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Sample records for contaminant plume delineation

  1. Methane oxidation in a crude oil contaminated aquifer: Delineation of aerobic reactions at the plume fringes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Blowes, D.W.; Kirshtein, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution direct-push profiling over short vertical distances was used to investigate CH4 attenuation in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. The contaminant plume was delineated using dissolved gases, redox sensitive components, major ions, carbon isotope ratios in CH4 and CO2, and the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. Sharp redox gradients were observed near the water table. Shifts in ??13CCH4 from an average of - 57.6??? (?? 1.7???) in the methanogenic zone to - 39.6??? (?? 8.7???) at 105 m downgradient, strongly suggest CH4 attenuation through microbially mediated degradation. In the downgradient zone the aerobic/anaerobic transition is up to 0.5 m below the water table suggesting that transport of O2 across the water table is leading to aerobic degradation of CH4 at this interface. Dissolved N2 concentrations that exceeded those expected for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere indicated bubble entrapment followed by preferential stripping of O2 through aerobic degradation of CH4 or other hydrocarbons. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to distinguish between areas of significant bubble entrapment and areas where other processes such as the infiltration of O 2 rich recharge water were important O2 transport mechanisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Delineation of discharge areas of two contaminant plumes by use of diffusion samplers, Johns Pond, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoie, Jennifer G.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Blackwood, D.S.; McCobb, T.D.; Rendigs, R. R.; Clifford, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion samplers were installed in the bottom of Johns Pond, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to confirm that volatile organic compounds from the Storm Drain-5 (SD-5) plume emanating from the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) were discharging into the pond. An array of 134 vapor-diffusion samplers was buried by divers about 0.5 feet below the pond bottom in the presumed discharge area of the SD-5 plume and left in place for about 2 weeks to equilibrate. Two areas of high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified. Samples from the first area contained trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene with concentrations in vapor as high as 890 and 667 parts per billion by volume, respectively. This discharge area is about 1,000 feet wide, extends from 100 to 350 feet offshore, and is interpreted to be the discharge area of the SD-5 plume. Samples from the second area were located closer to shore than the discharge area of the SD-5 plume and contained unexpectedly high vapor concentrations of TCE (more than 40,000 parts per billion by volume). Ground-water samples collected with a drive-point sampler near the second area had aqueous TCE concentrations as high as 1,100 micrograms per liter. Subsequently, a more closely spaced array of 110 vapor-diffusion samplers was installed to map the area of elevated TCE concentrations . The discharge area detected with the samplers is about 75 feet wide and extends from about 25 to 200 feet offshore . TCE vapor concentrations in this area were as high as 42,800 parts per billion by volume. TCE concentrations in micrograms per liter in water-diffusion samples from 15 selected sites in the two discharge areas were about 35 times lower than the TCE concentrations in parts per billion by volume in corresponding vapor-diffusion samples. The difference in values is due to the volatile nature of TCE and the different units of measure. TCE was detected in diffusion samplers set in the pond water column above the plume discharge areas, but the TCE concentrations were 20 to 30 times lower than the corresponding levels in diffusion samplers buried in the pond bottom.

  3. Dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for groundwater contaminant plume delineation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Smuin, D.R.; Morti, E.E.; Zutman, J.L.; Pickering, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Dual wall reverse circulation (DWRC) drilling was used to drill 48 borings during a groundwater contaminant investigation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. This method was selected as an alternative to conventional hollow stem auger drilling for a number of reasons, including the expectation of minimizing waste, increasing the drilling rate, and reducing the potential for cross contamination of aquifers. Groundwater samples were collected from several water-bearing zones during drilling of each borehole. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds using a field gas chromatograph. This approach allowed the investigation to be directed using near-real-time data. Use of downhole geophysical logging, in conjunction with lithologic descriptions of borehole cuttings, resulted in excellent correlation of the geology in the vicinity of the contaminant plume. The total volume of cuttings generated using the DWRC drilling method was less than half of what would have been produced by hollow stem augering; however, the cuttings were recovered in slurry form and had to be dewatered prior to disposal. The drilling rate was very rapid, often approaching 10 ft/min; however, frequent breaks to perform groundwater sampling resulted in an average drilling rate of < 1 ft/min. The time required for groundwater sampling could be shortened by changing the sampling methodology. Analytical results indicated that the drilling method successfully isolated the various water bearing zones and no cross contamination resulted from the investigation.

  4. Plume Delineation in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, Dale F.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2004-11-30

    HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc. and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were contracted by Fluor Hanford Group, Inc. to conduct a geophysical investigation in the area of the BC Cribs and Trenches (subject site) at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The BC Cribs and Trenches are located south of the 200 East Area. This document provides the details of the investigation to identify existing infrastructure from legacy disposal activities and to delineate the edges of a groundwater plume that contains radiological and heavy metal constituents beneath the 216-B-26 and 216-B-52 Trenches, and the 216-B-14 through 216-B-19 Cribs.

  5. Hydrocone groundwater study delineates petroleum contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, K.; Hartness, J.; Christenson, K.

    1994-12-31

    Law Environmental, Inc., (LAW), conducted a groundwater survey at Myrtle Beach Air Force Base, South Carolina, to delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of petroleum contamination at the BX Service station. The survey was performed using the In-Situ Technology Hydrocone in conjunction with a field gas chromatograph. The Hydrocone proved to be a reliable, cost-effective method of extracting multi-depth groundwater samples without incurring the expenses associated with the installation and maintenance of monitoring wells. The process generates virtually no investigation-derived waste. The Hydrocone system consists of an elongated cylindrical steel sampler attached to drill rods on a direct push trailer mounted rig. A gas/electronic cable connects to the sampler, and a computer installed on the rig displays pressure on the tool, sampling time, and groundwater volume collected. A total of 18 groundwater samples were collected from 12 locations around the site at sampling depths of approximately 10, 20, and 30 feet below the ground surface. The Hydrocone/gas chromatograph method produced a large volume of groundwater quality data within a relatively short time interval.

  6. Monitoring Groundwater Contaminant Plumes Using Airborne Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Martin; Oftendinger, Ulrich; Ruffell, Alastair; Cowan, Marie; Cassidy, Rachel; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Wilson, Christopher; Desissa, Mohammednur

    2013-04-01

    Under the European Union Water Framework Directive, Member States are required to assess water quality across both surface water and groundwater bodies. Subsurface pollution plumes, originating from a variety of sources, pose a significant direct risk to water quality. The monitoring and characterisation of groundwater contaminant plumes is generally invasive, time consuming and expensive. In particular, adequately capturing the contaminant plume with monitoring installations, when the extent of the feature is unknown and the presence of contamination is only evident from indirect observations, can be prohibitively expensive. This research aims to identify the extent and nature of subsurface contaminant plumes using airborne geophysical survey data. This data was collected across parts of the island of Ireland within the scope of the original Tellus and subsequent Tellus Border projects. The rapid assessment of the airborne electro-magnetic (AEM) data allowed the identification of several sites containing possible contaminant plumes. These AEM anomalies were assessed through the analysis of existing site data and field site inspections, with areas of interest being examined for metallic structures that could affect the AEM data. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) and ground-based electro-magnetic (EM) surveys were performed to ground-truth existing airborne data and to confirm the extent and nature of the affected area identified using the airborne data. Groundwater and surface water quality were assessed using existing field site information. Initial results collected from a landfill site underlain by basalt have indicated that the AEM data, coupled with ERT and GPR, can successfully be used to locate possible plumes and help delineate their extent. The analysis of a range of case study sites exhibiting different geological and environmental settings will allow for the development of a consistent methodology for examining the airborne data for the detection of groundwater contaminant plumes. This will provide a basis for assessing the influence that drift and bedrock geology exert on the feasibility of using Tellus airborne data as a plume monitoring tool. This research will facilitate a conjunctive approach for the detection and monitoring of pollution sources adversely affecting water bodies, as well as improve the targeting of costly intrusive monitoring and restoration efforts.

  7. RAPID REMOVAL OF A GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT PLUME.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L. Jeff; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1985-01-01

    A groundwater management model is used to design an aquifer restoration system that removes a contaminant plume from a hypothetical aquifer in four years. The design model utilizes groundwater flow simulation and mathematical optimization. Optimal pumping and injection strategies achieve rapid restoration for a minimum total pumping cost. Rapid restoration is accomplished by maintaining specified groundwater velocities around the plume perimeter towards a group of pumping wells located near the plume center. The model does not account for hydrodynamic dispersion. Results show that pumping costs are particularly sensitive to injection capacity. An 8 percent decrease in the maximum allowable injection rate may lead to a 29 percent increase in total pumping costs.

  8. Monopropellant thruster exhaust plume contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerwald, R. K.; Passamaneck, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The potential spacecraft contaminants in the exhaust plume of a 0.89N monopropellant hydrazine thruster were measured in an ultrahigh quartz crystal microbalances located at angles of approximately 0 deg, + 15 deg and + or - 30 deg with respect to the nozzle centerline. The crystal temperatures were controlled such that the mass adhering to the crystal surface at temperatures of from 106 K to 256 K could be measured. Thruster duty cycles of 25 ms on/5 seconds off, 100 ms on/10 seconds off, and 200 ms on/20 seconds off were investigated. The change in contaminant production with thruster life was assessed by subjecting the thruster to a 100,000 pulse aging sequence and comparing the before and after contaminant deposition rates. The results of these tests are summarized, conclusions drawn, and recommendations given.

  9. Associations of free-living bacteria and dissolved organic compounds in a plume of contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Barber, L.B., II

    1992-01-01

    Associations of free-living bacteria (FLB) and dissolved organic contaminants in a 4-km-long plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated. Abundance of FLB in the core of the plume (as delineated by maximum specific conductance) steadily decreased in the direction of flow from a point 0.25 km downgradient from the source to the toe of the plume. At 0.25 km downgradient, FLB comprised up to 31% of the total bacterial population, but constituted < 7% of the population at 2 km downgradient. Abundance of FLB correlated strongly (r = 0.80 n = 23) with total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in contaminated groundwater between 0.64 and 2.1 km downgradient, although distributions of individual contaminants such as di-, tri- and tetrachloroethene were highly variable, and their association with FLB less clear. Numbers of FLB in the downgradient portion of the plume which is contaminated with branched-chain alkylbenzenesulfonate (ABS) surfactants were low (< 5??108/L) in spite of relatively high levels of DOC (up to 4 mg/L). However, abundance of FLB correlated strongly with non-surfactant DOC along vertical transects through the plume. The ratio of FLB to DOC and the ratio of FLB to attached bacteria generally decreased in the direction of flow and, consequently, with the age of the organic contaminants.

  10. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. I. Extension-expansion of the contaminant plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This study concerns the possible use of boundary layer (BL) approach for the analysis and evaluation of contaminant transport in groundwater due to contaminant penetration into the groundwater aquifer through a site of limited size. The contaminant penetration may occur through either the upper (surface) or lower (bedrock) boundary of the aquifer. Two general cases of contaminant penetration mechanisms are considered: (1) the contaminant is transferred through an interface between a contaminating and freshwater fluid phases, and (2) the contaminant arrives at groundwater by leakage and percolation. For the purpose of BL evaluation the contaminant plume is divided into three different sections: (1) the penetration section, (2) the extension-expansion section, and (3) the spearhead section. In each section a different BL method approach yields simple analytical expressions for the description of the contaminant plume migration and contaminant transport. Previous studies of the BL method can be directly applied to the evaluation of contaminant transport at the contaminant penetration section. The present study extends those studies and concerns the contaminant transport in the two other sections, which are located downstream of the penetration section. This study shows that the contaminant concentration profiles in sections 2 and 3 incorporate two BLs: (1) an inner BL adjacent to the aquifer bottom or surface boundary, and (2) an outer BL, which develops above or below the inner one. The method developed in the present study has been applied to practical issues concerning salinity penetration into groundwater in south central Kansas.

  11. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. I. Extension-expansion of the contaminant plume.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Hillel; Buddemeier, Robert W

    2002-11-01

    This study concerns the possible use of boundary layer (BL) approach for the analysis and evaluation of contaminant transport in groundwater due to contaminant penetration into the groundwater aquifer through a site of limited size. The contaminant penetration may occur through either the upper (surface) or lower (bedrock) boundary of the aquifer. Two general cases of contaminant penetration mechanisms are considered: (1) the contaminant is transferred through an interface between a contaminating and freshwater fluid phases, and (2) the contaminant arrives at groundwater by leakage and percolation. For the purpose of BL evaluation the contaminant plume is divided into three different sections: (1) the penetration section, (2) the extension-expansion section, and (3) the spearhead section. In each section a different BL method approach yields simple analytical expressions for the description of the contaminant plume migration and contaminant transport. Previous studies of the BL method can be directly applied to the evaluation of contaminant transport at the contaminant penetration section. The present study extends those studies and concerns the contaminant transport in the two other sections, which are located downstream of the penetration section. This study shows that the contaminant concentration profiles in sections 2 and 3 incorporate two BLs: (1) an inner BL adjacent to the aquifer bottom or surface boundary, and (2) an outer BL, which develops above or below the inner one. The method developed in the present study has been applied to practical issues concerning salinity penetration into groundwater in south central Kansas. PMID:12413210

  12. Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre; Skold, Magnus E; Karaoulis, Marios; Schmutz, Myriam; Hubbard, Susan S; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Watson, David B

    2013-01-01

    At the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contaminants from the former S-3 ponds have infiltrated the shallow saprolite for over 60 years. Two- and three-dimensional DC-resistivity tomography is used to characterize the number and location of the main contaminant plumes, which include high concentration of nitrate. These contaminant plumes have typically an electrical resistivity in the range 2 20 ohm-m while the background saprolite resistivity is in the range 60 120 ohm-m, so the difference of resistivity can be easily mapped using DC-resistivity tomography to locate the contaminant pathways. We develop a relationship to derive the in situ nitrate concentrations from the 3D resistivity tomograms accounting for the effect of surface conductivity. The footprint of the contamination upon the resistivity is found to be much stronger than the local variations associated with changes in the porosity and the clay content. With this method, we identified a total of five main plumes (termed CP1 to CP5). Plume CP2 corresponds to the main plume in terms of nitrate concentration ( 50,000 ). We also used an active time constrained approach to perform time-lapse resistivity tomography over a section crossing the plumes CP1 and CP2. The sequence of tomograms is used to determine the changes in the nitrate concentrations associated with infiltration of fresh (meteoritic) water from a perched aquifer. This study highlights the importance of accounting for surface conductivity when characterizing plume distributions in clay-rich subsurface systems.

  13. Advanced QCM controller for NASA's plume impingement contamination-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Russell P.; Lumpkin, Forrest E., III; Carkhuff, Bliss G.; Wallace, Scott A.; Uy, O. Manuel

    2002-09-01

    Currently, no accurate models or recent data exist for modeling contamination from spacecraft thrusters to meet the stringent requirements of the International Space Station (ISS). Few flight measurements of contaminant deposition from spacecraft thrusters have been made, and no measurements have been made for angles away from the plume centerline. The Plume Impingement Contamination-II (PIC-II)1 experiment is planned to provide such measurements using quartz crystal microbalances placed into the plume of a Shuttle Orbiter RCS thruster. To this end, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has supported NASA in the development of the PIC-II experiment Flight Electronics Unit known as the Remote Arm TQCM System (RATS), which will measure the contamination in the Shuttle Obiter RCS thruster. The development was based on an ongoing effort between the APL and QCM Research to develop an inexpensive, miniature TQCM controller based on a legacy of QCM controllers developed at the APL. PIC-II will provide substantial improvements over previous systems, including higher resolution, greater flexibility, intensive housekeeping, and in-situ operational control. Details of the experiment hardware and measurement technique are given. The importance of the experiment to the ISS and the general plume contamination community is discussed.

  14. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. II. Horizontal penetration of the contaminant plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Part I of this study (Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W. Groundwater Contamination Downstream of a Contaminant Penetration Site Part 1: Extension-Expansion of the Contaminant Plume. J. of Environmental Science and Health Part A (in press).) addressed cases, in which a comparatively thin contaminated region represented by boundary layers (BLs) developed within the freshwater aquifer close to contaminant penetration site. However, at some distance downstream from the penetration site, the top of the contaminant plume reaches the top or bottom of the aquifer. This is the location of the "attachment point," which comprises the entrance cross section of the domain evaluated by the present part of the study. It is shown that downstream from the entrance cross section, a set of two BLs develop in the aquifer, termed inner and outer BLs. It is assumed that the evaluated domain, in which the contaminant distribution gradually becomes uniform, can be divided into two sections, designated: (a) the restructuring section, and (b) the establishment section. In the restructuring section, the vertical concentration gradient leads to expansion of the inner BL at the expense of the outer BL, and there is almost no transfer of contaminant mass between the two layers. In the establishment section, each of the BLs occupies half of the aquifer thickness, and the vertical concentration gradient leads to transfer of contaminant mass from the inner to the outer BL. By use of BL approximations, changes of salinity distribution in the aquifer are calculated and evaluated. The establishment section ends at the uniformity point, downstream from which the contaminant concentration profile is practically uniform. The length of the restructuring section, as well as that of the establishment section, is approximately proportional to the aquifer thickness squared, and is inversely proportional to the transverse dispersivity. The study provides a convenient set of definitions and terminology that are helpful in visualizing the gradual development of uniform contaminant concentration distribution in an aquifer subject to contaminant plume penetration. The method developed in this study can be applied to a variety of problems associated with groundwater quality, such as initial evaluation of field data, design of field data collection, the identification of appropriate boundary conditions for numerical models, selection of appropriate numerical modeling approaches, interpretation and evaluation of field monitoring results, etc.

  15. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  16. Contamination control and plume assessment of low-energy thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Potential contamination of a spacecraft cryogenic surface by a xenon (Xe) ion generator was evaluated. The analysis involves the description of the plume exhausted from the generator with its relative component fluxes on the spacecraft surfaces, and verification of the conditions for condensation, adsorption, and sputtering at those locations. The data describing the plume fluxes and their effects on surfaces were obtained from two sources: the tests carried out with the Xe generator in a small vacuum chamber to indicate deposits and sputter on monitor slides; and the extensive tests with a mercury (Hg) ion thruster in a large vacuum chamber. The Hg thruster tests provided data on the neutrals, on low-energy ion fluxes, on high-energy ion fluxes, and on sputtered materials at several locations within the plume.

  17. Delineating Landfill Leachate Discharge To An Arsenic Contaminated Waterway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discharge of contaminated ground water may serve as a primary and on-going source of contamination to surface water. A field investigation was conducted at a Superfund site in Massachusetts, USA to define the locus of contaminant flux and support source identification for arseni...

  18. Hall Effect Thruster Plume Contamination and Erosion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the Hall effect thruster plume contamination and erosion study was to evaluate the impact of a xenon ion plume on various samples placed in the vicinity of a Hall effect thruster for a continuous 100 hour exposure. NASA Glenn Research Center was responsible for the pre- and post-test evaluation of three sample types placed around the thruster: solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton(R). Mass and profilometer), were used to identify the degree of deposition and/or erosion on the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton@ samples. Transmittance, reflectance, solar absorptance, and room temperature emittance were used to identify the degree of performance degradation of the solar cell cover glass samples alone. Auger spectroscopy was used to identify the chemical constituents found on the surface of the exposed solar cell cover glass samples. Chemical analysis indicated some boron nitride contamination on the samples, from boron nitride insulators used in the body of the thruster. However, erosion outweighted contamination. All samples exhibited some degree of erosion. with the most erosion occurring near the centerline of the plume and the least occurring at the +/- 90 deg positions. For the solar cell cover glass samples, erosion progressed through the antireflective coating and into the microsheet glass itself. Erosion occurred in the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone and Kapton(R) at different rates. All optical properties changed with the degree of erosion, with solar absorptance and room temperature emittance increasing with erosion. The transmittance of some samples decreased while the reflectance of some samples increased and others decreased. All results are consistent with an energetic plume of xenon ions serving as a source for erosion.

  19. Shuttle PRCS plume contamination analysis for Astro-2 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Francis C.; Greene, Cindy

    1993-01-01

    The Astro-2 mission scheduled for Jan. 1995 flight is co-manifested with the Spartan experiment. The Astro instrument array consists of several telescopes operating in the UV spectrum. To obtain the desired 300 observations with the telescope array in a shorter time than the Astro-1 mission, it will be necessary to use the primary reaction control system (PRCS) rather than just the Vernier reaction control system. The high mass flow rate of the PRCS engines cause considerable concern about contamination due to PRCS plume return flux. Performance of these instruments depends heavily on the environment they encounter. The ability of the optical system to detect a remote signal depends not only on the intensity of the incoming signal, but also on the ensuing transmission loss through the optical train of the instrument. Performance of these instruments is thus dependent on the properties of the optical surface and the medium through which it propagates. The on-orbit contamination environment will have a strong influence on the performance of these instruments. The finding of a two-month study of the molecular contamination environment of the Astro-2 instruments due to PRCS thruster plumes during the planned Astro-2 mission are summarized.

  20. Field demonstration of technologies for delineating uranium contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, V.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Schwing, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Perry, D.L.; Morris, D.E.

    1993-11-01

    An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. An important part of this effort is the evaluation of field screening tools capable of acquiring high resolution information on the distribution of uranium contamination in surface soils in a cost-and-time efficient manner. Consistent with this need, four field screening technologies have been demonstrated at two hazardous waste sites at the FERMCO. The four technologies tested are wide-area gamma spectroscopy, beta scintillation counting, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES), and long-range alpha detection (LRAD). One of the important findings of this demonstration was just how difficult it is to compare data collected by means of multiple independent measurement techniques. Difficulties are attributed to differences in measurement scale, differences in the basic physics upon which the various measurement schemes are predicated, and differences in the general performance of detector instrumentation. It follows that optimal deployment of these techniques requires the development of an approach for accounting for the intrinsic differences noted above. As such, emphasis is given in this paper to the development of a methodology for integrating these techniques for use in site characterization programs as well as the development of a framework for interpreting the collected data. The methodology described here also has general application to other field-based screening technologies and soil sampling programs.

  1. Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery

    E-print Network

    Theiler, James

    Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery James, hyperspectral imagery, adaptive signal detection, clutter, signal contamination 1. INTRODUCTION Hyperspectral include thermal emission from atmosphere and instrument (Lpath ) and radiance from the ground (Lgnd

  2. IDENTIFYING AND PREDICTING DIVING PLUME BEHAVIOR AT GROUNDWATER SITES CONTAMINATED WITH MTBE: PART 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    As contaminant ground water flows downgradient from a release point, its movement is dictated by site geological conditions and hydraulics that may result in significant perpendicular contamination migration. This vertical migration pattern has been termed 'plume diving'. Under ...

  3. Persistence of a Groundwater Contaminant Plume after Hydraulic Source Containment at a Chlorinated-Solvent Contaminated Site

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, D.E.; Brusseau, M.L.; Guo, Z.; Plaschke, M.; Carroll, K.C.; Brinker, F.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the behavior of a groundwater contaminant (trichloroethene) plume after implementation of a source-containment operation at a site in Arizona. The plume resides in a quasi three-layer system comprising a sand/gravel unit bounded on the top and bottom by relatively thick silty clayey layers. The system was monitored for 60 months beginning at start-up in 2007 to measure the change in contaminant concentrations within the plume, the change in plume area, the mass of contaminant removed, and the integrated contaminant mass discharge. Concentrations of trichloroethene in groundwater pumped from the plume extraction wells have declined significantly over the course of operation, as have concentrations for groundwater sampled from 40 monitoring wells located within the plume. The total contaminant mass discharge associated with operation of the plume extraction wells peaked at 0.23 kg/d, decreased significantly within one year, and thereafter began an asymptotic decline to a current value of approximately 0.03 kg/d. Despite an 87% reduction in contaminant mass and a comparable 87% reduction in contaminant mass discharge for the plume, the spatial area encompassed by the plume has decreased by only approximately 50%. This is much less than would be anticipated based on ideal flushing and mass-removal behavior. Simulations produced with a simplified 3-D numerical model matched reasonably well to the measured data. The results of the study suggest that permeability heterogeneity, back diffusion, hydraulic factors associated with the specific well field system, and residual discharge from the source zone are all contributing to the observed persistence of the plume, as well as the asymptotic behavior currently observed for mass removal and for the reduction in contaminant mass discharge. PMID:26069436

  4. Delineation of brine contamination in and near the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana, 2004-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamke, Joanna N.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    The extent of brine contamination in the shallow aquifers in and near the East Poplar oil field is as much as 17.9 square miles and appears to be present throughout the entire saturated zone in contaminated areas. The brine contamination affects 15–37 billion gallons of groundwater. Brine contamination in the shallow aquifers east of the Poplar River generally moves to the southwest toward the river and then southward in the Poplar River valley. The likely source of brine contamination in the shallow aquifers is brine that is produced with crude oil in the East Poplar oil field study area. Brine contamination has not only affected the water quality from privately owned wells in and near the East Poplar oil field, but also the city of Poplar’s public water-supply wells. Three water-quality types characterize water in the shallow aquifers; a fourth water-quality type in the study area characterizes the brine. Type 1 is uncontaminated water that is suitable for most domestic purposes and typically contains sodium bicarbonate and sodium/magnesium sulfate as the dominant ions. Type 2 is moderately contaminated water that is suitable for some domestic purposes, but not used for drinking water, and typically contains sodium and chloride as the dominant ions. Type 3 is considerably contaminated water that is unsuitable for any domestic purpose and always contains sodium and chloride as the dominant ions. Type 3 quality of water in the shallow aquifers is similar to Type 4, which is the brine that is produced with crude oil. Electromagnetic apparent conductivity data were collected in the 106 square-mile area and used to determine extent of brine contamination. These data were collected and interpreted in conjunction with water-quality data collected through 2009 to delineate brine plumes in the shallow aquifers. Monitoring wells subsequently were drilled in some areas without existing water wells to confirm most of the delineated brine plumes; however, several possible plumes do not contain either existing water wells or monitoring wells. Analysis of groundwater samples from wells confirms the presence of 12.1 square miles of contamination, as much as 1.7 square miles of which is considerably contaminated (Type 3). Electromagnetic apparent conductivity data in areas with no wells delineate an additional 5.8 square miles of possible contamination, 2.1 square miles of which might be considerably contaminated (Type 3). Storage-tank facilities, oil wells, brine-injection wells, pipelines, and pits are likely sources of brine in the study area. It is not possible to identify discrete oil-related features as likely sources of brine plumes because several features commonly are co-located. During the latter half of the twentieth century, many brine plumes migrated beyond the immediate source area and likely mix together in modern and ancestral Poplar River valley subareas.

  5. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed by the Portuguese Fundation for Science and Tecnology and FEDER Program.

  6. INORGANIC PLUME DELINEATION USING SURFACE HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AT THE BC CRIBS & TRENCHES SITE HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2007-05-29

    A surface resistivity survey was conducted on the Hanford Site over a waste disposal trench that received a large volume of liquid inorganic waste. The objective of the survey was to map the extent of the plume that resulted from the disposal activities approximately 50 years earlier. The survey included six resistivity transects of at least 200m, where each transect provided two-dimensional profile information of subsurface electrical properties. The results of the survey indicated that a low resistivity plume resides at a depth of approximately 25-44 m below ground surface. The target depth was calibrated with borehole data of pore-water electrical conductivity. Due to the high correlation of the pore-water electrical conductivity to nitrate concentration and the high correlation of measured apparent resistivity to pore-water electrical conductivity, inferences were made that proposed the spatial distribution of the apparent resistivity was due to the distribution of nitrate. Therefore, apparent resistivities were related to nitrate, which was subsequently rendered in three dimensions to show that the nitrate likely did not reach the water table and the bounds of the highest concentrations are directly beneath the collection of waste sites.

  7. Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes, Oak Ridge Integrated Field

    E-print Network

    Hubbard, Susan

    Field Research Challenge site, Tennessee A. Revil1 , M. Skold2 , M. Karaoulis2 , M. Schmutz3 , S. S Challenge site, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contaminants from the former S-3 ponds have infiltrated. With this method, we identified a total of five main plumes (termed CP1 to CP5). Plume CP2 corresponds to the main

  8. Leachate plume delineation and lithologic profiling using surface resistivity in an open municipal solid waste dumpsite, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wijesekara, Hasintha Rangana; De Silva, Sunethra Nalin; Wijesundara, Dharani Thanuja De Silva; Basnayake, Bendict Francis Antony; Vithanage, Meththika Suharshini

    2015-12-01

    This study presents the use of direct current resistivity techniques (DCRT) for investigation and characterization of leachate-contaminated subsurface environment of an open solid waste dumpsite at Kandy, Sri Lanka. The particular dumpsite has no liner and hence the leachate flows directly to the nearby river via subsurface and surface channels. For the identification of possible subsurface flow paths and the direction of the leachate, DCRT (two-dimensional, three-dimensional and vertical electrical sounding) have been applied. In addition, the physico-chemical parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity (EC), alkalinity, hardness, chloride, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) of leachate collected from different points of the solid waste dumping area and leachate drainage channel were analysed. Resistivity data confirmed that the leachate flow is confined to the near surface and no separate plume is observed in the downstream area, which may be due to the contamination distribution in the shallow overburden thickness. The stratigraphy with leachate pockets and leachate plume movements was well demarcated inside the dumpsite via low resistivity zones (1-3 ?m). The recorded EC, alkalinity, hardness and chloride contents in leachate were averaged as 14.13?mS?cm(-1), 3236, 2241 and 320?mg?L(-1), respectively, which confirmed the possible causes for low resistivity values. This study confirms that DCRT can be effectively utilized to assess the subsurface characteristics of the open dumpsites to decide on corridor placement and depth of permeable reactive barriers to reduce the groundwater contamination. PMID:25209886

  9. The Plume Impingement Contamination II Experiment: Motivation, Design, and Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, Forrest E., III; Albyn, Keith C.; Farrell, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will have a long service life during which it must be able to serve as a capable platform for a wide variety of scientific investigations. In order to provide this capability, the ISS has, at the system level, a design requirement of no more than 100 Angstroms of contaminant deposition per year from "non-quiescent" sources. Non-quiescent sources include the plumes resulting from the firing of reaction control system (ReS) engines on space vehicles visiting the ISS as well as the engines on the ISS itself. Unfortunately, good general plume contamination models do not yet exist. This is due both to the complexity of the problem, making the analytic approach difficult, and to the difficulty in obtaining empirical measurements of contaminant depositions. To address this lack of flight data, NASA Johnson Space Center is planning to fly an experiment, Plume Impingement Contamination-II, to measure the contamination deposition from the Shuttle Orbiter's primary RCS engines as a function angle from plume centerline. This represents the first direct on-orbit measurement of plume impingement contamination away from the nozzle centerline ever performed, and as such is extremely important in validating mathematical models which will be used to quantify the cumulative plume impingement contamination to the ISS over its lifetime. The paper will elaborate further upon the motivation behind making these measurements as well as present the design and implementation plan of this planned experiment.

  10. High-resolution electromagnetic imaging of subsurface contaminant plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Thomas, S.J.; Bax, N.H.; Poulton, M.M. . Lab. for Advanced Subsurface Imaging)

    1991-09-01

    A high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) system has been assembled to image subsurface contaminant plumes. The system consists of a transmitter which emits electromagnetic energy in the frequency range 30 Hz to 30 KHz. A receiver records 3 components of the magnetic field. From these 3 components the ellipticity of the magnetic field vector is determined. Ellipticity is a particularly diagnostic characteristic for detecting variations in subsurface resistivity. A unique feature of this system involves a high-accuracy calibration method. In this method a signal is fed to the receiver system at the same time that data are being collected. Our goal is to exploit the very-high-accuracy data collected with this system to obtain a high-resolution image of the surface. We are experimenting with several data interpretation methods. One method involves conventional modeling of the data. Another method treats the data set as an image. A particularly promising image processing technique involves recognizing the patterns in the data, specifically, the earth model pattern which corresponds to the observed EM data pattern. This is accomplished by training neural networks to recognize the patterns. 40 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  11. GIS-based colour composites and overlays to delineate heavy metal contamination zones in the shallow alluvial aquifers, Ankaleshwar industrial estate, south Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suyash; Shirke, K. D.; Pawar, N. J.

    2008-03-01

    In an attempt to delineate heavy metal contamination precincts and to evaluate the extent and degree of toxic levels, besides their possible sources, 38 water samples from Ankaleshwar Industrial Estate, south Gujarat, India were analyzed. By clutching geochemical analyses and GIS-based colour composites areas depicting anomalously high concentration of heavy metals (Mo, Zn, Pb, Ni, Co, Cd, etc.) in the groundwater were revealed. The multicomponent overlays in grey-scale facilitated in identifying situates of heavy metal ‘hot spots’, and lateral protuberances of the contamination plume around defile stretch of the main stream Amla Khadi flowing through the area. The multiple pollution plumes emerging from other parts of the area further coincide with effluent laden streams and small channels indicating industrial establishments as major sources of groundwater contamination. Influent nature of the streams, accelerated infiltration process, high mass influx and shallow groundwater table are the factors conducive for easy access of heavy metals to the phreatic aquifers affecting over 20 km2 area. On the basis of P/ U ratios (concentration of metals in polluted water to unpolluted water), geogenic and anthropogenic sources have been identified. Very high levels of technogenic elements present in the ground water raise concerns about possible migration into food crops, as the area is an important horticultural locale and is highly cultivated.

  12. Air-Seawater Exchange of Organochlorine Pesticides along the Sediment Plume of a Large Contaminated River.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tian; Guo, Zhigang; Li, Yuanyuan; Nizzetto, Luca; Ma, Chuanliang; Chen, Yingjun

    2015-05-01

    Gaseous exchange fluxes of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) across the air-water interface of the coastal East China Sea were determined in order to assess whether the contaminated plume of the Yangtze River could be an important regional source of OCPs to the atmosphere. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) were the most frequently detected OCPs in air and water. Air-water exchange was mainly characterized by net volatilization for all measured OCPs. The net gaseous exchange flux ranged 10-240 ng/(m2·day) for ?-HCH, 60-370 ng/(m2·day) for trans-CHL, 97-410 ng/(m2·day) for cis-CHL, and ?0 (e.g., equilibrium) to 490 ng/(m2·day) for p,p'-DDE. We found that the plume of the large contaminated river can serve as a significant regional secondary atmospheric source of legacy contaminants released in the catchment. In particular, the sediment plume represented the relevant source of DDT compounds (especially p,p'-DDE) sustaining net degassing when clean air masses from the open ocean reached the plume area. In contrast, a mass balance showed that, for HCHs, contaminated river discharge (water and sediment) plumes were capable of sustaining volatilization throughout the year. These results demonstrate the inconsistencies in the fate of HCHs and DDTs in this large estuarine system with declining primary sources. PMID:25827140

  13. An application of geoelectrical methods for contamination plume recognition in Urbanowice waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mycka, Mateusz; Mendecki, Maciej Jan

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to detect groundwater pollution and to identify the conditions of soil and groundwater near the Urbanowice landfill site using geoelectrical measurements. Presented measurements are preliminary results from tested site and are beginning of continuous monitoring. Contamination outflows detected by resistivity and IP technique show a good correlation with available hydrological data. Contamination plume were found in Eastern part of survey profil.

  14. COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT IN CONTAMINANT PLUMES: FILED EXPERIMENTS, LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbatio...

  15. Hydrogeological factors affecting the multiple plumes of chlorinated contaminants in an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Kaown, D.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.

    2010-12-01

    Apparent plume attenuations of multiple chlorinated contaminants such as TCE, carbon tetrachloride, and its daughter products at an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea were examined through various hydraulic tests and six rounds of groundwater quality analyses. Aquifer media properties and hydrogeologic factors affecting the distribution and attenuation of multiple contaminants were investigated and key attributes were evaluated. The study area has vertically heterogeneous properties from top alluvial layer to crystalline rocks while the weathered fractured layer above intact Jurassic biotite granite acts as the main layer for groundwater flow and aqueous phase multiple contaminants migration. Aerial heterogeneity in surface conditions plays an important role for groundwater recharge because the industrial complex is mostly paved by asphalt and concrete. Due to limited recharge area and concentrated precipitation in summer season, seasonal effects of contaminant plume distribution diminish as the distance increase from the area of recharge. This study analyzed how differently the solute and contaminant concentrations response to the seasonal recharge. For the analyses, the study site was divided into three zones and four transects were established. Groundwater and solute mass balances were estimated by computing groundwater and solute mass flux through transects. The effects of groundwater pumping, groundwater flow and contaminant degradation were examined to simulate the solutes and contaminant concentrations. General tendency of the water quality and contaminant concentration were reproducible with the effects of major components such as groundwater recharge, pumping and estimated degradation rate.

  16. Testing of stack-unit/aquifer sensitivity analysis using contaminant plume distribution in the subsurface of Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rine, J.M.; Shafer, J.M.; Covington, E.; Berg, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Published information on the correlation and field-testing of the technique of stack-unit/aquifer sensitivity mapping with documented subsurface contaminant plumes is rare. The inherent characteristic of stack-unit mapping, which makes it a superior technique to other analyses that amalgamate data, is the ability to deconstruct the sensitivity analysis on a unit-by-unit basis. An aquifer sensitivity map, delineating the relative sensitivity of the Crouch Branch aquifer of the Administrative/Manufacturing Area (A/M) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA, incorporates six hydrostratigraphic units, surface soil units, and relevant hydrologic data. When this sensitivity map is compared with the distribution of the contaminant tetrachloroethylene (PCE), PCE is present within the Crouch Branch aquifer within an area classified as highly sensitive, even though the PCE was primarily released on the ground surface within areas classified with low aquifer sensitivity. This phenomenon is explained through analysis of the aquifer sensitivity map, the groundwater potentiometric surface maps, and the plume distributions within the area on a unit-by- unit basis. The results of this correlation show how the paths of the PCE plume are influenced by both the geology and the groundwater flow. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  17. Tracking the origin and dispersion of contaminated sediments transported by rivers draining the Fukushima radioactive contaminant plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, H.; Evrard, O.; Onda, Y.; Chartin, C.; Lefevre, I.; Sophie, A.; Bonte, P.

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted in several catchments draining the main Fukushima Dai-ichi Power Plant contaminant plume in Fukushima prefecture, Japan. We collected soils and sediment drape deposits (n = 128) and investigated the variation in 137Cs enrichment during five sampling campaigns, conducted every six months, which typically occurred after intense erosive events such as typhoons and snowmelt. We show that upstream contaminated soils are eroded during summer typhoons (June-October) before being exported during the spring snowmelt (March-April). However, this seasonal cycle of sediment dispersion is further complicated by the occurrence of dam releases that may discharge large amounts of contaminants to the coastal plains during the coming years.

  18. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical contaminant distribution are necessary in order to adequately characterize waste sites and determine remedial strategies to be employed. However, it is important to consider the sampling objectives, sampling methods, and sampl...

  19. Detection of contaminant plumes in ground water of Long Island, New York, by electromagnetic terrain-conductivity surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mack, T.J.; Maus, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic terrain conductivity surveys were conducted at four landfills in Suffolk county and at an artificial recharge site in Nassau County to assess the feasibility of this technique for detecting contaminant plumes. The technique was successful at three of the landfills; results compared closely with those indicated by specific conductance of water from observation wells on the sites. Data from the three sites for which the technique was successful--the Horseblock Road landfill , the Manorville scavenger waste disposal facility, and the Riverhead landfill--revealed pronounced terrain conductivity anomalies that reflect known contaminant plumes. Plumes at the other two sites--Blydenburgh landfill and the East Meadow artificial recharge site--could not be detected because cultural interferences were too great and, at the Blydenburgh site, depth to water was too great. The interferences included pipelines, utility cables, and traffic. Given favorable conditions, such as high plume conductivity, lack of cultural interferences, and a depth of less than 100 ft to the plume, electromagnetic surveying can provide a rapid means of locating contaminant plumes. (Author 's abstract)

  20. Delineation of soil and groundwater contamination using geophysical methods at a waste disposal site in Canakkale, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kaya, M Ali; Ozürlan, Gülçin; Sengül, Ebru

    2007-12-01

    Direct current (DC) resistivity, self potential (SP) and very low frequency electromagnetic (VLF-EM) measurements are carried out to detect the spread of groundwater contamination and to locate possible pathways of leachate plumes, that resulted from an open waste disposal site of Canakkale municipality. There is no proper management of the waste disposal site in which industrial and domestic wastes were improperly dumped. Furthermore, because of the dumpsite is being located at the catchment area borders of a small creek and is being topographically at a high elevation relative to the urban area, the groundwater is expected to be hazardously contaminated. Interpretations of DC resistivity geoelectrical data showed a low resistivity zone (<5 ohm-m), which appears to be a zone, that is fully saturated with leachate from an open dumpsite. The VLF-EM and SP method, support the results of geoelectrical method relating a contaminated zone in the survey area. There is a good correlation between the geophysical investigations and the results of previously collected geochemical and hydrochemical measurements. PMID:17385055

  1. Phytoforensics, dendrochemistry, and phytoscreening: New green tools for delineating contaminants from past and present

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burken, J.G.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Balouet, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    As plants evolved to be extremely proficient in mass transfer with their surroundings and survive as earth's dominant biomass, they also accumulate and store some contaminants from surroundings, acting as passive samplers. Novel applications and analytical methods have been utilized to gain information about a wide range of contaminants in the biosphere soil, water, and air, with information available on both past (dendrochemistry) and present (phytoscreening). Collectively these sampling approaches provide rapid, cheap, ecologically friendly, and overall "green" tools termed "Phytoforensics". ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Resistivity and self-potential tomography applied to groundwater remediation and contaminant plumes: Sandbox and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Revil, A.; Hort, R. D.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Kulessa, B.

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical methods can be used to remotely characterize contaminated sites and monitor in situ enhanced remediation processes. We have conducted one sandbox experiment and one contaminated field investigation to show the robustness of electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential (SP) tomography for these applications. In the sandbox experiment, we injected permanganate in a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated environment under a constant hydraulic gradient. Inverted resistivity tomograms are able to track the evolution of the permanganate plume in agreement with visual observations made on the side of the tank. Self-potential measurements were also performed at the surface of the sandbox using non-polarizing Ag-AgCl electrodes. These data were inverted to obtain the source density distribution with and without the resistivity information. A compact horizontal dipole source located at the front of the plume was obtained from the inversion of these self-potential data. This current dipole may be related to the redox reaction occurring between TCE and permanganate and the strong concentration gradient at the front of the plume. We demonstrate that time-lapse self-potential signals can be used to track the kinetics of an advecting oxidizer plume with acceptable accuracy and, if needed, in real time, but are unable to completely resolve the shape of the plume. In the field investigation, a 3D resistivity tomography is used to characterize an organic contaminant plume (resistive domain) and an overlying zone of solid waste materials (conductive domain). After removing the influence of the streaming potential, the identified source current density had a magnitude of 0.5 A m-2. The strong source current density may be attributed to charge movement between the neighboring zones that encourage abiotic and microbially enhanced reduction and oxidation reactions. In both cases, the self-potential source current density is located in the area of strong resistivity gradient.

  3. COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT IN CONTAMINANT PLUMES: FIELD EXPERIMENTS, LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, AND MODELING (EPA/600/S-99/001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbatio...

  4. DELINEATION OF SUBSURFACE HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION USING A DIRECT PUSH RESISTIVITY METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct push resistivity method was evaluated as a complementary screening tool to provide rapid in-situ contaminant detection to aid in better defining locations for drilling, sampling, and monitoring well installation at hazardous waste sites. Nine continuous direct push resi...

  5. Movement and fate of solutes in a plume of sewage-contaminated ground water, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, D. R., (Edited By)

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has begun a nationwide program to study the fate of toxic wastes in groundwater. Several sites where groundwater is known to be contaminated are being studied by interdisciplinary teams of geohydrologists, chemists, and microbiologists. The objective of these studies is to obtain a thorough quantitative understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes of contaminant generation, migration, and attenuation in aquifers. One of the sites being studied by the USGS under this program is a plume of sewage contaminated groundwater on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The plume was formed by land disposal of treated sewage to a glacial outwash aquifer since 1936. This report summarizes results obtained during the first year of research at the Cape Cod s under the USGS Toxic-Waste Ground-Water Contamination Program. The seven papers included in this volume were presented at the Toxic Waste Technical Meeting, Tucson, Arizona, in March 1984. They provide an integrated view of the subsurface distribution of contaminants based on the first year of research and discuss hypotheses concerning the transport processes that affect the movement of contaminants in the plume. (See W89-09053 thru W89-09059) (Lantz-PTT)

  6. Indian MORB-source mantle: not just a case of plume contamination or sediment recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, P. D.; Pearce, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) from the Indian Ocean have long been known for their distinctive Pb and Sr isotope compositions relative to other MORBs. Most models for their origin involve contamination of a "normal" depleted mantle by a distinctly enriched material, the most favoured being (1) recycled oceanic crust plus pelagic sediments, (2) mantle plumes and/or (3) delaminated sub-continental lithosphere. Based on quantitative mixing models, Rehkämper and Hofmann (1997) showed that recycling of an old, compositionally heterogeneous component could explain the range of Sr, Nd and Pb isotope compositions for Indian MORBs. Their model predicts that the predominant recycled component is ancient (1.5Ga) altered ocean crust, with pelagic sediment comprising less than 10% of the contaminant. However, Hf-Nd isotope systematics are difficult to explain in this way because Indian MORBs have higher eHf values (i.e. greater time-integrated depletion of Lu relative to Hf) for a given eNd than nearly all other MORBs - and considerably higher than any of the enriched materials suggested as contaminants. Essentially, Indian and Pacific MORBs form separate and parallel arrays in Nd-Hf isotope space. What is required is a mechanism that involves not only enrichment of some elements, but also relative depletion of others. Based on new Nd-Hf isotope data for Indian and Pacific MORBs from the Australian-Antarctic Discordance, we propose that the distinctive Indian MORB source composition can be explained by recycling of subduction-modified mantle. This mantle could have been generated within the convergent margin that existed off the east coast of Gondwana throughout most of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic Eras. It was subsequently recycled into the upper mantle beneath Gondwana and became the source of Indian MORBs following the break-up of the Gondwanan supercontinent. Rehkämper, M., and A. W. Hofmann, Recycled ocean crust and sediment in Indian Ocean MORB, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 147, 93-106, 1997.

  7. In search of plumes: a GPR odyssey in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrych, T.J.; Lima, O.A.L. de; Sampaio, E.E.S.

    1994-12-31

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) and geoelectrical surveys have been combined to outline underground contaminant plumes of industrial origin within a petrochemical center in Bahia, Brazil. Such plumes are invading the upper phreatic layers of a regional aquifer system which is being exploited for supplying cities and villages in the region, for industrial activities and even for the population of Salvador, the third largest city in Brazil. Three case studies are presented: two are related to conductive plumes localized beneath a metallurgical plant and an effluent treatment plant and another, a DNAPL plume below a dirt petrochemical unit. Resistivity soundings and transverse profiling were useful for a gross delineation of the aquifer structure and the extent of the contamination. GPR processed sections were employed for refining the subsurface stratigraphy and petrophysics as well as for a more precise mapping of the plume boundaries.

  8. Delineating Fecal Contaminant Sources and Travel Times in a Karst Groundwater Basin, Inner Bluegrass Region, Kentucky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. W.; Reed, T. M.; Fryar, A. E.; Brion, G. M.

    2006-12-01

    Because of preferential flowpaths via features such as sinkholes and conduits, karst aquifers are susceptible to non-point-source pollution from agricultural and urban drainage. With many karst aquifers being drinking- water sources, pathogens are contaminants of public health concern. Monitoring of microbial parameters (total coliforms [TC], atypical colonies [AC] and fecal coliform bacteria [FC]) transpired biweekly from December 2002 March 2004 and weekly from February October 2005 at Blue Hole Spring, which drains outlying farm lands and the town of Versailles in the Inner Bluegrass Region of Kentucky. Physicochemical parameters (discharge, temperature, specific conductance, and pH) were measured continuously during the entire period. The AC/TC ratio, which had been employed only in surface water-quality studies, was used with FC counts, precipitation and discharge data to determine sources of fecal loading to ground water as result of land-use practices. An AC/TC ratio < 10 demonstrates fresh input of fecal matter, while a larger ratio can represent a variety of occurrences, including aged fecal material input and/or lack of nutrient input into the system. AC/TC ratio data in the 2002 04 dataset behaved similarly to surface waters, with ratios > 10 during dry periods and < 10 during wet periods, while the 2005 data demonstrated a very irregular pattern. The difference in these two data sets indicated a compositional change within the groundwater basin between the two sampling periods, perhaps as a result of construction at a sewage treatment plant adjoining the spring. Solute (rhodamine WT fluorescent dye and bromide) and particle (1-?m diameter fluorescent latex microspheres) tracer tests were conducted during summer 2006 to examine contaminant mobility within the system under base-flow and storm-flow conditions. Rainfall was limited prior to the base-flow trace, totaling 0.025 cm within 2 weeks prior to the slug injection. Base-flow discharge averaged 400 m3/s and solute breakthrough began ~ 7.5 hours post injection and cleared the system after 77 hours. For the storm-flow trace, rainfall totaled 3.12 cm prior to injection, with another 9.35 cm of rainfall occurring over the two week monitoring period. Spring discharge during the storm-flow trace averaged 0.443 m3/s, with a maximum of 0.503 m3/s. Under storm-flow conditions solute breakthrough began ~ 2.33 hours post injection, with particle breakthrough beginning ~ 2.5 hours post injection. Bromide concentrations at the spring were < 0.1 ppm (the detection limit, or DL) 5.5 hours after injection, while rhodamine WT concentrations were < DL (0.1 ppb) 14 hours post injection. Microspheres were detected at the spring until 164 hours after injection. These traces demonstrate that storms in this karst basin can accelerate solute movement, and particles can remain mobile for as long as 1 week after introduction.

  9. Combining pump-and-treat and physical barriers for contaminant plume control.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Peter; Finkel, Michael; Teutsch, Georg

    2004-01-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the hydraulic efficiency of plume management alternatives that combine a conventional pump-and-treat system with vertical, physical hydraulic barriers such as slurry walls or sheet piles. Various design settings are examined for their potential to reduce the pumping rate needed to obtain a complete capture of a given contaminated area. Using established modeling techniques for flow and transport, those barrier configurations (specified by location, shape, and length) that yield a maximum reduction of the pumping rate are identified assuming homogeneous aquifer conditions. Selected configurations are further analyzed concerning their hydraulic performance under heterogeneous aquifer conditions by means of a stochastic approach (Monte Carlo simulations) with aquifer transmissivity as a random space function. The results show that physical barriers are an appropriate means to decrease expected (mean) pumping rates, as well as the variance of the corresponding pumping rate distribution at any given degree of heterogeneity. The methodology presented can be transferred easily to other aquifer scenarios, provided some basic premises are fulfilled, and may serve as a basis for reducing the pumping rate in existing pump-and-treat systems. PMID:15584299

  10. Insights into biodegradation through depth-resolved microbial community functional and structural profiling of a crude-oil contaminant plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bailey, Zach; Pruden, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale geochemical gradients are a key feature of aquifer contaminant plumes, highlighting the need for functional and structural profiling of corresponding microbial communities on a similar scale. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial functional and structural diversity with depth across representative redox zones of a hydrocarbon plume and an adjacent wetland, at the Bemidji Oil Spill site. A combination of quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and pyrosequencing were applied to vertically sampled sediment cores. Levels of the methanogenic marker gene, methyl coenzyme-M reductase A (mcrA), increased with depth near the oil body center, but were variable with depth further downgradient. Benzoate degradation N (bzdN) hydrocarbon-degradation gene, common to facultatively anaerobic Azoarcus spp., was found at all locations, but was highest near the oil body center. Microbial community structural differences were observed across sediment cores, and bacterial classes containing known hydrocarbon degraders were found to be low in relative abundance. Depth-resolved functional and structural profiling revealed the strongest gradients in the iron-reducing zone, displaying the greatest variability with depth. This study provides important insight into biogeochemical characteristics in different regions of contaminant plumes, which will aid in improving models of contaminant fate and natural attenuation rates.

  11. Chromium isotope variation along a contaminated groundwater plume: a coupled Cr(VI)- reduction, advective mixing perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, T.; Izbicki, J.

    2007-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a common contaminant in groundwater, used in electroplating, leather tanning, wood preservation, and as an anti-corrosion agent. Cr occurs in two oxidation states in groundwater: Cr(VI) is highly soluble and mobile, and is a carcinogen; Cr(III) is generally insoluble, immobile and less toxic than Cr(VI). Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is thus a central issue in approaches to Cr(VI) contaminant remediation in aquifers. Aqueous Cr(VI) occurs mainly as the chromate (CrO22-) and bichromate (HCrO2-) oxyanions, while Cr(III) is mainly "hexaquo" Cr(H2O)63+. Cr has four naturally-occurring stable isotopes: 50Cr, 52Cr, 53Cr and 54Cr. When Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), the strong Cr-O bond must be broken, resulting in isotopic selection. Ellis et al. (2002) demonstrated that for reduction of Cr(VI) on magnetite and in natural sediment slurries, the change of isotopic composition of the remnant Cr(VI) pool was described by a Rayleigh fractionation model having fractionation factor ?Cr(VI)-Cr(III) = 3.4‰. We attempted to use Cr isotopes as a monitor of Cr(VI) reduction at a field site in Hinkley, California (USA) where groundwater contaminated with Cr(VI) has been under assessment for remediation. Groundwater containing up to 5 ppm Cr(VI) has migrated down-gradient from the contamination source through the fluvial to alluvial sediments to form a well-defined plume. Uncontaminated groundwater in the aquifer immediately adjacent to the plume has naturally-occurring Cr(VI) of 4 ppb or less (CH2M-Hill). In early 2006, colleagues from CH2M-Hill collected 17 samples of groundwater from within and adjacent to the plume. On a plot of ?53Cr vs. log Cr(VI), the data array is strikingly linear and differs markedly from the trend predicted for reduction of Cr(VI) in the contaminated water. There appear to be two groups of data: four samples with ?53Cr >+2‰ and Cr(VI) <4 ppb, and 13 samples with ?53Cr <+2‰ and Cr(VI) >15 ppb. Simple mixing lines between the groundwater samples having <4 ppb Cr(VI), taken to be representative of regional groundwater, and the contaminated water do not pass through the remainder of the data, discounting a simple advective mixing scenario. We hypothesize a more likely scenario that involves both Cr(VI) reduction and advective mixing. As the plume initially expands downgradient, Cr(VI) in water at the leading edge encounters reductant in the aquifer resulting in limited Cr(VI) reduction. As a result of reduction, ?53Cr of Cr(VI) remaining in solution at the leading edge increases along the "reduction" trend from 0 to ~+2‰. Inevitable mixing of this water at the leading edge with regional groundwater results in a suitable mixing end-member to combine with Cr(VI) within the plume in order to explain the bulk of the remaining data. Neither Cr(VI) reduction nor advective mixing of plume and regional groundwaters can explain the data on their own, implying an interplay of at least these two processes during plume evolution. Ellis, A.S., Johnson, T.M. and Bullen, T.D. 2002, Science, 295, 2060-2062.

