized water extends approximately 7 miles southeast of the well and ranges in width from 1 to 2 miles. The areal extent of contamination in the primary plume is approximately 12 square miles. The principal ions contaminating the Biscayne aquifer are chloride, sodium, and sulfate. (USGS)

  19. Experimental insights on the development of buoyant plumes injected into a porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Xiaoying; Woods, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a series of new laboratory experiments which examine the rise of a two-dimensional buoyancy-driven plume of freshwater through a porous layer initially saturated with aqueous saline solution. Measurements show that the plume head accounts for a constant fraction of about 0.7 of the buoyancy supplied at the source and that it grows as it rises through the porous layer. However, the morphology of the plume head becomes increasingly complex as the ratio of the injection speed to the buoyancy rise speed increases, with the fluid spreading laterally and developing localized buoyant fingers which intermingle with the ambient fluid. Behind the plume head, a tail of nearly constant width develops providing a pathway from the source to the plume head. These starting plume dynamics may be relevant for buoyancy-driven contaminant dispersal and also for the convection which develops during CO2 sequestration as CO2 dissolves into aquifer water.

  20. THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED WATER AT REMEDIAL WOOD PRESERVING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated groundwater and surface water have posed a great challenge in restoring wood preserving sites to beneficial use. Often contaminated groundwater plumes extend far beyond the legal property limits, adversely impacting drinking water supplies and crop lands. To contain,...

  1. Hydraulic gradient control for groundwater contaminant removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Atwood D.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver, Colarado, U.S.A., is used as a realistic setting for a hypothetical test of a procedure that plans the hydraulic stabilization and removal of a groundwater contaminant plume. A two-stage planning procedure successfully selects the best wells and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules to contain the plume while a well or system of wells within the plume removes the contaminated water. In stage I, a combined groundwater flow and solute transport model is used to simulate contaminant removal under an assumed velocity field. The result is the approximated plume boundary location as a function of time. In stage II, a linear program, which includes a groundwater flow model as part of the set of constraints, determines the optimal well selection and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules by minimizing total pumping and recharge. The simulation-management model eliminates wells far from the plume perimeter and activates wells near the perimeter as the plume decreases in size. This successfully stablizes the hydraulic gradient during aquifer cleanup.The Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver, Colorado, USA, is used as a realistic setting for a hypothetical test of a procedure that plans the hydraulic stabilization and removal of a groundwater contaminant plume. A two-stage planning procedure successfully selects the best wells and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules to contain the plume while a well or system of wells within the plume removes the contaminated water. In stage I, a combined groundwater flow and solute transport model is used to simulate contaminant removal under an assumed velocity field. The result is the approximated plume boundary location as a function of time. In stage II, a linear program, which includes a groundwater flow model as part of the set of constraints, determines the optimal well selection and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules by minimizing total pumping and recharge. Refs.

  2. Hele-Shaw Experiments on Plume Stretching and Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M.; Mays, D. C.; Neupauer, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Fluid mixing in laminar flow is important in a number of practical applications, including remediation of contaminated groundwater. Recent modeling studies have shown that mixing can be accelerated and amplified by imposing a flow that generates stretching and folding of an injected plume of treatment solution. Stretching and folding, in turn, results from engineered injection and extraction of clean water through an array of wells surrounding the treatment solution. This poster describes a series of experiments whose goal is to demonstrate plume stretching and folding in a Hele-Shaw apparatus. An initial plume of treatment solution is injected into the center of the Hele-Shaw apparatus, which is assumed to represent a zone of contaminated groundwater, with four wells spaced evenly around the treatment solution. In order to spread the treatment solution into the groundwater, the four wells perform a series of infusions and withdrawals that push and pull apart the plume of treatment solution. With the proper steps, it will be shown that the plume can be stretched and folded to greatly increase the reactive interface area between the treatment solution and the contaminated groundwater. Consideration is given to two qualitative differences with respect to previous modeling studies. First, constant volume is required by the no-flow boundary used at the edge of the Hele-Shaw cell; any pump that is withdrawing water must have a complementary pump adding water at the same rate. Second, in these experiments, mixing results from a physical process, namely Taylor dispersion, eliminating the uncertainty resulting from the need to assume dispersion mechanisms in numerical models. Therefore, these experiments further elucidate the benefits and challenges of imposing plume stretching and folding in systems (like aquifers) where dispersion is unavoidable, providing new insight into the required logistics of using this approach in groundwater treatment.

  3. The Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Performance Testing for Plume Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters are currently being tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. A suite of diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, and Schlieren imaging are being used to acquire plume measurements of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  4. Plume Characterization of a Laboratory Model 22 N GPIM Thruster via High-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the capability of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive areas of the spacecraft from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume characterization of a laboratory-model 22 N thruster via optical diagnostics was conducted at NASA GRC in a space-simulated environment. A high-frequency pulsed laser was coupled with an electron-multiplied ICCD camera to perform Raman spectroscopy in the near-field, low-pressure plume. The Raman data yielded plume constituents and temperatures over a range of thruster chamber pressures and as a function of thruster (catalyst) operating time. Schlieren images of the near-field plume enabled calculation of plume velocities and revealed general plume structure of the otherwise invisible plume. The measured velocities are compared to those predicted by a two-dimensional, kinetic model. Trends in data and numerical results are presented from catalyst mid-life to end-of-life. The results of this investigation were coupled with the Raman and Schlieren data to provide an anchor for plume impingement analysis presented in a companion paper. The results of both analyses will be used to improve understanding of the nature of AF-M315E plumes and their impacts to GPIM and other future missions.

  5. The Milan photooxidant plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PréVôT, André S. H.; Staehelin, Johannes; Kok, Gregory L.; Schillawski, Richard D.; Neininger, Bruno; Staffelbach, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; Wernli, Heini; Dommen, Josef

    1997-10-01

    In Switzerland, measurement campaigns including aircraft measurements were carried out in the summers of 1992 and 1993 as part of the Pollution and Meteorology (POLLUMET) study. Ozone (O3) concentrations, up to 185 ppb, with a large spatial variability were found south of the Alps in the afternoon. Comparison to measurements north of the Alps shows that these concentration levels are extraordinarily high for central Europe. Backward trajectories reveal that the highest O3 levels were found 4-5 hours downwind of Milan, Italy. The measurements suggest a reactive organic gas (ROG) sensitive O3 production regime 1-3 hours downwind in the plume, and a NOx (sum of nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) limitation in air masses not affected by the Milan plume. Air masses originating north of Milan are probably close to the transition zone between the two photochemical regimes. This was found by using measurements of total odd nitrogen (NOy,), NO, NO2, formaldehyde (HCHO), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) yielding indicators for ROG and NOx sensitive O3 production. The slope of ozone versus NOz (=NOy-NOx: photochemical products of NOx) were markedly higher in NOx limited conditions (ΔO3/ΔNOz=13.6) than in air masses close to the transition zone (ΔO3/ΔNOz=4.2).

  6. Nuclear rocket plume studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Daniel

    1993-05-01

    A description and detailed computational analysis of a vortex cleaning system designed to remove radioactive material from the plumes of nuclear rockets is included. The proposed system is designed to remove both particulates and radioactive gaseous material from the plume. A two part computational model is used to examine the system's ability to remove particulates, and the results indicate that under some conditions, the system can remove over 99% of the particles in the flow. Two critical parameters which govern the effectiveness of the system are identified and the information necessary to estimate cleaning efficiencies for particles of known sizes and densities is provided. A simple steady analytical solution is also developed to examine the system's ability to remove gaseous radioactive material. This analysis, while inconclusive, suggests that the swirl rates necessary to achieve useful efficiencies are too high to be achieved in any practical manner. Therefore, this system is probably not suitable for use, with gaseous radioactive material. It was concluded that the system can cause negligible specific impulse losses, though there may be a substantial mass penalty associated with its use.

  7. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  8. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes

    PubMed Central

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  9. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental scientists are generally familiar with the concept of barriers for restricting the movement of contaminant plumes in ground water. Such barriers are typically constructed of highly impermeable emplacements of materials such as grouts, slurries, or sheet pilings to ...

  10. Formation, Dynamics, and Impact of Plasmaspheric Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Jerry; Borovsky, Joseph; Foster, John; Carpenter, Donald

    2007-06-01

    Workshop on Plasmaspheric Drainage Plumes, Taos, New Mexico, 9-13 October 2006 Plasmaspheric plumes result from erosion of the plasmasphere. The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) Workshop on Plasmaspheric Drainage Plumes was convened in Taos, N. M., on 9-13 October 2006 to examine outstanding questions about the formation and dynamics of plumes, and the impact of plumes on the near-Earth space environment (geospace). A second workshop on plasmaspheric drainage plumes is planned for late 2007.

  11. Electrochemical method for defect delineation in silicon-on-insulator wafers

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Kelly, Michael J.; Medernach, John W.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical method for defect delineation in thin-film SOI or SOS wafers in which a surface of a silicon wafer is electrically connected so as to control the voltage of the surface within a specified range, the silicon wafer is then contacted with an electrolyte, and, after removing the electrolyte, defects and metal contamination in the silicon wafer are identified.

  12. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  13. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.; Fliermans, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  14. A multivariate statistical approach to spatial representation of groundwater contamination using hydrochemistry and microbial community profiles.

    PubMed

    Mouser, Paula J; Rizzo, Donna M; Röling, Wilfred F M; Van Breukelen, Boris M

    2005-10-01

    Managers of landfill sites are faced with enormous challenges when attempting to detect and delineate leachate plumes with a limited number of monitoring wells, assess spatial and temporal trends for hundreds of contaminants, and design long-term monitoring (LTM) strategies. Subsurface microbial ecology is a unique source of data that has been historically underutilized in LTM groundwater designs. This paper provides a methodology for utilizing qualitative and quantitative information (specifically, multiple water quality measurements and genome-based data) from a landfill leachate contaminated aquifer in Banisveld, The Netherlands, to improve the estimation of parameters of concern. We used a principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce nonindependent hydrochemistry data, Bacteria and Archaea community profiles from 16S rDNA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), into six statistically independent variables, representing the majority of the original dataset variances. The PCA scores grouped samples based on the degree or class of contamination and were similar over considerable horizontal distances. Incorporation of the principal component scores with traditional subsurface information using cokriging improved the understanding of the contaminated area by reducing error variances and increasing detection efficiency. Combining these multiple types of data (e.g., genome-based information, hydrochemistry, borings) may be extremely useful at landfill or other LTM sites for designing cost-effective strategies to detect and monitor contaminants. PMID:16245827

  15. Scanning thermal plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Madding, R. P.; Green, T., III

    1975-01-01

    Over a three-year period 800 thermal line scans of power plant plumes were made by an airborne scanner, with ground truth measured concurrently at the plants. Computations using centered finite differences in the thermal scanning imagery show a lower bound in the horizontal temperature gradient in excess of 1.6 C/m. Gradients persist to 3 m below the surface. Vector plots of the velocity of thermal fronts are constructed by tracing the front motion in successive thermal images. A procedure is outlined for the two-point ground calibration of a thermal scanner from an equation describing the scanner signal and the voltage for two known temperatures. The modulation transfer function is then calculated by input of a thermal step function and application of digital time analysis techniques using Fast Fourier Transforms to the voltage output. Field calibration tests are discussed. Data accuracy is limited by the level of ground truth effort chosen.

  16. Capture of the Canary mantle plume head by the Gibraltar arc mantle wedge during slab roll back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Sílvia; Duarte, João; Mériaux, Catherine; Rosas, Filipe; Mata, João; Schellart, Wouter; Chen, Zhihao; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a portion of the Canary plume travelled northeastwards across the Atlas Mountains in North Africa and was captured ~10 Ma ago by the Western Mediterranean Gibraltar subduction system. The capture would have been associated with the retreating slab-induced mantle return flow that would have dragged and trapped a portion of the plume head in the mantle wedge of the Gibraltar subduction zone. Such material eventually contaminated the subduction related volcanism in the Alboran region. In this work we used scaled analogue models of slab-plume head interaction to investigate the plausibility of the plume capture. A 400 km narrow dense plate was drawn into subduction in a viscous upper mantle, while a buoyant plume was initiated at the base of the upper mantle 800 km aside of the plate centreline. First, a transient phase took place during which the plate sunk to the base of the upper mantle and the plume rose up to the surface without interaction, as plate and plume were 2375 km apart. During the second phase of interest, the slab started retreating towards the plume whose head began to grow. The influence of the subducting plate on the spreading plume head was seen with the onset of asymmetry in the plume head in a direction of the trench and parallel to the plate. The asymmetry began as the trench was 862 km away from the plume head centre and the plume head edge was 138 km far from the plate edge. With the passing of the trench at the apex of the plume head centre, capture of the plume head towards the mantle wedge began, and after 6 Myr, 9.5% of the plume head had been captured. Our results support the evidence that mantle plume material may have been sucked towards the mantle wedge of the Gibraltar subduction system during slab rollback induced toroidal mantle flow.

  17. Multi-layer sampling in conventional monitoring wells for improved estimation of vertical contaminant distributions and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Robert W.; Paul, Cynthia J.

    1997-02-01

    "Traditional" approaches to sampling groundwater and interpreting monitoring well data often provide misleading pictures of plume shape and location in the subsurface and the true extent of contamination. Groundwater samples acquired using pumps and bailers in conventional monitoring wells yield data which are largely dependent upon the length of the screened interval, the purging and sampling method employed, and the purge volume extracted prior to sample collection. Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical concentration gradients is desirable, to accurately characterize waste sites and optimize remedial strategies. The objective of this study was to compare sampling results using four different sampling approaches and devices. Conventional monitoring wells were sampled with an electric submersible pump using low-flow sampling techniques and with a bailer using "traditional" sampling methods. The same wells were also sampled with a passive multi-layer sampling system (DMLS®, Margan Ltd.). Finally, aqueous concentrations were also determined in the formation adjacent to the monitoring wells studied using a Geoprobe® and short (30 cm) screens. Results indicated that "traditional" sampling methods can provide misleading information regarding contaminant distribution and mass and indeed can miss the presence of contamination altogether.

  18. Tracking stormwater discharge plumes and water quality of the Tijuana River with multispectral aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejkovsky, Jan; Nezlin, Nikolay P.; Mustain, Neomi M.; Kum, Jamie B.

    2010-04-01

    Spatial-temporal characteristics and environmental factors regulating the behavior of stormwater runoff from the Tijuana River in southern California were analyzed utilizing very high resolution aerial imagery, and time-coincident environmental and bacterial sampling data. Thirty nine multispectral aerial images with 2.1-m spatial resolution were collected after major rainstorms during 2003-2008. Utilizing differences in color reflectance characteristics, the ocean surface was classified into non-plume waters and three components of the runoff plume reflecting differences in age and suspended sediment concentrations. Tijuana River discharge rate was the primary factor regulating the size of the freshest plume component and its shorelong extensions to the north and south. Wave direction was found to affect the shorelong distribution of the shoreline-connected fresh plume components much more strongly than wind direction. Wave-driven sediment resuspension also significantly contributed to the size of the oldest plume component. Surf zone bacterial samples collected near the time of each image acquisition were used to evaluate the contamination characteristics of each plume component. The bacterial contamination of the freshest plume waters was very high (100% of surf zone samples exceeded California standards), but the oldest plume areas were heterogeneous, including both polluted and clean waters. The aerial imagery archive allowed study of river runoff characteristics on a plume component level, not previously done with coarser satellite images. Our findings suggest that high resolution imaging can quickly identify the spatial extents of the most polluted runoff but cannot be relied upon to always identify the entire polluted area. Our results also indicate that wave-driven transport is important in distributing the most contaminated plume areas along the shoreline.

  19. High-resolution satellite turbidity and sea surface temperature observations of river plume interactions during a significant flood event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brando, V. E.; Braga, F.; Zaggia, L.; Giardino, C.; Bresciani, M.; Matta, E.; Bellafiore, D.; Ferrarin, C.; Maicu, F.; Benetazzo, A.; Bonaldo, D.; Falcieri, F. M.; Coluccelli, A.; Russo, A.; Carniel, S.

    2015-11-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) and turbidity (T) derived from Landsat 8 (L8) imagery were used to characterize river plumes in the northern Adriatic Sea (NAS) during a significant flood event in November 2014. Circulation patterns and sea surface salinity (SSS) from an operational coupled ocean-wave model supported the interpretation of the plumes' interaction with the receiving waters and among them. There was a good agreement of the SSS, T, and SST fields at the sub-mesoscale and mesoscale delineation of the major river plumes. L8 30 m resolution also enabled the description of smaller plume structures. The different plumes' reflectance spectra were related to the lithological fingerprint of the sediments in the river catchments. Sharp fronts in T and SST delimited each single river plume. The isotherms and turbidity isolines' coupling varied among the plumes due to differences in particle loads and surface temperatures in the discharged waters. The surface expressions of all the river plumes occurring in NAS were classified based on the occurrence of the plume dynamical regions in the L8 30 m resolution imagery.

  20. International Space Station External Contamination Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikatarian, Ron; Soares, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    PResentation slides examine external contamination requirements; International Space Station (ISS) external contamination sources; ISS external contamination sensitive surfaces; external contamination control; external contamination control for pre-launch verification; flight experiments and observations; the Space Shuttle Orbiter waste water dump, materials outgassing, active vacuum vents; example of molecular column density profile, modeling and analysis tools; sources of outgassing induced contamination analyzed to date, quiescent sources, observations on optical degradation due to induced external contamination in LEO; examples of typical contaminant and depth profiles; and status of the ISS system, material outgassing, thruster plumes, and optical degradation.

  1. Fracture Network Characteristics Informed by Detailed Studies of Chlorinated Solvent Plumes in Sedimentary Rock Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, B. L.; Chapman, S.

    2015-12-01

    Various numerical approaches have been used to simulate contaminant plumes in fractured porous rock, but the one that allows field and laboratory measurements to be most directly used as inputs to these models is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) Approach. To effectively account for fracture-matrix interactions, emphasis must be placed on identifying and parameterizing all of the fractures that participate substantially in groundwater flow and contaminated transport. High resolution plume studies at four primary research sites, where chlorinated solvent plumes serve as long-term (several decades) tracer tests, provide insight concerning the density of the fracture network unattainable by conventional methods. Datasets include contaminant profiles from detailed VOC subsampling informed by continuous core logs, hydraulic head and transmissivity profiles, packer testing and sensitive temperature logging methods in FLUTe™ lined holes. These show presence of many more transmissive fractures, contrasting observations of only a few flow zones per borehole obtained from conventional hydraulic tests including flow metering in open boreholes. Incorporating many more fractures with a wider range of transmissivities is key to predicting contaminant migration. This new understanding of dense fracture networks combined with matrix property measurements have informed 2-D DFN flow and transport modelling using Fractran and HydroGeosphere to simulate plume characteristics ground-truthed by detailed field site plume characterization. These process-based simulations corroborate field findings that plumes in sedimentary rock after decades of transport show limited plume front distances and strong internal plume attenuation by diffusion, transverse dispersion and slow degradation. This successful application of DFN modeling informed by field-derived parameters demonstrates how the DFN Approach can be applied to other sites to inform plume migration rates and remedial efficacy.

  2. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) plume and plume effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to characterize the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) propulsion and attitude control system engine exhaust plumes and predict the resultant plume impingement pressure, heat loads, forces, and moments. Detailed description is provided of the OMV gaseous nitrogen (GN2) thruster exhaust plume flow field characteristics calculated with the RAMP2 snd SFPGEN computer codes. Brief descriptions are included of the two models, GN2 thruster characteristics and RAMP2 input data files. The RAMP2 flow field could be recalculated by other organizations using the information presented. The GN2 flow field can be readily used by other organizations who are interested in GN2 plume induced environments which require local flow field properties which can be supplied using the SFPGEN GN2 model.

  3. USING DIRECT-PUSH TOOLS TO MAP HYDROSTRATIGRAPHY AND PREDICT MTBE PLUME DIVING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional wells for monitoring MTBE contamination at underground storage tank sites are screened a few feet above and a few feet below the water table. At some sites, a plume of contamination in ground water may dive below the screen of conventional monitoring wells and escap...

  4. Degradation of solar cell optical performance due to plume particle pitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidl, William; Smith, Kendall; Soares, Carlos; Steagall, Courtney; Shaw, Christopher G.

    2008-08-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) solar arrays provide power that is needed for on-orbit experiments and operations. The ISS solar arrays are exposed to space environment effects that include contamination, atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and thermal cycling. The contamination effects include exposure to thruster plume contamination and erosion. This study was performed to better understand potential solar cell optical performance degradation due to increased scatter caused by plume particle pitting. A ground test was performed using a light gas gun to shoot glass beads at a solar cell with a shotgun approach. The increase in scatter was then measured and correlated with the surface damage.

  5. Persistent source influences on the trailing edge of a groundwater plume, and natural attenuation timeframes: the F-Area Savannah River Site.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Dong, Wenming; Denham, Miles E; Hubbard, Susan S

    2012-04-17

    At the Savannah River Site's F-Area, wastewaters containing radionuclides were disposed into seepage basins for decades. After closure and capping in 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has being monitoring and remediating the groundwater plume. Despite numerous studies of the plume, its persistence for over 20 years has not been well understood. To better understand the plume dynamics, a limited number of deep boreholes were drilled to determine the current plume characteristics. A mixing model was developed to predict plume tritium and nitrate concentrations. We found that the plume trailing edges have emerged for some contaminants, and that contaminant recharge from the basin's vadose zone is still important. The model's estimated time-dependent basin drainage rates combined with dilution from natural recharge successfully predicted plume tritium and nitrate concentrations. This new understanding of source zone influences can help guide science-based remediation, and improve predictions of the natural attenuation timeframes. PMID:22432961

  6. Complex electrical resistance tomography of a subsurface PCE plume

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W,; LeBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    A controlled experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of complex electrical resistivity tomography (CERT) for detecting and delineating free product dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. One hundred ninety liters of PCE were released at a rate of 2 liters per hour from a point 0.5 m below ground surface. The spill was conducted within a double walled tank where saturated layers of sand, bentonite and a sand/bentonite mixture were installed. Complex electrical resistance measurements were performed. Data were taken before the release, several times during, and then after the PCE was released. Magnitude and phase were measured at 1 and 64 Hz. Data from before the release were compared with those during the release for the purpose of imaging the changes in conductivity resulting from the plume. Conductivity difference tomographs showed a decrease in electrical conductivity as the DNAPL penetrated the soil. A pancake-shaped anomaly developed on the top of a bentonite layer at 2 m depth. The anomaly grew in magnitude and extent during the release and borehole television surveys data confirmed the anomaly to be free-product PCE whose downward migration was stopped by the low permeability clay. The tomographs clearly delineated the plume as a resistive anomaly.

  7. Understanding target delineation using simple probabilistic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Chris J.

    2015-10-01

    Performance assessment is carried out for a simple target delineation process based on thresholding and shape fitting. The method uses the information contained in Receiver Operating Characteristic curves together with basic observations regarding target sizes and shapes. Performance is gauged by considering the delineations that might result from having particular arrangements of detected pixels within the vicinity of a hypothesized target. In particular, the method considers the qualities of delineations generated when having various combinations of detected pixels at a number of locations around the inner and outer boundaries of the underlying object. Three distinct types of arrangement for pixels on the inner target boundary are considered. Each has the potential to lead to a good quality delineation in a thresholding and shape fitting scheme. The deleterious effect of false alarms within the surrounding local region is also taken into account. The resulting ensembles of detected pixels are treated using familiar rules for combination to form probabilities for the delineations as a whole. Example results are produced for simple target prototypes in cluttered SAR imagery.

  8. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  9. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  10. NSTAR Ion Thruster Plume Impact Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Pencil, Eric J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Kussmaul, Michael; Oden, Katessha

    1995-01-01

    Tests were performed to establish 30-cm ion thruster plume impacts, including plume characterizations via near and farfield ion current measurements, contamination, and sputtering assessments. Current density measurements show that 95% of the beam was enclosed within a 22 deg half-angle and that the thrust vector shifted by less than 0.3 deg during throttling from 2.3 to 0.5 kW. The beam flatness parameter was found to be 0.47, and the ratio of doubly charged to singly charged ion current density decreased from 15% at 2.3 kW to 5% at 0.5 kW. Quartz sample erosion measurements showed that the samples eroded at a rate of between 11 and 13 pm/khr at 25 deg from the thruster axis, and that the rate dropped by a factor of four at 40 deg. Good agreement was obtained between extrapolated current densities and those calculated from tantalum target erosion measurements. Quartz crystal microbalance and witness plate measurements showed that ion beam sputtering of the tank resulted in a facility material backflux rate of -10 A/hr in a large space simulation chamber.

  11. A simple method for calculating growth rates of petroleum hydrocarbon plumes.

    PubMed

    Bekins, Barbara A; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Curtis, Gary P

    2005-01-01

    Consumption of aquifer Fe(III) during biodegradation of ground water contaminants may result in expansion of a contaminant plume, changing the outlook for monitored natural attenuation. Data from two research sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons show that toluene and xylenes degrade under methanogenic conditions, but the benzene and ethylbenzene plumes grow as aquifer Fe(III) supplies are depleted. By considering a one-dimensional reaction front in a constant unidirectional flow field, it is possible to derive a simple expression for the growth rate of a benzene plume. The method balances the mass flux of benzene with the Fe(III) content of the aquifer, assuming that the biodegradation reaction is instantaneous. The resulting expression shows that the benzene front migration is retarded relative to the ground water velocity by a factor that depends on the concentrations of hydrocarbon and bioavailable Fe(III). The method provides good agreement with benzene plumes at a crude oil study site in Minnesota and a gasoline site in South Carolina. Compared to the South Carolina site, the Minnesota site has 25% higher benzene flux but eight times the Fe(III), leading to about one-sixth the expansion rate. Although it was developed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, the growth-rate estimation method may have applications to contaminant plumes from other persistent contaminant sources. PMID:16324003

  12. A simple method for calculating growth rates of petroleum hydrocarbon plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Curtis, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Consumption of aquifer Fe(III) during biodegradation of ground water contaminants may result in expansion of a contaminant plume, changing the outlook for monitored natural attenuation. Data from two research sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons show that toluene and xylenes degrade under methanogenic conditions, but the benzene and ethylbenzene plumes grow as aquifer Fe(III) supplies are depleted. By considering a one-dimensional reaction front in a constant unidirectional flow field, it is possible to derive a simple expression for the growth rate of a benzene plume. The method balances the mass flux of benzene with the Fe(III) content of the aquifer, assuming that the biodegradation reaction is instantaneous. The resulting expression shows that the benzene front migration is retarded relative to the ground water velocity by a factor that depends on the concentrations of hydrocarbon and bioavailable Fe(III). The method provides good agreement with benzene plumes at a crude oil study site in Minnesota and a gasoline site in South Carolina. Compared to the South Carolina site, the Minnesota site has 25% higher benzene flux but eight times the Fe(III), leading to about one-sixth the expansion rate. Although it was developed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, the growth-rate estimation method may have applications to contaminant plumes from other persistent contaminant sources. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  13. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page

  14. Space shuttle exhaust plumes in the lower thermosphere: Advective transport and diffusive spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Siskind, David E.; Meier, R. R.; Randall, Cora E.; Russell, James M.; Urban, Jo; Murtagh, Donal

    2014-02-01

    The space shuttle main engine plume deposited between 100 and 115 km altitude is a valuable tracer for global-scale dynamical processes. Several studies have shown that this plume can reach the Arctic or Antarctic to form bursts of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) within a few days. The rapid transport of the shuttle plume is currently not reproduced by general circulation models and is not well understood. To help delineate the issues, we present the complete satellite datasets of shuttle plume observations by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument and the Sub-Millimeter Radiometer instrument. From 2002 to 2011 these two instruments observed 27 shuttle plumes in over 600 limb scans of water vapor emission, from which we derive both advective meridional transport and diffusive spreading. Each plume is deposited at virtually the same place off the United States east coast so our results are relevant to northern mid-latitudes. We find that the advective transport for the first 6-18 h following deposition depends on the local time (LT) of launch: shuttle plumes deposited later in the day (~13-22 LT) typically move south whereas they otherwise typically move north. For these younger plumes rapid transport is most favorable for launches at 6 and 18 LT, when the displacement is 10° in latitude corresponding to an average wind speed of 30 m/s. For plumes between 18 and 30 h old some show average sustained meridional speeds of 30 m/s. For plumes between 30 and 54 h old the observations suggest a seasonal dependence to the meridional transport, peaking near the beginning of year at 24 m/s. The diffusive spreading of the plume superimposed on the transport is on average 23 m/s in 24 h. The plume observations show large variations in both meridional transport and diffusive spreading so that accurate modeling requires knowledge of the winds specific to each case. The combination of transport and spreading from the STS-118 plume in August

  15. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  16. Impacts of transport mechanisms and plume history on tailing of sorbing plumes in heterogeneous porous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, Mahdi; Jankovic, Igor; Allen-King, Richelle M.; Rabideau, Alan J.; Kalinovich, Indra; Weissmann, Gary S.

    2014-11-01

    This work investigated the impacts of permeability and sorption heterogeneity on contaminant transport in groundwater using simulation experiments designed to elucidate the causes of tailing. The effects of advection, diffusion and sorption mechanisms and plume history were explored. A simple conceptual model consisting of a single inclusion (heterogeneity) of uniform hydraulic conductivity K and sorption distribution coefficient Kd was adopted. The 3D inclusion, shaped as a horizontal oblate ellipsoid of variable thickness, was placed in a homogeneous anisotropic background of different hydraulic conductivity and sorption distribution coefficient. The background represents average K and Kd of a heterogeneous porous formation. A closed-form analytic flow solution for uniform flow past the inclusion was coupled with a numerical transport solution to simulate contaminant migration for a wide range of transport parameters and two distinct source conditions. Over 2600 numerical simulations were performed in parallel. Transport results were presented in terms of travel time distributions at a control plane downstream of the inclusion and used to quantify tailing for a wide range of transport parameters, in order to separate advection-dominated from diffusion-dominated transport regime and to investigate effects of inclusion shape, diffusion, sorption and plume history on tailing.

  17. Detection of Plastic Explosive Traces in the Human Thermal Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowadia, Huban A.; Settles, Gary S.

    1998-11-01

    Aviation security requires the detection of explosive devices which terrorists, posing as passengers, may conceal beneath their clothing. Our goal is to understand the generation, transport, and collection of trace signals from such concealed explosives, which are found in the natural convective plume produced by the human body. Previous work (APS/DFD96, CG10) has visualized this plume and shown that concealed volatile explosives (e.g. TNT) produce a detectable vapor signal therein. Plastic explosives, on the other hand, have vanishingly low vapor pressures and are thus considered very difficult to detect. Present experiments use a dispersal chamber to collect and sample the plumes of human subjects wearing concealed gauze patches containing milligrams of RDX, the primary component of plastic explosives such as C-4. These experiments address the effects of agitation, clothing, temperature and humidity on trace detectability. Further experiments address the effects of oily vs. dry skin, contaminated clothing vs. gauze patches, and residual contamination left on skin previously in contact with RDX. The key role of airborne contaminated textile fibers is noted. Knowledge thus gained contributes to the design of an explosive detection portal for aviation security screening. (Research supported by FAA Grant 93-G-052.)

  18. THE STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF SOLAR PLUMES: NETWORK PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, A.; Tison, E.; Bely-Dubau, F.; Wilhelm, K.

    2009-07-20

    This study is based upon plumes seen close to the solar limb within coronal holes in the emission from ions formed in the temperature region of 1 MK, in particular, the band of Fe IX 171 A from EIT on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. It is shown, using geometric arguments, that two distinct classes of structure contribute to apparently similar plume observations. Quasi-cylindrical structures are anchored in discrete regions of the solar surface (beam plumes), and faint extended structures require integration along the line of sight (LOS) in order to reproduce the observed brightness. This second category, sometimes called 'curtains', are ubiquitous within the polar holes and are usually more abundant than the beam plumes, which depend more on the enhanced magnetic structures detected at their footpoints. It is here proposed that both phenomena are based on plasma structures in which emerging magnetic loops interact with ambient monopolar fields, involving reconnection. The important difference is in terms of physical scale. It is proposed that curtains are composed of a large number of microplumes, distributed along the LOS. The supergranule network provides the required spatial structure. It is shown by modeling that the observations can be reproduced if microplumes are concentrated within some 5 Mm of the cell boundaries. For this reason, we propose to call this second population 'network plumes'. The processes involved could represent a major contribution to the heating mechanism of the solar corona.

  19. Non-intrusive characterization methods for wastewater-affected groundwater plumes discharging to an alpine lake.

    PubMed

    Roy, James W; Robillard, Jasen M; Watson, Susan B; Hayashi, Masaki

    2009-02-01

    Streams and lakes in rocky environments are especially susceptible to nutrient loading from wastewater-affected groundwater plumes. However, the use of invasive techniques such as drilling wells, installing piezometers or seepage meters, to detect and characterize these plumes can be prohibitive. In this work, we report on the use of four non-intrusive methods for this purpose at a site in the Rocky Mountains. The methods included non-invasive geophysical surveys of subsurface electrical conductivity (EC), in-situ EC measurement of discharging groundwater at the lake-sediment interface, shoreline water sampling and nutrient analysis, and shoreline periphyton sampling and analysis of biomass and taxa relative abundance. The geophysical surveys were able to detect and delineate two high-EC plumes, with capacitively coupled ERI (OhmMapper) providing detailed two-dimensional images. In situ measurements at the suspected discharge locations confirmed the presence of high-EC water in the two plumes and corroborated their spatial extent. The nutrient and periphyton results showed that only one of the two high-EC plumes posed a current eutrophication threat, with elevated nitrogen and phosphorus levels, high localized periphyton biomass and major shifts in taxonomic composition to taxa that are commonly associated with anthropogenic nutrient loading. This study highlights the need to use non-intrusive methods in combination, with geophysical and water EC-based methods used for initial detection of wastewater-affected groundwater plumes, and nutrient or periphyton sampling used to characterize their ecological effects. PMID:18253851

  20. Induced Contamination Predictions for JAXA's MPAC&SEED Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steagall, Courtney; Smith, Kendall; Huang, Alvin; Soares, Carlos; Mikatarian, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Externally mounted ISS payloads are exposed to the induced ISS environment, including material outgassing and thruster plume contamination. The Boeing Space Environments Team developed analytical and semiempirical models to predict material outgassing and thruster plume induced contamination. JAXA s SM/MPAC&SEED experiment provides an unique opportunity to compare induced contamination predications with measurements. Analysis results are qualitatively consistent with XPS measurements. Calculated depth of contamination within a factor of 2-3 of measured contamination. Represents extremely good agreement, especially considering long duration of experiment and number of outgassing sources. Despite XPS limitations in quantifying plume contamination, the measured and predicted results are of similar scale for the wake-facing surfaces. JAXA s JEM/MPAC&SEED experiment will also be exposed to induced contamination due to JEM and ISS hardware. Predicted material outgassing induced contamination to JEM/MPAC&SEED ranges from 44 to 262 (depending on surface temperature) for a 3 year exposure duration.

  1. 30 CFR 282.22 - Delineation Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delineation Plan. 282.22 Section 282.22 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... that the seafloor is left free of obstructions or structures that may present a hazard to other uses...

  2. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tract delineation. 3922.40 Section 3922.40 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40...

  3. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tract delineation. 3922.40 Section 3922.40 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing §...

  4. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Pencil, Eric J.; Carter, Justin; Heminger, Jason; Gatsonis, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) are currently baselined for the Air Force Mightysat II.1 flight in 1999 and are under consideration for a number of other missions for primary propulsion, precision positioning, and attitude control functions. In this work, PPT plumes were characterized to assess their contamination characteristics. Diagnostics included planar and cylindrical Langmuir probes and a large number of collimated quartz contamination sensors. Measurements were made using a LES 8/9 flight PPT at 0.24, 0.39, 0.55, and 1.2 m from the thruster, as well as in the backflow region behind the thruster. Plasma measurements revealed a peak centerline ion density and velocity of approx. 6 x 10(exp 12) cm(exp -3) and 42,000 m/s, respectively. Optical transmittance measurements of the quartz sensors after 2 x 10(exp 5) pulses showed a rapid decrease in plume contamination with increasing angle from the plume axis, with a barely measurable transmittance decrease in the ultraviolet at 90 deg. No change in optical properties was detected for sensors in the backflow region.

  5. Capture of the Canary mantle plume material by the Gibraltar arc mantle wedge during slab rollback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mériaux, C. A.; Duarte, J. C.; Duarte, S. S.; Schellart, W. P.; Chen, Z.; Rosas, F.; Mata, J.; Terrinha, P.

    2015-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a portion of the Canary plume travelled northeastwards below the lithosphere of the Atlas Mountains in North Africa towards the Alboran domain and was captured ˜10 Ma ago by the Gibraltar subduction system in the Western Mediterranean. The capture would have been associated with the mantle return flow induced by the westward-retreating slab that would have dragged and trapped a portion of the plume material in the mantle wedge of the Gibraltar subduction zone. Such material eventually contaminated the subduction related volcanism in the Alboran region. In this work, we use scaled analogue models of slab-plume interaction to investigate the plausibility of the plume capture. An upper-mantle-scaled model combines a narrow (400 km) edge-fixed subduction plate with a laterally offset compositional plume. The subduction dominated by slab rollback and toroidal mantle flow is seen to increasingly impact on the plume dynamics as the area of influence of the toroidal flow cells at the surface is up to 500 × 1350 km2. While the plume head initially spreads axisymmetrically, it starts being distorted parallel to the plate in the direction of the trench as the slab trench approaches the plume edge at a separation distance of about 500 km, before getting dragged towards mantle wedge. When applied to the Canary plume-Gibraltar subduction system, our model supports the observationally based conceptual model that mantle plume material may have been dragged towards the mantle wedge by slab rollback-induced toroidal mantle flow. Using a scaling argument for the spreading of a gravity current within a channel, we also show that more than 1500 km of plume propagation in the sublithospheric Atlas corridor is dynamically plausible.

  6. Overview of NASA GRCs Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Testing and Plume Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Yim, John T.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The models describe the pressure, temperature, density, Mach number, and species concentration of the AF-M315E thruster exhaust plumes. The models are being used to assess the impingement effects of the AF-M315E thrusters on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters will be tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. The GRC thruster testing will be conducted at duty cycles representatives of the planned GPIM maneuvers. A suite of laser-based diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, Schlieren imaging, and physical probes will be used to acquire plume measurements of AFM315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  7. Pb - Isotopes and Pulses of the Deccan Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, A. R.; Yannopoulos, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle plumes are generally implicated for flood basalt generation in both continental and oceanic environments by impact of large plume heads beneath or within the lithosphere. The Deccan and Siberian flood basalt eruptions, synchronous with the Cretaceous-Paleogene and end-Permian extinctions, respectively, continue to fascinate geoscientists in search for the "kill-mechanisms" by impacts, volcanisms or both. Recently, Richards et al. (2015) proposed that bulk of the Deccan eruption was triggered by the Chicxulub impact. We showed (Basu et al., 1993) that early (68.5 Ma) and late (65 Ma) alkalic pulses of the Deccan were before and after the impact event at 66 Ma. Here, we focus on an extensive volcano-stratigraphic study of Pb isotopic systematics of 69 basaltic samples from 3 subgroups and 12 formations of the Deccan, each sampled from bottom to top along the stratigraphic section, covering the 3km thick 12 Deccan formations. Pb is sensitive to crustal contamination of mantle plume-derived magmas as both the upper and lower mantle are low in Pb (0.02 - 0.15 ppm) compared to ~ 4 ppm in continental crust. The lower Deccan formations of Kalsubai and Lonavala have initial 206Pb/204Pb with a widely varying range (16.543 - 22.823) indicating continental crustal contamination. In contrast, the upper formations of the Wai subgroup show a narrow range of 16.883 to 18.956, reflecting the plume signature. In addition, the 206Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb data of the Kalsubai subgroup lavas give an isochron age of 2603±140 Ma (single-stage, µ = 8). The Wai subgroup shows a narrow and restricted Pb isotopic range plotting closer to the Geochron. We interpret these data to infer that the basement rocks of the Deccan, the Archean Indian craton, were assimilated by the upwelling melt, ultimately clearing the conduit passages for the lavas sourced from direct melting of the plume head.

  8. Tomographic reconstruction of polar plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchère, F.; Guennou, C.; Barbey, N.

    2012-06-01

    We present a tomographic reconstruction of polar plumes as observed in the Extreme Ultraviolet in January 2010. Plumes are elusive structures visible in polar coronal holes that may play an important role in the acceleration of the solar wind. However, despite numerous observations, little is irrefutably known about them. Because of line of sight effects, even their geometry is subject to debate. Are they genuine cylindrical features of the corona or are they only chance alignments along the line of sight? Tomography provides a means to reconstruct the volume of an optically thin object from a set of observations taken from different vantage points. In the case of the Sun, these are typically obtained by using a solar rotation worth of images, which limits the ability to reconstruct short lived structures. We present here a tomographic inversion of the solar corona obtained using only 6 days of data. This is achieved by using simultaneously three space telescopes (EUVI/STEREO and SWAP/PROBA2) in a very specific orbital configuration. The result is the shortest possible tomographic snapshot of polar plumes. The 3D reconstruction shows both quasi-cylindrical plumes and a network pattern that can mimic them by line of sight superimpositions. This suggests that the controversy on plume geometry is due to the coexistence of both types of structures.

  9. Stationary Plasma Thruster Plume Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary Plasma Thrusters (SPT's) are being investigated for application to a variety of near-term missions. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the thruster plume characteristics which are needed to assess spacecraft integration requirements. Langmuir probes, planar probes, Faraday cups, and a retarding potential analyzer were used to measure plume properties. For the design operating voltage of 300 V the centerline electron density was found to decrease from approximately 1.8 x 10 exp 17 cubic meters at a distance of 0.3 m to 1.8 X 10 exp 14 cubic meters at a distance of 4 m from the thruster. The electron temperature over the same region was between 1.7 and 3.5 eV. Ion current density measurements showed that the plume was sharply peaked, dropping by a factor of 2.6 within 22 degrees of centerline. The ion energy 4 m from the thruster and 15 degrees off-centerline was approximately 270 V. The thruster cathode flow rate and facility pressure were found to strongly affect the plume properties. In addition to the plume measurements, the data from the various probe types were used to assess the impact of probe design criteria

  10. Hot rocket plume experiment - Survey and conceptual design. [of rhenium-iridium bipropellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, Jerry M.; Luan, Taylor W.; Dowdy, Mack W.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a space-borne engine plume experiment study to fly an experiment which will both verify and quantify the reduced contamination from advanced rhenium-iridium earth-storable bipropellant rockets (hot rockets) and provide a correlation between high-fidelity, in-space measurements and theoretical plume and surface contamination models. The experiment conceptual design is based on survey results from plume and contamination technologists throughout the U.S. With respect to shuttle use, cursory investigations validate Hitchhiker availability and adaptability, adequate remote manipulator system (RMS) articulation and dynamic capability, acceptable RMS attachment capability, adequate power and telemetry capability, and adequate flight altitude and attitude/orbital capability.

  11. Lidar sounding of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorani, Luca; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Angelini, Federico; Borelli, Rodolfo; Del Franco, Mario; Murra, Daniele; Pistilli, Marco; Puiu, Adriana; Santoro, Simone

    2013-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of gas composition in volcanic plumes has high scientific and societal value. On the one hand, it gives information on the geophysical processes taking place inside volcanos; on the other hand, it provides alert on possible eruptions. For this reasons, it has been suggested to monitor volcanic plumes by lidar. In particular, one of the aims of the FP7 ERC project BRIDGE is the measurement of CO2 concentration in volcanic gases by differential absorption lidar. This is a very challenging task due to the harsh environment, the narrowness and weakness of the CO2 absorption lines and the difficulty to procure a suitable laser source. This paper, after a review on remote sensing of volcanic plumes, reports on the current progress of the lidar system.

  12. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology

  13. Simulation of Europa's water plume .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, A.; Cremonese, G.; Schneider, N. M.; Plainaki, C.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Palumbo, P.

    Plumes on Europa would be extremely interesting science and mission targets, particularly due to the unique opportunity to obtain direct information on the subsurface composition, thereby addressing Europa's potential habitability. The existence of water plume on the Jupiter's moon Europa has been long speculated until the recent discover. HST imaged surpluses of hydrogen Lyman alpha and oxygen emissions above the southern hemisphere in December 2012 that are consistent with two 200 km high plumes of water vapor (Roth et al. 2013). In previous works ballistic cryovolcanism has been considered and modeled as a possible mechanism for the formation of low-albedo features on Europa's surface (Fagents et al. 2000). Our simulation agrees with the model of Fagents et al. (2000) and consists of icy particles that follow ballistic trajectories. The goal of such an analysis is to define the height, the distribution and the extension of the icy particles falling on the moon's surface as well as the thickness of the deposited layer. We expect to observe high albedo regions in contrast with the background albedo of Europa surface since we consider that material falling after a cryovolcanic plume consists of snow. In order to understand if this phenomenon is detectable we convert the particles deposit in a pixel image of albedo data. We consider also the limb view of the plume because, even if this detection requires optimal viewing geometry, it is easier detectable in principle against sky. Furthermore, we are studying the loss rates due to impact electron dissociation and ionization to understand how these reactions decrease the intensity of the phenomenon. We expect to obtain constraints on imaging requirements necessary to detect potential plumes that could be useful for ESA's JUICE mission, and in particular for the JANUS camera (Palumbo et al. 2014).

  14. Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multi–element Contaminated, Organic–rich Subsurface Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

    2014-03-02

    Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mössbauer, µ-XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments’ solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi – element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 µm) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZ’s complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

  15. Mobile Bay turbidity plume study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory and field transmissometer studies on the effect of suspended particulate material upon the appearance of water are reported. Quantitative correlations were developed between remotely sensed image density, optical sea truth data, and actual sediment load. Evaluation of satellite image sea truth data for an offshore plume projects contours of transmissivity for two different tidal phases. Data clearly demonstrate the speed of change and movement of the optical plume for water patterns associated with the mouth of Mobile bay in which relatively clear Gulf of Mexico water enters the bay on the eastern side. Data show that wind stress in excess of 15 knots has a marked impact in producing suspended sediment loads.