  12. Distributional patterns of arsenic concentrations in contaminant plumes offer clues to the source of arsenic in groundwater at landfills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2015-01-01

    The distributional pattern of dissolved arsenic concentrations from landfill plumes can provide clues to the source of arsenic contamination. Under simple idealized conditions, arsenic concentrations along flow paths in aquifers proximal to a landfill will decrease under anthropogenic sources but potentially increase under in situ sources. This paper presents several conceptual distributional patterns of arsenic in groundwater based on the arsenic source under idealized conditions. An example of advanced subsurface mapping of dissolved arsenic with geophysical surveys, chemical monitoring, and redox fingerprinting is presented for a landfill site in New Hampshire with a complex flow pattern. Tools to assist in the mapping of arsenic in groundwater ultimately provide information on the source of contamination. Once an understanding of the arsenic contamination is achieved, appropriate remedial strategies can then be formulated.

  13. Hydrazine engine plume contamination mapping. [measuring instruments for rocket exhaust from liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirivella, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Instrumentation for the measurement of plume exhaust specie deposition rates were developed and demonstrated. The instruments, two sets of quartz crystal microbalances, were designed for low temperature operation in the back flow and variable temperature operation in the core flow regions of an exhaust plume. These quartz crystal microbalances performed nominally, and measurements of exhaust specie deposition rates for 8400 number of pulses for a 0.1-lb monopropellant thruster are reported.

  14. Tracing the dispersion of sediment contaminated with fallout radionuclides along the main rivers draining the contaminated plume in Fukushima Prefecture (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, O.; Patin, J.; Lefèvre, I.; Chartin, C.; Ayrault, S.; Bonté, Ph.; Onda, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident led to the release of important quantities of radionuclides into the environment. Several of those substances (e.g., Cs-134; Cs-137) strongly sorb onto soil particles. Resulting radiations lead to an external exposure threat associated with the spatial distribution of radionuclides. This threat, associated with the possibility of transfer of contamination to plants and direct ingestion of contaminated particles, will affect human activities such as agriculture, forest exploitation and fishing for long periods of time, depending on the half life of the radionuclides (e.g., 2 yrs for Cs-134; 30 yrs for Cs-137). Furthermore, sediment can be a preferential vector of contaminants in rivers, and its transfer can lead to the dispersion of radioactive contamination across larger areas over time. We present here preliminary results obtained during a field campaign conducted in November 2011 in a part of Fukushima Prefecture located in the main contamination plume and covering an area of about 5000 km2. We had the unique opportunity to measure and "trace" the dispersion of sediment contaminated with radionuclides shortly after the catastrophe. In total, 125 soil and sediment samples were collected along the main rivers of the area (i.e., Abukuma, Nitta, Mano, Kutchibuto and Hirose Rivers). This hydrological network drains the contamination plume located 20 to 80 km northwest of Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant. Furthermore, radiation dose rates were measured all throughout the field survey. Preliminary results show that, 8 months after the accident, radiation dose rates constitute a good proxy to trace contamination dispersion in the region, especially along rivers. Radiation dose rates varied between 0.5 µSv/h and 200 µSv/h in the field. Transfer of contaminated sediment has already started in rivers, and it was accelerated by the occurrence of violent typhoons in the region between July and October, 2011. Main gamma-emitting radionuclides detected in the area are Cs-134, Cs-137 and Ag-110m. So far, activities of Cs-134+137 measured in river sediment ranged between 3-300 kBq/kg, sometimes far exceeding the expected activity associated with the initial deposits. This pioneer investigation is crucial and constitutes a scientific prerequisite for the proposal of catchment management measures to control and limit radioactive pollution propagation. Typhoon-triggered flooding leading to subsequent sediment redistribution might generate long-lasting contamination of the food chain in this agricultural region. Keywords: Fallout radionuclides; sediment tracing; nuclear accident; catchment; river; Fukushima Dai-ichi.

  15. On the significance of contaminant plume-scale and dose-response models in defining hydrogeological characterization needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, F.; Rubin, Y.; Maxwell, R.; Bai, H.

    2007-12-01

    Defining rational and effective hydrogeological data acquisition strategies is of crucial importance since financial resources available for such efforts are always limited. Usually such strategies are developed with the goal of reducing uncertainty, but less often they are developed in the context of the impacts of uncertainty. This paper presents an approach for determining site characterization needs based on human health risk factors. The main challenge is in striking a balance between improved definition of hydrogeological, behavioral and physiological parameters. Striking this balance can provide clear guidance on setting priorities for data acquisition and for better estimating adverse health effects in humans. This paper addresses this challenge through theoretical developments and numerical testing. We will report on a wide range of factors that affect the site characterization needs including contaminant plume's dimensions, travel distances and other length scales that characterize the transport problem, as well as health risk models. We introduce a new graphical tool that allows one to investigate the relative impact of hydrogeological and physiological parameters in risk. Results show that the impact of uncertainty reduction in the risk-related parameters decreases with increasing distances from the contaminant source. Also, results indicate that human health risk becomes less sensitive to hydrogeological measurements when dealing with ergodic plumes. This indicates that under ergodic conditions, uncertainty reduction in human health risk may benefit from better understanding of the physiological component as opposed to a detailed hydrogeological characterization

  16. Huntington beach shoreline contamination investigation, phase III: coastal circulation and transport patterns : the likelihood of OCSD's plume impacting Huntington beach shoreline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, Marlene; Xu, Jingping; Rosenfeld, Leslie; Largier, John; Hamilton, Peter; Jones, Burt; Robertson, George

    2003-01-01

    A consortium of agencies have conducted an extensive investigation of the coastal ocean circulation and transport pathways off Huntington Beach, with the aim of identifying any causal links that may exist between the offshore discharge of wastewater by OCSD and the significant bacterial contamination observed along the Huntington Beach shoreline. This is the third study supported by OCSD to determine possible land-based and coa Although the study identifies several possible coastal ocean pathways by which diluted wastewater may be transported to the beach, including internal tide, sea-breeze and subtidal flow features, there were no direct observations of either the high bacteria concentrations seen in the OCSD plume at the shelf break reaching the shoreline in significant levels or of an association between the existence of a coastal ocean process and beach contamination at or above AB411 levels. It is concluded that the OCSD plume is not a major cause of beach contamination; no causal links could be demonstrated. This conclusion is based on the absence of direct observation of plume-beach links, on analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of shoreline contamination and coastal ocean processes, and on the observation of higher levels of contamination at the beach than in the plume.

  17. Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue. PMID:24165695

  18. Techniques of contributing-area delineation for analysis of nonpoint-source contamination of Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misut, P.

    1995-01-01

    Ninety shallow monitoring wells on Long Island, N.Y., were used to test the hypothesis that the correlation between the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) at a well and explanatory variables representing land use, population density, and hydrogeologic conditions around the well is affected by the size and shape of the area defined as the contributing area. Explanatory variables are quantified through overlay of various specified contributing areas on 1:24 000-scale landuse and population-density geographic information system (GIS) coverages. Four methods of contributing-area delineation were used: (a) centering a circle of selected radius on the well site, (b) orienting a triangular area along the direction of horizontal ground-water flow to the well, (c) generating a shaped based on direction and magnitude of horizontal flow to the well, and (d) generating a shape based on three-dimensional particle pathlines backtracked from the well screen to the water table. The strongest correlations with VOC detections were obtained from circles of 400- to 1 000-meter radius. Improvement in correlation through delineations based on ground-water flow would require geographic overlay on more highly detailed GIS coverages than those used in the study.

  19. A comparison of shuttle vernier engine plume contamination with CONTAM 3.4 code predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Jones, Thomas M.; Rao, Shankar M.; Linder, W. Kelly

    1992-01-01

    In 1985, using the CONTAM 3.2 code, it was predicted that the shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) and Vernier Reaction Control System (VRCS) engines could be potential contamination sources to sensitive surfaces located within the shuttle payload bay. Spaceflight test data on these engines is quite limited. Shuttle mission STS-32, the Long Duration Exposure Facility retrieval mission, was instrumented with an experiment that provided the design engineer with evidence that contaminant species from the VRCS engines can enter the payload bay. More recently, the most recent version of the analysis code, CONTAM 3.4, has re-examined the contamination potential of these engines.

  20. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-09-01

    Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a preferred treatment technology saves significant site restoration costs for DOE. However, in order to be accepted MNA requires direct evidence of which processes are responsible for the contaminant loss and also the rates of the contaminant loss. Our proposal aims to: 1) provide evidence for one example of MNA, namely the disappearance of the dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Test Area North (TAN) site, 2) determine the rates at which aquifer microbes can co-metabolize TCE, and 3) determine whether there are other examples of natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents occurring at DOE sites. To this end, our research has several objectives. First, we have conducted studies to characterize the microbial processes that are likely responsible for the co-metabolic destruction of TCE in the aquifer at TAN (University of Idaho and INL). Second, we are investigating realistic rates of TCE co-metabolism at the low catabolic activities typical of microorganisms existing under aquifer conditions (INL). Using the co-metabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained in the aquifer at TAN and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Coupled with the research on low catabolic activities of co-metabolic microbes we are determining the patterns of functional gene expression by these cells, patterns that may be used to diagnose the co-metabolic activity in the SRPA or other aquifers. Third, we have systematically considered the aquifer contaminants at different locations in plumes at other DOE sites in order to determine whether MNA is a broadly applicable remediation strategy for chlorinated hydrocarbons (North Wind Inc.). Realistic terms for co-metabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE’s ability to predict and monitor natural attenuation of chlorinated organics, increase the acceptability of this solution, and provide significant economic and health benefits through this noninvasive remediation strategy. This project also aims to derive valuable genomic information about the functional attributes of subsurface microbial communities upon which DOE must depend to resolve some of its most difficult contamination issues.

  1. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment - Task 4: Modeling - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Starr

    2005-10-31

    Trichloroethene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, can be degraded under certain conditions by microorganisms that occur naturally in the subsurface. TCE can be degraded under anaerobic conditions to less chlorinated compounds and ultimately into the non-chlorinated, non-hazardous end product, ethene, via anaerobic reductive dechlorination (ARD). ARD is widely recognized as a TCE degradation mechanism, and occurs in active groundwater remediation and can occur during monitored natural attenuation (MNA). MNA relies on natural processes, such as dispersion and degradation, to reduce contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels without active human intervention other than monitoring. TCE can also be biodegraded under aerobic conditions via cometabolism, in which microbial enzymes produced for other purposes fortuitously also react with TCE. In cometabolism, TCE is oxidized directly to non-hazardous products. Cometabolism as a TCE-degrading process under aerobic conditions is less well known than ARD. Natural attenuation is often discounted as a TCE remedial alternative in aerobic conditions based on the paradigm that TCE is biodegradable only under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to this paradigm, TCE was shown to degrade relative to conservative co-contaminants at an environmentally significant rate in a large (approximately 3 km long) TCE plume in aerobic groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the degradation mechanism was shown to be cometabolism. MNA was selected as the remedy for most of this plume, resulting in a considerable cost savings relative to conventional remedial methods. To determine if cometabolism might be a viable remedy at other sites with TCE-contaminated aerobic groundwater, TCE plumes at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were screened to evaluate whether TCE commonly degrades in aerobic groundwater, and if degradation rates are fast enough that natural attenuation could be a viable remedy. One hundred and twenty seven plumes at 24 DOE facilities were screened, and 14 plumes were selected for detailed examination. In the plumes selected for further study, spatial changes in the concentration of a conservative co-contaminant were used to compensate for the effects of mixing and temporal changes in TCE release from the contaminant source. Decline in TCE concentration along a flow path in excess of the co contaminant concentration decline was attributed to cometabolic degradation. This study indicated that TCE was degraded in 9 of the 14 plumes examined, with first order degradation half-lives ranging from about 1 to 12 years. TCE degradation in about two-thirds of the plumes examined suggests that cometabolism of TCE in aerobic groundwater is a common occurrence, in contrast to the conventional wisdom that TCE is recalcitrant in aerobic groundwater. The degradation half-life values calculated in this study are short enough that natural attenuation may be a viable remedy in many aerobic plumes. Computer modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport and degradation is frequently used to predict the evolution of groundwater plumes, and for evaluating natural attenuation and other remedial alternatives. An important aspect of a computer model is the mathematical approach for describing degradation kinetics. A common approach is to assume that degradation occurs as a first-order process. First order kinetics are easily incorporated into transport models and require only a single value (a degradation half-life) to describe reaction kinetics. The use of first order kinetics is justified in many cases because more elaborate kinetic equations often closely approximate first order kinetics under typical field conditions. A previous modeling study successfully simulated the INL TCE plume using first order degradation kinetics. TCE cometabolism is the result of TCE reacting with microbial enzymes that were produced for other purposes, such as oxidizing a growth substrate to obtain energy. Both TCE and the growth substrate compete for enzyme reactive sites, and the presence of

  2. Innovative Use of Cr(VI) Plume Depictions and Pump-and-Treat Capture Analysis to Estimate Risks of Contaminant Discharge to Surface Water at Hanford Reactor Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Chuck W.; Hanson, James P.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Hanford Site nuclear reactor operations required large quantities of high-quality cooling water, which was treated with chemicals including sodium dichromate dihydrate for corrosion control. Cooling water leakage, as well as intentional discharge of cooling water to ground during upset conditions, produced extensive groundwater recharge mounds consisting largely of contaminated cooling water and resulted in wide distribution of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) contamination in the unconfined aquifer. The 2013 Cr(VI) groundwater plumes in the 100 Areas cover approximately 6 km2 (1500 acres), primarily in the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units (OUs). The Columbia River is a groundwater discharge boundary; where the plumes are adjacent to the Columbia River there remains a potential to discharge Cr(VI) to the river at concentrations above water quality criteria. The pump-and-treat systems along the River Corridor are operating with two main goals: 1) protection of the Columbia River, and 2) recovery of contaminant mass. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat systems was needed to determine if the Columbia River was protected from contamination, and also to determine where additional system modifications may be needed. In response to this need, a technique for assessing the river protection was developed which takes into consideration seasonal migration of the plume and hydraulic performance of the operating well fields. Groundwater contaminant plume maps are generated across the Hanford Site on an annual basis. The assessment technique overlays the annual plume and the capture efficiency maps for the various pump and treat systems. The river protection analysis technique was prepared for use at the Hanford site and is described in detail in M.J. Tonkin, 2013. Interpolated capture frequency maps, based on mapping dynamic water level observed in observation wells and derived water levels in the vicinity of extraction and injection wells, are developed initially. Second, simulated capture frequency maps are developed, based on transport modelling results. Both interpolated and simulated capture frequency maps are based on operation of the systems over a full year. These two capture maps are then overlaid on the plume distribution maps for inspection of the relative orientation of the contaminant plumes with the capture frequency. To quantify the relative degree of protection of the river from discharges of Cr(VI) (and conversely, the degree of threat) at any particular location, a systematic method of evaluating and mapping the plume/capture relationship was developed. By comparing the spatial relationship between contaminant plumes and hydraulic capture frequency, an index of relative protectiveness is developed and the results posted on the combined plume/capture plan view map. Areas exhibiting lesser degrees of river protection are identified for remedial process optimization actions to control plumes and prevent continuing discharge of Cr(VI) to the river.

  3. 3-D SPECTRAL IP IMAGING: NON-INVASIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONTAMINANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to develop a noninvasive tomographic imaging technique,based on the spectral induced-polarization method, to characterize the in-situ distribution of organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants. Recent advances in tomographic imaging, applied to ...

  4. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-06-01

    Dissolved dense nonaqueous-phase liquid plumes are persistent, widespread problems in the DOE complex. At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) is disappearing from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) by natural attenuation, a finding that saves significant site restoration costs. Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation as a preferred treatment technology requires direct evidence of the processes and rates of the degradation. Our proposal aims to provide that evidence for one such site by testing two hypotheses. First, we believe that realistic values for in situ rates of TCE cometabolism can be obtained by sustaining the putative microorganisms at the low catabolic activities consistent with aquifer conditions. Second, the patterns of functional gene expression evident in these communities under starvation conditions while carrying out TCE cometabolism can be used to diagnose the cometabolic activity in the aquifer itself. Using the cometabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained at this location and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Realistic terms for cometabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE's ability to predict and monitor natural attenuation of chlorinated organics at other sites, increase the acceptability of this solution, and provide significant economic and health benefits through this noninvasive remediation strategy. Finally, this project aims to derive valuable genomic information about the functional attributes of subsurface microbial communities upon which DOE must depend to resolve some of its most difficult contamination issues.

  5. Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of a contaminant plume in Kingsford, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, R.L.; Silva, S.R.; Bemis, B.; Godsy, E.M.; Warren, E.

    2001-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis was used to study a contaminated site near Kingsford, Michigan, USA. Organic compounds at three of the sites studied had similar ??13C values indicating that the contaminant source is the same for all sites. At a fourth site, chemical and ??13C values had evolved due to microbial degradation of organics, with the ??13C being much heavier than the starting materials. A microcosm experiment was run to observe isotopic changes with time in the methane evolved and in compounds remaining in the water during degradation. The ??13C values of the methane became heavier during the initial period of the run when volatile fatty acids were being consumed. There was an abrupt decrease in the ??13C values when fatty acids had been consumed and phenols began to be utilized. The ??13C value of the propionate remaining in solution also increased, similar to the results found in the field.

  6. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    David Watson

    2005-04-18

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies.

  7. Using ASCEM Modeling and Visualization to Inform Stakeholders of Contaminant Plume Evolution and Remediation Efficacy at F-Basin Savannah River, SC – 15156

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.; Wainwright, H.; Molins, S.; Davis, J.; Arora, B.; Faybishenko, B.; Krishnan, H.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Moulton, D.; Lipnikov, K.; Gable, C.; Miller, T.; Freshley, M.

    2015-01-28

    Communication with stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and the public is an essential part of implementing different remediation and monitoring activities, and developing site closure strategies at contaminated sites. Modeling of contaminant plume evolution plays a critical role in estimating the benefit, cost, and risk of particular options. At the same time, effective visualization of monitoring data and modeling results are particularly important for conveying the significance of the results and observations. In this paper, we present the results of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project, including the discussion of the capabilities of newly developed ASCEM software package, along the its application to the F-Area Seepage Basins located in the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). ASCEM software includes state-of-the-art numerical methods for simulating complex flow and reactive transport, as well as various toolsets such as a graphical user interface (GUI), visualization, data management, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation. Using this software, we have developed an advanced visualization of tritium plume migration coupled with a data management system, and simulated a three-dimensional model of flow and plume evolution on a high-performance computing platform. We evaluated the effect of engineered flow barriers on a nonreactive tritium plume, through advanced plume visualization and modeling of tritium plume migration. In addition, we developed a geochemical reaction network to describe complex geochemical processes at the site, and evaluated the impact of coupled hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These results are expected to support SRS’s monitoring activities and operational decisions.

  8. Assessing Contaminant-Removal Conditions and Plume Persistence through Analysis of Data from Long-term Pump-and-Treat Operations

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Guo, Zhilin

    2014-01-01

    Historical groundwater-withdrawal and contaminant-concentration data collected from long-term pump-and-treat operations were analyzed and used to examine contaminant mass discharge (CMD) and mass-removal behavior for multiple sites. Differences in behavior were observed, and these differences were consistent with the nature of contaminant distributions and subsurface properties of the sites. For example, while CMD exhibited a relatively rapid decline during the initial stage of operation for all three sites, the rate of decline varied. The greatest rate was observed for the PGN site, whereas the lowest rate was observed for the MOT site. In addition, the MOT site exhibited the lowest relative reduction in CMD. These results are consistent with the actuality that the MOT site likely contains the greatest proportion of poorly accessible contaminant mass, given that it comprises a combined alluvium and fractured-bedrock system in which solvent and dissolved mass are present directly in the bedrock. The relative contributions of the source zones versus the plumes to total CMD were determined. Constrained contaminant mass removal was observed to influence the plumes for all three sites, and was attributed to a combination of uncontrolled (or imperfectly controlled) sources, back diffusion, and well-field hydraulics. The results presented herein illustrate that detailed analysis of operational pump-and-treat data can be a cost-effective method for providing value-added characterization of contaminated sites. PMID:24914523

  9. Assessing contaminant-removal conditions and plume persistence through analysis of data from long-term pump-and-treat operations.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Guo, Zhilin

    2014-08-01

    Historical groundwater-withdrawal and contaminant-concentration data collected from long-term pump-and-treat operations were analyzed and used to examine contaminant mass discharge (CMD) and mass-removal behavior for multiple sites. Differences in behavior were observed, and these differences were consistent with the nature of contaminant distributions and subsurface properties of the sites. For example, while CMD exhibited a relatively rapid decline during the initial stage of operation for all three sites, the rate of decline varied. The greatest rate was observed for the PGN site, whereas the lowest rate was observed for the MOT site. In addition, the MOT site exhibited the lowest relative reduction in CMD. These results are consistent with the actuality that the MOT site likely contains the greatest proportion of poorly accessible contaminant mass, given that it comprises a combined alluvium and fractured-bedrock system in which solvent and dissolved mass are present directly in the bedrock. The relative contributions of the source zones versus the plumes to total CMD were determined. Constrained contaminant mass removal was observed to influence the plumes for all three sites, and was attributed to a combination of uncontrolled (or imperfectly controlled) sources, back diffusion, and well-field hydraulics. The results presented herein illustrate that detailed analysis of operational pump-and-treat data can be a cost-effective method for providing value-added characterization of contaminated sites. PMID:24914523

  10. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F.S.; Crawford, R.L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-09-01

    Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a preferred treatment technology saves significant site restoration costs for DOE. However, in order to be accepted MNA requires direct evidence of which processes are responsible for the contaminant loss and also the rates of the contaminant loss. Our proposal aims to: 1) provide evidence for one example of MNA, namely the disappearance of the dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Test Area North (TAN) site, 2) determine the rates at which aquifer microbes can co-metabolize TCE, and 3) determine whether there are other examples of natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents occurring at DOE sites. To this end, our research has several objectives. First, we have conducted studies to characterize the microbial processes that are likely responsible for the co-metabolic destruction of TCE in the aquifer at TAN (University of Idaho and INL). Second, we are investigating realistic rates of TCE co-metabolism at the low catabolic activities typical of microorganisms existing under aquifer conditions (INL). Using the co-metabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained in the aquifer at TAN and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Coupled with the research on low catabolic activities of co-metabolic microbes we are determining the patterns of functional gene expression by these cells, patterns that may be used to diagnose the co-metabolic activity in the SRPA or other aquifers.

  11. Detection of fresh ground water and a contaminant plume beneath Red Brook Harbor, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCobb, Timothy D.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2002-01-01

    Trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene were detected in ground water in a vertical interval from about 68 to 176 feet below sea level beneath the shoreline where the contaminant plume emanating from a capped landfill on the Massachusetts Military Reservation intersects Red Brook Harbor. The highest concentrations at the shoreline, about 15 micrograms per liter of trichloroethene and 1 microgram per liter of tetrachloroethene, were measured in samples from one well at about 176 feet below sea level. The concentrations of nutrients, such as nitrate and ammonium, and trace metals, such as iron and manganese, in these same samples are typical of uncontaminated ground water on Cape Cod. Fresh ground water (bulk electrical conductance less than 100 millisiemens per meter) is present beneath the harbor at 40 of 48 locations investigated within about 250 feet of the shoreline. Fresh ground water also was detected at one location approximately 450 feet from shore. The harbor bottom consists of soft sediments that range in thickness from 0 to greater than 20 feet and overlie sandy aquifer materials. Trichloroethene was detected at several locations in fresh ground water from the sandy aquifer materials beneath the harbor. The highest trichloroethene concentration, about 4.5 micrograms per liter, was measured about 450 feet from shore.

  12. Determination of Premining Geochemical Background and Delineation of Extent of Sediment Contamination in Blue Creek Downstream from Midnite Mine, Stevens County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Stanley E.; Kirschner, Frederick E.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Budahn, James R.; Brown, Zoe Ann

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical and radionuclide studies of sediment recovered from eight core sites in the Blue Creek flood plain and Blue Creek delta downstream in Lake Roosevelt provided a stratigraphic geochemical record of the contamination from uranium mining at the Midnite Mine. Sediment recovered from cores in a wetland immediately downstream from the mine site as well as from sediment catchments in Blue Creek and from cores in the delta in Blue Creek cove provided sufficient data to determine the premining geochemical background for the Midnite Mine tributary drainage. These data provide a geochemical background that includes material eroded from the Midnite Mine site prior to mine development. Premining geochemical background for the Blue Creek basin has also been determined using stream-sediment samples from parts of the Blue Creek, Oyachen Creek, and Sand Creek drainage basins not immediately impacted by mining. Sediment geochemistry showed that premining uranium concentrations in the Midnite Mine tributary immediately downstream of the mine site were strongly elevated relative to the crustal abundance of uranium (2.3 ppm). Cesium-137 (137Cs) data and public records of production at the Midnite Mine site provided age control to document timelines in the sediment from the core immediately downstream from the mine site. Mining at the Midnite Mine site on the Spokane Indian Reservation between 1956 and 1981 resulted in production of more than 10 million pounds of U3O8. Contamination of the sediment by uranium during the mining period is documented from the Midnite Mine along a small tributary to the confluence of Blue Creek, in Blue Creek, and into the Blue Creek delta. During the period of active mining (1956?1981), enrichment of base metals in the sediment of Blue Creek delta was elevated by as much as 4 times the concentration of those same metals prior to mining. Cadmium concentrations were elevated by a factor of 10 and uranium by factors of 16 to 55 times premining geochemical background determined upstream of the mine site. Postmining metal concentrations in sediment are lower than during the mining period, but remain elevated relative to premining geochemical background. Furthermore, the sediment composition of surface sediment in the Blue Creek delta is contaminated. Base-metal contamination by arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc in sediment in the delta in Blue Creek cove is dominated by suspended sediment from the Coeur d?Alene mining district. Uranium contamination in surface sediment in the delta of Blue Creek cove extends at least 500 meters downstream from the mouth of Blue Creek as defined by the 1,290-ft elevation boundary between lands administered by the National Park Service and the Spokane Indian Tribe. Comparisons of the premining geochemical background to sediment sampled during the period the mine was in operation, and to the sediment data from the postmining period, are used to delineate the extent of contaminated sediment in Blue Creek cove along the thalweg of Blue Creek into Lake Roosevelt. The extent of contamination out into Lake Roosevelt by mining remains open.

  13. 3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, K.M.; Lesmes, D.P.; Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W.; Shi, W.; Sturrock, J.

    1997-12-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. The first-year accomplishments are (1) laboratory experiments on fluid-saturated sandstones quantifying the dependence of spectral IP responses on solution chemistry and rock micro-geometry; (2) library research on the current understanding of electromagnetic coupling effects on IP data acquired in the field: and (3) development of prototype forward modeling and inversion algorithms for interpreting IP data in terms of 3-D models of complex resistivity.'

  14. Investigation of the Strontium-90 Contaminant Plume along the Shoreline of the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Patton, Gregory W.; Hartman, Mary J.; Spane, Frank A.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts are underway to remediate strontium-laden groundwater to the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site. Past practices of the 100-N reactor liquid waste disposal sites has left strontium-90 sorbed onto sediments which is a continuing source of contaminant discharge to the river. The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology Project assessed the interaction of groundwater and river water at the hyporheic zone. Limited data have been obtained at this interface of contaminant concentrations, geology, groundwater chemistry, affects of river stage and other variables that may affect strontium-90 release. Efforts were also undertaken to determine the extent, both laterally and horizontally, of the strontium-90 plume along the shoreline and to potentially find an alternative constituent to monitor strontium-90 that would be more cost effective and could possibly be done under real time conditions. A baseline of strontium-90 concentrations along the shoreline was developed to help assess remediation technologies.

  15. Vertical Transverse Dispersion Controls the Natural Attenuation of Spatially Variable Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. D.; Huettmann, A.; Lerner, D. N.; Thornton, S. F.

    2003-12-01

    Many, if not most organic contaminant plumes are spatially variable. This presents a challenge for natural attenuation assessment using traditional methods that rely on monitoring along plume centrelines that are necessarily assumed to be unique. An alternative approach is to characterise the processes that control attenuation, and delineate where those processes occur within the plume. For example, carbon turnover in many organic plumes is constrained to biodegradation at the plume fringe where contaminants mix with electron acceptors. This mixing is influenced by concentration gradients of organics (out of the plume) and oxygen and nitrate (into the plume), and vertical transverse dispersion. Where plumes consist of complex mixtures of organics, an added factor is the preferential degradation of certain compounds (target or non-target organics) due to various microbiological concerns. Accurate prediction of natural attenuation of such plumes may be possible if spatially discrete carbon turnover processes are considered in the context of spatial plume variability. A transect of four highly detailed multilevel sampling wells were installed across a well-studied tar acid plume migrating within the Triassic sandstones in the UK Midlands. The goal of these wells was to locate the upper plume fringe and quantify degradation within those zones. The multilevel sample ports were 20 cm apart to characterise both electron acceptor and donor profiles in great detail. The primary contaminants within the plume are the phenolics (phenol, xylenols, cresols), but other compounds are present that impose a demand on electron acceptor supply (tar neutrals TEX, C4-C8 benzenes, benzofuran and tar bases pyridines, picoline, aniline). The bioactive zone appears to be constrained to a narrow zone less than 1 m thick wherein all dissolved oxygen and nitrate are consumed, with phenol persisting to depth, consistent with weak vertical mixing due to weak dispersion at the scale of diffusion. The vertical position of this fringe varies in space, suggesting that natural attenuation cannot be accurately estimated by extrapolating the reactive processes quantified at one location to the plume as a whole.

  16. Experimental characterization of a plume of passive contaminant above a thermal source: capture efficiency of a fume extraction hood.

    PubMed

    Devienne, René; Fontaine, Jean Raymond; Kicka, Jérémie; Bonthoux, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Industrial ventilation problems can be linked to the formation of thermal plumes that develop due to natural convection above various heat sources. These plumes, independent of the energy losses and thermal constraints caused, can also be the carrier of polluting products. This article describes an experimental study of the dynamic, thermal, and mass fields that develop from a hot rectangular (0.5 x 1.25 m) horizontal source. The metrology available allows the measurement of not only the local temperatures and velocities but also the concentration of a tracer gas (helium). Mathematical models have been developed enabling representation of the fields concerned; their characterization by isothermal, iso-velocity, or iso-concentration curves; calculation of the flow rate carried by the plume at a given height; calculation of the enthalpy transport; and so on. Moreover, a pollutant capture device has been introduced, and the measurement technique used allows the determination of various efficiencies of practical interest. The ratio of capture flow to free plume flow at a particular height appears to correlate well with the mean efficiencies obtained for distinct source temperatures. PMID:19666957

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of future groundwater flow conditions and contaminant plume transport in the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1996 and 1997 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, C.R.; Wurstner, S.K.; Williams, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.; Bergeron, M.P.

    1997-12-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow and transport, based on the Coupled Fluid Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code, was developed for the Hanford Site to support the Hanford Groundwater Project (HGWP), managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The model was developed to increase the understanding and better forecast the migration of several contaminant plumes being monitored by the HGWP, and to support the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200-Area Plateau. Recent modeling efforts have focused on continued refinement of an initial version of the three-dimensional model developed in 1995 and its application to simulate future transport of selected contaminant plumes in the aquifer system. This version of the model was updated using a more current version of the CFEST code called CFEST96. Prior to conducting simulations of contaminant transport with the three-dimensional model, a previous steady-state, two-dimensional model of the unconfined aquifer system was recalibrated to 1979 water-table conditions with a statistical inverse method implemented in the CFEST-INV computer code. The results of the recalibration were used to refine the three-dimensional conceptual model and to calibrate it with a conceptualization that preserves the two-dimensional hydraulic properties and knowledge of the aquifer`s three-dimensional properties for the same 1979 water-table conditions. The transient behavior of the three-dimensional flow model was also calibrated by adjusting model storage properties (specific yield) until transient water-table predictions approximated observed water-table elevations between 1979 and 1996.

  18. Assessment of diesel contamination in groundwater using electromagnetic induction geophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Fallgren, Paul; Cooper, Jeffrey; Morris, Jeffrey; Urynowicz, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Determining hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater is typically accomplished through the installation of extensive monitoring wells. Issues of scale and site heterogeneities tend to introduce errors in delineating the extent of contamination and environmental impact. In this study, electromagnetic induction survey was investigated as an alternative technique for mapping petroleum contaminants in the subsurface. The surveys were conducted at a coal mining site near Gillette, Wyoming, using the EM34-XL ground conductivity meter. Data from this survey were validated with known concentrations of diesel compounds detected in groundwater from the study site. Groundwater data correlated well with the electromagnetic survey data, which was used to generate a site model to identify subsurface diesel plumes. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to use electromagnetic survey techniques for mapping hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater. Results from this study indicate that this geophysical technique can be an effective tool for assessing subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon sources and plumes at contaminated sites. PMID:18393065

  19. Assessment of diesel contamination in groundwater using electromagnetic induction geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, S.; Fallgren, P.; Cooper, J.; Morris, J; . Urynowicz, M.

    2008-07-01

    Determining hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater is typically accomplished through the installation of extensive monitoring wells. Issues of scale and site heterogeneities tend to introduce errors in delineating the extent of contamination and environmental impact. In this study, electromagnetic induction survey was investigated as an alternative technique for mapping petroleum contaminants in the subsurface. The surveys were conducted at a coal mining site near Gillette, Wyoming, using the EM34-XL ground conductivity meter. Data from this survey were validated with known concentrations of diesel compounds detected in groundwater from the study site. Groundwater data correlated well with the electromagnetic survey data, which was used to generate a site model to identify subsurface diesel plumes. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to use electromagnetic survey techniques for mapping hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater. Results from this study indicate that this geophysical technique can be an effective tool for assessing subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon sources and plumes at contaminated sites.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter oleivorans PF1, a Diesel-Degrading and Plant-Growth-Promoting Endophytic Strain Isolated from Poplar Trees Growing on a Diesel-Contaminated Plume

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Rineau, Francois; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Daghio, Matteo; Thijs, Sofie; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report the 3.7-Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter oleivorans strain PF1, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-negative bacterium in the class Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from poplar trees growing on a diesel-contaminated plume at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain PF1 is a potent plant-growth promoter, useful for diesel fuel phytoremediation applications. PMID:25657268

  1. Investigation of the potential source area, contamination pathway, and probable release history of chlorinated-solvent-contaminated groundwater at the Capital City Plume Site, Montgomery, Alabama, 2008-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Miller, Scott; Campbell, Bruce G.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Gill, Amy C.; Clark, Athena P.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of the organic solvent perchloroethylene (PCE) in a shallow public-supply well in 1991 and exposure of workers in 1993 to solvent vapors during excavation activities to depths near the water table provided evidence that the shallow aquifer beneath the capital city of Montgomery, Alabama, was contaminated. Investigations conducted from 1993 to 1999 by State and Federal agencies confirmed the detection of PCE in the shallow aquifer, as well as the detection of the organic solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and various inorganic compounds, but the source of the groundwater contamination was not determined. In May 2000 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed that the site, called the Capital City Plume (CCP) Site, be a candidate for the National Priorities List. Between 2000 and 2007, numerous site-investigation activities also did not determine the source of the groundwater contamination. In 2008, additional assessments were conducted at the CCP Site to investigate the potential source area, contamination pathway, and the probable release history of the chlorinated-solvent-contaminated groundwater. The assessments included the collection of (1) pore water in 2008 from the hyporheic zone of a creek using passive-diffusion bag samplers; (2) tissue samples in 2008 and 2009 from trees growing in areas of downtown Montgomery characterized by groundwater contamination and from trees growing in riparian zones along the Alabama River and Cypress Creek; and (3) groundwater samples in 2009 and 2010. The data collected were used to investigate the potential source area of contaminants detected in groundwater, the pathway of groundwater contamination, and constraints on the probable contaminant-release history. The data collected between 2008 and 2010 indicate that the PCE and TCE contamination of the shallow aquifer beneath the CCP Site most likely resulted from the past use and disposal of industrial wastewater from printing operations containing chlorinated solvents into the sanitary sewer and (or) stormwater systems of Montgomery. Moreover, chlorinated-solvent use and disposal occurred at least between the 1940s and 1970s at several locations occupied by printing operations. The data also indicate that PCE and TCE contamination continues to occur in the shallow subsurface near potential release areas and that PCE and TCE have been transported to the intermediate part of the shallow aquifer.

  2. Groundwater ecosystem resilience to organic contaminations: microbial and geochemical dynamics throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Nossa, Carlos W; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-09-01

    The capacity of groundwater ecosystem to recover from contamination by organic chemicals is a vital concern for environmental scientists. A pilot-scale aquifer system was used to investigate the long-term dynamics of contaminants, groundwater geochemistry, and microbial community structure (by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR) throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume (10% ethanol + 50 mg/L benzene + 50 mg/L toluene). Two-year continuous ethanol-blended release significantly changed the groundwater geochemistry (resulted in anaerobic, low pH, and organotrophic conditions) and increased bacterial and archaeal populations by 82- and 314-fold respectively. Various anaerobic heterotrophs (fermenters, acetogens, methanogens, and hydrocarbon degraders) were enriched. Two years after the release was shut off, all contaminants and their degradation byproducts disappeared and groundwater geochemistry completely restored to the pre-release states (aerobic, neutral pH, and oligotrophic). Bacterial and archaeal populations declined by 18- and 45-fold respectively (relative to the time of shut off). Microbial community structure reverted towards the pre-release states and alpha diversity indices rebounded, suggesting the resilience of microbial community to ethanol blend releases. We also found shifts from O2-sensitive methanogens (e.g., Methanobacterium) to methanogens that are not so sensitive to O2 (e.g., Methanosarcina and Methanocella), which is likely to contribute to the persistence of methanogens and methane generation following the source removal. Overall, the rapid disappearance of contaminants and their metabolites, rebound of geochemical footprints, and resilience of microbial community unequivocally document the natural capacity of groundwater ecosystem to attenuate and recover from a large volume of catastrophic spill of ethanol-based biofuel. PMID:25996759

  3. Evaluation of Visible Plumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Thomas

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline discusses plumes with contaminants that are visible to the naked eye. Information covers: (1) history of air pollution control regulations, (2) need for methods of evaluating…

  4. Numerical simulations of sulphate emissions from the unsaturated zone on NA processes in ground water - reactive transport modelling of a benzene and naphthalene contaminated plume. Reaktive Transportmodellierungen einer mit Benzen und Naphthalin kontaminierten Abstromfahne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbruch, G.; Schäfer, D.; Dahmke, A.

    2007-06-01

    The supply of electron acceptors from leachate through the unsaturated zone could represent a special boundary condition with regard to contaminant plume spreading in groundwater. This is an important issue for the acceptance of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) strategies and the prediction of NA processes, but which to date has received little attention. The results of the numerical simulations considered herein show problems in parameterisation of the Monod kinetic approach used for modelling biodegradation processes under sulphate reducing conditions and show the effects of different sulphate loads on the future spreading of a benzene and naphthalene plume at a former coking plant. The results indicate a strong influence of sulphate supply and thus highlight the importance of quantifying these electron acceptor sources and loads, and of defining the controlling parameters for predicting long-term trends in plume development.

  5. Interpolating and Extrapolating Contaminant Concentrations from Monitor Wells to Model Grids for Fate-and-Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D. B.; Clement, P.; Bostick, K.

    2002-02-26

    Geostatistical interpolation of groundwater characterization data to visualize contaminant distributions in three dimensions is often hindered by the sparse distribution of samples relative to the size of the plume and scale of heterogeneities. Typically, placement of expensive monitoring wells is guided by the conceptualized plume rather than geostatistical considerations, focusing on contaminated areas rather than thoroughly gridding the plume boundary. The resulting data sets require careful analysis in order to produce plausible plume shells. A purely geostatistical approach is usually impractical; kriging parameters based on the observed data structure can extrapolate contamination far beyond the demonstrated extent of the plume. When more appropriate kriging parameters are selected, holes often occur in the interpolated distribution because realistic kriging ranges may not bridge large gaps between data points. Such artifacts obscure the probable location of the plume boundary and distort the contaminant distribution, obstructing quantitative modeling of remedial strategies. Two methods of constraining kriging can successfully eliminate these geostatistical artifacts. Laterally, the plume boundary may be controlled using a manually constructed mask that delineates the plan-view extent of the plume. After kriging, the mask is used to set all grid cells outside of the plume to a concentration of zero. Use of non-zero control points is a more refined but laborious approach that also bridges data gaps within the body of a plume and permits use of tighter kriging parameters. These can be obtained by manual linear interpolation between measured samples, or derived from historical data migrated along flow paths while accounting for all attenuative processes. Masking and use of non-zero control points result in a plume shell that reflects the intuition and professional judgment of the hydrologist, and can be interpolated automatically to any desired grid, providing initial conditions for fate-and-transport simulations. Error maps are a valuable aid in assessing data density, identifying areas that require additional sampling, or that must be filled by control points, if additional sampling is impractical.

  6. USE OF AROMATIC ACIDS AND PHOSPHOLIPID-ESTER-LINKED FATTY ACIDS FOR DELINEATION OF PROCESSES AFFECTING AN AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH JP-4 FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A glacio-fluvial aquifer located at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, has been contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons released by the crash of a tanker aircraft in October of 1988. A comprehensive analysis of the inorganic and organic geochemical constituents and geomicrobio...

  7. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

  8. Delineation of a wellhead protection zone and determination of flowpaths from potential groundwater contaminant source areas at Camp Ripley, Little Falls, Minnesota.

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-12-22

    Groundwater at Camp Ripley, Minnesota, is recharged both on post and off site and discharged to rivers, wetlands, and pumping wells. The subsurface geologic materials have a wide range of permeabilities and are arranged in a complex fashion as a result of the region's multiple glacial advances. Correlation of individual glacial geologic units is difficult, even between nearby boreholes, because of the heterogeneities in the subsurface. This report documents the creation of a numerical model of groundwater flow for Camp Ripley and hydrologically related areas to the west and southwest. The model relies on a hydrogeological conceptual model built on the findings of a University of Minnesota-Duluth drilling and sampling program conducted in 2001. Because of the site's stratigraphic complexity, a geostatistical approach was taken to handle the uncertainty of the subsurface correlation. The U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW code was used to create the steady-state model, which includes input data from a variety of sources and is calibrated to water levels in monitoring wells across much of the site. This model was used for several applications. Wellhead protection zones were delineated for on-site production wells H, L, and N. The zones were determined on the basis of a probabilistic assessment of the groundwater captured by these wells; the assessment, in turn, had been based on multiple realizations of the study area's stratigraphy and groundwater flowfield. An additional application of the model was for estimating flowpaths and times of travel for groundwater at Camp Ripley's range areas and waste management facilities.

  9. Temporal variations in natural attenuation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in eutrophic river sediments impacted by a contaminated groundwater plume.

    PubMed

    Hamonts, Kelly; Kuhn, Thomas; Vos, Johan; Maesen, Miranda; Kalka, Harald; Smidt, Hauke; Springael, Dirk; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Dejonghe, Winnie

    2012-04-15

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) often discharge into rivers as contaminated groundwater baseflow. Biotransformation, sorption and dilution of CAHs in the impacted river sediments have been reported to reduce discharge, but the effect of temporal variations in environmental conditions on the occurrence and extent of those processes in river sediments is largely unknown. We monitored the reduction of CAH discharge into the Zenne River during a 21-month period. Despite a relatively stable influx of CAHs from the groundwater, the total reduction in CAH discharge from 120 to 20 cm depth in the river sediments, on average 74 ± 21%, showed moderate to large temporal variations, depending on the riverbed location. High organic carbon and anaerobic conditions in the river sediments allowed microbial reductive dechlorination of both chlorinated ethenes and chlorinated ethanes. ?(13)C values of the CAHs showed that this biotransformation was remarkably stable over time, despite fluctuating pore water temperatures. Daughter products of the CAHs, however, were not detected in stoichiometric amounts and suggested the co-occurrence of a physical process reducing the concentrations of CAHs in the riverbed. This process was the main process causing temporal variations in natural attenuation of the CAHs and was most likely dilution by surface water-mixing. However, higher spatial resolution monitoring of flow transients in the riverbed is required to prove dilution contributions due to dynamic surface water-groundwater flow exchanges. ?(13)C values and a site-specific isotope enrichment factor for reductive dechlorination of the main groundwater pollutant vinyl chloride (VC) allowed assessment of changes over time in the extent of both biotransformation and dilution of VC for different scenarios in which those processes either occurred consecutively or simultaneously between 120 and 20 cm depth in the riverbed. The extent of reductive dechlorination of VC ranged from 27 to 89% and differed spatially but was remarkably stable over time, whereas the extent of VC reduction by dilution ranged from 6 to 94%, showed large temporal variations, and was often the main process contributing to the reduction of VC discharge into the river. PMID:22280951

  10. Phytoscreening for chlorinated solvents using rapid in vitro SPME sampling: Application to urban plume in Verl, Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Limmer, M.A.; Balouet, J.-C.; Karg, F.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Burken, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid detection and delineation of contaminants in urban settings is critically important in protecting human health. Cores from trees growing above a plume of contaminated groundwater in Verl, Germany, were collected in 1 day, with subsequent analysis and plume mapping completed over several days. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) analysis was applied to detect tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to below nanogram/liter levels in the transpiration stream of the trees. The tree core concentrations showed a clear areal correlation to the distribution of PCE and TCE in the groundwater. Concentrations in tree cores were lower than the underlying groundwater, as anticipated; however, the tree core water retained the PCE:TCE signature of the underlying groundwater in the urban, populated area. The PCE:TCE ratio can indicate areas of differing degradation activity. Therefore, the phytoscreening analysis was capable not only of mapping the spatial distribution of groundwater contamination but also of delineating zones of potentially differing contaminant sources and degradation. The simplicity of tree coring and the ability to collect a large number of samples in a day with minimal disruption or property damage in the urban setting demonstrates that phytoscreening can be a powerful tool for gaining reconnaissance-level information on groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. The use of SPME decreases the detection level considerably and increases the sensitivity of phytoscreening as an assessment, monitoring, and phytoforensic tool. With rapid, inexpensive, and noninvasive methods of detecting and delineating contaminants underlying homes, as in this case, human health can be better protected through screening of broader areas and with far faster response times. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) for groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.E.; Van Pelt, R.S.

    1993-10-01

    Over the past decade, researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and elsewhere have greatly advanced the knowledge of waste site characterization technologies. As a result, many of the techniques used in the past to investigate waste sites have been replaced by newer technologies, designed to provide greater protection for human health and the environment, greater access to suspected zones of contamination, and more accurate information of subsurface conditions. Determining the most environmentally sound method of assessing a waste unit is a major component of the SRS environmental restoration program. In an effort to understand the distribution and migration of contaminants in the groundwater system, the cone penetrometer investigation of the A/M-Area Southern Sector was implemented. The program incorporated a phased approach toward characterization by first using the CPT to delineate the plume boundary, followed by installing groundwater monitoring wells. The study provided the additional hydrogeologic information necessary to better understand the nature and extent of the contaminant plume (Fig. 1) and the hydrogeologic system in the Southem Sector. This data is essential for the optimal layout of the planned groundwater monitoring well network and recovery system to remediate the aquifers in the area. A number of other test locations were selected in the area during this study for lithologic calibration of the tool and to collect confirmation water samples from the aquifer. Cone penetrometer testing and hydrocone sampling, were performed at 17 sites (Fig. 2). The hydrocone, a tool modification to the CPT, was used to collect four groundwater samples from confined aquifers. These samples were analyzed by SRS laboratories. Elevated levels of chlorinated compounds were detected from these samples and have aided in further delineating the southern sector contaminant plume.

  12. Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl I; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-04-01

    A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentration of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO2(CO3)3(4-) is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), whereas Ca2UO2(CO3)3 and CaUO2(CO3)32- are also significant in the plume frontvicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole pore-waters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that continuous gravity-driven migration of the highly stable U02(CO3)34 in the residual carbonate and sodium rich tank waste solution is likely responsible for the detected growing U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater. PMID:19452870

  13. Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-02-01

    A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentrations of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {sup 4-} is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), while Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} and CaUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} are also significant in the plume front vicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole porewaters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that high geochemical stability of UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-} in the original carbonate and sodium rich waste solution permits its continues migration and the field observed increases of U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater.

  14. Optimized Field Sampling and Monitoring of Airborne Hazardous Transport Plumes; A Geostatistical Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, DI-WEN

    2001-11-21

    Airborne hazardous plumes inadvertently released during nuclear/chemical/biological incidents are mostly of unknown composition and concentration until measurements are taken of post-accident ground concentrations from plume-ground deposition of constituents. Unfortunately, measurements often are days post-incident and rely on hazardous manned air-vehicle measurements. Before this happens, computational plume migration models are the only source of information on the plume characteristics, constituents, concentrations, directions of travel, ground deposition, etc. A mobile ''lighter than air'' (LTA) system is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will be part of the first response in emergency conditions. These interactive and remote unmanned air vehicles will carry light-weight detectors and weather instrumentation to measure the conditions during and after plume release. This requires a cooperative computationally organized, GPS-controlled set of LTA's that self-coordinate around the objectives in an emergency situation in restricted time frames. A critical step before an optimum and cost-effective field sampling and monitoring program proceeds is the collection of data that provides statistically significant information, collected in a reliable and expeditious manner. Efficient aerial arrangements of the detectors taking the data (for active airborne release conditions) are necessary for plume identification, computational 3-dimensional reconstruction, and source distribution functions. This report describes the application of stochastic or geostatistical simulations to delineate the plume for guiding subsequent sampling and monitoring designs. A case study is presented of building digital plume images, based on existing ''hard'' experimental data and ''soft'' preliminary transport modeling results of Prairie Grass Trials Site. Markov Bayes Simulation, a coupled Bayesian/geostatistical methodology, quantitatively combines soft information regarding contaminant location with hard experimental results. Soft information is used to build an initial conceptual image of where contamination is likely to be. As experimental data are collected and analyzed, indicator kriging is used to update the initial conceptual image. The sequential Gaussian simulation is then practiced to make a comparison between the two simulations. Simulated annealing is served as a postprocessor to improve the result of Markov Bayes simulation or sequential Gaussian simulation.

  15. Assessment of ground-water contamination at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, 1982-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummings, T.R.; Twenter, F.R.

    1986-01-01

    Study of ground-water contamination at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, defined the movement and distribution of volatile organic compounds in the glacial sand and gravel aquifer at known sites of contamination, and has defined new plumes at two other sites. The Arrow Street purge system, installed in 1982 to remove contaminants from the Building 43 plume, has lowered concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater in the central part of the most contaminated area from a range of 1,000 to 2,000 microg/L to about 200 microg/L. TCE is not escaping off-Base from this area. In the southern part of the Base a plume containing principally TCE and dichloroethylene (DCE) has been delineated along Mission Drive. Maximum concentrations observed were 3,290 microg/L of TCE and 1,480 microg/L of DCE. Hydrologically suitable sites for purge wells were identified in the southern part of the plume using a new ground-water flow model of the Base. A benzene plume near the bulk-fuel storage area has shifted to a more northerly direction under influence of the Arrow Street purge system. Sites initially identified for purging the benzene plume have been repositioned because of the change in contaminant movement. JP-4 fuel was found to be accumulating in wells near the bulk-fuel storage area, largely in response to seasonal fluctuations in the water-table. It is thought to originate from a spill that occurred several years ago. In general, concentrations found in water do not differ greatly from those observed in 1981. Since 1981, concentrations of TCE have decreased significantly in the Alert Apron plume. Near the origin of the plume, the concentration of TCE has decreased from 1,000 microg/L in 1980 to 50 microg/L in 1984. Water from Van Etten Lake near the termination of the plume had only a trace of TCE at one site. Benzene detected in water from well AF2 seems to originate near the former site of buried fuel tanks west of the operational apron. During periods of normal purge pumping along Arrow Street, contaminants are drawn toward water-supply wells AF2, AF4, and AF5. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Sewage plume in a sand and gravel aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Secondarily treated domestic sewage has been disposed of to a sand and gravel aquifer by infiltration through sand beds at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts, since 1936. The disposal has formed a plume of contaminated ground water that is more than 11 ,000 feet long, is 2,500 to 3,500 feet wide and 75 feet thick, and is overlain by 20 to 50 feet of uncontaminated ground water derived from precipitation. The distributions of specific conductance, temperature, boron chloride, sodium, phosphorus, nitrogen, ammonia, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, and detergents are used to delineate the plume. The center of the plume contains up to 2.6 milligrams per liter detergents as MBAS (methylene blue active substances), 0.4 milligram per liter boron, 20 milligrams per liter ammonia-nitrogen, and specific conductance as high as 405 micromhos per centimeter. Corresponding levels in uncontaminated ground water are less than 0.1 milligram per liter detergents, less than 0.1 ammonia-nitrogen, less than 0.05 milligram per liter boron, and less than 80 micromhos per centimeter specific conductance. Chloride, sodium, and boron concentrations seem to be affected only by hydrodynamic dispersion. Phosphorus movement is greatly retarded by sorption. Detergent concentrations exceed 0.5 milligram per liter from 3 ,000 to 10,000 feet from the sand beds and reflect the use of nonbiodegradable detergents from 1946 through 1964. The center of the plume as far as 5,000 feet from the sand beds contains nitrogen as ammonia, no nitrate, and no dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is oxidized to nitrate gradually with distance from the center of the plume. (USGS)

  17. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30

    Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation and/or bioaugmentation to provide a sustainable remediation system within the flow path of the plume. Additional data will be required to implement this approach and will include: (1) Better delineation of the nature and extent of contamination; (2) Demonstration the plume is currently stable or shrinking; and (3) Demonstration the full reductive dechlorination is occurring. The technical team recommends that DOE use a phased approach to identify residual contamination and to provide rapid installation of remedies. Matrices of characterization and remediation sensors, technologies, and tools were developed by the team in order to match the specific conditions and requirements of the site. The team provides a specific example of remedy that includes the incorporation of a dynamic characterization strategy moving from minimally invasive to more aggressive field techniques, the consideration of multiple complementary remediation approaches based on a spatiotemporally phased approach keyed to the different demands of different parts of the plume, and the integration and sequencing of the characterization and remediation activities.