  16. Assessment of natural attenuation of ground-water contamination at sites FT03, LF13, and WP14/LF15, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

    2002-01-01

    source areas, and (6) determine whether intrinsic biodegradation is occurring at these sites.The water-quality data indicate that intrinsic biodegradation is occurring at all three sites. The strongest indication of intrinsic biodegradation is the detection of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene breakdown products within and down-gradient of the source areas. The patterns of electron acceptors and metabolic by-products indicate that contaminant biodegradation has changed the prevailing geochemistry of the surficial aquifer, creating the strongly reducing conditions necessary for chlorinated solvent bio-degradation. Geochemical changes include depleted dissolved oxygen and elevated ferrous iron and methane levels relative to concentrations in uncontaminated zones of the surficial aquifer. At Fire Training Area Three and the Rubble Area Landfill sites, natural attenuation appears to be adequate for controlling the migration of the contaminant plumes. At the third site, the Liquid Waste Disposal and Receiver Station Landfills, the plume is larger and the uncertainty about the effectiveness of natural attenuation in reducing contaminant concentrations and controlling plume migration is greater. Ground-water data indicate, however, that U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels were not exceeded in any point-of-compliance wells located along the Base boundary.The information presented in this report led to the development of improved conceptual models for these sites, and to the recognition of four issues that are currently unclear and may need further study. These issues include delineating the areal and vertical extent of the contaminant plumes in greater detail, determining the extent of intrinsic biodegradation downgradient of the Liquid Waste Disposal and Receiver Station Landfills, deter-mining the fate of contaminants in the ground-water discharge areas, and determining the effect of temporal variability in source concentrations and ground-water

  17. Delineation, characterization, and classification of topographic eminences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Gaurav

    Topographic eminences are defined as upwardly rising, convex shaped topographic landforms that are noticeably distinct in their immediate surroundings. As opposed to everyday objects, the properties of a topographic eminence are dependent not only on how it is conceptualized, but is also intrinsically related to its spatial extent and its relative location in the landscape. In this thesis, a system for automated detection, delineation and characterization of topographic eminences based on an analysis of digital elevation models is proposed. Research has shown that conceptualization of eminences (and other landforms) is linked to the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of people. However, the perception of stimuli from our physical environment is not subject to cultural or linguistic bias. Hence, perceptually salient morphological and spatial properties of the natural landscape can form the basis for generically applicable detection and delineation of topographic eminences. Six principles of cognitive eminence modeling are introduced to develop the philosophical foundation of this research regarding eminence delineation and characterization. The first step in delineating eminences is to automatically detect their presence within digital elevation models. This is achieved by the use of quantitative geomorphometric parameters (e.g., elevation, slope and curvature) and qualitative geomorphometric features (e.g., peaks, passes, pits, ridgelines, and valley lines). The process of eminence delineation follows that of eminence detection. It is posited that eminences may be perceived either as monolithic terrain objects, or as composites of morphological parts (e.g., top, bottom, slope). Individual eminences may also simultaneously be conceived as comprising larger, higher order eminence complexes (e.g., mountain ranges). Multiple algorithms are presented for the delineation of simple and complex eminences, and the morphological parts of eminences. The proposed eminence

  18. Delineation of fault zones using imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Gulen, L.; Prange, M.; Matarese, J.; Pettengill, G. H.; Ford, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    The assessment of earthquake hazards and mineral and oil potential of a given region requires a detailed knowledge of geological structure, including the configuration of faults. Delineation of faults is traditionally based on three types of data: (1) seismicity data, which shows the location and magnitude of earthquake activity; (2) field mapping, which in remote areas is typically incomplete and of insufficient accuracy; and (3) remote sensing, including LANDSAT images and high altitude photography. Recently, high resolution radar images of tectonically active regions have been obtained by SEASAT and Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A and SIR-B) systems. These radar images are sensitive to terrain slope variations and emphasize the topographic signatures of fault zones. Techniques were developed for using the radar data in conjunction with the traditional types of data to delineate major faults in well-known test sites, and to extend interpretation techniques to remote areas.

  19. PERFORMANCE MONITORING OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  20. Importance of closely spaced vertical sampling in delineating chemical and microbiological gradients in groundwater studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume. A 27-fold change in bacterial abundance; a 35-fold change in frequency of dividing cells (FDC), an indicator of bacterial growth; a 23-fold change in 3H-glucose uptake, a measure of heterotrophic activity; and substantial changes in overall cell morphology were evident within a 9-m vertical interval at 250 m downgradient. The existence of these gradients argues for the need for closely spaced vertical sampling in groundwater studies because small differences in the vertical placement of a well screen can lead to incorrect conclusions about the chemical and microbiological processes within an aquifer.Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume

  1. Computer Aids Delineation Of Boundaries In Farmlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slyle, R.; Cheng, T.; Ma, M.; Angelici, G.

    1992-01-01

    Computer-aided stratification (CAS) procedure developmental procedure of image-processing computer equipment and programs partly automating delineation of boundaries between areas. These areas, "primary sampling units", are images of primarily agricultural lands composed by melding digital Landsat Thematic Mapper data and Digital Line Graph data from United States Geological Survey. CAS output data used as inputs for subsequent sampling procedures from which statistics on uses of agricultural lands developed.

  2. Dynamics of laser ablated colliding plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shyam L.; Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-01-15

    We report the dynamics of single and two collinearly colliding laser ablated plumes of ZnO studied using fast imaging and the spectroscopic measurements. Two dimensional imaging of expanding plume and temporal evolution of various species in interacting zones of plumes are used to calculate plume front velocity, electron temperature, and density of plasma. The two expanding plumes interact with each other at early stage of expansion ({approx}20 ns) resulting in an interaction zone that propagates further leading to the formation of stagnation layer at later times (>150 ns) at the lateral collision front of two plumes. Colliding plumes have larger concentration of higher ionic species, higher temperature, and increased electron density in the stagnation region. A one-to-one correlation between the imaging and optical emission spectroscopic observations in interaction zone of the colliding plumes is reported.

  3. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  4. Smoke Plume Over Eastern Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In late May, a massive smoke plume hundreds of kilometers across blew eastward over New Brunswick toward the Atlantic Ocean. On May 26, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image at 11:40 a.m. local time. By the time MODIS took this picture, the smoke appeared to have completely detached itself from the source, a large fire burning in southwestern Quebec, beyond the western edge of this image. In this image, the smoke appears as a gray-beige opaque mass with fuzzy, translucent edges. The plume is thickest in the southwest and diminishes toward the northeast. Just southwest of the plume is a red outline indicating a hotspot an area where MODIS detected anomalously warm surface temperatures, such as those resulting from fires. This hotspot, however, is not the source for this smoke plume. According to a bulletin from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the southwestern Quebec fire was the source. According to reports from the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre on May 29, that fire was estimated at 63,211 hectares (156,197 acres), and it was classified as 'being held.' At the same time, more than 20 wildfires burned in Quebec, news sources reported, and firefighters from other Canadian provinces and the United States had been brought in to provide reinforcements for the area's firefighters.

  5. ASRM plume deflector analysis program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Michael C.; Douglas, Freddie, III; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents analytical conclusions resulting from subscale solid rocket motor tests and flowfield modeling for a plume deflector. Loads, flow characteristics, and corresponding material behavior were predicted or observed and will be used in final design of the deflector. The efforts resulted in quantifiable size reductions and lower cost material selections, which will significantly reduce the deflector cost while meeting performance requirements.

  6. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Hammer, J.H.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

  7. Chesapeake Bay plume dynamics from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, J. C., Jr.; Fedosh, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT images with enhancement and density slicing show that the Chesapeake Bay plume usually frequents the Virginia coast south of the Bay mouth. Southwestern (compared to northern) winds spread the plume easterly over a large area. Ebb tide images (compared to flood tide images) show a more dispersed plume. Flooding waters produce high turbidity levels over the shallow northern portion of the Bay mouth.

  8. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  9. Types of thermal plumes in coastal waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, T.; Madding, R.; Scarpace, F.

    1977-01-01

    A large number of thermal images of the surface temperatures of the thermal plumes associated with the once-through cooling of electric power plants show that four kinds of plume occur sufficiently often to be classified as distinct plume types. Each type has implications for both numerical models and measurement strategies.

  10. Field note: hydraulic containment of a BTEX plume using poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Barac, Tanja; Weyens, Nele; Oeyen, Licy; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Dubin, Dirk; Spliet, Marco; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2009-07-01

    In 1999, 275 poplar trees were planted on a field site near a car factory in order to install a bioscreen. The aim was to combine the biodegradation activities of poplar and its associated rhizosphere and endophytic microorganisms for containing a BTEX contaminated groundwater plume. This BTEX plume occurred as the result of leaking solvents and fuel storage tanks. Monitoring, conducted overa 6-year period (1999-2005) after the planting of the trees suggested that the poplar trees and their associated microorganisms had, once the tree roots reached the contaminated groundwater zone, an active role in the remediation of the BTEX plume, resulting in full containment of the contamination. Analysis of the microbial communities associated with poplar demonstrated that, once the poplar roots got in contact with the BTEX contaminated groundwater, enrichment occurred of both rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria that were able to degrade toluene. Interestingly, once the BTEX plume was remediated, the numbers of toluene degrading rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria decreased below the detection limit, indicating that their population resulted from selective enrichment by the presence of the contaminants. PMID:19810345

  11. A young source for the Hawaiian plume.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Alexander V; Hofmann, Albrecht W; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Kuzmin, Dmitry V; Stoll, Brigitte

    2011-08-25

    Recycling of oceanic crust through subduction, mantle upwelling, and remelting in mantle plumes is a widely accepted mechanism to explain ocean island volcanism. The timescale of this recycling is important to our understanding of mantle circulation rates. Correlations of uranogenic lead isotopes in lavas from ocean islands such as Hawaii or Iceland, when interpreted as model isochrons, have yielded source differentiation ages between 1 and 2.5 billion years (Gyr). However, if such correlations are produced by mixing of unrelated mantle components they will have no direct age significance. Re-Os decay model ages take into account the mixing of sources with different histories, but they depend on the assumed initial Re/Os ratio of the subducted crust, which is poorly constrained because of the high mobility of rhenium during subduction. Here we report the first data on (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios for 138 melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from lavas of Mauna Loa shield volcano, Hawaii, indicating enormous mantle source heterogeneity. We show that highly radiogenic strontium in severely rubidium-depleted melt inclusions matches the isotopic composition of 200-650-Myr-old sea water. We infer that such sea water must have contaminated the Mauna Loa source rock, before subduction, imparting a unique 'time stamp' on this source. Small amounts of seawater-derived strontium in plume sources may be common but can be identified clearly only in ultra-depleted melts originating from generally highly (incompatible-element) depleted source components. The presence of 200-650-Myr-old oceanic crust in the source of Hawaiian lavas implies a timescale of general mantle circulation with an average rate of about 2 (±1) cm yr(-1), much faster than previously thought. PMID:21832996

  12. Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-08-24

    The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.

  13. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  14. Biogeochemical characterisation of a coal tar distillate plume.

    PubMed

    Williams, G M; Pickup, R W; Thornton, S F; Lerner, D N; Mallinson, H E; Moore, Y; White, C

    2001-12-15

    The distillation of acidified coal tars for up to 50 years has given rise to a phenol plume approximately 500 m long, 50 m deep and containing up to 15 g l(-1) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the Triassic Sandstones aquifer. A conceptual biogeochemical model based on chemical and microbiological analysis of groundwater samples has been developed as a preliminary to more detailed studies of the controls on natural attenuation. While the development of redox zones and the production of methane and carbon dioxide provide evidence of natural attenuation, it appears that degradation is slow. The existence of sulphate in the plume indicates that this electron acceptor has not been depleted and that consequently methanogenesis is probably limited. Based on a simple estimate of sulphate input concentration, a half-life of about 15 years has been estimated for sulphate reduction. Geochemical modelling predicts that increased alkalinity within the plume has not led to carbonate precipitation, and thus within the limits of accuracy of the measurement, alkalinity may reflect the degree of biodegradation. This implies a loss of around 18% of the DOC over a 30-year period. Despite limited degradation, microbial studies show that there are diverse microbial communities in the aquifer with the potential for both anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation. Microbial activity was found to be greatest at the leading edge of the plume where DOC concentrations are 60 mg l(-1) or less, but activity could still be observed in more contaminated samples even though cells could not be cultured. The study suggests that degradation may be limited by the high phenol concentrations within the core of the plume, but that once diluted by dispersion, natural attenuation may proceed. More detailed studies to confirm these initial findings are identified and form the basis of associated papers. PMID:11820470

  15. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: secondary effects of natural attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Ziegler, Brady A.

    2016-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230 µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5 µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  16. Arsenic Cycling in Hydrocarbon Plumes: Secondary Effects of Natural Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Schreiber, Madeline E; Erickson, Melinda L; Ziegler, Brady A

    2016-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230 µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5 µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction. PMID:25612004

  17. Velocity control as a tool for optimal plume containment in the Equus Beds aquifer, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidari, M.; Sadeghipour, J.; Drici, O.

    1987-01-01

    A ground-water-management model was developed to investigate the best management options for the containment of an oil-field-brine plume in the Equus Beds aquifer in south-central Kansas. The main purpose of the management model was to find the optimal locations and minimum rates of pumpage of a set of plume-interception wells, to successfully reverse the velocity vectors at observation wells located along the plume front, and also to satisfy freshwater demands from supply wells. The effects of the calculated minimum withdrawals from the interception wells on the migration of contaminants throughout the ground-water system were evaluated utilizing a solute-transport model. This latter analysis was carried out to ensure the containment of the plume. Whereas application of the management model to the study area achieves the management objectives, the implementation of the results is believed to be impractical and expensive.

  18. FIELD-DRIVEN APPROACHES TO SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT MODELING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations from field sites provide a means for prioritizing research activities. In the case of petroleum releases, observations may include spiking of concentration distributions that may be related to water table fluctuation, co-location of contaminant plumes with geochemi...

  19. Influence Of Groundwater Discharge On Arsenic Contamination In Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field investigation was conducted to evaluate the impact of a discharging arsenic plume on sediment contaminant characteristics at a site adjacent to a landfill in northeastern Massachusetts. Site characterization included assessment of the hydrologic and chemical samples coll...

  20. IUS solid rocket motor contamination prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Kearnes, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A series of computer codes were developed to predict solid rocket motor produced contamination to spacecraft sensitive surfaces. Subscale and flight test data have confirmed some of the analytical results. Application of the analysis tools to a typical spacecraft has provided early identification of potential spacecraft contamination problems and provided insight into their solution; e.g., flight plan modifications, plume or outgassing shields and/or contamination covers.

  1. Detection of Metallic Compounds in Rocket Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Chris; Dunn, Dr. Robert

    1998-04-01

    Recent experiments using metal mixed in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) fuel grains in small hybrid rocket indicates ion detectors may be effective in detection of metallic compounds in rocket plumes. We wanted to ascertain the extent to which the presence of metallic compounds in rocket plumes could be detected using ion probes and Gaussian rings. Charges that collide with or pass near the intruding probe are detected. Gaussian rings, short insulated cylindrical Gaussian surfaces, enclose the plume without intruding into the plume. Charges in the plume are detected by currents they induce in the cylinder.

  2. Liquid Booster Module (LBM) plume flowfield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    A complete definition of the LBM plume is important for many Shuttle design criteria. The exhaust plume shape has a significant effect on the vehicle base pressure. The LBM definition is also important to the Shuttle base heating, aerodynamics and the influence of the exhaust plume on the launch stand and environment. For these reasons a knowledge of the LBM plume characteristics is necessary. A definition of the sea level LBM plume as well as at several points along the Shuttle trajectory to LBM, burnout is presented.

  3. Transition Flow Effects On Plume Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgin, James B.

    1983-07-01

    A calculational comparison of a free molecular plume code (HAPAIR: High Altitude Plume-Atmosphere Interaction Radiation) and a Monte-Carlo Plume Code (TRAMP: Transitional and Rarefied Axisymmetric Monte-carlo Plume) is made for a selected sequence of cases going from a free molecular (Kn = 15) to a highl transitional (Kn = 0.07) flow regime. Results are presented which document the breakdown of free molecular flow assumptions in the transition regime and show the effect on the critical physical processes responsible for plume emission.

  4. Compositional differentiation of Enceladus' plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, N.; Postberg, F.; Schmidt, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on board the Cassini spacecraft sampled Enceladus' plume ice particles emanated directly from Enceladus' fractured south polar terrain (SPT), the so-called "Tiger Stripes", during two consecutive flybys (E17 and E18) in 2012. The spacecraft passed through the dense plume with a moderate velocity of ~7.5km/s, horizontally to the SPT with a closest approach (CA) at an altitude of ~75km almost directly over the south pole. In both flybys, spectra were recorded during a time interval of ~ ±3 minutes with respect to the closest approach achieving an average sampling rate of about 0.6 sec-1. We assume that the spacecraft passed through the plume during an interval of about ±60(sec) from the CA. Particles encountered before and after this period are predominately from the E-ring background in which Enceladus is embedded. Most CDA TOF-mass spectra are identified as one of three compositional types: (i) almost pure water (ii) organic rich and (iii) salt rich [2]. A Boxcar Analysis (BCA) is performed from a count database for compositional mapping of the plume along the space-craft trajectory. In BCA, counts of each spectrum type are integrated for a certain interval of time (box size). The integral of counts represents frequencies of compositional types in absolute abundances, which are converted later into proportions. This technique has been proven to be a suitable for inferring the compositional profiles from an earlier flyby (E5) [1]. The inferred compositional profiles show similar trends on E17 and E18. The abundances of different compositional types in the plume clearly differ from the Ering background and imply a compositional differentiation inside the plume. Following up the work of Schmidt et al, 2008 and Postberg et al, 2011 we can link different compositional types to different origins. The E17/E18 results are compared with the E5 flyby in 2008, which yielded the currently best compositional profile [2] but was executed at much

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Northwest Plume, Paducah, KY, July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Northwest Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this interim remedial action is to initiate a first phase remedial action, as an interim action to initiate control of the source and mitigate the spread of contamination in the Northwest plume. This operable unit addresses a portion of the contaminated ground water. Additional interim actions associated with this integrator operable unit are being considered, as well as for other areas of contaminated ground water.

  6. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Hammer, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  7. Infrared recordings for characterizing an aircraft plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retief, S. J. P.; Dreyer, M. M.; Brink, C.

    2014-06-01

    Some key electro-optical measurements required to characterize an aircraft plume for automated recognition are shown, as well as some aspects of the processing and use of these measurements. Plume measurements with Short Wavelength Infrared (1.1 - 2.5 um), Mid-Wavelength Infrared (2.5 - 7 um) and Long Wavelength Infrared (7 - 15 um) cameras are presented, as well as spectroradiometer measurements covering the whole Mid-Wavelength, Long Wavelength and upper part of the Short Wavelength Infrared bands. The two limiting factors for the detection of the plume, i.e. the atmospheric transmission bands and the plume emission bands, are discussed, and it is shown how a micro turbine engine can assist in aircraft plume studies. One such a study, regarding the differentiation between an aircraft plume and a blackbody emitter using subbands in the Mid-Wavelength Infrared, is presented. The factors influencing aircraft plume emission are discussed, and the measurements required to characterize an aircraft plume for the purpose of constructing a mathematical plume model are indicated. Since the required measurements are prescribed by the plume model requirements, a brief overview of the plume model, that can be used to simulate the results of the plume's emission under different conditions and observation configurations, is given. Such a model can be used to test the robustness of algorithms, like the mentioned subband method, for identifying aircraft plumes. Such a model furthermore enables the simulation of measurements that would be obtained by an electro-optical system, like an infrared seekerhead of a missile, of a plume for the purpose of algorithm training under various simulated environmental conditions.

  8. Improved site contamination through time-lapse complex resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Orozco, Adrian; Kemna, Andreas; Cassiani, Giorgio; Binley, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the EU FP7 project ModelPROBE, time-lapse complex resistivity (CR) measurements were conducted at a test site close to Trecate (NW Italy). The objective was to investigate the capabilities of the CR imaging method to delineate the geometry and dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon contaminant plume which resulted from a crude oil spill in 1994. To achieve this it is required to discriminate the electrical signal associated to static (i.e., lithology) from dynamic changes in the subsurface, with the latter associated to significant seasonal groundwater fluctuations. Previous studies have demonstrated the benefits of the CR method to gain information which is not accessible with common electrical resistivity tomography. However field applications are still rarely and neither the analysis of the data error for CR time-lapse measurements, nor the inversion itself haven not received enough attention. While the ultimate objective at the site is to characterize, here we address the discrimination of the lithological and hydrological controls on the IP response by considering data collected in an uncontaminated area of the site. In this study we demonstrate that an adequate error description of CR measurements provides images free of artifacts and quantitative superior than previous approaches. Based on this approach, differential images computed for time-lapse data exhibited anomalies well correlated with spatiotemporal changes correlated to seasonal fluctuations in the groundwater level. The proposed analysis may be useful in the characterization of fate and transport of hydrocarbon contaminants relevant for the site, which presents areas contaminated with crude oil.

  9. Simplified soil-gas sensing techniques for plume mapping and remediation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; Ostendorf, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Soil gas measurements were taken in a beach sand matrix of the unsaturated zone above a ground water plume contaminated from a spill near 35,000 gallons of aviation gasoline. The soil gas sampling and analysis strategy provided required information for mapping the plume and vertical profile measurements with a minimal expenditure of resources and work time. Analysis of a calibration gas and replicate sampling showed that the apparatus used gave reasonably correct soil gas contituent measurements. Boundaries of the plume were defined and a hot spot was located downgradient from the original spill location. Elevated carbon dioxide above the contaminated capillary fringe indicated microbial respiration activity. A biodegradation model developed from the vertical profile data predicted very low oxygen at the water table and little or no loss of hydrocarbon emissions to the atmosphere.

  10. Irritants in cigarette smoke plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, H.E.; Yeager, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    Concentrations of the irritants formaldehyde and acrolein in side stream cigarette smoke plumes are up to three orders of magnitude above occupational limits, readily accounting for eye and nasal irritation. ''Low-tar'' cigarettes appear at least as irritating as other cigarettes. More than half the irritant is associated with the particulate phase of the smoke, permitting deposition throughout the entire respiratory tract and raising the issue of whether formaldehyde in smoke is associated with bronchial cancer.

  11. The ice plumes of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2014-10-01

    It is of extreme interest to NASA and the scientific community that evidence has been found for plumes of water ice venting from the polar regions of Europa (Roth et al 2014) - spectroscopic detection of off-limb line emission from the dissociation products of water. We were awarded Cycle 21 time to seek direct images of the Europa exosphere, including Enceladus-like plumes if present, basing our study on FUV images of Europa as it transits the smooth face of Jupiter. We also obtained a necessary FUV image of Europa out of transit. These observations provide additional evidence for the presence of ice plumes on Europa. Here, we propose to augment our previous imaging work and to seek an initial, efficient characterization of off-limb emission as Europa orbits Jupiter. Such images provide sensitive flux and column density limits, with exceptional spatial resolution. In transit, our strategy can place firm limits on, or measurements of, absorbing columns, their distribution with altitude above the surface of Europa, and constrain their wavelength dependence and hence composition. Out of transit, geometrical and surface brightness considerations can help us distinguish between continuum FUV emission from forward- or back-scattering, from line emission, or, though we might prefer otherwise, from more subtle instrumental artifacts than hitherto understood. If the ice fountains of Europa arise from the deep ocean, we have gained access to probably the most astrobiologically interesting location in the Solar System.

  12. Origin of VC-only plumes from naturally enhanced dechlorination in a peat-rich hydrogeologic setting.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Maria; Amorosi, Alessandro; Campo, Bruno; Herrero-Martìn, Sara; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Parker, Beth L; Gargini, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of vinyl chloride (VC) is often a main concern at sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents due to its high degree of toxicity and carcinogenicity. VC occurrence in aquifers is most often related to the degradation of higher chlorinated ethenes or ethanes and it is generally detected in plumes along with parent contaminants. However, specific combination of stratigraphic, hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions can enhance the degradation of parents and lead to the formation of plumes almost entirely composed of VC (i.e. VC-only plumes). This paper investigates the causes of VC-only plumes in the aquifers below the city of Ferrara (northern Italy) by combining multiple lines of evidence. The City of Ferrara is located on an alluvial lowland, built by the River Po, and is made up of alternating unconsolidated sandy aquifer and silt-clay aquitard deposits of fluvial origin. This region has been strongly impacted by prior industrial activities, with the occurrence of chlorinated compounds at several sites. VC-only plumes with uncertain source location were found at two contaminated sites. The source zone of a third plume composed of chloroethenes from PCE to VC was investigated for high resolution depositional facies architecture and contaminant distribution (contaminant concentration and Compound Specific Isotope Analysis - CSIA). The investigation suggested that degradation of PCE and TCE takes place during contaminant migration through peat-rich (swamp) layers related to the Holocene transgression, which locally act as a "reactor" for stimulating degradation with the accumulation of VC in the strongly reducing environment of the peat. Regional-scale stratigraphic architecture showed the ubiquitous occurrence of swamp layers at distinct stratigraphic levels in the investigated system and their apparent linkage to the in situ creation of the VC-only plumes. PMID:27451056

  13. Origin of VC-only plumes from naturally enhanced dechlorination in a peat-rich hydrogeologic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippini, Maria; Amorosi, Alessandro; Campo, Bruno; Herrero-Martìn, Sara; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Parker, Beth L.; Gargini, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of vinyl chloride (VC) is often a main concern at sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents due to its high degree of toxicity and carcinogenicity. VC occurrence in aquifers is most often related to the degradation of higher chlorinated ethenes or ethanes and it is generally detected in plumes along with parent contaminants. However, specific combination of stratigraphic, hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions can enhance the degradation of parents and lead to the formation of plumes almost entirely composed of VC (i.e. VC-only plumes). This paper investigates the causes of VC-only plumes in the aquifers below the city of Ferrara (northern Italy) by combining multiple lines of evidence. The City of Ferrara is located on an alluvial lowland, built by the River Po, and is made up of alternating unconsolidated sandy aquifer and silt-clay aquitard deposits of fluvial origin. This region has been strongly impacted by prior industrial activities, with the occurrence of chlorinated compounds at several sites. VC-only plumes with uncertain source location were found at two contaminated sites. The source zone of a third plume composed of chloroethenes from PCE to VC was investigated for high resolution depositional facies architecture and contaminant distribution (contaminant concentration and Compound Specific Isotope Analysis - CSIA). The investigation suggested that degradation of PCE and TCE takes place during contaminant migration through peat-rich (swamp) layers related to the Holocene transgression, which locally act as a "reactor" for stimulating degradation with the accumulation of VC in the strongly reducing environment of the peat. Regional-scale stratigraphic architecture showed the ubiquitous occurrence of swamp layers at distinct stratigraphic levels in the investigated system and their apparent linkage to the in situ creation of the VC-only plumes.