  18. Mann-Kendall Test for Analysis of Groundwater Contaminant Plume Stability and Evaluation of Sampling Frequency for Long-Term Monitoring - 13233

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Jeffrey R.; Harrison, Toby R.

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes a spreadsheet-based approach for applying the Mann-Kendall (MK) Test to identify statistically significant increasing or decreasing concentration trends, stable concentration trends (not increasing or decreasing), and indeterminate concentration trends (no trend) defined by time-series groundwater monitoring data for inorganic, organic, or radiological contaminants. The approach has been applied in support of ongoing long-term monitoring (LTM) of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and elsewhere on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and has proven effective at minimizing subjective bias in the evaluation and interpretation of contaminant concentration trend data. Application of the approach for the purposes of optimizing groundwater sampling frequency for LTM also is outlined. (authors)

  19. Geophysical detection of on-site wastewater plumes in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew

    Nonpoint source pollution (NPS) continues to be the leading cause of water quality degradation in the United States. On-site wastewater systems (OWS) contribute to NPS; however, due to the range of system designs and complexity of the subsurface, OWS contributions to groundwater pollution are not well understood. As the population of coastal North Carolina continues to increase, better methods to locate and characterize wastewater impacted groundwater are needed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of non-intrusive geophysical methods to provide high resolution information on various contaminants in different geologic settings. The goals of this study were to evaluate the utility of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and capacitively coupled resistivity (CCR) for detecting OWS components, delineating associated wastewater plumes, and monitoring temporal variations in groundwater quality. Cross-sectional and three dimensional (3D) geophysical surveys were conducted periodically over a one year period (February 2011--January 2012) at two schools utilizing OWS in the lower Neuse River Basin (NRB) in the North Carolina Coastal Plain (NCCP). Cores were collected at both study sites; as well as monthly groundwater depth, temperature, and specific conductivity measurements to better constrain the geophysical interpretations. Additionally, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and Cl concentrations were monitored bi-monthly to assess nutrient transport at the sites. The 3D GPR surveys effectively located the wastewater drainage trenches at both sites, in close agreement with locations described in as-built OWS blueprints. Regression analysis of resistivity versus groundwater specific conductivity revealed an inverse relationship, suggesting resistivity ? 250 ohm.m was indicative of wastewater impacted groundwater at both sites. The 3D resistivity models identified regions of low resistivity beneath the drainfields relative to background values. Regression analysis of GPR signal absolute peak amplitude (APA) versus groundwater specific conductivity revealed a decrease in APA indicative of radar signal attenuation at locations where groundwater specific conductivity was elevated. The 3D GPR models identified regions of attenuated radar signal beneath the drainfields relative to background locations. Comparisons of groundwater specific conductivity, GPR, and CCR lateral wastewater plume estimates indicated similar dimensions at both sites. The sensitivity of resistivity measurements tended to decline with increased water-table depth; although, differences in resistivity associated with seasonal water-table depth changes were noticeable. Overall, results of this study suggest that GPR and CCR surveys combined with sediment, hydrologic, and water quality data may provide reliable information on the location of OWS components and extent of associated wastewater plumes. The GPR surveys successfully located the wastewater drainage trenches and helped image the uppermost surface of the wastewater plumes. The CCR surveys delineated the lateral wastewater plume dimensions and revealed temporal changes in groundwater quality associated with differences in groundwater recharge.

  20. Innovative measures for subsurface chromium remediation: Source zone, concentrated plume, and dilute plume. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, D.A.; Knox, R.C.; Tucker, E.E.; Puls, R.W.

    1997-09-01

    This environmental research brief reports on innovative measures for addressing subsurface chromium contamination. For the source zone, surfactant-enhanced chromium extraction is evaluated for expediting the removal of chromium from the source zone soils, thereby mitigating the continual feeding of the ground-water plume. For the concentrated plume, polyelectrolyte-enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF) is evaluated as an innovative treatment process with desirable operating characteristics (less sludge production, higher quality final water, etc.), Relative to the dilute plume, the hydrogeological effectiveness of hydraulically passive, chemically reactive barrier systems is evaluated (i.e., in situ reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III)).

  1. In-situ hydrocarbon delineation using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Taer, A.D.; Hastings, R.W.; Brown, A.Y.; Frend, R.

    1996-12-01

    An investigation of hydrocarbons in soils was conducted at an active Shell Oil Company petroleum products terminal, located in Carson, California. An investigation approach involving Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT) technologies was implemented to provide real-time, in-situ characterization of site stratigraphy, hydrocarbon distribution and importantly, hydrocarbon product differentiation. The area of investigation is located along a property boundary, where a plume of separate phase hydrocarbons has been actively recovered for several years. CPT/LIF technology was selected for the investigation since previous delineation efforts using hydrocarbon fingerprinting methods proved inconclusive. Additionally, the CPT/LIF technology had the potential to provide a cost effective solution to accomplish project objectives. Based on the information obtained during this investigation, it was determined that the plume of separate phase hydrocarbons along the northern property boundary is from a source distinctly different than any identified hydrocarbons known to be from on-site sources. In addition, the plume was determined to not be connected with any other known on-site hydrocarbon plumes. The results of this CPT/LIF investigation were consistent with the known hydrogeologic conditions. This evaluation determined that CPT/LIF technology was very effective in addressing project objectives and resulted in a significant cost savings.

  2. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  3. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  4. SH-Wave Imaging of Potential Near-Surface Geologic Controls on Contaminant Plume Migration: Fluorspar Area Fault Complex, Western Kentucky USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almayahi, A.; Woolery, E.; Hampson, S.

    2011-12-01

    Subbottom lake stratification is of interest to hydrology and core site selection, and in delta formation, sediment focusing and periglacial dynamics. Mirror Lake, New Hampshire, within the Hubbard Brook research area, has long been studied, but its subbottom stratification has only been estimated from coring that revealed up to 13 m of gyttja above about 1 m of Late Wisconsin glacial silt. However, the very low water conductivity of 0.002-0.003 S/m allows exceptional penetration of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals. Here we discuss several GPR profiles recorded at pulse center frequencies of 60 and 120 MHz along 300-600 m transects that crossed the entire lake in many directions. With care not to misinterpret multiple reflection horizons, the profiles clearly delineate gyttja, till, bedrock horizons, boulder horizons near shore and deltaic deposition. Hyperbolic backscatter in the well-stratified gyttja may be responses from buried logs because they often occur in nests of close, deepening diffractions and much logging historically occurred. Strong local horizons within the gyttja suggest sediment retransport and focusing, as suggested by Davis and Ford in their1982 interpretation of cores. The generally deeper and underlying till is characterized by sections of dense diffractions. In some profile sections internal till horizons appear draped over the bedrock horizons. In others parallel and deep horizons may be responses to bedrock fractures. Using estimated minimal wave speeds based on maximum possible dielectric permittivities calculated from assumed saturated conditions, and partly verified by diffraction interpretation after statics removal, our 60 MHz profiles show gyttja (permittivity no greater than 53) thicknesses of at least 11 m, till (permittivity no greater than 33) thicknesses of at least 25 m and depths to bedrock (Littleton schist) up to 28 m. This till thickness far exceeds the average 4-5 m on the surrounding slopes of the Hubbard Brook watershed. We will return with more powerful and lower frequency antennas during January 2014 to try to find deeper gyttja horizons and more continuity in the bedrock horizons, while improving our positioning by using the ice cover. 60-MHz profile of Mirror Lake showing stratified gyttja, dense diffractions from till, and bedrock. Scales are in meters. Depth scale calibrated for till.

  5. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  6. Sewage plume in a sand and gravel aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, Denis R.

    1984-01-01

    Secondarily treated domestic sewage has been disposed of on surface sand beds at the sewage treatment facility at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts, since 1936. Infiltration of the sewage through the sand beds into the underlying unconfined sand and gravel aquifer has resulted in a plume of sewage-contaminated ground water that is 2,500 to 3,500 feet wide, 75 feet thick, and more than 11,000 feet long. The plume extends south and southwest of the sand beds in the same direction as the regional flow of ground water, and is overlain by 20 to 50 feet of ground water derived from precipitation that recharges the aquifer. The bottom of the plume generally coincides with the contact between the permeable sand and gravel and underlying finer grained sediments. The distributions in the aquifer of specific conductance, temperature, boron, chloride, sodium, phosphorus, nitrogen (total of all species), ammonia, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, and detergents are used to delineate the plume. In ground water outside the plume, the detergent concentration is less than 0.1 milligrams per liter as MBAS (methylene blue active substances), the ammonia-nitrogen concentration is less than 0.1 milligrams per liter, the boron concentration is less than 50 micrograms per liter, and specific conductance is less than 80 mircromhos per centimeter. In the center of the plume, detergent concentrations as high as 2.6 milligrams per liter as MBAS, ammonia-nitrogen concentrations as high as 20 milligrams per liter, boron concentrations as high as 400 micrograms per liter, and specific conductance as high as 405 micromhos per centimeter were measured. Chloride, sodium, and boron are transported by the southward-flowing ground water without significant retardation, and seem to be diluted only by hydrodynamic dispersion. The movement of phosphorus is greatly restricted by sorption. Phosphorus concentrations do not exceed 0.05 milligrams per liter farther than 2,500 feet from the sand beds. Detergent concentrations in the plume are highest between 3,000 and 10,000 feet from the sand beds and reflect the introduction of nonbiodegradable detergents in 1946 and the conversion to biodegradable detergents in 1964. The center of the plume as far as 5,000 feet from the sand beds contains nitrogen as ammonia, but no nitrate and no dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is gradually oxidized to nitrate between 5,000 and 8,000 feet from the sand beds, and at distances greater than 8,000 feet oxidation of ammonia is essentially complete. Ammonia also is oxidized to nitrate along the top and sides of the plume within 5,000 of the beds where the contaminated ground water mixes with uncontaminated ground water that contains up to 11 milligrams per liter dissolved oxygen.

  7. Colloid formation at waste plume fronts.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A

    2004-11-15

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington state). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 degrees C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass %, and their particle sizes ranged from tens of nanometers to a few micrometers. Calcium carbonate is always one of the dominant phases of the plume front colloids, while the other phases varied with solution pH and temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high-Na+ waste solution, rapid and completed Na+ replacement of exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca2+/Mg2+-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction atthe plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies. PMID:15573608

  8. Detection of heavy metal and hydrocarbon contamination using a miniature resistivity probe.

    PubMed

    Ahn, T; Allouche, E N; Yanful, E K

    2007-06-01

    The usefulness of the electrical resistivity method for characterization of contaminated sites has been studied in many ways. The most commonly used device is a cone penetrometer that utilizes two or four electrodes to measure electrical resistivity (or conductivity) during a cone penetration test (CPT) along a vertical or horizontal alignment. This paper introduces a new miniature resistivity probe (MRP) that can potentially be deployed from a sampling platform to detect contaminant plumes prior to collecting soil samples. Following bench-scale tests aimed at quantifying the sensitivity of the MRP to various operating and environmental parameters, the response of the MRP in sandy soil containing various concentrations of tour heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni) and two hydrocarbons (phenol and gasoline) is evaluated. The test data revealed that the MRP has the potential to serve as an indexing tool for rapidly delineating contaminant plumes where heavy metals are present. The results for hydrocarbons were less conclusive, ranging from moderate ability to differentiate contaminated and non-contaminated soils for phenol to poor differentiation ability for gasoline. PMID:17624110

  9. REFERENCE SITE WATERSHED DELINEATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of geographic information systems for the delineation of watersheds and analysis of land use / land cover associated with 250 reference sites on wadeable streams as identified by the Central Plains Bioassessment workgroup and located in the States of Kansas, Iowa, Missour...

  10. COOLING TOWER PLUME MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of recently reported cooling tower plume models yields none that is universally accepted. The entrainment and drag mechanisms and the effect of moisture on the plume trajectory are phenomena which are treated differently by various investigators. In order to better under...

  11. Stealth Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Blaney, Diana L.; Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley

    1995-01-01

    We suggest that Io's eruptive activity may include a class of previously undetected SO2 geysers. The thermodynamic models for the eruptive plumes discovered by Voyager 'involve low to moderate entropy SO2 eruptions. The resulting plumes are a mixture of solid and gas which emerge from the vent and follow essentially ballistic trajectories. We show that intrusion of silicate magma into buried SO2 deposits can create the required conditions for high entropy eruptions which proceed entirely in the vapor phase. These purely gaseous plumes would have been invisible to Voyager's instruments. Hence, we call them "stealth" plumes. Such eruptions could explain the "patchy" SO2 atmosphere inferred from recent UV and micro-wave spectral observations. The magma intrusion rate required to support the required gas production for these plumes is a negligible fraction of estimated global magma intrusion rates.

  12. Colloid Formation at Waste Plume Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T.; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A.

    2004-05-22

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington State). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass%, and their particle-sizes ranged from tens of nm to a few {micro}m. Colloid chemical composition and mineralogy depended on temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high Na{sup +} waste solution, rapid and completed Na{sup +} replacement of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+}-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction at the plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions, and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies.

  13. Final report : results of the 2006-2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The 2006-2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Barnes, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The overall goal of the investigation was to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The investigation objectives were to (1) determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, (2) delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and (3) design and implement an expanded monitoring network at Barnes (Argonne 2006a).

  14. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40 Tract delineation...competitive sale to provide for the orderly development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less...

  15. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40 Tract delineation...competitive sale to provide for the orderly development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less...

  16. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40 Tract delineation...competitive sale to provide for the orderly development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less...

  17. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40 Tract delineation...competitive sale to provide for the orderly development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less...

  18. Solar Coronal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Giannina

    2015-12-01

    Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL) images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV) and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  19. Prometheus: Io's wandering plume.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, S W; Lopes-Gautier, R; McEwen, A; Smythe, W; Keszthelyi, L; Carlson, R

    2000-05-19

    Unlike any volcanic behavior ever observed on Earth, the plume from Prometheus on Io has wandered 75 to 95 kilometers west over the last 20 years since it was first discovered by Voyager and more recently observed by Galileo. Despite the source motion, the geometric and optical properties of the plume have remained constant. We propose that this can be explained by vaporization of a sulfur dioxide and/or sulfur "snowfield" over which a lava flow is moving. Eruption of a boundary-layer slurry through a rootless conduit with sonic conditions at the intake of the melted snow can account for the constancy of plume properties. PMID:10817989

  20. In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC); Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Kaback, Dawn S. (Aiken, SC)

    1989-01-01

    A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like.

  1. In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

    1989-05-23

    A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 figs.

  2. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  3. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  4. Enceladus' water vapor plume.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Candice J; Esposito, L; Stewart, A I F; Colwell, J; Hendrix, A; Pryor, W; Shemansky, D; West, R

    2006-03-10

    The Cassini spacecraft flew close to Saturn's small moon Enceladus three times in 2005. Cassini's UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph observed stellar occultations on two flybys and confirmed the existence, composition, and regionally confined nature of a water vapor plume in the south polar region of Enceladus. This plume provides an adequate amount of water to resupply losses from Saturn's E ring and to be the dominant source of the neutral OH and atomic oxygen that fill the Saturnian system. PMID:16527971

  5. Bipropellant rocket exhaust plume analysis on the Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guernsey, C. S.; Mcgregor, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to quantify the contaminant flow field produced by 10 N thrust bipropellant rocket engines used on the Galileo spacecraft. The prediction of the composition of the rocket exhaust by conventional techniques is found to be inadequate to explain experimental observations of contaminant deposition on moderately cold (200 K) surfaces. It is hypothesized that low volatility contaminants are formed by chemical reactions which occur on the surfaces. The flow field calculations performed using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method give the expected result that the use of line-of-sight plume shields may have very little effect on the flux of vapor phase contaminant species to a surface, especially if the plume shields are located so close to the engine that the interaction of the plume with the shield is in the transition flow regime. It is shown that significant variations in the exhaust plume composition caused by nonequilibrium effects in the flow field lead to very low concentrations of species which have high molecular weights in the more rarefied regions of the flow field. Recommendations for the design of spacecraft plume shields and further work are made.

  6. Experiments on Plume Spreading by Engineered Injection and Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, D. C.; Jones, M.; Tigera, R. G.; Neupauer, R.

    2014-12-01

    The notion that groundwater remediation is transport-limited emphasizes the coupling between physical (i.e., hydrodynamic), geochemical, and microbiological processes in the subsurface. Here we leverage this coupling to promote groundwater remediation using the approach of engineered injection and extraction. In this approach, inspired by the literature on chaotic advection, uncontaminated groundwater is injected and extracted through a manifold of wells surrounding the contaminated plume. The potential of this approach lies in its ability to actively manipulate the velocity field near the contaminated plume, generating plume spreading above and beyond that resulting from aquifer heterogeneity. Plume spreading, in turn, promotes mixing and reaction by chemical and biological processes. Simulations have predicted that engineered injection and extraction generates (1) chaotic advection whose characteristics depend on aquifer heterogeneity, and (2) faster rates and increased extent of groundwater remediation. This presentation focuses on a complimentary effort to experimentally demonstrate these predictions experimentally. In preparation for future work using refractive index matched (RIM) porous media, the experiments reported here use a Hele-Shaw apparatus containing silicone oil. Engineered injection and extraction is used to manipulate the geometry of an initially circular plume of black pigment, and photographs record the plume geometry after each step of injection of extraction. Image analysis, using complimentary Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, reveals the thickness and variability of the dispersion zone surrounding the deformed plume of black pigment. The size, shape, and evolution of this dispersion zone provides insight into the interplay between engineered injection and extraction, which generates plume structure, and dispersion (here Taylor dispersion), which destroys plume structure. These experiments lay the groundwork for application of engineered injection and extraction at field sites where improvements to the rate, extent, and cost of remediation are hoped.

  7. Biodegradation at Dynamic Plume Fringes: Mixing Versus Reaction Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Eckert, D.; Griebler, C.; Haberer, C.; Kürzinger, P.; Bauer, R.; Mellage, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biodegradation of continuously emitted plumes is known to be most pronounced at the plume fringe, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. Under steady-state conditions, physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion was shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation, with plume lengths scaling inversely with the bulk transverse dispersivity in quasi two-dimensional settings. Under these conditions, the presence of suitable microbes is essential but the biokinetic parameters do not play an important role. When the location of the plume shifts (caused, e.g., by a fluctuating groundwater table), however, the bacteria are no more situated at the plume fringe and biomass growth, decay, activation and deactivation determine the time lag until the fringe-controlled steady state is approached again. During this time lag, degradation is incomplete. The objective of the presented study was to analyze to which extent flow and transport dynamics diminish effectiveness of fringe-controlled biodegradation and which microbial processes and related biokinetic parameters determine the system response in overall degradation to hydraulic fluctuations. We performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth and maintenance (often subsumed as "biomass decay") microbial dormancy (that is, change into a metabolically inactive state) and endogeneous respiration are important to understand the dynamic behavior of electron-acceptor and -donor fluxes under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  8. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Masoner, Jason R.; Breit, George N.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework.

  9. Assessment of groundwater contamination by landfill leachate: a case in México.

    PubMed

    Reyes-López, Jaime A; Ramírez-Hernández, Jorge; Lázaro-Mancilla, Octavio; Carreón-Diazconti, Concepción; Garrido, Miguel Martín-Loeches

    2008-01-01

    In México, uncontrolled landfills or open-dumps are regularly used as "sanitary landfills". Interactions between landfills/open-dumps and shallow unconfined aquifers have been widely documented. Therefore, evidence showing the occurrence of aquifer contamination may encourage Mexican decision makers to enforce environmental regulations. Traditional methods such as chemical analysis of groundwater, hydrological descriptions, and geophysical studies including vertical electrical sounding (VES) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) were used for the identification and delineation of a contaminant plume in a shallow aquifer. The Guadalupe Victoria landfill located in Mexicali is used as a model study site. This landfill has a shallow aquifer of approximately 1m deep and constituted by silty sandy soil that may favor the transport of landfill leachate. Geophysical studies show a landfill leachate contaminant plume that extends for 20 and 40 m from the SE and NW edges of the landfill, respectively. However, the zone of the leachate's influence stretches for approximately 80 m on both sides of the landfill. Geochemical data corroborates the effects of landfill leachate on groundwater. PMID:18595685

  10. Stormwater plume detection by MODIS imagery in the southern California coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezlin, Nikolay P.; DiGiacomo, Paul M.; Diehl, Dario W.; Jones, Burton H.; Johnson, Scott C.; Mengel, Michael J.; Reifel, Kristen M.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Wang, Menghua

    2008-10-01

    Stormwater plumes in the southern California coastal ocean were detected by MODIS-Aqua satellite imagery and compared to ship-based data on surface salinity and fecal indicator bacterial (FIB) counts collected during the Bight'03 Regional Water Quality Program surveys in February-March of 2004 and 2005. MODIS imagery was processed using a combined near-infrared/shortwave-infrared (NIR-SWIR) atmospheric correction method, which substantially improved normalized water-leaving radiation (nLw) optical spectra in coastal waters with high turbidity. Plumes were detected using a minimum-distance supervised classification method based on nLw spectra averaged within the training areas, defined as circular zones of 1.5-5.0-km radii around field stations with a surface salinity of S < 32.0 ("plume") and S > 33.0 ("ocean"). The plume optical signatures (i.e., the nLw differences between "plume" and "ocean") were most evident during the first 2 days after the rainstorms. To assess the accuracy of plume detection, stations were classified into "plume" and "ocean" using two criteria: (1) "plume" included the stations with salinity below a certain threshold estimated from the maximum accuracy of plume detection; and (2) FIB counts in "plume" exceeded the California State Water Board standards. The salinity threshold between "plume" and "ocean" was estimated as 32.2. The total accuracy of plume detection in terms of surface salinity was not high (68% on average), seemingly because of imperfect correlation between plume salinity and ocean color. The accuracy of plume detection in terms of FIB exceedances was even lower (64% on average), resulting from low correlation between ocean color and bacterial contamination. Nevertheless, satellite imagery was shown to be a useful tool for the estimation of the extent of potentially polluted plumes, which was hardly achievable by direct sampling methods (in particular, because the grids of ship-based stations covered only small parts of the plumes detected via synoptic MODIS imagery). In most southern California coastal areas, the zones of bacterial contamination were much smaller than the areas of turbid plumes; an exception was the plume of the Tijuana River, where the zone of bacterial contamination was comparable with the zone of plume detected by ocean color.

  11. Evidence for mantle plumes?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Don L; Natland, James H

    2007-11-22

    Geophysical hotspots have been attributed to partially molten asthenosphere, fertile blobs, small-scale convection and upwellings driven by core heat. Most are short-lived or too close together to be deeply seated, and do not have anomalous heat flow or temperature; many are related to tectonic features. Bourdon et al. investigate the dynamics of mantle plumes from uranium-series geochemistry and interpret their results as evidence for thermal plumes. Here we show why alternative mechanisms of upwelling and melting should be considered. PMID:18033248

  12. SIMPLIFIED SOIL GAS SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR PLUME MAPPING AND REMEDIATION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil gas measurements were taken in a beach sand matrix of the unsaturated zone above a ground water plume contaminated from a spill near 35,000 gallons of aviation gasoline. he soil gas sampling and analysis strategy provided required information for mapping the plume and vertic...

  13. Modeling benzene plume elongation mechanisms exerted by ethanol using RT3D with a general

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Modeling benzene plume elongation mechanisms exerted by ethanol using RT3D with a general substrate ethanol on benzene fate and transport in fuel-contaminated groundwater and to discern the most influential benzene plume elongation mechanisms. The model, developed as a module for the Reactive Transport in 3

  14. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  15. Improving operational plume forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-04-01

    Forecasting how plumes of particles, such as radioactive particles from a nuclear disaster, will be transported and dispersed in the atmosphere is an important but computationally challenging task. During the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan, operational plume forecasts were produced each day, but as the emissions continued, previous emissions were not included in the simulations used for forecasts because it became impractical to rerun the simulations each day from the beginning of the accident. Draxler and Rolph examine whether it is possible to improve plume simulation speed and flexibility as conditions and input data change. The authors use a method known as a transfer coefficient matrix approach that allows them to simulate many radionuclides using only a few generic species for the computation. Their simulations work faster by dividing the computation into separate independent segments in such a way that the most computationally time consuming pieces of the calculation need to be done only once. This makes it possible to provide real-time operational plume forecasts by continuously updating the previous simulations as new data become available. They tested their method using data from the Fukushima incident to show that it performed well. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2011JD017205, 2012)

  16. New MISR Plume Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-06

    ... annotated to reduce confusion regarding identification of ash vs. cloud. A new version of MINX (V2.0), due to be released to ... .vs. Plumes_O35550-B101-SPWR1.txt). The four links at the bottom of the main page have been updated to describe these changes. Refer to ...

  17. NTR plume modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, D.; Chung, C.-H.; Stubbs, Robert M.

    Viewgraphs on nuclear thermal propulsion are presented. Topics covered include computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for plume analysis; molecular fluid dynamics; molecular CFD characteristics; direct-simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method; integration of DSMC and Navier-Stokes computations; and density profiles.

  18. NTR plume modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, D.; Chung, C.-H.; Stubbs, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on nuclear thermal propulsion are presented. Topics covered include computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for plume analysis; molecular fluid dynamics; molecular CFD characteristics; direct-simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method; integration of DSMC and Navier-Stokes computations; and density profiles.

  19. Enceladus' Water Vapour Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Esposito, L.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A.; Matson, Dennis; Parkinson, C.; Pryor, W.; Shemansky, D.; Stewart, I.; Tew, J.; Yung, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the discovery of Enceladus water vapor plumes is shown. Conservative modeling of this water vapor is also presented and also shows that Enceladus is the source of most of the water required to supply the neutrals in Saturn's system and resupply the E-ring against losses.

  20. COLD WEATHER PLUME STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While many studies of power plant plume transport and transformation have been performed during the summer, few studies of these processes during the winter have been carried out. Accordingly, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Electric Power Research Institute join...

  1. Hydraulic gradient control for groundwater contaminant removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Atwood D.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver, Colarado, U.S.A., is used as a realistic setting for a hypothetical test of a procedure that plans the hydraulic stabilization and removal of a groundwater contaminant plume. A two-stage planning procedure successfully selects the best wells and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules to contain the plume while a well or system of wells within the plume removes the contaminated water. In stage I, a combined groundwater flow and solute transport model is used to simulate contaminant removal under an assumed velocity field. The result is the approximated plume boundary location as a function of time. In stage II, a linear program, which includes a groundwater flow model as part of the set of constraints, determines the optimal well selection and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules by minimizing total pumping and recharge. The simulation-management model eliminates wells far from the plume perimeter and activates wells near the perimeter as the plume decreases in size. This successfully stablizes the hydraulic gradient during aquifer cleanup.The Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver, Colorado, USA, is used as a realistic setting for a hypothetical test of a procedure that plans the hydraulic stabilization and removal of a groundwater contaminant plume. A two-stage planning procedure successfully selects the best wells and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules to contain the plume while a well or system of wells within the plume removes the contaminated water. In stage I, a combined groundwater flow and solute transport model is used to simulate contaminant removal under an assumed velocity field. The result is the approximated plume boundary location as a function of time. In stage II, a linear program, which includes a groundwater flow model as part of the set of constraints, determines the optimal well selection and their optimal pumping/recharge schedules by minimizing total pumping and recharge. Refs.

  2. Phytoremediation of MTBE from a groundwater plume.

    PubMed

    Hong, M S; Farmayan, W F; Dortch, I J; Chiang, C Y; McMillan, S K; Schnoor, J L

    2001-03-15

    The feasibility of phytoremediation to both remediate and hydraulically contain a methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-contaminated groundwater plume was investigated in a three-phase study that included the following elements: (i) a laboratory bioreactor study that examined the fate and transport of 14C-radiolabeled MTBE in hybrid poplar trees, (ii) a novel approach for a mathematical modeling study that investigated the influence of deep-rooted trees on unsaturated and saturated groundwater flow, and (iii) a field study at a Houston site with MTBE-contaminated groundwater where hybrid poplar trees were planted. In the laboratory study, the predominant fate pathway was uptake and evapotranspiration of [14C]-MTBE from leaves and stems of poplar cuttings rooted in hydroponic solution. The modeling study demonstrates that phytohydraulic containment of MTBE in groundwater by deep-rooted trees can be achieved. The field study demonstrated significant groundwater uptake of groundwater by deep-rooted trees via direct measurement in the first three seasons. The use of vegetation may provide a cost-effective in-situ alternative for containment and remediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater plumes. PMID:11347938

  3. Dynamics of thermochemical plumes: 2. Complexity of plume structures and its implications for mapping mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shu-Chuan; van Keken, Peter E.

    2006-03-01

    The mantle plume hypothesis provides explanations for several major observations of surface volcanism. The dynamics of plumes with purely thermal origin has been well established, but our understanding of the role of compositional variations in the Earth's mantle on plume formation is still incomplete. In this study we explore the structures of plumes originating from a thermochemical boundary layer at the base of the mantle in an attempt to complement fluid dynamical studies of purely thermal plumes. Our numerical experiments reveal diverse characteristics of thermochemical plumes that frequently deviate from the classic features of plumes. In addition, owing to the interplay between the thermal and compositional buoyancy forces, the morphology, temperature, and flow fields in both the plume head and plume conduit are strongly time-dependent. The entrainment of the dense layer and secondary instabilities developed in the boundary layer contribute to lateral heterogeneities and enhance stirring processes in the plume head. Our models show that substantial topography of the compositional layer can develop simultaneously with the plumes. In addition, plumes may be present in the lower mantle for more than 70 million years. These features may contribute to the large low seismic velocity provinces beneath the south central Pacific, the southern Atlantic Ocean, and Africa. Our model results support the idea that the dynamics of mantle plumes is much more complicated than conventional thinking based on studies of purely thermal plumes. The widely used criteria for mapping mantle plumes, such as a vertically continuous low seismic velocity signature and strong surface topography swell, may not be universally applicable. We propose that the intrinsic density contrast of the distinct composition may reduce the associated topography of some large igneous provinces such as Ontong Java.

  4. Areal extent of a plume of mineralized water from a flowing artesian well in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1982-01-01

    A flowing artesian well that taps the Floridan aquifer at Chekika Hammock State Park is contaminating the overlying Biscayne aquifer with saline water. The plume of mineralized water extends approximately 7 miles southeast of the well and ranges in width from 1 to 2 miles. The areal extent of contamination in the primary plume is approximately 12 square miles. The principal ions contaminating the Biscayne aquifer are chloride, sodium, and sulfate. (USGS)

  5. Electrochemical method for defect delineation in silicon-on-insulator wafers

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Howland D. T. (Albuquerque, NM); Kelly, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Medernach, John W. (Albuquerque, NM); Stevenson, Joel O. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Sylvia S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical method for defect delineation in thin-film SOI or SOS wafers in which a surface of a silicon wafer is electrically connected so as to control the voltage of the surface within a specified range, the silicon wafer is then contacted with an electrolyte, and, after removing the electrolyte, defects and metal contamination in the silicon wafer are identified.

  6. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental scientists are generally familiar with the concept of barriers for restricting the movement of contaminant plumes in ground water. Such barriers are typically constructed of highly impermeable emplacements of materials such as grouts, slurries, or sheet pilings to ...

  7. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  8. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  9. The Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Performance Testing for Plume Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters are currently being tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. A suite of diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, and Schlieren imaging are being used to acquire plume measurements of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  10. Plume Characterization of a Laboratory Model 22 N GPIM Thruster via High-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the capability of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive areas of the spacecraft from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume characterization of a laboratory-model 22 N thruster via optical diagnostics was conducted at NASA GRC in a space-simulated environment. A high-frequency pulsed laser was coupled with an electron-multiplied ICCD camera to perform Raman spectroscopy in the near-field, low-pressure plume. The Raman data yielded plume constituents and temperatures over a range of thruster chamber pressures and as a function of thruster (catalyst) operating time. Schlieren images of the near-field plume enabled calculation of plume velocities and revealed general plume structure of the otherwise invisible plume. The measured velocities are compared to those predicted by a two-dimensional, kinetic model. Trends in data and numerical results are presented from catalyst mid-life to end-of-life. The results of this investigation were coupled with the Raman and Schlieren data to provide an anchor for plume impingement analysis presented in a companion paper. The results of both analyses will be used to improve understanding of the nature of AF-M315E plumes and their impacts to GPIM and other future missions.

  11. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40... development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  12. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40... development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  13. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40... development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  14. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40 Tract... the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  15. Low altitude plume impingement handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    Plume Impingement modeling is required whenever an object immersed in a rocket exhaust plume must survive or remain undamaged within specified limits, due to thermal and pressure environments induced by the plume. At high altitudes inviscid plume models, Monte Carlo techniques along with the Plume Impingement Program can be used to predict reasonably accurate environments since there are usually no strong flowfield/body interactions or atmospheric effects. However, at low altitudes there is plume-atmospheric mixing and potential large flowfield perturbations due to plume-structure interaction. If the impinged surface is large relative to the flowfield and the flowfield is supersonic, the shock near the surface can stand off the surface several exit radii. This results in an effective total pressure that is higher than that which exists in the free plume at the surface. Additionally, in two phase plumes, there can be strong particle-gas interaction in the flowfield immediately ahead of the surface. To date there have been three levels of sophistication that have been used for low altitude plume induced environment predictions. Level 1 calculations rely on empirical characterizations of the flowfield and relatively simple impingement modeling. An example of this technique is described by Piesik. A Level 2 approach consists of characterizing the viscous plume using the SPF/2 code or RAMP2/LAMP and using the Plume Impingement Program to predict the environments. A Level 3 analysis would consist of using a Navier-Stokes code such as the FDNS code to model the flowfield and structure during a single calculation. To date, Level 1 and Level 2 type analyses have been primarily used to perform environment calculations. The recent advances in CFD modeling and computer resources allow Level 2 type analysis to be used for final design studies. Following some background on low altitude impingement, Level 1, 2, and 3 type analysis will be described.

  16. High-resolution satellite turbidity and sea surface temperature observations of river plume interactions during a significant flood event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brando, V. E.; Braga, F.; Zaggia, L.; Giardino, C.; Bresciani, M.; Matta, E.; Bellafiore, D.; Ferrarin, C.; Maicu, F.; Benetazzo, A.; Bonaldo, D.; Falcieri, F. M.; Coluccelli, A.; Russo, A.; Carniel, S.

    2015-11-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) and turbidity (T) derived from Landsat 8 (L8) imagery were used to characterize river plumes in the northern Adriatic Sea (NAS) during a significant flood event in November 2014. Circulation patterns and sea surface salinity (SSS) from an operational coupled ocean-wave model supported the interpretation of the plumes' interaction with the receiving waters and among them. There was a good agreement of the SSS, T, and SST fields at the sub-mesoscale and mesoscale delineation of the major river plumes. L8 30 m resolution also enabled the description of smaller plume structures. The different plumes' reflectance spectra were related to the lithological fingerprint of the sediments in the river catchments. Sharp fronts in T and SST delimited each single river plume. The isotherms and turbidity isolines' coupling varied among the plumes due to differences in particle loads and surface temperatures in the discharged waters. The surface expressions of all the river plumes occurring in NAS were classified based on the occurrence of the plume dynamical regions in the L8 30 m resolution imagery.

  17. Enceladus Plume Composition (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. H.; Brockwell, T.; Magee, B.; Walker, J.; Chocron, S.; Lewis, W. S.; McKinnon, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Cassini INMS) has obtained valuable data on the composition and structure of the Enceladus plume on several flybys of the Cassini spacecraft: E3, E5, E7, E14, E17, and E18. Flybys E3, and E5 had flyby velocities of 16.6 and 17.7 km per second, respectively, due to the large inclination of the Cassini orbit plane with respect to the Saturn ecliptic plane, while flybys E7, E14, E17, and E18 performed a prograde equatorial flyby of Enceladus below the southern pole with flyby velocities of 7 to 8 km per second. The plume composition observed by the ion neutral mass spectrometer at the various flyby velocities was strongly dependent on the flyby velocity. In particular decreases in the water to molecular hydrogen density and the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratios were observed as the flyby speed increased. We have investigated these changes using collisional models that can determine the effects of molecules and micron-sized ice grains as they impact the titanium surface of the closed ion source of the instrument. At flyby velocities above 16 km per second the subsequent release of titanium vapor induces chemical changes in the incoming gas. At all velocities some molecular fragmentation is possible. Using these model results we examine the velocity-induced changes during the various flybys. We find that water molecules can be converted to molecular hydrogen by chemi-absorption of the water onto the titanium vapor thus creating titanium oxide. However, changes induced in carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide cannot be explained by this process, but are likely due to molecular fragmentation of organic macromolecules. Organic macromolecules (dust grains) or organic macromolecules as condensation nuclei for ice grains can be dissociated by impact on the titanium surface and observed as molecular fragments in the mass spectra from the plume during high velocity flybys. These processes have important implications for the previously reported composition of the Enceladus plume, which are presented in this paper.

  18. Tracking stormwater discharge plumes and water quality of the Tijuana River with multispectral aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejkovsky, Jan; Nezlin, Nikolay P.; Mustain, Neomi M.; Kum, Jamie B.

    2010-04-01

    Spatial-temporal characteristics and environmental factors regulating the behavior of stormwater runoff from the Tijuana River in southern California were analyzed utilizing very high resolution aerial imagery, and time-coincident environmental and bacterial sampling data. Thirty nine multispectral aerial images with 2.1-m spatial resolution were collected after major rainstorms during 2003-2008. Utilizing differences in color reflectance characteristics, the ocean surface was classified into non-plume waters and three components of the runoff plume reflecting differences in age and suspended sediment concentrations. Tijuana River discharge rate was the primary factor regulating the size of the freshest plume component and its shorelong extensions to the north and south. Wave direction was found to affect the shorelong distribution of the shoreline-connected fresh plume components much more strongly than wind direction. Wave-driven sediment resuspension also significantly contributed to the size of the oldest plume component. Surf zone bacterial samples collected near the time of each image acquisition were used to evaluate the contamination characteristics of each plume component. The bacterial contamination of the freshest plume waters was very high (100% of surf zone samples exceeded California standards), but the oldest plume areas were heterogeneous, including both polluted and clean waters. The aerial imagery archive allowed study of river runoff characteristics on a plume component level, not previously done with coarser satellite images. Our findings suggest that high resolution imaging can quickly identify the spatial extents of the most polluted runoff but cannot be relied upon to always identify the entire polluted area. Our results also indicate that wave-driven transport is important in distributing the most contaminated plume areas along the shoreline.

  19. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  20. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  1. Persistent Source Influences on the Trailing Edge of a Groundwater Plume, and Natural Attenuation Timeframes: The F-Area Savannah

    E-print Network

    Hubbard, Susan

    production, and industrial sites have left groundwater at many locations contaminated, even decades after the Cold War, and resulted in similar groundwater plumes at other locations such as the S-3 Ponds in OakPersistent Source Influences on the Trailing Edge of a Groundwater Plume, and Natural Attenuation

  2. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  3. Simple models of tropical plumes 

    E-print Network

    Carrie, Gordon David, d 1960-

    1994-01-01

    Tropical plumes are upper and mid-level cloud bands at least 2000 km long that cross 15' latitude. The simplest conditions that lead to tropical plume development are sought in a barotropic model simulating winter 200 mb flow. The features sought...

  4. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes

    PubMed Central

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  5. USING DIRECT-PUSH TOOLS TO MAP HYDROSTRATIGRAPHY AND PREDICT MTBE PLUME DIVING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional wells for monitoring MTBE contamination at underground storage tank sites are screened a few feet above and a few feet below the water table. At some sites, a plume of contamination in ground water may dive below the screen of conventional monitoring wells and escap...

  6. Induced Contamination Predictions for JAXA's MPAC&SEED Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steagall, Courtney; Smith, Kendall; Huang, Alvin; Soares, Carlos; Mikatarian, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Externally mounted ISS payloads are exposed to the induced ISS environment, including material outgassing and thruster plume contamination. The Boeing Space Environments Team developed analytical and semiempirical models to predict material outgassing and thruster plume induced contamination. JAXA s SM/MPAC&SEED experiment provides an unique opportunity to compare induced contamination predications with measurements. Analysis results are qualitatively consistent with XPS measurements. Calculated depth of contamination within a factor of 2-3 of measured contamination. Represents extremely good agreement, especially considering long duration of experiment and number of outgassing sources. Despite XPS limitations in quantifying plume contamination, the measured and predicted results are of similar scale for the wake-facing surfaces. JAXA s JEM/MPAC&SEED experiment will also be exposed to induced contamination due to JEM and ISS hardware. Predicted material outgassing induced contamination to JEM/MPAC&SEED ranges from 44 to 262 (depending on surface temperature) for a 3 year exposure duration.

  7. Complex electrical resistance tomography of a subsurface PCE plume

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W,; LeBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    A controlled experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of complex electrical resistivity tomography (CERT) for detecting and delineating free product dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. One hundred ninety liters of PCE were released at a rate of 2 liters per hour from a point 0.5 m below ground surface. The spill was conducted within a double walled tank where saturated layers of sand, bentonite and a sand/bentonite mixture were installed. Complex electrical resistance measurements were performed. Data were taken before the release, several times during, and then after the PCE was released. Magnitude and phase were measured at 1 and 64 Hz. Data from before the release were compared with those during the release for the purpose of imaging the changes in conductivity resulting from the plume. Conductivity difference tomographs showed a decrease in electrical conductivity as the DNAPL penetrated the soil. A pancake-shaped anomaly developed on the top of a bentonite layer at 2 m depth. The anomaly grew in magnitude and extent during the release and borehole television surveys data confirmed the anomaly to be free-product PCE whose downward migration was stopped by the low permeability clay. The tomographs clearly delineated the plume as a resistive anomaly.

  8. Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multi–element Contaminated, Organic–rich Subsurface Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

    2014-03-02

    Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mössbauer, µ-XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments’ solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi – element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 µm) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZ’s complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

  9. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Pencil, Eric J.; Carter, Justin; Heminger, Jason; Gatsonis, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) are currently baselined for the Air Force Mightysat II.1 flight in 1999 and are under consideration for a number of other missions for primary propulsion, precision positioning, and attitude control functions. In this work, PPT plumes were characterized to assess their contamination characteristics. Diagnostics included planar and cylindrical Langmuir probes and a large number of collimated quartz contamination sensors. Measurements were made using a LES 8/9 flight PPT at 0.24, 0.39, 0.55, and 1.2 m from the thruster, as well as in the backflow region behind the thruster. Plasma measurements revealed a peak centerline ion density and velocity of approx. 6 x 10(exp 12) cm(exp -3) and 42,000 m/s, respectively. Optical transmittance measurements of the quartz sensors after 2 x 10(exp 5) pulses showed a rapid decrease in plume contamination with increasing angle from the plume axis, with a barely measurable transmittance decrease in the ultraviolet at 90 deg. No change in optical properties was detected for sensors in the backflow region.

  10. A simple method for calculating growth rates of petroleum hydrocarbon plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Curtis, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Consumption of aquifer Fe(III) during biodegradation of ground water contaminants may result in expansion of a contaminant plume, changing the outlook for monitored natural attenuation. Data from two research sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons show that toluene and xylenes degrade under methanogenic conditions, but the benzene and ethylbenzene plumes grow as aquifer Fe(III) supplies are depleted. By considering a one-dimensional reaction front in a constant unidirectional flow field, it is possible to derive a simple expression for the growth rate of a benzene plume. The method balances the mass flux of benzene with the Fe(III) content of the aquifer, assuming that the biodegradation reaction is instantaneous. The resulting expression shows that the benzene front migration is retarded relative to the ground water velocity by a factor that depends on the concentrations of hydrocarbon and bioavailable Fe(III). The method provides good agreement with benzene plumes at a crude oil study site in Minnesota and a gasoline site in South Carolina. Compared to the South Carolina site, the Minnesota site has 25% higher benzene flux but eight times the Fe(III), leading to about one-sixth the expansion rate. Although it was developed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, the growth-rate estimation method may have applications to contaminant plumes from other persistent contaminant sources. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  11. Assessment of natural attenuation of ground-water contamination at sites FT03, LF13, and WP14/LF15, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

    2002-01-01

    Water-quality, aquifer-sediment, and hydro-logic data were used to assess the effectiveness of natural attenuation of ground-water contamination at Fire Training Area Three, the Rubble Area Landfill, the Liquid Waste Disposal Landfill, and the Receiver Station Landfill in the East Management Unit of Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. These sites, which are contaminated with chlorinated solvents and fuel hydrocarbons, are under-going long-term monitoring to determine if natural attenuation continues to sufficiently reduce contaminant concentrations to meet regulatory requirements. This report is the first assessment of the effectiveness of natural attenuation at these sites since long-term monitoring began in 1999, and follows a preliminary investigation done in 1995?96. This assessment was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force.Since 1995?96, additional information has been collected and used in the current assessment. The conclusions in this report are based primarily on ground-water samples collected from January through March 2000. Previous analytical results from selected wells, available geologic and geo-physical well logs, and newly acquired information such as sediment organic-carbon measurements, hydraulic-conductivity measurements determined from slug tests on wells in the natural attenuation study area, and water-level measurements from surficial-aquifer wells also were used in this assessment. This information was used to: (1) calculate retardation factors and estimate contaminant migration velocities, (2) improve estimates of ground-water flow directions and inferred contaminant migration pathways, (3) better define the areal extent of contamination and the proximity of contaminants to discharge areas and the Base boundary, (4) develop a better under-standing of the vertical variability of contaminant concentrations and redox conditions, (5) evaluate the effects of temporal changes on concentrations in the plumes and source areas, and (6) determine whether intrinsic biodegradation is occurring at these sites.The water-quality data indicate that intrinsic biodegradation is occurring at all three sites. The strongest indication of intrinsic biodegradation is the detection of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene breakdown products within and down-gradient of the source areas. The patterns of electron acceptors and metabolic by-products indicate that contaminant biodegradation has changed the prevailing geochemistry of the surficial aquifer, creating the strongly reducing conditions necessary for chlorinated solvent bio-degradation. Geochemical changes include depleted dissolved oxygen and elevated ferrous iron and methane levels relative to concentrations in uncontaminated zones of the surficial aquifer. At Fire Training Area Three and the Rubble Area Landfill sites, natural attenuation appears to be adequate for controlling the migration of the contaminant plumes. At the third site, the Liquid Waste Disposal and Receiver Station Landfills, the plume is larger and the uncertainty about the effectiveness of natural attenuation in reducing contaminant concentrations and controlling plume migration is greater. Ground-water data indicate, however, that U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels were not exceeded in any point-of-compliance wells located along the Base boundary.The information presented in this report led to the development of improved conceptual models for these sites, and to the recognition of four issues that are currently unclear and may need further study. These issues include delineating the areal and vertical extent of the contaminant plumes in greater detail, determining the extent of intrinsic biodegradation downgradient of the Liquid Waste Disposal and Receiver Station Landfills, deter-mining the fate of contaminants in the ground-water discharge areas, and determining the effect of temporal variability in source concentrations and ground-water

  12. Estimating Uncertainty in Brain Region Delineations

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Karl R.; Prasad, Gautam; Fletcher, Evan; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating uncertainty in MRI-based brain region delineations provided by fully-automated segmentation methods. In large data sets, the uncertainty estimates could be used to detect fully-automated method failures, identify low-quality imaging data, or endow downstream statistical analyses with per-subject uncertainty in derived morphometric measures. Region segmentation is formulated in a statistical inference framework; the probability that a given region-delineating surface accounts for observed image data is quantified by a distribution that takes into account a prior model of plausible region shape and a model of how the region appears in images. Region segmentation consists of finding the maximum a posteriori (MAP) parameters of the delineating surface under this distribution, and segmentation uncertainty is quantified in terms of how sharply peaked the distribution is in the vicinity of the maximum. Uncertainty measures are estimated through Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of the distribution in the vicinity of the MAP estimate. Experiments on real and synthetic data show that the uncertainty measures automatically detect when the delineating surface of the entire brain is unclear due to poor image quality or artifact; the experiments cover multiple appearance models to demonstrate the generality of the method. The approach is also general enough to accommodate a wide range of shape models and brain regions. PMID:19694287

  13. Delineating Groundwater Sources and Protection Zones

    E-print Network

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    : Groundwater protection zones for five city-owned water supply wells in Sebastopol, Calif. Zones were water to a particular well by seepage or other means is called the well recharge area (Figure 1). Delineating a water well's recharge area is the first step in the water source protection process outlined

  14. Space shuttle exhaust plumes in the lower thermosphere: Advective transport and diffusive spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Siskind, David E.; Meier, R. R.; Randall, Cora E.; Russell, James M.; Urban, Jo; Murtagh, Donal

    2014-02-01

    The space shuttle main engine plume deposited between 100 and 115 km altitude is a valuable tracer for global-scale dynamical processes. Several studies have shown that this plume can reach the Arctic or Antarctic to form bursts of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) within a few days. The rapid transport of the shuttle plume is currently not reproduced by general circulation models and is not well understood. To help delineate the issues, we present the complete satellite datasets of shuttle plume observations by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument and the Sub-Millimeter Radiometer instrument. From 2002 to 2011 these two instruments observed 27 shuttle plumes in over 600 limb scans of water vapor emission, from which we derive both advective meridional transport and diffusive spreading. Each plume is deposited at virtually the same place off the United States east coast so our results are relevant to northern mid-latitudes. We find that the advective transport for the first 6-18 h following deposition depends on the local time (LT) of launch: shuttle plumes deposited later in the day (~13-22 LT) typically move south whereas they otherwise typically move north. For these younger plumes rapid transport is most favorable for launches at 6 and 18 LT, when the displacement is 10° in latitude corresponding to an average wind speed of 30 m/s. For plumes between 18 and 30 h old some show average sustained meridional speeds of 30 m/s. For plumes between 30 and 54 h old the observations suggest a seasonal dependence to the meridional transport, peaking near the beginning of year at 24 m/s. The diffusive spreading of the plume superimposed on the transport is on average 23 m/s in 24 h. The plume observations show large variations in both meridional transport and diffusive spreading so that accurate modeling requires knowledge of the winds specific to each case. The combination of transport and spreading from the STS-118 plume in August 2007 formed bright PMCs between 75 and 85°N a day after launch. These are the highest latitude Arctic PMCs formed by shuttle exhaust reported to date.

  15. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  16. PERFORMANCE MONITORING OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  17. Viability of longitudinal trenches for capturing contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Paul F

    2010-04-01

    Using a groundwater flow and mass transport model, this study compared the capability of trenches with permeable backfill for capturing hypothetical contaminant plumes in homogeneous and heterogeneous unconfined aquifers. Longitudinal (parallel to groundwater flow), as well as conventional transverse (perpendicular to groundwater flow) trench configurations were considered. Alternate trench configurations intercepted the leading tip of an initial contaminant plume and had identical length, equal to the cross-gradient width of the plume. A longitudinal trench required 31% less time than its transverse counterpart to remediate a homogeneous aquifer. By contrast, in simulated heterogeneous aquifers, longitudinal remediation timeframes ranged from 41% less to 33% more than transverse trenches. Results suggest that longitudinal trenches may be a viable alternative for narrow contaminant plumes under low-groundwater velocity conditions, but may be impractical for plumes with wide leading tips, or in complex heterogeneous aquifers with divergent flow. PMID:20237910

  18. IMPROVED PREDICTION OF BENDING PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integral plume models harbor a fundamental, often significant error because the standard implementation of control volumes, or elements, is inconsistent with the overall geometry of the problem. he error, called negative volume anomaly, occurs irregularly, being contingent on the...

  19. NSTAR Ion Thruster Plume Impact Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Pencil, Eric J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Kussmaul, Michael; Oden, Katessha

    1995-01-01

    Tests were performed to establish 30-cm ion thruster plume impacts, including plume characterizations via near and farfield ion current measurements, contamination, and sputtering assessments. Current density measurements show that 95% of the beam was enclosed within a 22 deg half-angle and that the thrust vector shifted by less than 0.3 deg during throttling from 2.3 to 0.5 kW. The beam flatness parameter was found to be 0.47, and the ratio of doubly charged to singly charged ion current density decreased from 15% at 2.3 kW to 5% at 0.5 kW. Quartz sample erosion measurements showed that the samples eroded at a rate of between 11 and 13 pm/khr at 25 deg from the thruster axis, and that the rate dropped by a factor of four at 40 deg. Good agreement was obtained between extrapolated current densities and those calculated from tantalum target erosion measurements. Quartz crystal microbalance and witness plate measurements showed that ion beam sputtering of the tank resulted in a facility material backflux rate of -10 A/hr in a large space simulation chamber.

  20. Overview of NASA GRCs Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Testing and Plume Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Yim, John T.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The models describe the pressure, temperature, density, Mach number, and species concentration of the AF-M315E thruster exhaust plumes. The models are being used to assess the impingement effects of the AF-M315E thrusters on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters will be tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. The GRC thruster testing will be conducted at duty cycles representatives of the planned GPIM maneuvers. A suite of laser-based diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, Schlieren imaging, and physical probes will be used to acquire plume measurements of AFM315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  1. Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-08-24

    The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.