  14. Geophysical Characterization and Reactive Transport Modeling to Quantify Plume Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Wainwright, H.; Bea, S. A.; Spycher, N.; Li, L.; Sassen, D.; Chen, J.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions of subsurface contaminant plume mobility and remediation often fail due to the inability to tractably characterize heterogeneous flow-and-transport properties and monitor critical geochemical transitions over plume-relevant scales. This study presents two recently developed strategies to quantify and predict states and processes across scales that govern plume behavior. Development of both strategies takes advantage of multi-scale and disparate datasets and has involved the use of reactive transport models, geophysical methods, and stochastic integration approaches. The first approach, called reactive facies, exploits coupled physiochemical heterogeneity to characterize subsurface flow and transport properties that impact plume sorption and thus mobility. We develop and test the reactive facies concept within uranium contaminated Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments that underlie the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site, F-Area, South Carolina. Through analysis of field data (core samples, geophysical well logs, and cross-hole ground penetrating radar and seismic datasets) coupled with laboratory sorption studies, we have identified two reactive facies that have unique distributions of mineralogy, texture, porosity, hydraulic conductivity and geophysical attributes. We develop and use facies-based relationships with geophysical data in a Bayesian framework to spatially distribute reactive facies and their associated transport properties and uncertainties along local and plume-scale geophysical transects. To illustrate the value of reactive facies, we used the geophysically-obtained reactive facies properties to parameterize reactive transport models and simulate the migration of an acidic-U(VI) plume through the 2D domains. Modeling results suggest that each identified reactive facies exerts control on plume evolution, highlighting the usefulness of the reactive facies concept and approach for spatially distributing properties that control flow and

  15. Mixing-controlled biodegradation in a toluene plume — Results from two-dimensional laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Robert D.; Maloszewski, Piotr; Zhang, Yanchun; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Griebler, Christian

    2008-02-01

    Various abiotic and biotic processes such as sorption, dilution, and degradation are known to affect the fate of organic contaminants, such as petroleum hydrocarbons in saturated porous media. Reactive transport modeling of such plumes indicates that the biodegradation of organic pollutants is, in many cases, controlled by mixing and therefore occurs locally at the plume's fringes, where electron donors and electron-acceptors mix. Herein, we aim to test whether this hypothesis can be verified by experimental results obtained from aerobic and anaerobic degradation experiments in two-dimensional sediment microcosms. Toluene was selected as a model compound for oxidizable contaminants. The two-dimensional microcosm was filled with quartz sand and operated under controlled flow conditions simulating a contaminant plume in otherwise uncontaminated groundwater. Aerobic degradation of toluene by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 reduced a continuous 8.7 mg L - 1 toluene concentration by 35% over a transport distance of 78 cm in 15.5 h. In comparison, under similar conditions Aromatoleum aromaticum strain EbN1 degraded 98% of the toluene infiltrated using nitrate (68.5 ± 6.2 mg L - 1 ) as electron acceptor. A major part of the biodegradation activity was located at the plume fringes and the slope of the electron-acceptor gradient was steeper during periods of active biodegradation. The distribution of toluene and the significant overlap of nitrate at the plume's fringe indicate that biokinetic and/or microscale transport processes may constitute additional limiting factors. Experimental data is corroborated with results from a reactive transport model using double Monod kinetics. The outcome of the study shows that in order to simulate degradation in contaminant plumes, detailed data sets are required to test the applicability of models. These will have to deal with the incorporation of existing parameters coding for substrate conversion kinetics and microbial growth.

  16. COMPLETE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF A PCE AND TCE PLUME AFTER SOURCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of the chlorinated solvents PCE and TCE at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) resulted in the contamination of groundwater in a shallow, unconsolidated sand aquifer. The resulting plume had moved over 1000 feet from the disposal source area and had impacted p...

  17. Mantle plumes on Venus revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1992-01-01

    The Equatorial Highlands of Venus consist of a series of quasicircular regions of high topography, rising up to about 5 km above the mean planetary radius. These highlands are strongly correlated with positive geoid anomalies, with a peak amplitude of 120 m at Atla Regio. Shield volcanism is observed at Beta, Eistla, Bell, and Atla Regiones and in the Hathor Mons-Innini Mons-Ushas Mons region of the southern hemisphere. Volcanos have also been mapped in Phoebe Regio and flood volcanism is observed in Ovda and Thetis Regiones. Extensional tectonism is also observed in Ovda and Thetis Regiones. Extensional tectonism is also observed in many of these regions. It is now widely accepted that at least Beta, Atla, Eistla, and Bell Regiones are the surface expressions of hot, rising mantel plumes. Upwelling plumes are consistent with both the volcanism and the extensional tectonism observed in these regions. The geoid anomalies and topography of these four regions show considerable variation. Peak geoid anomalies exceed 90 m at Beta and Atla, but are only 40 m at Eistla and 24 m at Bell. Similarly, the peak topography is greater at Beta and Atla than at Eistla and Bell. Such a range of values is not surprising because terrestrial hotspot swells also have a side range of geoid anomalies and topographic uplifts. Kiefer and Hager used cylindrical axisymmetric, steady-state convection calculations to show that mantle plumes can quantitatively account for both the amplitude and the shape of the long-wavelength geoid and topography at Beta and Atla. In these models, most of the topography of these highlands is due to uplift by the vertical normal stress associated with the rising plume. Additional topography may also be present due to crustal thickening by volcanism and crustal thinning by rifting. Smrekar and Phillips have also considered the geoid and topography of plumes on Venus, but they restricted themselves to considering only the geoid-topography ratio and did not

  18. Seismically imaging the Afar plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Stuart, G. W.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Ogubazghi, G.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.

    2011-12-01

    Plume related flood basalt volcanism in Ethiopia has long been cited to have instigated continental breakup in northeast Africa. However, to date seismic images of the mantle beneath the region have not produced conclusive evidence of a plume-like structure. As a result the nature and even existence of a plume in the region and its role in rift initiation and continental rupture are debated. Previous seismic studies using regional deployments of sensors in East-Africa show that low seismic velocities underlie northeast Africa, but their resolution is limited to the top 200-300km of the Earth. Thus, the connection between the low velocities in the uppermost mantle and those imaged in global studies in the lower mantle is unclear. We have combined new data from Afar, Ethiopia with 6 other regional experiments and global network stations across Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and Yemen, to produce high-resolution models of upper mantle P- and S- wave velocities to the base of the transition zone. Relative travel time tomographic inversions show that the top 100km is dominated by focussed low velocity zones, likely associated with melt in the lithosphere/uppermost asthenosphere. Below these depths a broad SW-NE oriented sheet like upwelling extends down to the top of the transition zone. Within the transition zone two focussed sharp-sided low velocity regions exist: one beneath the Western Ethiopian plateau outside the rift valley, and the other beneath the Afar depression. The nature of the transition zone anomalies suggests that small upwellings may rise from a broader low velocity plume-like feature in the lower mantle. This interpretation is supported by numerical and analogue experiments that suggest the 660km phase change and viscosity jump may impede flow from the lower to upper mantle creating a thermal boundary layer at the base of the transition zone. This allows smaller, secondary upwellings to initiate and rise to the surface. Our images of secondary upwellings

  19. Bifurcation of volcanic plumes in a crosswind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Gerald G. J.; Davis, John P.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    1994-08-01

    Bent-over buoyant jets distorted by a crosscurrent develop a vortex pair structure and can bifurcate to produce two distinct lobes which diverge from one another downwind. The region downwind of the source between the lobes has relatively low proportions of discharged fluid. Factors invoked by previous workers to cause or enhance bifurcation include buoyancy, release of latent heat at the plume edge by evaporating water droplets, geometry and orientation of the source, and the encounter with a density interface on the rising path of the plume. We suggest that the pressure distribution around the vortex pair of a rising plume may initially trigger bifurcation. We also report new experimental observations confirming that bifurcation becomes stronger for stronger bent-over plumes, identifying that bifurcation can also occur for straight-edged plumes but gradually disappears for stronger plumes which form a gravity current at their final level and spread for a significant distance against the current. Observations from satellites and the ground are reviewed and confirm that volcanic plumes can show bifurcation and a large range of bifurcation angles. Many of the bifurcating plumes spread out at the tropopause level and suggest the tropopause may act on the plumes as a density interface enhancing bifurcation. Even for quite moderate bifurcation angles, the two plume lobes become rapidly separated downwind by distances of tens of kilometers. Such bifurcating plumes drifting apart can only result in bilobate tephra fall deposits. The tephra fall deposit from the 16 km elevation, SE spreading, bifurcating volcanic plume erupted on 15 May 1981 from Mt Pagan was sampled by previous workers and clearly displayed bilobate characteristics. Examples of bilobate tephra fall deposits are reviewed and their origin briefly discussed. Bilobate deposits are common and may result from many causes. Plume bifurcation should be considered one of the possible mechanisms which can account

  20. SURFACE AND BOREHOLE ELECTROMAGNETIC IMAGING OF CONDUCTING CONTAMINANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component ma...

  1. COMPARISON OF PREDICTED AND OBSERVED PLUME TRENDS AT CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 45 natural attenuation treatability studies (TSs) were performed from 1993 to 1999 by Parsons Corporation (Parsons) for the Technology Transfer Division of the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE/ERT) in conjunction with researchers from the US EPA - NRMRL. ...

  2. On the accuracy of PLIF measurements in slender plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderwel, Christina; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article was to assess the measurement uncertainty of the planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) method and, as much as possible, to devise corrections for predictable biases. More specifically, we considered the measurement of concentration maps in cross sections parallel to and normal to the axis of a slender plume containing Rhodamine 6G as a passive scalar tracer and transported by a turbulent shear flow. In addition to previously examined sources of error related to PLIF, we also investigated several unexplored ones. First, we demonstrated that errors would arise if the laser sheet thickness was comparable to or larger than the thickness of the instantaneous plume. We then investigated the effect of secondary fluorescence, which was attributed to absorption and re-emission of primary fluorescence by dye both within and outside the laser sheet. We found that, if uncorrected, this effect would contaminate the calibration as well as the instantaneous concentration measurements of the plume, and proposed methods for the correction of these errors and for identifying the instantaneous boundaries of the in-sheet dye regions.

  3. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale

    2016-06-10

    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air. PMID:27409023

  4. Enhanced biodegradation by hydraulic heterogeneities in petroleum hydrocarbon plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Robert D.; Rolle, Massimo; Bauer, Sebastian; Eberhardt, Christina; Grathwohl, Peter; Kolditz, Olaf; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Griebler, Christian

    2009-02-01

    In case of dissolved electron donors and acceptors, natural attenuation of organic contaminant plumes in aquifers is governed by hydrodynamic mixing and microbial activity. Main objectives of this work were (i) to determine whether aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation in porous sediments is controlled by transverse dispersion, (ii) to elucidate the effect of sediment heterogeneity on mixing and biodegradation, and (iii) to search for degradation-limiting factors. Comparative experiments were conducted in two-dimensional sediment microcosms. Aerobic toluene and later ethylbenzene degradation by Pseudomonas putida strain F1 was initially followed in a plume developing from oxic to anoxic conditions and later under steady-state mixing-controlled conditions. Competitive anaerobic degradation was then initiated by introduction of the denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1. In homogeneous sand, aerobic toluene degradation was clearly controlled by dispersive mixing. Similarly, under denitrifying conditions, microbial activity was located at the plume's fringes. Sediment heterogeneity caused flow focusing and improved the mixing of reactants. Independent from the electron accepting process, net biodegradation was always higher in the heterogeneous setting with a calculated efficiency plus of 23-100% as compared to the homogeneous setup. Flow and reactive transport model simulations were performed in order to interpret and evaluate the experimental results.

  5. Constraining the source of mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagney, N.; Crameri, F.; Newsome, W. H.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Cotel, A.; Hart, S. R.; Whitehead, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    In order to link the geochemical signature of hot spot basalts to Earth's deep interior, it is first necessary to understand how plumes sample different regions of the mantle. Here, we investigate the relative amounts of deep and shallow mantle material that are entrained by an ascending plume and constrain its source region. The plumes are generated in a viscous syrup using an isolated heater for a range of Rayleigh numbers. The velocity fields are measured using stereoscopic Particle-Image Velocimetry, and the concept of the 'vortex ring bubble' is used to provide an objective definition of the plume geometry. Using this plume geometry, the plume composition can be analysed in terms of the proportion of material that has been entrained from different depths. We show that the plume composition can be well described using a simple empirical relationship, which depends only on a single parameter, the sampling coefficient, sc. High-sc plumes are composed of material which originated from very deep in the fluid domain, while low-sc plumes contain material entrained from a range of depths. The analysis is also used to show that the geometry of the plume can be described using a similarity solution, in agreement with previous studies. Finally, numerical simulations are used to vary both the Rayleigh number and viscosity contrast independently. The simulations allow us to predict the value of the sampling coefficient for mantle plumes; we find that as a plume reaches the lithosphere, 90% of its composition has been derived from the lowermost 260-750 km in the mantle, and negligible amounts are derived from the shallow half of the lower mantle. This result implies that isotope geochemistry cannot provide direct information about this unsampled region, and that the various known geochemical reservoirs must lie in the deepest few hundred kilometres of the mantle.

  6. Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1978-01-01

    The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

  7. Aggregate particles in the plumes of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Kopparla, Pushkar; Zhang, Xi; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of the total particulate mass of the plumes of Enceladus are important to constrain theories of particle formation and transport at the surface and interior of the satellite. We revisit the calculations of Ingersoll and Ewald (Ingersoll, A.P., Ewald, S.P. [2011]. Icarus 216(2), 492-506), who estimated the particulate mass of the Enceladus plumes from strongly forward scattered light in Cassini ISS images. We model the plume as a combination of spherical particles and irregular aggregates resulting from the coagulation of spherical monomers, the latter of which allows for plumes of lower particulate mass. Though a continuum of solutions are permitted by the model, the best fits to the ISS data consist either of low mass plumes composed entirely of small aggregates or high mass plumes composed of mostly spheres. The high particulate mass plumes have total particulate masses of (166 ± 42) × 103 kg, consistent with the results of Ingersoll and Ewald (Ingersoll, A.P., Ewald, S.P. [2011]. Icarus 216(2), 492-506). The low particulate mass plumes have masses of (25 ± 4) × 103 kg, leading to a solid to vapor mass ratio of 0.07 ± 0.01 for the plume. If indeed the plumes are made of such aggregates, then a vapor-based origin for the plume particles cannot be ruled out. Finally, we show that the residence time of the monomers inside the plume vents is sufficiently long for Brownian coagulation to form the aggregates before they are ejected to space.

  8. Applying Contamination Modelling to Spacecraft Propulsion Systems Designs and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T.; Thomson, Shaun; Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and particulate contaminants generated from the operations of a propulsion system may impinge on spacecraft critical surfaces. Plume depositions or clouds may hinder the spacecraft and instruments from performing normal operations. Firing thrusters will generate both molecular and particulate contaminants. How to minimize the contamination impact from the plume becomes very critical for a successful mission. The resulting effect from either molecular or particulate contamination of the thruster firing is very distinct. This paper will discuss the interconnection between the functions of spacecraft contamination modeling and propulsion system implementation. The paper will address an innovative contamination engineering approach implemented from the spacecraft concept design, manufacturing, integration and test (I&T), launch, to on- orbit operations. This paper will also summarize the implementation on several successful missions. Despite other contamination sources, only molecular contamination will be considered here.

  9. Microbial reduction of sulfate injected to gas condensate plumes in cold groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Stempvoort, Dale R.; Armstrong, James; Mayer, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    Despite a rapid expansion over the past decade in the reliance on intrinsic bioremediation to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater, significant research gaps remain. Although it has been demonstrated that bacterial sulfate reduction can be a key electron accepting process in many petroleum plumes, little is known about the rate of this reduction process in plumes derived from crude oil and gas condensates at cold-climate sites (mean temperature < 10 °C), and in complex hydrogeological settings such as silt/clay aquitards. In this field study, sulfate was injected into groundwater contaminated by gas condensate plumes at two petroleum sites in Alberta, Canada to enhance in-situ bioremediation. In both cases the groundwater near the water table had low temperature (6-9 °C). Monitoring data had provided strong evidence that bacterial sulfate reduction was a key terminal electron accepting process (TEAP) in the natural attenuation of dissolved hydrocarbons at these sites. At each site, water with approximately 2000 mg/L sulfate and a bromide tracer was injected into a low-sulfate zone within a condensate-contaminant plume. Monitoring data collected over several months yielded conservative estimates for sulfate reduction rates based on zero-order kinetics (4-6 mg/L per day) or first-order kinetics (0.003 and 0.01 day - 1 ). These results favor the applicability of in-situ bioremediation techniques in this region, under natural conditions or with enhancement via sulfate injection.

  10. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  11. Propagation of light through ship exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Iersel, M.; Mack, A.; van Eijk, A. M. J.; Schleijpen, H. M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Looking through the atmosphere, it is sometimes difficult to see the details of an object. Effects like scintillation and blur are the cause of these difficulties. Exhaust plumes of e.g. a ship can cause extreme scintillation and blur, making it even harder to see the details of what lies behind the plume. Exhaust plumes come in different shapes, sizes, and opaqueness and depending on atmospheric parameters like wind speed and direction, as well as engine settings (power, gas or diesel, etc.). A CFD model is used to determine the plume's flow field outside the stack on the basis of exhaust flow properties, the interaction with the superstructure of the ship, the meteorological conditions and the interaction of ship's motion and atmospheric wind fields. A modified version of the NIRATAM code performs the gas radiation calculations and provides the radiant intensity of the (hot) exhaust gases and the transmission of the atmosphere around the plume is modeled with MODTRAN. This allows assessing the irradiance of a sensor positioned at some distance from the ship and its plume, as function of the conditions that influence the spatial distribution and thermal properties of the plume. Furthermore, an assessment can be made of the probability of detecting objects behind the plume. This plume module will be incorporated in the TNO EOSTAR-model, which provides estimates of detection range and image quality of EO-sensors under varying meteorological conditions.

  12. Relationship between plume and plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between plate- and plume-tectonics is considered in view of the growth and breakdown of supercontinents, active rifting, the formation of passive volcanic-type continental margins, and the origin of time-progressive volcanic chains on oceanic and continental plates. The mantle wind phenomenon is described, as well as its effect on plume morphology and anisotropy of the ambient mantle. The interaction of plumes and mid-ocean ridges is discussed. The principles and problems of plume activity analysis in subduction- and collision-related foldbelts are considered and illustrated with examples.

  13. Vertical cloud structure of Jupiter's equatorial plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Hord, C.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple-scattering radiative transfer calculations were used to deduce the vertical cloud structure (VCS) of Jupiter's equatorial region. The VCS model of the equatorial plumes is obtained through an analysis of Voyager images of the 6190-A methane band and the 6000-A continuum, and ground-based 8900-A methane band images. The VCS of the equatorial plumes is found to be consistent with the hypothesis that the plumes are caused by upwelling at the ammonia condensation level produced by buoyancy due to latent heat release from the condensation of water clouds nearly three scale heights below the plumes.

  14. ASRM subscale plume deflector testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Freddie, III; Dawson, Michael C.; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports the results of the scale model (1/22) testing of candidate refractory materials to be used as surface coatings for a solid rocket motor plume deflector structure. Five ROM tests were conducted to acquire data to support the selection, thickness determination, and placement of the materials. All data acquisition was achieved through nonintrusive methods. The tests demonstrated that little or no reductions in performance of the full-scale deflector would be experienced if the most economical materials were selected for construction.

  15. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead

  16. Modelling the fate of the Tijuana River discharge plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ormondt, M.; Terrill, E.; Hibler, L. F.; van Dongeren, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    After rainfall events, the Tijuana River discharges excess runoff into the ocean in a highly turbid plume. The runoff waters contain large suspended solids concentrations, as well as high levels of toxic contaminants, bacteria, and hepatitis and enteroviruses. Public health hazards posed by the effluent often result in beach closures for several kilometers northward along the U.S. shoreline. A Delft3D model has been set up to predict the fate of the Tijuana River plume. The model takes into account the effects of tides, wind, waves, salinity, and temperature stratification. Heat exchange with the atmosphere is also included. The model consists of a relatively coarse outer domain and a high-resolution surf zone domain that are coupled with Domain Decomposition. The offshore boundary conditions are obtained from the larger NCOM SoCal model (operated by the US Navy) that spans the entire Southern California Bight. A number of discharge events are investigated, in which model results are validated against a wide range of field measurements in the San Diego Bight. These include HF Radar surface currents, REMUS tracks, drifter deployments, satellite imagery, as well as current and temperature profile measurements at a number of locations. The model is able to reproduce the observed current and temperature patterns reasonably well. Under calm conditions, the model results suggest that the hydrodynamics in the San Diego Bight are largely governed by internal waves. During rainfall events, which are typically accompanied by strong winds and high waves, wind and wave driven currents become dominant. An analysis will be made of what conditions determine the trapping and mixing of the plume inside the surfzone and/or the propagation of the plume through the breakers and onto the coastal shelf. The model is now also running in operational mode. Three day forecasts are made every 24 hours. This study was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  17. Identification of an ancient mantle reservoir and young recycled materials in the source region of a young mantle plume: Implications for potential linkages between plume and plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan-Ce; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Li, Xian-Hua; Li, Jie; Xu, Yi-Gang; Li, Xiang-Hui

    2013-09-01

    Whether or not mantle plumes and plate subduction are genetically linked is a fundamental geoscience question that impinges on our understanding of how the Earth works. Late Cenozoic basalts in Southeast Asia are globally unique in relation to this question because they occur above a seismically detected thermal plume adjacent to deep subducted slabs. In this study, we present new Pb, Sr, Nd, and Os isotope data for the Hainan flood basalts. Together with a compilation of published results, our work shows that less contaminated basaltic samples from the synchronous basaltic eruptions in Hainan-Leizhou peninsula, the Indochina peninsula and the South China Sea seamounts share the same isotopic and geochemical characteristics. They have FOZO-like Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions (the dominant lower mantle component). These basalts have primitive Pb isotopic compositions that lie on, or very close to, 4.5- to 4.4-Ga geochrons on 207Pb/204Pb versus 206Pb/204Pb diagram, suggesting a mantle source developed early in Earth's history (4.5-4.4 Ga). Furthermore, our detailed geochemical and Sr, Nd, Pb and Os isotopic analyses suggest the presence of 0.5-0.2 Ga recycled components in the late Cenozoic Hainan plume basalts. This implies a mantle circulation rate of >1 cm/yr, which is similar to that of previous estimates for the Hawaiian mantle plume. The identification of the ancient mantle reservoir and young recycled materials in the source region of these synchronous basalts is consistent with the seismically detected lower mantle-rooted Hainan plume that is adjacent to deep subducted slab-like seismic structures just above the core-mantle boundary. We speculate that the continued deep subduction and the presence of a dense segregated basaltic layer may have triggered the plume to rise from the thermal-chemical pile. This work therefore suggests a dynamic linkage between deep subduction and mantle plume generation.