  2. Biogeochemical assessment of natural attenuation of JP-4-contaminated ground water in the presence of fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Levine, A D; Libelo, E L; Bugna, G; Shelley, T; Mayfield, H; Stauffer, T B

    1997-12-22

    The biogeochemistry of the natural attenuation of petroleum-contaminated ground water was investigated in a field study. The focus of the study was a fire training site located on Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. The site has been used by the Air Force for approximately 11 years in fire fighting exercises. An on-site above-ground tank of JP-4 provided fuel for setting controlled fires for the exercises. Various amounts of water and aqueous film forming foams (AFFF) were applied to extinguish the fires. The sources of contamination included leaks from pipelines transporting the fuel, leaks from an oil/water separator and runoff and percolation from the fire fighting activities. Previous investigations had identified jet fuel contamination at the site, however, no active remediation efforts have been conducted to date. The goal of this study was to use biogeochemical monitoring data to delineate redox zones within the site and to identify evidence of natural attenuation of JP-4 contamination. In addition to identifying several hydrocarbon metabolites, fluorinated surfactants (AFFF) were detected down-gradient of the hydrocarbon plume. PMID:9496640

  3. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  4. Hot rocket plume experiment - Survey and conceptual design. [of rhenium-iridium bipropellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, Jerry M.; Luan, Taylor W.; Dowdy, Mack W.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a space-borne engine plume experiment study to fly an experiment which will both verify and quantify the reduced contamination from advanced rhenium-iridium earth-storable bipropellant rockets (hot rockets) and provide a correlation between high-fidelity, in-space measurements and theoretical plume and surface contamination models. The experiment conceptual design is based on survey results from plume and contamination technologists throughout the U.S. With respect to shuttle use, cursory investigations validate Hitchhiker availability and adaptability, adequate remote manipulator system (RMS) articulation and dynamic capability, acceptable RMS attachment capability, adequate power and telemetry capability, and adequate flight altitude and attitude/orbital capability.

  5. Importance of closely spaced vertical sampling in delineating chemical and microbiological gradients in groundwater studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume. A 27-fold change in bacterial abundance; a 35-fold change in frequency of dividing cells (FDC), an indicator of bacterial growth; a 23-fold change in 3H-glucose uptake, a measure of heterotrophic activity; and substantial changes in overall cell morphology were evident within a 9-m vertical interval at 250 m downgradient. The existence of these gradients argues for the need for closely spaced vertical sampling in groundwater studies because small differences in the vertical placement of a well screen can lead to incorrect conclusions about the chemical and microbiological processes within an aquifer.Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume. A 27-fold change in bacterial abundance; a 35-fold change in frequency of dividing cells (FDC), an indicator of bacterial growth; a 23-fold change in 3H-glucose uptake, a measure of heterotrophic activity; and substantial changes in overall cell morphology were evident within a 9-m vertical interval at 250 m downgradient. The existence of these gradients argues for the need for closely spaced vertical sampling in ground-water studies because small differences in the vertical placement of a well screen can lead to incorrect conclusions about the chemical and microbiological processes within an aquifer.

  6. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. Delineation of fault zones using imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Gulen, L.; Prange, M.; Matarese, J.; Pettengill, G. H.; Ford, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    The assessment of earthquake hazards and mineral and oil potential of a given region requires a detailed knowledge of geological structure, including the configuration of faults. Delineation of faults is traditionally based on three types of data: (1) seismicity data, which shows the location and magnitude of earthquake activity; (2) field mapping, which in remote areas is typically incomplete and of insufficient accuracy; and (3) remote sensing, including LANDSAT images and high altitude photography. Recently, high resolution radar images of tectonically active regions have been obtained by SEASAT and Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A and SIR-B) systems. These radar images are sensitive to terrain slope variations and emphasize the topographic signatures of fault zones. Techniques were developed for using the radar data in conjunction with the traditional types of data to delineate major faults in well-known test sites, and to extend interpretation techniques to remote areas.

  8. Delineation, characterization, and classification of topographic eminences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Gaurav

    Topographic eminences are defined as upwardly rising, convex shaped topographic landforms that are noticeably distinct in their immediate surroundings. As opposed to everyday objects, the properties of a topographic eminence are dependent not only on how it is conceptualized, but is also intrinsically related to its spatial extent and its relative location in the landscape. In this thesis, a system for automated detection, delineation and characterization of topographic eminences based on an analysis of digital elevation models is proposed. Research has shown that conceptualization of eminences (and other landforms) is linked to the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of people. However, the perception of stimuli from our physical environment is not subject to cultural or linguistic bias. Hence, perceptually salient morphological and spatial properties of the natural landscape can form the basis for generically applicable detection and delineation of topographic eminences. Six principles of cognitive eminence modeling are introduced to develop the philosophical foundation of this research regarding eminence delineation and characterization. The first step in delineating eminences is to automatically detect their presence within digital elevation models. This is achieved by the use of quantitative geomorphometric parameters (e.g., elevation, slope and curvature) and qualitative geomorphometric features (e.g., peaks, passes, pits, ridgelines, and valley lines). The process of eminence delineation follows that of eminence detection. It is posited that eminences may be perceived either as monolithic terrain objects, or as composites of morphological parts (e.g., top, bottom, slope). Individual eminences may also simultaneously be conceived as comprising larger, higher order eminence complexes (e.g., mountain ranges). Multiple algorithms are presented for the delineation of simple and complex eminences, and the morphological parts of eminences. The proposed eminence detection and delineation methods are amenable to intuitive parameterization such that they can easily capture the multitude of eminence conceptualizations that people develop due to differences in terrain type and cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Eminence delineation is an important step in object based modeling of the natural landscape. However, mere 'geocoding' of eminences is not sufficient for modeling how people intuitively perceive and reason about eminences. Therefore, a comprehensive eminence parameterization system for characterizing the perceptual properties of eminences is also proposed in this thesis. Over 40 parameters are suggested for measuring the commonly perceived properties of eminences: size, shape, topology, proximity, and visibility. The proposed parameters describe different aspects of naive eminence perception. Quantitative analysis of eminence parameters using cluster analysis, confirms that not only can eminences be parameterized as individual terrain objects, but that eminence (dis)similarities can be exploited to develop intuitive eminence classification systems. Eminence parameters are also shown to be essential for exploring the relationships between extracted eminences and natural language terms (e.g., hill, mount, mountain, peak) used commonly to refer to different types of eminences. The results from this research confirm that object based modeling of the landscape is not only useful for terrain information system design, but is also essential for understanding how people commonly conceptualize their observations of and interactions with the natural landscape.

  9. Rapid in-situ subsurface characterization of a petroleum-contaminated site using laser induced fluorescence and cone penetrometer testing

    SciTech Connect

    Boorse, S.C.

    1996-09-01

    In-situ sampling techniques used to characterize the stratigraphy and extent of subsurface contamination are becoming increasingly common in environmental site investigations. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) combined with Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT) is a new in-situ technology that provides real-time data on the extent to Aromatic Petroleum Hydrocarbons and stratigraphy in the subsurface. Integrated LIF/CPT data can rapidly provide contaminant and geologic information necessary to define plume boundaries and design efficient and effective remediation plans. The Rapid Optical Screening Tool (ROST{trademark}, a trademark of the Loral Corporation) combines state-of-the-art LIF technology in conjunction with CPT equipment. The combined ROST{trademark}/CPT system provides a two centimeter resolution which quickly and accurately delineates the vertical and horizontal extent of petroleum contamination. The system distinguishes between specific fuel types by obtaining wavelength-time matrices, which are three-dimensional representations of the fluorescence data. By performing the test in-situ, the combined system eliminates cuttings disposal and the cost and time of extensive laboratory analysis associated with other subsurface screening techniques. The ROST{trademark}/CPT system was used at a former refinery to investigate the extent of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface. The ROST{trademark}/CPT tool was hydraulically advanced to an average depth of 30 feet below grade at 150 grid locations in two separate areas. The results provided a clear real-time characterization of the vertical and horizontal extent of three separate plumes and the potential contamination migration pathways. Due to the rapid, continuous subsurface characterization, on-site decision making enabled a 50% reduction in the planned scope of work and significantly reduced the investigation costs to the client.

  10. THE STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF SOLAR PLUMES: NETWORK PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, A.; Tison, E.; Bely-Dubau, F.; Wilhelm, K.

    2009-07-20

    This study is based upon plumes seen close to the solar limb within coronal holes in the emission from ions formed in the temperature region of 1 MK, in particular, the band of Fe IX 171 A from EIT on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. It is shown, using geometric arguments, that two distinct classes of structure contribute to apparently similar plume observations. Quasi-cylindrical structures are anchored in discrete regions of the solar surface (beam plumes), and faint extended structures require integration along the line of sight (LOS) in order to reproduce the observed brightness. This second category, sometimes called 'curtains', are ubiquitous within the polar holes and are usually more abundant than the beam plumes, which depend more on the enhanced magnetic structures detected at their footpoints. It is here proposed that both phenomena are based on plasma structures in which emerging magnetic loops interact with ambient monopolar fields, involving reconnection. The important difference is in terms of physical scale. It is proposed that curtains are composed of a large number of microplumes, distributed along the LOS. The supergranule network provides the required spatial structure. It is shown by modeling that the observations can be reproduced if microplumes are concentrated within some 5 Mm of the cell boundaries. For this reason, we propose to call this second population 'network plumes'. The processes involved could represent a major contribution to the heating mechanism of the solar corona.

  11. Influence Of Groundwater Discharge On Arsenic Contamination In Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field investigation was conducted to evaluate the impact of a discharging arsenic plume on sediment contaminant characteristics at a site adjacent to a landfill in northeastern Massachusetts. Site characterization included assessment of the hydrologic and chemical samples coll...

  12. FIELD-DRIVEN APPROACHES TO SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT MODELING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations from field sites provide a means for prioritizing research activities. In the case of petroleum releases, observations may include spiking of concentration distributions that may be related to water table fluctuation, co-location of contaminant plumes with geochemi...

  13. Stationary Plasma Thruster Plume Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary Plasma Thrusters (SPT's) are being investigated for application to a variety of near-term missions. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the thruster plume characteristics which are needed to assess spacecraft integration requirements. Langmuir probes, planar probes, Faraday cups, and a retarding potential analyzer were used to measure plume properties. For the design operating voltage of 300 V the centerline electron density was found to decrease from approximately 1.8 x 10 exp 17 cubic meters at a distance of 0.3 m to 1.8 X 10 exp 14 cubic meters at a distance of 4 m from the thruster. The electron temperature over the same region was between 1.7 and 3.5 eV. Ion current density measurements showed that the plume was sharply peaked, dropping by a factor of 2.6 within 22 degrees of centerline. The ion energy 4 m from the thruster and 15 degrees off-centerline was approximately 270 V. The thruster cathode flow rate and facility pressure were found to strongly affect the plume properties. In addition to the plume measurements, the data from the various probe types were used to assess the impact of probe design criteria

  14. Enceladus's Plumes: A Rocket Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R. L.; Perry, M. E.; Waite, J. H.; Fletcher, G.; Cravens, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    The plumes of Enceladus, and the source of the E-ring in the Saturnian system, easily rank as the major, significant, and unexpected discovery of the Cassini mission. While clearly the source of the E-ring,the nature of the sources and the energetics and dynamics of the plumes and underlying jets remains a subject of intensive study. Refinements of the observations suggest supersonic flow of the primary, water-vapor effluent. Such behavior implies a sonic critical point in the flow beginning from a heated reservoir of vapor, through a constriction, and out at supersonic speeds in the space above the plume/jet channels. Such geometry and thermal conditions mimic that of a de Laval nozzle, such as used in rocket engines for converting chemically heated combustion products into a directional flow. A chamber temperature of 180K suggests an outflow speed as high as 0.8 km/s. With a column density across a jet of ~3 x 1016 cm-2 (about twice that of the broad plume) and a jet width of ~10 km, the implied outflow of water molecules is ~3 x 1010 cm-3 x ?/4 (106 cm)2 x 18 amu x 1.66 x 10-27 amu/kg x 8 x 104 cm/s = ~60 kg/s in each constituent jet, of which eight were identified by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) during the occultation measurements of the plume region of Enceladus carried out on 24 October 2007.

  15. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for carbon dioxide geologic sequestration protecting the sources of potable water.

  16. Mobile Bay turbidity plume study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory and field transmissometer studies on the effect of suspended particulate material upon the appearance of water are reported. Quantitative correlations were developed between remotely sensed image density, optical sea truth data, and actual sediment load. Evaluation of satellite image sea truth data for an offshore plume projects contours of transmissivity for two different tidal phases. Data clearly demonstrate the speed of change and movement of the optical plume for water patterns associated with the mouth of Mobile bay in which relatively clear Gulf of Mexico water enters the bay on the eastern side. Data show that wind stress in excess of 15 knots has a marked impact in producing suspended sediment loads.

  17. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  18. Dynamics of laser ablated colliding plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shyam L.; Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-01-15

    We report the dynamics of single and two collinearly colliding laser ablated plumes of ZnO studied using fast imaging and the spectroscopic measurements. Two dimensional imaging of expanding plume and temporal evolution of various species in interacting zones of plumes are used to calculate plume front velocity, electron temperature, and density of plasma. The two expanding plumes interact with each other at early stage of expansion ({approx}20 ns) resulting in an interaction zone that propagates further leading to the formation of stagnation layer at later times (>150 ns) at the lateral collision front of two plumes. Colliding plumes have larger concentration of higher ionic species, higher temperature, and increased electron density in the stagnation region. A one-to-one correlation between the imaging and optical emission spectroscopic observations in interaction zone of the colliding plumes is reported.

  19. OZONE FORMATION IN POLLUTANT PLUMES: A REACTIVE PLUME MODEL WITH ARBITRARY CROSSWIND RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new two-layer reactive plume model is developed, in which arbitrary crosswind resolution of the emission field of each precursor is preserved, and dynamic plume-plume and plume-background interactions are explictly accomodated. The model has a hybrid formulation, having Lagrang...

  20. Velocity control as a tool for optimal plume containment in the Equus Beds aquifer, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidari, M.; Sadeghipour, J.; Drici, O.

    1987-01-01

    A ground-water-management model was developed to investigate the best management options for the containment of an oil-field-brine plume in the Equus Beds aquifer in south-central Kansas. The main purpose of the management model was to find the optimal locations and minimum rates of pumpage of a set of plume-interception wells, to successfully reverse the velocity vectors at observation wells located along the plume front, and also to satisfy freshwater demands from supply wells. The effects of the calculated minimum withdrawals from the interception wells on the migration of contaminants throughout the ground-water system were evaluated utilizing a solute-transport model. This latter analysis was carried out to ensure the containment of the plume. Whereas application of the management model to the study area achieves the management objectives, the implementation of the results is believed to be impractical and expensive.

  1. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Hammer, J.H.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

  2. Types of thermal plumes in coastal waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, T.; Madding, R.; Scarpace, F.

    1977-01-01

    A large number of thermal images of the surface temperatures of the thermal plumes associated with the once-through cooling of electric power plants show that four kinds of plume occur sufficiently often to be classified as distinct plume types. Each type has implications for both numerical models and measurement strategies.

  3. Biogeochemical characterisation of a coal tar distillate plume.

    PubMed

    Williams, G M; Pickup, R W; Thornton, S F; Lerner, D N; Mallinson, H E; Moore, Y; White, C

    2001-12-15

    The distillation of acidified coal tars for up to 50 years has given rise to a phenol plume approximately 500 m long, 50 m deep and containing up to 15 g l(-1) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the Triassic Sandstones aquifer. A conceptual biogeochemical model based on chemical and microbiological analysis of groundwater samples has been developed as a preliminary to more detailed studies of the controls on natural attenuation. While the development of redox zones and the production of methane and carbon dioxide provide evidence of natural attenuation, it appears that degradation is slow. The existence of sulphate in the plume indicates that this electron acceptor has not been depleted and that consequently methanogenesis is probably limited. Based on a simple estimate of sulphate input concentration, a half-life of about 15 years has been estimated for sulphate reduction. Geochemical modelling predicts that increased alkalinity within the plume has not led to carbonate precipitation, and thus within the limits of accuracy of the measurement, alkalinity may reflect the degree of biodegradation. This implies a loss of around 18% of the DOC over a 30-year period. Despite limited degradation, microbial studies show that there are diverse microbial communities in the aquifer with the potential for both anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation. Microbial activity was found to be greatest at the leading edge of the plume where DOC concentrations are 60 mg l(-1) or less, but activity could still be observed in more contaminated samples even though cells could not be cultured. The study suggests that degradation may be limited by the high phenol concentrations within the core of the plume, but that once diluted by dispersion, natural attenuation may proceed. More detailed studies to confirm these initial findings are identified and form the basis of associated papers. PMID:11820470

  4. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: secondary effects of natural attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Ziegler, Brady A.

    2015-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230?µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5?µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  5. A young source for the Hawaiian plume.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Alexander V; Hofmann, Albrecht W; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Kuzmin, Dmitry V; Stoll, Brigitte

    2011-08-25

    Recycling of oceanic crust through subduction, mantle upwelling, and remelting in mantle plumes is a widely accepted mechanism to explain ocean island volcanism. The timescale of this recycling is important to our understanding of mantle circulation rates. Correlations of uranogenic lead isotopes in lavas from ocean islands such as Hawaii or Iceland, when interpreted as model isochrons, have yielded source differentiation ages between 1 and 2.5?billion years (Gyr). However, if such correlations are produced by mixing of unrelated mantle components they will have no direct age significance. Re-Os decay model ages take into account the mixing of sources with different histories, but they depend on the assumed initial Re/Os ratio of the subducted crust, which is poorly constrained because of the high mobility of rhenium during subduction. Here we report the first data on (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios for 138 melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from lavas of Mauna Loa shield volcano, Hawaii, indicating enormous mantle source heterogeneity. We show that highly radiogenic strontium in severely rubidium-depleted melt inclusions matches the isotopic composition of 200-650-Myr-old sea water. We infer that such sea water must have contaminated the Mauna Loa source rock, before subduction, imparting a unique 'time stamp' on this source. Small amounts of seawater-derived strontium in plume sources may be common but can be identified clearly only in ultra-depleted melts originating from generally highly (incompatible-element) depleted source components. The presence of 200-650-Myr-old oceanic crust in the source of Hawaiian lavas implies a timescale of general mantle circulation with an average rate of about 2 (±1)?cm?yr(-1), much faster than previously thought. PMID:21832996

  6. Smoke Plume Over Eastern Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In late May, a massive smoke plume hundreds of kilometers across blew eastward over New Brunswick toward the Atlantic Ocean. On May 26, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image at 11:40 a.m. local time. By the time MODIS took this picture, the smoke appeared to have completely detached itself from the source, a large fire burning in southwestern Quebec, beyond the western edge of this image. In this image, the smoke appears as a gray-beige opaque mass with fuzzy, translucent edges. The plume is thickest in the southwest and diminishes toward the northeast. Just southwest of the plume is a red outline indicating a hotspot an area where MODIS detected anomalously warm surface temperatures, such as those resulting from fires. This hotspot, however, is not the source for this smoke plume. According to a bulletin from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the southwestern Quebec fire was the source. According to reports from the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre on May 29, that fire was estimated at 63,211 hectares (156,197 acres), and it was classified as 'being held.' At the same time, more than 20 wildfires burned in Quebec, news sources reported, and firefighters from other Canadian provinces and the United States had been brought in to provide reinforcements for the area's firefighters.

  7. Applying Contamination Modelling to Spacecraft Propulsion Systems Designs and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T.; Thomson, Shaun; Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and particulate contaminants generated from the operations of a propulsion system may impinge on spacecraft critical surfaces. Plume depositions or clouds may hinder the spacecraft and instruments from performing normal operations. Firing thrusters will generate both molecular and particulate contaminants. How to minimize the contamination impact from the plume becomes very critical for a successful mission. The resulting effect from either molecular or particulate contamination of the thruster firing is very distinct. This paper will discuss the interconnection between the functions of spacecraft contamination modeling and propulsion system implementation. The paper will address an innovative contamination engineering approach implemented from the spacecraft concept design, manufacturing, integration and test (I&T), launch, to on- orbit operations. This paper will also summarize the implementation on several successful missions. Despite other contamination sources, only molecular contamination will be considered here.

  8. Detection of Metallic Compounds in Rocket Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Chris; Dunn, Dr. Robert

    1998-04-01

    Recent experiments using metal mixed in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) fuel grains in small hybrid rocket indicates ion detectors may be effective in detection of metallic compounds in rocket plumes. We wanted to ascertain the extent to which the presence of metallic compounds in rocket plumes could be detected using ion probes and Gaussian rings. Charges that collide with or pass near the intruding probe are detected. Gaussian rings, short insulated cylindrical Gaussian surfaces, enclose the plume without intruding into the plume. Charges in the plume are detected by currents they induce in the cylinder.

  9. Liquid Booster Module (LBM) plume flowfield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    A complete definition of the LBM plume is important for many Shuttle design criteria. The exhaust plume shape has a significant effect on the vehicle base pressure. The LBM definition is also important to the Shuttle base heating, aerodynamics and the influence of the exhaust plume on the launch stand and environment. For these reasons a knowledge of the LBM plume characteristics is necessary. A definition of the sea level LBM plume as well as at several points along the Shuttle trajectory to LBM, burnout is presented.

  10. Deployment Plan for Bioremediation and Natural Attenuation for In Situ Restoration of Chloroethene-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, L.N.; Starr, R.C.; Sorenson, K.S.; Smith, R.W.; Phelps, T.J.

    1999-03-01

    This deployment plan describes a project funded by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective is to facilitate deployment of enhanced in situ bioremediation (ISB) an monitored natural attenuation (MNA) or chloroethene-contaminated groundwater to DOE sites. Enhanced ISB accelerates dechlorination of chloroethenes under anaerobic conditions by providing nutrients to the microbial community. Natural attenuation does not require nutrient addition. Enhanced ISB in the upgradient portion of a contaminant plume couples with MNA in the downgradient portion is being implemented at Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Selected DOE sites will be screened to assess their suitability for enhanced ISB/MNA. Tasks include: (1) characterization of the TAN microbial community and correlation of community characteristics with chloroethene degradation ability, (2) installation of wells to facilitate evaluation of MNA at TAN, (3) monitoring to better delineate MNA at TAN, and (4) screening of selected other DOE sites for suitability of ISB/MNA, and limited supplemental characterization. Data evaluation will provide a sound technical basis for decision makers to consider use of enhanced ISB and MNA, alone or together, as remedial technologies for these sites.

  11. COMPLETE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF A PCE AND TCE PLUME AFTER SOURCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of the chlorinated solvents PCE and TCE at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) resulted in the contamination of groundwater in a shallow, unconsolidated sand aquifer. The resulting plume had moved over 1000 feet from the disposal source area and had impacted p...

  12. Impact of Ethanol on Benzene Plume Lengths: Microbial and Modeling Studies

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Impact of Ethanol on Benzene Plume Lengths: Microbial and Modeling Studies Rula A. Deeb1 ; Jonathan as a replacement for MTBE. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential impact of ethanol on benzene indigenous to a gasoline-contaminated aquifer to evaluate the effect of ethanol on the rate of benzene

  13. A Geostatistical Data Assimilation Approach for Estimating Groundwater Plume Distributions From

    E-print Network

    Michalak, Anna M.

    , groundwater contamination is detected by a small number of fortuitously-located groundwater wells or moni73 A Geostatistical Data Assimilation Approach for Estimating Groundwater Plume Distributions From Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Knowledge of the distribution of groundwater

  14. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Hammer, James H. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  15. Infrared recordings for characterizing an aircraft plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retief, S. J. P.; Dreyer, M. M.; Brink, C.

    2014-06-01

    Some key electro-optical measurements required to characterize an aircraft plume for automated recognition are shown, as well as some aspects of the processing and use of these measurements. Plume measurements with Short Wavelength Infrared (1.1 - 2.5 um), Mid-Wavelength Infrared (2.5 - 7 um) and Long Wavelength Infrared (7 - 15 um) cameras are presented, as well as spectroradiometer measurements covering the whole Mid-Wavelength, Long Wavelength and upper part of the Short Wavelength Infrared bands. The two limiting factors for the detection of the plume, i.e. the atmospheric transmission bands and the plume emission bands, are discussed, and it is shown how a micro turbine engine can assist in aircraft plume studies. One such a study, regarding the differentiation between an aircraft plume and a blackbody emitter using subbands in the Mid-Wavelength Infrared, is presented. The factors influencing aircraft plume emission are discussed, and the measurements required to characterize an aircraft plume for the purpose of constructing a mathematical plume model are indicated. Since the required measurements are prescribed by the plume model requirements, a brief overview of the plume model, that can be used to simulate the results of the plume's emission under different conditions and observation configurations, is given. Such a model can be used to test the robustness of algorithms, like the mentioned subband method, for identifying aircraft plumes. Such a model furthermore enables the simulation of measurements that would be obtained by an electro-optical system, like an infrared seekerhead of a missile, of a plume for the purpose of algorithm training under various simulated environmental conditions.

  16. Compositional differentiation of Enceladus' plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, N.; Postberg, F.; Schmidt, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on board the Cassini spacecraft sampled Enceladus' plume ice particles emanated directly from Enceladus' fractured south polar terrain (SPT), the so-called "Tiger Stripes", during two consecutive flybys (E17 and E18) in 2012. The spacecraft passed through the dense plume with a moderate velocity of ~7.5km/s, horizontally to the SPT with a closest approach (CA) at an altitude of ~75km almost directly over the south pole. In both flybys, spectra were recorded during a time interval of ~ ±3 minutes with respect to the closest approach achieving an average sampling rate of about 0.6 sec-1. We assume that the spacecraft passed through the plume during an interval of about ±60(sec) from the CA. Particles encountered before and after this period are predominately from the E-ring background in which Enceladus is embedded. Most CDA TOF-mass spectra are identified as one of three compositional types: (i) almost pure water (ii) organic rich and (iii) salt rich [2]. A Boxcar Analysis (BCA) is performed from a count database for compositional mapping of the plume along the space-craft trajectory. In BCA, counts of each spectrum type are integrated for a certain interval of time (box size). The integral of counts represents frequencies of compositional types in absolute abundances, which are converted later into proportions. This technique has been proven to be a suitable for inferring the compositional profiles from an earlier flyby (E5) [1]. The inferred compositional profiles show similar trends on E17 and E18. The abundances of different compositional types in the plume clearly differ from the Ering background and imply a compositional differentiation inside the plume. Following up the work of Schmidt et al, 2008 and Postberg et al, 2011 we can link different compositional types to different origins. The E17/E18 results are compared with the E5 flyby in 2008, which yielded the currently best compositional profile [2] but was executed at much higher velocity (~17.6km/s) and a very different, highly inclined, flyby geometry.

  17. Delta Chromium-53/52 isotopic composition of native and contaminated groundwater, Mojave Desert, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Bullen, Thomas D.; Martin, Peter; Schroth, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in groundwater sampled from three contaminant plumes in aquifers in the Mojave Desert near Hinkley, Topock and El Mirage, California, USA, were as high as 2600, 5800 and 330 ?g/L, respectively. ?53/52Cr compositions from more than 50 samples collected within these plumes ranged from near 0‰ to almost 4‰ near the plume margins. Assuming only reductive fractionation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) within the plume, apparent fractionation factors for ?53/52Cr isotopes ranged from ?app = 0.3 to 0.4 within the Hinkley and Topock plumes, respectively, and only the El Mirage plume had a fractionation factor similar to the laboratory derived value of ? = 3.5. One possible explanation for the difference between field and laboratory fractionation factors at the Hinkley and Topock sites is localized reductive fractionation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), with subsequent advective mixing of native and contaminated water near the plume margin. Chromium(VI) concentrations and ?53/52Cr isotopic compositions did not uniquely define the source of Cr near the plume margin, or the extent of reductive fractionation within the plume. However, Cr(VI) and ?53/52Cr data contribute to understanding of the interaction between reductive and mixing processes that occur within and near the margins of Cr contamination plumes. Reductive fractionation of Cr(VI) predominates in plumes having higher ?app, these plumes may be suitable for monitored natural attenuation. In contrast, advective mixing predominates in plumes having lower ?app, the highly dispersed margins of these plumes may be difficult to define and manage.

  18. SHORT COMMUNICATION Delineating geographic boundaries of the woolly mouse opossums,

    E-print Network

    DeSalle, Rob

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Delineating geographic boundaries of the woolly mouse opossums, Micoureus on molecular classification of the woolly mouse opossum, Micoureus spp., in the southeastern Atlantic Forest

  19. Characterization and monitoring of contaminated sites by multi-geophysical approach (IP, ERT and GPR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaolo, Valeria; Capozzoli, Luigi; Votta, Mario; Rizzo, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    The contamination of soils and groundwater by hydrocarbons, due to blow out, leakage from tank or pipe and oil spill, is a heavy environmental problem because infiltrated oil can persist in the ground for a long time leading to important changes on soils and physical and biogeochemical properties, which impact on ecosystems and shallow aquifers. The existing methods used for the characterization of hydrocarbon contaminated sites are invasive, time consuming and expensive. Therefore, in the last years, there was a growing interest in the use of geophysical methods for environmental monitoring (Börner et al., 1993; Vanhala, 1997; Atekwana et al., 2000; Chambers et al., 2004; Song et al., 2005; French et al., 2009). The goal of this work is to characterize underground contaminant distributions and monitoring a remediation activity using a multi-geophysical approach (cross-hole IP and ERT, GPR). The experiments consist in geophysical measurements both in surface and boreholes, to monitor a simulated hydrocarbon leachate into a ~1 m3 box. The tank is filled with quartz-rich sand (k = 1.16 x 10-12 m2) and it is equipped with six boreholes and 72 stainless steel ring electrodes, at 5 cm spacing, for cross-hole electrical resistivity and time-domain IP measurements. 25 additional stainless steel electrodes were installed at the surface of the tank. Two measurement phases were realized: first, we monitored electrical resistivity, IP, and dielectric conductivity of the uncontaminated soil; the second experimental phase consists in the geophysical monitoring of a crude oil controlled spill. Results showed significant changes in the responses of geoelectrical measurements in presence of a crude oil contamination. Instead IP results give a phase angle distribution related to the presence of hydrocarbon in the system but not so clear in the location of plume. Therefore, to clearly delineate the areas interested by contamination, we estimate the imaginary component of electrical resistivity. Finally, the electrical behaviour of the medium from GPR data, compared to geoelectrical measurements, was investigated by the analysis of the strength of EM-reflections and absorption of EM signal. In particular, the most contaminated areas are characterized by a variation of soil permittivity dielectric value. Furthermore, the frequency analysis show a significant downshift of the frequency in correspondence of contaminated areas. In conclusion, the experiment was able to obtain information about contaminant distribution in the subsurface. Besides combining measurements from multiple geophysical measurements allow us to obtain more accurate characterization of contamination spatial variability. Finally, the estimation of geophysical parameters in frequency domain gave a supplementary information to increase quality of acquired data.

  20. Costs of groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, W.B.; Raucher, R.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged.

  1. Dust Charging in Enceladus' Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paty, C. S.; Orlando, T. M.; Grieves, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with Enceladus provides an exciting natural laboratory for expanding our understanding of charge-dust interactions and their role in governing plasma dynamics and the associated currents and magnetic perturbations local to Enceladus. Recent observations in the Enceladus plume have raised many questions related to the charging process of nanograins bathed in Saturn's magnetospheric plasma [Hill et al., 2012] as well as the apparent modifications to the plasma population in the plume [Farrell et al., 2010]. Here we present a first look at the chemical processes associated with the flux of electrons through the dusty plume and the resulting charge distribution both on the dust and in the plasma. A representative distribution of electron energies is used to examine the processes of direct ionization, Auger decay and dissociative electron attachment of both gas-phase collision targets and ice covered grains. The resulting charge distributions, both on the dust grains and in the plasma will be incorporated into an existing 3-D plasma dynamic simulation of Enceladus to quantify the magnetic perturbations produced by this dusty plasma.

  2. The ice plumes of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2014-10-01

    It is of extreme interest to NASA and the scientific community that evidence has been found for plumes of water ice venting from the polar regions of Europa (Roth et al 2014) - spectroscopic detection of off-limb line emission from the dissociation products of water. We were awarded Cycle 21 time to seek direct images of the Europa exosphere, including Enceladus-like plumes if present, basing our study on FUV images of Europa as it transits the smooth face of Jupiter. We also obtained a necessary FUV image of Europa out of transit. These observations provide additional evidence for the presence of ice plumes on Europa. Here, we propose to augment our previous imaging work and to seek an initial, efficient characterization of off-limb emission as Europa orbits Jupiter. Such images provide sensitive flux and column density limits, with exceptional spatial resolution. In transit, our strategy can place firm limits on, or measurements of, absorbing columns, their distribution with altitude above the surface of Europa, and constrain their wavelength dependence and hence composition. Out of transit, geometrical and surface brightness considerations can help us distinguish between continuum FUV emission from forward- or back-scattering, from line emission, or, though we might prefer otherwise, from more subtle instrumental artifacts than hitherto understood. If the ice fountains of Europa arise from the deep ocean, we have gained access to probably the most astrobiologically interesting location in the Solar System.

  3. Delineation of the Postprostatectomy Prostate Bed Using Computed Tomography: Interobserver Variability Following the EORTC Delineation Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; De Meerleer, Gert; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Veldeman, Liv; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Fonteyne, Valerie; Villeirs, Geert

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The present study aims to assess the interobserver agreement of prostate bed delineation after radical prostatectomy using CT alone as proposed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) guidelines. Methods and Materials: Six observers delineated the postoperative prostate bed (PB) and the original seminal vesicle position or remnants (SV) of 10 patients according to the EORTC guidelines. Contours were then compared for agreement between observers (the apparent volume overlap and generalized kappa statistics). Standard deviations were also calculated to measure the variability of the position of the outer margins. Results: The mean volume of 100% agreement ({+-}1 standard deviation, SD) was only 5.0 ({+-}3.3) ml for the PB and 0.9 ({+-}1.5) ml for the SV, whereas the mean union of all contours ({+-}1 SD) was 41.1 ({+-}11.8) ml and 25.3 ({+-}13.4) ml, respectively. The mean overall agreement corrected for chance was moderate for both the PB (mean kappa, 0.49; range, 0.35-0.62) and SV (mean kappa, 0.42; range, 0.22-0.59). The overall SD of the outer margins of the PB ranged from 4.6 to 7.0 mm Conclusion: The delineation of the postprostatectomy bed using CT shows only a moderate observer agreement when following the EORTC guidelines.

  4. Bifurcation of volcanic plumes in a crosswind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Gerald G. J.; Davis, John P.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    1994-08-01

    Bent-over buoyant jets distorted by a crosscurrent develop a vortex pair structure and can bifurcate to produce two distinct lobes which diverge from one another downwind. The region downwind of the source between the lobes has relatively low proportions of discharged fluid. Factors invoked by previous workers to cause or enhance bifurcation include buoyancy, release of latent heat at the plume edge by evaporating water droplets, geometry and orientation of the source, and the encounter with a density interface on the rising path of the plume. We suggest that the pressure distribution around the vortex pair of a rising plume may initially trigger bifurcation. We also report new experimental observations confirming that bifurcation becomes stronger for stronger bent-over plumes, identifying that bifurcation can also occur for straight-edged plumes but gradually disappears for stronger plumes which form a gravity current at their final level and spread for a significant distance against the current. Observations from satellites and the ground are reviewed and confirm that volcanic plumes can show bifurcation and a large range of bifurcation angles. Many of the bifurcating plumes spread out at the tropopause level and suggest the tropopause may act on the plumes as a density interface enhancing bifurcation. Even for quite moderate bifurcation angles, the two plume lobes become rapidly separated downwind by distances of tens of kilometers. Such bifurcating plumes drifting apart can only result in bilobate tephra fall deposits. The tephra fall deposit from the 16 km elevation, SE spreading, bifurcating volcanic plume erupted on 15 May 1981 from Mt Pagan was sampled by previous workers and clearly displayed bilobate characteristics. Examples of bilobate tephra fall deposits are reviewed and their origin briefly discussed. Bilobate deposits are common and may result from many causes. Plume bifurcation should be considered one of the possible mechanisms which can account for come examples of bilobate tephra fall deposits.

  5. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

    2010-02-24

    The U.S. DOE and its predecessors released nearly 2 trillion liters (450 billion gallons) of contaminated liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Some of the contaminants currently reside in the deeper parts of the vadose zone where they are much less accessible to characterization, monitoring, and typical remediation activities. The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) prepared a treatability test plan in 2008 to examine remediation options for addressing contaminants in the deep vadose zone; one of the technologies identified was surface barriers (also known as engineered barriers, covers, and caps). In the typical configuration, the contaminants are located relatively close to the surface, generally within 15 m, and thus they are close to the base of the surface barrier. The proximity of the surface barrier under these conditions yielded few concerns about the effectiveness of the barrier at depth, particularly for cases in which the contaminants were in a lined facility. At Hanford, however, some unlined sites have contaminants located well below depths of 15 m. The issue raised about these sites is the degree of effectiveness of a surface barrier in isolating contaminants in the deep vadose zone. Previous studies by Hanford Site and PNNL researchers suggest that surface barriers have the potential to provide a significant degree of isolation of deep vadose zone contaminants. The studies show that the actual degree of isolation is site-specific and depends on many factors, including recharge rates, barrier size, depth of contaminants, geohydrologic properties ofthe sediments, and the geochemical interactions between the contaminants and the sediments. After the DOE-RL treatability test plan was published, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted to review the information available to support surface barrier evaluation for the deep vadose zone, identify gaps in the information and outcomes necessary to fill the data gaps, and outline tasks to achieve those outcomes. Full understanding of contaminant behavior in the deep vadose zone is constrained by four key data gaps: limited access; limited data; limited time; and the lack of an accepted predictive capability for determining whether surface barriers can effectively isolate deep vadose zone contaminants. Activities designed to fill these data gaps need to have these outcomes: (1) common evaluation methodology that provides a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination; (2) deep vadose zone data that characterize the lithology, the spatial distribution of moisture and contaminants, the physical, chemical, and biological process that affect the mobility of each contaminant, and the impacts to the contaminants following placement of a surface barrier; (3) subsurface monitoring to provide subsurface characterization of initial conditions and changes that occur during and following remediation activities; and (4) field observations that span years to decades to validate the evaluation methodology. A set of six proposed tasks was identified to provide information needed to address the above outcomes. The proposed tasks are: (1) Evaluation Methodology - Develop common evaluation methodology that will provide a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination. (2) Case Studies - Conduct case studies to demonstrate the applicability ofthe common evaluation methodology and provide templates for subsequent use elsewhere. Three sites expected to have conditions that would yield valuable information and experience pertinent to deep vadose zone contamination were chosen to cover a range of conditions. The sites are BC Cribs and Trenches, U Plant Cribs, and the T Farm Interim Cover. (3) Subsurface Monitoring Technologies - Evaluate minimally invasive geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

  6. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead to improved monitoring while simultaneously reducing costs. This paradigm is being tested at the SRS F-Area where an innovative passive remedial system is being monitored and evaluated over the long term prior to traditional regulatory closure. Contaminants being addressed at this site are uranium, strontium-90, iodine-129, and tritium. We believe that the proposed strategies will be more effective in early identification of potential risks; these strategies will also be cost effective because controlling variables are relatively simple to measure. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate large cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

  7. COMPARISON OF PREDICTED AND OBSERVED PLUME TRENDS AT CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 45 natural attenuation treatability studies (TSs) were performed from 1993 to 1999 by Parsons Corporation (Parsons) for the Technology Transfer Division of the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE/ERT) in conjunction with researchers from the US EPA - NRMRL. ...

  8. SURFACE AND BOREHOLE ELECTROMAGNETIC IMAGING OF CONDUCTING CONTAMINANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component ma...

  9. Evaluation of methodology for delineation of protection zones around public-supply wells in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchioli, John; Hunn, J.D.; Aucott, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    Public-supply wells in the west-central Florida area of Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Hillsborough, and Pinellas Counties derive their supply solely from the Floridan aquifer system. In much of this area, the Floridan is at or near land surface and vulnerable to contamination. Recognizing this potential threat to the aquifer, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER) recently promulgated regulations providing for the delineation of protection zones around public-supply wells that tap vulnerable aquifers, such as the Floridan in west-central Florida. This report evaluates the methodology for delineation of protection zones for public supply wells in west-central Florida in accordance with the methods detailed in the FDER regulations. Protection zones were delineated for public supply wells or well fields that are permitted an average daily withdrawal of 100,000 gal or more from the Floridan aquifer system where it is unconfined or leaky confined. Leaky confined, as used in FDER regulations describe conditions such that the time for a particle of water to travel vertically from the water table to the top of the Floridan is 5 years or less. Protection zones were delineated by using a radial volumetric-displacement model that simulated 5 years of permitted-rate withdrawal. Where zones overlapped, such as for well fields, composite protection zones in shapes that varied according to the configuration of well arrays were delineated on maps. (USGS)

  10. Analytical groundwater modeling flow and contaminant migration

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book includes four analytical microcomputer programs for simulation and graphing of uncomplicated two-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant migration situations. Program operation, concepts, techniques, and methods are described in detail. The Basic programs feature simulations of the following features: contaminant source areas and plumes and production and injection wells, drains, and mines. A graphics subprogram displays drawdown and concentration graphs and contour maps.

  11. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration /NOAA/ contamination monitoring instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The JPL has designed and built a plume contamination monitoring package to be installed on a NOAA environmental services satellite. The package is designed to monitor any condensible contamination that occurs during the ignition and burn of a TE-M-364-15 apogee kick motor. The instrumentation and system interface are described, and attention is given to preflight analysis and test.

  12. Identification of an ancient mantle reservoir and young recycled materials in the source region of a young mantle plume: Implications for potential linkages between plume and plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan-Ce; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Li, Xian-Hua; Li, Jie; Xu, Yi-Gang; Li, Xiang-Hui

    2013-09-01

    Whether or not mantle plumes and plate subduction are genetically linked is a fundamental geoscience question that impinges on our understanding of how the Earth works. Late Cenozoic basalts in Southeast Asia are globally unique in relation to this question because they occur above a seismically detected thermal plume adjacent to deep subducted slabs. In this study, we present new Pb, Sr, Nd, and Os isotope data for the Hainan flood basalts. Together with a compilation of published results, our work shows that less contaminated basaltic samples from the synchronous basaltic eruptions in Hainan-Leizhou peninsula, the Indochina peninsula and the South China Sea seamounts share the same isotopic and geochemical characteristics. They have FOZO-like Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions (the dominant lower mantle component). These basalts have primitive Pb isotopic compositions that lie on, or very close to, 4.5- to 4.4-Ga geochrons on 207Pb/204Pb versus 206Pb/204Pb diagram, suggesting a mantle source developed early in Earth's history (4.5-4.4 Ga). Furthermore, our detailed geochemical and Sr, Nd, Pb and Os isotopic analyses suggest the presence of 0.5-0.2 Ga recycled components in the late Cenozoic Hainan plume basalts. This implies a mantle circulation rate of >1 cm/yr, which is similar to that of previous estimates for the Hawaiian mantle plume. The identification of the ancient mantle reservoir and young recycled materials in the source region of these synchronous basalts is consistent with the seismically detected lower mantle-rooted Hainan plume that is adjacent to deep subducted slab-like seismic structures just above the core-mantle boundary. We speculate that the continued deep subduction and the presence of a dense segregated basaltic layer may have triggered the plume to rise from the thermal-chemical pile. This work therefore suggests a dynamic linkage between deep subduction and mantle plume generation.

  13. SemiAutomatic Delineation of Regions in Floor Plans

    E-print Network

    Shieber, Stuart

    Semi­Automatic Delineation of Regions in Floor Plans Kathy Ryall Joe Marks Harvard University@das.harvard.edu 1 #12; Semi­Automatic Delineation of Regions in Floor Plans Abstract The ability to recognize floor plans to processing of scanned forms. We consider a technique that makes use of a kind

  14. FLOOD-PLAIN DELINEATION IN ICE JAM PRONE REGIONS

    E-print Network

    Vogel, Richard M.

    FLOOD-PLAIN DELINEATION IN ICE JAM PRONE REGIONS By Richard M. Vogel,1 S. M. ASCE and Jery R. Stedinger,2 A. M. ASCE ABSTRACT:Flood-plain delineation in ice jam prone regions is in its infancy .A-plain boundaries. These results document the need to consider the probability of ice jam flood events

  15. Delineating groundwater and subsurface structures by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araffa, Sultan Awad Sultan; Helaly, Ahmed S.; Khozium, Ashraf; Lala, Amir M. S.; Soliman, Shokry A.; Hassan, Noha M.

    2015-06-01

    Geophysical tools such as magnetic, gravity and electric resistivity have been used to delineate subsurface structures, groundwater aquifer around Cairo-Belbies Desert road. A dipole-dipole section was measured at the central part of the study area with 2100 m length and electrode spacing 50 m for greater penetration depth. The results of the inverse resistivity data indicate that the study area includes two groundwater aquifers at different depths. The shallow aquifer water is near the surface and the deep aquifer lies at depth of about 115 m and exhibits low resistivity values ranging from 20 to 100 ohm m. One hundred and fifty-two gravity stations were measured using Autograv gravimeter (CG3), different gravity corrections (drift, elevation and latitude corrections) were applied. The corrected data represented by Bouguer anomaly map were filtered into regional and residual gravity anomaly maps. The residual gravity map indicates that the area is dissected by many faults with NW-SE, N-S, E-W and NE-SW trends. One hundred and fifty-three ground magnetic measurements are collected using two Proton magnetometers (Envimag). The corrected magnetic data are represented by total magnetic intensity map that was reduced to the magnetic pole. 3D magnetic modeling was applied to detect the depth of basaltic sheet and basement complex. The results indicated that the elevation of upper surface of basalt is ranging from 148 to -153 m and the elevation of lower surface of basalt is ranging from 148 to 269 m.

  16. Two Plumes Beneath the East African Rift System: a Geochemical Investigation into Possible Interactions in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. R.; Furman, T.; van Keken, P. E.; Lin, S.

    2007-12-01

    East African Rift System magmatism began over 40 my ago and has continued through the present. Numerical models have determined two plumes are necessary to create the spatial and temporal distribution of volcanism. Geochemical data support the presence of two chemically distinct plumes initially located beneath the Afar Depression (NE Ethiopia) and the Turkana Depression (SW Ethiopia/N Kenya). The timing and eruptive of the Afar and Kenya plumes are also distinct. While there is growing evidence to support the existence of two dynamically and chemically distinct plumes beneath the East African Rift System, the interactions between them remain unclear. Our study focuses on the geochemistry of mafic shield lavas from three locations on the eastern flank of the Ethiopian plateau. These lavas are spatially located between the surface manifestation of the Afar and Kenya plumes. The majority of the lava is alkaline and has experienced varying degrees of olivine and pyroxene fractionation. The northernmost lavas (9°10'N) are transitional and display the most fractionation. Primitive mantle melts were generated at depths near the fertile mantle garnet-spinel transition zone and deeper (80-100km) and are free of metasomatic influence. Minor HREE depletions also support derivation of melts from a garnet-bearing source. Lavas with lithospheric influence are generated from shallower depths and show minor amphibole influence. Overall, geochemical data show the lavas in this study closely resemble those from various episodes of Kenya plume magmatism with modifications attributed to lithospheric contamination. This interpretation is consistent with current numerical models suggesting episodic northward movement of Kenya plume magmas along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. The data imply that the Kenya plume has a much larger spatial influence and therefore a larger geodynamic influence in the EARS than previously recognized.

  17. Progression of natural attenuation processes at a crude-oil spill site . I. Geochemical evolution of the plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Baedecker, M.J.; Aiken, G.R.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Tuccillo, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    A 16-year study of a hydrocarbon plume shows that the extent of contaminant migration and compound-specific behavior have changed as redox reactions, most notably iron reduction, have progressed over time. Concentration changes at a small scale, determined from analysis of pore-water samples drained from aquifer cores, are compared with concentration changes at the plume scale, determined from analysis of water samples from an observation well network. The small-scale data show clearly that the hydrocarbon plume is growing slowly as sediment iron oxides are depleted. Contaminants, such as ortho-xylene that appeared not to be moving downgradient from the oil on the basis of observation well data, are migrating in thin layers as the aquifer evolves to methanogenic conditions. However, the plume-scale observation well data show that the downgradient extent of the Fe2+ and BTEX plume did not change between 1992 and 1995. Instead, depletion of the unstable Fe (III) oxides near the subsurface crude-oil source has caused the maximum dissolved iron concentration zone within the plume to spread at a rate of approximately 3 m/year. The zone of maximum concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) has also spread within the anoxic plume. In monitoring the remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water by natural attenuation, subtle concentration changes in observation well data from the anoxic zone may be diagnostic of depletion of the intrinsic electron-accepting capacity of the aquifer. Recognition of these subtle patterns may allow early prediction of growth of the hydrocarbon plume. Copyright ?? 2001 .

  18. Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1978-01-01

    The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

  19. Aggregate particles in the plumes of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Kopparla, Pushkar; Zhang, Xi; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of the total particulate mass of the plumes of Enceladus are important to constrain theories of particle formation and transport at the surface and interior of the satellite. We revisit the calculations of Ingersoll and Ewald (Ingersoll, A.P., Ewald, S.P. [2011]. Icarus 216(2), 492-506), who estimated the particulate mass of the Enceladus plumes from strongly forward scattered light in Cassini ISS images. We model the plume as a combination of spherical particles and irregular aggregates resulting from the coagulation of spherical monomers, the latter of which allows for plumes of lower particulate mass. Though a continuum of solutions are permitted by the model, the best fits to the ISS data consist either of low mass plumes composed entirely of small aggregates or high mass plumes composed of mostly spheres. The high particulate mass plumes have total particulate masses of (166 ± 42) × 103 kg, consistent with the results of Ingersoll and Ewald (Ingersoll, A.P., Ewald, S.P. [2011]. Icarus 216(2), 492-506). The low particulate mass plumes have masses of (25 ± 4) × 103 kg, leading to a solid to vapor mass ratio of 0.07 ± 0.01 for the plume. If indeed the plumes are made of such aggregates, then a vapor-based origin for the plume particles cannot be ruled out. Finally, we show that the residence time of the monomers inside the plume vents is sufficiently long for Brownian coagulation to form the aggregates before they are ejected to space.

  20. Modelling the fate of the Tijuana River discharge plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ormondt, M.; Terrill, E.; Hibler, L. F.; van Dongeren, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    After rainfall events, the Tijuana River discharges excess runoff into the ocean in a highly turbid plume. The runoff waters contain large suspended solids concentrations, as well as high levels of toxic contaminants, bacteria, and hepatitis and enteroviruses. Public health hazards posed by the effluent often result in beach closures for several kilometers northward along the U.S. shoreline. A Delft3D model has been set up to predict the fate of the Tijuana River plume. The model takes into account the effects of tides, wind, waves, salinity, and temperature stratification. Heat exchange with the atmosphere is also included. The model consists of a relatively coarse outer domain and a high-resolution surf zone domain that are coupled with Domain Decomposition. The offshore boundary conditions are obtained from the larger NCOM SoCal model (operated by the US Navy) that spans the entire Southern California Bight. A number of discharge events are investigated, in which model results are validated against a wide range of field measurements in the San Diego Bight. These include HF Radar surface currents, REMUS tracks, drifter deployments, satellite imagery, as well as current and temperature profile measurements at a number of locations. The model is able to reproduce the observed current and temperature patterns reasonably well. Under calm conditions, the model results suggest that the hydrodynamics in the San Diego Bight are largely governed by internal waves. During rainfall events, which are typically accompanied by strong winds and high waves, wind and wave driven currents become dominant. An analysis will be made of what conditions determine the trapping and mixing of the plume inside the surfzone and/or the propagation of the plume through the breakers and onto the coastal shelf. The model is now also running in operational mode. Three day forecasts are made every 24 hours. This study was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  1. A pilot study for delineation of areas contributing water to wellfields at Jackson, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.; Connell, J.F.; Short, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Division of Groundwater Protection, and the Jackson Utility Division, conducted a pilot study to determine data needs and the applicability of four methods for the delineation of wellhead protection areas. Jackson Utility Division in Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee, pumps about 9 million gallons of ground water daily from two municipal wellfields that tap an unconfined sand aquifer. Under natural hydraulic gradients, ground waterflows southward toward the South Wellfield at approximately 2 to 3 feet per day; natural flow toward the North Wellfield from the east at 1 to 2 feet per day. Water quality generally is suitable for most uses. Concentrations of dissolved solids are low, and excessive iron is the only significant naturally occurring water-quality problem. However, trace concentrations of volatile organic compounds have been detected in water pumps from the South Wellfield; the highest concentration of a single compound has been 23 micrograms per liter of tetrachloroethylene. Potential sources of ground-water contamination in the Jackson area include a hazardous-waste site, municipal and industrial landfill, and underground-storage tanks. Some of the four method for delineating wellhead protection areas did not adequately describe zones contributing flow to the wellfields. Calculations based on a uniform flow equation provided a preliminary delineation of zones of contribution for the wellfields and ground-water time-of-travel contours. Limitations of the applied methods motivated the design of a more rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

  2. A parsimonious analytical model for simulating multispecies plume migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-S.; Liang, C.-P.; Liu, C.-W.; Li, L. Y.

    2015-09-01

    A parsimonious analytical model for rapidly predicting the long-term plume behavior of decaying contaminant such as radionuclide and dissolved chlorinated solvent is presented in this study. Generalized analytical solutions in compact format are derived for the two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions involving an arbitrary number of species in groundwater system. The solution techniques involve the sequential applications of the Laplace, finite Fourier cosine, and generalized integral transforms to reduce the coupled partial differential equation system to a set of linear algebraic equations. The system of algebraic equations is next solved for each species in the transformed domain, and the solutions in the original domain are then obtained through consecutive integral transform inversions. Explicit form solutions for a special case are derived using the generalized analytical solutions and are verified against the numerical solutions. The analytical results indicate that the parsimonious analytical solutions are robust and accurate. The solutions are useful for serving as simulation or screening tools for assessing plume behaviors of decaying contaminants including the radionuclides and dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater systems.

  3. Monitoring spatio-temporal variability of the Adour River turbid plume (Bay of Biscay, France) with MODIS 250-m imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petus, Caroline; Marieu, Vincent; Novoa, Stefani; Chust, Guillem; Bruneau, Nicolas; Froidefond, Jean-Marie

    2014-02-01

    Increased loads of land-based pollutants through river plumes are a major threat to the coastal water quality, ecosystems and sanitary heath. Identifying the coastal areas impacted by potentially polluted freshwaters is necessary to inform management policies and prevent degradation of the coastal environment. This study presents the first monitoring of the Adour River turbid plume (south-eastern Bay of Biscay, France) using multi-annual MODIS data. Satellite data are processed using a regional algorithm that allows quantifying and mapping suspended matter in coastal waters. The results are used to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the Adour River turbid plume and to identify the risk of exposure of coastal ecosystems to the turbid plume waters. Changes in river plume orientation and spatial extent as well as suspended matter discharged through the river are correlated to the main hydro-climatic forcings acting in the south-eastern Bay of Biscay. The Adour River turbid plume is shown to be a highly reactive system mainly controlled by the river discharge rates and modulated by the wind changes. Despite the relatively small size of the Adour River, the Adour River turbid plume can have a non-negligible impact on the water quality of the southern Bay of Biscay and the MSM and associated contaminants/nutrients transported within the Adour turbid river plume have the potential to be disseminated far away along the northern shoreline or offshore. The main areas of influence of the river plume are defined over multi-annual (3 years) and seasonal periods. The results presented in this study show the potential of 250-m MODIS images to monitor small river plumes systems and support management and assessment of the water quality in the south-eastern Bay of Biscay.

  4. The MISR Wildfire Smoke Plume Height Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. L.; Garay, M. J.; Diner, D. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Together the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the Terra satellite observe several characteristics of wildfire smoke plumes. With support from NASA and the EPA, the MISR team is assembling a database of these observations for North America, Africa, Siberia, Indonesia, etc. that extends back to the beginning of the Terra mission in 2000. The thermal infrared channels on MODIS provide the location of fires and their approximate radiative power. By using an interactive visualization program called the MISR INteractive eXplorer (MINX), users interactively digitize wildfire plumes to retrieve accurate plume heights and wind speeds using a new stereo height retrieval algorithm. This information, along with the locations and directions of individual plumes, their areas and aerosol properties derived from the operational MISR aerosol algorithm, are stored in this publicly accessible database for subsequent analysis (http://www-misr2.jpl.nasa.gov/EPA-Plumes/). The plume database currently contains about 4000 smoke plumes and smoke clouds from North America. An equal number of plumes and clouds for other regions around the world has also been digitized. A few thousand additional plumes are in the process of being incorporated. Smoke plumes in this context are considered to be discrete regions of smoke that can be followed to their fire sources at ground level and have a distinctive shape determined by the direction the smoke is driven downwind. Smoke “clouds” are defined here as regions of dense smoke not clearly associated with specific fire sources, and whose direction of transport is not easily determined. Plume height measurements can be used as a surrogate for injection heights, which are important for modeling smoke transport. Examples of height and wind retrievals for specific plumes will be shown. Those chosen have not only been incorporated in statistical analyses of plume heights, but the quality of their spatial height variations is such that they are useful in dynamic modeling of plume rise. Both the plume database and the MINX program will be described.

  5. Radiation Chemistry of Potential Europa Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent detection of atomic hydrogen and atomic oxygen and their correlation to potential water plumes on Europa [Roth, Saur et al. 2014] invoked significant interest in further understanding of these potential/putative plumes on Europa. Unlike on Enceladus, Europa receives significant amount of electron and particle radiation. If the plumes come from trailing hemisphere and in the high radiation flux regions, then it is expected that the plume molecules be subjected to radiation processing. Our interest is to understand to what extent such radiation alterations occur and how they can be correlated to the plume original composition, whether organic or inorganic in nature. We will present laboratory studies [Henderson and Gudipati 2014] involving pulsed infrared laser ablation of ice that generates plumes similar to those observed on Enceladus [Hansen, Esposito et al. 2006; Hansen, Shemansky et al. 2011] and expected to be similar on Europa as a starting point; demonstrating the applicability of laser ablation to simulate plumes of Europa and Enceladus. We will present results from electron irradiation of these plumes to determine how organic and inorganic composition is altered due to radiation. Acknowledgments:This research was enabled through partial funding from NASA funding through Planetary Atmospheres, and the Europa Clipper Pre-Project. B.L.H. acknowledges funding from the NASA Postdoctoral Program for an NPP fellowship. Hansen, C. J., L. Esposito, et al. (2006). "Enceladus' water vapor plume." Science 311(5766): 1422-1425. Hansen, C. J., D. E. Shemansky, et al. (2011). "The composition and structure of the Enceladus plume." Geophysical Research Letters 38. Henderson, B. L. and M. S. Gudipati (2014). "Plume Composition and Evolution in Multicomponent Ices Using Resonant Two-Step Laser Ablation and Ionization Mass Spectrometry." The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118(29): 5454-5463. Roth, L., J. Saur, et al. (2014). "Transient Water Vapor at Europa's South Pole." Science 343(6167): 171-174.

  6. Image Processing Onboard Spacecraft for Autonomous Plume Detection$

    E-print Network

    Schaffer, Steven

    Image Processing Onboard Spacecraft for Autonomous Plume Detection$ David R. Thompson , Melissa's limited cache and bandwidth, and pre- cludes sustained surveys of plume activity. Onboard processing could image sequences onboard to identify plumes, with events triggering preferential storage, prioritized

  7. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  8. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  9. Preliminary far-field plume sputtering characterization of the Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT-100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.

    1994-01-01

    For electric propulsion devices to be considered for use on communications satellites, integration impacts must be examined in detail. Two phenomena of concern associated with highly energetic plumes are contamination via sputtered material from the thruster and sputter erosion of downstream surfaces. In order to characterize the net effect of both phenomena, an array of witness plates were mounted in several types of holders and were exposed to the SPT-100 thruster plume for 50 hours. Surface analysis of the witness plates revealed that in the most energetic regions of the plume, there was a net removal of material from the samples facing the thruster. In the peripheral regions, net deposits were observed and characterized by the changes in optical properties of these samples. Changes in surface properties of samples located in collimators were within experimental uncertainty.

  10. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a long history of both supporting plume model development and providing mixing zone modeling software. The Visual Plumes model is the most recent addition to the suite of public-domain models available through the EPA-Athens Center f...

  11. Distant Plume from Puhi-o-Kalaikini

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The plume from the Puhi-o-Kalaikini ocean entry is easily visible from Highway 130, on the hill descending towards Kalapana. Just in front of the ocean entry plume, the houses of Kalapana Gardens subdivision can be seen on the 1990 lava flows....

  12. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has a history of developing plume models and providing technical assistance. The Visual Plumes model (VP) is a recent addition to the public-domain models available on the EPA Center for Exposure Assessment Modeling (CEAM) web page. The Wind...

  13. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept

    PubMed Central

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models predict large plume heads that cause kilometre-scale surface uplift, and narrow (100?km radius) plume tails that remain in the mantle after the plume head spreads below the lithosphere. However, in many cases, such uplifts and narrow plume tails are not observed. Here using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes contain up to 15–20% of recycled oceanic crust in a form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth dependent. We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200?km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years. PMID:25907970

  14. Experiments on a turbulent plume: shape analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, S.; Sumita, I.

    2009-12-01

    Turbulent plume which is characterized by a large Reynolds number (Re >> 1) and buoyancy, is ubiquitous in nature, an example of which is a volcanic plume. As the turbulent plume rises, it entrains the ambient fluid and grows in size. There have been many laboratory experiments on turbulent plumes, but only few attempts were made to characterize the shape of the evolving plume as a function of source parameters (initial velocity and buoyancy). Here we report the results of laboratory experiments on a turbulent plume, a simplified model of a volcanic plume, to study how the shape of the plume changes as a function of time. Water and aqueous solutions of condensed milk, NaCl and CsCl, colored with a fluorescent dye are injected downward through an orifice (ID 1 mm) into a water contained in an acrylic tank with a cross-section of 30cm ¥times 30cm and a height of 50cm. Plumes with a density difference of 0.00 < ¥Delta ¥rho < 8.00 ¥times 10^ 2 (¥mbox{kg m}^ {-3}) and Re in the range and 210 < Re < 2850, are generated. These experimental parameters (initial Re, buoyancy) were chosen so that they cover the range from inertia-driven to buoyancy-driven regime. We find that the plume shape changes with time as instability and entrainment proceeds. In the beginning it is finger-like, but with time, plume head and vortices develop, and finally it transforms into a cone-like self-similar shape. After transforming a "cone-like" shape, sometimes a "head" appears again. We devise new methods to quantitatively characterize these changes of shape. Here we use (1) the height of the centroid of the plume shape and (2) the deviation from the self-similar triangular shape. Using these methods, we defined 4 regimes as a function of time. We find that the onset times of the 4 regimes have a negative power-law relations on initial Re, which scale better than using onset heights. Importantly, we find that the buoyancy causes the regime transitions to become earlier. Our experiments suggest that monitoring the change of the shape of the rising volcanic plumes and analyzing the regime transition times can be used to constrain the effective initial Re and buoyancy of the plumes.

  15. Mapping Pollution Plumes in Areas Impacted by Hurricane Katrina With Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swayze, G. A.; Furlong, E. T.; Livo, K. E.

    2007-12-01

    New Orleans endured flooding on a massive scale subsequent to Hurricane Katrina in August of 2005. Contaminant plumes were noticeable in satellite images of the city in the days following flooding. Many of these plumes were caused by oil, gasoline, and diesel that leaked from inundated vehicles, gas stations, and refineries. News reports also suggested that the flood waters were contaminated with sewage from breached pipes. Effluent plumes such as these pose a potential health hazard to humans and wildlife in the aftermath of hurricanes and potentially from other catastrophic events (e.g., earthquakes, shipping accidents, chemical spills, and terrorist attacks). While the extent of effluent plumes can be gauged with synthetic aperture radar and broad- band visible-infrared images (Rykhus, 2005) (e.g., Radarsat and Landsat ETM+) the composition of the plumes could not be determined. These instruments lack the spectral resolution necessary to do chemical identification. Imaging spectroscopy may help solve this problem. Over 60 flight lines of NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were collected over New Orleans, the Mississippi Delta, and the Gulf Coast from one to two weeks after Katrina while the contaminated water was being pumped out of flooded areas. These data provide a unique opportunity to test if imaging spectrometer data can be used to identify the chemistry of these flood-related plumes. Many chemicals have unique spectral signatures in the ultraviolet to near-infrared range (0.2 - 2.5 microns) that can be used as fingerprints for their identification. We are particularly interested in detecting thin films of oil, gasoline, diesel, and raw sewage suspended on or in water. If these materials can be successfully differentiated in the lab then we will use spectral-shape matching algorithms to look for their spectral signatures in the AVIRIS data collected over New Orleans and other areas impacted by Katrina. If imaging spectroscopy can be used to identify plume composition on a regional scale than this information would help emergency personnel prioritize evacuations, help government agencies formulate cleanup strategies, and help ecologists assess the potential damage to wetlands and wildlife. This work could be the start of a new application of hyperspectral data for world-wide monitoring of spills from space-based imaging spectrometers. AVIRIS data used to test our method were corrected for solar flux, atmospheric absorptions, and scattering using the Atmospheric CORrection Now (ACORN) radiative transfer algorithm and residual artifacts were removed using ground spectra of a concrete runway at the Gulfport Airport in Mississippi. The resulting apparent reflectance data were mapped for spectral signatures of pollution plumes and results will be presented.

  16. Site Characterization To Support Use Of Monitored Natural Attentuation For Remediation Of Inorganic Contaminants In Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical recommendations have recently been published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address site characterization needed to support selection of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for cleanup of inorganic contaminant plumes in groundwater. Immobilization onto ...

  17. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

    1997-12-16

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

  18. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Downs, Wayne C. (Sugar City, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Ammon, ID); Hall, H. James (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

  19. Automatic delineation of geomorphological slope units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Marchesini, Ivan; Fiorucci, Federica; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Reichenbach, Paola; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Slope units are portions of land surface, defined by the general requirement of maximizing homogeneity within a single unit and heterogeneity between different units, but whose formal characterization and practical delineation has been done in different ways. This is often justified by the statement that the slope unit partitioning of a territory can be used to describe a variety of landforms and processes, and for the assessment of natural hazards. As a result, they need to be tailored according to the specific model in use. This may result in an ambiguous definition of such objects, while an objective definition is highly desirable, which would also allow their reproducibility. We have developed a publicly accessible Web Processing Service (WPS) with the aim of incrementally achieve a satisfactory definition of slope unit. The service allows any user to connect to a CNR-IRPI (Perugia) server, upload his own Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and optional additional data, specify parameters constraining the size and aspect of slope units, and quickly obtain the result in a layer in vector format. The calculation is performed using a parallel algorithm, resulting in a processing time short enough to allow the user to tune the input parameters, repeating the process for a sufficient number of times in order to obtain a satisfactory result. We use quantitative criteria to define and draw the slope units, depending on the input parameters. The algorithm starts from a hydrologically consistent partition of the study area into half-basins with a large number of contributing DEM cells. Each of the half-basins is then checked against a few requirements: maximum area required by the user and maximum standard deviation of the aspect on two orthogonal directions. Those specific half-basin that do not meet the requirements are partitioned further, requiring a lower number of contributing cells. The process is iterated until no half-basin exceeds the user-specified thresholds. Our aim is to encourage users to test the algorithm on a large number of areas with different topographies so that new, meaningful requirements on the individual half-basins can be defined and included in our process, in order to achieve a robust and reproducible algorithm embodying a vast class of desiderata in the slope unit definition. This will eventually constitute a performing and customizable tool for the investigation of a variety of geomorphological phenomena.

  20. Groundwater plume control with phytotechnologies at Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, S.; Negri, M. C.; Quinn, J.; Wozniak, J.,; McPherson, J.

    2002-07-16

    In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) designed and installed a series of engineered plantings consisting of a vegetative cover system and approximately 800 hybrid poplars and willows rooting at various predetermined depths. The plants were installed using various methods including Applied Natural Science's TreeWell{reg_sign} system. The goal of the installation was to protect downgradient surface and groundwater by hydraulic control of the contaminated plume. This goal was to be accomplished by intercepting the contaminated groundwater with the tree roots, removing moisture from the upgradient soil area, reducing water infiltration, preventing soil erosion, degrading and/or transpiring the residual VOCs, and removing tritium from the subsoil and groundwater. The U.S. EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program (SITE) and ANL-E evaluated the demonstration. The effectiveness of the various plantings was monitored directly through groundwater measurements and samples, and indirectly via soil moisture probes, plant tissue analysis, microbial studies, geochemical analysis, and sap flow monitoring. A weather station with data logging equipment was installed. ANL-E modeled the predicted effect of the plants on the groundwater using MODFLOW. The demonstration has lasted three growing seasons and continues. This paper presents the results of the sampling, monitoring, and modeling efforts to date. The project was not only successful in reducing the groundwater contaminant flow and the contaminants at the source; it also provides insight into the techniques that are useful for measuring and predicting the effectiveness of future similar projects.

  1. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained 'ash' particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous 'snowflakes' as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  2. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P. E.; McMillan, M. T.

    2008-10-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO 2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained "ash" particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 10 6 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous "snowflakes" as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  3. 1. Photocopy of delineation, American Architect and Building News, Vol ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of delineation, American Architect and Building News, Vol VI, No. 146, (September 27, 1879). SHOWING FRONT ELEVATION AND FLOOR PLAN - G. B. P. Carpenter House, 100 Block of Polk Streets (Prospect Point), Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  4. Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for the City of San Jose in cooperative agreement with the California Department of Transportation (from the San Jose Historical Museum) - Stevens Ranch Complex, State Route 101, Coyote, Santa Clara County, CA

  5. 1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR AND DATE, SOURCE: BISHOP MUSEUM, HONOLULU, HI. - Ship "Falls of Clyde", Hawaii Maritime Center,Pier 7, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line.

  7. Plumes on Enceladus: Lessons for Europa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The possible detection of a water vapour plume on Europa [1] suggests resemblances to Enceladus, a cryovolcanically active satellite [2]. How does this activity work, and what lesson does Enceladus have for plumes on Europa? The inferred vapour column densities of the Europa [1] and Enceladus [3] plumes are similar, but the inferred velocity and mass flux of the former are higher. At Enceladus, the inferred plume strength is modulated by its orbital position [4,5], suggesting that tides opening and closing cracks control the eruption behaviour [6,7]. An additional source of stress potentially driving eruptions is the effect of slow freezing of the ice shell above[7,8]. The original detection of the Europa plume was close to apocentre, when polar fractures are expected to be in tension [1]. Follow-up observations at the same orbital phase did not detect a plume [9], although the Galileo E12 magnetometer data may provide evidence for an earlier plume [Khurana, pers. comm.]. One possible explanation for the plume's disappearance is that longer-period tidal effects are playing a role; there are hints of similar secular changes in the Enceladus data [4,5]. Another is that detectability of the Europa plumein the aurora observations also depends on variations in electron density (which affects the UV emission flux) [9]. Or it may simply be that eruptive activity on Europa is highly time-variable, as on Io. At Enceladus, the plume scale height is independent of orbital position and plume brightness [5]. This suggests that the vapour velocity does not depend on crack width, consistent with supersonic flow through a near-surface throat. The large scale height inferred for the Europa plume likewise suggests supersonic behaviour. Continuous fallback of solid plume material at Enceladus affects both the colour [10] and surface texture [2] of near-polar regions. Less frequent plume activity would produce subtler effects; whether the sparse available imagery at Europa [11] contains any similar evidence is yet to be determined. Forthcoming Hubble observations may also provide additional constraints. [1] Roth et al. 2012 [2] Porco et al. 2006 [3] Hansen et al. 2011 [4] Hedman et al. 2013 [5] Nimmo et al. 2014 [6] Hurford et al. 2007 [7] Porco et al. 2014 [8] Manga and Wang 2007 [9] Roth et al., submitted [10] Schenk et al. 2011. [11] Phillips et al. 2000

  8. Automatic Individual Shrub Delineation from Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Glenn, N. F.

    2014-12-01

    Species classification, gap analysis, biomass estimates, and biodiversity assessments in semiarid and arid regions can be improved by identifying individual shrubs using ground and airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging). In this study, we develop a new 3-dimensional shrub delineation method based on a moving window and region growing segmentation approach using ground based LiDAR (terrestrial laser scanning, TLS). The method leverages the variation and distribution of point densities that characterize a shrub and its boundary. The algorithm uses a combination of a voxel-based window (5-cm cubes) and segmentation. The segmentation approach begins with a seed point of the highest vegetation point from the point cloud, from the tallest to the shortest shrub. The automatic delineation results from this new method are compared to existing neighborhood point statistics and object-oriented segmentation methods, as well as manual delineation of individual shrubs. The results demonstrate that our new method closely approximates the number and boundaries of shrubs in two plots of different shrub densities, in comparison to manual delineation. These results provide an improvement over existing methods which over-delineate the branches and sub-crowns within shrubs. Our automatic delineation method will be used to improve shrub species classification and biomass estimates within TLS data, and potentially adapted for future use with airborne LiDAR.

  9. The Effect of Reaction Control System Thruster Plume Impingement on Orion Service Module Solar Array Power Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bury, Kristen M.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's new Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle has geometry that orients the reaction control system (RCS) thrusters such that they can impinge upon the surface of Orion's solar array wings (SAW). Plume impingement can cause Paschen discharge, chemical contamination, thermal loading, erosion, and force loading on the SAW surface, especially when the SAWs are in a worst-case orientation (pointed 45 towards the aft end of the vehicle). Preliminary plume impingement assessment methods were needed to determine whether in-depth, timeconsuming calculations were required to assess power loss. Simple methods for assessing power loss as a result of these anomalies were developed to determine whether plume impingement induced power losses were below the assumed contamination loss budget of 2 percent. This paper details the methods that were developed and applies them to Orion's worst-case orientation.

  10. Delinating Thermohaline Double-Diffusive Rayleigh Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, T.; Walther, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liedl, R.

    2013-12-01

    In natural systems, convective flow induced from density differences may occur in near-coastal aquifers, atmospheric boundary layers, oceanic streams or within the earth crust. Whether an initially stable, diffusive regime evolves into a convective (stable or chaotic) regime, or vice versa, depends on the system's framing boundary conditions. A conventional parameter to express the relation between diffusive and convective forces of such a density-driven regime is Rayleigh number (Ra). While most systems are mainly dominated by only a single significant driving force (i.e. only temperature or salinity), some systems need to consider two boundary processes (e.g. deep, thus warm, haline flow in porous media). In that case, a two-dimensional, 'double-diffusive' Rayleigh system can be defined. Nield (1998) postulated a boundary between diffusive and convective regime at RaT + RaC = 4pi^2 in the first quadrant (Q1), with Rayleigh numbers for temperature and concentration respectively. The boundary in the forth quadrant (Q4) could not exactly be determined, yet the approximate position estimated. Simulations with HydroGeoSphere (Therrien, 2010) using a vertical, quadratic, homogeneous, isotropic setup confirmed the existence of the 4pi^2-boundary and revealed additional regimes (diffusive, single-roll, double-roll, chaotic) in Q1. Also, non-chaotic, oscillating patterns could be identified in Q4. More detailed investigations with OpenGeoSys (Kolditz, 2012) confirmed the preceding HGS results, and, using a 1:10-scaled domain (height:length), uncovered even more distinctive regimes (diffusive, minimum ten roles, supposely up to 25 roles, and chaotic?) in Q1, while again, oscillating patterns were found in the transition zone between diffusive and chaotic regimes in Q4. Output of numerical simulations from Q1 and Q4 show the mentioned regimes (diffusive, stable-convective, stable-oscillatory, chaotic) while results are displayed in context of a possible delination between the regimes within the double-diffusive system and boundaries similar to the relation postulated by Nield (1998). Research on the existence of different regimes and the possiblity to predict and estimate a system's specific regime apriori (without numerical simulation) will aid in easy characterization of such thermohaline systems. Literature KOLDITZ, O., BAUER, S., BILKE, L., BÖTTCHER, N., DELFS, J. O., FISCHER, T., GÖRKE, U. J., ET AL. (2012). OPENGEOSYS: AN OPEN-SOURCE INITIATIVE FOR NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL/CHEMICAL (THM/C) PROCESSES IN POROUS MEDIA. ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 67(2), 589-599. DOI:10.1007/S12665-012-1546-X THERRIEN, R., MCLAREN, R.G., SUDICKY, E.A. AND PANDAY, S.M. (2010): HYDROGEOSPHERE--A THREE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL MODEL DESCRIBING FULLY INTEGRATED SUBSURFACE AND SURFACE FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT; UNIVERSITÉ LAVAL AND UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO, CANADA NIELD, D. A., & BEJAN, A. (1998). CONVECTION IN POROUS MEDIA (P. 546). SPRINGER.

  11. Grand Comore Island: A well-constrained “low 3He/4He” mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Class, Cornelia; Goldstein, Steven L.; Stute, Martin; Kurz, Mark D.; Schlosser, Peter

    2005-05-01

    We report He isotope ( 3He/ 4He) variations in samples from alkali basaltic and basanitic lava flows from Grande Comore Island complemented by existing [1,2] [C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, Plume-lithosphere interactions in the ocean basins: constraints from the source mineralogy. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 150 (1997) 245-260, C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, R. Altherr, P. Bachèchlery, The process of plume-lithosphere interaction in the ocean basins—the case of Grande Comore. J. Petrol., 39 (5) (1998) 881-903] and new Sr-Nd-Pb isotope ratios and major and trace element abundances. He isotope data in samples from Tristan da Cunha and Gough islands and the Huri Hills in Kenya are reported also. Grande Comore 3He/ 4He ratios vary between 5.05 and 7.08 RA ( 4He/ 3He ? 141,000-101,000). Chemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic variations of Grande Comore lavas were previously shown to reflect melts derived from the deep mantle plume and the shallow lithospheric mantle [1-3] [C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, Plume-lithosphere interactions in the ocean basins: constraints from the source mineralogy. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 150 (1997) 245-260, C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, R. Altherr, P. Bachèchlery, The process of plume-lithosphere interaction in the ocean basins-the case of Grande Comore. J. Petrol., 39 (5) (1998) 881-903, C. Claude-Ivanaj, B. Bourdon, C.J. Allègre, Ra-Th-Sr isotope systematics in Grande Comore Island: a case study of plume-lithosphere interaction. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 164 (1998) 99-117]. The lithosphere-dominated end-member (La Grille volcano) shows uniform 3He/ 4He ratios within error of 6.75-7.08 RA ( 4He/ 3He ? 106,000-101,000) over a range of [He] = 36-428 × 10 - 9 ccSTP/g. The plume end-member (of the Karthala volcano suite), as constrained by Sr, Nd, Pb isotope ratios, shows uniformly lower 3He/ 4He ratios with 5.05-5.41 RA ( 4He/ 3He ? 141,000-132,000) over a range of [He] = 11-136 × 10 - 9 ccSTP/g. All samples show good correlations between Sr-Nd-He isotope ratios, indicating that the Grande Comore 3He/ 4He ratios are not significantly influenced by crustal contamination and reflect recent mixing between plume- and lithosphere-derived melts. The lithosphere beneath Grande Comore has retained its MORB-like helium isotopic composition, which suggests that the previously identified amphibole-forming metasomatism of the lithospheric mantle [1] [C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, Plume-lithosphere interactions in the ocean basins: constraints from the source mineralogy. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 150 (1997) 245-260] occurred prior to the arrival of the Comoro plume. The well-constrained 3He/ 4He = 5.2 ± 0.2 RA ( 4He/ 3He ? 137,000 ± 5000) of the Comoro plume confirms the existence of "low 3He/ 4He" mantle plumes. A global compilation of OIB shows that OIB from "low 3He/ 4He" plumes form one "side" of the roughly triangular distribution of the global OIB data set in 143Nd/ 144Nd versus 206Pb/ 204Pb and 208Pb/ 204Pb, encompassing the lowest Nd to the highest Pb isotope ratios. It is also shown that "low 3He/ 4He" plumes are more enriched in Th and U relative to other plumes.

  12. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  13. A numerical study of the Magellan Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Elbio D.; Matano, Ricardo P.

    2012-05-01

    In this modeling study we investigate the dynamical mechanisms controlling the spreading of the Magellan Plume, which is a low-salinity tongue that extends along the Patagonian Shelf. Our results indicate that the overall characteristics of the plume (width, depth, spreading rate, etc.) are primarily influenced by tidal forcing, which manifests through tidal mixing and tidal residual currents. Tidal forcing produces a homogenization of the plume's waters and an offshore displacement of its salinity front. The interaction between tidal and wind-forcing reinforces the downstream and upstream buoyancy transports of the plume. The influence of the Malvinas Current on the Magellan Plume is more dominant north of 50°S, where it increases the along-shelf velocities and generates intrusions of saltier waters from the outer shelf, thus causing a reduction of the downstream buoyancy transport. Our experiments also indicate that the northern limit of the Magellan Plume is set by a high salinity discharge from the San Matias Gulf. Sensitivity experiments show that increments of the wind stress cause a decrease of the downstream buoyancy transport and an increase of the upstream buoyancy transport. Variations of the magnitude of the discharge produce substantial modifications in the downstream penetration of the plume and buoyancy transport. The Magellan discharge generates a northeastward current in the middle shelf, a recirculation gyre south of the inlet and a region of weak currents father north.

  14. Provenance of plumes in global convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Rakib; Flament, Nicolas; Gurnis, Michael; Bower, Dan J.; Müller, Dietmar

    2015-05-01

    In global convection models constrained by plume motions and subduction history over the last 230 Myr, plumes emerge preferentially from the edges of thermochemical structures that resemble present-day large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean. It has been argued that large igneous provinces (LIPs) erupting since 200 Ma may originate from plumes that emerged from the edges of the LLSVPs and numerical models have been devised to validate this hypothesis. Although qualitative assessments that are broadly in agreement with this hypothesis have been derived from numerical models, a quantitative assessment has been lacking. We present a novel plume detection scheme and derive Monte Carlo-based statistical correlations of model plume eruption sites and reconstructed LIP eruption sites. We show that models with a chemically anomalous lower mantle are highly correlated to reconstructed LIP eruption sites, whereas the confidence level obtained for a model with purely thermal plumes falls just short of 95%. A network of embayments separated by steep ridges form in the deep lower mantle in models with a chemically anomalous lower mantle. Plumes become anchored to the peaks of the chemical ridges and the network of ridges acts as a floating anchor, adjusting to slab push forces through time. The network of ridges imposes a characteristic separation between conduits that can extend into the interior of the thermochemical structures. This may explain the observed clustering of reconstructed LIP eruption sites that mostly but not exclusively occur around the present-day LLSVPs.

  15. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  16. Behavior of a chlorinated ethene plume following source-area treatment with Fenton's reagent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Casey, C.C.

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring data collected over a 6-year period show that a plume of chlorinated ethene-contaminated ground water has contracted significantly following treatment of the contaminant source area using in situ oxidation. Prior to treatment (1998), concentrations of perchloroethene (PCE) exceeded 4500 ??g/L in a contaminant source area associated with a municipal landfill in Kings Bay, Georgia. The plume emanating from this source area was characterized by vinyl chloride (VC) concentrations exceeding 800 ??g/L. In situ oxidation using Fenton's reagent lowered PCE concentrations in the source area below 100 ??g/L, and PCE concentrations have not rebounded above this level since treatment. In the 6 years following treatment, VC concentrations in the plume have decreased significantly. These concentration declines can be attributed to the movement of Fenton's reagent-treated water downgradient through the system, the cessation of a previously installed pump-and-treat system, and the significant natural attenuation capacity of this anoxic aquifer. While in situ oxidation briefly decreased the abundance and activity of microorganisms in the source area, this activity rebounded in <6 months. Nevertheless, the shift from sulfate-reducing to Fe(III)-reducing conditions induced by Fenton's treatment may have decreased the efficiency of reductive dechlorination in the injection zone. The results of this study indicate that source-area removal actions, particularly when applied to ground water systems that have significant natural attenuation capacity, can be effective in decreasing the areal extent and contaminant concentrations of chlorinated ethene plumes. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  17. Subsurface Contamination Focus Area technical requirements. Volume 1: Requirements summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This document summarizes functions and requirements for remediation of source term and plume sites identified by the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area. Included are detailed requirements and supporting information for source term and plume containment, stabilization, retrieval, and selective retrieval remedial activities. This information will be useful both to the decision-makers within the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) and to the technology providers who are developing and demonstrating technologies and systems. Requirements are often expressed as graphs or charts, which reflect the site-specific nature of the functions that must be performed. Many of the tradeoff studies associated with cost savings are identified in the text.

  18. Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes and plume impingement environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of experimental nozzle, exhaust plume, and exhaust plume impingement data is presented. The data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with propellant Al loadings of 2, 10 and 15% exhausting to simulated altitudes of 50,000, 100,000 and 112,000 ft. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase method of characteristics numerical solution and a technique for defining thermal and pressure environments experienced by bodies immersed in two-phase exhaust plumes.

  19. Plume Ascent Tracker: Interactive Matlab software for analysis of ascending plumes in image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, S. A.; Harris, A. J. L.; Cerminara, M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents Matlab-based software designed to track and analyze an ascending plume as it rises above its source, in image data. It reads data recorded in various formats (video files, image files, or web-camera image streams), and at various wavelengths (infrared, visible, or ultra-violet). Using a set of filters which can be set interactively, the plume is first isolated from its background. A user-friendly interface then allows tracking of plume ascent and various parameters that characterize plume evolution during emission and ascent. These include records of plume height, velocity, acceleration, shape, volume, ash (fine-particle) loading, spreading rate, entrainment coefficient and inclination angle, as well as axial and radial profiles for radius and temperature (if data are radiometric). Image transformations (dilatation, rotation, resampling) can be performed to create new images with a vent-centered metric coordinate system. Applications may interest both plume observers (monitoring agencies) and modelers. For the first group, the software is capable of providing quantitative assessments of plume characteristics from image data, for post-event analysis or in near real-time analysis. For the second group, extracted data can serve as benchmarks for plume ascent models, and as inputs for cloud dispersal models. We here describe the software's tracking methodology and main graphical interfaces, using thermal infrared image data of an ascending volcanic ash plume at Santiaguito volcano.

  20. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  1. Methane Plumes on Mars - Duration: 19 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Spectrometer instruments attached to several telescopes detect plumes of methane emitted from Mars during its summer and spring seasons. High levels of methane are indicated by warmer colors. The m...

  2. The Plasmaspheric Plume and Magnetopause Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Phan, T. D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Souza, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present near-simultaneous measurements from two THEMIS spacecraft at the dayside magnetopause with a 1.5 h separation in local time. One spacecraft observes a high-density plasmaspheric plume while the other does not. Both spacecraft observe signatures of magnetic reconnection, providing a test for the changes to reconnection in local time along the magnetopause as well as the impact of high densities on the reconnection process. When the plume is present and the magnetospheric density exceeds that in the magnetosheath, the reconnection jet velocity decreases, the density within the jet increases, and the location of the faster jet is primarily on field lines with magnetosheath orientation. Slower jet velocities indicate that reconnection is occurring less efficiently. In the localized region where the plume contacts the magnetopause, the high-density plume may impede the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling by mass loading the reconnection site.

  3. Calculating plume rise above level of stack

    SciTech Connect

    Zanker, A.

    1982-04-01

    A method for calculating plume rise above stack level is presented. The equations set forth by Briggs, which are presently the most popular for such calculations, are discussed. A method using 2 nomographs, simplifying the calculations is given. (JMT)

  4. High altitude plumes at Mars morning terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia Muñoz, A.; Garcia Melendo, E.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Gomez Forrellad, J. M.; Pellier, C.; Delcroix, M.; Lopez Valverde, M. A.; González Galindo, F.; Jaeschke, W.; Parker, D.; Phillips, J.; Peach, D.

    2015-10-01

    In March and April 2012 two extremely high altitude plumes were observed at the Martian terminator reaching 200 -250 km or more above the surface[1]. They were located at about 195o West longitude and 45o South latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and extended ˜500 -1,000 km in both North-South and East- West, and lasted for about 10 days. Both plumes exhibited day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb. Another large plume was captured on Hubble Space Telescope images in May 1997 at 99º West longitude and 3º South latitude, but its altitude cannot be pr ecisely determined.Broad-band photometry was performed of both events in the spectral range 255 nm -1052 nm. Based on the observed properties, we discuss different possible scenarios for the mechanism responsible for the formation of these plumes.

  5. Nuclear thermal rocket plume interactions with spacecraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, B.H.; Gatsonis, N.A.; Buzby, J.; Yin, X.

    1997-05-01

    This is the first study that has treated the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) effluent problem in its entirety, beginning with the reactor core, through the nozzle flow, to the plume backflow. The summary of major accomplishments is given below: (1) Determined the NTR effluents that include neutral, ionized and radioactive species, under typical NTR chamber conditions. Applied an NTR chamber chemistry model that includes conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (2) Performed NTR nozzle flow simulations using a Navier-Stokes solver. We assumed frozen chemistry at the chamber conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (3) Performed plume simulations using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code with chemistry. In order to account for radioactive trace species that may be important for contamination purposes we developed a multi-weighted DSMC methodology. The domain in our simulations included large regions downstream and upstream of the exit. Inputs were taken from the Navier-Stokes solutions.

  6. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher plume propagation estimates in a high-permeability conduit like a vertical fracture.

  7. Mantle plumes, mantle stirring and hotspot chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Geoffrey F.

    1990-07-01

    The role of plumes in a mantle with single-layer convection and stratified viscosity is studied. The way in which the large-scale flow stirs the mantle is illustrated, and a model is described in which plumes sample regions of the lowermost mantle having properties appropriate to oceanic island basalt sources. All proposed sources of recycled material, including oceanic crust, oceanic sediments, and continental lithosphere, can be accommodated in this model.

  8. Puff/Plume for Windows 95-NT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-05-20

    PFPL-NT is a GUI event-driven scientific application integrating 14 background processes to access the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous materials from production facilities and transportation vehicles. A simple straight-line Gaussian assumption has been employed with observations from meteorological towers to calculate and visually display plume directions, plume width, and dose/concentration estimates in the immediate vicinity of a radiological or chemical release.

  9. Microwave absorption for water plume density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulais, K. A.; Choe, J. Y.; Irwin, K. A.; Higdon, C. E.

    1998-01-01

    We describe an experimental method to measure the water density of a plume created from a shallow underwater explosion. Our approach is based on the attenuation characteristics of a microwave signal propagated through the plume. A unique correlation exists between the amount of attenuation and macroscopic quantities including the volume fraction of water in air. In this article, both the theory required for data analysis and the experimental arrangement used for measuring the highly attenuated microwave signal are discussed.

  10. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E.; Gamey, Jeff; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-03-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies.

  11. A six degree of freedom, plume-fuel optimal trajectory planner for spacecraft proximity operations using an A* node search. M.S. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark Charles

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft proximity operations are complicated by the fact that exhaust plume impingement from the reaction control jets of space vehicles can cause structural damage, contamination of sensitive arrays and instruments, or attitude misalignment during docking. The occurrence and effect of jet plume impingement can be reduced by planning approach trajectories with plume effects considered. An A* node search is used to find plume-fuel optimal trajectories through a discretized six dimensional attitude-translation space. A plume cost function which approximates jet plume isopressure envelopes is presented. The function is then applied to find relative costs for predictable 'trajectory altering' firings and unpredictable 'deadbanding' firings. Trajectory altering firings are calculated by running the spacecraft jet selection algorithm and summing the cost contribution from each jet fired. A 'deadbanding effects' function is defined and integrated to determine the potential for deadbanding impingement along candidate trajectories. Plume costs are weighed against fuel costs in finding the optimal solution. A* convergence speed is improved by solving approach trajectory problems in reverse time. Results are obtained on a high fidelity space shuttle/space station simulation. Trajectory following is accomplished by a six degree of freedom autopilot. Trajectories planned with, and without, plume costs are compared in terms of force applied to the target structure.

  12. OBSERVATION OF HIGH-SPEED OUTFLOW ON PLUME-LIKE STRUCTURES OF THE QUIET SUN AND CORONAL HOLES WITH SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Habbal, Shadia Rifal; He Jiansen E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu E-mail: jshept@gmail.com

    2011-08-01

    Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal ubiquitous episodic outflows (jets) with an average speed around 120 km s{sup -1} at temperatures often exceeding a million degree in plume-like structures, rooted in magnetized regions of the quiet solar atmosphere. These outflows are not restricted to the well-known plumes visible in polar coronal holes, but are also present in plume-like structures originating from equatorial coronal holes and quiet-Sun (QS) regions. Outflows are also visible in the 'inter-plume' regions throughout the atmosphere. Furthermore, the structures traced out by these flows in both plume and inter-plume regions continually exhibit transverse (Alfvenic) motion. Our finding suggests that high-speed outflows originate mainly from the magnetic network of the QS and coronal holes (CHs), and that the plume flows observed are highlighted by the denser plasma contained therein. These outflows might be an efficient means to provide heated mass into the corona and serve as an important source of mass supply to the solar wind. We demonstrate that the QS plume flows can sometimes significantly contaminate the spectroscopic observations of the adjacent CHs-greatly affecting the Doppler shifts observed, thus potentially impacting significant investigations of such regions.

  13. Confirmation of Europa's water vapor plume activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Lorenz

    2013-10-01

    STIS spectral UV images of Jupiter's satellite Europa obtained during HST Cycle 20 revealed atomic H and O auroral emissions in intensity ratios which uniquely identify the source as electron impact excitation of water molecules above Europa's south pole and hypothesized to be associated with water vapor plumes as reported in Roth et al., Science, 2014. The plumes were detected when Europa was at apocenter on December 30/31, 2012. Two other sets of STIS observations when Europa was near pericenter did not show plume emission within the sensitivity of STIS. The plume variability is predicted to be correlated with Europa's distance from Jupiter in the observed way. However, the one plume detection at apocenter and the two non-detections near pericenter require confirmation. Therefore we request two visits of 5 orbits each to observe Europa at orbital positions of the predicted maximum plume activity {similar to the December 2012 STIS Europa visit} to provide confirmation of the initial STIS discovery and to consolidate the predicted geophysical variability pattern.

  14. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-07-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ?24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.

  15. OZONE PRODUCTION IN URBAN PLUMES.

    SciTech Connect

    KLEINMAN,L.

    2001-09-17

    Ozone levels observed during a field campaign in Houston were significantly higher than that observed in Phoenix or Philadelphia. An examination of the slope of O{sub x} versus NO{sub z} in the urban plumes shows that NO{sub x} is used 2 to 3 times more efficiently in Houston as compared with Phoenix and Philadelphia. Representative values of OPEx are 7-12, 3, and 4, in Houston, Phoenix, and Philadelphia. Aircraft observations have been used to calculate P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}). Values in Houston are significantly higher than in Phoenix and Philadelphia. We show that P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) is proportional to a VOC/NO{sub 2}-OH reactivity ratio. High values of P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) in Houston are due to emissions of reactive olefins from the ship channel region. It is significant that high values of P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) occur at NO{sub x} levels up to several 10's of ppb. Not only is the chemistry efficient but it will be long lasting. The occurrence of high NO{sub x} and high OPEx is fostered by the co-location of VOC and NO{sub x} sources in the Houston industrial areas.

  16. Delineating the Rattlesnake Springs, New Mexico Watershed Using Shallow Subsurface Geophysical Techniques and Geologic Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doser, D. I.; Langford, R. P.; Boykov, N. D.; Baker, M. R.; Kaip, G. M.

    2007-12-01

    Rattlesnake Springs serves as the sole water source for Carlsbad Caverns National Park. The recent development of oil and gas leases and agricultural lands surrounding the springs has led to concern about contamination of the karst aquifer. We have used geophysical techniques, combined with geologic mapping, to delineate possible fracture systems in the gypsum and carbonate bedrock that feed the spring system. Our initial work has focused on a 700 m by 700 m region surrounding the springs. We conducted a series of ground conductivity surveys with follow-up DC resistivity surveys (Wenner array vertical electrical soundings and a pole- pole survey) to determine variations in soil grain size and moisture content. Surface geologic mapping was used to identify a series of Holocene terraces and valleys that incise the terraces. Our combined results suggest that northwest-southeast and north-south trending fractures and dissolution features control regional water flow. Relict spring valleys are found to the west of the present springs. A pole-pole survey conducted around the perimeter of the springs suggests main water flow into the springs occurs from the northwest. We plan to complete a precision gravity survey in September and October 2007 to map bedrock topography and determine its relation to structural and dissolution features. Ground penetrating radar data will be collected on the northwestern side of the springs in an attempt to better delineate structures controlling inflow into the springs.

  17. Sulfur chemistry in a copper smelter plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, D. J.; Christensen, J. J.; Eatough, N. I.; Hill, M. W.; Major, T. D.; Mangelson, N. F.; Post, M. E.; Ryder, J. F.; Hansen, L. D.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Fischer, J. W.

    Sulfur transformation chemistry was studied in the plume of the Utah smelter of Kennecott Copper Corporation from April to October 1977. Samples were taken at up to four locations from 4 to 60 km from the stacks. Data collected at each station included: SO 2 concentration, low-volume collected total paniculate matter, high-volume collected size fractionated paniculate matter, wind velocity and direction, temperature, and relative humidity. Paniculate samples were analyzed for S(IV). sulfate, strong acid, anions, cations, and elemental concentrations using calorimetric, ion Chromatographie, FIXE, ESCA, ion microprobe, and SEM-ion microprobe techniques. The concentration of As in the paniculate matter was used as a conservative plume tracer. The ratios Mo/As, Pb/As, and Zn/As were constant in particulate matter collected at all sampling sites for any particle size. Strong mineral acid was neutralized by background metal oxide and/or carbonate particulates within 40km of the smelter. This neutralization process is limited only by the rate of incorporation of basic material into the plume. Two distinct metal-S(IV) species similar to those observed in laboratory aerosol experiments were found in the plume. The formation of paniculate S(IV) species occurs by interaction of SO 2 (g) with both ambient and plume derived aerosol and is equilibrium controlled. The extent of formation of S(IV) complexes in the aerosol is directly proportional to the SO 2(g) and paniculate (Cu + Fe) concentration and inversely proportional to the paniculate acidity. S(IV) species were stable in collected paniculate matter only in the neutralized material, but with proper sampling techniques could be demonstrated to also be present in very acidic particles at high ambient SO 2(g) concentrations. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite by the aerosol S(IV) complexes during plume transport is suggested. The SO 2(g)-sulfate conversion process in the plume is described by a mechanism which is first order in SO 2(g). Equations are derived describing sulfur chemistry when both S(IV) and sulfate formation occur in a plume. The formation of sulfate results primarily in the formation of < 0.5 ?m particulates. The formation process is not correlated with plume expansion, paniculate acidity, metal content, or S(IV) species. Due to meteorological restrictions on sampling, data were collected only during periods of maximum insolation. The formation of sulfate from SO 2(g) in the plume during periods of high insolation is temperature dependent with an apparent activation energy of 16.6 ± 1.4 kcal mol -1 and a k1, value of 0.039h -1 at 25°C.

  18. Physical apparatus to demonstrate stretching and folding of contaminant/treatment solution in aquifers by extraction and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; Mays, D. C.; Neupauer, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    A chief limitation to in situ groundwater remediation is the very slow velocity of groundwater. This slow velocity prevents turbulence and thereby limits mixing, especially in the case where a treatment solution is injected within the contaminated plume in order to promote degradation reactions. This study expounds on the hypothesis that injection and extraction of uncontaminated water through wells surrounding the contaminated plume can compensate for lack of natural mixing. This is done by stretching and folding the contaminant and treatment plumes around each other, vastly increasing the surface area for molecular interaction. Previous experimental work by others has shown that injection and extraction schemes can increase the perimeter length of contaminant plumes and theoretical models by our group have demonstrated that stretching and folding is an effective means to promote plume spreading. The current presentation describes an experimental apparatus constructed to study how injection and extraction schemes can be used to generate plume stretching and folding. The apparatus created to display this technique comprises two parallel plates with no flow boundary conditions providing a two-dimensional view of treatment solution surrounded by contaminated groundwater. A series of injections and extractions can manipulate these plumes in a manner that can be duplicated in the field.

  19. MULTI-LAYER SAMPLING IN CONVENTIONAL MONITORING WELLS FOR IMPROVED ESTIMATION OF VERTICAL CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTIONS AND MASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Traditional" approaches to sampling groundwater and interpreting monitoring well data often provide misleading pictures of plume shape and location in the subsurface and the true extent of contamination. Groundwater samples acquired using pumps and bailers in conventional monito...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: INNOVATIVE MEASURES FOR SUBSURFACE CHROMIUM REMEDIATION: SOURCE ZONE, CONCENTRATED PLUME, AND DILUTE PLUME.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This environmental research brief reports on innovative measures for addressing 1) the source zone soils, 2) the concentrated portion of the ground-water plume, and 3) the dilute portion of the ground-water plume. For the source zone, surfactant-enhanced chromium extraction is ev...

  1. African Equatorial and Subtropical Ozone Plumes: Recurrences Timescales of the Brown Cloud Trans-African Plumes and Other Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Thompson, Anne M.; Guan, Hong; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    We have found repeated illustrations in the maps of Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) of apparent transport of ozone from the Indian Ocean to the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Most interesting are examples that coincide with the INDOEX observations of late northern winter, 1999. Three soundings associated with the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network help confirm and quantify degree of influence of pollution, lightning, and stratospheric sources, suggesting that perhaps 40% of increased Atlantic ozone could be Asian pollution during periods of maximum identified in the TTO maps. We outline recurrent periods of apparent ozone transport from Indian to Atlantic Ocean regions both during and outside the late-winter period. These are placed in the context of some general observations about factors controlling recurrence timescales for the expression of both equatorial and subtropical plumes. Low-level subtropical plumes are often controlled by frontal systems approaching the Namib coast; these direct mid-level air into either easterly equatorial plumes or westerly mid- troposphere plumes. Equatorial plumes of ozone cross Africa on an easterly path due to the occasional coincidence of two phenomena: (1) lofting of ozone to mid and upper levels, often in the Western Indian Ocean, and (2) the eastward extension of an Equatorial African easterly jet.

  2. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  3. Pele Plume Deposit on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The varied effects of Ionian volcanism can be seen in this false color infrared composite image of Io's trailing hemisphere. Low resolution color data from Galileo's first orbit (June, 1996) have been combined with a higher resolution clear filter picture taken on the third orbit (November, 1996) of the spacecraft around Jupiter.

    A diffuse ring of bright red material encircles Pele, the site of an ongoing, high velocity volcanic eruption. Pele's plume is nearly invisible, except in back-lit photographs, but its deposits indicate energetic ejection of sulfurous materials out to distances more than 600 kilometers from the central vent. Another bright red deposit lies adjacent to Marduk, also a currently active ediface. High temperature hot spots have been detected at both these locations, due to the eruption of molten material in lava flows or lava lakes. Bright red deposits on Io darken and disappear within years or decades of deposition, so the presence of bright red materials marks the sites of recent volcanism.

    This composite was created from data obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The region imaged is centered on 15 degrees South, 224 degrees West, and is almost 2400 kilometers across. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 3 kilometers across. North is towards the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the west.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  4. Mantle plume capture, anchoring, and outflow during Galápagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Geist, D. J.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Compositions of basalts erupted between the main zone of Galápagos plume upwelling and adjacent Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) provide important constraints on dynamic processes involved in transfer of deep-mantle-sourced material to mid-ocean ridges. We examine recent basalts from central and northeast Galápagos including some that have less radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions than plume-influenced basalts (E-MORB) from the nearby ridge. We show that the location of E-MORB, greatest crustal thickness, and elevated topography on the GSC correlates with a confined zone of low-velocity, high-temperature mantle connecting the plume stem and ridge at depths of ˜100 km. At this site on the ridge, plume-driven upwelling involving deep melting of partially dehydrated, recycled ancient oceanic crust, plus plate-limited shallow melting of anhydrous peridotite, generate E-MORB and larger amounts of melt than elsewhere on the GSC. The first-order control on plume stem to ridge flow is rheological rather than gravitational, and strongly influenced by flow regimes initiated when the plume was on axis (>5 Ma). During subsequent northeast ridge migration material upwelling in the plume stem appears to have remained "anchored" to a contact point on the GSC. This deep, confined NE plume stem-to-ridge flow occurs via a network of melt channels, embedded within the normal spreading and advection of plume material beneath the Nazca plate, and coincides with locations of historic volcanism. Our observations require a more dynamically complex model than proposed by most studies, which rely on radial solid-state outflow of heterogeneous plume material to the ridge.

  5. Combining a finite mixture distribution model with indicator kriging to delineate and map the spatial patterns of soil heavy metal pollution in Chunghua County, central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Pin; Cheng, Bai-You; Shyu, Guey-Shin; Chang, Tsun-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    This study identifies the natural background, anthropogenic background and distribution of contamination caused by heavy metal pollutants in soil in Chunghua County of central Taiwan by using a finite mixture distribution model (FMDM). The probabilities of contaminated area distribution are mapped using single-variable indicator kriging and multiple-variable indicator kriging (MVIK) with the FMDM cut-off values and regulation thresholds for heavy metals. FMDM results indicate that Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn can be individually fitted by a mixture model representing the background and contamination distributions of the four metals in soil. The FMDM cut-off values for contamination caused by the metals are close to the regulation thresholds, except for the cut-off value of Zn. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve validates that indicator kriging and MVIK with FMDM cut-off values can reliably delineate heavy metals contamination, particularly for areas lacking background information and high heavy metal concentrations in soil. PMID:19665827

  6. Dynamic Stereochemistry: A Simple Approach to Delineating Relative Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandal, Dipak K.

    2007-01-01

    A simple approach for delineating the stereochemistry of the products relative to that of the reactants in reactions involving stereogenic centers is addressed. The reaction at the tetrahedral center involves the cleavage of a bond to one of the ligands in the reactant and the resulting new ligand in the product is labeled by affixing prime to the…

  7. Interobserver Variation of Clinical Target Volume Delineation in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Verheij, Marcel

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) delineation in gastric cancer performed with the help of a delineation guide. Patients and Methods: Ten radiotherapy centers that participate in the CRITICS Phase III trial were provided with a delineation atlas, preoperative CT scans, a postoperative planning CT scan, and clinical information for a gastric cancer case and were asked to construct a CTV and create a dosimetric plan according to departmental policy. Results: The volumes of the CTVs and planning target volumes (PTVs) differed greatly, with a mean (SD) CTV volume of 392 (176) cm{sup 3} (range, 240-821cm{sup 3}) and PTV volume of 915 (312) cm{sup 3} (range, 634-1677cm{sup 3}). The overlapping volume was 376cm{sup 3} for the CTV and 890cm{sup 3} for the PTV. The greatest differences in the CTV were seen at the cranial and caudal parts. After planning, dose coverage of the overlapping PTV volume showed less variability than the CTV. Conclusion: In this series of 10 plans, variability of the CTV in postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer is large. Strict and clear delineation guidelines should be provided, especially in Phase III multicenter studies. Adaptations of these guidelines should be evaluated in clinical studies.

  8. Delineating the Citation Impact of Scientific Discoveries Chaomei Chen

    E-print Network

    Chen, Chaomei

    through a scientific community or across disciplines. Identifying the significance of specific scientificDelineating the Citation Impact of Scientific Discoveries Chaomei Chen Drexel University 3141 in the diffusion of scientific knowledge is a challenging issue concerning many theoretical and practical areas. We

  9. RESEARCH Open Access Head and neck lymph node region delineation

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    RESEARCH Open Access Head and neck lymph node region delineation with image registration Chia and neck represent a great epidemiological problem in western countries. Head and neck cancer accounts to clinical criteria, the results suggest the technique has promise. Background Malignant tumors in the head

  10. The Regionalization of Africa: Delineating Africa's Subregions Using Airline Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Pieter R.; Derudder, Ben; Witlox, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Current regionalizations of Africa have limitations in that they are attribute-based and regions are delineated according to national boundaries. Taking the world city network approach as starting point, it is possible to use relational data (i.e., information about the relationships between cities) rather than attribute data, and moreover, it…

  11. 1. Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for the City of San Jose in cooperative agreement with the California Department of Transportation (from the San Jose Historical Museum). - Twin Oaks Dairy, Northwest of Metcalfe Road, off State Route 101 (Monterey Road), Coyote, Santa Clara County, CA

  12. Delineation of Preventative Landslide Buffers Along Steep Streamside Slopes in

    E-print Network

    213 Delineation of Preventative Landslide Buffers Along Steep Streamside Slopes in Northern of sediment delivering to watercourses as a result of landslides generated by forest management related operations. Initial default buffers were developed through a landslide study during the planning stages

  13. Tidal networks 2. Watershed delineation and comparative network morphology

    E-print Network

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    of three, we quantify various tidal network properties including common power law relationships which have common power law relationships quantified for terrestrial systems to tidal systems and use these analysesTidal networks 2. Watershed delineation and comparative network morphology Andrea Rinaldo,1 Sergio

  14. Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-13

    A pipeline, implemented within the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK) and The Visualization Toolkit (VTK) framework, to delineate each nucleus and to profile morphometric and colony organization. At an abstract level, our approach is an extension of a previously developed method for monolayer call structure models.