  18. Volcanic Plume Chemistry: Models, Observations and Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Martin, Robert; Oppenheimer, Clive; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Cox, Tony; Jones, Rod; Durant, Adam; Kelly, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic plumes are highly chemically reactive; both in the hot, near-vent plume, and also at ambient temperatures in the downwind plume, as the volcanic gases and aerosol disperse into the background atmosphere. In particular, DOAS (Differential Optical Absortpion Spectroscopy) observations have identified BrO (Bromine Monoxide) in several volcanic plumes degassing into the troposphere. These observations are explained by rapid in-plume autocatalytic BrO-chemistry that occurs whilst the plume disperses, enabling oxidants such as ozone from background air to mix with the acid gases and aerosol. Computer modelling tools have recently been developed to interpret the observed BrO and predict that substantial ozone depletion occurs downwind. Alongside these modelling developments, advances in in-situ and remote sensing techniques have also improved our observational understanding of volcanic plumes. We present simulations using the model, PlumeChem, that predict the spatial distribution of gases in volcanic plumes, including formation of reactive halogens BrO, ClO and OClO that are enhanced nearer the plume edges, and depletion of ozone within the plume core. The simulations also show that in-plume chemistry rapidly converts NOx into nitric acid, providing a mechanism to explain observed elevated in-plume HNO3. This highlights the importance of coupled BrO-NOx chemistry, both for BrO-formation and as a production mechanism for HNO3 in BrO-influenced regions of the atmosphere. Studies of coupled halogen-H2S-chemistry are consistent with in-situ Alphasense electrochemical sensor observations of H2S at a range of volcanoes, and only predict H2S-depletion if Cl is additionally elevated. Initial studies regarding the transformations of mercury within volcanic plumes suggest that significant in-plume conversion of Hg0 to Hg2+ can occur in the downwind plume. Such Hg2+ may impact downwind ecology through enhanced Hg-deposition, and causing enhanced biological uptake of

  19. Delta Chromium-53/52 isotopic composition of native and contaminated groundwater, Mojave Desert, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Bullen, Thomas D.; Martin, Peter; Schroth, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in groundwater sampled from three contaminant plumes in aquifers in the Mojave Desert near Hinkley, Topock and El Mirage, California, USA, were as high as 2600, 5800 and 330 μg/L, respectively. δ53/52Cr compositions from more than 50 samples collected within these plumes ranged from near 0‰ to almost 4‰ near the plume margins. Assuming only reductive fractionation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) within the plume, apparent fractionation factors for δ53/52Cr isotopes ranged from εapp = 0.3 to 0.4 within the Hinkley and Topock plumes, respectively, and only the El Mirage plume had a fractionation factor similar to the laboratory derived value of ε = 3.5. One possible explanation for the difference between field and laboratory fractionation factors at the Hinkley and Topock sites is localized reductive fractionation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), with subsequent advective mixing of native and contaminated water near the plume margin. Chromium(VI) concentrations and δ53/52Cr isotopic compositions did not uniquely define the source of Cr near the plume margin, or the extent of reductive fractionation within the plume. However, Cr(VI) and δ53/52Cr data contribute to understanding of the interaction between reductive and mixing processes that occur within and near the margins of Cr contamination plumes. Reductive fractionation of Cr(VI) predominates in plumes having higher εapp, these plumes may be suitable for monitored natural attenuation. In contrast, advective mixing predominates in plumes having lower εapp, the highly dispersed margins of these plumes may be difficult to define and manage.

  20. Space simulation experiments on reaction control system thruster plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A space simulation procedure was developed for studying rocket plume contamination effects using a 5-pound bipropellant reaction control system thruster. Vacuum chamber pressures of 3 x 10 to the minus 5 torr (70 miles altitude) were achieved with the thruster firing in pulse trains consisting of eight pulses (50 msec on, 100 msec off, and seven minutes between pulse trains). The final vacuum was achieved by cooling all vacuum chamber surfaces to liquid helium temperature and by introducing a continuous argon leak of 48 std. cc/sec into the test chamber. An effort was made to simulate propellant system flow dynamics corresponding to actual spacecraft mission use. Fast time response liquid flow rate measurements showed that large variations occurred in the ratio of oxidizer to fuel flow for pulse-on times up to 120 msec. These variations could lead to poor combustion efficiency and the production of contamination.

  1. Spatial and temporal migration of a landfill leachate plume in alluvium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Leachate from unlined or leaky landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that last decades to centuries. Understanding the dynamics of leachate movement in space and time is essential for monitoring, planning and management, and assessment of risk to groundwater and surface-water resources. Over a 23.4-year period (1986–2010), the spatial extent of the Norman Landfill leachate plume increased at a rate of 7800 m2/year and expanded by 878 %, from an area of 20,800 m2 in 1986 to 203,400 m2 in 2010. A linear plume velocity of 40.2 m/year was calculated that compared favorably to a groundwater-seepage velocity of 55.2 m/year. Plume-scale hydraulic conductivity values representative of actual hydrogeological conditions in the alluvium ranged from 7.0 × 10−5 to 7.5 × 10−4 m/s, with a median of 2.0 × 10−4 m/s. Analyses of field-measured and calculated plume-scale hydraulic conductivity distributions indicate that the upper percentiles of field-measured values should be considered to assess rates of plume-scale migration, spreading, and biodegradation. A pattern of increasing Cl− concentrations during dry periods and decreasing Cl− concentrations during wet periods was observed in groundwater beneath the landfill. The opposite occurred in groundwater downgradient from the landfill; that is, Cl− concentrations in groundwater downgradient from the landfill decreased during dry periods and increased during wet periods. This pattern of changing Cl−concentrations in response to wet and dry periods indicates that the landfill retains or absorbs leachate during dry periods and produces lower concentrated leachate downgradient. During wet periods, the landfill receives more recharge which dilutes leachate in the landfill but increases leachate migration from the landfill and produces a more concentrated contaminant plume. This approach of quantifying plume expansion, migration, and concentration during variable hydrologic

  2. Two Plumes Beneath the East African Rift System: a Geochemical Investigation into Possible Interactions in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. R.; Furman, T.; van Keken, P. E.; Lin, S.

    2007-12-01

    East African Rift System magmatism began over 40 my ago and has continued through the present. Numerical models have determined two plumes are necessary to create the spatial and temporal distribution of volcanism. Geochemical data support the presence of two chemically distinct plumes initially located beneath the Afar Depression (NE Ethiopia) and the Turkana Depression (SW Ethiopia/N Kenya). The timing and eruptive of the Afar and Kenya plumes are also distinct. While there is growing evidence to support the existence of two dynamically and chemically distinct plumes beneath the East African Rift System, the interactions between them remain unclear. Our study focuses on the geochemistry of mafic shield lavas from three locations on the eastern flank of the Ethiopian plateau. These lavas are spatially located between the surface manifestation of the Afar and Kenya plumes. The majority of the lava is alkaline and has experienced varying degrees of olivine and pyroxene fractionation. The northernmost lavas (9°10'N) are transitional and display the most fractionation. Primitive mantle melts were generated at depths near the fertile mantle garnet-spinel transition zone and deeper (80-100km) and are free of metasomatic influence. Minor HREE depletions also support derivation of melts from a garnet-bearing source. Lavas with lithospheric influence are generated from shallower depths and show minor amphibole influence. Overall, geochemical data show the lavas in this study closely resemble those from various episodes of Kenya plume magmatism with modifications attributed to lithospheric contamination. This interpretation is consistent with current numerical models suggesting episodic northward movement of Kenya plume magmas along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. The data imply that the Kenya plume has a much larger spatial influence and therefore a larger geodynamic influence in the EARS than previously recognized.

  3. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  4. Deployment Plan for Bioremediation and Natural Attenuation for In Situ Restoration of Chloroethene-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, L.N.; Starr, R.C.; Sorenson, K.S.; Smith, R.W.; Phelps, T.J.

    1999-03-01

    This deployment plan describes a project funded by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective is to facilitate deployment of enhanced in situ bioremediation (ISB) an monitored natural attenuation (MNA) or chloroethene-contaminated groundwater to DOE sites. Enhanced ISB accelerates dechlorination of chloroethenes under anaerobic conditions by providing nutrients to the microbial community. Natural attenuation does not require nutrient addition. Enhanced ISB in the upgradient portion of a contaminant plume couples with MNA in the downgradient portion is being implemented at Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Selected DOE sites will be screened to assess their suitability for enhanced ISB/MNA. Tasks include: (1) characterization of the TAN microbial community and correlation of community characteristics with chloroethene degradation ability, (2) installation of wells to facilitate evaluation of MNA at TAN, (3) monitoring to better delineate MNA at TAN, and (4) screening of selected other DOE sites for suitability of ISB/MNA, and limited supplemental characterization. Data evaluation will provide a sound technical basis for decision makers to consider use of enhanced ISB and MNA, alone or together, as remedial technologies for these sites.

  5. Radiation Chemistry of Potential Europa Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent detection of atomic hydrogen and atomic oxygen and their correlation to potential water plumes on Europa [Roth, Saur et al. 2014] invoked significant interest in further understanding of these potential/putative plumes on Europa. Unlike on Enceladus, Europa receives significant amount of electron and particle radiation. If the plumes come from trailing hemisphere and in the high radiation flux regions, then it is expected that the plume molecules be subjected to radiation processing. Our interest is to understand to what extent such radiation alterations occur and how they can be correlated to the plume original composition, whether organic or inorganic in nature. We will present laboratory studies [Henderson and Gudipati 2014] involving pulsed infrared laser ablation of ice that generates plumes similar to those observed on Enceladus [Hansen, Esposito et al. 2006; Hansen, Shemansky et al. 2011] and expected to be similar on Europa as a starting point; demonstrating the applicability of laser ablation to simulate plumes of Europa and Enceladus. We will present results from electron irradiation of these plumes to determine how organic and inorganic composition is altered due to radiation. Acknowledgments:This research was enabled through partial funding from NASA funding through Planetary Atmospheres, and the Europa Clipper Pre-Project. B.L.H. acknowledges funding from the NASA Postdoctoral Program for an NPP fellowship. Hansen, C. J., L. Esposito, et al. (2006). "Enceladus' water vapor plume." Science 311(5766): 1422-1425. Hansen, C. J., D. E. Shemansky, et al. (2011). "The composition and structure of the Enceladus plume." Geophysical Research Letters 38. Henderson, B. L. and M. S. Gudipati (2014). "Plume Composition and Evolution in Multicomponent Ices Using Resonant Two-Step Laser Ablation and Ionization Mass Spectrometry." The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118(29): 5454-5463. Roth, L., J. Saur, et al. (2014). "Transient Water Vapor at Europa's South

  6. Electric propulsion plasma plume interaction with “Phobos-Soil” spacecraft structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiradze, Andrey B.; Obukhov, Vladimir A.; Popov, Garri A.

    2009-05-01

    Assessment was made by calculations for the possible consequences of the effect of plasma plume injected by the solar electric propulsion system (SEPS) on the structural components of "Phobos-Soil" spacecraft (SC). Propulsion system comprises three SPT-140 thrusters, two of which should secure the required total thrust impulse during 8000 hours of operation approximately. Variation of the solar panel (SP) properties as a result of their surface contamination with the products of erosion of thruster and SC structural components is the primary negative consequence of plasma plume effect on the SC. Calculation study for the processes of erosion, particle flow distribution, and contaminating coating formation on the SP surface was made for different SEPS arrangements. It is shown that power reduction for the landing module SP sections, which are subjected to the contaminating coating deposition to the most extent, will not exceed 5% of the nominal level.

  7. A parsimonious analytical model for simulating multispecies plume migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-S.; Liang, C.-P.; Liu, C.-W.; Li, L. Y.

    2015-09-01

    A parsimonious analytical model for rapidly predicting the long-term plume behavior of decaying contaminant such as radionuclide and dissolved chlorinated solvent is presented in this study. Generalized analytical solutions in compact format are derived for the two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions involving an arbitrary number of species in groundwater system. The solution techniques involve the sequential applications of the Laplace, finite Fourier cosine, and generalized integral transforms to reduce the coupled partial differential equation system to a set of linear algebraic equations. The system of algebraic equations is next solved for each species in the transformed domain, and the solutions in the original domain are then obtained through consecutive integral transform inversions. Explicit form solutions for a special case are derived using the generalized analytical solutions and are verified against the numerical solutions. The analytical results indicate that the parsimonious analytical solutions are robust and accurate. The solutions are useful for serving as simulation or screening tools for assessing plume behaviors of decaying contaminants including the radionuclides and dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater systems.

  8. Progression of natural attenuation processes at a crude-oil spill site . I. Geochemical evolution of the plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Baedecker, M.J.; Aiken, G.R.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Tuccillo, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    A 16-year study of a hydrocarbon plume shows that the extent of contaminant migration and compound-specific behavior have changed as redox reactions, most notably iron reduction, have progressed over time. Concentration changes at a small scale, determined from analysis of pore-water samples drained from aquifer cores, are compared with concentration changes at the plume scale, determined from analysis of water samples from an observation well network. The small-scale data show clearly that the hydrocarbon plume is growing slowly as sediment iron oxides are depleted. Contaminants, such as ortho-xylene that appeared not to be moving downgradient from the oil on the basis of observation well data, are migrating in thin layers as the aquifer evolves to methanogenic conditions. However, the plume-scale observation well data show that the downgradient extent of the Fe2+ and BTEX plume did not change between 1992 and 1995. Instead, depletion of the unstable Fe (III) oxides near the subsurface crude-oil source has caused the maximum dissolved iron concentration zone within the plume to spread at a rate of approximately 3 m/year. The zone of maximum concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) has also spread within the anoxic plume. In monitoring the remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water by natural attenuation, subtle concentration changes in observation well data from the anoxic zone may be diagnostic of depletion of the intrinsic electron-accepting capacity of the aquifer. Recognition of these subtle patterns may allow early prediction of growth of the hydrocarbon plume. Copyright ?? 2001 .

  9. Costs of groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, W.B.; Raucher, R.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged.

  10. MODELING PLUMES IN SMALL STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticides accumulate on land surfaces from agricultural, commercial, and domestic application, and wash into streams and rivers during dry and wet weather. Flood water retention basins or structures often collect this contaminated runoff, providing intermediate storage and limit...

  11. Delineating groundwater and subsurface structures by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araffa, Sultan Awad Sultan; Helaly, Ahmed S.; Khozium, Ashraf; Lala, Amir M. S.; Soliman, Shokry A.; Hassan, Noha M.

    2015-06-01

    Geophysical tools such as magnetic, gravity and electric resistivity have been used to delineate subsurface structures, groundwater aquifer around Cairo-Belbies Desert road. A dipole-dipole section was measured at the central part of the study area with 2100 m length and electrode spacing 50 m for greater penetration depth. The results of the inverse resistivity data indicate that the study area includes two groundwater aquifers at different depths. The shallow aquifer water is near the surface and the deep aquifer lies at depth of about 115 m and exhibits low resistivity values ranging from 20 to 100 ohm m. One hundred and fifty-two gravity stations were measured using Autograv gravimeter (CG3), different gravity corrections (drift, elevation and latitude corrections) were applied. The corrected data represented by Bouguer anomaly map were filtered into regional and residual gravity anomaly maps. The residual gravity map indicates that the area is dissected by many faults with NW-SE, N-S, E-W and NE-SW trends. One hundred and fifty-three ground magnetic measurements are collected using two Proton magnetometers (Envimag). The corrected magnetic data are represented by total magnetic intensity map that was reduced to the magnetic pole. 3D magnetic modeling was applied to detect the depth of basaltic sheet and basement complex. The results indicated that the elevation of upper surface of basalt is ranging from 148 to -153 m and the elevation of lower surface of basalt is ranging from 148 to 269 m.

  12. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has a history of developing plume models and providing technical assistance. The Visual Plumes model (VP) is a recent addition to the public-domain models available on the EPA Center for Exposure Assessment Modeling (CEAM) web page. The Wind...

  13. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a long history of both supporting plume model development and providing mixing zone modeling software. The Visual Plumes model is the most recent addition to the suite of public-domain models available through the EPA-Athens Center f...

  14. LNAPL source zone delineation using soil gases in a heterogeneous silty-sand aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Grégory J. V.; Jousse, Florie; Luze, Nicolas; Höhener, Patrick; Atteia, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Source delineation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites is of high importance for remediation work. However, traditional methods like soil core extraction and analysis or recent Membrane Interface Probe methods are time consuming and costly. Therefore, the development of an in situ method based on soil gas analysis can be interesting. This includes the direct measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gas taken from gas probes using a PID (Photo Ionization Detector) and the analysis of other soil gases related to VOC degradation distribution (CH4, O2, CO2) or related to presence of Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) as 222Rn. However, in widespread heterogeneous formations, delineation by gas measurements becomes more challenging. The objective of this study is twofold: (i) to analyse the potential of several in situ gas measurement techniques in comparison to soil coring for LNAPL source delineation at a heterogeneous contaminated site where the techniques might be limited by a low diffusion potential linked to the presence of fine sands and silts, and (ii) to analyse the effect of vertical sediment heterogeneities on the performance of these gas measurement methods. Thus, five types of gases were analysed: VOCs, their three related degradation products O2, CO2 and CH4 and 222Rn. Gas measurements were compared to independent LNAPL analysis by coring. This work was conducted at an old industrial site frequently contaminated by a Diesel-Fuel mixture located in a heterogeneous fine-grained aquifer. Results show that in such heterogeneous media migration of reactive gases like VOCs occurs only across small distances and the VOC concentrations sampled with gas probes are mainly related to local conditions rather than the presence of LNAPL below the gas probe. 222Rn is not well correlated with LNAPL because of sediment heterogeneity. Oxygen, CO2, and especially CH4, have larger lengths of diffusion and give the clearest picture for LNAPL presence at this

  15. LNAPL source zone delineation using soil gases in a heterogeneous silty-sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Grégory J V; Jousse, Florie; Luze, Nicolas; Höhener, Patrick; Atteia, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Source delineation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites is of high importance for remediation work. However, traditional methods like soil core extraction and analysis or recent Membrane Interface Probe methods are time consuming and costly. Therefore, the development of an in situ method based on soil gas analysis can be interesting. This includes the direct measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gas taken from gas probes using a PID (Photo Ionization Detector) and the analysis of other soil gases related to VOC degradation distribution (CH4, O2, CO2) or related to presence of Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) as (222)Rn. However, in widespread heterogeneous formations, delineation by gas measurements becomes more challenging. The objective of this study is twofold: (i) to analyse the potential of several in situ gas measurement techniques in comparison to soil coring for LNAPL source delineation at a heterogeneous contaminated site where the techniques might be limited by a low diffusion potential linked to the presence of fine sands and silts, and (ii) to analyse the effect of vertical sediment heterogeneities on the performance of these gas measurement methods. Thus, five types of gases were analysed: VOCs, their three related degradation products O2, CO2 and CH4 and (222)Rn. Gas measurements were compared to independent LNAPL analysis by coring. This work was conducted at an old industrial site frequently contaminated by a Diesel-Fuel mixture located in a heterogeneous fine-grained aquifer. Results show that in such heterogeneous media migration of reactive gases like VOCs occurs only across small distances and the VOC concentrations sampled with gas probes are mainly related to local conditions rather than the presence of LNAPL below the gas probe. (222)Rn is not well correlated with LNAPL because of sediment heterogeneity. Oxygen, CO2, and especially CH4, have larger lengths of diffusion and give the clearest picture for LNAPL presence at

  16. Experiments on a turbulent plume: shape analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, S.; Sumita, I.

    2009-12-01

    Turbulent plume which is characterized by a large Reynolds number (Re >> 1) and buoyancy, is ubiquitous in nature, an example of which is a volcanic plume. As the turbulent plume rises, it entrains the ambient fluid and grows in size. There have been many laboratory experiments on turbulent plumes, but only few attempts were made to characterize the shape of the evolving plume as a function of source parameters (initial velocity and buoyancy). Here we report the results of laboratory experiments on a turbulent plume, a simplified model of a volcanic plume, to study how the shape of the plume changes as a function of time. Water and aqueous solutions of condensed milk, NaCl and CsCl, colored with a fluorescent dye are injected downward through an orifice (ID 1 mm) into a water contained in an acrylic tank with a cross-section of 30cm ¥times 30cm and a height of 50cm. Plumes with a density difference of 0.00 < ¥Delta ¥rho < 8.00 ¥times 10^ 2 (¥mbox{kg m}^ {-3}) and Re in the range and 210 < Re < 2850, are generated. These experimental parameters (initial Re, buoyancy) were chosen so that they cover the range from inertia-driven to buoyancy-driven regime. We find that the plume shape changes with time as instability and entrainment proceeds. In the beginning it is finger-like, but with time, plume head and vortices develop, and finally it transforms into a cone-like self-similar shape. After transforming a "cone-like" shape, sometimes a "head" appears again. We devise new methods to quantitatively characterize these changes of shape. Here we use (1) the height of the centroid of the plume shape and (2) the deviation from the self-similar triangular shape. Using these methods, we defined 4 regimes as a function of time. We find that the onset times of the 4 regimes have a negative power-law relations on initial Re, which scale better than using onset heights. Importantly, we find that the buoyancy causes the regime transitions to become earlier. Our experiments

  17. Numerical Simulations of Europa Hydrothermal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J. C.; Lenferink, E.

    2009-12-01

    The liquid water interiors of Europa and other icy moons of the outer solar system are likely to be driven by geothermal heating from the sea floor, leading to the development of buoyant hydrothermal plumes. These plumes potentially control icy surface geomorphology, and are of interest to astrobiologists. We have performed a series of simulations of these plumes using the MITGCM. We assume in this experiment that Europa's ocean is deep (of order 100 km) and unstratified, and that plume buoyancy is controlled by temperature, not composition. A series of experiments was performed to explore a limited region of parameter space, with ocean depth H ranging from 50 to 100 km deep, source heat flux Q between 1 and 10 GW, and values of the Coriolis parameter f between 30% and 90% of the Europa average value. As predicted by earlier work, the plumes in our simulations form narrow cylindrical chimneys (a few km across) under the influence of the Coriolis effect. These plumes broaden over time until they become baroclinically unstable, breaking up into cone-shaped eddies when they become 20-35 km in diameter; the shed eddies are of a similar size. Large-scale currents in the region of the plume range between 1.5 and 5 cm/s; temperature anomalies in the plume far from the seafloor are tiny, varying between 30 and 160 microkelvin. Variations in plume size, shape, speed, and temperature are in excellent agreement with previous laboratory tank experiments, and in rough agreement with theoretical predictions. Plume dynamics and geometry are controlled by a "natural Rossby number" which depends strongly on depth H and Coriolis parameter f, but only weakly on source heat flux Q. However, some specific theoretical predictions are not borne out by these simulations. The time elapsed between startup of the source and the beginning of eddy-shedding is much less variable than predicted; also, the plume temperature varies with ocean depth H when our theory says it should not. Both of

  18. Application of 4D resistivity image profiling to detect DNAPLs plume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Tsai, Y.

    2008-12-01

    In July 1993, the soil and groundwater of the factory of Taiwan , Miaoli was found to be contaminated by dichloroethane, chlorobenzene and other hazardous solvents. The contaminants were termed to be dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The contaminated site was neglected for the following years until May 1998, the Environment Protection Agency of Miaoli ordered the company immediately take an action for treatment of the contaminated site. Excavating and exposing the contaminated soil was done at the previous waste DNAPL dumped area. In addition, more than 53 wells were drilled around the pool with a maximum depth of 12 m where a clayey layer was found. Continuous pumping the groundwater and monitoring the concentration of residual DNAPL contained in the well water samples have done in different stages of remediation. However, it is suspected that the DNAPL has existed for a long time, therefore the contaminants might dilute but remnants of a DNAPL plume that are toxic to humans still remain in the soil and migrate to deeper aquifers. A former contaminated site was investigated using the 2D, 3D and 4D resisitivity image technique, with aims of determining buried contaminant geometry. This paper emphasizes the use of resistivity image profiling (RIP) method to map the limit of this DNAPL waste disposal site where the records of operations are not variations. A significant change in resistivity values was detected between known polluted and non-polluted subsurface; a high resistivity value implies that the subsurface was contaminated by DNAPL plume. The results of the survey serve to provide insight into the sensitivity of RIP method for detecting DNAPL plumes within the shallow subsurface, and help to provide valuable information related to monitoring the possible migration path of DNAPL plume in the past. According to the formerly studies in this site, affiliation by excavates with pumps water remediation had very long time, Therefore this research was used

  19. Plume detachment from a magnetic nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, Christopher A.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris N.; Tushentsov, Mikhail R.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, D. Greg; Dobson, Chris C.; Schuettpelz, Branwen M.