  15. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mapped and unmapped delineations. 415.43 Section 415.43 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... channel and overbanks, stream profile, and factors involved in determining obstructions to flow. From...

  16. CALIOP-derived Smoke Plume Injection Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, A. J.; Winker, D. M.; Choi, H. D.; Fairlie, T. D.; Westberg, D. J.; Roller, C. M.; Pouliot, G.; Vaughan, M.; Pierce, T. E.; Trepte, C. R.; Rao, V.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning is a dominant natural and anthropogenic disturbance that feeds back to the climate system. Fire regimes, ecosystem fuels, fire severity and intensity vary widely, even within the same system, largely under the control of weather and climate. These strongly influence fire plume injection height and thus the transport of related biomass burning emissions, affecting air quality, human health and the climate system. If our knowledge of plume injection height is incorrect, transport models of those emissions will likewise be incorrect, adversely affecting our ability to analyze and predict climate feedbacks (i.e. black carbon to the Arctic, precipitation, cloud-radiation relationships) and public health (air quality forecast). Historically, plume height was based on the pioneering work of G.A. Briggs [1969; 1971] and verified with limited field campaigns. However, we currently have two satellite instruments, Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO (afternoon overpass) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) onboard TERRA (morning overpass), that can provide the statistics necessary to verify our assumptions and improve fire plume injection height estimates for use in both small- and large-scale models. We have developed a methodology to assess fire plume injection height using the Langley Trajectory Model (LaTM), CALIOP, Hazard Mapping System (HMS) smoke plume, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly data that is capable of generating two distinct types of verification data. A single CALIOP smoke-filled aerosol envelop can be traced back to numerous fire events, and using multiple CALIOP transects from numerous days, a daily smoke plume injection height evolution from a single fire can be defined. Additionally, we have linked the smoke plumes to ecosystems and the meteorological variables that define fire weather. In concert, CALIOP and MISR data can produce the statistical knowledge necessary to improve our understanding of the dynamics of fire plume injection height, thus improving our ability to forecast poor air quality and to accurately define smoke feedbacks to climate change.

  17. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  18. a Lagrangian Philosophy for Plume Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Walter Eugen

    A Lagrangian plume model is described that has proven useful in water and air applications. It contrasts sharply with earlier Eulerian integral flux models even though they are shown to be equivalent. As an alternative and complementary approach, the Lagrangian formulation offers new insights into the problem. As a result, it furnished the first accurate statement of the Projected Area Entrainment (PAE) hypothesis that describes the assimilation of moving ambient fluid into the plume. The hypothesis allows--without tuning--average motion and dilution characteristics to be predicted for the first time. Further contemplation of the Lagrangian plume element resulted in the identification of the Negative Volume Anomaly (NVA). The NVA is an inconsistency in control volume conception resulting from the intersection of the cross-sections that bound it, causing the anomalous production of negative volume. Although the Lagrangian plume model, UM, has been adopted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is used in over a dozen foreign countries, and has been verified independently, a pervasive bias against the approach makes it difficult to publish findings in the peer reviewed literature. A case study describing the problem is presented. This analysis suggests that the phenomenon is not unique to plume modeling. The contributing causes are perpetuated by the closedness of the peer review system. Recommendations are given for improving peer review procedures to open the process to inspection. They include simple measures modifying anonymity and allowing authors to submit to multiple journals simultaneously.

  19. Follow the plume: the habitability of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P; Anbar, Ariel D; Porco, Carolyn; Tsou, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The astrobiological exploration of other worlds in our Solar System is moving from initial exploration to more focused astrobiology missions. In this context, we present the case that the plume of Enceladus currently represents the best astrobiology target in the Solar System. Analysis of the plume by the Cassini mission indicates that the steady plume derives from a subsurface liquid water reservoir that contains organic carbon, biologically available nitrogen, redox energy sources, and inorganic salts. Furthermore, samples from the plume jetting out into space are accessible to a low-cost flyby mission. No other world has such well-studied indications of habitable conditions. Thus, the science goals that would motivate an Enceladus mission are more advanced than for any other Solar System body. The goals of such a mission must go beyond further geophysical characterization, extending to the search for biomolecular evidence of life in the organic-rich plume. This will require improved in situ investigations and a sample return. PMID:24684187

  20. Particle Characterization in Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, E. Eugene, Jr.; Fisher, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method to characterize particles in rocket exhaust plumes is developed. The particle velocity, size, and material composition are determined from crater characteristics resulting from impacts into aluminum and copper targets passed through the plume. The targets are mounted on a steel arm approximately 21 inches (53 cm) long which is rotated through the plume at sufficient velocity to prevent material failure resulting from thermal effects. A Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with secondary x-ray detectors is used to determine the particle material, and a standard optical measurement microscope is used to determine the crater diameter and depth. The crater diameter and depth are used in turn, as inputs to a ballistics computer code to estimate the velocity and size of the particle. The target has a safe residence time in the plume of approximately 50 ms before reaching an unacceptably high temperature. The = must mach a velocity of 104 ft/s (32 m/s) before entering the plume to produce the design residence time of 20 ms. The arm is actuated by a torsion spring with a 5-inch (13 cm) outer diameter, 0.625-inch (16 mm wire diameter, and 11 coils. A prototype of the entire rocket exhaust particle impact characterization system (PICS) was constructed and statically tested.

  1. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  2. SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

    2006-07-12

    Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

  3. OPTIMIZING PUMPING STRATEGIES FOR CONTAMINANT STUDIES AND REMEDIAL ACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the more common techniques for controlling the migration of contaminant plumes is the use of pumping wells to produce desired changes in local flow rates and hydraulic gradients. When seeking to optimize an array of pumping well locations and discharge rates, it is importa...

  4. GASEOUS BEHAVIOR OF TCE (TRICHLOROETHYLENE) OVERLYING A CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shallow soil gas (<2 meters deep) was collected and analyzed for trichloroethylene (TCE) to determine the relationship with ground-water contamination directly below. The gaseous TCE plume was mapped with 46 probes and spanned three orders of magnitude in concentration (<0.001 to...

  5. Simulating Irregular Source Geometries for Ionian Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    McDoniel, W. J.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.; Buchta, D. A.; Freund, J.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2011-05-20

    Volcanic plumes on Io respresent a complex rarefied flow into a near-vacuum in the presence of gravity. A 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to investigate the gas dynamics of such plumes, with a focus on the effects of source geometry on far-field deposition patterns. A rectangular slit and a semicircular half annulus are simulated to illustrate general principles, especially the effects of vent curvature on deposition ring structure. Then two possible models for the giant plume Pele are presented. One is a curved line source corresponding to an IR image of a particularly hot region in the volcano's caldera and the other is a large area source corresponding to the entire caldera. The former is seen to produce the features seen in observations of Pele's ring, but with an error in orientation. The latter corrects the error in orientation, but loses some structure. A hybrid simulation of 3D slit flow is also discussed.

  6. BACTERIA USED TO PRECIPITATE MERCURY IN CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER OF PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for poster presentation: A number of regions in Kazakhstan are contaminated with soluble mercury originating from industrial sources. A chlor-alkali plant that operated from 1970-1990 caused contamination of ground water near a northern suburb of Pavlodar city. The plume...

  7. Delineating Contaminants and Transport Pathways Within a Coastal Watershed in Southeast Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coastal water quality decline due to point and non-point source pollution from terrestrial sources is a serious concern throughout the Caribbean basin and worldwide. Toxic and noxious algal blooms, declines in mangrove forests and seagrass meadows, depletion of fishery stocks, coral reef die-off, pu...

  8. Effects of meteorological conditions on spore plumes.

    PubMed

    Burch, M; Levetin, E

    2002-08-01

    Fungal spores are an ever-present component of the atmosphere, and have long been known to trigger asthma and hay fever symptoms in sensitive individuals. The atmosphere around Tulsa has been monitored for airborne spores and pollen with Burkard spore traps at several sampling stations. This study involved the examination of the hourly spore concentrations on days that had average daily concentrations near 50,000 spores/m(3) or greater. Hourly concentrations of Cladosporium, Alternaria, Epicoccum, Curvularia, Pithomyces, Drechslera, smut spores, ascospores, basidiospores, other, and total spores were determined on 4 days at three sites and then correlated with hourly meteorological data including temperature, rainfall, wind speed, dew point, air pressure, and wind direction. On each of these days there was a spore plume, a phenomenon in which spore concentrations increased dramatically over a very short period of time. Spore plumes generally occurred near midday, and concentrations were seen to increase from lows around 20,000 total spores/m(3) to highs over 170,000 total spores/m(3) in 2 h. Multiple regression analysis of the data indicated that increases in temperature, dew point, and air pressure correlated with the increase in spore concentrations, but no single weather variable predicted the appearance of a spore plume. The proper combination of changes in these meteorological parameters that result in a spore plume may be due to the changing weather conditions associated with thunderstorms, as on 3 of the 4 days when spore plumes occurred there were thunderstorms later that evening. The occurrence of spore plumes may have clinical significance, because other studies have shown that sensitization to certain spore types can occur during exposure to high spore concentrations. PMID:12194003

  9. The reactive bed plasma system for contamination control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, Joseph G.; Moore, Robert R.; Perry, Tony R.

    1990-01-01

    The contamination control capabilities of the Reactive Bed Plasma (RBP) system is described by delineating the results of toxic chemical composition studies, aerosol filtration work, and other testing. The RBP system has demonstrated its capabilities to decompose toxic materials and process hazardous aerosols. The post-treatment requirements for the reaction products have possible solutions. Although additional work is required to meet NASA requirements, the RBP may be able to meet contamination control problems aboard the Space Station.

  10. A buoyant plume adjacent to a headland-Observations of the Elwha River plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Stevens, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Small rivers commonly discharge into coastal settings with topographic complexities - such as headlands and islands - but these settings are underrepresented in river plume studies compared to more simplified, straight coasts. The Elwha River provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of coastal topography on a buoyant plume, because it discharges into the Strait of Juan de Fuca on the western side of its deltaic headland. Here we show that this headland induces flow separation and transient eddies in the tidally dominated currents (O(100. cm/s)), consistent with other headlands in oscillatory flow. These flow conditions are observed to strongly influence the buoyant river plume, as predicted by the "small-scale" or "narrow" dynamical classification using Garvine's (1995) system. Because of the transient eddies and the location of the river mouth on the headland, flow immediately offshore of the river mouth is directed eastward twice as frequently as it is westward. This results in a buoyant plume that is much more frequently "bent over" toward the east than the west. During bent over plume conditions, the plume was attached to the eastern shoreline while having a distinct, cuspate front along its westernmost boundary. The location of the front was found to be related to the magnitude and direction of local flow during the preceding O(1. h), and increases in alongshore flow resulted in deeper freshwater mixing, stronger baroclinic anomalies, and stronger hugging of the coast. During bent over plume conditions, we observed significant convergence of river plume water toward the frontal boundary within 1. km of the river mouth. These results show how coastal topography can strongly influence buoyant plume behavior, and they should assist with understanding of initial coastal sediment dispersal pathways from the Elwha River during a pending dam removal project. ?? 2010.

  11. Segmented electrode hall thruster with reduced plume

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2004-08-17

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with segmented electrodes along the channel, which make the acceleration region as localized as possible. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to minimize erosion and arcing. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to produce a substantial reduction in plume divergence. The use of electrodes made of emissive material will reduce the radial potential drop within the channel, further decreasing the plume divergence. Also disclosed is a method of arranging and powering these electrodes so as to provide variable mode operation.

  12. Experimental and theoretical characterization of a Hall thruster plume

    E-print Network

    Azziz, Yassir, 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Despite the considerable flight heritage of the Hall thruster, the interaction of its plume with the spacecraft remains an important integration issue. Because in-flight data fully characterizing the plume in the space ...

  13. Turbid Coastal Plume of the Elwha River, Washington

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The turbid waters of the Elwha River and the coastal waters of the Strait de Fuca mix directly offshore of the river mouth, forming a large coastal plume.  This plume is easily identified by the cloudiness of the water (or

  14. LAMP Observes the LCROSS Plume - Duration: 47 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows LAMPâ??s view of the LCROSS plume. The first half of the animation shows the LAMP viewport scanning across the horizon, passing through the plume, and moving on. The second half of...

  15. Hydrocarbon production and photochemical ozone formation in forest burn plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Westberg, H.; Sexton, K.; Flyckt, D.

    1981-06-01

    Ozone production in forest slash burn plumes is described. Plumes from controlled fires in Washington were monitored using an instrumented aircraft. Ozone, nitrogen oxides, condensation nuclei, and visual range were measured continuously. The slash burn plumes were found to contain significant quantities of ozone. A buildup of 40-50 ppb above the ambient background ozone concentrations was not unusual. Many photochemically reactive olefins were also detected in the plume. (8 graphs, 1 map, 15 references, 2 tables)

  16. Tracking Iceland Plume Motion Using Trace Element Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitton, J. G.; Walters, R. L.; Jones, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) is a hotspot track built by interaction between the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the Iceland mantle plume. Unlike most other hotspot tracks built by ridge-plume interaction, the GSR is 2 to 3 times wider than the plume conduit in the upper mantle. (This unusual wide morphology arises because Icelandic crust changes significantly in thickness within a few million years of accretion, probably mainly by viscous flow in the hot lower crust). The upshot is that the GSR cannot be compared directly with theoretical plume tracks from hotspot reference frame models. However, it is possible to track the position of the Iceland plume conduit using the trace element geochemistry of basaltic lavas. Away from the plume conduit, plate spreading drives upwelling of mantle through the melting region. Above the plume conduit, plume-driven flow forces mantle through the lower part of the melting region faster than the plate-driven upwelling rate. The average depth of melting is therefore greater directly above the plume conduit than away from the plume conduit, and this difference in average melting depth means that melts generated directly above the plume conduit are relatively enriched in incompatible trace elements. Joint modelling of trace element compositions and crustal thickness can also be used to establish location of melting relative to the plume conduit. To date, these concepts have been used only to explain compositional variations in modern (post-glacial) Icelandic lavas; in this study we show that the same concepts can be applied to map the location of the plume conduit throughout the onshore Icelandic geological record (since the middle Miocene, c. 16 Ma). The plume track thus determined is in reasonable agreement with theoretical tracks calculated under the assumption that the Iceland Plume has remained fixed relative to other Indo-Atlantic hotspots. This result also supports the idea that episodic relocations of the onshore part of the MAR act to maintain the spreading axis above the plume conduit.

  17. Dispersion in two-dimensional turbulent buoyant plumes

    E-print Network

    Rocco, Stefano; Woods, Andrew W.

    2015-06-02

    -dimensional planar plumes and fountains. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 750, 210–244. Carazzo, G., Kaminski, E. & Tait, S. 2008 On the rise of turbulent plumes: Quantitative effects of variable entrainment for submarine hydrothermal vents, terrestrial and extra... or buoyancy are especially intriguing ( Turner 1979 and Carazzo et al. 2008 ), with applications for modelling volcanic plumes in the atmosphere, hydrothermal plumes in the ocean ( Woods 2010 ), effluent spreading in shallow estuaries and river outflows...

  18. Deep-sea oil plume enriches psychrophilic oil-degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Dubinsky, E.A.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Andersen, G.L.; Piceno, Y.M.; Singh, N.; Jansson, J.K.; Probst, A.; Borglin, S.E.; Fortney, J.L.; Stringfellow, W.T.; Bill, M.; Conrad, M.S.; Tom, L.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Alusi, T.R.; Lamendella, R.; Joyner, D.C.; Spier, C.; Auer, M.; Zemla, M.L.; Chakraborty, R.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; D'haeseleer, P.; Holman, H.-Y. N.; Osman, S.; Lu, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mason, O.U.

    2010-09-01

    The biological effects and expected fate of the vast amount of oil in the Gulf of Mexico from the Deepwater Horizon blowout are unknown owing to the depth and magnitude of this event. Here, we report that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated deep-sea indigenous {gamma}-Proteobacteria that are closely related to known petroleum degraders. Hydrocarbon-degrading genes coincided with the concentration of various oil contaminants. Changes in hydrocarbon composition with distance from the source and incubation experiments with environmental isolates demonstrated faster-than-expected hydrocarbon biodegradation rates at 5 C. Based on these results, the potential exists for intrinsic bioremediation of the oil plume in the deep-water column without substantial oxygen drawdown.

  19. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 6: Water ejector plume tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginnis, F. K.; Summerhays, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Results are given of vacuum testing of nozzles designed to eject water vapor away from the space shuttle to prevent contamination of the spacecraft surfaces and payload. The water vapor is generated by an active cooling system which evaporates excess fuel cell water to supplement a modular radiator system (MRS). The complete heat rejection system including the MRS, flash evaporator or sublimator and nozzle were first tested to demonstrate the system operational characteristics. The plume tests were performed in two phases and the objectives of this test series were: (1) to determine the effectiveness of a supersonic nozzle and a plugged nozzle in minimizing impingement upon the spacecraft of water vapor exhausted by an active device (flash evaporator or sublimator); and (2) to obtain basic data on the flow fields of exhaust plumes generated by these active devices, both with and without nozzles installed.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of plume dispersion under various thermally stratified boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, H.; Takemi, T.; Nagai, H.

    2014-07-01

    Contaminant gas dispersion in atmospheric boundary layer is of great concern to public health. For the accurate prediction of the dispersion problem, the present study numerically investigates the behavior of plume dispersion by taking into account the atmospheric stability which is classified into three types; neutral, stable, and convective boundary layers. We first proposed an efficient method to generate spatially-developing, thermally-stratified boundary layers and examined the usefulness of our approach by comparing to wind tunnel experimental data for various thermal boundary layers. The spreads of plume in the spanwise direction are quantitatively underestimated especially at large downwind distances from the point source, owing to the underestimation of turbulence intensities for the spanwise component; however, the dependence of the spanwise spreads to atmospheric stability is well represented in a qualitative sense. It was shown that the large-eddy simulation (LES) model provides physically reasonable results.

  1. FORMATION OF A DETACHED PLUME FROM A CEMENT PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A coordinated study of process, source emissions, and plume sampling was conducted at a coal-fired cement production plant. Both source and plume sampling consisted of particle and gas measurement and characterization. Particulate sampling of both the source and plume addressed p...

  2. EXPERIMENTS ON BUOYANT PLUME DISPERSION IN A LABORATORY CONVENTION TANK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buoyant plume dispersion in the convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated experimentally in a laboratory convection tank. The focus is on highly-buoyant plumes that loft near the CBL capping inversion and resist downward mixing. Highly- buoyant plumes are those with dimen...

  3. Transmittance and Radiance Computations for Rocket Engine Plume Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.

    2003-01-01

    Emission and absorption characteristics of several atmospheric and combustion species have been studied and are presented with reference to rocket engine plume environments. The effects of clous, rain, and fog on plume radiance/transmittance has also been studied.Preliminary results for the radiance from the exhaust plume of the space shuttle main engine are shown and discussed.

  4. A Comparative Review of North American Tundra Delineations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Kirk C.; Carroll, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Recent profound changes have been observed in the Arctic environment, including record low sea ice extents and high latitude greening. Studying the Arctic and how it is changing is an important element of climate change science. The Tundra, an ecoregion of the Arctic, is directly related to climate change due to its effects on the snow ice feedback mechanism and greenhouse gas cycling. Like all ecoregions, the Tundra border is shifting, yet studies and policies require clear delineation of boundaries. There are many options for ecoregion classification systems, as well as resources for creating custom maps. To help decision makers identify the best classification system possible, we present a review of North American Tundra ecoregion delineations and further explore the methodologies, purposes, limitations, and physical properties of five common ecoregion classification systems. We quantitatively compare the corresponding maps by area using a geographic information system.

  5. Population delineation of polar bears using satellite collar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bethke, R.; Taylor, M.; Amstrup, S.; Messler, F.

    1996-01-01

    To produce reliable estimates of the size or vital rates of a given population, it is important that the boundaries of the population under study are clearly defined. This is particularly critical for large, migratory animals where levels of sustainable harvest are based on these estimates, and where small errors may have serious long-term consequences for the population. Once populations are delineated, rates of exchange between adjacent populations can be determined and accounted/corrected for when calculating abundance (e.g., based on mark-recapture data). Using satellite radio-collar locations for polar bears in the western Canadian Arctic, we illustrate one approach to delineating wildlife populations that integrates cluster analysis methods for determining group membership with home range plotting procedures to define spatial utilization. This approach is flexible with respect to the specific procedures used and provides an objective and quantitative basis for defining population boundaries.

  6. Spatial and temporal distribution of specific conductance, boron, and phosphorus in a sewage-contaminated aquifer near Ashumet Pond, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bussey, K.W.; Walter, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal distributions of specific conductance, boron, and phosphorus were determined in a sewage-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer near Ashumet Pond, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The source of contamination is secondarily treated sewage that has been discharged onto rapid- infiltration sand beds at the Massachusetts Military Reservation since 1936. Contaminated ground water containing as much as 2 milligrams per liter of dissolved phosphorus is discharging into Ashumet Pond, and there is concern that the continued discharge of phosphorus into the pond will accelerate eutrophication of the pond. Water-quality data collected from observation wells and multilevel samplers from June through July 1995 were used to delineate the spatial distributions of specific conductance, boron, and phosphorus. Temporal distributions were determined using sample-interval-weighted average concen- trations calculated from data collected in 1993, 1994, and 1995. Specific conductances were greater than 400 microsiemens per centimeter at 25C as far as 1,200 feet downgradient from the infiltration beds. Boron concentrations were greater than 400 micrograms per liter as far as 1,800 feet down- gradient from the beds and phosphorus concen- trations were greater than 3.0 milligrams per liter as far as 1,200 feet from the beds. Variability in distributions of specific conductance and boron concentrations is attributed to the history and distribution of sewage disposal onto the infiltration beds. The distribution of phosphorus concentrations also is related to the history and distribution of sewage disposal onto the beds but additional variability is caused by chemical interactions with the aquifer materials. Temporal changes in specific conductance and boron from 1993 to 1995 were negligible, except in the lower part of the plume (below an altitude of about 5 feet above sea level), where changes in weighted-average specific conductance were greater than 100 microsiemens per centimeter at 25C. Temporal changes in phosphorus generally were small except in the lower part of the plume, where weighted-average phosphorus concentrations decreased more than 1.3 milligrams per liter from 1993 to 1994. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in specific conductance. High concen- trations of phosphorus associated with low and moderate specific conductances possibly are the result of rapid phosphorus desorption in response to an influx of uncontaminated ground water. As a result of the cessation of sewage disposal in December 1995, clean, oxygenated water moving into contaminated parts of the aquifer may cause rapid desorption of sorbed phosphorus and temporarily result in high dissolved phosphorus concentrations in the aquifer.

  7. A study of a plume induced separation shock wave, including effects of periodic plume unsteadiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doughty, J. O.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to study the flow field in which separation is caused by an expanding plume, with emphasis on effects associated with periodic unsteadiness in the plume. The separation shock was photographed with high speed motion pictures, from which mean shock position and excursion data were reported. Pressure fluctuations were measured beneath the separation shock. A response of the separation shock to plume periodic unsteadiness was identified, and the magnitude of a corresponding transfer function was defined. Small harmonic effects in plume response to periodic unsteadiness were noted. The stabilizing effect of a lateral surface protuberance near the separation shock wave was investigated. The protuberance configuration was a lateral circular cylinder, and various diameters, all less than the boundary layer thickness, were employed.

  8. Thruster Plume Plasma Diagnostics: A Ground Chamber Experiment for a 2-Kilowatt Arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, Joel T.; Vayner, Boris V.; Hillard, G. Barry; Chornak, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Although detailed near field (0 to 3 cm) information regarding the exhaust plume of a two kilowatt arc jet is available (refs. 1 to 6), there is virtually little or no information (outside of theoretical extrapolations) available concerning the far field (2.6 to 6.1 m). Furthermore real information about the plasma at distances between (3 to 6 m) is of critical importance to high technology satellite companies in understanding the effect of arc jet plume exhausts on space based power systems. It is therefore of utmost importance that one understands the exact nature of the interaction between the arc jet plume, the spacecraft power system and the surrounding electrical plasma environment. A good first step in understanding the nature of the interactions lies in making the needed plume parameter measurements in the far field. All diagnostic measurements are performed inside a large vacuum system (12 m diameter by 18 m high) with a full scale arc jet and solar array panel in the required flight configuration geometry. Thus, necessary information regarding the plume plasma parameters in the far field is obtained. Measurements of the floating potential, the plasma potential, the electron temperature, number density, density distribution, debye length, and plasma frequency are obtained at various locations about the array (at vertical distances from the arc jet nozzle: 2.6, 2.7, 2.8, 3.2, 3.6, 4.0, 4.9, 5.0, 5.4, 5.75, and 6.14 m). Plasma diagnostic parameters are measured for both the floating and grounded configurations of the arc jet anode and array. Spectroscopic optical measurements are then acquired in close proximity to the nozzle, and contamination measurements are made in the vicinity of the array utilizing a mass spectrometer and two Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM's).

  9. Delineation of major soil associations using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, W. L.; Bodenheimer, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The delineation of a major soil association in the loess region of Obion County has been accomplished using ERTS-1 imagery. Channel 7 provides the clearest differentiation. The separation of other smaller soil associations in an intensive row crop agricultural area is somewhat more difficult. Soil differentiation has been accomplished visually as well as electronically using a scanning microdensitometer. Lower altitude aircraft imagery permits a more refined soil association identification and where imagery is of sufficient scale, even individual soils may be identified.

  10. [Background of a new delineation of the medical profession].

    PubMed

    Gebbers, J O

    2007-10-10

    The survival of mankind is jeopardized in a hitherto unprecedented manner by the three global-scale interacting worldillnesses, i.e., overpopulation, environmental deterioration, and the extermination potential of the modern arsenals of atomic, biologic and chemical weapons. These self-created hazards should appeal to new accountability, to a rethinking of our medical duties and actions. With their consequences they form the background of a new delineation of the medical profession. PMID:17987926

  11. Stratiform/convective rain delineation for TRMM microwave imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanvir; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Dai, Qiang; Gupta, Manika; Wan Jaafar, Wan Zurina

    2015-10-01

    This article investigates the potential for using machine learning algorithms to delineate stratiform/convective (S/C) rain regimes for passive microwave imager taking calibrated brightness temperatures as only spectral parameters. The algorithms have been implemented for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) microwave imager (TMI), and calibrated as well as validated taking the Precipitation Radar (PR) S/C information as the target class variables. Two different algorithms are particularly explored for the delineation. The first one is metaheuristic adaptive boosting algorithm that includes the real, gentle, and modest versions of the AdaBoost. The second one is the classical linear discriminant analysis that includes the Fisher's and penalized versions of the linear discriminant analysis. Furthermore, prior to the development of the delineation algorithms, a feature selection analysis has been conducted for a total of 85 features, which contains the combinations of brightness temperatures from 10 GHz to 85 GHz and some derived indexes, such as scattering index, polarization corrected temperature, and polarization difference with the help of mutual information aided minimal redundancy maximal relevance criterion (mRMR). It has been found that the polarization corrected temperature at 85 GHz and the features derived from the "addition" operator associated with the 85 GHz channels have good statistical dependency to the S/C target class variables. Further, it has been shown how the mRMR feature selection technique helps to reduce the number of features without deteriorating the results when applying through the machine learning algorithms. The proposed scheme is able to delineate the S/C rain regimes with reasonable accuracy. Based on the statistical validation experience from the validation period, the Matthews correlation coefficients are in the range of ~0.60-0.70. Since, the proposed method does not rely on any a priori information, this makes it very suitable for other microwave sensors having similar channels to the TMI. The method could possibly benefit the constellation sensors in the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission era.

  12. Enhanced delineation of degradation in aortic walls through OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Eusebio; Val-Bernal, José Fernando; Revuelta, José M.; Pontón, Alejandro; Calvo Díez, Marta; Mayorga, Marta; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2015-03-01

    Degradation of the wall of human ascending thoracic aorta has been assessed through Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT images of the media layer of the aortic wall exhibit micro-structure degradation in case of diseased aortas from aneurysmal vessels or in aortas prone to aortic dissections. The degeneration in vessel walls appears as low-reflectivity areas due to the invasive appearance of acidic polysaccharides and mucopolysaccharides within a typical ordered microstructure of parallel lamellae of smooth muscle cells, elastin and collagen fibers. An OCT indicator of wall degradation can be generated upon the spatial quantification of the extension of degraded areas in a similar way as conventional histopathology. This proposed OCT marker offers a real-time clinical insight of the vessel status to help cardiovascular surgeons in vessel repair interventions. However, the delineation of degraded areas on the B-scan image from OCT is sometimes difficult due to presence of speckle noise, variable SNR conditions on the measurement process, etc. Degraded areas could be outlined by basic thresholding techniques taking advantage of disorders evidences in B-scan images, but this delineation is not always optimum and requires complex additional processing stages. This work proposes an optimized delineation of degraded spots in vessel walls, robust to noisy environments, based on the analysis of the second order variation of image intensity of backreflection to determine the type of local structure. Results improve the delineation of wall anomalies providing a deeper physiological perception of the vessel wall conditions. Achievements could be also transferred to other clinical scenarios: carotid arteries, aorto-iliac or ilio-femoral sections, intracranial, etc.

  13. Delineation of a clinical syndrome caused by mosaic trisomy 15

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, E.M.; Bienz, G.; Straumann, E.; Bosceh, N.

    1996-03-15

    We report on a boy with mosaic trisomy 15. The clinical manifestations are compared with those of the few cases reported up to now. A clinical syndrome is delineated consisting of a characteristic shape of the nose and other minor craniofacial anomalies, as well as typical deformities of the hands and feet. Different degrees of mosaicism may explain the more or less severe manifestations in individual patients. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A locally adaptive kernel regression method for facies delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Barahona-Palomo, M.; Henri, C. V.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2015-12-01

    Facies delineation is defined as the separation of geological units with distinct intrinsic characteristics (grain size, hydraulic conductivity, mineralogical composition). A major challenge in this area stems from the fact that only a few scattered pieces of hydrogeological information are available to delineate geological facies. Several methods to delineate facies are available in the literature, ranging from those based only on existing hard data, to those including secondary data or external knowledge about sedimentological patterns. This paper describes a methodology to use kernel regression methods as an effective tool for facies delineation. The method uses both the spatial and the actual sampled values to produce, for each individual hard data point, a locally adaptive steering kernel function, self-adjusting the principal directions of the local anisotropic kernels to the direction of highest local spatial correlation. The method is shown to outperform the nearest neighbor classification method in a number of synthetic aquifers whenever the available number of hard data is small and randomly distributed in space. In the case of exhaustive sampling, the steering kernel regression method converges to the true solution. Simulations ran in a suite of synthetic examples are used to explore the selection of kernel parameters in typical field settings. It is shown that, in practice, a rule of thumb can be used to obtain suboptimal results. The performance of the method is demonstrated to significantly improve when external information regarding facies proportions is incorporated. Remarkably, the method allows for a reasonable reconstruction of the facies connectivity patterns, shown in terms of breakthrough curves performance.

  15. Volatile content and distribution in the Azorean mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, K.; Parman, S. W.; Saal, A. E.; Kelley, K. A.; Shimizu, N.; Nunes, J. C.; Rose-Koga, E. F.

    2012-12-01

    In order to assess pre-eruptive volatile contents of magmas in the central Azores, we have measured major element, trace element, and volatile contents of olivine hosted melt inclusions. Seventy tephra samples were collected from Sao Jorge, Pico and Faial islands. Three samples yielded naturally glassy melt inclusions, while five samples produced crystallized melt inclusions that were rehomogenized with either a one atmosphere furnace or a heating stage. The melt inclusions were analyzed for major elements, volatiles, and trace elements by electron microprobe, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and laser ablation ICP-MS, respectively. Olivine host crystals for the melt inclusions are Fo77-88. Melt inclusions compositionally are alkali basalts with Mg #50-68, 40-51wt% SiO2, and 0.82-1.63wt% K2O (corrected for post-entrapment olivine crystallization), which is consistent with existing whole-rock data. They are trace element enriched with 19.3-49.9ppm La and 3.22-4.33 La/Sm. Volatile contents are 270-2509ppm CO2, 0.06-1.52wt% H2O, 120-1465ppm F, 30-2298ppm S, and 28-727ppm Cl. Volatile to trace element ratios are 8.4-46.5 CO2/Nb, 7-220 H2O/Ce, 2.1-42.4 F/Nd, 4-381 S/Dy, and 0.002-0.084 Cl/K. Correlation between Cl and F precludes seawater contamination as a source for the high volatile content. These data suggest that the HIMU component of the Azorean mantle plume is volatile rich, which is consistent with previously published volatile data from other HIMU sources, such as the Austral Islands plume (Lassiter et. al., 2002).

  16. Reed Watkins: A Passion for Plume Moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reed Watkins has curated the nationl Pterophordiae or plume moth collection at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, for the past 13 years. He has decreased the number of specimens of unsorted and unidentified material and has expanded the collection from 3 to 6 cabinets....

  17. PLUME DEFINITION IN REGIONS OF STRONG BENDING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years most of the emphasis in plume modeling has been directed at improving the entrainment equations while the non-entrainment equations (momentum, energy, state, etc.) have been thought to be firmly established. t is shown that serious deficiencies remain in the non-e...

  18. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometry of chemical plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth C.; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2009-05-01

    A midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), the Telops FIRST-MWE (Field-portable Imaging Radiometric Spectrometer Technology - Midwave Extended) has been utilized for the standoff detection and characterization of chemical plumes. Successful collection and analysis of MWIR hyperspectral imagery of jet engine exhaust has allowed us to produce spatial profiles of both temperature and chemical constituent concentrations of exhaust plumes. Successful characterization of this high temperature combustion event has led to the collection and analysis of hyperspectral imagery of lower temperature emissions from industrial smokestacks. This paper presents MWIR data from remote collection of hyperspectral imagery of methyl salicilate (MeS), a chemical warfare agent simulant, during the Chemical Biological Distributed Early Warning System (CBDEWS) test at Dugway Proving Grounds, UT in 2008. The data did not contain spectral lines associated with emission of MeS. However, a few broad spectral features were present in the background-subtracted plume spectra. Further analysis will be required to assign these features, and determine the utility of MWIR hyperspectral imagery for analysis of chemical warfare agent plumes.

  19. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    E-print Network

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  20. Halema'uma'u Vent Gas Plume

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Over the past several days, the lava surface within the vent in Halema'uma'u has occasionally, and temporarily, reached to within about 115 m (375 ft) below the floor of Halema'uma'u Crater, as seen in this photo. During these high-lava stands, the gas plume is generally fairly wispy, providing the ...

  1. STS-98 Emits Plume of Smoke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This awesome image depicts the full moon, sunset launch of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-98 mission on February 7, 2001 at 6:13 p.m. eastern time. The large white plume is the pillar of smoke and stream left behind by the solid rocket boosters. The very bright dot that exists above the plume is the flame still visible at the base of the rocket boosters. The top of the plume is being directly illuminated by sunlight whereas the bottom portion lies within the Earth's shadow. The bright orb in the lower right-hand corner of the image is the full sunlit face of the moon which has already risen above the eastern horizon. The dark cone-shaped feature extending downward towards the moon is the smoke plume shadow, known as the Bugeron Effect (common during sunrise and sunset launches). The Earth, Moon, and Sun were naturally in alignment causing the shadow to appear to end at the moon. (Photo courtesy Patrick McCracken, NASA Headquarters)

  2. Ordinary High Water: Concepts and Problems in Stream Delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersel, M. K.; Lichvar, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Ordinary High Water Mark (OHWM) is used by the U.S. Army Corps and other regulatory agencies to determine the lateral extent of streams for jurisdictional purposes. The OHWM is defined in the Clean Water Act as "that line on the shore established by the fluctuations of water and indicated by physical characteristics such as a clear, natural line impressed on the bank, shelving, changes in the character of soil, destruction of terrestrial vegetation, the presence of litter and debris, or other appropriate means that consider the characteristics of the surrounding areas." This working definition can be highly problematic where OHWM indicators are unclear or contradictory and can lead to multiple interpretations and inconsistency in delineation at a given location. A rigorous and repeatable approach to OHWM delineation is needed, and an effort to standardize the field methods for doing so is currently under way by the U.S. Army Corps. Attempts to correlate OHW with flow recurrence indicate that substantial variability exists in the temporal component of OHW. Likewise, flow indicators such as drift or debris have been shown to be misleading with respect to OHWM delineation. Early studies suggest that the most accurate and repeatable description of OHW is in terms of the geomorphically effective flow event - that with a low to moderate frequency of occurrence and which gives the channel its average appearance. Further investigation and field sampling is needed, however, to accurately characterize the variability in OHWM indicators both along a given stream and between different streams.

  3. Delineation of regional arid karstic aquifers: an integrative data approach.

    PubMed

    Wolaver, Brad D; Sharp, John M; Rodriguez, Juan M; Flores, Juan Carlos Ibarra

    2008-01-01

    This research integrates data procedures for the delineation of regional ground water flow systems in arid karstic basins with sparse hydrogeologic data using surface topography data, geologic mapping, permeability data, chloride concentrations of ground water and precipitation, and measured discharge data. This integrative data analysis framework can be applied to evaluate arid karstic aquifer systems globally. The accurate delineation of ground water recharge areas in developing aquifer systems with sparse hydrogeologic data is essential for their effective long-term development and management. We illustrate the use of this approach in the Cuatrociénegas Basin (CCB) of Mexico. Aquifers are characterized using geographic information systems for ground water catchment delineation, an analytical model for interbasin flow evaluation, a chloride balance approach for recharge estimation, and a water budget for mapping contributing catchments over a large region. The test study area includes the CCB of Coahuila, Mexico, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve containing more than 500 springs that support ground water-dependent ecosystems with more than 70 endemic organisms and irrigated agriculture. We define recharge areas that contribute local and regional ground water discharge to springs and the regional flow system. Results show that the regional aquifer system follows a topographic gradient that during past pluvial periods may have linked the Río Nazas and the Río Aguanaval of the Sierra Madre Occidental to the Río Grande via the CCB and other large, currently dry, upgradient lakes. PMID:18194323

  4. Methods for Data-based Delineation of Spatial Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, John E.

    2012-10-01

    In data analysis, it is often useful to delineate or segregate areas of interest from the general population of data in order to concentrate further analysis efforts on smaller areas. Three methods are presented here for automatically generating polygons around spatial data of interest. Each method addresses a distinct data type. These methods were developed for and implemented in the sample planning tool called Visual Sample Plan (VSP). Method A is used to delineate areas of elevated values in a rectangular grid of data (raster). The data used for this method are spatially related. Although VSP uses data from a kriging process for this method, it will work for any type of data that is spatially coherent and appears on a regular grid. Method B is used to surround areas of interest characterized by individual data points that are congregated within a certain distance of each other. Areas where data are “clumped” together spatially will be delineated. Method C is used to recreate the original boundary in a raster of data that separated data values from non-values. This is useful when a rectangular raster of data contains non-values (missing data) that indicate they were outside of some original boundary. If the original boundary is not delivered with the raster, this method will approximate the original boundary.

  5. Towards an automatic delineation of lower abdomen structures for conformational radiotherapy based on CT

    E-print Network

    Ayache, Nicholas

    Towards an automatic delineation of lower abdomen structures for conformational radiotherapy based.Delingette@sophia.inria.fr Abstract. The delineation of anatomical structures based on images of the lower abdomen in the frame

  6. MINERAL EXPLORATION BY USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGE CLASSIFICATION AND \\DOMING" DELINEATION 1

    E-print Network

    Merényi, Erzsébet

    MINERAL EXPLORATION BY USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGE CLASSIFICATION AND \\DOMING" DELINEATION 1 Erzsebet that o ers promise for mineral exploration. Two fully independent data analyses are combined. \\Doming" delineation, which predicts the locations of endogenetic mineralization from topographic features

  7. Role of back diffusion and biodegradation reactions in sustaining an MTBE/TBA plume in alluvial media

    PubMed Central

    Rasa, Ehsan; Chapman, Steven W.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Fogg, Graham E.; Scow, Kate M.; Mackay, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    A methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) / tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume originating from a gasoline spill in late 1994 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) persisted for over 15 years within 200 feet of the original spill source. The plume persisted until 2010 despite excavation of the tanks and piping within months after the spill and excavations of additional contaminated sediments from the source area in 2007 and 2008. The probable history of MTBE concentrations along the plume centerline at its source was estimated using a wide variety of available information, including published details about the original spill, excavations and monitoring by VAFB consultants, and our own research data. Two-dimensional reactive transport simulations of MTBE along the plume centerline were conducted for a 20-year period following the spill. These analyses suggest that MTBE diffused from the thin anaerobic aquifer into the adjacent anaerobic silts and transformed to TBA in both aquifer and silt layers. The model reproduces the observation that after 2004 TBA was the dominant solute, diffusing back out of the silts into the aquifer and sustaining plume concentrations much longer than would have been the case in the absence of such diffusive exchange. Simulations also suggest that aerobic degradation of MTBE or TBA at the water table in the overlying silt layer significantly affected concentrations of MTBE and TBA by limiting the chemical mass available for back diffusion to the aquifer. PMID:22115089

  8. Role of back diffusion and biodegradation reactions in sustaining an MTBE/TBA plume in alluvial media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasa, Ehsan; Chapman, Steven W.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Fogg, Graham E.; Scow, Kate M.; Mackay, Douglas M.

    2011-11-01

    A methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) / tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume originating from a gasoline spill in late 1994 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) persisted for over 15 years within 200 feet of the original spill source. The plume persisted until 2010 despite excavation of the tanks and piping within months after the spill and excavations of additional contaminated sediments from the source area in 2007 and 2008. The probable history of MTBE concentrations along the plume centerline at its source was estimated using a wide variety of available information, including published details about the original spill, excavations and monitoring by VAFB consultants, and our own research data. Two-dimensional reactive transport simulations of MTBE along the plume centerline were conducted for a 20-year period following the spill. These analyses suggest that MTBE diffused from the thin anaerobic aquifer into the adjacent anaerobic silts and transformed to TBA in both aquifer and silt layers. The model reproduces the observation that after 2004 TBA was the dominant solute, diffusing back out of the silts into the aquifer and sustaining plume concentrations much longer than would have been the case in the absence of such diffusive exchange. Simulations also suggest that aerobic degradation of MTBE or TBA at the water table in the overlying silt layer significantly affected concentrations of MTBE and TBA by limiting the chemical mass available for back diffusion to the aquifer.

  9. Role of back diffusion and biodegradation reactions in sustaining an MTBE/TBA plume in alluvial media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasa, Ehsan; Chapman, Steven W.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Fogg, Graham E.; Scow, Kate M.; Mackay, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    A methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) / tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume originating from a gasoline spill in late 1994 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) persisted for over 15 years within 200 feet of the original spill source. The plume persisted until 2010 despite excavation of the tanks and piping within months after the spill and excavations of additional contaminated sediments from the source area in 2007 and 2008. The probable history of MTBE concentrations along the plume centerline at its source was estimated using a wide variety of available information, including published details about the original spill, excavations and monitoring by VAFB consultants, and our own research data. Two-dimensional reactive transport simulations of MTBE along the plume centerline were conducted for a 20-year period following the spill. These analyses suggest that MTBE diffused from the thin anaerobic aquifer into the adjacent anaerobic silts and transformed to TBA in both aquifer and silt layers. The model reproduces the observation that after 2004 TBA was the dominant solute, diffusing back out of the silts into the aquifer and sustaining plume concentrations much longer than would have been the case in the absence of such diffusive exchange. Simulations also suggest that aerobic degradation of MTBE or TBA at the water table in the overlying silt layer significantly affected concentrations of MTBE and TBA by limiting the chemical mass available for back diffusion to the aquifer.

  10. Fallout plume of submerged oil from Deepwater Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, David L.; Fisher, G. Burch; Bagby, Sarah C.; Nelson, Robert K.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Sylva, Sean P.; Woo, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    The sinking of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico led to uncontrolled emission of oil to the ocean, with an official government estimate of ?5.0 million barrels released. Among the pressing uncertainties surrounding this event is the fate of ?2 million barrels of submerged oil thought to have been trapped in deep-ocean intrusion layers at depths of ?1,000–1,300 m. Here we use chemical distributions of hydrocarbons in >3,000 sediment samples from 534 locations to describe a footprint of oil deposited on the deep-ocean floor. Using a recalcitrant biomarker of crude oil, 17?(H),21?(H)-hopane (hopane), we have identified a 3,200-km2 region around the Macondo Well contaminated by ?1.8 ± 1.0 × 106 g of excess hopane. Based on spatial, chemical, oceanographic, and mass balance considerations, we calculate that this contamination represents 4–31% of the oil sequestered in the deep ocean. The pattern of contamination points to deep-ocean intrusion layers as the source and is most consistent with dual modes of deposition: a “bathtub ring” formed from an oil-rich layer of water impinging laterally upon the continental slope (at a depth of ?900–1,300 m) and a higher-flux “fallout plume” where suspended oil particles sank to underlying sediment (at a depth of ?1,300–1,700 m). We also suggest that a significant quantity of oil was deposited on the ocean floor outside this area but so far has evaded detection because of its heterogeneous spatial distribution. PMID:25349409

  11. Fallout plume of submerged oil from Deepwater Horizon.

    PubMed

    Valentine, David L; Fisher, G Burch; Bagby, Sarah C; Nelson, Robert K; Reddy, Christopher M; Sylva, Sean P; Woo, Mary A

    2014-11-11

    The sinking of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico led to uncontrolled emission of oil to the ocean, with an official government estimate of ? 5.0 million barrels released. Among the pressing uncertainties surrounding this event is the fate of ? 2 million barrels of submerged oil thought to have been trapped in deep-ocean intrusion layers at depths of ? 1,000-1,300 m. Here we use chemical distributions of hydrocarbons in >3,000 sediment samples from 534 locations to describe a footprint of oil deposited on the deep-ocean floor. Using a recalcitrant biomarker of crude oil, 17?(H),21?(H)-hopane (hopane), we have identified a 3,200-km(2) region around the Macondo Well contaminated by ? 1.8 ± 1.0 × 10(6) g of excess hopane. Based on spatial, chemical, oceanographic, and mass balance considerations, we calculate that this contamination represents 4-31% of the oil sequestered in the deep ocean. The pattern of contamination points to deep-ocean intrusion layers as the source and is most consistent with dual modes of deposition: a "bathtub ring" formed from an oil-rich layer of water impinging laterally upon the continental slope (at a depth of ? 900-1,300 m) and a higher-flux "fallout plume" where suspended oil particles sank to underlying sediment (at a depth of ? 1,300-1,700 m). We also suggest that a significant quantity of oil was deposited on the ocean floor outside this area but so far has evaded detection because of its heterogeneous spatial distribution. PMID:25349409

  12. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  13. Modeling of strategies for performance monitoring of groundwater contamination at sites underlain by fractured bedrock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaming; Smith, Leslie; Beckie, Roger

    2012-06-01

    A three dimensional flow and transport modeling using FRAC3DVS was undertaken to examine factors which influence plume detection in a performance monitoring network for a site where an unconfined aquifer composed of uniform unconsolidated sediments overlies fractured bedrock. The bedrock is assumed to contain a fracture system with three orthogonal fracture sets embedded in a low permeable homogeneous rock matrix. A dissolved phase, non-reactive contaminant is released from a source zone located at the ground surface. The processes which influence plume geometry, and probabilities of plume detection for a performance monitoring network located between the contaminant source and a downstream compliance boundary, are evaluated. Factors considered include the hydraulic conductivity of the unconfined aquifer, the geometric properties of the fracture network and the matrix permeability of the bedrock, and the contaminant detection threshold concentration. The simulations demonstrate that the character of the fracture network not only controls contaminant transport and plume detection in the bedrock but also influences plume detection in the overlying unconfined aquifer. The ratio of the hydraulic conductivity of the unconfined aquifer to the effective hydraulic conductivity of the fractured bedrock, and the contaminant detection threshold concentration, are principal factors influencing detection probability in the performance monitoring network. Results suggest that in many instances encountered in field practice, the unconfined aquifer and fractured bedrock should be viewed as an integrated hydrogeologic system from a monitoring perspective. PMID:22579666

  14. EVALUATION OF NATURAL AND IN-SITU REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR A COAL-RELATED METALS PLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Jeffrey A.; Bayer, Cassandra L.; Socha, Ronald P.; Sochor,Cynthia S.; Fliermans, Carl B.; McKinsey, Pamela C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Phifer, Mark A.; Powell, Kimberly R.; Serkiz, Steven M.; Sappington, Frank C.; Turick, Charles E.

    2003-02-27

    Metals contamination exceeding drinking water standards (MCLs) is associated with acidic leachate generated from a coal pile runoff basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The metals plume extends over 100 acres with its' distal boundary about onehalf mile from the Savannah River. Based on the large plume extent and high dissolved iron and aluminum concentrations, conventional treatment technologies are likely to be ineffective and cost prohibitive. In-situ bioremediation using existing groundwater microbes is being evaluated as a promising alternative technology for effective treatment, along with consideration of natural attenuation of the lower concentration portions of the plume to meet remedial goals. Treatment of the high concentration portion of the groundwater plume by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is being evaluated through laboratory microcosm testing and a field-scale demonstration. Organic substrates are added to promote SRB growth. These bacteria use dissolved sulfate as an electron acceptor and ultimately precipitate dissolved metals as metal sulfides. Laboratory microcosm testing indicate SRB are present in groundwater despite low pH conditions, and that their growth can be stimulated by soybean oil and sodium lactate. The field demonstration consists of substrate injection into a 30-foot deep by 240-foot long permeable trench. Microbial activity is demonstrated by an increase in pH from 3 to 6 within the trench. Downgradient monitoring will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of SRB in reducing metal concentrations. Natural attenuation (NA) is being evaluated for the low concentration portion of the plume. A decrease in metal mobility can occur through a variety of abiotically and/or biotically mediated mechanisms. Quantification of these mechanisms is necessary to more accurately predict contaminant attenuation using groundwater transport models that have historically relied on simplified conservative assumptions. Result s from matched soil/porewater samples indicate higher soil/water partition coefficients (Kds) with increasing distance from the source. In addition, site-specific metals availability is being assessed using sequential extraction techniques, which more accurately represent environmental conditions as compared to default EPA extraction methods. Due to elevated sulfate levels in the plume, SRB are most likely to be the dominant biotic contributor to NA processes.

  15. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Emissive Probes to Determine the Plasma Potential of the Plumes of Various Electric Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Erinna M.

    2005-01-01

    A significant problem in the use of electric thrusters in spacecraft is the formation of low-energy ions in the thruster plume. Low-energy ions are formed in the plume via random collisions between high-velocity ions ejected from the thruster and slow-moving neutral atoms of propellant effusing from the engine. The sputtering of spacecraft materials due to interactions with low-energy ions may result in erosion or contamination of the spacecraft. The trajectory of these ions is determined primarily by the plasma potential of the plume. Thus, accurate characterization of the plasma potential is essential to predicting low-energy ion contamination. Emissive probes were utilized to determine the plasma potential. When the ion and electron currents to the probe are balanced, the potential of such probes float to the plasma potential. Two emissive probes were fabricated; one utilizing a DC power supply, another utilizing a rectified AC power source. Labview programs were written to coordinate and automate probe motion in the thruster plume. Employing handshaking interaction, these motion programs were synchronized to various data acquisition programs to ensure precision and accuracy of the measurements. Comparing these experimental values to values from theoretical models will allow for a more accurate prediction of low-energy ion interaction.

  16. Irreversible phosphorus sorption in septic system plumes?

    PubMed

    Robertson, W D

    2008-01-01

    The mobility of phosphorus (P) in septic system plumes remains a topic of debate because of the considerable reactivity of this constituent. In this study, a septic system plume in Ontario was monitored over a 16-year period with detail that clearly shows the advancing frontal portion of the P plume. This monitoring record provides insight into the extent of secondary P attenuation in the ground water zone beyond that available from previous studies. A P plume 16 m in length developed over the monitoring period with PO(4)-P concentrations (3 to 6 mg/L) that approached the concentrations present under the tile bed. Simulations using an analytical model showed that when first-order solute decay was considered to account for the possibility of secondary P attenuation in the ground water zone, field values could only be matched when decay was absent or occurred at an exceedingly slow rate (half-life greater than 30 years). Thus, hypothesized secondary P attenuation mechanisms such as slow recystallization of sorbed P into insoluble metal phosphate minerals, diffusion into microsites, or kinetically slow direct precipitation of P minerals such as hydroxyapatite were inactive in the ground water zone at this site or occurred at rates that were too slow to be observed in the context of the current 16-year study. Desorption tests on sediment samples from below the tile bed indicated a PO(4) distribution coefficient (K(d)) of 4.8, which implies a P retardation factor of 25, similar to the field apparent value of 37 determined from model calibrations. This example of inactive secondary P attenuation in the ground water zone shows that phosphorus in some ground water plumes can remain mobile and conservative for decades. This has important implications for septic systems located in lakeshore environments when long-term usage scenarios are considered. PMID:18181864

  17. The Chemistry of Tropospheric Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, T. A.; Allen, A. G.; Pyle, D. M.; Oppenheimer, C.; McGonigle, A. J.; Tsanev, V. I.