    2009-03-15

    High-powered electric propulsion thrusters utilizing a magnetized plasma require that plasma exhaust detach from the applied magnetic field in order to produce thrust. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating that a sufficiently energetic and flowing plasma can indeed detach from a magnetic nozzle. Microwave interferometer and probe measurements provide plume density, electron temperature, and ion flux measurements in the nozzle region. Measurements of ion flux show a low-beta plasma plume which follows applied magnetic field lines until the plasma kinetic pressure reaches the magnetic pressure and a high-beta plume expanding ballistically afterward. Several magnetic configurations were tested including a reversed field nozzle configuration. Despite the dramatic change in magnetic field profile, the reversed field configuration yielded little measurable change in plume trajectory, demonstrating the plume is detached. Numerical simulations yield density profiles in agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Mount Everest snow plume: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G. W. K.

    2004-11-01

    A plume of snow blowing from the summit of Mount Everest is one of the most iconic images of the world's highest mountain. Its presence provides evidence of the strong jet stream winds that can buffet the mountain. In January 2004, astronauts onboard the International Space Station (ISS) observed a 15 to 20 km long snow plume emanating from the summit of Mount Everest. Remarkably little is known about these plumes and the role that they play in the redistribution of snow in the high Himalaya. In this paper we use a variety of meteorological datasets to show that the observed plume was the combination of high winds associated with the East Asian Jet Stream (EAJS) and a heavy snowfall that had occurred over the Himalaya during the preceding week. A simple model of a blown snow plume is shown to be consistent with the observations made from the ISS.

  1. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept.

    PubMed

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models predict large plume heads that cause kilometre-scale surface uplift, and narrow (100 km radius) plume tails that remain in the mantle after the plume head spreads below the lithosphere. However, in many cases, such uplifts and narrow plume tails are not observed. Here using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes contain up to 15-20% of recycled oceanic crust in a form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth dependent. We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200 km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years. PMID:25907970

  2. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept

    PubMed Central

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models predict large plume heads that cause kilometre-scale surface uplift, and narrow (100 km radius) plume tails that remain in the mantle after the plume head spreads below the lithosphere. However, in many cases, such uplifts and narrow plume tails are not observed. Here using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes contain up to 15–20% of recycled oceanic crust in a form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth dependent. We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200 km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years. PMID:25907970

  3. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mapped and unmapped delineations. 415.43 Section 415.43 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever...

  4. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever an official flood plain map providing the pertinent information is available with respect to a given project, the map shall be used for the delineation of the flood hazard area,...

  5. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever an official flood plain map providing the pertinent information is available with respect to a given project, the map shall be used for the delineation of the flood hazard area,...

  6. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever an official flood plain map providing the pertinent information is available with respect to a given project, the map shall be used for the delineation of the flood hazard area,...

  7. MISR Observations of Etna Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scollo, S.; Kahn, R. A.; Nelson, D. L.; Coltelli, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twelve years, Mt. Etna, located in eastern Sicily, has produced a great number of explosive eruptions. Volcanic plumes have risen to several km above sea level and created problems for aviation and the communities living near the volcano. A reduction of hazards may be accomplished using remote sensing techniques to evaluate important features of volcanic plumes. Since 2000, the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on board NASA s Terra spacecraft has been extensively used to study aerosol dispersal and to extract the three-dimensional structure of plumes coming from anthropogenic or natural sources, including volcanoes. In the present work, MISR data from several explosive events occurring at Etna are analyzed using a program named MINX (MISR INteractive eXplorer). MINX uses stereo matching techniques to evaluate the height of the volcanic aerosol with a precision of a few hundred meters, and extracts aerosol properties from the MISR Standard products. We analyzed twenty volcanic plumes produced during the 2000, 2001, 2002-03, 2006 and 2008 Etna eruptions, finding that volcanic aerosol dispersal and column height obtained by this analysis is in good agreement with ground-based observations. MISR aerosol type retrievals: (1) clearly distinguish volcanic plumes that are sulphate and/or water vapor dominated from ash-dominated ones; (2) detect even low concentrations of volcanic ash in the atmosphere; (3) demonstrate that sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes consist of smaller-sized particles compared to ash plumes. This work highlights the potential of MISR to detect important volcanic plume characteristics that can be used to constrain the eruption source parameters in volcanic ash dispersion models. Further, the possibility of discriminating sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes from ash-dominated ones is important to better understand the atmospheric impact of these plumes.

  8. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P. E.; McMillan, M. T.

    2008-10-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO 2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained "ash" particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 10 6 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous "snowflakes" as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  9. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  10. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration /NOAA/ contamination monitoring instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The JPL has designed and built a plume contamination monitoring package to be installed on a NOAA environmental services satellite. The package is designed to monitor any condensible contamination that occurs during the ignition and burn of a TE-M-364-15 apogee kick motor. The instrumentation and system interface are described, and attention is given to preflight analysis and test.

  11. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

    2010-02-24

    geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

  12. Dynamics and Deposits of Coignimbrite Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engwell, Samantha; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Neri, Augusto

    2014-05-01

    Fine ash in the atmosphere poses a significant hazard, with potentially disastrous consequences for aviation and, on deposition, health and infrastructure. Fine-grained particles form a large proportion of ejecta in Plinian volcanic clouds. However, another common, but poorly studied phenomena exists whereby large amounts of fine ash are injected into the atmosphere. Coignimbrite plumes form as material is elutriated from the top of pyroclastic density currents. The ash in these plumes is considerably finer grained than that in Plinian plumes and can be distributed over thousands of kilometres in the atmosphere. Despite their significance, very little is known regarding coignimbrite plume formation and dispersion, predominantly due to the poor preservation of resultant deposits. As a result, consequences of coignimbrite plume formation are usually overlooked when conducting hazard and risk analysis. In this study, deposit characteristics and numerical models of plumes are combined to investigate the conditions required for coignimbrite plume formation. Coignimbrite deposits from the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption (Magnitude 7.7, 39 ka) are well sorted and very fine, with a mode of between 30 and 50 microns, and a significant component of respirable ash (less than 10 microns). Analogous distributions are found for coignimbrite deposits from Tungurahua 2006 and Volcan de Colima (2004-2006), amongst others, regardless of magnitude, type or chemistry of eruption. These results indicate that elutriation processes are the dominant control on coignimbrite grainsize distribution. To further investigate elutriation and coignimbrite plume dynamics, the numerical plume model of Bursik (2001) is applied. Model sensitivity analysis demonstrates that neutral buoyancy conditions (required for the formation of the plume) are controlled by a balance between temperature and gas mass flux in the upper most parts of the pyroclastic density current. In addition, results emphasize the

  13. Plumes on Enceladus: Lessons for Europa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The possible detection of a water vapour plume on Europa [1] suggests resemblances to Enceladus, a cryovolcanically active satellite [2]. How does this activity work, and what lesson does Enceladus have for plumes on Europa? The inferred vapour column densities of the Europa [1] and Enceladus [3] plumes are similar, but the inferred velocity and mass flux of the former are higher. At Enceladus, the inferred plume strength is modulated by its orbital position [4,5], suggesting that tides opening and closing cracks control the eruption behaviour [6,7]. An additional source of stress potentially driving eruptions is the effect of slow freezing of the ice shell above[7,8]. The original detection of the Europa plume was close to apocentre, when polar fractures are expected to be in tension [1]. Follow-up observations at the same orbital phase did not detect a plume [9], although the Galileo E12 magnetometer data may provide evidence for an earlier plume [Khurana, pers. comm.]. One possible explanation for the plume's disappearance is that longer-period tidal effects are playing a role; there are hints of similar secular changes in the Enceladus data [4,5]. Another is that detectability of the Europa plumein the aurora observations also depends on variations in electron density (which affects the UV emission flux) [9]. Or it may simply be that eruptive activity on Europa is highly time-variable, as on Io. At Enceladus, the plume scale height is independent of orbital position and plume brightness [5]. This suggests that the vapour velocity does not depend on crack width, consistent with supersonic flow through a near-surface throat. The large scale height inferred for the Europa plume likewise suggests supersonic behaviour. Continuous fallback of solid plume material at Enceladus affects both the colour [10] and surface texture [2] of near-polar regions. Less frequent plume activity would produce subtler effects; whether the sparse available imagery at Europa [11

  14. Preliminary far-field plume sputtering characterization of the Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT-100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.

    1994-01-01

    For electric propulsion devices to be considered for use on communications satellites, integration impacts must be examined in detail. Two phenomena of concern associated with highly energetic plumes are contamination via sputtered material from the thruster and sputter erosion of downstream surfaces. In order to characterize the net effect of both phenomena, an array of witness plates were mounted in several types of holders and were exposed to the SPT-100 thruster plume for 50 hours. Surface analysis of the witness plates revealed that in the most energetic regions of the plume, there was a net removal of material from the samples facing the thruster. In the peripheral regions, net deposits were observed and characterized by the changes in optical properties of these samples. Changes in surface properties of samples located in collimators were within experimental uncertainty.

  15. Groundwater plume control with phytotechnologies at Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, S.; Negri, M. C.; Quinn, J.; Wozniak, J.,; McPherson, J.

    2002-07-16

    In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) designed and installed a series of engineered plantings consisting of a vegetative cover system and approximately 800 hybrid poplars and willows rooting at various predetermined depths. The plants were installed using various methods including Applied Natural Science's TreeWell{reg_sign} system. The goal of the installation was to protect downgradient surface and groundwater by hydraulic control of the contaminated plume. This goal was to be accomplished by intercepting the contaminated groundwater with the tree roots, removing moisture from the upgradient soil area, reducing water infiltration, preventing soil erosion, degrading and/or transpiring the residual VOCs, and removing tritium from the subsoil and groundwater. The U.S. EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program (SITE) and ANL-E evaluated the demonstration. The effectiveness of the various plantings was monitored directly through groundwater measurements and samples, and indirectly via soil moisture probes, plant tissue analysis, microbial studies, geochemical analysis, and sap flow monitoring. A weather station with data logging equipment was installed. ANL-E modeled the predicted effect of the plants on the groundwater using MODFLOW. The demonstration has lasted three growing seasons and continues. This paper presents the results of the sampling, monitoring, and modeling efforts to date. The project was not only successful in reducing the groundwater contaminant flow and the contaminants at the source; it also provides insight into the techniques that are useful for measuring and predicting the effectiveness of future similar projects.

  16. A pilot study for delineation of areas contributing water to wellfields at Jackson, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.; Connell, J.F.; Short, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Division of Groundwater Protection, and the Jackson Utility Division, conducted a pilot study to determine data needs and the applicability of four methods for the delineation of wellhead protection areas. Jackson Utility Division in Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee, pumps about 9 million gallons of ground water daily from two municipal wellfields that tap an unconfined sand aquifer. Under natural hydraulic gradients, ground waterflows southward toward the South Wellfield at approximately 2 to 3 feet per day; natural flow toward the North Wellfield from the east at 1 to 2 feet per day. Water quality generally is suitable for most uses. Concentrations of dissolved solids are low, and excessive iron is the only significant naturally occurring water-quality problem. However, trace concentrations of volatile organic compounds have been detected in water pumps from the South Wellfield; the highest concentration of a single compound has been 23 micrograms per liter of tetrachloroethylene. Potential sources of ground-water contamination in the Jackson area include a hazardous-waste site, municipal and industrial landfill, and underground-storage tanks. Some of the four method for delineating wellhead protection areas did not adequately describe zones contributing flow to the wellfields. Calculations based on a uniform flow equation provided a preliminary delineation of zones of contribution for the wellfields and ground-water time-of-travel contours. Limitations of the applied methods motivated the design of a more rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

  17. Mapping Pollution Plumes in Areas Impacted by Hurricane Katrina With Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swayze, G. A.; Furlong, E. T.; Livo, K. E.

    2007-12-01

    New Orleans endured flooding on a massive scale subsequent to Hurricane Katrina in August of 2005. Contaminant plumes were noticeable in satellite images of the city in the days following flooding. Many of these plumes were caused by oil, gasoline, and diesel that leaked from inundated vehicles, gas stations, and refineries. News reports also suggested that the flood waters were contaminated with sewage from breached pipes. Effluent plumes such as these pose a potential health hazard to humans and wildlife in the aftermath of hurricanes and potentially from other catastrophic events (e.g., earthquakes, shipping accidents, chemical spills, and terrorist attacks). While the extent of effluent plumes can be gauged with synthetic aperture radar and broad- band visible-infrared images (Rykhus, 2005) (e.g., Radarsat and Landsat ETM+) the composition of the plumes could not be determined. These instruments lack the spectral resolution necessary to do chemical identification. Imaging spectroscopy may help solve this problem. Over 60 flight lines of NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were collected over New Orleans, the Mississippi Delta, and the Gulf Coast from one to two weeks after Katrina while the contaminated water was being pumped out of flooded areas. These data provide a unique opportunity to test if imaging spectrometer data can be used to identify the chemistry of these flood-related plumes. Many chemicals have unique spectral signatures in the ultraviolet to near-infrared range (0.2 - 2.5 microns) that can be used as fingerprints for their identification. We are particularly interested in detecting thin films of oil, gasoline, diesel, and raw sewage suspended on or in water. If these materials can be successfully differentiated in the lab then we will use spectral-shape matching algorithms to look for their spectral signatures in the AVIRIS data collected over New Orleans and other areas impacted by Katrina. If imaging spectroscopy

  18. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  19. No Ocean Source for the Enceladus Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Schneider, N. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kargel, J. S.; Schaller, E. L.; Brown, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    One surprising discovery of the Cassini mission to Saturn has been the presence of geyser-like plumes at the south pole of the icy moon Enceladus ejecting >300; kg/s of water into Saturn's magnetosphere. In situ and remote observations (Waite et al. 2006; Hansen et al. 2006) have shown that the primary plume constituent is H2O, and thermal measurements indicate intense heating in cracks believed to be plume vents on the surface (Spencer et al. 2006). These observations have led to speculation that the plumes are fed from a liquid water reservoir beneath Enceladus' surface. We present results from an extremely sensitive, high-resolution spectroscopic search using the Keck and Anglo-Australian Telescopes which place a stringent upper limit on sodium emission in the Enceladus plumes. Large amounts of sodium would be expected if Enceladus' plume material were derived directly from a subsurface liquid reservoir in contact with rocky material. Chemical models predict that sodium would dissolve into such an ocean at mixing ratios relative to water of 10-4 to 10-1 (Zolotov et al., 2007). Our numerical plume models show that such high sodium concentrations would form a detectable torus encircling Saturn. Our detection upper limits fall orders of magnitude below these models, leading us to conclude that the Enceladus plumes do not originate in an ocean or sea. These observations support the alternative theories that the plumes are generated by shear heating of the icy crust resulting in sublimation or melting, or the decomposition of clathrates. This work has been supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program and the NSF's Planetary Astronomy Program. References: Hansen et al., Science, 311, 1422, 2006. Spencer et al., Science, 311, 1401, 2006. Waite et al., Science, 311, 1419, 2006. Zolotov et al., Presented to the "Enceladus Focus Group Workshop," Boulder, CO, 2007.

  20. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  1. Automatic delineation of geomorphological slope units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Marchesini, Ivan; Fiorucci, Federica; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Reichenbach, Paola; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Slope units are portions of land surface, defined by the general requirement of maximizing homogeneity within a single unit and heterogeneity between different units, but whose formal characterization and practical delineation has been done in different ways. This is often justified by the statement that the slope unit partitioning of a territory can be used to describe a variety of landforms and processes, and for the assessment of natural hazards. As a result, they need to be tailored according to the specific model in use. This may result in an ambiguous definition of such objects, while an objective definition is highly desirable, which would also allow their reproducibility. We have developed a publicly accessible Web Processing Service (WPS) with the aim of incrementally achieve a satisfactory definition of slope unit. The service allows any user to connect to a CNR-IRPI (Perugia) server, upload his own Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and optional additional data, specify parameters constraining the size and aspect of slope units, and quickly obtain the result in a layer in vector format. The calculation is performed using a parallel algorithm, resulting in a processing time short enough to allow the user to tune the input parameters, repeating the process for a sufficient number of times in order to obtain a satisfactory result. We use quantitative criteria to define and draw the slope units, depending on the input parameters. The algorithm starts from a hydrologically consistent partition of the study area into half-basins with a large number of contributing DEM cells. Each of the half-basins is then checked against a few requirements: maximum area required by the user and maximum standard deviation of the aspect on two orthogonal directions. Those specific half-basin that do not meet the requirements are partitioned further, requiring a lower number of contributing cells. The process is iterated until no half-basin exceeds the user-specified thresholds. Our

  2. Use of plume mapping data to estimate chlorinated solvent mass loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, J.R.; Neupane, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    Results from a plume mapping study from November 2000 through February 2001 in the sand-and-gravel surficial aquifer at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, were used to assess the occurrence and extent of chlorinated solvent mass loss by calculating mass fluxes across two transverse cross sections and by observing changes in concentration ratios and mole fractions along a longitudinal cross section through the core of the plume. The plume mapping investigation was conducted to determine the spatial distribution of chlorinated solvents migrating from former waste disposal sites. Vertical contaminant concentration profiles were obtained with a direct-push drill rig and multilevel piezometers. These samples were supplemented with additional ground water samples collected with a minipiezometer from the bed of a perennial stream downgradient of the source areas. Results from the field program show that the plume, consisting mainly of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-1,2-DCE), was approximately 670 m in length and 120 m in width, extended across much of the 9- to 18-m thickness of the surficial aquifer, and discharged to the stream in some areas. The analyses of the plume mapping data show that losses of the parent compounds, PCE and TCE, were negligible downgradient of the source. In contrast, losses of cis-1,2-DCE, a daughter compound, were observed in this plume. These losses very likely resulted from biodegradation, but the specific reaction mechanism could not be identified. This study demonstrates that plume mapping data can be used to estimate the occurrence and extent of chlorinated solvent mass loss from biodegradation and assess the effectiveness of natural attenuation as a remedial measure.

  3. Tritium plume dynamics in the shallow unsaturated zone in an arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maples, S.R.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Pohll, G.; Michel, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    The spatiotemporal variability of a tritium plume in the shallow unsaturated zone and the mechanisms controlling its transport were evaluated during a 10-yr study. Plume movement was minimal and its mass declined by 68%. Upward-directed diffusive-vapor tritium fluxes and radioactive decay accounted for most of the observed plume-mass declines. Effective isolation of tritium (3H) and other contaminants at waste-burial facilities requires improved understanding of transport processes and pathways. Previous studies documented an anomalously widespread (i.e., theoretically unexpected) distribution of 3H (>400 m from burial trenches) in a dry, sub-root-zone gravelly layer (1–2-m depth) adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) burial facility in the Amargosa Desert, Nevada, that closed in 1992. The objectives of this study were to: (i) characterize long-term, spatiotemporal variability of 3H plumes; and (ii) quantify the processes controlling 3H behavior in the sub-root-zone gravelly layer beneath native vegetation adjacent to the facility. Geostatistical methods, spatial moment analyses, and mass flux calculations were applied to a spatiotemporally comprehensive, 10-yr data set (2001–2011). Results showed minimal bulk-plume advancement during the study period and limited Fickian spreading of mass. Observed spreading rates were generally consistent with theoretical vapor-phase dispersion. The plume mass diminished more rapidly than would be expected from radioactive decay alone, indicating net efflux from the plume. Estimates of upward 3H efflux via diffusive-vapor movement were >10× greater than by dispersive-vapor or total-liquid movement. Total vertical fluxes were >20× greater than lateral diffusive-vapor fluxes, highlighting the importance of upward migration toward the land surface. Mass-balance calculations showed that radioactive decay and upward diffusive-vapor fluxes contributed the majority of plume loss. Results indicate that plume losses

  4. Linear Spectral Analysis of Plume Emissions Using an Optical Matrix Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, C. K.

    1992-01-01

    Plume spectrometry provides a means to monitor the health of a burning rocket engine, and optical matrix processors provide a means to analyze the plume spectra in real time. By observing the spectrum of the exhaust plume of a rocket engine, researchers have detected anomalous behavior of the engine and have even determined the failure of some equipment before it would normally have been noticed. The spectrum of the plume is analyzed by isolating information in the spectrum about the various materials present to estimate what materials are being burned in the engine. Scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have implemented a high resolution spectrometer to discriminate the spectral peaks of the many species present in the plume. Researchers at the Stennis Space Center Demonstration Testbed Facility (DTF) have implemented a high resolution spectrometer observing a 1200-lb. thrust engine. At this facility, known concentrations of contaminants can be introduced into the burn, allowing for the confirmation of diagnostic algorithms. While the high resolution of the measured spectra has allowed greatly increased insight into the functioning of the engine, the large data flows generated limit the ability to perform real-time processing. The use of an optical matrix processor and the linear analysis technique described below may allow for the detailed real-time analysis of the engine's health. A small optical matrix processor can perform the required mathematical analysis both quicker and with less energy than a large electronic computer dedicated to the same spectral analysis routine.

  5. Black Saturday bushfire smoke plumes as seen from SCIAMACHY measurements in limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörner, Steffen; Pukite, Janis; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Fromm, Mike; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The so called Black Saturday bushfires started on the 7th of February 2009 in southeastern Victoria, Australia. Resulting smoke plumes contaminated the lower stratosphere in the following weeks as measured by a variety satellite instruments. Particle extinction profiles retrieved from SCIAMACHY measurements in limb geometry provide a complementary view on the development of the smoke plume, especially on the first days of the event when measurements of other instruments were sparse. Earlier studies showed that commonly used 1D retrieval algorithms for limb observations of particle extinction potentially underestimate optical thickness and altitude of such injections into the stratosphere. In this study, a 2D particle extinction retrieval algorithm for SCIAMACHY limb measurements is used to track optical thickness and plume altitude of the Black Saturday bushfires over the month of February. The required information about the horizontal distribution of the plume is determined by the absorbing aerosol index (AAI) derived from SCIAMACHY measurements in nadir geometry. First results indicate enhanced particle scattering above 18 km on the 9th of February while the smoke plume is drifting to the north east above the Pacific ocean.

  6. A detailed study on Catchment delineation for Urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, B.; B M, A.; Lohani, B.; Jain, A.

    2015-12-01

    Urban flood modelling is carried out for predicting, analysing and planning of floods in urban areas. Catchment information is an important input for urban flood modelling. Automatic catchment delineation at gully gratings for urban areas using appropriate software packages/methods along with an appropriate set of input data and parameters is still a research challenge. Considering the above, the aim of this study is to (i) identify the best suitable software for automatic catchment delineation by considering gully grating as outlet (ii) understand the effect of resolution of DEM on catchments delineated (iii) understand whether to consider DEM or DSM for catchment delineation (iv) study the effect of grid based and TIN based DEM. In this study catchment delineation has been investigated considering IIT Kanpur as a study site. LiDAR data are used to generate DEM/DSM of the study area. A comparative study of catchment delineation has been carried out between ArcHydro 10.1, BASINS 4.1, ArcSWAT, WMS 7.1, and HEC-GeoHMS approaches. Catchments have been delineated for different drainage threshold areas using gully grating points as outlets and their effects have been compared for the aforementioned software. In order to understand the effect of resolution of data, DEMs of 1m and 5m resolution have been generated and compared against each other. Effects of building ridge lines and their contribution to catchment delineation has been studied by generating a DSM of 1m resolution, and comparing the results with catchments delineated using 1m DEM. In order to assess the effects of the types of DEM over catchment delineation, a grid based DEM and TIN based DEM are compared against each other using WMS 7.1 software. The results for the catchment delineation using various software illustrate that ArcHydro 10.1 performs better than any other aforementioned software. Also, it is noted that varied drainage threshold area parameters, resolutions of DEM, selection of DEM

  7. Geochemical evolution of highly alkaline and saline tank waste plumes during seepage through vadose zone sediments 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Larsen, Joern T.; Serne, R. Jeff

    2004-02-01

    Leakage of highly saline and alkaline radioactive waste from storage tanks into underlying sediments is a serious environmental problem at the Hanford Site in Washington State. This study focuses on geochemical evolution of tank waste plumes resulting from interactions between the waste solution and sediment. A synthetic tank waste solution was infused into unsaturated Hanford sediment columns (0.2, 0.6, and 2 m) maintained at 70°C to simulate the field contamination process. Spatially and temporally resolved geochemical profiles of the waste plume were obtained. Thorough OH - neutralization (from an initial pH 14 down to 6.3) was observed. Three broad zones of pore solutions were identified to categorize the dominant geochemical reactions: the silicate dissolution zone (pH > 10), pH-neutralized zone (pH 10 to 6.5), and displaced native sediment pore water (pH 6.5 to 8). Elevated concentrations of Si, Fe, and K in plume fluids and their depleted concentrations in plume sediments reflected dissolution of primary minerals within the silicate dissolution zone. The very high Na concentrations in the waste solution resulted in rapid and complete cation exchange, reflected in high concentrations of Ca and Mg at the plume front. The plume-sediment profiles also showed deposition of hydrated solids and carbonates. Fair correspondence was obtained between these results and analyses of field borehole samples from a waste plume at the Hanford Site. Results of this study provide a well-defined framework for understanding waste plumes in the more complex field setting and for understanding geochemical factors controlling transport of contaminant species carried in waste solutions that leaked from single-shell storage tanks in the past.

  8. Charged body potential monitoring of an electrolyte plume emanating from a dripping source.

    PubMed

    Nimmer, Robin E; Osiensky, James L

    2003-05-01

    Hole-surface charged body potential (CBP) measurements were taken over a 173-day period during a drip-injection, tracer experiment in partially saturated, fractured basalt. A continuous, enhanced conductivity, potassium chloride (KCl) solution was dripped into the fractured basalt and energized directly through a current electrode placed in the conductive solution. The constant concentration, KCl solution was introduced above a perched water table at an average rate of 10.07 L/day under a constant hydraulic head for 76 days. The KCl drip period was followed by a 34-day tap water drip period and a 62-day drainage period. Hole-surface CBP measurements were taken over time to delineate the evolution of the asymmetrical, vadose zone, plume. A 15 by 15 grid of land surface based, porous pot electrodes (copper sulfate), located symmetrically about the centrally located injection borehole, was used for the hole-surface CBP experiment. Ratios of electrical potentials measured at the land surface over time were contoured and profiled to delineate the evolution of the electrolyte plume. PMID:12744429

  9. Occurrence and attenuation of specific organic compounds in the groundwater plume at a former gasworks site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfirescu, Daniela; Grathwohl, Peter

    2001-12-01

    The changing contaminant pattern with travelled distance was investigated in the anaerobic groundwater plume downstream from an extended zone containing residual NAPL at a former gas manufacturing plant. With increasing distance, O- and N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds are enriched in the plume relative to the usually assessed coal tar constituents (poly- and monocyclic aromatic compounds). In a first approximation, the overall concentration decrease of the investigated compounds follows a first order overall decay. The half life distance in the plume downgradient from the source varied between 20 m for benzene and up to 167-303 m for alkyl-naphthalenes. Acenaphthene is degraded only within about 50 m downstream from the source area, then its concentration remains constant (ca. 180 μg/l) and far above the legal limit. Dimethyl-benzofurans were the most recalcitrant among all compounds which could be quantified with the analytical method available. The overall groundwater contamination in the plume is seriously underestimated if only BTEX and 16-EPA-PAHs are monitored.

  10. Occurrence and attenuation of specific organic compounds in the groundwater plume at a former gasworks site.

    PubMed

    Zamfirescu, D; Grathwohl, P

    2001-12-15

    The changing contaminant pattern with travelled distance was investigated in the anaerobic groundwater plume downstream from an extended zone containing residual NAPL at a former gas manufacturing plant. With increasing distance, O- and N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds are enriched in the plume relative to the usually assessed coal tar constituents (poly- and monocyclic aromatic compounds). In a first approximation, the overall concentration decrease of the investigated compounds follows a first order overall decay. The half life distance in the plume downgradient from the source varied between 20 m for benzene and up to 167-303 m for alkyl-naphthalenes. Acenaphthene is degraded only within about 50 m downstream from the source area, then its concentration remains constant (ca. 180 microg/l) and far above the legal limit. Dimethyl-benzofurans were the most recalcitrant among all compounds which could be quantified with the analytical method available. The overall groundwater contamination in the plume is seriously underestimated if only BTEX and 16-EPA-PAHs are monitored. PMID:11820480

  11. Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes and plume impingement environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of experimental nozzle, exhaust plume, and exhaust plume impingement data is presented. The data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with propellant Al loadings of 2, 10 and 15% exhausting to simulated altitudes of 50,000, 100,000 and 112,000 ft. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase method of characteristics numerical solution and a technique for defining thermal and pressure environments experienced by bodies immersed in two-phase exhaust plumes.

  12. Characterization of a Contaminant Inventory at DOE Sites, as a Tool for Selecting Monitoring and Remediation Technologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, T. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world’s largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. The frequency of occurrence and ranking of contaminants in groundwater plumes is one of the main criteria needed for decision-making related to planning and prioritizing the types of basic research and the development of site characterization, monitoring, and remedial approaches. Using the data from 60 DOE sites, including 221 groundwater plumes, collected in the DOE Groundwater Database (GWD), we evaluated the frequency of occurrence of specific contaminants and their associations, plume volumes, contaminant maximum concentrations, masses, and isotope activities. Contaminants detected in groundwater at 60 DOE sites and facilities can be categorized into the following eight generic contaminant groups: chlorinated hydrocarbons (chlorinated ethenes), fuels and fuel components (i.e., petroleum/fuel hydrocarbons), explosives, metals, radioactive isotopes (excluding tritium), tritium, sulfates, and nitrates. The most common are plumes containing two (29.4% of all plumes in the GWD) and three (29%) contaminant groups. The most frequent binary combinations of contaminant groups are those of mixed waste, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and tritium—35% and metals and isotopes—28% of all plumes. Our results were compared to the data from 18 DOE sites and 91 plumes, collected in 1992, to illustrate the progress in site characterization and remediation over the past decade. The analysis of contaminant inventory and plume characteristics should be helpful in establishing priorities for basic research needs, which will enable cost-effective and efficient application of new characterization, monitoring, modeling, and remediation technologies.

  13. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites

  14. The Effect of Reaction Control System Thruster Plume Impingement on Orion Service Module Solar Array Power Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bury, Kristen M.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's new Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle has geometry that orients the reaction control system (RCS) thrusters such that they can impinge upon the surface of Orion's solar array wings (SAW). Plume impingement can cause Paschen discharge, chemical contamination, thermal loading, erosion, and force loading on the SAW surface, especially when the SAWs are in a worst-case orientation (pointed 45 towards the aft end of the vehicle). Preliminary plume impingement assessment methods were needed to determine whether in-depth, timeconsuming calculations were required to assess power loss. Simple methods for assessing power loss as a result of these anomalies were developed to determine whether plume impingement induced power losses were below the assumed contamination loss budget of 2 percent. This paper details the methods that were developed and applies them to Orion's worst-case orientation.

  15. Space shuttle contamination due to backflow from control motor exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Chan, S. T. K.; Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    Spacecraft contamination of the space shuttle orbiter and accompanying Spacelab payloads is studied. The scattering of molecules from the vernier engines and flash evaporator nozzle after impingement on the orbiter wing surfaces, and the backflow of molecules out of the flash evaporator nozzle plume flow field due to intermolecular collisions in the plume are the problems discussed. A method was formulated for dealing with these problems, and detailed results are given.

  16. Simulation of plume dynamics using particle graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourtellott, John; Coker, Charles F.; Crow, Dennis R.

    2000-07-01

    To enhance the fidelity of numerical flow field (plume) imagery in hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) systems, new methods using particle system graphics have been developed. To render infrared (IR) images that are consistent with the underlying physical phenomenology, techniques for particle placement, pixel rasterization and drawing were developed and implemented in computer software. The software was integrated into an existing HIL scene generator and used to demonstrate several new capabilities. Moving particle systems were used to depict the internal flow and turbulence common to plumes. Persistent particle systems were used to depict the trail of hot gas and particulates left behind typical plumes. The addition of plume dynamic behaviors such as these can potentially improve HIL systems and, as a result, improve the testing of seekers and other weapon systems.

  17. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  18. High altitude plumes at Mars morning terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia Muñoz, A.; Garcia Melendo, E.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Gomez Forrellad, J. M.; Pellier, C.; Delcroix, M.; Lopez Valverde, M. A.; González Galindo, F.; Jaeschke, W.; Parker, D.; Phillips, J.; Peach, D.

    2015-10-01

    In March and April 2012 two extremely high altitude plumes were observed at the Martian terminator reaching 200 -250 km or more above the surface[1]. They were located at about 195o West longitude and 45o South latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and extended ˜500 -1,000 km in both North-South and East- West, and lasted for about 10 days. Both plumes exhibited day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb. Another large plume was captured on Hubble Space Telescope images in May 1997 at 99º West longitude and 3º South latitude, but its altitude cannot be pr ecisely determined.Broad-band photometry was performed of both events in the spectral range 255 nm -1052 nm. Based on the observed properties, we discuss different possible scenarios for the mechanism responsible for the formation of these plumes.

  19. The Plasmaspheric Plume and Magnetopause Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Phan, T. D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Souza, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present near-simultaneous measurements from two THEMIS spacecraft at the dayside magnetopause with a 1.5 h separation in local time. One spacecraft observes a high-density plasmaspheric plume while the other does not. Both spacecraft observe signatures of magnetic reconnection, providing a test for the changes to reconnection in local time along the magnetopause as well as the impact of high densities on the reconnection process. When the plume is present and the magnetospheric density exceeds that in the magnetosheath, the reconnection jet velocity decreases, the density within the jet increases, and the location of the faster jet is primarily on field lines with magnetosheath orientation. Slower jet velocities indicate that reconnection is occurring less efficiently. In the localized region where the plume contacts the magnetopause, the high-density plume may impede the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling by mass loading the reconnection site.

  20. Local stability of axisymmetric plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R. v. K., Chakravarthy; Lesshafft, Lutz; Huerre, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    A linear stability analysis of a forced plume with non-zero momentum at the inlet is performed for Pr = 1 , Re = 100 and Ri near 1. The steady base flow is obtained as a laminar solution of the steady Navier Stokes equations. The base flow asymptotes to a self-similar solution as it evolves downstream. In the non-self-similar regime close to the inlet, both axisymmetric mode (m = 0) and the helical mode (m = 1) are convectively unstable at sufficiently low Richardson number. In the self-similar regime, only the helical mode is absolutely unstable and the axisymmetric mode is stable. Higher helical modes (m >= 2) are seen to be convectively unstable very close to the inlet and become stable as the flow evolves downstream. The transition from convective to absolute instability makes the flow a good candidate for observing steep nonlinear global modes associated with buoyancy. This work is supported by a PhD scholarship from Ecole polytechnique.

  1. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  2. Delinating Thermohaline Double-Diffusive Rayleigh Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, T.; Walther, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liedl, R.

    2013-12-01

    In natural systems, convective flow induced from density differences may occur in near-coastal aquifers, atmospheric boundary layers, oceanic streams or within the earth crust. Whether an initially stable, diffusive regime evolves into a convective (stable or chaotic) regime, or vice versa, depends on the system's framing boundary conditions. A conventional parameter to express the relation between diffusive and convective forces of such a density-driven regime is Rayleigh number (Ra). While most systems are mainly dominated by only a single significant driving force (i.e. only temperature or salinity), some systems need to consider two boundary processes (e.g. deep, thus warm, haline flow in porous media). In that case, a two-dimensional, 'double-diffusive' Rayleigh system can be defined. Nield (1998) postulated a boundary between diffusive and convective regime at RaT + RaC = 4pi^2 in the first quadrant (Q1), with Rayleigh numbers for temperature and concentration respectively. The boundary in the forth quadrant (Q4) could not exactly be determined, yet the approximate position estimated. Simulations with HydroGeoSphere (Therrien, 2010) using a vertical, quadratic, homogeneous, isotropic setup confirmed the existence of the 4pi^2-boundary and revealed additional regimes (diffusive, single-roll, double-roll, chaotic) in Q1. Also, non-chaotic, oscillating patterns could be identified in Q4. More detailed investigations with OpenGeoSys (Kolditz, 2012) confirmed the preceding HGS results, and, using a 1:10-scaled domain (height:length), uncovered even more distinctive regimes (diffusive, minimum ten roles, supposely up to 25 roles, and chaotic?) in Q1, while again, oscillating patterns were found in the transition zone between diffusive and chaotic regimes in Q4. Output of numerical simulations from Q1 and Q4 show the mentioned regimes (diffusive, stable-convective, stable-oscillatory, chaotic) while results are displayed in context of a possible delination between

  3. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher

  4. Bathymetric effects on estuarine plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2013-04-01

    influence of bathymetry on an estuary plume at an estuary-shelf transition is studied with a three-dimensional ocean circulation model. To understand the response of the plume to bathymetry, several types of estuarine shapes and shelf geometries were adopted in this numerical study. The channel's shape and its width-to-depth aspect ratio affected the fate of the plume by determining flow characteristics inside the estuary. Moreover, the bathymetry of the shelf such as the shelf slope and the direction of a submarine channel defined the plume characteristics on the shelf. An estuarine channel with a triangular cross section generated relatively stronger exchange flows at midestuary than a rectangular cross section, which resulted in a larger surface plume over the shelf. The extension of the submarine channel onto the shelf favored increased plume water transport out to the shelf, a result of reduced frictional effects on the shelf. The orientation of the submarine channel changed the direction of the plume over the shelf, with no additional external forces. Two fronts developed at the edges of the submarine channel because of enhanced lateral shears in the flow. When the estuary was relatively wide compared to the internal Rossby radius (Kelvin number Ke ≥ 5), or when the relative strength of the freshwater discharge compared to the estuary width was weak (Rossby number Ro ≤ 0.05), the coastal plume did not expand up-shelf. In fact, results indicated that freshwater up-shelf transport in a coastal current, moving against Coriolis' accelerations, was proportional to Ro.

  5. Puff/Plume for Windows 95-NT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-05-20

    PFPL-NT is a GUI event-driven scientific application integrating 14 background processes to access the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous materials from production facilities and transportation vehicles. A simple straight-line Gaussian assumption has been employed with observations from meteorological towers to calculate and visually display plume directions, plume width, and dose/concentration estimates in the immediate vicinity of a radiological or chemical release.

  6. Geological factors affecting CO2 plume distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Leetaru, H.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the lateral extent of a CO2 plume has important implications with regards to buying/leasing pore volume rights, defining the area of review for an injection permit, determining the extent of an MMV plan, and managing basin-scale sequestration from multiple injection sites. The vertical and lateral distribution of CO2 has implications with regards to estimating CO2 storage volume at a specific site and the pore pressure below the caprock. Geologic and flow characteristics such as effective permeability and porosity, capillary pressure, lateral and vertical permeability anisotropy, geologic structure, and thickness all influence and affect the plume distribution to varying degrees. Depending on the variations in these parameters one may dominate the shape and size of the plume. Additionally, these parameters do not necessarily act independently. A comparison of viscous and gravity forces will determine the degree of vertical and lateral flow. However, this is dependent on formation thickness. For example in a thick zone with injection near the base, the CO2 moves radially from the well but will slow at greater radii and vertical movement will dominate. Generally the CO2 plume will not appreciably move laterally until the caprock or a relatively low permeability interval is contacted by the CO2. Conversely, in a relatively thin zone with the injection interval over nearly the entire zone, near the wellbore the CO2 will be distributed over the entire vertical component and will move laterally much further with minimal vertical movement. Assuming no geologic structure, injecting into a thin zone or into a thick zone immediately under a caprock will result in a larger plume size. With a geologic structure such as an anticline, CO2 plume size may be restricted and injection immediately below the caprock may have less lateral plume growth because the structure will induce downward vertical movement of the CO2 until the outer edge of the plume reaches a spill

  7. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  8. A tidal plume front and internal solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald R.; Weidemann, Alan D.

    1998-07-01

    A tidal plume front (internal tidal bore) propagating from the Apalachicola Bay outflow into the northern Gulf of Mexico is examined in a brief set of observations. Temperature and salinity time series showed a radially spreading "pool" of estuarine water with a character similar to a previously observed "turbulent rotor", and with a following packet of internal solitons. Features associated with these observations may be pertinent to interpretation of remotely sensed plumes and to predictive modeling.

  9. Ion recombination in aircraft exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A.; Mirabel, P.

    In this article, a model which examines the evolution of ion concentrations in a hot aircraft exhaust plume on the ground is proposed. The model includes plume dilution and ion-ion recombination with coefficients which vary with temperature. A comparison of the model is made with the available ground-based experimental data obtained on the ATTAS research aircraft engines. From this comparison, an ion emission index of the order of 8 1016 ions/kg(fuel) inferred.

  10. 1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR AND DATE, SOURCE: BISHOP MUSEUM, HONOLULU, HI. - Ship "Falls of Clyde", Hawaii Maritime Center,Pier 7, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for the City of San Jose in cooperative agreement with the California Department of Transportation (from the San Jose Historical Museum) - Stevens Ranch Complex, State Route 101, Coyote, Santa Clara County, CA

  12. 356. Delineator Unknown March 1946 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    356. Delineator Unknown March 1946 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; GENERAL DATA; PLAT III - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. Polymer delineation system. [Patent application: traffic lane lines

    DOEpatents

    Woolman, S.; Steinberg, M.

    1975-06-24

    A delineation system (traffic lane lines) for highways is described in which polymerizable substances are applied to existing or newly prepared highway pavements. The substances would contain a suitable pigment and may incorporate reflective elements.

  14. 10. Photocopy of map (from Benicia Historical Society) Delineator unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of map (from Benicia Historical Society) Delineator unknown May 1, 1894, revised to Mar. 27, 1918 'MAP OF BENICIA ARSENAL RESERVATION' - Benicia Arsenal, Benicia Industrial Park, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  15. 22. Photocopy of drawing Delineator unknown, ca. 1931 Wright Studio, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of drawing Delineator unknown, ca. 1931 Wright Studio, photographer View from Kellogg Blvd. - St. Paul City Hall & Ramsey County Courthouse, 15 West Kellogg Boulevard, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  16. An analytical model for simulating two-dimensional multispecies plume migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Liang, Ching-Ping; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Li, Loretta Y.

    2016-02-01

    The two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions involving arbitrary number of species in groundwater system is considered to predict the two-dimensional plume behavior of decaying contaminant such as radionuclide and dissolved chlorinated solvent. Generalized analytical solutions in compact format are derived through the sequential application of the Laplace, finite Fourier cosine, and generalized integral transform to reduce the coupled partial differential equation system to a set of linear algebraic equations. The system of algebraic equations is next solved for each species in the transformed domain, and the solutions in the original domain are then obtained through consecutive integral transform inversions. Explicit form solutions for a special case are derived using the generalized analytical solutions and are compared with the numerical solutions. The analytical results indicate that the analytical solutions are robust, accurate and useful for simulation or screening tools to assess plume behaviors of decaying contaminants.

  17. Vertical distribution of Pahang River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, T. M.; Lihan, T.; Mustapha, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Large rivers transported high amount of discharge towards the sea and induced the river plume formation. The contents of the plume consist of suspended solids, nutrients, pollutants and other particles. Productivity at estuary depends on the organic and nutrient contents from the river discharge. Due to many possible factors, the dispersal of the plume shows spatial variation horizontally and vertically. The monsoonal wind is a factor that effecting plume vertical profile pattern. This study determines the vertical distribution pattern of the plumeat Pahang River through field observation. Several water parameters were measured during cruises conducted at respective monsoon. Data collected includes depth, chlorophyll-a, salinity, temperature and suspended particulate matter. Depth at Pahang's offshore usually does not reached more than 15 m depth because of the shallow continental shelf at South China Sea. The plume has higher concentration at the mouth of the river which causes the area to be less saline and it decreases as the station furthers from the river. Chlorophyll-a is distributed mainly at the surface level where the area is warmer and received freshwater runoff. Suspended particulate matter shows downward distribution from the front of the estuary towards deep water column depth (10 m). Temperature pattern shows warmer surface layer with depth less than 5 m while deeper water column has lower temperature. Vertical profile pattern of Pahang River plume generally shows slight difference between each monsoon by referring to particular parameter.

  18. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-07-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.

  19. Site Characterization To Support Use Of Monitored Natural Attentuation For Remediation Of Inorganic Contaminants In Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical recommendations have recently been published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address site characterization needed to support selection of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for cleanup of inorganic contaminant plumes in groundwater. Immobilization onto ...

  20. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Downs, Wayne C.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Hall, H. James

    1997-01-01

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

  1. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

    1997-12-16

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

  2. Long-term natural attenuation of carbon and nitrogen within a groundwater plume after removal of the treated wastewater source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repert, D.A.; Barber, L.B.; Hess, K.M.; Keefe, S.H.; Kent, D.B.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Smith, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    Disposal of treated wastewater for more than 60 years onto infiltration beds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts produced a groundwater contaminant plume greater than 6 km long in a surficial sand and gravel aquifer. In December 1995 the wastewater disposal ceased. A long-term, continuous study was conducted to characterize the post-cessation attenuation of the plume from the source to 0.6 km downgradient. Concentrations and total pools of mobile constituents, such as boron and nitrate, steadily decreased within 1-4 years along the transect. Dissolved organic carbon loads also decreased, but to a lesser extent, particularly downgradient of the infiltration beds. After 4 years, concentrations and pools of carbon and nitrogen in groundwater were relatively constant with time and distance, but substantially elevated above background. The contaminant plume core remained anoxic for the entire 10-year study period; temporal patterns of integrated oxygen deficit decreased slowly at all sites. In 2004, substantial amounts of total dissolved carbon (7 mol C m-2) and fixed (dissolved plus sorbed) inorganic nitrogen (0.5 mol N m-2) were still present in a 28-m vertical interval at the disposal site. Sorbed constituents have contributed substantially to the dissolved carbon and nitrogen pools and are responsible for the long-term persistence of the contaminant plume. Natural aquifer restoration at the discharge location will take at least several decades, even though groundwater flow rates and the potential for contaminant flushing are relatively high.

  3. Back contamination.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, G. B.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of the concept and implications of back contamination and of the ways and means for its prevention. Back contamination is defined as contamination of the terrestrial biosphere with organisms or materials returned from outer space that are capable of potentially harmful terrestrial activity. Since the question of whether or not life exists on other planets may, in reality, not be answered until many samples are returned to earth for detailed study, requirements for the prevention of back contamination are necessary. A review of methods of microbiologic contamination control is followed by a discussion of the nature of back contamination and its risk levels, contamination sources and locations, and possible defenses against back contamination. The U.S. lunar back contamination program is described and shown to provide a valuable basis for further refining the technology for the control of planetary back contamination.

  4. Nuclear thermal rocket plume interactions with spacecraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, B.H.; Gatsonis, N.A.; Buzby, J.; Yin, X.

    1997-05-01

    This is the first study that has treated the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) effluent problem in its entirety, beginning with the reactor core, through the nozzle flow, to the plume backflow. The summary of major accomplishments is given below: (1) Determined the NTR effluents that include neutral, ionized and radioactive species, under typical NTR chamber conditions. Applied an NTR chamber chemistry model that includes conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (2) Performed NTR nozzle flow simulations using a Navier-Stokes solver. We assumed frozen chemistry at the chamber conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (3) Performed plume simulations using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code with chemistry. In order to account for radioactive trace species that may be important for contamination purposes we developed a multi-weighted DSMC methodology. The domain in our simulations included large regions downstream and upstream of the exit. Inputs were taken from the Navier-Stokes solutions.

  5. Behavior of a chlorinated ethene plume following source-area treatment with Fenton's reagent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Casey, C.C.