    2003-12-01

    Persistently degassing volcanoes contribute substantial amounts of many different chemical species to the troposphere, including acidic gases (sulfur dioxide, HF and HCl), toxic trace metals (including mercury, cadmium and lead) and aerosols of different types. The continuous release of such species from active volcanoes may lead to significant short- and medium-range environmental impacts as well as constituting an important contribution to global natural emissions inventories. However, the emissions from many important volcanic centers remain poorly characterized meaning that the global volcanic emissions of many species are not reliably constrained. Further, the chemical evolution of volcanic plumes from emission source (magma) to the point of deposition remains poorly understood. Our work seeks to build upon and extend previous efforts in this field. We have deployed a range of field instruments at active volcanoes (including those in Nicaragua, Italy and Chile) in order to study different aspects of volcanic plume chemistry. These studies have included the use of an impactor (particles), sun photometry (particles), filter packs (particles and gases) and UV spectrometry (gases). Our primary aims are to look for trends in emission composition with style of degassing (e.g. open-vent vs fumarolic) and to consider how the emittants are processed during transport under different atmospheric conditions. As well as contributing to the understanding of local and regional scale impacts of volcanic plumes, this work will enable us to improve global flux estimates of volcanic emissions, such as trace metals and aerosols (particularly important given the ongoing efforts of climate modelers to include particles in their models). We are also working to identify previously unconsidered components in volcanic plumes. We have recently identified nitric acid emissions from volcanoes, suggesting that volcanoes are not only important atmospheric sources of chemicals exsolved from magma, but may also be important as high temperature reaction environments for plume-air mixtures.

  18. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and that are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 µg/L or 0.126 µmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influences plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the sites include the geochemical nature of residual, contaminant U; the rates of current kinetic processes (both biotic and abiotic) influencing U(VI) solid-liquid distribution; the presence of detrital organic matter and the resulting spatial heterogeneity in microbially-driven redox properties; and the magnitude of groundwater hydrologic dynamics controlled by river-stage fluctuations, geologic structures, and aquifer hydraulic properties. The comparative analysis of these sites provides important guidance to the characterization, understanding, modeling, and remediation of groundwater contaminant plumes influenced by surface water interaction that are common world-wide.

  19. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone.

    PubMed

    Zachara, John M; Long, Philip E; Bargar, John; Davis, James A; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K; Freshley, Mark D; Konopka, Allan E; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P; Rockhold, Mark L; Williams, Kenneth H; Yabusaki, Steve B

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 ?g/L or 0.126 ?mol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the sites include the geochemical nature of residual, contaminant U; the rates of current kinetic processes (both biotic and abiotic) influencing U(VI) solid-liquid distribution; the presence of detrital organic matter and the resulting spatial heterogeneity in microbially-driven redox properties; and the magnitude of groundwater hydrologic dynamics controlled by river-stage fluctuations, geologic structures, and aquifer hydraulic properties. The comparative analysis of these sites provides important guidance to the characterization, understanding, modeling, and remediation of groundwater contaminant plumes influenced by surface water interaction that are common world-wide. PMID:23500840

  20. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan E.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steve B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 ?g/L or 0.126 ?mol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the sites include the geochemical nature of residual, contaminant U; the rates of current kinetic processes (both biotic and abiotic) influencing U(VI) solid-liquid distribution; the presence of detrital organic matter and the resulting spatial heterogeneity in microbially-driven redox properties; and the magnitude of groundwater hydrologic dynamics controlled by river-stage fluctuations, geologic structures, and aquifer hydraulic properties. The comparative analysis of these sites provides important guidance to the characterization, understanding, modeling, and remediation of groundwater contaminant plumes influenced by surface water interaction that are common world-wide.

  1. Persistence of artificial sweeteners in a 15-year-old septic system plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, W. D.; Van Stempvoort, D. R.; Solomon, D. K.; Homewood, J.; Brown, S. J.; Spoelstra, J.; Schiff, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    SummaryGroundwater contamination from constituents such as NO3-, often occurs where multiple sources are present making source identification difficult. This study examines a suite of major ions and trace organic constituents within a well defined septic system plume in southern Ontario, Canada (Long Point site) for their potential use as wastewater tracers. The septic system has been operating for 20 years servicing a large, seasonal-use campground and tritium/helium age dating indicates that the 200 m long monitored section of the plume is about 15 years old. Four parameters are elevated along the entire length of the plume as follows; the mean electrical conductivity value (EC) in the distal plume zone is 926 ?S/cm which is 74% of the mean value below the tile bed, Na+ (14.7 mg/L) is 43%, an artificial sweetener, acesulfame (12.1 ?g/L) is 23% and Cl- (71.5 mg/L) is 137%. EC and Cl- appear to be affected by dispersive dilution with overlying background groundwater that has lower EC but has locally higher Cl- as result of the use of a dust suppressant (CaCl2) in the campground. Na+, in addition to advective dilution, could be depleted by weak adsorption. Acesulfame, in addition to the above processes could be influenced by increasing consumer use in recent years. Nonetheless, both Na+ and acesulfame remain elevated throughout the plume by factors of more than 100 and 1000 respectively compared to background levels, and are strong indicators of wastewater impact at this site. EC and Cl- are less useful because their contrast with background values is much less (EC) or because other sources are present (Cl-). Nutrients (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-, K+) and pathogens (Escherichia coli) do not persist in the distal plume zone and are less useful as wastewater indicators here. The artificial sweetener, acesulfame, has persisted at high concentrations in the Long Point plume for at least 15 years (and this timing agrees with tritium/helium-3 dating) and this compound likely occurs at uniquely high concentrations in domestic wastewater. As such, it holds considerable promise as a powerful new tracer of wastewater impact in groundwater.

  2. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  3. Geophysical Prospecting, 1997, 45, 39-64 Fractured reservoir delineation using

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    Geophysical Prospecting, 1997, 45, 39-64 Fractured reservoir delineation using multicomponent of delineating fractured reservoirs and optimizing the development of the reservoirs using shear-wave data the potential of shear waves for fractured reservoir delineation. Introduction Most carbonate reservoirs contain

  4. ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic pollutants may constitute the most widespread waste loadings into the waters of Lake Superior. There are essentially three categories of organic contaminants. The first grouping consists of those organic compounds that readily degrade biologically or chemically. The secon...

  5. Segregation of acid plume pixels from background water pixels, signatures of background water and dispersed acid plumes, and implications for calculation of iron concentration in dense plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahn, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Two files of data, obtained with a modular multiband scanner, for an acid waste dump into ocean water, were analyzed intensively. Signatures were derived for background water at different levels of effective sunlight intensity, and for different iron concentrations in the dispersed plume from the dump. The effect of increased sunlight intensity on the calculated iron concentration was found to be relatively important at low iron concentrations and relatively unimportant at high values of iron concentration in dispersed plumes. It was concluded that the basic equation for iron concentration is not applicable to dense plumes, particularly because lower values are indicated at the very core of the plume, than in the surrounding sheath, whereas radiances increase consistently from background water to dispersed plume to inner sheath to innermost core. It was likewise concluded that in the dense plume the iron concentration would probably best be measured by the higher wave length radiances, although the suitable relationship remains unknown.

  6. Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Upjohn Company sought a solution to their problem of potential particulate contamination of sterile injectable drugs. Contamination was caused by dust particles attracted by static electrical charge, which clung to plastic curtains in clean rooms. Upjohn found guidance in NASA Tech Briefs which provided detailed information for reducing static electricity. Guidelines for setting up static free work stations, materials and equipment needed to maintain antistatic protection.

  7. Solder Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.

    1999-02-22

    There are two sources of contamination in solder alloys. The first source is trace elements from the primary metals used in the as-manufactured product, be that product in ingot, wire, or powder form. Their levels in the primary metal are determined by the refining process. While some of these trace elements are naturally occurring materials, additional contamination can result from the refining and/or forming processes. Sources include: furnace pot liners, debris on the cutting edges of shears, rolling mill rollers, etc. The types and levels of contaminants per solder alloy are set by recognized industrial, federal, military, and international specifications. For example, the 63Sn-37Pb solder purchased to the ASTM B 32 standard can have maximum levels of contamination for the following metals: 0.08(wt.)%Cu, 0.001 %Cd, 0.005%Al, 0.25%Bi, 0.03%As, 0.02%Fe, and 0.005 %Zn. A second cause of contamination in solders, and solder baths in particular, is their actual use in soldering operations. Each time a workpiece is introduced into the bath, some dissolution of the joint base metal(s), protective or solderable coatings, and fixture metal takes place which adds to contamination levels in the solder. The potential impurities include Cu; Ni; Au or other noble metals used as protective finishes and Al; Fe; and Zn to name a few. Even dissolution of the pot wall or liner is a source of impurities, typically Fe.

  8. Noninvasive Contaminant Site Characterization Using Geophysical Induced Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, F.D.; Sogade, J.; Lesmes, D.; Coles, D.; Vichabian, Y.; Scira-Scappuzzo, F.; Shi, W.; Vandiver, A.; Rodi, W.

    2003-03-27

    Results of aspects of a broad foundational study of time domain IP (TDIP) and spectral IP (SIP) for contaminant site characterization are presented. This ongoing study encompassed laboratory studies of coupled effects of rock/soil microgeometry and contaminant chemistry on induced polarization (IP), an investigation of electromagnetic coupling (EMC) noise and development of 3D modeling and inversion codes. SIP requires extensions to higher frequencies (above the typical 100Hz threshold) and EMC becomes the major limitation for field implementation, because conventional correction methods are inadequate at required higher frequencies. A proposed methodology is outlined, based on a model of all EMC components, that addresses the EMC problem by coupling IP and electromagnetic induction in modeling and inversion. Examples of application of IP and SIP to contaminant mapping and detection for TDIP and SIP will be presented for FS-12 plume at Massachusetts Military Reservation and a suspected DNAPL plume at Savannah River Site.

  9. Two classes of volcanic plumes on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 images of the south polar region of Io has revealed that a major volcanic eruption occured there during the period between the two spacecraft encounters. An annular deposit ???1400 km in diameter formed around the Aten Patera caldera (311??W, 48??S), the floor of which changed from orange to red-black. The characteristics of this eruption are remarkably similar to those described earlier for an eruption centered on Surt caldera (338??W, 45??N) that occured during the same period, also at high latitude, but in the north. Both volcanic centers were evidently inactive during the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters but were active sometime between the two. The geometric and colorimetric characteristics, as well as scale of the two annular deposits, are virtually identical; both resemble the surface features formed by the eruption of Pele (255??W, 18??S). These three very large plume eruptions suggest a class of eruption distinct from that of six smaller plumes observed to be continously active by both Voyagers 1 and 2. The smaller plumes, of which Prometheus is the type example, are longer-lived, deposit bright, whitish material, erupt at velocities of ???0.5 km sec-1, and are concentrated at low latitudes in an equatorial belt around the satellite. The very large Pele-type plumes, on the other hand, are relatively short-lived, deposit darker red materials, erupt at ???1.0 km sec-1, and (rather than restricted to a latitudinal band) are restricted in longitude from 240?? to 360??W. Both direct thermal infrared temperature measurements and the implied color temperatures for quenched liquid sulfur suggest that hot spot temperatures of ???650??K are associated with the large plumes and temperatures 650??K), sulfur is a low-viscosity fluid (orange and black, respectively); at other temperatures it is either solid or has a high viscosity. As a result, there will be two zones in Io's crust in which liquid sulfur will flow freely: a shallow zone of orange sulfur and a deeper zone of black sulfur. A low-temperature system driven by SO2 heated to 400 to 400??K by the orange sulfur zone seems the best model for the small plumes; a system driven by sulfur heated to >650??K by hot or even molten silicates in the black sulfur zone seems the best explanation for the large plume class. The large Pele-type plumes are apparently concentrated in a region of the satellite in which a thinner sulfur-rich crust overlies the tidally heated silicate lithosphere, so the black sulfur zone may be fairly shallow in this region. The Prometheus-type plumes are possibly confined to the equatorial belt by some process that concentrates SO2 fluid in the equatorial crust. ?? 1983.

  10. Prediction of the visible plume from a cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, Kazutaka; Nasu, Kiyoshi

    1996-10-01

    The visible plume from a cooling tower is sometimes considered to be a cause of nuisance such as icing, lower visibility, and obstructed sunshine. A reliable method of predicting the behavior of the visible plume is therefore expected to be established. In this study, the visible plume was predicted by means of computational fluid dynamics. The computational results were capable of reproducing the main features of the visible plume. The length,width, and volume of the visible plume in various conditions agreed well with the measured values. Although it was not possible to represent the small fluctuations of the visible plume due to turbulence by the above simulation, this method is expected to become a useful tool in normalizing the scale of the visible plume.

  11. Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.J.; Carpenter, M.V.

    1995-12-01

    A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing {sup 227}Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

  12. Geodynamic modeling of eclogite-bearing mantle plumes: Ascent dynamics, plume-plate-interaction and surface manifestations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    According to widely accepted models, plumes ascend from the deep mantle and cause massive melting when they reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical geodynamic models consider plumes as purely thermal and thus predict a flattening of the plume head to a disk-like structure and thin plume tails. However, geochemical data indicate that plumes have a different composition than the average mantle material and it has been suggested a long time ago that subducted oceanic crust could be recycled by mantle plumes. In addition, seismic imaging reveals thicker plume tails as well as a more complex plume structure in the upper mantle, including broad low-velocity anomalies up to 400 km depth and elongated low-velocity fingers fed by plumes. While recent numerical models have considered a different chemistry to explain complex plume shapes or zoning within plumes, they either are restricted to only a part of the plume evolution or use simplified material models. However, due to the high density of recycled oceanic crust, thermo-chemical plumes are expected to have much smaller buoyancy than thermal plumes. Therefore it is especially important to incorporate realistic material properties, as they can influence the plume dynamics crucially and determine if a plume reaches the lithosphere or remains in deeper parts of the mantle. We perform numerical experiments in a 3D spherical shell geometry to study the dynamics of the plume ascent, the interaction between plume- and plate-driven flow and the dynamics of melting in a plume head. For that purpose, we use the finite-element code ASPECT, which allows for complex temperature-, pressure-, and composition-dependent material properties. Moreover, our models incorporate phase transitions (including melting) with the accompanying rheological and density changes, Clapeyron slopes and latent heat effects for the peridotite and eclogite phase, mantle compressibility and a highly temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity. We study under which conditions thermo-chemical plumes ascend through the whole mantle and what structures they form in the upper mantle. Modeling shows that plumes with a buoyancy higher than some critical value directly advance to the base of the lithosphere, while plumes with slightly lower buoyancy pond in a depth of 300-400 km and form pools or a second layer of hot material. These structures become asymmetric and finger-like channels begin to form when the plume gets entrained by a quickly moving overlying plate. Our models also suggest that thermo-chemical plumes ascend in the mantle much slower compared to thermal plumes and have thicker plume tails. The conversion of plume excess temperatures to anomalies in seismic velocity shows that thermo-chemical low-buoyancy plumes can explain a variety of features observed by seismic tomography much better than purely thermal plumes.

  13. Contaminant transport through a coal washery discard reactive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.C.; Indraratna, B.; Yassini, I.

    1999-07-01

    This study examines the utilization of coal washery discard (CWD) as an inexpensive and readily available reactive wall material for the treatment of contaminated groundwater within the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia. The technology has been applied to a blast furnace slag (BFS) emplacement to attenuate an alkaline plume migrating towards a sensitive marine water body. Preliminary field performance data indicates that the CWD wall is reducing the pH of the plume to acceptable levels for marine ecosystems. The primary removal mechanisms within the CWD have been identified, however, have not be quantified at this stage.

  14. On possible plume-guided seismic waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Evans, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothetical thermal plumes in the Earth's mantle are expected to have low seismic-wave speeds and thus would support the propagation of guided elastic waves analogous to fault-zone guided seismic waves, fiber-optic waves, and acoustic waves in the oceanic SOund Fixing And Ranging channel. Plume-guided waves would be insensitive to geometric complexities in the wave guide, and their dispersion would make them distinctive on seismograms and would provide information about wave-guide structure that would complement seismic tomography. Detecting such waves would constitute strong evidence of a new kind for the existence of plumes. A cylindrical channel embedded in an infinite medium supports two classes of axially symmetric elastic-wave modes, torsional and longitudinal-radial. Torsional modes have rectilinear particle motion tangent to the cylinder surface. Longitudinal-radial modes have elliptical particle motion in planes that include the cylinder axis, with retrograde motion near the axis. The direction of elliptical particle motion reverses with distance from the axis: once for the fundamental mode, twice for the first overtone, and so on. Each mode exists only above its cut-off frequency, where the phase and group speeds equal the shear-wave speed in the infinite medium. At high frequencies, both speeds approach the shear-wave speed in the channel. All modes have minima in their group speeds, which produce Airy phases on seismograms. For shear wave-speed contrasts of a few percent, thought to be realistic for thermal plumes in the Earth, the largest signals are inversely dispersed and have dominant frequencies of about 0.1-1 Hz and durations of 15-30 sec. There are at least two possible sources of observable plume waves: (1) the intersection of mantle plumes with high-amplitude core-phase caustics in the deep mantle; and (2) ScS-like reflection at the core-mantle boundary of downward-propagating guided waves. The widespread recent deployment of broadband seismometers makes searching for these waves possible.

  15. Io Plume Monitoring (frames 1-36)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A sequence of full disk Io images was taken prior to Galileo's second encounter with Ganymede. The purpose of these observations was to view all longitudes of Io and search for active volcanic plumes. The images were taken at intervals of approximately one hour corresponding to Io longitude increments of about ten degrees. Because both the spacecraft and Io were traveling around Jupiter the lighting conditions on Io (e.g. the phase of Io) changed dramatically during the sequence. These images were registered at a common scale and processed to produce a time-lapse 'movie' of Io. This movie combines all of the plume monitoring frames obtained by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The most prominent volcanic plume seen in this movie is Prometheus (latitude 1.6 south, longitude 153 west). The plume becomes visible as it moves into daylight, crosses the center of the disk, and is seen in profile against the dark of space at the edge of Io. This plume was first seen by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979 and is believed to be a geyser-like eruption of sulfur dioxide snow and gas. Although details of the region around Prometheus have changed in the seventeen years since Voyager's visit, the shape and height of the plume have not changed significantly. It is possible that this geyser has been erupting nearly continuously over this time. Galileo's primary 24 month mission includes eleven orbits around Jupiter and will provide observations of Jupiter, its moons and its magnetosphere.

    North is to the top of all frames. The smallest features which can be discerned range from 13 to 31 kilometers across. The images were obtained between the 2nd and the 6th of September, 1996.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  16. Hydrothermal outflow plume of Valles caldera, New Mexico, and a comparison with other outflow plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Gardner, J.N.; Vuataz, F.; Grigsby, C.O.

    1988-06-10

    Stratigraphic, temperature gradient, hydrogeochemical, and hydrologic data have been integrated with geologic data from previous studies to show the structural configuration of the Valles caldera hydrothermal outflow plume. Hydrologic data suggest that 25--50% of the discharge of the Valles outflow is confined to the Jemez fault zone, which predates caldera formation. Thermal gradient data from bores penetrating the plume show that shallow gradients are highest in the vicinity of the Jemez fault zone (up to 190 /sup 0/C/km). Shallow heat flow above the hydrothermal plume is as high as 500 mW m/sup -2/ near core hole VC-1 (Jemez fault zone) to 200 mW m/sup -2/ at Fenton Hill (Jemez Plateau). Chemical and isotopic data indicate that two source reservoirs within the caldera (Redondo Creek and Sulphur Springs reservoirs) are parents to mixed fluids flowing in the hydrothermal plume. However, isotopic data, borehole data, basic geology, and inverse relations between temperature and chloride content at major hot springs indicate that no single reservoir fluid and no single diluting fluid are involved in mixing. The Valles caldera hydrothermal plume is structurally dominated by lateral flow through a belt of vertical conduits (Jemez fault zone) that strike away from the source reservoir. Stratigraphically confined flow is present but dispersed over a wide area in relatively impermeable rocks. The Valles configuration is contrasted with the configuration of the hydrothermal plume at Roosevelt Hot Springs, which is dominated by lateral flow through a near-surface, widespread, permeable aquifer. Data from 12 other representative geothermal systems show that outflow plumes occur in a variety of magmatic and tectonic settings, have varying reservoir compositions, and have different flow characteristics.

  17. Helping Students make the transition from novice learner of ground-water concepts to expert using the Plume Busters software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macfarlane, P.A.; Bohling, G.; Thompson, K.W.; Townsend, M.

    2006-01-01

    Environmental and earth science students are novice learners and lack the experience needed to rise to the level of expert. To address this problem we have developed the prototype Plume Busters?? software as a capstone educational experience, in which students take on the role of an environmental consultant. Following a pipeline spill, the environmental consultant is hired by the pipeline owner to locate the resulting plume created by spill and remediate the contaminated aquifer at minimum monetary and time cost. The contamination must be removed from the aquifer before it reaches the river and eventually a downstream public water supply. The software consists of an interactive Java application and accompanying HTML linked pages. The application simulates movement of a plume from a pipeline break throug h a shallow alluvial aquifer towards the river. The accompanying web pages establish the simulated contamination scenario and provide students with background material on ground-water flow and transport principles. To make the role-play more realistic, the student must consider cost and time when making decisions about siting observation wells and wells for the pump-and-treat remediation system.

  18. Hydrothermal plume measurements: a regional perspective.

    PubMed

    Baker, E T; Massoth, G J

    1986-11-21

    An extensive deep-tow survey around an active submarine vent field was conducted to map the three-dimensional distribution of hydrothermal emissions and calculate the hydrothermal discharge of heat and manganese. Emissions from the 10-kilometer-long vent field formed a nearly isopycnal plume about 250 meters thick and elongated in the direction of the local net current. Net export of hydrothermal discharge from both point and diffuse sources was estimated from the advective transport of the plume; the heat flux was 5.8 +/- 2.9 x 10(8) watts and the dissolved manganese flux was 0.2 +/- 0.1 moles per second. Flux measurements of this type could be expanded to encompass entire ridge segments, allowing comparison with theoretical thermal and chemical process models on a common spatial scale. PMID:17771339

  19. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  20. Validation of holistic nursing competencies: role-delineation study, 2012.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Helen Lorraine; Erickson, Margaret Elizabeth; Campbell, Joan A; Brekke, Mary E; Sandor, M Kay

    2013-12-01

    The American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Corporation (AHNCC), certifying body for nurses practicing within the precepts of holistic nursing, uses a systematic process to guide program development. A previous publication described their early work that distinguished basic and advanced holistic nursing and development of related examinations. A more recent publication described the work of AHNCC from 2004 to 2012, including a role-delineation study (RDS) that was undertaken to identify and validate competencies currently used by holistic nurses. A final report describes the RDS design, methods, and raw data information. This article discusses AHNCC's goals for undertaking the 2012 Holistic Nursing RDS and the implications for the certification programs. PMID:23783664

  1. 12. J. Fuss, delineator (from Folder 5) 'PLAN ETC. OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. J. Fuss, delineator (from Folder 5) 'PLAN ETC. OF NEW ARSENAL FOR BENICIA DEPOT CAL.' PLAN, ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, DETAILS (right half of CA-1828-13) 13. (From Folder 5) PLAN, ELEVATION, SECTION (left half of CA-1828-12) 14. (From Folder 2) PLAN, ELEVATION, AND DETAILS OF STONES TO BE CUT 15. (From Folder 4) PLAN AND ELEVATION OF MAIN DOORWAY 16. (From Folder 5) DETAILS OF CANNON EMBRASURES - Benicia Arsenal, Storehouse, Comandant's Lane, Benicia Industrial Park, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  2. VELOCITY PLOTS AND CAPTURE ZONES OF PUMPING CENTERS FOR GROUND-WATER INVESTIGATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonpumping monitoring wells are commonly installed and sampled to delineate the extent of a contaminant plume and its chemical character. Samples from municipal and private pumping wells are frequently collected during ground-water contamination investigations as well. Pumping we...

  3. EFFECTS OF THE VARIATION OF SELECT SAMPLING PARAMETERS ON SOIL VAPOR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently soil vapor surveys are commonly used as a screening technique to delineate subsurface volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminant plumes and to provide information for vapor intrusion and contaminated site evaluations. To improve our understanding of the fate and transp...

  4. Next-generation marine instruments to join plume debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, F. J.; Nolet, G.; Babcock, J.

    2003-12-01

    Whether hot spot volcanism is the consequence of plate tectonics or has a deep origin in a mantle plume is debated. G.~Foulger (Geol.~Soc.~London Lett.~Online, accessed 9/3/2003), writes that carefully truncated cross sections, with color scales cranked up, give noisy images the illusion of strong anomalies traversing the mantle. Don Anderson, the big daddy of non-plume hypotheses (R.~Kent, Geol.~Soc.~London Lett.~Online, accessed 9/3/2003) has written that the resolution of regional tomography experiments must be improved in order to successfully determine whether (...) the deep mantle is the controlling factor in the formation of proposed hot spots (Keller et al., GRL 27 (24), 2000). In particular for Iceland, at issue is the inherently limited aperture of any land-based seismometer array on the island: (...) the resolution of such images could be increased (...) by using ocean bottom seismometers (...) (ibidem). These problems are not unique to the plume debate. Coverage, resolution and robustness of models of the wave speed distribution in the interior of the Earth obtained by seismic tomographic inversions are limited by the areal distribution of seismic stations. Two thirds of Earth's surface are virtually inaccessible to passive-source seismometry, save indeed for expensive ocean-bottom seismometers or moored hydrophones. Elsewhere at this meeting, Montelli et al. describe how an improved theoretical treatment of the generation and survival of travel-time anomalies and sophisticated parameterization techniques yield unprecedented resolution of the seismic expression of a variety of ``plumes'' coming from all depths within the mantle. On the other hand, the improved resolution required to settling the debate on the depth to the seismic origin of various hot spots will also result from the collection of previously inaccessable data. Here, we show our progress in the development of an independent hydro-acoustical recording device mounted on SOLO floats. Our instrument is able to maintain a constant water column depth below the sound channel and will surface only periodically for position determination and satellite data communication. Using these low-cost, non-recovered floating sensors, the aperture of arrays mounted on oceanic islands can be increased manifold. Furthermore, adding such instruments to poorly instrumented areas will improve the resolution of deep Earth structure more dramatically than the addition of stations in already densely sampled continental areas. Our progress has been made in the design of intelligent algorithms for the automatic identification and discrimination of seismic phases that are expected to be recorded. We currently recognize teleseismic arrivals in the presence of local P, S, and T phases, ship and whale noise, and other contaminating factors such as airgunning. Our approach combines continuous time-domain processing, spectrogram analysis, and custom-made wavelet methods new to global seismology. The lifespan and cost of the instrument are critically dependent on its ability to limit its power consumption by using a minimum amount of processing steps. Hence, we pay particular attention to the numerical implementation and efficiency of our algorithms, which are shown to be accurate while approaching a theoretical limit of efficiency. We show examples on data from ridge-tethered hydrophones and expect preliminary results from a first test deployment in October.

  5. Volcanic Plumes on Venus and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Proxemy Research is under contract to NASA to perform science research of volcanic plumes on Venus and lo. This report is submitted in accordance with contract NASW -98012 and contains a summary of activities conducted over the time period indicated. In addition to a synopsis of science research conducted, any manuscripts submitted for publication in this time period are also attached. Abstracts to scientific conferences may also be included if appropriate.

  6. 40 Million Years of the Iceland Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, R. E.; White, N.; Henstock, T.; Maclennan, J.; Murton, B. J.; Jones, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The V-shaped ridges, straddling the mid oceanic ridges to the North and South of Iceland, provide us with a linear record of transient mantle convective circulation. Surprisingly, we know little about the structure of these ridges: prior to this study, the most recent regional seismic reflection profiles were acquired in the 1960s. During the Summer of 2010, we acquired over 3,000 km of seismic reflection data across the oceanic basin South of Iceland. The cornerstones of this programme are two 1000 km flowlines, which traverse the basin from Greenland to the European margin. The geometry of young V-shaped ridges near to the oceanic spreading center has been imaged in fine detail; older ridges, otherwise obscured in gravity datasets by sediment cover, have been resolved for the first time. We have mapped the sediment-basement interface, transformed each profile onto an astronomical time scale, and removed the effects of long wavelength plate cooling. The resulting chronology of Icelandic plume activity provides an important temporal frame of reference for plume flux over the past 40 million years. The profiles also cross major contourite drift deposits, notably the Gardar, Bjorn and Eirik drifts. Fine-scale sedimentary features imaged here demonstrate distinct episodes of drift construction; by making simple assumptions about sedimentation rates, we can show that periods of drift formation correspond to periods of enhanced deep water circulation which is in turn moderated by plume activity. From a regional point of view, this transient behaviour manifests itself in several important ways. Within sedimentary basins fringing the North Atlantic, short lived regional uplift events periodically interrupt thermal subsidence from Eocene times to the present day. From a paleoceanographic perspective, there is good correlation between V-shaped ridge activity and changes in overflow of the ancient precursor to North Atlantic Deep Water. This complete history of the Iceland plume provides a framework into which observations of surface processes can be placed, and allow important causal relationships to be established.

  7. Electrification of Ash in Icelandic Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, K.; Aplin, K. L.; Houghton, I.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic ash is known to charge electrically, producing some of the most spectacular displays of lightning on the planet. Lightning activity within volcanic plumes can be sensed remotely using systems such as the United Kingdom Met Office long-range lightning detection network, ATDnet, which recorded over 16 000 lightning strokes during the 2011 Grimsvötn eruption in Iceland. These remote sensing techniques can only be fully exploited if the charging mechanisms in volcanic plumes are well understood. Although the exact details of ash charging processes will vary from one eruption to another, triboelectrification, fractoemission, and the ''dirty thunderstorm'' mechanism are all thought to play a role in the electrification of ash near the vent. In addition to near-vent charging, observations show that charging can also occur in volcanic plumes up to hundreds of kilometres from the source region. The sustained nature of this charge in the presence of electrically conducting air suggests that a self-charging mechanism through the action of ash-to-ash contact charging (triboelectrification), may also play a role in the electrification of volcanic ash. This work describes a laboratory investigation into triboelectric charging of ash from the 2010 and 2011 volcanic eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn in Iceland respectively. Consistently with previous work, we find that the particle size distribution plays an important role in the magnitude of charging generated, specifically in terms of the normalized span of the particle size distribution. As well as triboelectrificiation, natural radioactivity in some volcanic ash could also contribute to self-charging of volcanic plumes, which is also examined here.

  8. Volcanic Plumes on Io and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Senske, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Proxemy research is under contract to NASA to perform science research of volcanic plumes on Mars and Io. This report is submitted in accordance with contract NASW-00013 and contains a summary of activities. In addition to a synopsis of science research conducted, any manuscripts submitted for publication in this time period are also attached. Abstracts to scientific conferences may also be included if appropriate.

  9. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1993-01-01

    Progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere is documented. A kinetic condensation model was implemented to predict heterogeneous condensation in the plume regime behind an HSCT flying in the lower stratosphere. Simulations were performed to illustrate the parametric dependence of contrail droplet growth on the exhaust condensation nuclei number density and size distribution. Model results indicate that the condensation of water vapor is strongly dependent on the number density of activated CN. Incorporation of estimates for dilution factors into a Lagrangian box model of the far-wake regime with scale-dependent diffusion indicates negligible decrease in ozone and enhancement of water concentrations of 6-13 times background, which decrease rapidly over 1-3 days. Radiative calculations indicate a net differential cooling rate of the plume about 3K/day at the beginning of the wake regime, with a total subsidence ranging between 0.4 and 1 km. Results from the Lagrangian plume model were used to estimate the effect of repeated superposition of aircraft plumes on the concentrations of water and NO(y) along a flight corridor. Results of laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry are also described. Kinetics of HCl, N2O5 and ClONO2 uptake on liquid sulfuric acid were measured as a function of composition and temperature. Refined measurements of the thermodynamics of nitric acid hydrates indicate that metastable dihydrate may play a role in the nucleation of more stable trihydrates PSC's.

  10. Recycled crust in the Galápagos Plume source at 70 Ma: Implications for plume evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trela, Jarek; Vidito, Christopher; Gazel, Esteban; Herzberg, Claude; Class, Cornelia; Whalen, William; Jicha, Brian; Bizimis, Michael; Alvarado, Guillermo E.

    2015-09-01

    Galápagos plume-related lavas in the accreted terranes of the Caribbean and along the west coast of Costa Rica and Panama provide evidence on the evolution of the Galápagos mantle plume, specifically its mantle temperature, size and composition of heterogeneities, and dynamics. Here we provide new 40Ar/39Ar ages, major and trace element data, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions, and high-precision olivine analyses for samples from the Quepos terrane (Costa Rica) to closely examine the transitional phase of the Galápagos Plume from Large Igneous Province (LIP) to ocean island basalt (OIB) forming stages. The new ages indicate that the record of Quepos volcanism began at 70 Ma and persisted for 10 Ma. Petrological evidence suggests that the maximum mantle potential temperature (Tp) of the plume changed from ?1650° to ?1550 °C between 90-70 Ma. This change correlates with a dominant pyroxenite component in the Galapagos source as indicated by high Ni and Fe/Mn and low Ca olivines relative to those that crystallized in normal peridotite derived melts. The decrease in Tp also correlates with an increase in high-field strength element enrichments, e.g., Nb/Nb*, of the erupted lavas. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Nd-Pb) suggest that the Quepos terrane samples have intermediate (Central Domain) radiogenic signatures. The Galápagos plume at 70 Ma represents elevated pyroxenite melt productivity relative to peridotite in a cooling lithologically heterogeneous mantle.

  11. Cassini INMS measurements of Enceladus plume density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. E.; Teolis, B. D.; Hurley, D. M.; Magee, B. A.; Waite, J. H.; Brockwell, T. G.; Perryman, R. S.; McNutt, R. L.

    2015-09-01

    During six encounters between 2008 and 2013, the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) made in situ measurements deep within the Enceladus plumes. Throughout each encounter, those measurements contained density variations that reflected the nature of the source, particularly of the high-velocity jets. Since the dominant constituent of the vapor, H2O, interacted with the walls of the INMS inlet, we track changes in the external vapor density by using more-volatile species that responded promptly to those changes. However, the most-abundant volatiles, at 28 u and 44 u, behaved differently from each other in the plume. At least a portion of their differences may be attributed to mass-dependent thermal velocity that affects Mach number in the high-velocity jets. Variations between volatiles place an emphasis on modeling as a means to construct overall plume density from the volatile densities and to investigate the velocity, gas temperature, and location of the jets. Ice grains, entering the INMS aperture add complexity and uncertainty to the physical interpretation of the data because the grains modified the INMS measurements. A comparison of data from the last three encounters, E14, E17, and E18, are consistent with the VIMS observation of variability in jet production and a slower, more diffuse gas flux from the four sulci or tiger stripes. We provide and describe the INMS data, its processing, and its uncertainty.

  12. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) operated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon flow rates between 19 - 46 standard cubic centimeter per minute. The HCA was centrally mounted in the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster and was operated in the "spot" and "plume" modes with additional data taken with an applied magnetic field. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orifice of the HCA and to assess the charge state of the near-field plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 electron volt) and plasma potentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operation with an applied-field yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, and increased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with an applied field, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies significantly exceeding the applied discharge voltage. These findings are correlated with high-frequency oscillations associated with each mode.

  13. Numerical simulation of rarefied nozzle plume impingements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyakutake, Toru; Nishida, Michio

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes numerical simulation of rarefied nozzle plume impingements. Two different reservoir pressures 400 kPa are considered. In the case of 400 kPa, the simulation of the nozzle flow was conducted by using the Navier-Stokes equation, and then the analysis of the plume flow was carried out by the DSMC method, employing the nozzle exit conditions obtained by Navier-Stokes equation. On the other hand, for 4 kPa, both the nozzle flow and the plume impingement have been calculated using the DSMC method. Concerning the angle between the nozzle axis and the flat plate, three kinds of angle are selected, that is, 90°, 45° and 0°. In addition, we considered the case where there exists a flat plate behind the nozzle. Simulated results have been compared with the existing experiments for the pressure and shear stress distributions on the flat plate. A good agreement between the DSMC results and the experiments are shown. In the case of the oblique and parallel impingements, the location of the impingement pressure peak and the stagnation point shifted upstream with increasing rarefaction.

  14. Aerosol invariance in expanding coagulating plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, Richard P.; Yu, Fangqun

    We demonstrate that the total number of particles in an evolving aerosol plume is limited in a predictable way by the competing rates of coagulation and atmospheric dispersion, and is generally independent of the details of particle nucleation or growth. Using a simplified phenomenological model, expressions are derived from which the time variation in the total number of aerosols generated by localized sources can be calculated, as can their size distribution and local concentrations. Consideration of various microphysical processes contributing to aerosol plume development leads to the conclusion that the potential nucleation of enormous numbers of fine particles (for example, in high-altitude aircraft wakes and volcanic eruption clouds) does not affect the total number eventually dispersed throughout the atmosphere. We show that, after a suitable period of time (which is quite short relative to the time scales of regional and global dispersion), the aerosol population (total number, or concentration) is independent of the initial number, and instead depends in a simple way on the average coagulation kernel and plume dispersion rate. In terms of these basic physical parameters, we define a unique dimensionless number that fully determines the time evolution of the aerosol population, and show how this invariant number can be applied to estimate the properties of particulates emitted by high-altitude aircraft.

  15. Laser ablation plume dynamics in nanoparticle synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V V; Platonov, V V; Lisenkov, V V

    2009-06-30

    The dynamics of the plume ejected from the surface of solid targets (YSZ, Nd:YAG and graphite) by a CO{sub 2} laser pulse with a duration of {approx}500 {mu}s (at the 0.03 level), energy of 1.0-1.3 J and peak power of 6-7 kW have been studied using high-speed photography of the plume luminescence and shadow. The targets were used to produce nanopowders by laser evaporation. About 200 {mu}s after termination of the pulse, shadowgraph images of the plumes above the YSZ and Nd:YAG targets showed dark straight tracks produced by large particles. The formation of large ({approx}10 {mu}m) particles is tentatively attributed to cracking of the solidified melt at the bottom of the ablation crater. This is supported by the fact that no large particles are ejected from graphite, which sublimes without melting. Further support to this hypothesis is provided by numerical 3D modelling of melt cooling in craters produced by laser pulses of different shapes. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  16. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) oper-ated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon ow rates between 19 - 46 sccm.The HCA was centrally mounted in the annulus of the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster andwas operated in the spot and plume modes with additional data taken with an appliedmagnetic eld. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spec-troscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orice of the HCA and toassess the charge state of the near-eld plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 eV) and plasmapotentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operationwith an applied-eld yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, andincreased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with anapplied eld, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies signicantlyexceeding the applied discharge voltage. These ndings are correlated with high-frequencyoscillations associated with each mode.

  17. Mercury Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Marcella R.

    2013-01-01

    IN BRIEF A residential elemental mercury contamination incident in Rhode Island resulted in the evacuation of an entire apartment complex. To develop recommendations for improved response, all response-related documents were examined; personnel involved in the response were interviewed; policies and procedures were reviewed; and environmental monitoring data were compiled from specific phases of the response for analysis of effect. A significant challenge of responding to residential elemental mercury contamination lies in communicating risk to residents affected py a HazMat spill. An ongoing, open and honest dialogue is emphasized where concerns of the public are heard and addressed, particularly when establishing and/or modifying policies and procedures for responding to residential elemental mercury contamination. PMID:23436951

  18. Synthetic image generation of factory stack and cooling tower plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Shiao D.; Schott, John R.

    1997-07-01

    A new model for generating synthetic images of plumes has been developed using a radiometrically based ray-tracing algorithm. Existing plume models that describe the characteristics of the plume (constituents, concentration, particulate sizing, and temperature) are used to generate AutoCAD models for input into the code. The effects of scattered light using Mie theory and radiative transfer, as well as thermal self-emission/absorption from within the plume, are modeled for different regions of the plume. The ray-tracing accounts for direct sunlight, scattered skylight, reflected sunlight from the background, and thermal self-emission from both the atmosphere and background. Synthetic generated images of a cooling tower plume, composed of water droplets, and a factor stack plume, composed of methyl chloride, are produced for visible, MWIR, and LWIR bands. Images of the plume from different view angles are also produced. Observations are made on the interaction between the plume and its background and possible effects for remote sensing. Images are made of the methyl chloride plume in which the concentration and temperature are varied to determine the sensitivity of the radiance reaching the sensor.

  19. Plume dynamics in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T.; Lunney, J. G.; Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Wang, X.

    2010-10-08

    In femtosecond laser ablation the plume has two components: a faster-moving plasma part and a slower nanoparticle plume which contains most of the ablated material. This paper describes the results of experiments to comprehensively characterize the plume in laser ablation of Ni with {approx_equal}300 fs pulses at 527 nm. Both single-pulse and double-pulse irradiation was used. The laser ablation depth was measured using white light interferometry. The dynamics of the plasma part of the ablation plume was measured using Langmuir ion probes. The shape of the overall ablation plume was recorded by depositing a thin film on a transparent substrate and measuring the thickness distribution. The expansion of the plasma plume is well described by the Anismov isentropic model of plume expansion. Just above the ablation threshold, the nanoparticle plume is also well described by the Anisimov expansion model. However, at higher fluence a wider plume is formed, perhaps due to the pressure exerted by plasma. For double-pulse ablation it is observed that as the second pulse is delayed beyond {approx_equal}20 ps the ablation depth is reduced and the ion yield is increased. This behaviour is due to reheating of the nascent plasma plume produced by the first pulse. This generates a pressure pulse that acts as a tamper which impedes the fragmentation and ablation of deeper layers of material.

  20. Weather radar signatures derived from simulated volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Michael; Mather, Luke; Giuliani, Graziano; Marzano, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions form ash clouds that pose a severe threat to aviation safety and to infrastructure on the ground. For the prediction of the plume track and ash fall it is necessary to know the characteristics of the initial plume in terms of its size, height and its particle concentrations and size distribution. The differentiation between ash particles, pure hydrometeors like ice crystals and aggregates is important because the ash signal can be obscured by the presence of water and ice in the plume. Since direct observations of volcanic plumes are nearly impossible, remote sensing techniques, like microwave weather radar, offer a unique tool to gain valuable information about the plume and its particles. In order to adequately test the retrieval algorithm for deriving the physical plume properties from radar signals, independent measurements of plume characteristics are required. Numerical modeling of the plume provides a unique opportunity whereby all physical parameters are known to very high temporal and spatial resolution without observational errors. For this purpose we applied the plume model ATHAM (Active Tracer High Resolution Atmospheric Model) to the eruption of the Etna volcano in 2002. Radar reflectivities were calculated for the simulated volcanic plume under different assumptions and scenarios and compared to the corresponding available C-band radar observations.

  1. Effects of reduced contaminant loading on downgradient water quality in an idealized two-layer granular porous media

    E-print Network

    Dandy, David

    Effects of reduced contaminant loading on downgradient water quality in an idealized two the issue of how reductions in contaminant loading to plumes will effect downgradient water quality-scale scenarios are considered using the analytical solutions. Results indicate that improvement in water quality

  2. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DYNAMICS IN ARSENIC SPECIATION ACROSS THE GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER TRANSITION ZONE AT A CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field investigations have been conducted to understand the fate of arsenic in contaminated ground water during discharge into a small lake. The ground-water plume contains elevated levels of arsenic and hydrocarbon contaminants derived from historical disposal of process wastes ...

  3. Delineating biophysical environments of the Sunda Banda Seascape, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingshu; Ahmadia, Gabby N; Chollett, Iliana; Huang, Charles; Fox, Helen; Wijonarno, Anton; Madden, Marguerite

    2015-02-01

    The Sunda Banda Seascape (SBS), located in the center of the Coral Triangle, is a global center of marine biodiversity and a conservation priority. We proposed the first biophysical environmental delineation of the SBS using globally available satellite remote sensing and model-assimilated data to categorize this area into unique and meaningful biophysical classes. Specifically, the SBS was partitioned into eight biophysical classes characterized by similar sea surface temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, currents, and salinity patterns. Areas within each class were expected to have similar habitat types and ecosystem functions. Our work supplemented prevailing global marine management schemes by focusing in on a regional scale with finer spatial resolution. It also provided a baseline for academic research, ecological assessments and will facilitate marine spatial planning and conservation activities in the area. In addition, the framework and methods of delineating biophysical environments we presented can be expanded throughout the whole Coral Triangle to support research and conservation activities in this important region. PMID:25648170

  4. Delineating Biophysical Environments of the Sunda Banda Seascape, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingshu; Ahmadia, Gabby N.; Chollett, Iliana; Huang, Charles; Fox, Helen; Wijonarno, Anton; Madden, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    The Sunda Banda Seascape (SBS), located in the center of the Coral Triangle, is a global center of marine biodiversity and a conservation priority. We proposed the first biophysical environmental delineation of the SBS using globally available satellite remote sensing and model-assimilated data to categorize this area into unique and meaningful biophysical classes. Specifically, the SBS was partitioned into eight biophysical classes characterized by similar sea surface temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, currents, and salinity patterns. Areas within each class were expected to have similar habitat types and ecosystem functions. Our work supplemented prevailing global marine management schemes by focusing in on a regional scale with finer spatial resolution. It also provided a baseline for academic research, ecological assessments and will facilitate marine spatial planning and conservation activities in the area. In addition, the framework and methods of delineating biophysical environments we presented can be expanded throughout the whole Coral Triangle to support research and conservation activities in this important region. PMID:25648170

  5. Variety and complexity of the Late-Permian Emeishan basalts: Reappraisal of plume-lithosphere interaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qi; Xiao, Long; Balta, Brian; Gao, Rui; Chen, Jianye

    2010-09-01

    New petrographic, major element, trace element and isotopic data (Sr and Nd) for 17 Emeishan basalts from the Lijiang-Shangri-La area of SW China are integrated with published data comprising ~ 300 mafic rocks from the Emeishan large igneous province (LIP) to create a comprehensive model for this LIP event. We find large compositional variations in the Emeishan basalts that were generated by melting of heterogeneous mantle sources and interaction between the Emeishan plume and lithosphere. The Emeishan basalts can be generally grouped into high-Ti and low-Ti classes, but our samples argue that a more detailed classification scheme is required, and the two classes are better separated by the line TiO 2 = -0.08MgO + 2.91. We suggest that high-Ti basalts are products of deep melting plume head material similar to oceanic island basalts (OIBs), with little lithospheric overprint. The low-Ti basalts, alternatively, were generated from shallower melting of the plume head and have significant lithospheric inputs via either direct crustal contamination or by inherited subduction components in the lithosphere. The Vietnam picrites and low-Ti basalts are distinct from other ELIP samples, and probably derived from a much more depleted mantle component, either intrinsic to the mantle plume itself or entrained in the plume head during its ascent. We infer that the thermal structure, spatially distributed compositional heterogeneities within the plume head, and varying degrees of interaction with overlying lithosphere and crust control the composition of lavas from a given locality.

  6. Geodynamic modelling of low-buoyancy thermo-chemical plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events that form Large Igneous Provinces are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models of thermal mantle plumes predict a flattening of the plume head to a disk-like structure, a kilometer-scale surface uplift just before the initiation of LIPs and thin plume tails. However, there are seismic observations and paleo-topography data that are difficult to explain with this classical approach. Here, using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes are thermo-chemical rather than purely thermal. It has been suggested a long time ago that subducted oceanic crust could be recycled by mantle plumes; and based on geochemical data, they may contain up to 15-20% of this recycled material in the form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth-dependent. We perform numerical experiments in a 3D spherical shell geometry to investigate the dynamics of the plume ascent, the interaction between plume- and plate-driven flow and the dynamics of melting in a plume head. For this purpose, we use the finite-element code ASPECT, which allows for complex temperature-, pressure- and composition-dependent material properties. Moreover, our models incorporate phase transitions (including melting) with the accompanying rheological and density changes, Clapeyron slopes and latent heat effects for both peridotite and eclogite, mantle compressibility and a strong temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity. We demonstrate that despite their low buoyancy, such plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Conditions for this ascent are high plume volume and moderate lower mantle subadiabaticity. While high plume buoyancy results in plumes directly advancing to the base of the lithosphere, plumes with slightly lower buoyancy pond in a depth of 300-400 km and form pools or a second layer of hot material. These structures are caused by phase transitions occurring in different depths in peridotite and eclogite; and they become asymmetric and finger-like channels begin to form when the plume gets entrained by a quickly moving overlying plate. We also show that the bulky tails of large and hot low-buoyancy plumes are stable for several tens of millions of years and that their shapes fit seismic tomography data much better than the narrow tails of thermal plumes.

  7. The geochemical geometry of mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Lavas erupted at oceanic hotspot volcanoes exhibit tremendous isotopic variability, which indicates that the mantle sources of the hotspots are highly heterogeneous geochemically. A key question is how the surface expression of hotspot lavas relates to the spatial distribution of the geochemical components within upwelling mantle plumes. Significant progress has been made in recent years relating the geographic distribution of geochemical heterogeneities in hotspot lavas to parallel volcanic lineaments that define the traces of oceanic hotspot tracks. For example, a well known geographic separation of parallel volcanic lineaments at Hawaii - the Loa and Kea trends - are also isotopically resolved. In addition to the Hawaiian example, clear patterns relating the geographic distribution of geochemical components along hotspot tracks are emerging from a suite of global hotspots, and these patterns suggest that geochemical heterogeneities are highly organized within upwelling mantle plume conduits. At the Samoan hotspot, the Pb-isotopic compositions measured in lavas reveal several geochemical groups, and each group corresponds to a different geographic lineament of volcanoes. Each group has a geochemical signature that relates to each of the canonical low 3He/4He mantle endmembers: EMII (enriched mantle 2), EMI (enriched mantle 1), HIMU (high U/Pb) and DM (depleted mantle). In Pb-isotopic space, the four geochemical groups each form an array that trends toward a common component (thus forming an "X-shape" in Pb-isotopic space). The region of isotope space where the 4 Pb-isotopic array intersect is defined by the highest 3He/4He (up to 34 Ra, or ratio to atmosphere) in the Samoan hotspot. In Pb-isotopic space, 3He/4He decreases monotonically along each of the Pb-isotopic groups away from the common region of convergence. In order to quantify the relationship between He and Pb isotopes, 3He/4He is plotted versus distance from the common component in Pb-isotopic space, and a clear relationship emerges from the dataset. This observation supports a hypothesis where several low-3He/4He components are embedded within (and mix with) a plume matrix that is composed of the high 3He/4He component. In this way, the four distinct Pb-isotopic groups do not mix efficiently with each other, thereby preserving the four distinct arrays in Pb-isotope space. However, the low 3He/4He components do mix with the high 3He/4He plume matrix, thereby generating the clear relationship between He and Pb isotopes. These mixing relationships provide a clear picture of the geochemical geometry of the Samoan plume. However, owing to the sparse datasets that link high-precision Pb-isotopic measurements with 3He/4He measurements on the same sample, it is not yet clear whether the geochemical geometry observed in the Samoan plume is feature that is common to mantle plumes globally.

  8. Imaging of Vapor Plumes Produced by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption: A Plume Sharpening Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, A.A.; Geohegan, D.B.; Hurst, G.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Luk`yanchuk, B.S.

    1999-07-01

    The first gated imaging of both light matrix molecule and heavy biomolecule vapor expansion during matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization is reported, revealing a plume sharpening effect. Laser induced fluorescence imaging of dye-tagged DNasethinspthinspI proteins shows that these heavy molecules (30thinsp000thinspthinspDa) propagate within a very narrow angular distribution compared to that of the 3-HPA matrix (139thinspthinspDa). A special solution of the gas dynamic equations is developed to describe the 3D coexpansion of heavy and light plume components. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Water Vapor Enhancements in an Athena II Rocket Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, R. L.; Friedl, R. R.; Gandrud, B. W.

    2001-12-01

    One of the major goals of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) mission was to quantify rocket plume emissions and chemistry. On September 24, 1999, the NASA WB-57F aircraft intercepted an Athena II rocket plume multiple times in the lower stratosphere. Within the rocket plume, water vapor was enhanced two to four times above the background mixing ratio of 4.6 ppmv due to oxidation of the hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene rocket propellant. Particle concentrations were also enhanced in the rocket plume. In this talk, we will address the following questions: What is the emission index (EI) of water from an Athena II rocket? Can plume dilution be estimated? Does a significant fraction of water condense onto particles in the rocket plume?

  10. Organic contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface: Evolution of knowledge and understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2015-07-01

    Toxic organic contaminants may enter the subsurface as slightly soluble and volatile nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) or as dissolved solutes resulting in contaminant plumes emanating from the source zone. A large body of research published in Water Resources Research has been devoted to characterizing and understanding processes controlling the transport and fate of these organic contaminants and the effectiveness of natural attenuation, bioremediation, and other remedial technologies. These contributions include studies of NAPL flow, entrapment, and interphase mass transfer that have advanced from the analysis of simple systems with uniform properties and equilibrium contaminant phase partitioning to complex systems with pore-scale and macroscale heterogeneity and rate-limited interphase mass transfer. Understanding of the fate of dissolved organic plumes has advanced from when biodegradation was thought to require oxygen to recognition of the importance of anaerobic biodegradation, multiple redox zones, microbial enzyme kinetics, and mixing of organic contaminants and electron acceptors at plume fringes. Challenges remain in understanding the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and hydrogeological heterogeneity, pore-scale interactions, and mixing on the fate of organic contaminants. Further effort is needed to successfully incorporate these processes into field-scale predictions of transport and fate. Regulations have greatly reduced the frequency of new point-source contamination problems; however, remediation at many legacy plumes remains challenging. A number of fields of current relevance are benefiting from research advances from point-source contaminant research. These include geologic carbon sequestration, nonpoint-source contamination, aquifer storage and recovery, the fate of contaminants from oil and gas development, and enhanced bioremediation.

  11. Organic contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface: evolution of knowledge and understanding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Toxic organic contaminants may enter the subsurface as slightly soluble and volatile nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) or as dissolved solutes resulting in contaminant plumes emanating from the source zone. A large body of research published in Water Resources Research has been devoted to characterizing and understanding processes controlling the transport and fate of these organic contaminants and the effectiveness of natural attenuation, bioremediation, and other remedial technologies. These contributions include studies of NAPL flow, entrapment, and interphase mass transfer that have advanced from the analysis of simple systems with uniform properties and equilibrium contaminant phase partitioning to complex systems with pore-scale and macroscale heterogeneity and rate-limited interphase mass transfer. Understanding of the fate of dissolved organic plumes has advanced from when biodegradation was thought to require oxygen to recognition of the importance of anaerobic biodegradation, multiple redox zones, microbial enzyme kinetics, and mixing of organic contaminants and electron acceptors at plume fringes. Challenges remain in understanding the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and hydrogeological heterogeneity, pore-scale interactions, and mixing on the fate of organic contaminants. Further effort is needed to successfully incorporate these processes into field-scale predictions of transport and fate. Regulations have greatly reduced the frequency of new point-source contamination problems; however, remediation at many legacy plumes remains challenging. A number of fields of current relevance are benefiting from research advances from point-source contaminant research. These include geologic carbon sequestration, nonpoint-source contamination, aquifer storage and recovery, the fate of contaminants from oil and gas development, and enhanced bioremediation.