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring data collected over a 6-year period show that a plume of chlorinated ethene-contaminated ground water has contracted significantly following treatment of the contaminant source area using in situ oxidation. Prior to treatment (1998), concentrations of perchloroethene (PCE) exceeded 4500 ??g/L in a contaminant source area associated with a municipal landfill in Kings Bay, Georgia. The plume emanating from this source area was characterized by vinyl chloride (VC) concentrations exceeding 800 ??g/L. In situ oxidation using Fenton's reagent lowered PCE concentrations in the source area below 100 ??g/L, and PCE concentrations have not rebounded above this level since treatment. In the 6 years following treatment, VC concentrations in the plume have decreased significantly. These concentration declines can be attributed to the movement of Fenton's reagent-treated water downgradient through the system, the cessation of a previously installed pump-and-treat system, and the significant natural attenuation capacity of this anoxic aquifer. While in situ oxidation briefly decreased the abundance and activity of microorganisms in the source area, this activity rebounded in <6 months. Nevertheless, the shift from sulfate-reducing to Fe(III)-reducing conditions induced by Fenton's treatment may have decreased the efficiency of reductive dechlorination in the injection zone. The results of this study indicate that source-area removal actions, particularly when applied to ground water systems that have significant natural attenuation capacity, can be effective in decreasing the areal extent and contaminant concentrations of chlorinated ethene plumes. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  6. Investigation of ship-plume chemistry using a newly-developed photochemical ship-plume model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. S.; Park, R. S.; Song, C. H.

    2009-05-01

    A photochemical ship-plume model, which can consider the ship-plume dynamics and ship-plume chemistry, simultaneously, was developed to gain a better understanding of atmospheric impact of ship emissions. The model performance was then evaluated by a comparison with the observation data measured on a NOAA WP-3D flight during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002 (ITCT 2K2) airborne field campaign. The simulation conditions and parameters, such as meteorological conditions, emission rates, and background gas and particulate species concentrations, were obtained directly and/or inferred indirectly from the ITCT 2K2 observation data. The model-predicted concentrations showed good agreement with the observed concentrations of five ambient species (NOx, NOy, O3, HNO3, and H2SO4) at the eight plume transects by the WP-3D flight with strong correlations around the 1:1 line (0.66≤R≤0.85). In addition, a set of tests were carried out to approximate the magnitude of the reaction probability of HNO3 onto sea-salt particles in the model-observation comparison framework. These results suggest that the reaction probability of HNO3 onto sea-salt particles may be in the order of 10-3 or smaller. The equivalent NOx lifetime throughout the "entire" plume was also estimated from ship-plume chemistry modeling. The NOx lifetimes estimated throughout the "entire ship plume" was 3.36 h. The short NOx lifetime over the entire ship plume clearly shows that the ship-plume chemistry shortens the NOx lifetime considerably. Therefore, the ship-plume chemistry model should be used to model the changes in ship-plume chemical compositions and better evaluate the atmospheric impact of ocean-going ship emissions.

  7. Lateral plume spreading in a medium size river plume using surface Lagrangian drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakoulaki, Georgia; MacDonald, Daniel; Cole, Kelly

    2016-04-01

    Groups of 27 Lagrangian drifters deployed in the Merrimack River plume over twelve tides, with river discharges ranging between 150-800 m3/s, are used to understand the external forcing mechanisms responsible for the extent of spreading in river plumes. The transition of buoyant flow from a confined estuary to an unconfined coastal ocean introduces the complicated phenomenon of lateral spreading, which occurs preferentially near the surface and results in a flow that spreads laterally as plume water propagates forward in the direction of mean flow. In this work, the temporal and spatial scales of the active spreading region are estimated in the sampled plumes and related to environmental parameters at the river mouth such as inflow river discharge, initial drifter velocity at the point of release, initial reduced gravity and initial internal wave speed. The initial wave speed was found to be the environmental parameter that best predicts the magnitude of the spatial and temporal scales of the active spreading region. Previous studies have asserted the importance of initial plume parameters in near-field plume evolution and here we extrapolate this idea to the mid-field. Interestingly, we find that that lateral plume spreading is arrested at approximately one inertial radius from the river mouth. We therefore propose that the shutdown of spreading is controlled almost exclusively by Coriolis force and it is responsible for converting spreading motion to spinning motion after the mid field region. The outcomes of this research are widely applicable to other energetic, medium size river plume systems and to the author's knowledge this is the first study to estimate lateral plume expansion using observations beyond the immediate near field region of a river plume. This work will provide further development in understanding plume dynamics and the fundamental physical processes that influence coastal ecosystems.

  8. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E; Gamey, T Jeffrey; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-01-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies. PMID:15819938

  9. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E.; Gamey, Jeff; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-03-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies.

  10. Hubble Captures Volcanic Eruption Plume From Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a picture of a 400-km-high (250-mile-high) plume of gas and dust from a volcanic eruption on Io, Jupiter's large innermost moon.

    Io was passing in front of Jupiter when this image was taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in July 1996. The plume appears as an orange patch just off the edge of Io in the eight o'clock position, against the blue background of Jupiter's clouds. Io's volcanic eruptions blasts material hundreds of kilometers into space in giant plumes of gas and dust. In this image, material must have been blown out of the volcano at more than 2,000 mph to form a plume of this size, which is the largest yet seen on Io.

    Until now, these plumes have only been seen by spacecraft near Jupiter, and their detection from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope opens up new opportunities for long-term studies of these remarkable phenomena.

    The plume seen here is from Pele, one of Io's most powerful volcanos. Pele's eruptions have been seen before. In March 1979, the Voyager 1 spacecraft recorded a 300-km-high eruption cloud from Pele. But the volcano was inactive when the Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Jupiter in July 1979. This Hubble observation is the first glimpse of a Pele eruption plume since the Voyager expeditions.

    Io's volcanic plumes are much taller than those produced by terrestrial volcanos because of a combination of factors. The moon's thin atmosphere offers no resistance to the expanding volcanic gases; its weak gravity (one-sixth that of Earth) allows material to climb higher before falling; and its biggest volcanos are more powerful than most of Earth's volcanos.

    This image is a contrast-enhanced composite of an ultraviolet image (2600 Angstrom wavelength), shown in blue, and a violet image (4100 Angstrom wavelength), shown in orange. The orange color probably occurs because of the absorption and/or scattering of ultraviolet light in the plume. This light from Jupiter passes through

  11. Pele Plume Deposit on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The varied effects of Ionian volcanism can be seen in this false color infrared composite image of Io's trailing hemisphere. Low resolution color data from Galileo's first orbit (June, 1996) have been combined with a higher resolution clear filter picture taken on the third orbit (November, 1996) of the spacecraft around Jupiter.

    A diffuse ring of bright red material encircles Pele, the site of an ongoing, high velocity volcanic eruption. Pele's plume is nearly invisible, except in back-lit photographs, but its deposits indicate energetic ejection of sulfurous materials out to distances more than 600 kilometers from the central vent. Another bright red deposit lies adjacent to Marduk, also a currently active ediface. High temperature hot spots have been detected at both these locations, due to the eruption of molten material in lava flows or lava lakes. Bright red deposits on Io darken and disappear within years or decades of deposition, so the presence of bright red materials marks the sites of recent volcanism.

    This composite was created from data obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The region imaged is centered on 15 degrees South, 224 degrees West, and is almost 2400 kilometers across. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 3 kilometers across. North is towards the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the west.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  12. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  13. The planet beyond the plume hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alan D.; Lewis, Charles

    1999-12-01

    Acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics was accompanied by the rise of the mantle plume/hotspot concept which has come to dominate geodynamics from its use both as an explanation for the origin of intraplate volcanism and as a reference frame for plate motions. However, even with a large degree of flexibility permitted in plume composition, temperature, size, and depth of origin, adoption of any limited number of hotspots means the plume model cannot account for all occurrences of the type of volcanism it was devised to explain. While scientific protocol would normally demand that an alternative explanation be sought, there have been few challenges to "plume theory" on account of a series of intricate controls set up by the plume model which makes plumes seem to be an essential feature of the Earth. The hotspot frame acts not only as a reference but also controls plate tectonics. Accommodating plumes relegates mantle convection to a weak, sluggish effect such that basal drag appears as a minor, resisting force, with plates having to move themselves by boundary forces and continents having to be rifted by plumes. Correspondingly, the geochemical evolution of the mantle is controlled by the requirement to isolate subducted crust into plume sources which limits potential buffers on the composition of the MORB-source to plume- or lower mantle material. Crustal growth and Precambrian tectonics are controlled by interpretations of greenstone belts as oceanic plateaus generated by plumes. Challenges to any aspect of the plume model are thus liable to be dismissed unless a counter explanation is offered across the geodynamic spectrum influenced by "plume theory". Nonetheless, an alternative synthesis can be made based on longstanding petrological evidence for derivation of intraplate volcanism from volatile-bearing sources (wetspots) in conjunction with concepts dismissed for being incompatible or superfluous to "plume theory". In the alternative Earth, the sources for

  14. African Equatorial and Subtropical Ozone Plumes: Recurrences Timescales of the Brown Cloud Trans-African Plumes and Other Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Thompson, Anne M.; Guan, Hong; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    We have found repeated illustrations in the maps of Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) of apparent transport of ozone from the Indian Ocean to the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Most interesting are examples that coincide with the INDOEX observations of late northern winter, 1999. Three soundings associated with the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network help confirm and quantify degree of influence of pollution, lightning, and stratospheric sources, suggesting that perhaps 40% of increased Atlantic ozone could be Asian pollution during periods of maximum identified in the TTO maps. We outline recurrent periods of apparent ozone transport from Indian to Atlantic Ocean regions both during and outside the late-winter period. These are placed in the context of some general observations about factors controlling recurrence timescales for the expression of both equatorial and subtropical plumes. Low-level subtropical plumes are often controlled by frontal systems approaching the Namib coast; these direct mid-level air into either easterly equatorial plumes or westerly mid- troposphere plumes. Equatorial plumes of ozone cross Africa on an easterly path due to the occasional coincidence of two phenomena: (1) lofting of ozone to mid and upper levels, often in the Western Indian Ocean, and (2) the eastward extension of an Equatorial African easterly jet.

  15. PlumeSat: A Micro-Satellite Based Plume Imagery Collection Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.

    2002-06-30

    This paper describes a technical approach to cost-effectively collect plume imagery of boosting targets using a novel micro-satellite based platform operating in low earth orbit (LEO). The plume collection Micro-satellite or PlueSat for short, will be capable of carrying an array of multi-spectral (UV through LWIR) passive and active (Imaging LADAR) sensors and maneuvering with a lateral divert propulsion system to different observation altitudes (100 to 300 km) and different closing geometries to achieve a range of aspect angles (15 to 60 degrees) in order to simulate a variety of boost phase intercept missions. The PlumeSat will be a cost effective platform to collect boost phase plume imagery from within 1 to 10 km ranges, resulting in 0.1 to 1 meter resolution imagery of a variety of potential target missiles with a goal of demonstrating reliable plume-to-hardbody handover algorithms for future boost phase intercept missions. Once deployed on orbit, the PlumeSat would perform a series phenomenology collection experiments until expends its on-board propellants. The baseline PlumeSat concept is sized to provide from 5 to 7 separate fly by data collects of boosting targets. The total number of data collects will depend on the orbital basing altitude and the accuracy in delivering the boosting target vehicle to the nominal PlumeSat fly-by volume.

  16. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  17. CORONAL PLUMES IN THE FAST SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran E-mail: lionel@predsci.com E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com

    2011-07-20

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of {approx}50 km s{sup -1}, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large distances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  18. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line.

  19. Identification of a reactive degradation zone at a landfill leachate plume fringe using high resolution sampling and incubation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuxen, Nina; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul L.

    2006-05-01

    Vertical small-scale variation in phenoxy acid herbicide degradation across a landfill leachate plume fringe was studied using laboratory degradation experiments. Sediment cores (subdivided into 5 cm segments) were collected in the aquifer and the sediment and porewater were used for microcosm experiments (50 experiments) and for determination of solid organic carbon, solid-water partitioning coefficients, specific phenoxy acid degraders and porewater chemistry. Results from a multi-level sampler installed next to the cores provided information on the plume position and oxygen concentration in the groundwater. Oxygen concentration was controlled individually in each microcosm to mimic the conditions at their corresponding depths. A highly increased degradation potential existed at the narrow plume fringe (37.7 to 38.6 masl), governed by the presence of phenoxy acids and oxygen. This resulted in the proliferation of a microbial population of specific phenoxy acid degraders, which further enhanced the degradation potential for phenoxy acids at the fringe. The results illustrate the importance of fringe degradation processes in contaminant plumes. Furthermore, they highlight the relevance of using high-resolution sampling techniques as well as controlled microcosm experiments in the assessment of the natural attenuation capacity of contaminant plumes in groundwater.

  20. In situ remediation of a shallow BTEX plume using vertical groundwater circulation (CGC) technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wasp, R.G.; Desrosiers, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    Remediation of a BTEX plume at a gasoline service station located adjacent to a waterway in lower Westchester County, New York, required the design, installation and operation of two Coaxial Groundwater Circulation (CGC) wells. The CGC units induce a vertical groundwater circulation cell around the well, drawing in contamination into the lower portion of the well for treatment and releasing treated groundwater back into the aquifer. The technique is hydraulically balanced and does not rely on extraction and surface treatment, as required by many conventional technologies. The presence of a 3-dimensional flow field provides soil flushing of the plume through heterogeneous soils. This flushing action mobilizes more contamination to the CGC wells for treatment and reduces rebound effects. This leads to quicker remediation times and shorter post monitoring of the plume. CGC systems use considerably lower injection pressures than conventional sparging wells, eliminating increases in heat. This leads to reduced fouling and reduced energy consumption. The data collected as part of the remediation effort included pressure transducer tests to verify the presence of the circulation cell and geochemical data to demonstrate chemical reductions by the CGC units. Data collected was used to validate the initial mathematical modeling used to predict the radius of influence of the vertical circulation cell. The results indicated that the radius of influence was 25 feet with an effective upgradient capture area of 80 feet in the shallow portion of the plume. Chemical reduction over the first 60 days indicated a 30% reduction in BTEX and a 54% reduction in Benzene. The two CGC units effectively captured the upgradient plume between the units without impacting the adjacent waterway.

  1. A six degree of freedom, plume-fuel optimal trajectory planner for spacecraft proximity operations using an A* node search. M.S. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark Charles

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft proximity operations are complicated by the fact that exhaust plume impingement from the reaction control jets of space vehicles can cause structural damage, contamination of sensitive arrays and instruments, or attitude misalignment during docking. The occurrence and effect of jet plume impingement can be reduced by planning approach trajectories with plume effects considered. An A* node search is used to find plume-fuel optimal trajectories through a discretized six dimensional attitude-translation space. A plume cost function which approximates jet plume isopressure envelopes is presented. The function is then applied to find relative costs for predictable 'trajectory altering' firings and unpredictable 'deadbanding' firings. Trajectory altering firings are calculated by running the spacecraft jet selection algorithm and summing the cost contribution from each jet fired. A 'deadbanding effects' function is defined and integrated to determine the potential for deadbanding impingement along candidate trajectories. Plume costs are weighed against fuel costs in finding the optimal solution. A* convergence speed is improved by solving approach trajectory problems in reverse time. Results are obtained on a high fidelity space shuttle/space station simulation. Trajectory following is accomplished by a six degree of freedom autopilot. Trajectories planned with, and without, plume costs are compared in terms of force applied to the target structure.

  2. OBSERVATION OF HIGH-SPEED OUTFLOW ON PLUME-LIKE STRUCTURES OF THE QUIET SUN AND CORONAL HOLES WITH SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Habbal, Shadia Rifal; He Jiansen E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu E-mail: jshept@gmail.com

    2011-08-01

    Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal ubiquitous episodic outflows (jets) with an average speed around 120 km s{sup -1} at temperatures often exceeding a million degree in plume-like structures, rooted in magnetized regions of the quiet solar atmosphere. These outflows are not restricted to the well-known plumes visible in polar coronal holes, but are also present in plume-like structures originating from equatorial coronal holes and quiet-Sun (QS) regions. Outflows are also visible in the 'inter-plume' regions throughout the atmosphere. Furthermore, the structures traced out by these flows in both plume and inter-plume regions continually exhibit transverse (Alfvenic) motion. Our finding suggests that high-speed outflows originate mainly from the magnetic network of the QS and coronal holes (CHs), and that the plume flows observed are highlighted by the denser plasma contained therein. These outflows might be an efficient means to provide heated mass into the corona and serve as an important source of mass supply to the solar wind. We demonstrate that the QS plume flows can sometimes significantly contaminate the spectroscopic observations of the adjacent CHs-greatly affecting the Doppler shifts observed, thus potentially impacting significant investigations of such regions.

  3. Multiscale Hydrogeophysical Data Assimilation for Plume-Scale Subsurface Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, H. M.; Sassen, D. S.; Chen, J.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of subsurface contaminant plume evolution and natural attenuation capacity often fail due to the difficulty to tractably characterize heterogeneity of flow-and-transport properties at the plume-relevant scales. This study presents a stochastic-estimation framework for assimilating multiscale datasets and characterizing a plume-scale subsurface domain. We utilize the concept of reactive facies, which is based on the hypothesis that we can identify packages of sediments that have distinct distributions of properties influencing reactive transport, such as effective surface area, mineralogy and permeability. Because geophysical attributes are often sensitive to some of those properties, this concept allows us to take advantage of both geophysical and lithological datasets, to characterize the spatial distribution of reactive transport parameters. Previous research has illustrated that crosshole geophysical methods can be used to identify and spatially distribute reactive facies at the local scale. To map the spatial distribution of reactive facies at the plume-scale, we must (1) honor the large-scale trend without smoothing out the detail structure of facies, and (2) assimilate multi-source, multiscale datasets in a consistent manner, including wellbore data and crosshole and surface geophysical data. To tackle these challenges, we have developed a hierarchical Bayesian framework, which consists of three statistical sub-models: a data model, a process model, and a prior model. The data model - developed according to the stochastic feature of measurement errors - provides the linkage between the multiple geophysical datasets and the spatially distributed geophysical attributes through linear/nonlinear forward models. The process model describes the spatial distribution of reactive facies and geophysical attributes as spatial random processes controlled by geostatistical and petrophysical parameters. We use an indicator random field with a trend function for

  4. CALIOP-derived Smoke Plume Injection Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, A. J.; Winker, D. M.; Choi, H. D.; Fairlie, T. D.; Westberg, D. J.; Roller, C. M.; Pouliot, G.; Vaughan, M.; Pierce, T. E.; Trepte, C. R.; Rao, V.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning is a dominant natural and anthropogenic disturbance that feeds back to the climate system. Fire regimes, ecosystem fuels, fire severity and intensity vary widely, even within the same system, largely under the control of weather and climate. These strongly influence fire plume injection height and thus the transport of related biomass burning emissions, affecting air quality, human health and the climate system. If our knowledge of plume injection height is incorrect, transport models of those emissions will likewise be incorrect, adversely affecting our ability to analyze and predict climate feedbacks (i.e. black carbon to the Arctic, precipitation, cloud-radiation relationships) and public health (air quality forecast). Historically, plume height was based on the pioneering work of G.A. Briggs [1969; 1971] and verified with limited field campaigns. However, we currently have two satellite instruments, Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO (afternoon overpass) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) onboard TERRA (morning overpass), that can provide the statistics necessary to verify our assumptions and improve fire plume injection height estimates for use in both small- and large-scale models. We have developed a methodology to assess fire plume injection height using the Langley Trajectory Model (LaTM), CALIOP, Hazard Mapping System (HMS) smoke plume, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly data that is capable of generating two distinct types of verification data. A single CALIOP smoke-filled aerosol envelop can be traced back to numerous fire events, and using multiple CALIOP transects from numerous days, a daily smoke plume injection height evolution from a single fire can be defined. Additionally, we have linked the smoke plumes to ecosystems and the meteorological variables that define fire weather. In concert, CALIOP and MISR data can produce the statistical knowledge

  5. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  6. Chemical and biochemical transformations in hydrothermal plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Marvin D.; Feely, Richard A.; Trefry, John H.

    Hydrothermal plumes integrate the heat and mass flux originating at seafloor hydrothermal vents thereby providing both a means of detecting hydrothermal activity and estimating hydrothermal fluxes. Many chemical species are introduced into the deep sea via hydrothermal plumes (Figure 1) in concentrations many orders of magnitude higher than that existing in background seawater (e.g. H2, CH4 3He, Mn, Fe) while others are scavenged from seawater by hydrothermal particles (e.g. PO4-3, V, As, rare earth elements, Th). Dilution by entrainment of background seawater in the buoyant portion of the plume is very rapid (see chapters by Lupton and McDuff, this volume) such that the hydrothermal component in the near-field portion of the neutrally buoyant plume represents only about 0.01% of the mixture. Nevertheless, chemical tracers such as 3He, CH4, and Mn are widely utilized in addition to temperature, salinity, and light transmission anomalies to detect hydrothermal venting and to draw inferences about the nature of the underlying geochemistry of the hydrothermal system. Many other chemical tracers can be utilized during plume studies to provide additional information about the nature of the venting. These include particles, H2, Al, and radioisotopes, among others.

  7. a Lagrangian Philosophy for Plume Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Walter Eugen

    A Lagrangian plume model is described that has proven useful in water and air applications. It contrasts sharply with earlier Eulerian integral flux models even though they are shown to be equivalent. As an alternative and complementary approach, the Lagrangian formulation offers new insights into the problem. As a result, it furnished the first accurate statement of the Projected Area Entrainment (PAE) hypothesis that describes the assimilation of moving ambient fluid into the plume. The hypothesis allows--without tuning--average motion and dilution characteristics to be predicted for the first time. Further contemplation of the Lagrangian plume element resulted in the identification of the Negative Volume Anomaly (NVA). The NVA is an inconsistency in control volume conception resulting from the intersection of the cross-sections that bound it, causing the anomalous production of negative volume. Although the Lagrangian plume model, UM, has been adopted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is used in over a dozen foreign countries, and has been verified independently, a pervasive bias against the approach makes it difficult to publish findings in the peer reviewed literature. A case study describing the problem is presented. This analysis suggests that the phenomenon is not unique to plume modeling. The contributing causes are perpetuated by the closedness of the peer review system. Recommendations are given for improving peer review procedures to open the process to inspection. They include simple measures modifying anonymity and allowing authors to submit to multiple journals simultaneously.

  8. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  9. Using infrasound to constrain ash plume height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Oliver; De Angelis, Silvio; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Airborne volcanic ash advisories are currently based on analyses of satellite imagery with relatively low temporal resolution, and numerical simulations of atmospheric plume dispersion. These simulations rely on key input parameters such as the maximum height of eruption plumes and the mass eruption rate at the vent, which remain loosely constrained. In this study, we present a proof-of-concept workflow that incorporates the analysis of volcanic infrasound with numerical modelling of volcanic plume rise in a realistic atmosphere. We analyse acoustic infrasound records from two explosions during the 2009 eruption of Mt. Redoubt, USA, that produced plumes reaching heights of 12-14 km. We model the infrasonic radiation at the source under the assumptions of linear acoustic theory and calculate variations in mass ejection velocity at the vent. The estimated eruption velocities serve as the input for numerical models of plume rise. The encouraging results highlight the potential for infrasound measurements to be incorporated into numerical modelling of ash dispersion, and confirm their value for volcano monitoring operations.

  10. Follow the plume: the habitability of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P; Anbar, Ariel D; Porco, Carolyn; Tsou, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The astrobiological exploration of other worlds in our Solar System is moving from initial exploration to more focused astrobiology missions. In this context, we present the case that the plume of Enceladus currently represents the best astrobiology target in the Solar System. Analysis of the plume by the Cassini mission indicates that the steady plume derives from a subsurface liquid water reservoir that contains organic carbon, biologically available nitrogen, redox energy sources, and inorganic salts. Furthermore, samples from the plume jetting out into space are accessible to a low-cost flyby mission. No other world has such well-studied indications of habitable conditions. Thus, the science goals that would motivate an Enceladus mission are more advanced than for any other Solar System body. The goals of such a mission must go beyond further geophysical characterization, extending to the search for biomolecular evidence of life in the organic-rich plume. This will require improved in situ investigations and a sample return. PMID:24684187