  12. Modeling process plant plume dispersion and recirculation using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berkoe, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to solve environmental problems caused by heat and contaminant dispersion from process plants. CFD is a CAD-based software tool, which provides profiles of local fluid velocity, fluid temperature and species concentrations. CFD has enabled engineers to identify solutions to problems quickly without resorting to traditional experimental approaches. In this paper, three actual projects are described which demonstrate the utility of CFD to dispersion modeling and the increasing level of sophistication with which it has been applied. In some cases experimental tests or actual field operation provide sources of model validation and verification. In the first case, CFD models of tankhouse ventilation systems, based on three South American projects, were developed to guide the selection of equipment for crossflow ventilation systems to meet workplace air quality requirements. In the course of this study, it was found that significant quantities of recirculation could occur for moderate wind conditions opposite to the fan exhaust. In the second case, CFD models were developed to simulate the fluid dynamics of the buoyant plume released during a copper smelter charging operation and to investigate plume collection system designs. Side skirt and canopy configurations were demonstrated to be key design parameters for plume capture. Although not initially expected, a simplified design configuration was found to achieve maximum plume capture, which was later confirmed in actual operation. In the third case, heat recirculation from LNG Plants was investigated. In a liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant in the Caribbean, it was recognized that wind-induced recirculation of the turbine and condenser exhaust could negatively impact operating margins. Dispersion characteristics for the entire plant were simulated using detailed CFD models to predict the temperature profiles entering the coolers under various wind directions and speeds.

  13. Marine bird aggregations associated with the tidally-driven plume and plume fronts of the Columbia River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamon, Jeannette E.; Phillips, Elizabeth M.; Guy, Troy J.

    2014-09-01

    Freshwater discharge from large rivers into the coastal ocean creates tidally-driven frontal systems known to enhance mixing, primary production, and secondary production. Many authors suggest that tidal plume fronts increase energy flow to fish-eating predators by attracting planktivorous fishes to feed on plankton aggregated by the fronts. However, few studies of plume fronts directly examine piscivorous predator response to plume fronts. Our work examined densities of piscivorous seabirds relative to the plume region and plume fronts of the Columbia River, USA. Common murres (Uria aalge) and sooty shearwaters (Puffinus griseus) composed 83% of all birds detected on mesoscale surveys of the Washington and Oregon coasts (June 2003-2006), and 91.3% of all birds detected on fine scale surveys of the plume region less than 40 km from the river mouth (May 2003 and 2006). Mesoscale comparisons showed consistently more predators in the central plume area compared to the surrounding marine area (murres: 10.1-21.5 vs. 3.4-8.2 birds km-2; shearwaters: 24.2-75.1 vs. 11.8-25.9 birds km-2). Fine scale comparisons showed that murre density in 2003 and shearwater density in both 2003 and 2006 were significantly elevated in the tidal plume region composed of the most recently discharged river water. Murres tended to be more abundant on the north face of the plume. In May 2003, more murres and shearwaters were found within 3 km of the front on any given transect, although maximum bird density was not necessarily found in the same location as the front itself. Predator density on a given transect was not correlated with frontal strength in either year. The high bird densities we observed associated with the tidal plume demonstrate that the turbid Columbia River plume does not necessarily provide fish with refuge from visual predators. Bird predation in the plume region may therefore impact early marine survival of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), which must migrate through the tidal plume and plume front to enter the ocean. Because murres and shearwaters eat primarily planktivorous fish such as the northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax), aggregation of these birds in the plume supports the hypothesis that it is the plume region as a whole, and not just the plume fronts, which enhances trophic transfer to piscivorous predators via planktivorous fishes.

  14. Delineating the Rattlesnake Springs, New Mexico Watershed Using Precision Gravity Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doser, D. I.; Boykov, N. D.; Baker, M. R.; Kaip, G. M.; Langford, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Rattlesnake Springs serves as the sole domestic water source for Carlsbad Caverns National Park. The recent development of oil and gas leases and agricultural lands surrounding the springs has led to concern about contamination of the fracture controlled aquifer system. We have conducted a series of precision gravity surveys (station spacing 200 to 300 m in a 4 x 4 km area), combined with other geophysical studies and geologic mapping, to delineate possible fracture systems in the gypsum and carbonate bedrock that feed the spring system. Our combined results suggest several pathways for water to enter the springs. A series of WNW-ESE striking features are apparent in our gravity data that appear to align with relict spring valleys we have mapped to the west of the springs. A self potential survey indicates that water is entering the springs at a shallow level from the northwest direction. However, gravity data also indicate a north-south trending fracture system could be providing a pathway for water to enter from the south. This is consistent with drawdown tests conducted in the 1950’s and 1960’s on irrigation wells located to the south of the springs. The north-south fracture system appears related to a basin bounding fault system observed in the regional gravity data.

  15. Rebound of a coal tar creosote plume following partial source zone treatment with permanganate.

    PubMed

    Thomson, N R; Fraser, M J; Lamarche, C; Barker, J F; Forsey, S P

    2008-11-14

    The long-term management of dissolved plumes originating from a coal tar creosote source is a technical challenge. For some sites stabilization of the source may be the best practical solution to decrease the contaminant mass loading to the plume and associated off-site migration. At the bench-scale, the deposition of manganese oxides, a permanganate reaction byproduct, has been shown to cause pore plugging and the formation of a manganese oxide layer adjacent to the non-aqueous phase liquid creosote which reduces post-treatment mass transfer and hence mass loading from the source. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of partial permanganate treatment to reduce the ability of a coal tar creosote source zone to generate a multi-component plume at the pilot-scale over both the short-term (weeks to months) and the long-term (years) at a site where there is >10 years of comprehensive synoptic plume baseline data available. A series of preliminary bench-scale experiments were conducted to support this pilot-scale investigation. The results from the bench-scale experiments indicated that if sufficient mass removal of the reactive compounds is achieved then the effective solubility, aqueous concentration and rate of mass removal of the more abundant non-reactive coal tar creosote compounds such as biphenyl and dibenzofuran can be increased. Manganese oxide formation and deposition caused an order-of-magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Approximately 125 kg of permanganate were delivered into the pilot-scale source zone over 35 days, and based on mass balance estimates <10% of the initial reactive coal tar creosote mass in the source zone was oxidized. Mass discharge estimated at a down-gradient fence line indicated >35% reduction for all monitored compounds except for biphenyl, dibenzofuran and fluoranthene 150 days after treatment, which is consistent with the bench-scale experimental results. Pre- and post-treatment soil core data indicated a highly variable and random spatial distribution of mass within the source zone and provided no insight into the mass removed of any of the monitored species. The down-gradient plume was monitored approximately 1, 2 and 4 years following treatment. The data collected at 1 and 2 years post-treatment showed a decrease in mass discharge (10 to 60%) and/or total plume mass (0 to 55%); however, by 4 years post-treatment there was a rebound in both mass discharge and total plume mass for all monitored compounds to pre-treatment values or higher. The variability of the data collected was too large to resolve subtle changes in plume morphology, particularly near the source zone, that would provide insight into the impact of the formation and deposition of manganese oxides that occurred during treatment on mass transfer and/or flow by-passing. Overall, the results from this pilot-scale investigation indicate that there was a significant but short-term (months) reduction of mass emanating from the source zone as a result of permanganate treatment but there was no long-term (years) impact on the ability of this coal tar creosote source zone to generate a multi-component plume. PMID:18757111

  16. Satellite assessment of Mississippi River plume variability: Causes and predictability

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, N.D.

    1996-10-01

    The Mississippi River is the largest river in North America and 6th largest worldwide in terms of discharge. In this study, 5 years (1989--1993) of NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite data were used to investigate the variability of the Mississippi River sediment plume and the environmental forcing factors responsible for its variability. Plume variability was determined by extracting information on plume area and plume length from 112 cloud-free satellite images. Correlation and multiple regression techniques were used to quantify these relationships for possible predictive applications. River discharge and wind forcing were identified as the main factors affecting plume variability. Seasonal and interannual variabilities in plume area were similar in magnitude and corresponded closely with large changes in river discharge. However, day-to-day variability in plume size and morphology was more closely associated with changes in the wind field. The plume parameters best predicted by the multiple regression models were plume area, east and west of the delta. Predictive models were improved by separating the data into summer and winter seasons.

  17. Naval weapons center plume radar frequency interference code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, B. E.; McCullough, R. W.

    1982-10-01

    A description of the Naval Weapons Center Plume Radar Frequency Interference Code (PRFIC) is given. The methods used to predict the attenuation and phase shifts contributed by the mean plume flowfield, and the scattering and Doppler shift due to turbulent fluctuations, are defined. Examples of the predictions of the plume RF interference using the flowfield predictions of a modified JANNAF Standard Plume Flowfield code are given. The capabilities and limitations of PRFIC are listed and improvements are proposed. A code user's manual and software description are included.

  18. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  19. Algorithms and analysis for underwater vehicle plume tracing.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Savage, Elizabeth L.; Hurtado, John Edward; Eskridge, Steven E.

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this research was to develop and demonstrate cooperative 3-D plume tracing algorithms for miniature autonomous underwater vehicles. Applications for this technology include Lost Asset and Survivor Location Systems (L-SALS) and Ship-in-Port Patrol and Protection (SP3). This research was a joint effort that included Nekton Research, LLC, Sandia National Laboratories, and Texas A&M University. Nekton Research developed the miniature autonomous underwater vehicles while Sandia and Texas A&M developed the 3-D plume tracing algorithms. This report describes the plume tracing algorithm and presents test results from successful underwater testing with pseudo-plume sources.

  20. Impacts of stormwater runoff in the Southern California Bight: Relationships among plume constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifel, Kristen M.; Johnson, Scott C.; DiGiacomo, Paul M.; Mengel, Michael J.; Nezlin, Nikolay P.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Jones, Burton H.

    2009-08-01

    The effects from two winter rain storms on the coastal ocean of the Southern California Bight were examined as part of the Bight '03 program during February 2004 and February-March 2005. The impacts of stormwater from fecal indicator bacteria, water column toxicity, and nutrients were evaluated for five major river discharges: the Santa Clara River, Ballona Creek, the San Pedro Shelf (including the Los Angeles, San Gabriel, and Santa Ana Rivers), the San Diego River, and the Tijuana River. Exceedances of bacterial standards were observed in most of the systems. However, the areas of impact were generally spatially limited, and contaminant concentrations decreased below California Ocean Plan standards typically within 2-3 days. The largest bacterial concentrations occurred in the Tijuana River system where exceedances of fecal indicator bacteria were noted well away from the river mouth. Maximum nitrate concentrations (~40 ?M) occurred in the San Pedro Shelf region near the mouth of the Los Angeles River. Based on the results of general linear models, individual sources of stormwater differ in both nutrient concentrations and the concentration and composition of fecal indicator bacteria. While nutrients appeared to decrease in plume waters due to simple mixing and dilution, the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria in plumes depends on more than loading and dilution rates. The relationships between contaminants (nutrients and fecal indicator bacteria) and plume indicators (salinity and total suspended solids) were not strong indicating the presence of other potentially important sources and/or sinks of both nutrients and fecal indicator bacteria. California Ocean Plan standards were often exceeded in waters containing greater than 10% stormwater (<28-30 salinity range). The median concentration dropped below the standard in the 32-33 salinity range (1-4% stormwater) for total coliforms and Enterococcus spp. and in the 28-30 salinity range (10-16% stormwater) for fecal coliforms. Nutrients showed a similar pattern with the highest median concentrations in water with greater than 10% stormwater. Relationships between colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and salinity and between total suspended solids and beam attenuation indicate that readily measurable, optically active variables can be used as proxies to provide at least a qualitative, if not quantitative, evaluation of the distribution of the dissolved, as well as the particulate, components of stormwater plumes. In this context, both CDOM absorption and the beam attenuation coefficient can be derived from satellite ocean color measurements of inherent optical properties suggesting that remote sensing of ocean color should be useful in mapping the spatial areas and durations of impacts from these contaminants.

  1. Delineating riparian zones for entire river networks using geomorphological criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, D.; Barquín, J.; Álvarez-Cabria, M.; Peñas, F. J.

    2012-03-01

    Riparian zone delineation is a central issue for riparian and river ecosystem management, however, criteria used to delineate them are still under debate. The area inundated by a 50-yr flood has been indicated as an optimal hydrological descriptor for riparian areas. This detailed hydrological information is, however, not usually available for entire river corridors, and is only available for populated areas at risk of flooding. One of the requirements for catchment planning is to establish the most appropriate location of zones to conserve or restore riparian buffer strips for whole river networks. This issue could be solved by using geomorphological criteria extracted from Digital Elevation Models. In this work we have explored the adjustment of surfaces developed under two different geomorphological criteria with respect to the flooded area covered by the 50-yr flood, in an attempt to rapidly delineate hydrologically-meaningful riparian zones for entire river networks. The first geomorphological criterion is based on the surface that intersects valley walls at a given number of bankfull depths above the channel (BFDAC), while the second is based on the surface defined by a~threshold value indicating the relative cost of moving from the stream up to the valley, accounting for slope and elevation change (path distance). As the relationship between local geomorphology and 50-yr flood has been suggested to be river-type dependant, we have performed our analyses distinguishing between three river types corresponding with three valley morphologies: open, shallow vee and deep vee valleys (in increasing degree of valley constrainment). Adjustment between the surfaces derived from geomorphological and hydrological criteria has been evaluated using two different methods: one based on exceeding areas (minimum exceeding score) and the other on the similarity among total area values. Both methods have pointed out the same surfaces when looking for those that best match with the 50-yr flood. Results have shown that the BFDAC approach obtains an adjustment slightly better than that of path distance. However, BFDAC requires bankfull depth regional regressions along the considered river network. Results have also confirmed that unconstrained valleys require lower threshold values than constrained valleys when deriving surfaces using geomorphological criteria. Moreover, this study provides: (i) guidance on the selection of the proper geomorphological criterion and associated threshold values, and (ii) an easy calibration framework to evaluate the adjustment with respect to hydrologically-meaningful surfaces.

  2. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  3. Hotspots and mantle plumes: Some Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, N.H. )

    1990-05-10

    The available data, mainly topography, geoid, and heat flow, describing hotspots worldwide are examined to constrain the mechanisms for swell uplift and to obtain fluxes and excess temperatures of mantle plumes. Swell uplift is caused mainly by excess temperatures that move with the lithosphere plate and to a lesser extent hot asthenosphere near the hotspot. The volume, heat, and buoyancy fluxes of hotspots are computed from the cross-sectional areas of swells, the shapes of noses of swells, and, for on ridge hotspots, the amount of ascending material needed to supply the length of ridge axis which has abnormally high elevation and thick crust. The buoyancy fluxes range over a factor of 20 with Hawaii, 8.7 Mg/s, the largest. The buoyancy flux for Iceland is 1.4 Mg/s which is similar to the flux of Cape Verde. The excess temperature of both on-ridge and off-ridge hotspots is around the 200 C value inferred from petrology but is not tightly constrained by geophysical considerations. This observation, the similarity of the fluxes of on-ridge and off-ridge plumes, and the tendency for hotspots to cross the ridge indicate that similar plumes are likely to cause both types of hotspots. The buoyancy fluxes of 37 hotspots are estimated; the global buoyancy flux is 50 Mg/s, which is equivalent to a globally averaged surface heat flow of 4 mW/m{sup 2} from core sources and would cool the core at a rate of 50 C/b.y.. Based on a thermal model and the assumption that the likelihood of subduction is independent of age, most of the heat from hotspots is implaced in the lower lithosphere and later subducted.

  4. The mass-loading from Enceladus' plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H.; Russell, C. T.; Cowee, M.; Leisner, J. S.; Jia, Y.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    Enceladus, orbiting at 3.95 Saturn radii, is the primary mass-loading source for the neutral cloud in the inner magnetosphere. Cassini observations have revealed that the Enceladus‘ southern plume releases hundreds of kilograms of water-group neutrals per second. Ionization of these neutrals generates pickup ions which have unstable pitch angle distributions in velocity space and create electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. These waves can be studied as diagnostic tools for the mass-loading process because the wave amplitude is proportional to the ionization rate of the newly added mass. The ion cyclotron waves are observed throughout the extended neutral cloud, from slightly inside Enceladus‘ orbit to outside of Dione’s. At the Enceladus orbit, the waves are longitudinally asymmetric, enhanced between forty degrees upstream and over a hundred degrees downstream of the moon’s position. These observations are used to estimate the ionization rate of the neutral cloud and the ion production rate from Enceladus fast neutrals. We use a Monte Carlo particle-tracing code to simulate the pickup ions and fast neutrals produced by Enceladus. This model assumes the neutral gas produced from Enceladus is first ionized, accelerated by the corotational electric field and then drifts away from the source region. Later, it is neutralized by charge exchange and are transported across field lines as fast neutrals, which may be re-ionized or may escape the Saturnian system. The model shows that the pickup ions, which generate ion cyclotron waves, extend far from Enceladus both upstream and downstream, consistant with the wave observations. The fast neutrals also travel largely outward from the Enceladus orbit and could escape the Saturnian system. Furthermore, we compare the wave observations during each Enceladus pass with the model predictions to investigate the plume geometry, the initial velocity of particles in the plume, and variability of the ion production rate.

  5. Modeling benzene plume elongation mechanisms exerted by ethanol using RT3D with a general substrate interaction module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Diego E.; de Blanc, Phillip C.; Rixey, William G.; Bedient, Phillip B.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.

    2008-05-01

    A mathematical model was developed to evaluate the effect of the common fuel additive ethanol on benzene fate and transport in fuel-contaminated groundwater and to discern the most influential benzene plume elongation mechanisms. The model, developed as a module for the Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions (RT3D) model, includes commonly considered fate and transport processes (advection, dispersion, adsorption, biodegradation, and depletion of molecular oxygen during biodegradation) and substrate interactions previously not considered (e.g., a decrease in the specific benzene utilization rate due to metabolic flux dilution and/or catabolite repression) as well as microbial population shifts. Benzene plume elongation predictions, based on literature model parameters, were on the order of 40% for a constant source of E10 gasoline (10% vol/vol ethanol), which compares favorably to field observations. For low benzene concentrations (<1 mg/L), oxygen depletion during ethanol degradation was the principal mechanism hindering benzene natural attenuation. For higher benzene concentrations (exerting an oxygen demand higher than the available dissolved oxygen), metabolic flux dilution was the dominant plume elongation process. If oxygen were not limiting, as might be the case in zones undergoing aerobic biostimulation, model simulations showed that microbial growth on ethanol could offset negative substrate interactions and enhance benzene degradation, resulting in shorter plumes than baseline conditions without ethanol.

  6. Delineation of geological facies from poorly differentiated data

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt; Tartakovsky, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The ability to delineate geologic facies and to estima.te their properties from sparse data is essential for modeling physical and biochemical processes occurring in the 'ubsurface. If such data are poorly differentiated, this challcnrring task is complicated further by the absence of a clear distinction between different hydrofacies even at locations where data. are available. vVe consider three alt mative approaches for analysis of poorly differentiated data: a k-means clU!:iterinrr algorithm, an expectation-maximization algorithm, and a minimum-variance algorithm. Two distinct synthetically generated geological settings are used to r:tnalyze the ability of these algorithmti to as ign accurately the membership of such data in a given geologic facies. On average, the minimum-variance algorithm provides a more robust p rformance than its two counterparts and when combined with a nearest-neighbor algorithm, it also yields the most accurate reconstruction of the boundaries between the facies.

  7. Computer-aided boundary delineation of agricultural lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Thomas D.; Angelici, Gary L.; Slye, Robert E.; Ma, Matt

    1989-01-01

    The National Agricultural Statistics Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) presently uses labor-intensive aerial photographic interpretation techniques to divide large geographical areas into manageable-sized units for estimating domestic crop and livestock production. Prototype software, the computer-aided stratification (CAS) system, was developed to automate the procedure, and currently runs on a Sun-based image processing system. With a background display of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and United States Geological Survey Digital Line Graph data, the operator uses a cursor to delineate agricultural areas, called sampling units, which are assigned to strata of land-use and land-cover types. The resultant stratified sampling units are used as input into subsequent USDA sampling procedures. As a test, three counties in Missouri were chosen for application of the CAS procedures. Subsequent analysis indicates that CAS was five times faster in creating sampling units than the manual techniques were.

  8. Rectal Radiotherapy - Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Delivery, Delineation and Doses.

    PubMed

    Teoh, S; Muirhead, R

    2016-02-01

    The use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in rectal cancer is attractive in that it may reduce acute and late toxicities and potentially facilitate dose escalation. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy probably has a role in selected patients, but further investigation is required to identify the parameters for selection. Delineation of specific nodal groups allows maximal sparing of bladder and small bowel. In locally advanced tumours a simultaneous integrated boost allows dose escalation incorporating hypofractionation and a shorter overall treatment time. However, due to a sparsity of data on late toxicity in doses ?60 Gy, doses at this level should be used with caution, ideally within prospective trials. Future studies investigating dose escalation must ascertain late toxicity as well as local control, as both can significantly affect quality of life and without both, the risk-benefit ratio cannot be calculated. PMID:26643092

  9. DATA BASE FOR PLUMES WITH SIGNIFICANT PLUME AND BACKGROUND PARTICLE SCATTERING

    EPA Science Inventory

    VISTTA (Visibility Impairment due to Sulfur Transport and Transformation in the Atmosphere) is a program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to study the effect of anthropogenic emissions on atmospheric visibility. During the winter and summer of 1981, plume mea...

  10. MODELING PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND AEROSOL FORMATION IN POINT SOURCE PLUMES WITH THE CMAQ PLUME-IN-GRID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides from the tall stacks of major point sources are important precursors of a variety of photochemical oxidants and secondary aerosol species. Plumes released from point sources exhibit rather limited dimensions and their growth is gradu...

  11. Coastal pollution hazards in southern California observed by SAR imagery: stormwater plumes, wastewater plumes,

    E-print Network

    Washburn, Libe

    Coastal pollution hazards in southern California observed by SAR imagery: stormwater plumes pollution hazards for the heavily populated Southern California Bight (SCB). Due to their small size observational tool for assessment and monitoring of coastal marine pollution hazards in the SCB and other

  12. Remote monitoring of a thermal plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. Y.; Talay, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    A remote-sensing experiment conducted on May 17, 1977, over the Surry nuclear power station on the James River, Virginia is discussed. Isotherms of the thermal plume from the power station were derived from remotely sensed data and compared with in situ water temperature measurements provided by the Virginia Electric and Power Company, VEPCO. The results of this study were also qualitatively compared with those from other previous studies under comparable conditions of the power station's operation and the ambient flow. These studies included hydraulic model predictions carried out by Pritchard and Carpenter and a 5-year in situ monitoring program based on boat surveys.

  13. Imaging the Icelandic Plume With Geochemical Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koornneef, J. M.; Stracke, A.; Meier, M. A.; Bourdon, B.; Jochum, K. P.; Stoll, B.; Grönvold, K.

    2008-12-01

    The radial decrease in excess temperature (?T) away from the Iceland plume axis should cause a systematic decrease in degree and depth of partial melting. La/Sm and ?(Sm/Nd), and La,Sm/Yb and ?(Lu/Hf)ratios in post-glacial basalts from Iceland rift zone, however, do not vary systematically with progressive distance to the plume center. Despite strong correlations between La/Sm, La/Yb or Sm/Yb and 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf isotope ratios, the large observed trace element variability (e.g. La/Sm 1.72 - 4.34) and the inferred low abundance of the enriched source component (Stracke et al., 2003) suggests that melting-induced trace element fractionation dominates over the influence of source heterogeneity. Hence, differences in the initial depth of partial melting caused by varying ?T should be resolvable. The general lack of correlation between the geochemical melting parameters and the distance from the inferred plume indicates that the ?T over the sampled area is too small to resolve the induced variation. This is in agreement with the relative broad excess temperature profile for Iceland that was modeled based on uranium-series (Bourdon et al., 2006). In addition to the limited ?T, there is an effect of radial thinning of the Icelandic crust (40-15 km) that controls the final depth of melting. The highest degree melts with the lowest average pressure of melting (i.e low La/Sm, La,Sm/Yb, and ?(Sm/Nd), ?(Lu/Hf)) only occur where the crust is thinnest (SW and NE Iceland). Therefore, the effect of crustal thickness (final depth of melting) appears to outweigh the effect of ?T (initial depth of melting). Bourdon B., Ribe N.M., Stracke A., Saal A.E., Turner S.P. (2006). Insights into the dynamics of mantle plumes from uranium-series geochemistry. Nature, 444, 713-717. Stracke A., Zindler A., Salters V.J.M., McKenzie D., Grönvold, K. (2003). The dynamics of melting beneath Theistareykir, northern Iceland. Geochem., Geophys., Geosyst. 4(10), (8513)

  14. NASA/LaRC jet plume research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Ponton, Michael K.; Manning, James C.

    1992-01-01

    The following provides a summary for research being conducted by NASA/LaRC and its contractors and grantees to develop jet engine noise suppression technology under the NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The objective of this effort is to explore new innovative concepts for reducing noise to Federally mandated guidelines with minimum compromise on engine performance both in take-off and cruise. The research program is divided into four major technical areas: (1) jet noise research on advanced nozzles; (2) plume prediction and validation; (3) passive and active control; and (4) methodology for noise prediction.

  15. An Organic Carbon Budget for the Mississippi River Turbidity Plume and Plume Contributions to Air-sea CO2 Fluxes and

    E-print Network

    Breed, Greg A.

    An Organic Carbon Budget for the Mississippi River Turbidity Plume and Plume Contributions to Air for the Mississippi River turbidity plume. Plume volume was calculated from mixed layer depth and area in each of four for establishment of hypoxia in the region. Introduction River-dominated ocean margins (RiOMar) are one of the most

  16. Capturing Greenland Meltwater Plume Dynamics with IcePod Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S.; Le Bel, D. A.; Zappa, C. J.; Porter, D. F.; Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.

    2014-12-01

    Meltwater that forms on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet and falls to the ice sheet bed eventually emerges at the calving front as tan, turbid plumes of water. Adjacent to the ice, these meltwater plumes foster mixing in the fjord moving warm ocean water into contact with the front of the ice sheet where it can undercut the ice front and trigger calving. The dynamics of meltwater plumes is difficult to study due to their proximity to the steep calving fronts and their intermittent nature. In July 2014 the IcePod, the ice-ocean imaging system mounted on a New York Air National Guard LC-130, surveyed the 5 glaciers just north of Jakobshavn Isbrae, each of which had an active meltwater plume. The IcePod system has core instrumentation that can resolve high-resolution surface elevations with a scanning laser and visual cameras, the temperature of the surface with an infrared camera, and the structure of snow and ice with two radar systems. For the study of plume dynamics, the key IcePod observations include: (1) the morphology of the calving front captured with the visual camera and the scanning laser and (2) thermal structure, velocity and turbulence of the plume water resolved with the infrared camera. In the future, an expanded IcePod capability will include an AXCTD launching system to recovery the hydrography of the fjord and the plumes. The IcePod survey directly crossed 3 of the 5 meltwater plumes on two subsequent days. The plumes sampled multiple times were Sermeq Avangnardleq A that drains into the Jakobshavn Isbrae Fjord, Eqip Sermia and Sermia Kangilerngata. While each of the ice feeding these three adjacent fjords has experienced the same surface melting conditions the structure of the meltwater plumes was very different in each fjords. Sermeq Avangnardleq A had a narrow angular shaped plume nestled in an embayment in the calving front, Eqip Sermia had two broad diffuse plumes and Sermia Kangilerngata had a narrow circular plume in an ice choked fjord. We use particle image velocimetry (PIV), a method to measure velocities in fluid, to resolve the varying turbulence in the individual plumes. The variability of these 5 plumes, within the hydrologic framework of their catchments, provides insights into the role of meltwater in fjord circulation, transport, and mixing.

  17. Birth, life, and death of a solar coronal plume

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2014-10-01

    We analyze a solar polar-coronal-hole (CH) plume over its entire ?40 hr lifetime, using high-resolution Solar Dynamic Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data. We examine (1) the plume's relationship to a bright point (BP) that persists at its base, (2) plume outflows and their possible contribution to the solar wind mass supply, and (3) the physical properties of the plume. We find that the plume started ?2 hr after the BP first appeared and became undetectable ?1 hr after the BP disappeared. We detected radially moving radiance variations from both the plume and from interplume regions, corresponding to apparent outflow speeds ranging over ?(30-300) km s{sup –1} with outflow velocities being higher in the 'cooler' AIA 171 Å channel than in the 'hotter' 193 Å and 211 Å channels, which is inconsistent with wave motions; therefore, we conclude that the observed radiance variations represent material outflows. If they persist into the heliosphere and plumes cover ?10% of a typical CH area, these flows could account for ?50% of the solar wind mass. From a differential emission measure analysis of the AIA images, we find that the average electron temperature of the plume remained approximately constant over its lifetime, at T {sub e} ? 8.5 × 10{sup 5} K. Its density, however, decreased with the age of the plume, being about a factor of three lower when the plume faded compared to when it was born. We conclude that the plume died due to a density reduction rather than to a temperature decrease.

  18. Contamination vs. Exposure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... People who are externally contaminated can spread the contamination by touching surfaces, sitting in a chair, or even walking through a house. Contaminants can easily fall from clothing and contaminate other ...

  19. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, I.; Cornelissen, S. A. P.; Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van; Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M.; Peeters, S. T. H.; Hoebers, F. J. P.; Kaanders, J. H. A. M.; Nowak, P. J. C. M.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  20. Results of airborne measurements in the plume near and far from the 2014 Bardarbunga-Holuhraun eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnason, Gylfi; Eliasson, Jonas; Weber, Konradin; Boehlke, Christoph; Palsson, Thorgeir; Rognvaldsson, Olafur; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Platt, Ulrich; Tirpitz, Lukas; Jones, Roderic L.; Smith, Paul D.

    2015-04-01

    The Volcanic Ash Research (VAR) group is focused on airborne measurement of ash contamination to support safe air travel. In relations to the recent eruption, the group measured ash and several gaseous species in the plume 10-300 km from the volcano. The eruption emitted ash turned out to be mostly in the fine aerosol range (much less than 10 micrometers in diameter). Our highest measured concentrations were lower than 1 mg/m3 indicating that commercial air traffic was not threatened (greater than 2 mg/m3) by the ash contamination. But we measured sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) up to 90 mg/m3, which presented a potentially dangerous pollution problem. However, airborne measurements indicate that the sulfur concentration decays (probably due to scavenging) as the plume is carried by the wind from the volcano, which limits the area of immediate danger to the public. Here we present size distribution for particulate matter collected during flights, near and far from the crater at various times. The particle data is then compared with simultaneously collected sulfur dioxide data and the rate of decay of is estimated. Sulfur and particle concentration variations with height in the far plume are presented. Some airborne measurements for H2S, NO, NO2 and CO2 will also be presented. This includes correlation matrices for simultaneous measurements of these gases and comparison to National Air Quality Standards and background values.

  1. Ion thruster plume effects on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Kuo, Y. S.

    1981-01-01

    A charge-exchange plasma, generated by an ion thruster, is capable of flowing upstream from the ion thruster and therefore represents a source of contamination to a spacecraft. An analytical model of the charge-exchange plasma density around a spacecraft was used to estimate the contamination which various spacecraft materials may be exposed to. Measurements of plasma density around an ion thruster were compared to this model. Results of experimental studied regarding the effects on various spacecraft materials' properties due to exposure to expected mercury contamination levels are presented.

  2. Evolution of brown carbon in wildfire plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrister, Haviland; Liu, Jiumeng; Scheuer, Eric; Dibb, Jack; Ziemba, Luke; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Anderson, Bruce; Diskin, Glenn; Perring, Anne E.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Palm, Brett B.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney J.

    2015-06-01

    Particulate brown carbon (BrC) in the atmosphere absorbs light at subvisible wavelengths and has poorly constrained but potentially large climate forcing impacts. BrC from biomass burning has virtually unknown lifecycle and atmospheric stability. Here, BrC emitted from intense wildfires was measured in plumes transported over 2 days from two main fires, during the 2013 NASA SEAC4RS mission. Concurrent measurements of organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) mass concentration, BC coating thickness, absorption Ångström exponent, and OA oxidation state reveal that the initial BrC emitted from the fires was largely unstable. Using back trajectories to estimate the transport time indicates that BrC aerosol light absorption decayed in the plumes with a half-life of 9 to 15 h, measured over day and night. Although most BrC was lost within a day, possibly through chemical loss and/or evaporation, the remaining persistent fraction likely determines the background BrC levels most relevant for climate forcing.

  3. Autonomous volcanic plume detection on planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yucong; Bunte, Melissa; Saripalli, Srikanth; Bell, James; Greeley, Ronald

    2014-04-01

    Explosive eruptive events and outgassing have been observed at several outer solar system bodies. These events indicate a range of geophysical activity and ensure that the bodies remain targets of interest for future observations. Characterizing the events demands an inordinate fraction of spacecraft's limited resources. We have developed algorithms for onboard characterization of geophysical signatures such as eruptive events and surface features in order to facilitate rapid detection and conserve data volume. We applied supervised classification (K Nearest Neighbor) on SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) features extracted from spacecraft images where such transient events are known to exist. This method evidenced successful performance on images of Io2A moon of Jupiter. from the Voyager.3http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/ Galileo,4http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/galileo/ and New Horizons5http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/ missions, and images of Enceladus6A moon of Saturn. from the Cassini7http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/index.cfm missions. It is able to detect plumes of different shapes, sizes and orientations. We show a positive detection rate of 68-96% of known plumes on Io, Enceladus. Additionally, we show that a similar technique is applicable to differentiating geologic features which exhibit similar appearances.

  4. Global Circulation and Impact of Plasmaspheric Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Fok, Mei-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Hsiem; Delcourt, Dominique C.; Fedder, Joel A.; Slinker, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    We report results from the global circulation model of Lyon, Fedder, and Mobarry with an embedded model of the inner magnetosphere including the plasmasphere. The combination is used to initiate large numbers of representative protons on the geosynchronous orbit L shell, to assign particle weightings, to track their: subsequent trajectories in the 3D fields. This permits us to study the global circulation of plasmaspheric plumes and to compare these with Polar observations from the dayside magnetopause region . A range of events is studied from an isolated period of SBz in the solar wind,to a large storm sequence. We consider effects on circulating plasma reaching the dayside reconnection X-line, the population of the plasma sheet with ionospheric protons and the generation of ring current pressure from this source, compared with solar wind, polar wind, and auroral wind sources. We find that the transient plasmaspheric plume source is large in terms of total fluence, but of modest proportions in terms of contribution to the ring current. Implications of this and other results for improved space weather modeling and prediction will be discussed.

  5. Triton's plumes - The dust devil hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Tryka, Kimberly A.

    1990-01-01

    Triton's plumes are narrow columns 10 km in height, with tails extending horizontally for distances over 100 km. This structure suggests that the plumes are an atmospheric rather than a surface phenomenon. The closest terrestrial analogs may be dust devils, which are atmospheric vortices originating in the unstable layer close to the ground. Since Triton has such a low surface pressure, extremely unstable layers could develop during the day. Patches of unfrosted ground near the subsolar point could act as sites for dust devil formation because they heat up relative to the surrounding nitrogen frost. The resulting convection would warm the atmosphere to temperatures of 48 k or higher, as observed by the Voyager radio science team. Assuming that velocity scales as the square root of temperature difference times the height of the mixed layer, a velocity of 20 m/sec is derived for the strongest dust devils on Triton. Winds of this speed could raise particles provided they are a factor of 1000 to 10,000 less cohesive than those on earth.

  6. Dusty plasma of the Enceladus plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Victoria; Lühr, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Geological active south-pole fractures of the icy moon Enceladus produce a specific region, a so-called plume that extends up to 1000 km into space. The main constituents of the plume are electrons, ions, water molecules, and charged nanograins, which are responsible for the unusual properties of this kind of low-temperature dusty plasma. The examples discussed represent our results in this field within the last few years, and mostly such cases were chosen, in which measurements of different Cassini instruments could be compared with theory or where the phenomenon has a diagnostic application. Dust charging, role of dust size distributions and dust charge fluctuations are discussed. The findings are used for interpretations of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer data and improve constraints on the dust characteristics. Then the main forces and dust dynamics are discussed in conditions relevant for the near-Enceladus plasma. It is also examined how the charged dust can affect the plasma shielding length which is of importance for the reliable Cassini Langmuir probe measurements. Considering the dust grains as heavy negative ion species, the electric conductivity tensor is modified, whose elements are the key quantities for understanding the magnetic field perturbations registered by the Cassini Magnetometer during Enceladus flybys.

  7. Scalable hardbody and plume optical signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Dennis R.; Hawes, Fred; Braunstein, Matthew; Coker, Charles F.; Smith, Thomas, Jr.

    2004-08-01

    The Fast Line-of-sight Imagery for Target and Exhaust Signatures (FLITES) is a High Performance Computing (HPC-CHSSI) and Missile Defense Agency (MDA) funded effort that provides a scalable program to compute highly resolved temporal, spatial, and spectral hardbody and plume optical signatures. Distributed processing capabilities are included to allow complex, high fidelity, solutions to be generated quickly generated. The distributed processing logic includes automated load balancing algorithms to facilitate scalability using large numbers of processors. To enhance exhaust plume optical signature capabilities, FLITES employs two different radiance transport algorithms. The first algorithm is the traditional Curtis-Godson bandmodel approach and is provided to support comparisons to historical results and high-frame rate production requirements. The second algorithm is the Quasi Bandmodel Line-by-line (QBL) approach, which uses randomly placed "cloned" spectral lines to yield highly resolved radiation spectra for increased accuracy while maintaining tractable runtimes. This capability will provide a significant advancement over the traditional SPURC/SIRRM radiance transport methodology.

  8. Infrared optical properties of diesel smoke plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, C.W.; Crow, S.B.; Yee, Y.P.; Hinds, B.D. ); Marlin, D.; Jelinek, A.

    1989-10-01

    Far IR optical properties have been measured for smoke from diesel fires. Concentrations of both gaseous and particulate combustion products have been measured and chemical species contributing to the optical effects identified. To obtain these results, a variety of sampling instruments were lofted into large plumes on a mobile and open structure. The smoke plumes of diesel fires have been found to consist largely of carbonaceous material (in fibrous form) and heavy liquid hydrocarbons infused with the expected gaseous products of the combustion process. Strong attenuation at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m is found to be due largely to the carbonaceous aerosol. The absorption coefficient is typically {similar to}500 km{sup {minus}1} at 10 m from the source with a variable but often comparable total scattering coefficient. The extinction coefficient, normalized to the mass density of the aerosol in a unit volume of space, is found to be 1.2 m{sup 2}-g{sup {minus}1} with an estimated variance of 20%. Fluctuational spectra of the attenuation follow a form similar to turbulence spectra.

  9. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    SciTech Connect

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart.

  10. Delta 2 Explosion Plume Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.

    2000-01-01

    A Delta II rocket exploded seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on 17 January 1997. The cloud produced by the explosion provided an opportunity to evaluate the models which are used to track potentially toxic dispersing plumes and clouds at CCAFS. The primary goal of this project was to conduct a case study of the dispersing cloud and the models used to predict the dispersion resulting from the explosion. The case study was conducted by comparing mesoscale and dispersion model results with available meteorological and plume observations. This study was funded by KSC under Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) option hours. The models used in the study are part of the Eastern Range Dispersion Assessment System (ERDAS) and include the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), HYbrid Particle And Concentration Transport (HYPACT), and Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM). The primary observations used for explosion cloud verification of the study were from the National Weather Service's Weather Surveillance Radar 1988-Doppler (WSR-88D). Radar reflectivity measurements of the resulting cloud provided good estimates of the location and dimensions of the cloud over a four-hour period after the explosion. The results indicated that RAMS and HYPACT models performed reasonably well. Future upgrades to ERDAS are recommended.

  11. Solar rocket plume/mirror interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which the plume from a solar thermal rocket will impinge on the solar collector is studied by flow field analysis. Such interaction can adversely affect collector performance through fouling, excessive heat loading, or pressure loads that deform the delicate structures. The geometrical shape of the collector is such that only the flow from the nozzle boundary layer can reach it, but the thrust levels of interest lead to very viscous nozzle flows with thick boundary layers. Reasonable accuracy in solving these flows requires a fully coupled viscous-inviscid procedure. Results show that the fraction of the plume that hits the collector can be well estimated by continuum theory, but that transitional and rarefied phenomena will have some impact on how it is distributed over the surface. Initial results for one representative condition show that approx. 4 percent of the total flow in the jet makes its way to the collector. The pressures on the collector, however, remain quite low because of its distance from the engine. Additional work is needed to document the effect of thrust scaling and wall cooling on impingement.

  12. Geophysical and geochemical characterization and delineation of a crude oil spill in a highly saline environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Cameron Stuart

    Geophysical and geochemical methods were used at Grand Terre 1 (GT1) Island off the coast of Louisiana, an island that had been heavily contaminated with crude oil associated with the April 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Electrical methods and aqueous geochemistry have proven sensitive in the detection of contaminates, as well as the biological and chemical processes associated with the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. However, to the author's knowledge, all of these studies have dealt with mature (or aged) spills within a freshwater environment. The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill therefor provided a unique opportunity to not only use traditional geophysical and geochemical methods to characterize and delineate fresh crude oil in a highly saline environment and to capture the early time biogeophysical signals resulting from the physical, chemical, and microbial transformation of crude oil in a highly saline environment. Electrical resistivity and electromagnetic methods were used. Barometric pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity, and water level values for the shallow groundwater were continuously logged. Geochemical analysis was performed on water samples collected from piezometers networks installed in the impacted, transitional, and background areas. Sediment cores were retrieved throughout the site and used for grain size analysis, magnetic susceptibility, total organic and inorganic carbon, and x-ray fluorescence. Soil samples were collected for microbial analyses from the impacted and background areas. Microcosms were set up to determine the microbial diversity analysis was used to determine microbial community composition, and biodegradation potential of indigenous populations. Based on the geochemical, microbial, and soil analysis, the relatively higher apparent resistivity anomaly observed between the depths of 0.20 m to 1.20 m bgs could be explained by two scenarios(1): elevated resistivity was caused by gas in the subsurface produced by the degradation of organic matter coupled to sulfate and iron reduction. (2): from variations in salinity. This research demonstrates the sensitivity of geophysical and geochemical methods commonly used to detect contaminates in freshwater environment can also be utilized in a saline, coastal environment.

  13. Volcanic origin of the eruptive plumes on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, A.F.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Smith, B.A.; Danielson, G.E.; Johnson, T.V.; Synnott, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    A quadruple long exposure of Io in eclipse exhibits faint auroral emission from the eruptive plumes. No luminous spots in the vents, predicted by Gold, were observed. Heat from the interior of Io appears to be the predominant source of energy in the plumes. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  14. DREDGED MATERIAL PLUME DISPERSAL IN CENTRAL LONG ISLAND SOUND

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simulation model based upon in situ current velocity data and records of disposal events was developed to predict the chemical exposure field resulting from dredged material disposal plumes in central Long island Sound (CLIS) during the spring of 1983. n the model, plumes are a...

  15. INFRARED METHOD FOR PLUME RISE VISUALIZATION AND MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An infrared video camera and recording system were used to record near-source plume rise from a low turbine stack on an oil-gathering center at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. he system provided real-time, continuous visualization of the plume using a color monitor while the images were rec...

  16. Two views of Hawaiian plume structure Albrecht W. Hofmann

    E-print Network

    Farnetani, Cinzia G.

    Two views of Hawaiian plume structure Albrecht W. Hofmann Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964, USA Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, A. W., and C. G. Farnetani (2013), Two views of Hawaiian plume structure, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst

  17. A numerical study of interacting buoyant cooling-tower plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornoff, R. B.; Mokhtarzadeh-Dehghan, M. R.

    The compact design of mechanical cooling towers necessitates that the plumes are issued into the cross-wind in close proximity. An improved understanding of the interaction of adjacent plumes is therefore required for better design of such cooling towers, which may lead to a reduction in their environmental impact. This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation into the interaction of two adjacent plumes in a cross-flow. The numerical model simulates small-scale wind tunnel experiments of a cooling tower arrangement. The computations are performed for three-dimensional, turbulent, buoyant and interacting plumes, and for a single plume for comparison. Two double-source arrangements, namely, tandem and side-by-side, with respect to the oncoming atmospheric boundary layer are considered. A low Reynolds number k- ? turbulence model is used with two discretisation schemes, hybrid and QUICK, and the results are compared. Comparisons are also made with the experimental results. The results show that the interaction of side-by-side plumes is dominated by the interaction of the rotating vortex pairs within the plumes. A tandem source arrangement leads to early merging and efficient rise enhancement. Comparisons of the predicted results with experimental data show good agreement for the plume rise.

  18. Turbid Coastal Plume of the Elwha River, Washington

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The turbid waters of the Elwha River and the coastal waters of the Strait de Fuca mix directly offshore of the river mouth, forming a large coastal plume.  This plume is easily identified by the cloudiness of the water (or

  19. Ocean outfall plume characterization using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Peter; Terrill, Eric; Otero, Mark; Hazard, Lisa; Middleton, William

    2013-01-01

    A monitoring mission to map and characterize the Point Loma Ocean Outfall (PLOO) wastewater plume using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was performed on 3 March 2011. The mobility of an AUV provides a significant advantage in surveying discharge plumes over traditional cast-based methods, and when combined with optical and oceanographic sensors, provides a capability for both detecting plumes and assessing their mixing in the near and far-fields. Unique to this study is the measurement of Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) in the discharge plume and its application for quantitative estimates of the plume's dilution. AUV mission planning methodologies for discharge plume sampling, plume characterization using onboard optical sensors, and comparison of observational data to model results are presented. The results suggest that even under variable oceanic conditions, properly planned missions for AUVs equipped with an optical CDOM sensor in addition to traditional oceanographic sensors, can accurately characterize and track ocean outfall plumes at higher resolutions than cast-based techniques. PMID:23306274

  20. Mantle plume interaction with an endothermic phase change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles; Goldman, Peggy

    1995-01-01

    High spatial resolution numerical simulations of mantle plumes impinging from below on the endothermic phase change at 660-km depth are used to investigate the effects of latent heat release on the plume-phase change interaction. Both axisymmetric and planar upflows are considered, and the strong temperature dependence of mantle viscosity is taken into account. For plume strengths considered, a Clapeyron slope of -4 MPa/K prevents plume penetration of the phase change. Plumes readily penetrate the phase change for a Clapeyron slope of -2 MPa/K and arrive in the upper mantle considerably hotter than if they had not traversed the phase change. For the same amount of thermal drive, i.e., the same excess basal temperature, axisymmetric plumes are hotter upon reaching the upper mantle than are planar upwellings. Heating of plumes by their passage through the spinel-perovskite endothermic phase change can have important consequences for the ability of the plume to thermally thin the lithosphere and cause melting and volcanism.

  1. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR MULTICOMPONENT AEROSOL FORMATION AND GROWTH IN PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Description of the evolution of the size and chemical composition of aerosols in plumes is fundamental to the ability to predict visibility impairment. Previously, it has only been possible to predict changes in aerosol size distributions in plumes. In this work the first model f...

  2. Buoyant plumes with inertial and chemical reaction-driven forcing

    E-print Network

    Morris, Stephen W.

    power law relationship that explains their ascent velocity. However, the morphology of the plume heads flame balls, a phenomenon closely related to autocatalytic plumes, were also simulated. Flame balls were found to have three dynamical regimes. Below a critical radius, the smallest flame balls experi- enced

  3. Synchronized videography of plasma plume expansion during femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolasini, Steven; Kietzig, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond lasers are gaining industrial interest for surface patterning and structuring because of the reduced heat effects to the surrounding material, resulting in a good quality product with a high aspect ratio. Analysis of the plasma plume generated during ablation can provide useful information about the laser-material interactions and thereby the quality of the resulting surface patterns. As a low-cost alternative to rather complicated ICCD camera setups, presented here is an approach based on filming the laser machining process with a high speed camera and tuning the frame rate of the camera to slightly lower than the laser pulse frequency. The delay in frequency between the laser and camera results in frames taken from sequential pulses. Each frame represents a later phase of plume expansion although taken from different pulses. Assuming equal plume evolution processes from pulse to pulse, the sequence of images obtained completes a plume expansion video. To test the assumption of homogeneity between sequential plumes, the camera can be tuned to the frequency of the laser, as to capture consecutive plumes at the same phase in their evolution. This approach enables a relatively low-cost, high resolution visualization of plasma plume evolution suitable for industrial micromachining applications with femtosecond lasers. Using this approach we illustrate differences in plume expansion at the example of machining homogeneous surface patterns in different liquid and gaseous processing environments.

  4. PLUME-SCALER-EVALUATING LONG-TERM MONITORING WELL NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is developing a new computer application called PLUME-SCALER to evaluate long term monitoring well networks using typically available historical site water level data. PLUME-SCALER can be used to determine if there are enough ...

  5. Ocean and Plume Science Management Uncertainties, Questions and Potential Actions

    E-print Network

    Ocean and Plume Science Management Uncertainties, Questions and Potential Actions (Work Group draft and near ocean ecosystem functions, processes and relationships been altered? (Need to address the temporal been altered due to man-induced influences.) Has estuary, plume and near ocean carrying capacity

  6. Role of Internal Heat Source for Eruptive Plumes on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time the role of the internal heat source, due to radioactive decay in Triton's core, is investigate with respect to geyser-like plumes...A new mechanism of energy supply to the Tritonian eruptive plumes is proposed...We present the critical values of these parameters for Triton. A possible origin of the subsurface vents on Triton is also suggested.

  7. Plume Collection Strategies for Icy World Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neveu, M.; Glavin, D. P.; Tsou, P.; Anbar, A. D.; Williams, P.

    2015-01-01

    Three icy worlds in the solar system display evidence of pluming activity. Water vapor and ice particles emanate from cracks near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The plume gas contains simple hydrocarbons that could be fragments of larger, more complex organics. More recently, observations using the Hubble and Herschel space telescopes have hinted at transient water vapor plumes at Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres. Plume materials may be ejected directly from possible sub-surface oceans, at least on Enceladus. In such oceans, liquid water, organics, and energy may co-exist, making these environments habitable. The venting of habitable ocean material into space provides a unique opportunity to capture this material during a relatively simple flyby mission and return it to Earth. Plume collection strategies should enable investigations of evidence for life in the returned samples via laboratory analyses of the structure, distribution, isotopic composition, and chirality of the chemical components (including biomolecules) of plume materials. Here, we discuss approaches for the collection of dust and volatiles during flybys through Enceladus' plume, based on Cassini results and lessons learned from the Stardust comet sample return mission. We also highlight areas where sample collector and containment technology development and testing may be needed for future plume sample return missions.

  8. Stochastic mapping for chemical plume source localization with application to autonomous hydrothermal vent discovery

    E-print Network

    Jakuba, Michael Vavrousek, 1976-

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a stochastic mapping framework for autonomous robotic chemical plume source localization in environments with multiple sources. Potential applications for robotic chemical plume source localization ...

  9. Determining resolvability of mantle plumes with synthetic seismic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, R.; Van Keken, P. E.; Ritsema, J.; Fichtner, A.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Hotspot volcanism in locations such as Hawaii and Iceland is commonly thought to be associated with plumes rising from the deep mantle. In theory these dynamic upwellings should be visible in seismic data due to their reduced seismic velocity and their effect on mantle transition zone thickness. Numerous studies have attempted to image plumes [1,2,3], but their deep mantle origin remains unclear. In addition, a debate continues as to whether lower mantle plumes are visible in the form of body wave travel time delays, or whether such delays will be erased due to wavefront healing. Here we combine geodynamic modeling of mantle plumes with synthetic seismic waveform modeling in order to quantitatively determine under what conditions mantle plumes should be seismically visible. We model compressible plumes with phase changes at 410 km and 670 km, and a viscosity reduction in the upper mantle. These plumes thin from greater than 600 km in diameter in the lower mantle, to 200 - 400 km in the upper mantle. Plume excess potential temperature is 375 K, which maps to seismic velocity reductions of 4 - 12 % in the upper mantle, and 2 - 4 % in the lower mantle. Previous work that was limited to an axisymmetric spherical geometry suggested that these plumes would not be visible in the lower mantle [4]. Here we extend this approach to full 3D spherical wave propagation modeling. Initial results using a simplified cylindrical plume conduit suggest that mantle plumes with a diameter of 1000 km or greater will retain a deep mantle seismic signature. References[1] Wolfe, Cecily J., et al. "Seismic structure of the Iceland mantle plume." Nature 385.6613 (1997): 245-247. [2] Montelli, Raffaella, et al. "Finite-frequency tomography reveals a variety of plumes in the mantle." Science 303.5656 (2004): 338-343. [3] Schmandt, Brandon, et al. "Hot mantle upwelling across the 660 beneath Yellowstone." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 331 (2012): 224-236. [4] Hwang, Yong Keun, et al. "Wavefront healing renders deep plumes seismically invisible." Geophysical Journal International 187.1 (2011): 273-277.

  10. [Package contaminations].

    PubMed

    Fritsch, P; de Saint-Blanquat, G

    1991-04-11

    In this chapter, the authors consider the problems originating from packaging for foods and the possible risks of contamination. The methods available for evidencing the possible migrations from package to food are considered. Dealing with package safety, toxicological tests (animal, cells...) are described. Then, the different classes of materials, as well that are usual (wood, paper, cardboard, glass, ceramic, metal, ...) as the new materials (plastic, elastomer, ...) are described. The authors emphasis the importance of package and of its development in food industries. Safety control from toxicologist is critical. PMID:2063113

  11. Quantification of Plume-Soil Interaction and Excavation Due to the Sky Crane Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizcaino, Jeffrey; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of the particulate erosion